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Sample records for phase zone plate

  1. Nanometer focusing of hard x rays by phase zone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Maser, J.; Legnini, D.; Gluskin, E.; Chen, Z.; Krasnoperova, A. A.; Vladimirsky, Y.; Cerrina, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Gentili, M.

    1999-05-01

    Focusing of 8 keV x rays to a spot size of 150 and 90 nm full width at half maximum have been demonstrated at the first- and third-order foci, respectively, of a phase zone plate (PZP). The PZP has a numerical aperture of 1.5 mrad and focusing efficiency of 13% for 8 keV x rays. A flux density gain of 121 000 was obtained at the first-order focus. In this article, the fabrication of the PZP and its experimental characterization are presented and some special applications are discussed.

  2. Binary-phase Fresnel zone plate arrays for high-power laser beam smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepler, David A.; Danson, Colin N.; Ross, Ian N.; Rivers, S. A.; Edwards, Stanley A.; Bett, Thomas H.; Stevenson, R. M.; Jinks, P. M. R.

    1995-04-01

    Binary-phase optics have been used by a number of high-power laser laboratories in order to achieve relatively smooth focal spots. However, the intensity envelopes have in general been of a sinc form rather than `top-hat.' This paper presents work on the production of uniform `top-hat' intensity focal spot profiles obtained from Fresnel binary phase zone plate (PZP) arrays of various designs. Phase plates are used to generate large area smooth focal spots and both theoretical and experimental focal spots are presented. These demonstrate the flexibility of this technique which provides a simple method of generating both uniform `top-hat' intensity profiles and spatially shaped foci, for use with high-power lasers.

  3. Fabrication of large-scale multilevel phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Hao; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Niu, Li-Gang; Gao, Bing-Rong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of large-scale eight-level phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays (FZPAs) by femtosecond-laser direct writing technology. A high-speed galvanometer scanning system was used to fabricate each Fresnel zone plate to realize high fabrication efficiency. To overcome the limited fabrication scale in the case of galvanometer scanning, inter-plate movements were controlled by multi-axis air-bearing precise positioning stages. With the system, FZPAs whose fill-factor was designed to be 100% realized a diffraction efficiency of 89%. The focusing and imaging properties of the FZPAs were also evaluated, and the FZPAs showed high fidelity.

  4. Observation of the non-local electron transport effect by using phase zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, K.; Sakaiya, T.; Otani, K.; Watari, T.; Hosoda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Shigemori, K.; Mima, K.

    2008-05-01

    Non-local electron transport effect plays a significant role in inertial confinement fusion because it potentially preheats the fusion fuel and lowers the target density. Non-local electron transport effect is more pronounced for longer laser wave-length and higher intensity. We measured the density of the plastic target irradiated with 0.53 μm laser by using a phase zone plate (PZP) that has spatial resolution of about 2 μm. The target density predicted by the ILESTA-1D simulation with Spitzer-Härm thermal conduction is 1.5 times as large as that predicted with Fokker-Planck thermal conduction. The measured density profile is close to the density profile predicted by the simulation with Fokker-Planck thermal conduction.

  5. 500-nm-Resolution 10 keV X-Ray Imaging Transmission Microscope with Tantalum Phase Zone Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Ibuki, Takashi; Takai, Kengo; Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Naoki; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Junji

    2000-05-01

    An imaging transmission hard X-ray microscope has been constructed at the Hyogo-BL (BL24XU) of SPring-8. It makes use of X-ray phase zone plates (PZP’s) made of tantalum as its condenser and objective lenses. The objective PZP has an outermost zone width of 250 nm, which corresponds to the theoretically expected spatial resolution of 300 nm. An experiment was performed at the photon energy of 10 keV to check the performance of the microscope. Since a 250 nm line-and-space pattern was clearly resolved, we concluded that the microscope attained a spatial resolution limit better than 500 nm. A few samples were also examined and the feasibility of the microscope was successfully demonstrated.

  6. Downgoing plate controls on overriding plate deformation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, Fanny; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Davies, Huw; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Although subduction zones are convergent margins, deformation in the upper plate can be extensional or compressional and tends to change through time, sometimes in repeated episodes of strong deformation, e.g, phases of back-arc extension. It is not well understood what factors control this upper plate deformation. We use the code Fluidity, which uses an adaptive mesh and a free-surface formulation, to model a two-plate subduction system in 2-D. The model includes a composite temperature- and stress-dependent rheology, and plates are decoupled by a weak layer, which allows for free trench motion. We investigate the evolution of the state of stress and topography of the overriding plate during the different phases of the subduction process: onset of subduction, free-fall sinking in the upper mantle and interaction of the slab with the transition zone, here represented by a viscosity contrast between upper and lower mantle. We focus on (i) how overriding plate deformation varies with subducting plate age; (ii) how spontaneous and episodic back-arc spreading develops for some subduction settings; (iii) the correlation between overriding plate deformation and slab interaction with the transition zone; (iv) whether these trends resemble observations on Earth.

  7. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy using a Fresnel Zone Plate and a Transmission Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-06-23

    We report on a hard X-ray phase imaging microscopy (a phase-difference microscopy) that consists of an objective and a transmission grating. The simple optical system provides a quantitative phase image, and does not need a wave field mostly coherent on the objective. Our method has a spatial resolution almost same as that of the absorption contrast microscope image obtained by removing the grating. We demonstrate how our approach provides a phase image from experimentally obtained images. Our approach is attractive for easily appending a quantitative phase-sensitive mode to normal X-ray microscopes, and has potentially broad applications in biology and material sciences.

  8. Vector diffraction analysis of high numerical aperture focused beams modified by two- and three-zone annular multi-phase plates.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Toufic; Kuebler, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    Vector diffraction theory was applied to study the effect of two- and three-zone annular multi-phase plates (AMPs) on the three-dimensional point-spread-function (PSF) that results when linearly polarized light is focused using a high numerical aperture refractory lens. Conditions are identified for which a three-zone AMP generates a PSF that is axially superresolved by 19% with minimal change in the transverse profile and sufficiently small side lobes that the intensity pattern could be used for advanced photolithographic techniques, such as multi-photon 3D microfabrication, as well as multi-photon imaging. Conditions are also found in which a three-zone AMP generates a PSF that is axially elongated by 510% with only 1% change along the transverse direction. This intensity distribution could be used for sub-micron-scale laser drilling and machining.

  9. Zone plate lens antennas for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    1992-01-01

    Zone plate lenses are a type of focusing element which function essentially as differential phase shifters, having a relatively few, coarsely quantized phase delays across the incident beam of radiation. The major advantages are ease of fabrication and much reduced thickness, compared to conventional refractive focusing elements. These considerations are both of particular importance for the submillimeter range, in which manufacturing tolerances for curved optical elements can pose significant problems, and where the absorption of readily available dielectric materials is quite large. In this presentation we briefly review the theory of zone plate lens operations, present a relatively simple method for calculating the aperture efficiency of zone plate lenses used as antennas, and show some theoretical and measured results in the 100 GHz range.

  10. Composite Thue-Morse zone plates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua; Cheng, Shubo

    2016-06-13

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, composite Thue-Morse zone plates (CTMZPs), formed by multiple orders of Thue-Morse zone plates (TMZPs). The typical structure of a CTMZP is a composite of two concentric TMZPs. The focusing properties of the CTMZPs with different parameters have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Compared with the TMZPs, the CTMZPs have higher performance in axial intensity and imaging resolution. The CTMZP beams are also found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be useful for three-dimensional optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging. PMID:27410293

  11. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications.

  12. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications. PMID:27678305

  13. Array illumination of a Fresnel-Dammann zone plate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yayao; Ye, Chaochao; Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong; Zhu, Jianqiang; Ling, Zunqing

    2016-09-10

    The traditional Dammann grating is a phase-only modulation, and its theoretical foundation is based on far-field diffraction. Here we extend the traditional Fresnel zone plate (FZP) into a Fresnel-Dammann zone plate (FDZP), which is, in essence, considered as a FZP with Dammann modulation. Different from the Dammann grating, a single FDZP can generate array illumination from the near field to the far field by means of amplitude-only modulation in the absence of phase modulation. We then give some array illuminations operated in a water window to validate the feasibility and validity. This kind of wave-front modulation technology can be applied to array focusing and imaging from the x-ray to the EUV region. PMID:27661355

  14. Ultrathin plasmonic chiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Gorodetski, Yuri; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-09-15

    A thin free-standing gold membrane with complex plasmonic structures engraved on both sides is shown to perform as an ultrathin phase plate. Specifically, we demonstrate the generation of a far-field vortex beam propagating at a desired angle. The angular momentum of the beam is generated by the groove helicity, together with the geometric phase arising from a plasmonic spin-orbit interaction. The radial chirp of the back-side structure is used to modify the emission angle via a specific momentum matching condition. PMID:27628405

  15. Application Of Zone Plates In Interferometric Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Moreno, Vincente; Bara Vinas, Salvador

    1990-04-01

    The usefullness of the zone plates (ZP) to the optical alignment and displacements measurement is discussed basing on examples of parabolic (PZP) and equilateral hyperbolic ZP (EHZP). Any displacement of the ZP from the position occupied during its recording creates the interference patterns between diffracted beam and its undiffracted counterpart. The shape of this pattern is explicitly determined by the kind and range of the misalignment. The PZP enables the accurate measurement of the linear motion in the direction parallel to the foci line with the control of undesired deviations in perpendicular directions. EHZP offers a possibility of strict point positioning for all possible degrees of movement freedom (including in-plane rotations), in contrary to the commonly used spherical ZP. Simple experiments supporting the analysis are presented.

  16. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  17. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-01

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 700 [1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/ΔE = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  18. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  19. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported.

  20. A broadband zone plate lens from transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Wenxuan; Hao, Yang

    2011-06-20

    A zone plate lens utilizing a refractive instead of diffractive approach is presented for broadband operation. By utilizing transformation optics, we compress the conventional hyperbolic lens into a flat one with a few zone plates made of all-dielectric materials. Such a transformed lens maintains the broadband performance of the original lens, thus providing a superior alternative to the diffractive Fresnel element which is inherently narrow band.

  1. Zone Plates for Hard X-Ray FEL Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, D.; Holmberg, A.; Vogt, U.; Sinn, H.

    2011-09-09

    We investigated theoretically the use of zone plates for the focusing of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). In a finite-element simulation the heat load on zone plates placed in the high intensity x-ray beam was simulated for four different zone plate materials: gold, iridium, tungsten, and CVD diamond. The main result of the calculations is that all zone plates remain below the melting temperature throughout a full XFEL pulse train of 3000 pulses. However, if the zone plate is placed in the direct beam it will experience large and rapid temperature fluctuations on the order of 300 K. The situation is relaxed if the optic is placed behind a monochromator and the fluctuations are reduced to around 20 K. Besides heat load, the maximization of the total efficiency of the complete optical system is an important issue. We calculated the efficiency of different zone plates and monochromator systems and found that the final beam size of the XFEL in combination with its monochromaticity will be important parameters.

  2. Soft x-ray microscope with zone plates at UVSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Shimanuki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Mieko; Kihara, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    A soft x-ray microscope with zone plates was set up at UVSOR (Okazaki, Japan). A 0.41 micrometers line and space pattern was clearly distinguished using an objective zone plate with the outermost zone width of 0.41 micrometers . Modulation transfer functions were measured at wavelengths of 3.1 nm and 5.4 nm, and compared with theoretical calculations. Considering the resolution of a microchannel plate used as a detector, the agreement is fairly good. With this microscope, some biological specimens such as diatoms, spicule of trepang, crab and rabbit muscles, human blood cells, human chromosomes, and magnetotactic bacterium were observed at 3.1 nm and 5.4 nm. With an environmental chamber (wet cell) using polypropylene foils as windows, wet specimens were observed at a wavelength of 4.6 nm. Images of spicule of trepang, human blood cell, and cultured protoplast of plant cell stained by methyl mercury were observed with good contrast.

  3. Plate detachment, asthenosphere upwelling, and topography across subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Nur, Amos

    1999-06-01

    This study analyzes the topography across subduction zones, considering the separate contributions of the crust and the mantle lithosphere to the observed surface elevation. We have found a transition from a region where the overriding plate is coupled to the descending slab and pulled down along with it to a region where the overriding plate floats freely on the asthenosphere. When the subducting slab retreats oceanward rapidly this transition is abrupt, and the edge of the overriding plate is uplifted. We propose that at some point during rapid slab rollback the overriding plate detaches and rebounds like a boat released from its keel. This event is associated with suction of asthenospheric material into the gap that is opened between the plates up to the base of the crust. As a result, the forearc uplifts, and magmatism in the arc increases.

  4. Phase-Scrambler Plate Spreads Point Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Oliver J.; Arild, Tor

    1992-01-01

    Array of small prisms retrofit to imaging lens. Phase-scrambler plate essentially planar array of small prisms partitioning aperture of lens into many subapertures, and prism at each subaperture designed to divert relatively large diffraction spot formed by that subaperture to different, specific point on focal plane.

  5. Subduction Zone Diversity and Nature of the Plate Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defranco, R.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2008-12-01

    We recently showed that the overall dynamics of subduction and initial collision depends on whether the plate contact is a fault or a channel. Here, we combine results of our numerical experiments with a re-analysis of published observations. Overall, our synthesis connects seismic moment release with back-arc deformation and tectonic processes at the margin. It leads us to identify four classes of subduction zones. The first two classes results directly from our numerical experiments. In class 1, subduction zones are characterized by a plate contact that is largely fault-like with an accretionary margin. In class 2, the plate contacts are largely channel-type and have an erosive margin. Class 3, where the plate contact is entirely channel-like, consists of accretionary margins with a high sediment supply. Subduction zones of class 4, mostly characterized by an erosive convergent margin (northern Chili, Peru, Honshu and Kuril), are more complicated. They can be explained by incorporating regional observations.

  6. Relations between plate kinematics, slab geometry and overriding plate deformation in subduction zones: insights from statistical observations and laboratory modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Lallemand, S.

    2005-12-01

    3-D laboratory models have been performed in order to investigate the way plates kinematics (subducting and overriding plate absolute motions and the resulting plate convergence rate) influences the geometry of the slab and the overriding plate deformation in subduction zones. In the experiments a viscous plate of silicone (subducting plate) is pushed beneath another plate, which is itself pushed toward or pulled away from the trench (overriding plate), and sinks into a viscous layer of glucose syrup (upper mantle). The subducting and overriding plate velocities explored the variability field of natural subduction plates kinematics. The overriding plate motion exerts a primary role in the control of slab geometries and overriding plate deformation rates. The experiments have revealed two different subduction behaviours: (Style I) the overriding plate moves toward the trench and shortens at high rates, the slab is flat and deflected when reaching the bottom of the box in a forward direction; (Style II) the overriding plates moves away from the trench and shortens at low rates the slab is steep and deflected on the box bottom in a backward direction. To a lesser extent, increasing subducting plate motion is associated to increasing slab dips and overriding plate shortening. Slab geometry and overriding plate deformation are less sensitive to the overall plate convergence rate. These laboratory models behaviours are consistent with statistical analysis performed on natural subduction zones, and enlighten the first order control exerted by the overriding plate absolute motion, on the geometry adopted by the slab and the way the overriding plate deforms.

  7. Hydration of the incoming plate in the Kuril subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, N.; Noguchi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Water supplied from the subducting oceanic plate by dehydration is inferred to cause seismicity and magmatism in subduction zones. It is important, therefore, to reveal the distribution of water within the incoming plate for understanding seismic and volcanic activities in subduction zones. In 2009 and 2010, to reveal the detailed seismic structure and hydration process within the incoming plate, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey in the Kuril subduction zone, where the old Pacific plate formed in the eastern Pacific ridge is subducting from south to north beneath the island arc of Japan. We designed a north-south 500km-long seismic experimental line to be perpendicular to the Kuril trench. The northern end of our line is located at about 30km south of the trench axis and well-developed horst and graben structure is observed around the northern end. We deployed 80 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) at intervals of 6km and shot a large tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei. In addition, we obtained MCS reflection data using a 444-channel hydrophone streamer (6km long) along the same line. We modelled both P-wave and S-wave velocity structures by the traveltime inversion using refraction, reflection and PS-conversion traveltimes. Our results show that P-wave velocity beneath the well-developed horst and graben structure is about 5% lower than that in the south of outer rise. This is consistent with a previous structure study in the Chili subduction zone that shows the P-wave velocity in the vicinity of the trench axis is lower than that of normal oceanic plate. More notable feature of our results is the regional variations of Vp/Vs. The S-wave velocity, as well as P-wave velocity, gradually decreases toward the trench axis. However Vp/Vs is not uniform; Vp/Vs immediately beneath the sediments is remarkably high beneath the well-developed horst and graben structure, and Vp/Vs decreases with depth (high Vp/Vs is confined to the top of the oceanic plate). Since the

  8. Geophysical Limitations on the Habitable Zone: Volcanism and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Planets are typically classified as potentially life-bearing planets (i.e. habitable planets) if they are rocky planets and if a liquid (e.g. water) could exist at the surface. The latter depends on several factors, like for example the amount of available solar energy, greenhouse effects in the atmosphere and an efficient CO2-cycle. However, the definition of the habitable zone should be updated to include possible geophysical constraints, that could potentially influence the CO2-cycle. Planets like Mars without plate tectonics and no or only limited volcanic events can only be considered to be habitable at the inner boundary of the habitable zone, since the greenhouse effect needed to ensure liquid surface water farther away from the sun is strongly reduced. We investigate if the planet mass as well as the interior structure can set constraints on the occurrence of plate tectonics and outgassing, and therefore affect the habitable zone, using both parameterized evolution models [1] and mantle convection simulations [1,2]. We find that plate tectonics, if it occurs, always leads to sufficient volcanic outgassing and therefore greenhouse effect needed for the outer boundary of the habitable zone (several tens of bar CO2), see also [3]. One-plate planets, however, may suffer strong volcanic limitations. The existence of a dense-enough CO2 atmosphere allowing for the carbon-silicate cycle and release of carbon at the outer boundary of the habitable zone may be strongly limited for planets: 1) without plate tectonics, 2) with a large planet mass, and/or 3) a high iron content. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office through the Planet Topers alliance, and results within the collaboration of the COST Action TD 1308. References Noack, L., Rivoldini, A., and Van Hoolst, T.: CHIC - Coupling Habitability, Interior and Crust, INFOCOMP 2015, ISSN 2308-3484, ISBN 978

  9. Measuring Transient Signals in Plate Boundary Faults Zones with Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, Dave; Phillips, David; Henderson, Brent; Gottlieb, Mike; Gallaher, Warren; Johnson, Wade; Pyatt, Chad; Van Boskirk, Elizabeth; Fox, Otina; Mattioli, Glen; Meertens, Chuck

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental goals the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Earthscope program was to provide a high-quality, continuous geodetic data set that would allow the scientific community to study the evolution of plate boundary zones. Of particular importance was enabling investigation of the role aseismic transient deformation plays in the release of accumulated stress. For example, to allow the comparison of the amount of strain released through Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events to that released in subduction zone earthquakes or, provide the ability to geodetically illuminate the kinematics of fault creep in strike-slip fault zones. The ability to easily integrate these measurements with compatible geophysical data sets was also an essential objective. With goals such as these in mind NSF funded the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to record the continuous deformation field across the western US Plate Boundary. PBO, built and operated by UNAVCO, now consists of over 1100 GPS stations, 76 co-located borehole strain and seismic sites, 6 long baseline strainmeters, Depending on the scientific questions being addressed sites may also have tiltmeter, meteorological, pore pressure and meteorological instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the transient deformation signals recorded by the PBO strainmeter network. PBO strainmeters, which excel in recording signals on the order of nanostrain over hours, have provided unprecedented temporal resolution of aseismic transients such as ETS events in the Cascadia subduction zone, creep signals along the central section of the San Andreas fault system and tsunami generated strain waves. UNAVCO is responsible not only for the ongoing operation of PBO but also the generation of data products associated with each instrument type. In this presentation we will highlight some of the transient signals these instruments have captured, outline the processing steps required to extract these signals data and

  10. Owen Fracture Zone: The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Petit, C.; Beslier, M. O.; Zaragosi, S.

    2011-02-01

    We surveyed the Owen Fracture Zone at the boundary between the Arabia and India plates in the NW Indian Ocean using a high-resolution multibeam echo-sounder (Owen cruise, 2009) for search of active faults. Bathymetric data reveal a previously unrecognized submarine fault scarp system running for over 800 km between the Sheba Ridge in the Gulf of Aden and the Makran subduction zone. The primary plate boundary structure is not the bathymetrically high Owen Ridge, but is instead a series of clearly delineated strike-slip fault segments separated by several releasing and restraining bends. Despite an abundant sedimentary supply by the Indus River flowing from the Himalaya, fault scarps are not obscured by recent deposits and can be followed over hundreds of kilometres, pointing to very active tectonics. The total strike-slip displacement of the fault system is 10-12 km, indicating that it has been active for the past ~ 3 to 6 Ma if its current rate of motion of 3 ± 1 mm yr- 1 has remained stable. We describe the geometry of this recent fault system, including a major pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N, and we show that it closely follows an arc of small circle centred on the Arabia-India pole of rotation, as expected for a transform plate boundary.

  11. Plate description of active deformation in the Africa (AF)-Arabia (AR)-Eurasia (EU) zone of plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of 17 years of GPS monitoring in this zone of plate interaction and show that to the resolution of our observations (i.e., ~1-2 mm/yr; ~ ±10 % of relative plate motions), deformation is consistent with plate-block models with relative motion between adjacent plates/blocks accommodated by elastic strain accumulation. Relative plate motions are consistent with geologically recent (~ 3 Ma) plate motions where geologic estimates of relative plate motion have been determined (AR- Nubia: Red Sea; AR-Somalia: Gulf of Aden; AF-EU; AR-EU). Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from the GPS block motions are mostly equal to geologic slip rates determined for long enough time intervals to average out earthquake cycle effects. We conclude that a plate description (i.e., relative Euler vectors) is appropriate to describe the kinematics of continental deformation during the past few Myr in this zone of plate interaction.

  12. Towards multi-order hard X-ray imaging with multilayer zone plates

    PubMed Central

    Osterhoff, Markus; Eberl, Christian; Döring, Florian; Wilke, Robin N.; Wallentin, Jesper; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Sprung, Michael; Salditt, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This article describes holographic imaging experiments using a hard X-ray multilayer zone plate (MZP) with an outermost zone width of 10 nm at a photon energy of 18 keV. An order-sorting aperture (OSA) is omitted and emulated during data analysis by a ‘software OSA’. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy usually carried out in the focal plane is generalized to the holographic regime. The MZP focus is characterized by a three-plane phase-retrieval algorithm to an FWHM of 10 nm. PMID:26089748

  13. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  14. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, David C. Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-07-06

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  15. Ray transfer matrix for a spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, M; Godat, T; Munro, E; Alonso, M A; Shi, H; Bhattacharya, M

    2013-12-01

    We present a ray transfer matrix for a spiral phase plate. Using this matrix we determine the stability of an optical resonator made of two spiral phase plates and trace stable ray orbits in the resonator. Our results should be relevant to laser physics, optical micromanipulation, quantum information, and optomechanics.

  16. Hard x-ray microscopy with Fresnel zone plates reaches 40 nm Rayleigh resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y. S.; De Carlo, F.; Shen, Q.; Lee, W.K.; Wu, H.J.; Wang, C.L.; Wang, J.Y.; Liu, C.J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, S.R.; Chien, C.C.; Hwu, Y.; Tkachuk, A.; Yun, W.; Feser, M.; Liang, K.S.; Yang, C.S.; Je, J.H.; Margaritondo, G.; X-Ray Science Division; Academia Sinica; National Tsing Hua Univ.; National Taiwan Ocean Univ.; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Xradia, Inc.; National Health Research Inst.; Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne; Pohang Univ.

    2008-03-10

    Substantial improvements in the nanofabrication and characteristics of gold Fresnel zone plates yielded unprecedented resolution levels in hard-x-ray microscopy. Tests performed on a variety of specimens with 8-10 keV photons demonstrated a first-order lateral resolution below 40 nm based on the Rayleigh criterion. Combined with the use of a phase contrast technique, this makes it possible to view features in the 30 nm range; good-quality images can be obtained at video rate, down to 50 ms/frame. The important repercussions on materials science, nanotechnology, and the life sciences are discussed.

  17. Hard-x-ray microscopy with Fresnel zone plates reaches 40 nm Rayleigh resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y. S.; Yi, J. M.; De Carlo, F.; Shen, Q.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Wu, H. J.; Wang, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Liu, C. J.; Wang, C. H.; Wu, S. R.; Chien, C. C.; Hwu, Y.; Tkachuk, A.; Yun, W.; Feser, M.; Liang, K. S.; Yang, C. S.; Je, J. H.; Margaritondo, G.

    2008-03-10

    Substantial improvements in the nanofabrication and characteristics of gold Fresnel zone plates yielded unprecedented resolution levels in hard-x-ray microscopy. Tests performed on a variety of specimens with 8-10 keV photons demonstrated a first-order lateral resolution below 40 nm based on the Rayleigh criterion. Combined with the use of a phase contrast technique, this makes it possible to view features in the 30 nm range; good-quality images can be obtained at video rate, down to 50 ms/frame. The important repercussions on materials science, nanotechnology, and the life sciences are discussed.

  18. HSQ double patterning process for 12 nm resolution x-ray zone plates

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Weilun; Kim, Jihoon; Rekawa, Senajith; Fischer, Peter; Anderson, Erik H.

    2009-06-16

    Soft x-ray zone plate microscopy is a powerful nano-analytic technique used for a wide variety of scientific and technological studies. Pushing its spatial resolution to 10 nm and below is highly desired and feasible due to the short wavelength of soft x-rays. Instruments using Fresnel zone plate lenses achieve a spatial resolution approximately equal to the smallest, outer most zone width. We developed a double patterning zone plate fabrication process based on a high-resolution resist, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), to bypass the limitations of conventional single exposure fabrication to pattern density, such as finite beam size, scattering in resist and modest intrinsic resist contrast. To fabricate HSQ structures with zone widths in the order of 10 nm on gold plating base, a surface conditioning process with (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane, 3-MPT, is used, which forms a homogeneous hydroxylation surface on gold surface and provides good anchoring for the desired HSQ structures. Using the new HSQ double patterning process, coupled with an internally developed, sub-pixel alignment algorithm, we have successfully fabricated in-house gold zone plates of 12 nm outer zones. Promising results for 10 nm zone plates have also been obtained. With the 12 nm zone plates, we have achieved a resolution of 12 nm using the full-field soft x-ray microscope, XM-1.

  19. Solar Sail - Fresnel Zone Plate Lens for a Large Space Based Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-02-13

    A Fresnel zone plate lens made with solar sail material could be used as the primary optic for a very large aperture telescope on deep space probes propelled by solar sails. The large aperture telescope capability could enable significant science on fly-by missions to the asteroids, Pluto, Kuiper belt or the tort cloud and could also enable meaningful interstellar fly-by missions for laser propelled sails. This type of lens may also have some potential for laser communications and as a solar concentrator. The techniques for fabrication of meter size and larger Fresnel phase plate optics are under development at LLNL, and we are extending this technology to amplitude zone plates made from sail materials. Corrector optics to greatly extend the bandwidth of these Fresnel optics will be demonstrated in the future. This novel telescope concept will require new understanding of the fabrication, deployment and control of gossamer space structures. It will also require new materials technology for fabricating these optics and understanding their long term stability in a space environment.

  20. The North American Astronomical Photographic Plate Center: Phase I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. D.; Castelaz, M. W.; Crowley, T.; Griffin, E.; Osborn, W.

    2004-05-01

    Astronomical photographic plates constitute an important and, for the large part, unrepeatable resource for research. International pressure is mounting to preserve and catalog scientifically valuable plate collections and capture their information through digitization. At the same time, many institutions holding plates now lack the space, funds and expertise to adequately preserve this important material. In response, the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute has established the North American Photographic Plate Center (NAPPC). NAPPC is intended as a long-term repository for direct and objective prism plate collections currently stored in North America. PARI is a natural location for such a center. It offers physically secure and abundant environmentally controlled space for plate storage as well as Internet 2 infrastructure and instrument space necessary for the eventual digitization and Internet distribution of images. Phase I of this initiative is to collect unwanted plate collections, store them in an appropriate manner, prepare catalogues of their relevant information and establish a laboratory for on-site examination or measurement of the plates. This is currently underway. Phase II will be the eventual digitization and development of a public web accessible database of images. We will describe the procedures for placing plate collections in NAPPC, the infrastructure in place for plate storage and measurement, and our preliminary plans for making the plate archive a public image library with Internet access.

  1. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

    2009-06-05

    To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

  2. Stacked Fresnel Zone Plates for High Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly; Vaughan, Gavin; Di Michiel, Marco; Kohn, Viktor; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Grigoriev, Maxim

    2007-01-19

    A stacking technique was developed in order to increase focusing efficiency of Fresnel zone plates (FZP) at high energies. Two identical Si chips each of which containing 9 FZPs were used for stacking. Alignment of the chips was achieved by on-line observation of the moire pattern. The formation of moire patterns was studied theoretically and experimentally at different experimental conditions. To provide the desired stability Si-chips were bonded together with slow solidification speed epoxy glue. A technique of angular alignment in order to compensate a linear displacement in the process of gluing was proposed. Two sets of stacked FZPs were experimentally tested to focus 15 and 50 keV x rays. The gain in the efficiency by factor 2.5 was demonstrated at 15 keV. The focal spot of 1.8 {mu}m vertically and 14 {mu}m horizontally with 35% efficiency was measured at 50 keV. Forecast for the stacking of nanofocusing FZPs was discussed.

  3. Scanning Photoelectron Microscope (SPEM) with a zone plate generated microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, H.; Kirz, J.; Hulbert, S.; Johnson, E.; Anderson, E.; Kern, D. . Dept. of Physics; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA . Center for X-Ray Optics; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1989-01-01

    We describe instrumentation of a scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM), which we are presently developing and commissioning at the X1A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This instrument is designed to use the Soft X-ray Undulator (SXU) at the NSLS as a high brightness source to illuminate a Fresnel zone plate, thus forming a finely focused probe, {le} 0.2{mu}m in size, on the specimen surface. A grating monochromator selects the photon energy in the 400-800 eV range with an energy resolution better than 1 eV. The expected flux in the focus is in the 5 {times} 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 9} photons/s range. A single pass Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer (CMA) is used to record photoemission spectra, or to form an image within a fixed electron energy bandwidth as the specimen is mechanically scanned. As a first test, a 1000 mesh Au grid was successfully imaged with Au 4 f primary photoelectrons, achieving a resolution of about 1{mu}m. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 3D Thermochemical Numerical Model of a Convergent Zone With an Overriding Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, W. G.; Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    We have created a new three dimensional thermochemical numerical model of a convergent zone, in which a viscoplastic oceanic plate subducts beneath a viscous overriding plate, using the finite element Geoscience research code Underworld. Subduction is initiated by mantle flow induced by the gravitational instability of a slab tip, and buoyancy of the overriding plate. A cold thermal boundary layer envelopes both plates, and is partially dragged into the mantle along with the subducting slab. The trench rolls back as the slab subducts, and the overriding plate follows the retreating trench without being entrained into the upper mantle. The model is repeated with the overriding plate excluded, to analyse the influence of the overriding plate. The overriding plate retards the rate of subduction. Maximum strain rates, evident along the trench in the absence of an overriding plate, extend to a greater depth within the subducted portion of the slab in the presence of an overriding plate.

  5. Zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates for high-resolution hard X-ray full-field transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Pan, Yongsheng; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; David, Christian; Wang, Yuxin

    2012-01-01

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy is a unique non-destructive technique for three-dimensional imaging of specimens at the nanometer scale. Here, the use of zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates to achieve a spatial resolution better than 20 nm in the hard X-ray regime (8–10 keV) is reported. By obtaining a tomographic reconstruction of a Ni/YSZ solid-oxide fuel cell, the feasibility of performing three-dimensional imaging of scientifically relevant samples using such high-spatial-resolution Fresnel zone plates is demonstrated. PMID:22898949

  6. Testing and Calibration of Phase Plates for JWST Optical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Chu, Jenny; Tournois, Severine; Eichhorn, William; Kubalak, David

    2011-01-01

    Three phase plates were designed to simulate the JWST segmented primary mirror wavefront at three on-orbit alignment stages: coarse phasing, intermediate phasing, and fine phasing. The purpose is to verify JWST's on-orbit wavefront sensing capability. Amongst the three stages, coarse alignment is defined to have piston error between adjacent segments being 30 m to 300 m, intermediate being 0.4 m to 10 m, and fine is below 0.4 m. The phase plates were made of fused silica, and were assembled in JWST Optical Simulator (OSIM). The piston difference was realized by the thickness difference of two adjacent segments. The two important parameters to phase plates are piston and wavefront errors. Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS) method was used for initial coarse piston evaluation, which is the emphasis of this paper. Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI) is used for fine piston and wavefront error. In order to remove piston's 2 pi uncertainty with PDI, three laser wavelengths, 640nm, 660nm, and 780nm, are used for the measurement. The DHS test setup, analysis algorithm and results are presented. The phase plate design concept and its application (i.e. verifying the JWST on-orbit alignment algorithm) are described. The layout of JWST OSIM and the function of phase plates in OSIM are also addressed briefly.

  7. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape. PMID:25129640

  8. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    While slab pull is considered the dominant force controlling plate motion and speed, its magnitude is controlled by slab behavior in the mantle, where tomographic studies show a wide range of possibilities from direct penetration to folding, or stagnation directly above the lower mantle (e.g. Fukao et al., 2009). Geodynamic studies have investigated various parameters, such as plate age and two phase transitions, to recreate observed behavior (e.g. Běhounková and Cízková, 2008). However, past geodynamic models have left out known slab characteristics that may have a large impact on slab behavior and our understanding of subduction processes. Mineral experiments and seismic observations have indicated the existence of additional phase transitions in the mantle transition zone that may produce buoyancy forces large enough to affect the descent of a subducting slab (e.g. Ricard et al., 2005). The current study systematically tests different common assumptions used in geodynamic models: kinematic versus free-slip boundary conditions, the effects of adiabatic heating, viscous dissipation and latent heat, compositional layering and a more complete suite of phase transitions. Final models have a complete energy equation, with eclogite, harzburgite and pyrolite lithosphere compositional layers, and seven composition-dependent phase transitions within the olivine, pyroxene and garnet polymorph minerals. Results show important feedback loops between different assumptions and new behavior from the most complete models. Kinematic models show slab weakening or breaking above the 660 km boundary and between compositional layers. The behavior in dynamic models with a free-moving trench and overriding plate is compared to the more commonly found kinematic models. The new behavior may have important implications for the depth distribution of deep earthquakes within the slab. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, their presence and

  9. Axisymmetric deformation of plates and shells with phase trasformations under thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkutin, L. I.

    2008-03-01

    A mathematical formulation is given of nonlinear axisymmetric buckling problems for plates and shells in the two-phase zones of austenite-to-martensite transformation. Numerical solutions of the direct-and inverse-transformation problems are used to construct hysteresis loops for thermomechanically cycled, pressure-loaded circular plates and shallow spherical domes of titanium nickelide (NiTi) alloy. It is shown that dynamic instability of the dome deformation process can occur during transformation under loads notably lower than the upper critical values for the isothermal states of the material outside the transformation zone. A theoretical analysis gives external loads below which the dome remains stable in the thermally cycled material with phase transformations.

  10. Incoming plate faulting in the Northern and Western Pacific and implications for subduction zone water budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emry, Erica L.; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2015-03-01

    The greatest uncertainty in the amount of water input into the Earth at subduction zones results from poor constraints on the degree of mantle serpentinization in the incoming plate. Recent studies suggest that the depth of serpentinization within the incoming plate mantle is likely controlled by the depth of extensional faulting caused by lithospheric bending at the outer rise and trench. We explore the maximum depth of extension within the incoming plate at Northwestern Pacific subduction zones in order to estimate the depth limit of serpentinization and to identify any significant variation between subduction zone segments. We relocate trench earthquakes to identify which events occurred within the incoming plate and determine accurate depths for 63 incoming plate earthquakes occurring during 1988-2011 by inverting teleseismic broadband P and SH waveforms. We observe that the top 10-15 km of the incoming plate mantle experiences extensional faulting at all of the subduction zones with a reasonable sample of earthquakes; 60% of the total number of extensional earthquakes occur at crustal depths or within the top 5 km of the incoming plate mantle, 80% occur above 10 km within the mantle, and 95% occur above 15 km. There is evidence for variation throughout the different regions of study, for example extensional earthquakes occur down to 20 km below the crust in the western Aleutians and Izu-Bonin. We propose that the incoming plate mantle is most strongly hydrated in the upper 5 km, and that partial serpentinization exists regionally within the incoming plate mantle to ∼15 km. Making reasonable assumptions about the degree of serpentinization and incorporating previous estimates of crustal water, we calculate that the total water carried into the Northern and Western Pacific subduction zones is generally higher than previous estimates, and is approximately 4- 6 ×108 Tg /Myr, or ∼ 45- 70 ×103 Tg /Myr per kilometer of subduction zone.

  11. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  12. Investigating Transition Zone Thickness Variation under the Arabian Plate: Evidence Lacking for Deep Mantle Upwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliá, J.; Tang, Z.; Mai, P. M.; Zahran, H.

    2014-12-01

    Cenozoic volcanic outcrops in Arabia - locally known as harrats - span more than 2000 km along the western half of the Arabian plate, from eastern Yemen to southern Syria. The magmatism is bimodal in character, with older volcanics (30 to 20 My) being tholeiitic-to-transitional and paralleling the Red Sea margin, and younger volcanics (12 Ma to Recent) being transitional-to-strongly-alkalic and aligning in a more north-south direction. The bimodal character has been attributed to a two-stage rifting process along the Red Sea, where the old volcanics would have produced from shallow sources related to an initial passive rifting stage, and young volcanics would have originated from one or more deep-seated mantle plumes driving present active rifting. Early models suggested the harrats would have resulted from either lateral flow from the Afar plume in Ethiopia, or more locally from a separate mantle plume directly located under the shield. Most recently, tomographic images of the Arabian mantle have suggested the northern harrats could be resulting from flow originating at a deep plume under Jordan. In this work, we investigate the location of deep mantle plumes under the Arabian plate by mapping transition zone thickness with teleseismic receiver functions. The transition zone is bounded by seismic discontinuities, nominally at 410 and 660 km depth, originating from phase transitions in the olivine-normative component of the mantle. The precise depth of the discontinuities is strongly dependent on temperature and, due to the opposing signs of the corresponding Clapeyron slopes, positive temperature anomalies are expected to result in thinning of the transition zone. Our dataset consists of ~5000 low-frequency (fc < 0.25 Hz) receiver function waveforms obtained at ~110 broadband stations belonging to a number of permanent and temporary seismic networks in the region. The receiver functions were migrated to depth and stacked along a ~2000 km long record section

  13. Birefringent phase demodulator: application to wave plate characterization.

    PubMed

    Veiras, F E; Riobó, L M; Matteo, C L; Perez, L I; Garea, M T

    2015-03-20

    The scope of this work is to present a phase demodulator that enables the recovery of temporal phase information contained in the phase difference between two signals with different polarizations. This demodulator is a polarization interferometer that may consist only of a uniaxial crystal slab and a polarizer sheet. The phase shift between two orthogonal components of the electric field is translated into space by means of birefringent crystals, which act as demodulators or phase analyzers with great robustness. The experimental scheme utilized is based on a simple conoscopic interference setup. Each portion of the space in which the interference pattern is projected contains not only the unknown temporal phase we want to recover, but also a phase shift due to the uniaxial crystal itself. The underlying idea is developing simultaneous phase shifting with uniaxial crystals. Thus, different phase recovery techniques can be applied in order to maximize their ability to track high-speed signals. Depending on the characteristics of the fringe pattern, it will permit phase recovery via different classical procedures. In order to prove the demodulator under different experimental and signal processing schemes, we employed it for wave plate characterization. The results obtained not only allow some wave plate features such as axes determination and retardance to be characterized, but also prove the working principle and capabilities of the demodulator.

  14. Fraunhofer diffraction of a partially blocked spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Don M; Davis, Jeffrey A; Hernandez, Travis J

    2011-07-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a partially blocked spiral phase plate (SPP) produces a partial vortex output pattern that is rotated by 90 degrees compared with the input. The rotation direction depends on whether the angular phase pattern increases in the clockwise or counterclockwise direction. In this work, we present an explanation of this effect based on careful examination of classical diffraction theory and show new experimental results. This approach is very convenient for easily determining the sign of the vortex charge.

  15. Efficient alignment scheme for zone-plates-based transmission soft X-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Hong, Chung Ki

    2010-12-01

    Alignment and operation of a zone-plate (ZP)-based transmission soft X-ray microscope (TXM) is difficult and time consuming, especially when the TXM has no dedicated X-ray source. We introduce here an efficient TXM alignment scheme. The TXM employed is a simple in-situ-experiment-capable setup. It includes ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-compatible conflat flanges and is mountable in tandem with any soft X-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Obtaining zeroth- and first-order diffracted (condenser-zone-plate [CZP]-focused) beams simultaneously by means of the objective zone plate (OZP) is the most essential step in the alignment scheme. We were able to acquire, in one hour at a radiation wavelength of 2.49 nm, an image of 50 nm spatial resolution.

  16. Laboratory arrangement for soft x-ray zone plate efficiency measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertilson, Michael C.; Takman, Per A. C.; Holmberg, Anders; Vogt, Ulrich; Hertz, Hans M.

    2007-02-15

    We demonstrate a laboratory-scale arrangement for rapid and accurate measurements of the absolute and local efficiency of soft x-ray micro zone plates in the water window. This in-house instrument is based on a single-line {lambda}=2.88 nm liquid-jet laser-plasma source. Measurements are performed by a simultaneous comparison of first diffraction-order photon flux with the flux in a calibrated reference signal. This arrangement eliminates existing source emission fluctuations. The performance of the method is demonstrated by the result from measurements of two {approx}55 {mu}m diameter nickel micro zone plates, showing a groove efficiency of 12.9%{+-}1.1% and 11.7%{+-}1.0%. Furthermore, we show that spatially resolved efficiency mapping is an effective tool for a detailed characterization of local zone plate properties. Thus, this laboratory-scale instrument allows rapid feedback to the fabrication process which is important for future improvements.

  17. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  18. Fresnel zone plates for Achromatic Imaging Survey of X-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Debnath, D.; Yadav, Vipin; Nandi, Anuj

    2008-10-08

    A telescope with Fresnel Zone Plates has been contemplated to be an excellent imaging mask in X-rays and gamma-rays for quite some time. With a proper choice of zone plate material, spacing and an appropriate readout system it is possible to achieve any theoretical angular resolution. We provide the results of numerical simulations of how a large number of X-ray sources could be imaged at a high resolution. We believe that such an imager would be an excellent tool for a future survey mission for X-ray and gamma-ray sources which we propose.

  19. Phase plate technology for laser marking of magnetic discs

    DOEpatents

    Neuman, Bill; Honig, John; Hackel, Lloyd; Dane, C. Brent; Dixit, Shamasundar

    1998-01-01

    An advanced design for a phase plate enables the distribution of spots in arbitrarily shaped patterns with very high uniformity and with a continuously or near-continuously varying phase pattern. A continuous phase pattern eliminates large phase jumps typically expected in a grating that provides arbitrary shapes. Large phase jumps increase scattered light outside of the desired pattern, reduce efficiency and can make the grating difficult to manufacture. When manufacturing capabilities preclude producing a fully continuous grating, the present design can be easily adapted to minimize manufacturing errors and maintain high efficiencies. This continuous grating is significantly more efficient than previously described Dammann gratings, offers much more flexibility in generating spot patterns and is easier to manufacture and replicate than a multi-level phase grating.

  20. Phase plate technology for laser marking of magnetic discs

    DOEpatents

    Neuman, B.; Honig, J.; Hackel, L.; Dane, C.B.; Dixit, S.

    1998-10-27

    An advanced design for a phase plate enables the distribution of spots in arbitrarily shaped patterns with very high uniformity and with a continuously or near-continuously varying phase pattern. A continuous phase pattern eliminates large phase jumps typically expected in a grating that provides arbitrary shapes. Large phase jumps increase scattered light outside of the desired pattern, reduce efficiency and can make the grating difficult to manufacture. When manufacturing capabilities preclude producing a fully continuous grating, the present design can be easily adapted to minimize manufacturing errors and maintain high efficiencies. This continuous grating is significantly more efficient than previously described Dammann gratings, offers much more flexibility in generating spot patterns and is easier to manufacture and replicate than a multi-level phase grating. 3 figs.

  1. Spiral phase plate contrast in optical and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Clark, Laura; Lubk, Axel; Verbeeck, Jo

    2016-08-01

    The use of phase plates in the back focal plane of a microscope is a well-established technique in optical microscopy to increase the contrast of weakly interacting samples and is gaining interest in electron microscopy as well. In this paper we study the spiral phase plate (SPP), also called helical, vortex, or two-dimensional Hilbert phase plate, which adds an angularly dependent phase of the form ei ℓ ϕk to the exit wave in Fourier space. In the limit of large collection angles, we analytically calculate that the average of a pair of ℓ =±1 SPP filtered images is directly proportional to the gradient squared of the exit wave, explaining the edge contrast previously seen in optical SPP work. We discuss the difference between a clockwise-anticlockwise pair of SPP filtered images and derive conditions under which the modulus of the wave's gradient can be seen directly from one SPP filtered image. This work provides the theoretical background to interpret images obtained with a SPP, thereby opening new perspectives for new experiments to study, for example, magnetic materials in an electron microscope.

  2. Interplate coupling at oblique subduction zones: influence on upper plate erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Crispini, Laura; Federico, Laura; Scambelluri, Marco; Capponi, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In active subduction zones, when the converging plates cannot slip freely past each other, "plate coupling" occurs. The moving subducting slab and therefore the coupling/decoupling relationship between plates control both short- and long-term deformation of the upper plate. Short-term deformation is dominantly elastic, occurs at human timescales and can be directly associated with earthquakes. Long-term deformation is cumulative, permanent and prevails at the geological timescale (Hoffman-Rothe et al., 2006, Springer Berlin Heidelberg). Here we used 3D numerical simulations to test oblique subduction zones and to investigate: 1) how long-term deformation and coupling relationship vary along the trench-axis; 2) how this relationship influences erosion and down-drag of upper plate material. Our models are based on thermo-mechanical equations solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with a multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010, Cambridge Univ. Press). The reference model simulates an intraoceanic subduction close to the continental margin (Malatesta et al., 2013, Nature Communications, 4:2456 DOI:10.1038/ncomms3456). The oceanic crust is layered with a 5-km-thick layer of gabbro overlain by a 3-km-thick layer of basalt. The ocean floor is covered by 1-km-thick sediments. Plates move with a total velocity of 3.15 cm/yr; the oblique convergence is obtained using velocity vectors that form an angle of 45° with the initial starting point of subduction (weak zone in the lithosphere). After initiation of plate convergence, part of sediments on top of the incoming plate enters the subduction zone and is buried; another part is suddenly transferred along strike at shallow depths and along the subducting slab according to the direction of the along-trench velocity component of subduction. The lateral migration of sediment causes the evolution of the trench along its strike from sediment-poor to sediment-rich. As soon as subduction starts, where

  3. Zone plate tilt study in transmission x-ray microscope system at 8-11 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Fu-Han; Yin, Gung-Chian; Liang, Keng S.; Lai, Yin-Chieh

    2009-08-01

    Zone plate [1] has been used as a focal lens in transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) optical system in recent decades [2, 3]. In TXM of NSRRC[4,5], the thickness of zone plate is about 900nm and the width of its out most zones is 50nm, which has a high aspect ratio 18. When zone plate is tilted, the image quality will be affected by aberration. Since the aspect ratio of zone plate is large, for incident beam, the shape of zone plate's transmission function will look different when zone plate is tilted. The both experimental and simulation result will be shown in this present. A five axes stage is designed and manufactured for the zone plate holder for three dimensional movement, tip and tilt. According to Fourier theory, we can calculate the wave distribution on image plane, if we know the original wave function, the distances between each element, and the transparencies of the sample and zone plate. A parallel simulation process code in MATLAB is developed in workstation cluster with up to 128Gbytes memory. The effects of aberration generated by tilt effect are compared from the experimental data and simulation result. A maximum tilt angle within the acceptable image quality is calculated by simulation and will be verified by experiment.

  4. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼ 200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created "on the fly" by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  5. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created “on the fly” by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role. PMID:25331897

  6. Sputtered-sliced fabrication of kinoform zone plate for hard X-ray focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumoto, M.; Tamura, S.; Kamijo, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Awaji, M.; Takeuchi, A.; Takano, H.

    2003-03-01

    We are planning to develop a kinoform zone plate (ZP) for hard X-ray using a sputtered-sliced (SS) method with two materials (Cu/Al). The SS kinoform ZP is composed of a Cu/Al multilayer that is based on radial modulation of the refractive indices of deposition materials. The X-ray through the zones interferes constructively at the focal point. The kinoform ZP, therefore, has an advantage of high focusing efficiency. According to the our theoretical calculation, the focusing efficiency of the Cu/Al kinoform PZP is up to 86% in the 0~30 keV X-ray energy region, while one of the conventional Cu/Al multilayer Fresnel zone plate is up to 38%.

  7. Achromatic phase shifts utilizing dielectric plates for nulling interferometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. M.; Burge, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Schemes for detecting planets around other stars using interferometery have been developed which rely on a half wave phase delay to shift the central constructive fringe of an interferometer to a deep, destructive null fringe. To achieve the sensitivity and spectroscopy desired for exo-planets observations, such a null must be achromatic over a broad spectral region. One method for creating such a half wave phase delay achromatically involves the use of pairs of dielectric, plane parallel plates, analogous to the use of two types of glass in an achromatic lens. An analysis of the technique is presented with solutions using single plates to achieve null fringes to a cancellation of 10 exp -4 in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared for null. Solutions using two matched materials show that nulls to a depth of 10 exp -6 are achievable in 2 um bands in the 7-17 um regime, or to a depth of 10 exp -5 over the entire 7-17 um band. Experimental results using a single plate of BK7 in the visible spectrum verify the technique.

  8. Study of polarization properties of fiber-optics probes with use of a binary phase plate.

    PubMed

    Alferov, S V; Khonina, S N; Karpeev, S V

    2014-04-01

    We conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the distribution of the electric field components in the sharp focal domain when rotating a zone plate with a π-phase jump placed in the focused beam. Comparing the theoretical and experimental results for several kinds of near-field probes, an analysis of the polarization sensitivity of different types of metal-coated aperture probes is conducted. It is demonstrated that with increasing diameter of the non-metal-coated tip part there occurs an essential redistribution of sensitivity in favor of the transverse electric field components and an increase of the probe's energy throughput.

  9. Measurement of zone plate efficiencies in the extreme ultraviolet and applications to radiation monitors for absolute spectral emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, John; Holland, Glenn; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Tim; Feser, Michael; Feng, Yan; Kjornrattanawanich, Benjawan; Goray, Leonid

    2006-08-01

    The diffraction efficiencies of a Fresnel zone plate (ZP), fabricated by Xradia Inc. using the electron-beam writing technique, were measured using polarized, monochromatic synchrotron radiation in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range 3.4-22 nm. The ZP had 2 mm diameter, 3330 zones, 150 nm outer zone width, and a 1 mm central occulter. The ZP was supported by a 100 nm thick Si 3N 4 membrane. The diffraction patterns were recorded by CMOS imagers with phosphor coatings and with 5.2 μm or 48 μm pixels. The focused +n orders (n=1-4), the diverging -1 order, and the undiffracted 0 order were observed as functions of wavelength and off-axis tilt angle. Sub-pixel focusing of the +n orders was achieved. The measured efficiency in the +1 order was in the 5% to 30% range with the phase-shift enhanced efficiency occurring at 8.3 nm where the gold bars are partially transmitting. The +2 and higher order efficiencies were much lower than the +1 order efficiency. The efficiencies were constant when the zone plate was tilted by angles up to +/-1° from the incident radiation beam. This work indicates the feasibility and benefits of using zone plates to measure the absolute EUV spectral emissions from solar and laboratory sources: relatively high EUV efficiency in the focused +1 order, good out-of-band rejection resulting from the low higher-order efficiencies and the ZP focusing properties, insensitivity to (unfocused) visible light scattered by the ZP, flat response with off-axis angle, and insensitivity to the polarization of the radiation based on the ZP circular symmetry. EUV sensors with Fresnel zone plates potentially have many advantages over existing sensors intended to accurately measure absolute EUV emission levels, such as those implemented on the GOES N-P satellites that use transmission gratings which have off-axis sensitivity variations and poor out-of-band EUV and visible light rejection, and other solar and laboratory sensors using reflection gratings which

  10. Seismic evidence for deep fluid circulation in the overriding plate of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; Reynard, B.; Bodin, T.; Perrillat, J. P.; Debayle, E.

    2015-12-01

    In subduction zones, non-volcanic tremors are associated with fluid circulations (Obara, 2002). Their sources are often located on the interplate boundary (Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al, 2006; La Rocca, 2009), consistent with fluids released by the dehydration of subducted plates (Hacker et al., 2003). Reports of tremors in the overriding continental crust of several subduction zones in the world (Kao et al., 2005; Payero et al., 2008; Ide, 2012) suggest fluid circulation at shallower depths but potential fluid paths are poorly documented. Here we obtained seismic observations from receiver functions that evidence the close association between the shallow tremor zone, electrical conductivity, and tectonic features of the Cascadia overriding plate. A seismic discontinuity near 15 km depth in the crust of the overriding North American plate is attributed to the Conrad discontinuity. This interface is segmented, and its interruption is spatially correlated with conductive regions and shallow swarms of seismicity and non-volcanic tremors. These observations suggest that shallow fluid circulation, tremors and seismicity are controlled by fault zones limiting blocks of accreted terranes in the overriding plate (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). These zones constitute fluid "escape" routes that may contribute unloading fluid pressure on the megathrust. Obara, K. (2002). Science, 296, 1679-1681. Rogers, G., & Dragert, H. (2003). Science, 300, 1942-1943. Shelly, D. R., et al. (2006). Nature, 442, 188-191. La Rocca, M., et al. (2009). Science, 323, 620-623. Kao, H., et al. (2005). Nature, 436, 841-844. Payero, J. S., et al. (2008). Geophysical Research Letters, 35. Ide, S. (2012). Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 117. Brudzinski, M. R., & Allen, R. M. (2007). Geology, 35, 907-910.

  11. Microarray Cluster Analysis of Irradiated Growth Plate Zones Following Laser Microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Damron, Timothy A. Zhang Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Margulies, Bryan M.; Strauss, Judith A.; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Spadaro, Joseph A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Genes and pathways involved in early growth plate chondrocyte recovery after fractionated irradiation were sought as potential targets for selective radiorecovery modulation. Materials and Methods: Three groups of six 5-week male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fractionated irradiation to the right tibiae over 5 days, totaling 17.5 Gy, and then were killed at 7, 11, and 16 days after the first radiotherapy fraction. The growth plates were collected from the proximal tibiae bilaterally and subsequently underwent laser microdissection to separate reserve, perichondral, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones. Differential gene expression was analyzed between irradiated right and nonirradiated left tibia using RAE230 2.0 GeneChip microarray, compared between zones and time points and subjected to functional pathway cluster analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected results. Results: Each zone had a number of pathways showing enrichment after the pattern of hypothesized importance to growth plate recovery, yet few met the strictest criteria. The proliferative and hypertrophic zones showed both the greatest number of genes with a 10-fold right/left change at 7 days after initiation of irradiation and enrichment of the most functional pathways involved in bone, cartilage, matrix, or skeletal development. Six genes confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction to have early upregulation included insulin-like growth factor 2, procollagen type I alpha 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, fibromodulin, and aggrecan 1. Conclusions: Nine overlapping pathways in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones (skeletal development, ossification, bone remodeling, cartilage development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part) may play key roles in early growth plate radiorecovery.

  12. Evidence of lower-mantle slab penetration phases in plate motions.

    PubMed

    Goes, Saskia; Capitanio, Fabio A; Morra, Gabriele

    2008-02-21

    It is well accepted that subduction of the cold lithosphere is a crucial component of the Earth's plate tectonic style of mantle convection. But whether and how subducting plates penetrate into the lower mantle is the subject of continuing debate, which has substantial implications for the chemical and thermal evolution of the mantle. Here we identify lower-mantle slab penetration events by comparing Cenozoic plate motions at the Earth's main subduction zones with motions predicted by fully dynamic models of the upper-mantle phase of subduction, driven solely by downgoing plate density. Whereas subduction of older, intrinsically denser, lithosphere occurs at rates consistent with the model, younger lithosphere (of ages less than about 60 Myr) often subducts up to two times faster, while trench motions are very low. We conclude that the most likely explanation is that older lithosphere, subducting under significant trench retreat, tends to lie down flat above the transition to the high-viscosity lower mantle, whereas younger lithosphere, which is less able to drive trench retreat and deforms more readily, buckles and thickens. Slab thickening enhances buoyancy (volume times density) and thereby Stokes sinking velocity, thus facilitating fast lower-mantle penetration. Such an interpretation is consistent with seismic images of the distribution of subducted material in upper and lower mantle. Thus we identify a direct expression of time-dependent flow between the upper and lower mantle. PMID:18288192

  13. Circular multilayer zone plate for high-energy x-ray nano-imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Takahisa; Takano, Hidekazu; Konishi, Shigeki; Tsuji, Takuya; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Takenaka, Hisataka; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki

    2012-01-15

    A circular multilayer zone plate (MZP) was fabricated and its focusing performance was evaluated using 20-keV x-rays. MoSi{sub 2} and Si layers were alternately deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on a wire core; all the interfaces satisfied the Fresnel zone condition. The measured line spread function was converted to a point spread function by tomographic reconstruction. The results suggest that the MZP has the potential to realize the diffraction-limited resolving power, which is calculated to be 35 nm using the diffraction integral. Furthermore, scanning transmission microscopy using the MZP could resolve a 50-nm line-and-space pattern.

  14. 3D numerical modeling of subduction dynamics: plate stagnation and segmentation, and crustal advection in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Tajima, F.

    2012-04-01

    Water content in the mantle transition zone (MTZ) has been broadly debated in the Earth science community as a key issue for plate dynamics [e.g., Bercovici and Karato, 2003]. In this study, a systematic series of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation are performed in an attempt to verify two hypotheses for plate subduction with effects of deep water transport: (1) the small-scale behavior of subducted oceanic plate in the MTZ; and (2) the role of subducted crust in the MTZ. These hypotheses are postulated based on the seismic observations characterized by large-scale flattened high velocity anomalies (i.e., stagnant slabs) in the MTZ and discontinuity depth variations. The proposed model states that under wet conditions the subducted plate main body of peridotite (olivine rich) is abutted by subducted crustal materials (majorite rich) at the base of the MTZ. The computational domain of mantle convection is confined to 3D regional spherical-shell geometry with a thickness of 1000 km and a lateral extent of 10° × 30° in the latitudinal and longitudinal directions. A semi-dynamic model of subduction zone [Morishige et al., 2010] is applied to let the highly viscous, cold oceanic plate subduct. Weak (low-viscosity) fault zones (WFZs), which presumably correspond to the fault boundaries of large subduction earthquakes, are imposed on the top part of subducting plates. The phase transitions of olivine to wadsleyite and ringwoodite to perovskite+magnesiowüstite with Clapeyron slopes under both "dry" and "wet" conditions are considered based on recent high pressure experiments [e.g., Ohtani and Litasov, 2006]. Another recent experiment provides new evidence for lower-viscosity (weaker strength) of garnet-rich zones than the olivine dominant mantle under wet conditions [Katayama and Karato, 2008]. According to this, the effect of viscosity reduction of oceanic crust is considered under wet condition in the MTZ. Results show that there is a substantial difference

  15. Crustal Architecture at the Collision Zone Between Rivera and North American Plates at the Jalisco Block: Tsujal Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dañobeitia, Juanjo; Bartolomé, Rafael; Prada, Manel; Nuñez-Cornú, Francisco; Córdoba, Diego; Bandy, William L.; Estrada, F.; Cameselle, Alejandra L.; Nuñez, Diana; Castellón, Arturo; Alonso, José Luis; Mortera, Carlos; Ortiz, Modesto

    2016-09-01

    Processing and analysis of new multichannel seismic records, coincident with wide-angle seismic profiles, acquired in the framework of the TsuJal project allow us to investigate in detail the complex structure of the oceanic domain in the collision zone between Rivera Plate and Block Jalisco at its northern termination. The subducting Rivera Plate, which is overridden by the North American Plate-Jalisco Block, is clearly identified up to 21.5°N (just south of Maria Magdalena Island) as a two clear reflections that we interpret as the interplate and Moho discontinuities. North of the Tres Marias Islands the seismic images display a different tectonic scenario with structures that are consistent with large faulting and rifted margin. A two-dimensional velocity approach for the crustal geometry is achieved using joint refraction/reflection travel time tomography, the uncertainty of the results is assessed by means of Monte Carlo analysis. Our results show an average oceanic crustal thickness of 6-7 km with a moderate increase towards the Jalisco Block, an anomalous thick layers (~3.0 km) displaying a relatively low velocity (~5.5 km/s) underneath Maria Magdalena Rise, and an estimated Moho depth deeper than 15 km in the collision zone between Rivera Plate and Jalisco Block. We have also determined an anomalous crust on the western flank of the Tres Marias Islands, which may be related to the initial phases of continental breakup of the Baja California Peninsula and Mexico mainland. High-resolution bathymetry provides remarkable images of intensive slope instabilities marked by relatively large slides scars of more than 40 km2 extent, and mass-wasting deposits probably triggered by the intense seismicity in the area.

  16. Crustal Architecture at the Collision Zone Between Rivera and North American Plates at the Jalisco Block: Tsujal Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dañobeitia, Juanjo; Bartolomé, Rafael; Prada, Manel; Nuñez-Cornú, Francisco; Córdoba, Diego; Bandy, William L.; Estrada, F.; Cameselle, Alejandra L.; Nuñez, Diana; Castellón, Arturo; Alonso, José Luis; Mortera, Carlos; Ortiz, Modesto

    2016-10-01

    Processing and analysis of new multichannel seismic records, coincident with wide-angle seismic profiles, acquired in the framework of the TsuJal project allow us to investigate in detail the complex structure of the oceanic domain in the collision zone between Rivera Plate and Block Jalisco at its northern termination. The subducting Rivera Plate, which is overridden by the North American Plate-Jalisco Block, is clearly identified up to 21.5°N (just south of Maria Magdalena Island) as a two clear reflections that we interpret as the interplate and Moho discontinuities. North of the Tres Marias Islands the seismic images display a different tectonic scenario with structures that are consistent with large faulting and rifted margin. A two-dimensional velocity approach for the crustal geometry is achieved using joint refraction/reflection travel time tomography, the uncertainty of the results is assessed by means of Monte Carlo analysis. Our results show an average oceanic crustal thickness of 6-7 km with a moderate increase towards the Jalisco Block, an anomalous thick layers (~3.0 km) displaying a relatively low velocity (~5.5 km/s) underneath Maria Magdalena Rise, and an estimated Moho depth deeper than 15 km in the collision zone between Rivera Plate and Jalisco Block. We have also determined an anomalous crust on the western flank of the Tres Marias Islands, which may be related to the initial phases of continental breakup of the Baja California Peninsula and Mexico mainland. High-resolution bathymetry provides remarkable images of intensive slope instabilities marked by relatively large slides scars of more than 40 km2 extent, and mass-wasting deposits probably triggered by the intense seismicity in the area.

  17. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Observation of Wet Biological Specimen by Soft X-Ray Microscope with Zone Plates at UVSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Taniguchi, Mieko; Shimanuki, Yoshio; Sugiyama, Masaru; Ohba, Akira; Kihara, Hiroshi

    1992-11-01

    With an environmental chamber (wet cell) using polypropylene foils as windows, wet specimens were observed at a wavelength of 4.6 nm with a zone plate imaging X-ray microscope installed at the beamline 8 A of UVSOR (synchrotron radiation facility at Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan). Images of spicule of trepang, human blood cells and cultured protoplast of plant cell stained by methyl mercury were observed with good contrast.

  19. Slab Deformation in the Mantle Transition Zone: The Effect of Plate Age and Strength Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, S. D. B.; Garel, F.; Davies, R.; Davies, J. H.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The deformation encountered by subducted tectonic plates at the base of the upper mantle influences Earth's thermal, chemical, and tectonic evolution. Yet the mechanisms responsible for the wide range of imaged slab morphologies, either stagnating in the transition zone or penetrating into the lower mantle, remain debated. We use 2-D thermo-mechanical models of a two-plate subduction system, modeled with the finite-element, adaptive-mesh code Fluidity. We implement a temperature- and stress-dependent rheology, and viscosity increases 30-fold from upper to lower mantle. Trench position evolves freely in response to plate dynamics. Such an approach self-consistently captures feedbacks between temperature, density, flow, strength and deformation. Our results indicate that key controls on subduction dynamics and slab morphology are: (i) the evolution of slab strength; and (ii) the slab's ability to induce trench motion. We build a regime diagram that distinguishes four subduction styles: (1) a "vertical folding" mode with stationary trench; (2) young slabs that are "horizontally deflected" along the 660-km deep viscosity jump ; (3) an inclined slab morphology, resulting from strong trench retreat (old slabs and thinner overriding plates); and (4) a two-stage mode, displaying bent (rolled-over) slabs at the end of upper-mantle descent, that subsequently unbend and achieve inclined morphologies, with late trench retreat (strong overriding plates). We find that the interplay between trench motion and slab deformation at depth dictates the subduction style, both being controlled by slab strength. We show that all seismically observed slab morphologies in the transition zone can arise just by changing the subducting-plate ages. However, to understand present-day slab morphologies, we have to analyse subduction history rather than just current age at the trench.

  20. Plate kinematics, slab shape and back-arc stress: A comparison between laboratory models and current subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Lallemand, S.

    2007-04-01

    A combination of statistical studies on present-day subduction zones and three-dimensional (3D) laboratory models is performed with the aim to clarify the way that plate kinematics control the geometry of the slab and the overriding plate deformation in subduction zones. In 3D laboratory models, the analogue of a two layer linearly viscous lithosphere-upper mantle system is achieved by means of silicon putty glucose syrup tank experiment. The subducting and overriding plate velocities are systematically changed by exploring the variability field of natural plate kinematics. Both statistical and modelling approaches recognize the importance of overriding plate motion on subduction process behavior: (1) trenches migrate at a rate close to the overriding plate motion, but always move slower than the overriding plates. The mechanism at work is a direct consequence of "slab anchoring" opposed by both lithosphere and mantle viscous resistance and is responsible for overriding plate deformation and slab geometry variability. (2) An overriding plate shortens when the overriding plate moves toward the trench and conditions that are favourable for overriding plate extension are created when the overriding plate moves away from the trench. (3) Shallow and steep dips are found if the overriding plate moves toward and away from the trench, respectively.

  1. Performance characterization of a broadband vector Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Otten, Gilles P P L; Snik, Frans; Kenworthy, Matthew A; Miskiewicz, Matthew N; Escuti, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges for the direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is the suppression of the diffracted halo from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that suppress this diffracted halo. The Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph modifies the pupil-plane phase with an anti-symmetric pattern to suppress diffraction over a 180 degree region from 2 to 7 λ/D and achieves a mean raw contrast of 10(-4) in this area, independent of the tip-tilt stability of the system. Current APP coronagraphs implemented using classical phase techniques are limited in bandwidth and suppression region geometry (i.e. only on one side of the star). In this paper, we introduce the vector-APP (vAPP) whose phase pattern is implemented through the vector phase imposed by the orientation of patterned liquid crystals. Beam-splitting according to circular polarization states produces two, complementary PSFs with dark holes on either side. We have developed a prototype vAPP that consists of a stack of three twisting liquid crystal layers to yield a bandwidth of 500 to 900 nm. We characterize the properties of this device using reconstructions of the pupil-plane pattern, and of the ensuing PSF structures. By imaging the pupil between crossed and parallel polarizers we reconstruct the fast axis pattern, transmission, and retardance of the vAPP, and use this as input for a PSF model. This model includes aberrations of the laboratory set-up, and matches the measured PSF, which shows a raw contrast of 10(-3.8) between 2 and 7 λ/D in a 135 degree wedge. The vAPP coronagraph is relatively easy to manufacture and can be implemented together with a broadband quarter-wave plate and Wollaston prism in a pupil wheel in high-contrast imaging instruments. The liquid crystal patterning technique permits the application of extreme phase patterns with deeper contrasts inside the dark holes, and the multilayer liquid crystal achromatization technique enables unprecedented spectral bandwidths

  2. Surgical results of zones I and II fifth metatarsal base fractures using hook plates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Kyung Tai; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Jun Young; Kim, Hwa Rye

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of fifth metatarsal base fractures using a mini-hook plate. Seventeen patients with Lawrence classification zones I (n=6) and II (n=11) fifth metatarsal base fractures with an initial fracture displacement more than 2 mm and a small (less than 2 mm) comminuted avulsion fragment were included in the study. Patients treated using a mini-hook plate fixation method were prospectively evaluated. A mini-hook tubular plate was designed so that the last hole functioned as a hook for the application of compression force, grasping of comminuted fragments, and rotational stabilization in metatarsal base fractures. Clinically, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) midfoot scale questionnaire was administered preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Union was determined by 3-dimensional computed tomography as clinically nontender callus formation. Time to union and return to sports were calculated. Mean AOFAS midfoot scale scores were 48±8 points (range, 35-60 points) preoperatively and 91±7 points (range, 85-100 points) 1 year postoperatively. Mean time to complete union, as determined by computed tomography, was 54±11 days (range, 38-74 days). All patients reported returning to prior activities of daily living at a mean of 74±10 days (range, 63-98 days). One patient reported hardware irritation secondary to inadequate plate bending and screw curving. Mini-hook plate fixation is an effective alternative surgical method for zones I and II displaced fifth metatarsal base fractures or comminuted small fragment fractures.

  3. Soft X-Ray Microscopy at HZB: Zone Plate Development and Imaging Using the Third Order of Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, S.; Guttmann, P.; Werner, S.; Schneider, G.

    2011-09-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) operates a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) in the soft x-ray photon energy range with an energy resolution up to E/ΔE = 104 [1]. An approach to achieve ultrahigh spatial resolution with conventional, standard zone plate optics is to employ higher orders of diffraction of the zone plate objective [2]. In this paper, we demonstrate that 11-nm lines and spaces of a multilayer test structure are clearly resolved by the x-ray microscope using the third order of diffraction of a zone plate objective with 20-nm outermost zone width. The disadvantage of high-order imaging is an about one order of magnitude lower diffraction efficiency of the used zone plates employed in the third order compared to the first order of diffraction. In addition, the measured background signal in the TXM images is no longer negligible. Therefore, we worked on the fabrication of zone plates with sub-20-nm outermost zone width to increase the spatial resolution in the first order of diffraction. A new high-resolution 100-keV e-beam lithography system from VISTEC, which was recently installed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, makes these developments possible. Initial results on zone plates with an outermost zone width down to 15 nm exposed with the new e-beam system are presented. Furthermore, the contrast transfer function of the transmission x-ray microscope operating in partial coherence mode is measured by using the first and third diffraction order of the zone plate objective.

  4. Soft X-Ray Microscopy at HZB: Zone Plate Development and Imaging Using the Third Order of Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rehbein, S.; Guttmann, P.; Werner, S.; Schneider, G.

    2011-09-09

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) operates a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) in the soft x-ray photon energy range with an energy resolution up to E/{Delta}E = 10{sup 4}. An approach to achieve ultrahigh spatial resolution with conventional, standard zone plate optics is to employ higher orders of diffraction of the zone plate objective. In this paper, we demonstrate that 11-nm lines and spaces of a multilayer test structure are clearly resolved by the x-ray microscope using the third order of diffraction of a zone plate objective with 20-nm outermost zone width. The disadvantage of high-order imaging is an about one order of magnitude lower diffraction efficiency of the used zone plates employed in the third order compared to the first order of diffraction. In addition, the measured background signal in the TXM images is no longer negligible. Therefore, we worked on the fabrication of zone plates with sub-20-nm outermost zone width to increase the spatial resolution in the first order of diffraction. A new high-resolution 100-keV e-beam lithography system from VISTEC, which was recently installed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, makes these developments possible. Initial results on zone plates with an outermost zone width down to 15 nm exposed with the new e-beam system are presented. Furthermore, the contrast transfer function of the transmission x-ray microscope operating in partial coherence mode is measured by using the first and third diffraction order of the zone plate objective.

  5. Soft X-ray Zone Plate Microscopy to 10 nm Resolution with XM-1 at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Chao Weilun; Attwood, David T.; Anderson, Erik H.; Harteneck, Bruce D.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2007-01-19

    Soft x-ray zone plate microscopy provides a unique combination of capabilities that complement those of electron and scanning probe microscopies. Tremendous efforts are taken worldwide to achieve sub-10 nm resolution, which will permit extension of x-ray microscopy to a broader range of nanosciences and nanotechnologies. In this paper, the overlay nanofabrication technique is described, which permits zone width of 15 nm and below to be fabricated. The fabrication results of 12 nm zone plates, and the stacking of identical zone patterns for higher aspect ratio, are discussed.

  6. Design of an advanced two-phase capillary cold plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, D. R.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Ku, J.

    1986-01-01

    The functional principles and implementation of capillary pumped loop (CPL) two phase heat transport system for various elements of the Space Station program are described. Circulation of the working fluid by the surface-tension forces in a fine-pore capillary wick is the core principle of CPL systems. The liquid, usually NH3 at the moment, is changed into a vapor by heat absorption at one end of the loop, and the vapor is carrried back along the wick by the surface tension within the wick. NASA specifications and the results of mechanical and thermal tests for prototype cold plate and the capillary pump designs are outlined. The CPL is targeted for installation on free-flying platforms, attached payloads, and power subsystem thermal control systems.

  7. The Role of Bending Resistance at Subduction Zones on the Force Balance of Plate Tectonics through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, C. P.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2001-12-01

    The temperature-dependent rheology of mantle rock is such that cold lithosphere should have an effective viscosity several orders of magnitude greater than that of the underlying mantle. As a result, the deformation required to bend plates at subduction zones may have a slowing effect on plate motions comparable to the slowing associated with the deformation of the shearing mantle interior. We examine the force balance of all plates during the Cenozoic, and include the effects of bending resistance at subduction zones. The added resistance provided by bending is added via a parameterization derived from theory and supported by numerical calculations (e.g., Conrad and Hager, 1999). The global force balance is achieved by requiring that viscous resisting forces - including those associated with plate bending at subduction zones - and plate driving forces be exactly equal. In our model, driving torques arise largely from the flow induced by subducted buoyancy over the last 200 my (``slab pull''), and from the lateral density contrasts of the oceanic lithosphere as it ages (``ridge push''). The predicted velocities can be compared to global reconstructions in the Cenozoic. In this way, a suite of mantle viscosity and lithosphere bending models can be examined, and the importance of lithosphere bending to the global force balance on plates evaluated. Because, for a viscous plate, the bending resistance depends on the cube of the thickness of the plate, older, thicker plates exert a strong influence on the rate of plate motions. Indeed, if the plate viscosity is about two orders of magnitude stronger than that of the upper mantle, the bending resistance can effectively control plate motions. In addition, because the thickness of subducting plates evolves over time, the inclusion of the bending resistance in the global force balance provides a source of time-dependent behavior by which plates can rapidly change their direction and speed, as is observed in the geologic

  8. High-efficiency multilevel zone plates for keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fabrizio, E.; Romanato, F.; Gentili, M.; Cabrini, S.; Kaulich, B.; Susini, J.; Barrett, R.

    1999-10-01

    The development of high brilliance X-ray sources coupled with advances in manufacturing technologies has led to significant improvements in submicrometre probes for spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. The generation of a small beam spot size is commonly based on three principles: total reflection (as used in optical elements involving mirrors or capillaries), refraction (such as in refractive lenses) and diffraction. The latter effect is employed in Bragg-Fresnel or Soret lenses, commonly known as Fresnel zone plate lenses. These lenses currently give the best spatial resolution, but are traditionally limited to rather soft X-rays-at high energies, their use is still limited by their efficiency. Here we report the fabrication of high-efficiency, high-contrast gold and nickel multistep (quaternary) Fresnel zone plates using electron beam lithography. We achieve a maximum efficiency of 55% for the nickel plate at 7keV. In addition to their high efficiency, the lenses offer the advantages of low background signal and effective reduction of unwanted diffraction orders. We anticipate that these lenses should have a significant impact on techniques such as microscopy, micro-fluorescence and micro-diffraction, which require medium resolution (500-100nm) and high flux at fixed energies.

  9. The margin between Senja and Spitsbergen fracture zones: Implications from plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, Annik M.; Eldholm, Olav; Sundvor, Eirik

    1982-10-01

    Analysis of multichannel seismic data from the continental margin off Svalbard between the Senja and Spitsbergen fracture zones suggests that the transition between continental and oceanic crust is located at or close to the Hornsund Fault Zone. In the Late Paleocene/Early Eoeene (57 m.y.) the region between Svalbard and Northeast-Greenland was subjected to regional shear movements associated with a transform system between the young Lofoten-Greenland Basin and the Arctic Ocean. Approximately 50 m.y. ago the spreading axis migrated to the northeast creating a deep basin north of the Greenland-Senja Fracture Zone forming the passive margin between Bear Island and 76.5°N. North of 76.5°N the regional transform was maintained. At the time of the main reorganization of relative plate motion (36 m.y.) the northern margin evolved. A continental fragment was possibly cut off from the Svalbard margin forming a small microcontinent. The microcontinent appears as the submarine ridge which has been associated with the Hovgaard Fracture Zone. It is suggested that the sediments west of the Hornsund Fault Zone are not older than Eocene in the south and mid-Oligocene in the north. The position of the spreading axis has greatly influenced the margin sedimentation.

  10. Pore pressure evolution at the plate interface along the Cascadia subduction zone from the trench to the ETS transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Rempel, A. W.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pore fluid pressures in subduction zones are a primary control on fault strength and slip dynamics. Numerous studies document elevated pore pressures in the outer wedge along several margins. Seismic observations and the occurrence of non-volcanic tremor provide additional evidence for the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressures at the plate interface far down-dip from the trench (~35 km depth). Here we use numerical models in one and two dimensions to evaluate the pore pressure and compaction state of sediments on the subducting Juan de Fuca plate in Cascadia from the trench to the ETS zone. 2-D models allow pressure to diffuse vertically and also laterally normal to strike of the megathrust; 1-D models simulate only vertical diffusion. Model parameters are chosen with reference to two strike-normal profiles: one through central Oregon and one through the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. We examine temporal variations in sediment input to the trench and consider implications for fault strength and permeability as well as the down-dip extent to which compactive dewatering can be considered a significant fluid source. In 1-D, we use a general and fully nonlinear model of sediment compaction derived without making any assumptions regarding stress-strain or porosity-permeability relations and allowing finite strains. In contrast, most previous models of fluid flow in subduction zones have used linear models of diffusion that rely on assumptions of constant sediment permeability and infinitesimal strains for their formulation. Our nonlinear finite-strain model remains valid at greater depths, where stresses and strains are large. Boundary conditions in 1-D are constrained by pore pressure estimates along the megathrust fault that are based on seismic velocities (e.g. Tobin and Saffer, 2010) and data from consolidation tests conducted on sediments gathered during ODP Leg 204 (Tan, 2001). Initial conditions rely on input sediment thickness; while sediment thickness

  11. HPTLC Plate Blotting for Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Analytes Separated on a Wettable Phase Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; Stankovich, Joseph J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, susanne

    2012-01-01

    A blotting method that transfers analytes separated on wettable HPTLC plates to a hydrophobic reversed-phase C8 HPLTC plate suitable for analysis with a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system was described and demonstrated. The simple blotting procedure transfers the analyte from the wettable plate to the topmost surface of a rigidly backed, easy-to-mount hydrophobic substrate that already has been proven viable for analysis by this sampling probe/mass spectrometry system. The utility of the approach was demonstrated by the analysis of a four-component peptide mixture originally separated on a ProteoChrom HPTLC cellulose sheet and then blotted to the reversed phase HPTLC plate.

  12. Effects of low-spatial-frequency response of phase plates on TEM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Images of simple objects produced by a perfect lens and a phase plate have been calculated by use of Abbe theory for Foucault, Hilbert and Zernike phase plates. The results show that with a Zernike plate, white outlines and ringing like those observed previously can be caused by the beam hole, which limits the low-spatial-frequency response of the system even when the lens behaves perfectly. When the change of phase added by the phase plate is distributed over a range of radius rather than a simple step, the unwanted effects are substantially reduced.

  13. Geometry of the Philippine Sea plate subducting beneath the southwestern Nankai seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, A.; Kodaira, S.; Fujie, G.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Kashiwase, K.; Fujimori, H.; Kaneda, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. Possibility of a megathrust earthquake along the Nankai Trough from Tokai to the Hyuga-nada, east off the Kyushu Island, Japan, is recently pointed out. To understand rupture synchronization and segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake, it is important to know the geometry of the subducting Philippine Sea plate along the Nankai Trough. To obtain the deep subduction structure from the Hyuga-nada (off the Kyushu) to off the Shikoku area, the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle seismic study was conducted in 2008 and 2009. In this study, 160 and 200 ocean bottom seismographs were deployed, and a tuned airgun system (7800 cu. in.) shot every 200m along 11 profiles. Long-term observation was conducted for ~9 months by 21 OBSs off the Shikoku area. This research is part of ‘Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes’ funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Structural images beneath the Hyuga-nada clearly indicate the structural variation of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate from the subducting oceanic crust of Nankai Trough to the thick crust of the Kyushu Palau Ridge. The structural boundary between the oceanic crust and the Kyushu Palau Ridge is considered to lead to the southwestern rim of the coseismic slip zone of the 1968 Hyuga-nada earthquake (Mw7.5) (Yagi et al., 1999). This structural boundary may control the southwestern end of the megathrust earthquake of the Nankai Trough from the Tokai to Hyuga-nada. Moreover, geometry of the Philippine Sea plate estimated based on the structural images is shown in this presentation. Previously obtained seismic data is also used to make precise and detailed geometry of the subducting plate.

  14. Progress on multi-order hard x-ray imaging with multilayer zone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterhoff, Markus; Döring, Florian; Eberl, Christian; Wilke, Robin; Wallentin, Jesper; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Sprung, Michael; Salditt, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Hard x-ray focusing and imaging on the few nano metre scale has gained a lot of attraction in the last couple of years. Thanks to new developments in fabrication and inspection of high-N.A. optics, focusing of hard x-rays has caught up with the focusing performance for soft x-rays. Here we review the latest imaging experiments of the Göttinger Multilayer zone plate collaboration, summarising our route from 1D to 2D lenses for different hard x-ray energies, and recapitulate recent progress on a journey from focusing to imaging.

  15. Beam propagation modeling of modified volume Fresnel zone plates fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Srisungsitthisunti, Pornsak; Ersoy, Okan K; Xu, Xianfan

    2009-01-01

    Light diffraction by volume Fresnel zone plates (VFZPs) is simulated by the Hankel transform beam propagation method (Hankel BPM). The method utilizes circularly symmetric geometry and small step propagation to calculate the diffracted wave fields by VFZP layers. It is shown that fast and accurate diffraction results can be obtained with the Hankel BPM. The results show an excellent agreement with the scalar diffraction theory and the experimental results. The numerical method allows more comprehensive studies of the VFZP parameters to achieve higher diffraction efficiency.

  16. Angular spectrum simulation of X-ray focusing by Fresnel zone plates

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Wojcik, Michael; Diaz, Ana; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Kewish, Cameron M.; Wang, Steve; David, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A computing simulation routine to model any type of circularly symmetric diffractive X-ray element has been implemented. The wavefield transmitted beyond the diffractive structures is numerically computed by the angular spectrum propagation method to an arbitrary propagation distance. Cylindrical symmetry is exploited to reduce the computation and memory requirements while preserving the accuracy of the numerical calculation through a quasi-discrete Hankel transform algorithm, an approach described by Guizar-Sicairos & Gutierrez-Vega [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, (2004 ▶), 21, 53–58]. In particular, the code has been used to investigate the requirements for the stacking of two high-resolution Fresnel zone plates with an outermost zone width of 20 nm. PMID:23592617

  17. Water, oceanic fracture zones and the lubrication of subducting plate boundaries—insights from seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Collier, Jenny S.; Verdon, James P.; Blundy, Jon; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Massin, Frederic; Bouin, Marie-Paule

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between subduction processes and related seismicity for the Lesser Antilles Arc using the Gutenberg-Richter law. This power law describes the earthquake-magnitude distribution, with the gradient of the cumulative magnitude distribution being commonly known as the b-value. The Lesser Antilles Arc was chosen because of its along-strike variability in sediment subduction and the transition from subduction to strike-slip movement towards its northern and southern ends. The data are derived from the seismicity catalogues from the Seismic Research Centre of The University of the West Indies and the Observatoires Volcanologiques et Sismologiques of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and consist of subcrustal events primarily from the slab interface. The b-value is found using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for a maximum-likelihood straight line-fitting routine. We investigate spatial variations in b-values using a grid-search with circular cells as well as an along-arc projection. Tests with different algorithms and the two independent earthquake cataloges provide confidence in the robustness of our results. We observe a strong spatial variability of the b-value that cannot be explained by the uncertainties. Rather than obtaining a simple north-south b-value distribution suggestive of the dominant control on earthquake triggering being water released from the sedimentary cover on the incoming American Plates, or a b-value distribution that correlates with on the obliquity of subduction, we obtain a series of discrete, high b-value `bull's-eyes' along strike. These bull's-eyes, which indicate stress release through a higher fraction of small earthquakes, coincide with the locations of known incoming oceanic fracture zones on the American Plates. We interpret the results in terms of water being delivered to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone in the vicinity of fracture zones providing lubrication and thus changing the character of the

  18. Rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Tikoff, Basil; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Newman, Julie; Titus, Sarah J.; Withers, Anthony C.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-04-01

    How well constrained is the rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault systems? Further, how do lithospheric layers, with rheologically distinct behaviors, interact within the strike-slip fault zones? To address these questions, we present rheological observations from the mantle sections of two lithospheric-scale, strike-slip fault zones. Xenoliths from ˜40 km depth (970-1100 ° C) beneath the San Andreas fault system (SAF) provide critical constraints on the mechanical stratification of the lithosphere in this continental transform fault. Samples from the Bogota Peninsula shear zone (BPSZ, New Caledonia), which is an exhumed oceanic transform fault, provide insights on lateral variations in mantle strength and viscosity across the fault zone at a depth corresponding to deformation temperatures of ˜900 ° C. Olivine recrystallized grain size piezometry suggests that the shear stress in the SAF upper mantle is 5-9 MPa and in the BPSZ is 4-10 MPa. Thus, the mantle strength in both fault zones is comparable to the crustal strength (˜10 MPa) of seismogenic strike-slip faults in the SAF system. Across the BPSZ, shear stress increases from 4 MPa in the surrounding rocks to 10 MPa in the mylonites, which comprise the core of the shear zone. Further, the BPSZ is characterized by at least one order of magnitude difference in the viscosity between the mylonites (1018 Paṡs) and the surrounding rocks (1019 Paṡs). Mantle viscosity in both the BPSZ mylonites and the SAF (7.0ṡ1018-3.1ṡ1020 Paṡs) is relatively low. To explain our observations from these two strike-slip fault zones, we propose the "lithospheric feedback" model in which the upper crust and lithospheric mantle act together as an integrated system. Mantle flow controls displacement and the upper crust controls the stress magnitude in the system. Our stress data combined with data that are now available for the middle and lower crustal sections of other transcurrent fault

  19. High-frequency Pn,Sn phases recorded by ocean bottom seismometers on the Cocos plate

    SciTech Connect

    McCreery, C.S.

    1981-05-01

    Data from ocean bottom seismometers located on the Cocos plate indicate that high-frequency Pn,Sn phases are generated by earthquakes along the subducting margin of that plate and are propagated across the plate. The Sn phase appears to be severely attenuated as it approaches the ridge crest. Estimates of Pn velocity are lower than previous extimates for western Pacific paths, which may indicate a relationship between Pn,Sn velocity and lithospheric age. High frequencies found in these phases suggest that Q for Pn,Sn propagation across the Cocos plate is similar to that for the western Pacific.

  20. Analysis of Stress Field in Caribean Continental Plate - Southern Costa Rica zone - from CMT Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevallos, I.; Quintero, R.; Jimenez, W.

    2007-12-01

    During the of period 1984 2007, 51 earthquakes were registered with magnitudes above 5.1 mb in southern Costa Rica. Depth distribution of hypocenters shows shallow (0 20 km) earthquakes located in continental area; intermediate depth hypocenters (20 60 km) corresponding to subduction of the Coco plate under the Caribean plate; and just one earthquake have focus under 60 km depth. We choose hypocenters shallower than 100 km because our goal is to study intraplate stresses. Centroid Moment Tensor solutions for subduction zone earthquakes have inverse fault mechanism. But, in continental area there are evidences of strike slip and normal fault mechanisms. Direction of main stress (σ3) at the southern continental zone is NE-SW; in the Pacific ocean border region, the main stresses are oriented parallel to the coast line; inside the valley region, mechanisms are predominantly strike slip with σ1 in the near N-S direction. This is a complex stress field, with rotation of main stresses in a short space. σ1 is vertical in some continental areas due to influence of elevated terrain. Stress axis paralell to coast line maybe also due to gravitational body force.

  1. Role of the Eastern California Shear Zone in accommodating Pacific-North American Plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, Roy K.; Travis, Christopher J.

    1990-08-01

    The newly recognized Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) of the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has played a major, but previously underappreciated role in accommodating the dextral shear between the Pacific and North American plates in late Cenozoic time. Comparison of integrated net slip along the shear zone with motion values across the entire transform boundary indicates that between 9% and 23% of the total relative plate motion has occurred along the ECSZ since its probable inception ˜10-6 Ma. Long-term integrated shear along the ECSZ (6-12 mm yr-1) is similar to historic measurements (6.7±1.3 mm yr-1). Time-space patterns of faulting suggest that shear was concentrated in the eastern part of the Mojave Desert block and Death Valley during late Miocene and early Pleistocene time, but that the locus of faulting in the south-central Mojave jumped westward between 1.5 and 0.7 Ma.

  2. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Descending subducted slabs affect both plate tectonics at the surface and overall mantle flow (e.g. Conrad and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2002). For time-dependent numerical models, the potential evolution of these slabs, ranging from immediate penetration into the lower mantle to prior buckling and stagnation, are affected by parameters such as the plate age, the viscosity jump into the lower mantle, the presence of phase transitions, trench motion and the chosen governing equation approximation (e.g. Billen and Hirth, 2007). Similarly, the overall deviatoric stress within the slab, especially where modified by the phase transitions, may explain the uneven distribution of deep earthquakes with depth (e.g. Bina, 1997). Better understanding of these processes may arise from a more realistic 2-D model that is fully-dynamic, with an overriding plate, freely-moving trench, compositionally-layered slab and seven major phase transitions, in addition to using the compressible (TALA) form of the governing equations. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, this study aims to test the latest data and encourage further mineralogical research. We will present fully-dynamic models, which explore the importance of the phase transitions, especially those that have been previously excluded such as the wadsleyite to ringwoodite and the pyroxene and garnet phase transitions. These phase transitions, coupled with the modeled compositionally distinct crust, harzburgite, and pyrolite lithosphere layers, may produce new large-scale dynamic behavior not seen in past numerical models, as well as stress variations within the slab related to deep slab seismicity. Feedback from the compositionally complex slab to the dynamic trench may provide further insight on the mechanics of slab stagnation and behavior in the upper and lower mantle. Billen, M. I., and G. Hirth, Rheologic controls on slab dynamics, Geochemistry, Geophysics and Geosystems, 8 (Q08012

  3. Wave transfer matrix for a spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Rumala, Yisa S

    2015-05-10

    The wave transfer matrix (WTM) is applied to calculating various characteristics of a spiral phase plate (SPP) for the first time to our knowledge. This approach provides a more convenient and systematic approach to calculating properties of a multilayered SPP device. In particular, it predicts the optical wave characteristics on the input and output plane of the device when the SPP is fabricated on a substrate of the same refractive index as the SPP as well as on a substrate of a different refractive index compared to the SPP. The dependence of the parameters on the input laser frequency is studied in detail for a low finesse SPP etalon device for both cases. The equations derived from the WTM are used to show that a variation in input laser frequency causes the optical intensity pattern on the output plane to rotate, while preserving the topology of the optical vortex, i.e., the variation in laser frequency has a minimal effect on the parameters describing the azimuthal intensity modulation and orbital angular momentum content of the beam. In addition, the equations predict the presence of longitudinal modes in the SPP device.

  4. Elasticity of Hydrous Phases in Subduction Zones- Geophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Mainprice, D.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, subduction zones are region associated with earthquakes and volcanic activities, both involving risk to local populations. These processes are intimately related to the thermodynamic stability and instabilty of hydrous phases that are subducted with the down going slab. These phases sequestrate several wt % of water in their crystallographic structure and can account for significant proportion of the hydrogen budget of the upper mantle , transition zone and perhaps the top of the lower mantle. In order to quantify the degree of mantle hydration, we need to have a good understanding of the elastic properties of layered hydrous phases, the effects of temperature, and pressure and relate them to seismological observables, such as the velocity and its anisotropy. Using first principle simulations, we have investigated several layered hydrous phases, including the important minerals antigorite, talc, and chlorite. These results are complementary to the recent experimental Brillouin Scattering results at ambient conditions. Based on the full elastic constant tensor we note that these hydrous phases have significant shear wave anisotropy and often have unusual pressure dependence of the anisotropy. Together with elasticity data, thermodynamic predictions of phase stability and experimental plastic deformation studies it is apparent that these layered hydrous phases could account for the large delay times observed in certain subduction zone settings, such as Ryukyu trench. Acknowledgement- MM is supported by the US National Science Foundation grant (EAR-1250477). MM acknowledges computing resources (request # EAR130015) from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number OCI-1053575.

  5. A Bayesian Approach for Apparent Inter-plate Coupling in the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Gonzalez, G.; Norabuena, E. O.

    2010-12-01

    We aim to characterize the extent of apparent plate coupling on the subduction zone megathrust with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology, inferring relationships between apparent coupling and the rupture zone of big earthquakes, as well as the implications for earthquake and tsunami hazard. Unlike previous studies, we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, allowing us to completely characterize the model parameter space by searching a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models instead of seeking a single optimum model. Two important features of the Bayesian approach are the possibility to easily implement any kind of physically plausible a priori information and to perform the inversion without regularization, other than that imposed by the way in which we parameterize the forward model. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we can estimate the probability of apparent coupling (Pc) along the plate interface that is consistent with a priori information (e.g., approximate rake of back-slip) and available geodetic measurements. More generally, the Bayesian approach adopted here is applicable to any region and eventually would allow one to evaluate the spatial relationship between various inferred distributions of fault behavior (e.g., seismic rupture, postseismic creep, and apparent interseismic coupling) in a quantifiable manner. We apply this methodology to evaluate the state of apparent inter-seismic coupling in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction margin (12 S - 25 S). As observational constraints, we use previously published horizontal velocities from campaign GPS [Kendrick et al., 2001, 2006] as well as 3 component velocities from a recently established continuous GPS network in the region (CAnTO). We compare results from both joint and independent use of these data sets. We obtain patch like features for Pc with higher values located above 60 km

  6. A mega shear zone in the Central Range of Taiwan and it's implication for the Late Mesozoic subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D. C.; Lin, C. W.

    2012-04-01

    The metamorphic basement "Tananao Complex" exposed in the eastern flank of the Central Range of Taiwan. The ancient Asian continental margin deposited a thick sequence of sandstone, shale, limestone and volcanic rocks that was the protolith of Tananao Complex. In Late Mesozoic Era, the thick sequence of rocks was subjected to several phases of metamorphism and deformation to form the pair metamorphic belts which were the western Tailuko Belt and the eastern Yuli Belt. The Tailuko belt is composed of phyllite, quartzite, quartz-mica schist, meta-conglomerate, gneiss, meta-basite, amphibolite, serpentinite, marble and meta-chert, etc. The Yuli belt is composed of a monotonous assemblage of quartz-mica schist, subordinate meta-basite and serpentinite, etc. It is believed that the boundary of the Tailuko belt and the Yuli belt is a large fault, but the field evidence of the fault has never been found. In this study, meso-scale field investigation of the lithologies and rock fabrics indicate that a mega shear zone, called "The Daguan shear zone", separated the Tailuko belt from the Yuli belt. The Daguan shear zone is a NNE trending and west dipping mega shear zone which is mainly composed of mylonitic dark gray quartz-mica schist and mica schist, intercalated with 1 to 2 centimeters thick of elongated meta-conglomerate band. The shear zone is composed of numerous meso-scale ductile shear zones. Additionally, the shaer zone is characterized by abundant varied quartz veins that have been refolded to lenticular or pod shape and nearly parallel to S2 cleavage. Compaed to the existing geological information of the Central Range, we believe that the Daguan shear zone played a role as the boundary of the subduction zone which the paleo-Pacific Plate subducted into the Eurasian Plate in Late Mesozoic Era.

  7. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  8. Floating zone crystal growth and phase equilibria - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeyuki; Kitamura, Kenji

    1992-06-01

    The thermal-imaging floating zone technique can be used to grow crystals of yttrium iron garnet aluminum-doped yttrium orthoferrite and magnetite, which represent peritectic compounds, solid-solution crytals, and atmosphere-sensitive materials, respectively. The reactions involved in floating zone crystal growth are explained on the basis of phase diagrams. A review of crystal growth reports, including unpublished findings by the present authors, demonstrates how the crystallization processes, the reaction with the ambient atmosphere, and the composition variation in the obtained crystals can be explained or controlled on the basis of phase equilibrium. The floating zone technique is applicable to a variety of materials and remains a handy tool for materials research; however, its industrial application may be limited.

  9. Seismic Probing of the Base of a Tectonic Plate from Subduction Zone to Trench Outer Rise: Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kent, G. M.; Lamb, S. H.; Savage, M. K.; Stern, T. A.; Stratford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the base of a tectonic plate (LAB) is the 3rd dimension of plate tectonics. Recent seismic studies of the LAB have revealed planar features that show very different characteristics. In the oceans, the top of the S-wave low velocity zone shows a systematic deepening with plate age that fits plate-cooling models. However, the change in radial anisotropy has a markedly constant depth of ~70 km, regardless of plate age. A recent land-based study (SAHKE 2) of the subducted Pacific Plate in the southern Hikurangi margin has imaged a pair of distinct reflectors defining a ~10 km thick channel parallel to and ~70 km below the top of the ~15° dipping plate. Low velocities indicate that the channel is a zone of partial melt or high volatile content, acting as a weak base to the plate. Receiver function studies along the Japan margin have also imaged layers at these depths, parallel to the top of the plate and dipping up to 45°. We propose probing the base of the tectonic plate by tracing potential LAB seismic reflectors from their dipping portions in the subduction zone to where they bend in the trench outer rise. If the seismically identified boundary represents a 'frozen-in' feature, created at the mid ocean ridge, then it will remain parallel to the top of the plate, and its nature will remain unchanged as it is tracked over the outer rise. Alternatively, if the base of the plate is a thin channel of partial melt, then one would expect thickening of the channel beneath the outer rise due to melt ponding in the core of the flexure; this melt ponding may be the source of volcanic activity. A 500-km survey will trace the Pacific plate LAB from the subduction zone into the trench outer rise. The deeper part of the line coincides with the part of the plate where the ~10 km thick 'melt' channel was clearly imaged with the SAHKE 2 experiment. We show with synthetic experiments that given seismic energy scatter and attenuation comparable to that observed in the

  10. The memory of the accreting plate boundary and the continuity of fracture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed aeromagnetic anomaly map of the Mesozoic seafloor-spreading lineations southwest of Bermuda reveals the dominant magnetic grain of the oceanic crust and the character of the accreting boundary at the time of crustal formation. The magnetic anomaly pattern is that of a series of elongate lobes perpendicular to the fracture zone (flowline) trends. The linear sets of magnetic anomaly peaks and troughs have narrow regions of reduced amplitude anomalies associated with the fracture zones. During the period of Mesozoic geomagnetic polarity reversals (when 1200 km of central North Atlantic seafloor formed), the Atlantic accreting boundary consisted of stationary, elongate, spreading center cells that maintained their independence even though sometimes only minor spatial offsets existed between cells. Normal oceanic crustal structure was formed in the spreading center cells, but structural anomalies and discontinuities characteristic of fracture zones were formed at their boundaries, which parallel flowlines of Mesozoic relative plate motion in the central North Atlantic. We suggest that the memory for a stationary pattern of independent spreading center cells resides in the young brittle lithosphere at the accreting boundary where the lithosphere is weakest; here, each spreading center cell independently goes through its cylce of stress buildup, stress release, and crustal accretion, after which its memory is refreshed. The temporal offset between the peaks of the accretionary activity that takes place within each cell may provide the mechanism for maintaining the independence of adjacent spreading center cells through times when no spatial offset between the cells exists.

  11. Construction of semi-dynamic model of subduction zone with given plate kinematics in 3D sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, M.; Honda, S.; Tackley, P. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present a semi-dynamic subduction zone model in a three-dimensional spherical shell. In this model, velocity is imposed on the top surface and in a small three-dimensional region around the shallow plate boundary while below this region, the slab is able to subduct under its own weight. Surface plate velocities are given by Euler's theorem of rigid plate rotation on a sphere. The velocity imposed in the region around the plate boundary is determined so that mass conservation inside the region is satisfied. A kinematic trench migration can be easily incorporated in this model. As an application of this model, mantle flow around slab edges is considered, and we find that the effect of Earth curvature is small by comparing our model with a similar one in a rectangular box, at least for the parameters used in this study. As a second application of the model, mantle flow around a plate junction is studied, and we find the existence of mantle return flow perpendicular to the plate boundary. Since this model can naturally incorporate the spherical geometry and plate movement on the sphere, it is useful for studying a specific subduction zone where the plate kinematics is well constrained.

  12. Defect detection in anisotropic plates based on the instantaneous phase of signals.

    PubMed

    Prado, Vander Teixeira; Granja, Silvio Cesar Garcia; Higuti, Ricardo Tokio; Kitano, Cláudio; Martínez-Graullera, Óscar; Segura, Luis Elvira

    2015-10-01

    Anisotropic materials are widely employed in industry and engineering, and efficient nondestructive testing techniques are important to guarantee the structural integrity of the involved parts. A simple technique is proposed to detect defects in anisotropic plates using ultrasonic guided waves and arrays. The technique is based on the application of an objective threshold to a synthetic aperture image obtained from the instantaneous phase (IP) of the emitter-receiver signal combinations. In a previous work the method was evaluated for isotropic materials, and in this paper it is shown that with some considerations the technique can also be applied to anisotropic plates. These considerations, which should be taken into account in beamforming, are (1) group velocity dependence with propagation direction, and (2) elastic focusing, which results in energy concentration in some propagation directions, with the practical consequence that not all aperture signals effectively contribute to the image. When compared with conventional delay-and-sum image beamforming techniques, the proposed IP technique results in significant improvements relative to defect detection and artifacts/dead zone reduction. PMID:26470050

  13. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  14. Large area x-ray collimator-the zone plate approach.

    PubMed

    Menz, Benedikt; Braig, Christoph; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Predehl, Peter

    2015-09-10

    One question of particular interest in the measurement of x-ray imaging optics for space telescopes concerns the characteristics of the point spread function (PSF) in orbit and the focal length for an infinite source distance. In order to measure such a PSF, a parallel x-ray beam with a diameter of several centimeters to meters is required. For this purpose a large area transmission x-ray zone plate (ZP) for collimating x-ray beams has been designed, built, and tested. Furthermore we present a setup to determine large-scale aberrations of the collimated beam. From x-ray measurements we obtain an upper limit for the angular resolution of ±0.2 arc sec and a first-order diffraction efficiency of ≈13%. These results show that it is possible to use a ZP as a collimator for the PANTER x-ray test facility. PMID:26368954

  15. Fluorescence microscopy imaging with a Fresnel zone plate array based optofluidic microscope

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Lee, Lap Man; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-01-01

    We report the implementation of an on-chip microscope system, termed fluorescence optofluidic microscope (FOFM), which is capable of fluorescence microscopy imaging of samples in fluid media. The FOFM employs an array of Fresnel zone plates (FZP) to generate an array of focused light spots within a microfluidic channel. As a sample flows through the channel and across the array of focused light spots, the fluorescence emissions are collected by a filter-coated CMOS sensor, which serves as the channel's floor. The collected data can then be processed to render fluorescence microscopy images at a resolution determined by the focused light spot size (experimentally measured as 0.65 μm FWHM). In our experiments, our established resolution was 1.0 μm due to Nyquist criterion consideration. As a demonstration, we show that such a system can be used to image the cell nuclei stained by Acridine Orange and cytoplasm labeled by Qtracker®. PMID:21935556

  16. Extension and transtension in the plate boundary zone of the northeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C. ); Larue, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose that the Caribbean (Ca)-North American (NA) plate boundary zone (pbz) from the Puerto Rico Trench to the Venezuelan Basin from Mona Canyon east has been in left-transtension over the last 15-20 ma. A boundary-normal component of extension occurs throughout the pbz and is a principal cause of the Puerto Rico Trench. Such extension is due to WNW velocity of NA-Ca and the northward pullaway of NA from its S-dipping slab, which is below Puerto Rico. Strike slip motion may be taken up among terranes in the pbz by rigid CCW rotation and by oblique slip at their boundaries. Rotation of the largest terrane, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI), has caused such major structures as the Muertos thrust and Anegada Passage. The model implies NA-Ca velocity estimated from Cayman transforms is more accurate than that from slip vectors from seisms in the NA slab.

  17. Late Cretaceous-Paleogene transform zone between the Eurasian and North American lithospheric plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, V. D.; Lobkovskii, L. I.; Kononov, M. V.; Sheremet, O. G.

    2015-09-01

    Within the limits of the Chukchi Sea and the Amerasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, study have been carried out to calculate D function anomalies. The result was the discovery of elongated faults that cut, according to the positions of the upper and lower extents of the disturbing masses, both the upper crust and the upper mantle. It is shown that these faults are right-lateral strike-slips continuing the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene structures of the same type in the Bering Sea. This suggests that the en echelon strike-slip system of the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Amerasian Basin is a relic of the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene transform fault zone between the Eurasian and North American lithospheric plates.

  18. Evolving seismogenic plate boundary megathrust and mega-splay faults in subduction zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.; Fukuchi, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kameda, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Kawasaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the fault mechanism and its relationship to the sesimo-tsunamigenesis is a key of the scientific targets of subduction zone and therefore NantroSEIZE project of IODP and future new drilling project of International Ocean Discovery Program keeps focusing on that. Mega-splay fault branched from plate boundary megathrust in subduction zone is located around the border between outer and inner wedges and is considered to cause great earthquake and tsunami such as 1960 Alaska earthquake, 1944 and 1946 Nankai-Tonankai earthquakes, and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes. Seismic reflection studies for the mega-splay fault in 2D and 3D in the Nankai forearc present the reflector with negative or positive polarities with various amplitudes and suggest complicated petrophysical properties and condition of the fault and its surroundings. The Nankai mega-splay fault at a depth of ~5km is going to be drilled and cored by NantroSEIZE experiments and is expected for great progress of understanding of the fault mechanics. Before drilling the really targeted seismogenic fault, we are conducting many exercises of geophysical and geological observations. The core-log-seismic integrated exercise for the exhumed mega-splay fault by drilling was operated for the Nobeoka thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust was once buried in the depth >~10km and suffered maximum temperature >~300 dgree C. As the core recovery is ~99%, perfect correlation between the core and logging data is possible. Thickness of the fault zone is >200 m with a ~50 cm thick central fault core dividing the phyllitic hanging wall and the footwall of broken-melange like cataclasite. A-few-meter-thick discrete damage zones with fault cores are recognized by difference in physical properties and visual deformation textures at several horizons in the fault zone. Host rocks for those damaged zones are completely lithified cataclasites with abundant mineral veins, which record the older and deeper

  19. Another 60 years in electron microscopy: development of phase-plate electron microscopy and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    It has been six decades since the concept of phase-plate electron microscopy was first reported by Boersch, but an experimental report on a phase plate with a theoretically rational performance has only recently been released by a group including the present author. Currently, many laboratories around the world are attempting to develop a wide range of phase plates to enhance the capabilities of transmission electron microscopy. They are reporting not only advantages of their own developments but also a fundamental problem inherent to electron beam devices, namely charging, i.e. the accumulation of electrostatic charge. In this report, we review the 60-year history of phase-plate development, with a particular focus on the fundamental issue of phase-plate charging. Next, we review biological applications of qualified phase plates, which have been successful in avoiding charging to some extent. Finally, we compare and discuss electron microscopic images, taken with or without phase plates, of biological targets such as proteins (GroEL and TRPV4), protein complexes (flagellar motor), viruses (T4 phage, ε-15 phage and herpes simplex virus), bacterial (cyanobacteria) and mammalian (PtK2) cells. PMID:21844600

  20. From zone plate to microcalorimeter . 50 years of cosmic X-ray spectroscopy at SRON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleeker, J.; Verbunt, F.

    The first method used by the SRON Laboratory for Space Research at Utrecht to spectroscopically image the Sun in X-rays employed Fresnel zone plates. Four Fresnel plates, covering four specific wavelengths, were flown on an Aerobee rocket in 1967 and gave a first useful X-ray image of the Sun in the Si-X line at 51 Å. The technique developed for the solar X-ray images enabled SRON to become the Lead Investigator for the grating spectrographs on several major X-ray satellites, i.e. on the Einstein and EXOSAT satellites, launched in November 1978 and May 1983 respectively, and on the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories both launched in 1999. Since then, a considerable effort was put into the development of cryogenically cooled, non-dispersive X-ray spectrometers as model payload elements for the XEUS, IXO and Athena mission studies. This paper briefly reviews these developments, highlights some of the resulting scientific insights and offers a few thoughts on the present outlook for a next generation X-ray observatory. The biggest challenge for the realization of such a mission is not primarily technical: global coordination and collaboration, both among scientists and the major space agencies, is a prerequisite for a successful next major leap in this discipline.

  1. Tremor Hypocenters Form a Narrow Zone at the Plate Interface in Two Areas of SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The tremor detectors developed for accurately locating tectonic tremor in Cascadia [Armbruster et al., JGR 2014] have been applied to data from the HINET seismic network in Japan. In the overview by Obara [Science 2002] there are three strong sources of tectonic tremor in southwest Japan: Shikoku, Kii Pen. and Tokai. The daily epicentral distributions of tremor on the HINET web site allow the identification of days when tremor in each source is active. The worst results were obtained in Shikoku, in spite of the high level of tremor activity observed there by others. This method requires a clear direct arrival of the S and P waves at the stations for coherence to be seen, so scattering and shear wave splitting are possible reasons for poor results there. Relatively wide station spacing, 19-30 km, is another possible reason. The best results were obtained in Tokai with stations STR, HRY and TYE spacing 18-19 km, and Kii Pen. with stations KRT, HYS and KAW spacing 15-22 km. In both of those areas the three station detectors see strong episodes of tremor. If detections with three stations are located by constraining them to the plate interface, a pattern of persistent sources is seen, with some intense sources. This is similar to what was seen in Cascadia. Detections with four stations give S and P arrival times of high accuracy. In Tokai the hypocenters form a narrow, 2-3 km thick, zone dipping to the north, consistent with the plate interface there. In Kii Pen. the hypocenters dip to the northwest in a thin, 2-3 km thick, zone but approximately 5 km shallower than a plate interface model for this area [Yoshioka and Murakami, GJI 2007]. The overlap of tremor sources in the 12 years analyzed here suggests relative hypocentral location errors as small as 2-3 km. We conclude that the methods developed in Cascadia will work in Japan but the typical spacing of HINET stations, ~20 km, is greater than the optimum distance found in analysis of data from Cascadia, 8 to 15 km.

  2. Pinhole diffraction holography for fabrication of high-resolution Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sankha S; Solak, Harun H; David, Christian; van der Veen, J Friso

    2014-01-27

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) play an essential role in high spatial resolution x-ray imaging and analysis of materials in many fields. These diffractive lenses are commonly made by serial writing techniques such as electron beam or focused ion beam lithography. Here we show that pinhole diffraction holography has potential to generate FZP patterns that are free from aberrations and imperfections that may be present in alternative fabrication techniques. In this presented method, FZPs are fabricated by recording interference pattern of a spherical wave generated by diffraction through a pinhole, illuminated with coherent plane wave at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. Fundamental and practical issues involved in formation and recording of the interference pattern are considered. It is found that resolution of the produced FZP is directly related to the diameter of the pinhole used and the pinhole size cannot be made arbitrarily small as the transmission of EUV or x-ray light through small pinholes diminishes due to poor refractive index contrast found between materials in these spectral ranges. We also find that the practical restrictions on exposure time due to the light intensity available from current sources directly imposes a limit on the number of zones that can be printed with this method. Therefore a trade-off between the resolution and the FZP diameter exists. Overall, we find that this method can be used to fabricate aberration free FZPs down to a resolution of about 10 nm. PMID:24515148

  3. Multilayer on-chip stacked Fresnel zone plates: Hard x-ray fabrication and soft x-ray simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kenan; Wojcik, Michael J.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Jacobsen, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Fresnel zone plates are widely used as x-ray nanofocusing optics. To achieve high spatial resolution combined with good focusing efficiency, high aspect ratio nanolithography is required, and one way to achieve that is through multiple e-beam lithography writing steps to achieve on-chip stacking. A two-step writing process producing 50 nm finest zone width at a zone thickness of 1.14 µm for possible hard x-ray applications is shown here. The authors also consider in simulations the case of soft x-ray focusing where the zone thickness might exceed the depth of focus. In this case, the authors compare on-chip stacking with, and without, adjustment of zone positions and show that the offset zones lead to improved focusing efficiency. The simulations were carried out using a multislice propagation method employing Hankel transforms.

  4. On the growth of an intermediate phase in coherently stressed thin plates

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.C.

    2000-03-14

    Cahn-Hilliard type equations are derived to study the competitive growth of three isostructural phases in binary, stressed, thin-plate diffusion couple when the lattice parameter depends either linearly or quadratically on the composition. Compositional stresses change qualitatively and quantitatively the evolution of the intermediate phase with respect to the stress-free case. Growth kinetics depend critically on whether the plate is free to bend or is affixed to a rigid substrate. The thickness of the intermediate phase is proportional to the square root of time for the rigid substrate case, but can depend on plate thickness and exceed a linear dependence on time for other conditions. Compositional strains can stabilize a non-equilibrium phase, prevent the growth of an equilibrium phase, and give rise to the stable coexistence of three coherent phases, in contradiction to the Gibbs phase rule for hydrostatically stressed systems.

  5. Evaluation of crack arrest fracture toughness of parent plate, weld metal and heat affected zone of BIS 812 EMA ship plate steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, I. A.

    1993-10-01

    The steel chosen for the pressure hull of the Collins class submarine has undergone evaluation to compare the crack arrest fracture toughness, K(Ia), of the parent plate with that of weld metal and heat affected zone. The tests were conducted over a range of subzero temperatures on specimens slightly outside the ASTM standard test method specimen configuration. Shallow face grooved specimens were used to vary the propagating crack velocity from that of non face grooved specimens and determine if K(Ia), is sensitive to changes in crack velocity. The weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ), and parent plate were assessed to determine if the welding process had a deleterious effect on the crack arrest properties of this particular steel. Tests on each of these regions revealed that, for the combination of parent plate, welding procedure and consumables, no adverse effect on crack arrest properties was encountered. Crack arrest fracture toughness of the weld metal and HAZ was superior to that of the parent plate at comparable temperatures.

  6. Regional deformation from the 2004 Macquarie Ridge great earthquake, Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, R. J.; Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.

    2009-12-01

    The transpressional Australia-Pacific plate boundary south of New Zealand has produced some of the largest strike-slip earthquakes in the instrumental record, including the 23 December 2004 Mw ~ 8.1 earthquake. The oceanic setting of this plate boundary limits terrestrial GPS measurements to sites on Macquarie Island (the only subaerial portion of Macquarie Ridge), southeastern Australia, and New Zealand. We investigate coseismic and postseismic deformation from the 2004 earthquake by analyzing GPS data at 16 sites and compare observed GPS vertical velocity with a relative sea level dataset that spans 96 years. Horizontal coseismic offsets decrease systematically with distance from the earthquake epicenter: 24 mm at Macquarie Island (530 km south of the epicenter) to < 2 mm at mainland Australia and the North Island of New Zealand (> 1800 km from epicenter). We invert the horizontal displacements for a best fitting set of fault parameters using an elastic half-space dislocation model. The modeling results are similar to those reported from seismological techniques: predominantly lateral slip occurred on a fault within the Australian plate, west of the main plate boundary, with a moment magnitude of ~8.0. Due to the symmetry of far-field elastic deformation, the geodetic data cannot discriminate between the two possible nodal planes. We prefer left-lateral slip on a NNW-striking fault based on the orientation of the aftershock pattern and fracture zones. We observe transient postseismic horizontal velocity changes at all of the GPS sites with significant coseismic displacements. Postseismic site velocities are significantly different from the pre-earthquake tectonic velocities. Preliminary modeling suggests that most of the postseismic deformation results from viscoelastic relaxation rather than afterslip. In the four years following the earthquake, the total postseismic deformation is approximately equal in magnitude to the coseismic offset observed at each site

  7. Cryo-EM single particle analysis with the Volta phase plate.

    PubMed

    Danev, Radostin; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for in-focus data acquisition with a phase plate that enables near-atomic resolution single particle reconstructions. Accurate focusing is the determining factor for obtaining high quality data. A double-area focusing strategy was implemented in order to achieve the required precision. With this approach we obtained a 3.2 Å resolution reconstruction of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome. The phase plate matches or slightly exceeds the performance of the conventional defocus approach. Spherical aberration becomes a limiting factor for achieving resolutions below 3 Å with in-focus phase plate images. The phase plate could enable single particle analysis of challenging samples in terms of small size, heterogeneity and flexibility that are difficult to solve by the conventional defocus approach.

  8. Cryo-EM single particle analysis with the Volta phase plate

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for in-focus data acquisition with a phase plate that enables near-atomic resolution single particle reconstructions. Accurate focusing is the determining factor for obtaining high quality data. A double-area focusing strategy was implemented in order to achieve the required precision. With this approach we obtained a 3.2 Å resolution reconstruction of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome. The phase plate matches or slightly exceeds the performance of the conventional defocus approach. Spherical aberration becomes a limiting factor for achieving resolutions below 3 Å with in-focus phase plate images. The phase plate could enable single particle analysis of challenging samples in terms of small size, heterogeneity and flexibility that are difficult to solve by the conventional defocus approach. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13046.001 PMID:26949259

  9. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  10. Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  11. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, G.F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  12. Linking geological evidence from the Eurasian suture zones to a regional Indian Ocean plate tectonic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, A.; Aitchison, J.; Müller, R.; Whittaker, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a revised regional plate tectonic model for the Indian Ocean from the Late Jurassic to present, which assimilates both marine geophysical data constraining the seafloor spreading history as well as a variety of geological observations from the Eurasian collision zone. This model includes relative motion between Greater India, Sri Lanka, West Australia, East Antarctica, East Madagascar, the Seychelles and Argoland, a continental sliver which began migrating towards Eurasia in the Late Jurassic, forming the northern margins of Greater India and western Australia. Recently collected data offshore northwest Australia suggest that the majority of Greater India reached only halfway along the West Australian margin in an Early Mesozoic reconstruction, bounded by the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. The revised geometries and relative motion histories redefine the timing and nature of collisional events, as well as the history of back-arc basins and intra-oceanic arcs, such as the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc in northwest India and Pakistan. Abundant ophiolites have been identified throughout the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone, between the Indian-Himalaya and Tibet, several have boninitic compositions and almost all date to either the Mid Jurassic or late Early Cretaceous. Further evidence suggests that an intra-oceanic arc collided with Greater India before colliding with Eurasia. Our model features a transform boundary running north of East Africa, which initiated an oceanic arc following short-lived compression between the western and central Mesotethys in the Late Jurassic, coinciding with the initial motion of Argoland. The arc developed through extension and ophiolite generation until at least the mid-Cretaceous and consumed a narrow thinned sliver of West Argoland between ~120-65 Ma. The arc remained active in the same position until its eventual collision with Greater India ~55 Ma. The eastern portion of the intra-oceanic arc accreted to eastern Eurasia

  13. The effects of plate-bending-related aquifer thickening on temperatures in the Japan Trench subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate subduction zone thermal models are necessary to understand a wide range of geophysical and geochemical processes, including: metamorphic reaction progress, mantle wedge hydration, and melt generation. For decades, plate convergence rate and subducting plate age and dip have been recognized as basic factors affecting subduction zone temperatures. Recent discoveries highlight the important effects of fluid circulation in oceanic lithosphere on subduction zone temperatures. However, there are contrasting hypotheses for the distribution of the regions within the oceanic lithosphere that host vigorous fluid circulation: one with a constant thickness aquifer extending both seaward and landward of the trench, one with an aquifer that thickens as it approaches the trench (due to bend-related faulting) but assumes vigorous fluid circulation only occurs prior to subduction, and a hybrid that considers both aquifer thickening seaward of the trench and continued circulation in the subducting plate. I examine the effects of bend-related aquifer thickening on temperatures within the Japan Trench subduction zone with a suite of thermal models. Kawada et al. [2014] hypothesize that plate-bending faults offshore northern Japan increase the thickness of the oceanic crustal aquifer, and therefore influence heat redistribution in the system. Existing models explore the effects of aquifer thickening on heat flux seaward of the trench, but they do not examine the effects of this process on temperatures within the subduction zone; additionally, they treat the aquifer seaward of the trench as completely isolated from the aquifer in the subducted plate. Here, I exploit the fact that aquifer thickening from the outer rise to the trench and continued fluid circulation in subducting crust are expected to produce distinct surface heat flux anomalies, in order to constrain the thermal effects of each process. I find the combinations of the amount of aquifer thickening and the degree of

  14. On gravity from SST, geoid from SEASAT, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the SEASAT altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantel without complete thermal equilibration is considered.

  15. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    PubMed Central

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length. PMID:22355576

  16. The application of Fresnel zone plate based projection in optofluidic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jigang; Cui, Xiquan; Lee, Lap Man; Yang, Changhuei

    2008-09-29

    Optofluidic microscopy (OFM) is a novel technique for low-cost, high-resolution on-chip microscopy imaging. In this paper we report the use of the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) based projection in OFM as a cost-effective and compact means for projecting the transmission through an OFM's aperture array onto a sensor grid. We demonstrate this approach by employing a FZP (diameter = 255 microm, focal length = 800 microm) that has been patterned onto a glass slide to project the transmission from an array of apertures (diameter = 1 microm, separation = 10 microm) onto a CMOS sensor. We are able to resolve the contributions from 44 apertures on the sensor under the illumination from a HeNe laser (wavelength = 633 nm). The imaging quality of the FZP determines the effective field-of-view (related to the number of resolvable transmissions from apertures) but not the image resolution of such an OFM system--a key distinction from conventional microscope systems. We demonstrate the capability of the integrated system by flowing the protist Euglena gracilis across the aperture array microfluidically and performing OFM imaging of the samples. PMID:18825198

  17. Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of the Plate Boundary, Cascadia Subduction Zone, from Prestack Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, W.; Holbrook, W.; Tobin, H. J.; Keranen, K. M.; Everson, E.; Mallick, S.; Padhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the geologic makeup of the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) has great importance for understanding seismic hazards in the coastal margin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia margin is a potential earthquake and tsunami threat to the many millions who live in the area, yet details of its structure and mechanics remain poorly understood. In particular, the character of the subduction interface is elusive due to the CSZ's relatively aseismic behavior and low seismic reflectivity, making imaging difficult for passive and active source methods, respectively. In July 2012 seismic data were acquired as a part of the COAST project, spanning the important transition from the Cascadia basin, across the deformation front, and into the accretionary wedge. This modern data, coupled with sophisticated pre-stack full waveform seismic inversion methods, allows us to create highly detailed velocity models. While still computationally expensive, current computing clusters can perform these inversions with enough lateral density to yield highly detailed velocity information in both the vertical and horizontal. Here we present pre-stack full waveform inversions of a seismic line from the center of the COAST survey offshore Washington state as a cross section of the velocity structure of the CSZ. This detailed velocity model is a necessary initial step toward a detailed porosity cross section to be used to determine the role of fluids in the CSZ. Using these new data we investigate the lateral variability in reflectivity of the subducting plate boundary reflection in terms of its seismic velocity.

  18. Is the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone an ancient plate boundary of Baltica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Mikolajczak, Mateusz; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Buffenmyer, Vinton; Lewandowski, Marek

    2015-12-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is generally regarded as a fossil plate boundary in Europe that extends 2000 km from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea. We used an integrated approach merging potential fields and seismic data to explore crustal architecture across the TTZ in central Poland. The aim of the study was to test whether the TTZ coincides with an early Paleozoic (Caledonian) suture formed through the closure of the Tornquist Ocean along the SW Baltica margin. The suture is presumed to separate the East European Craton (EEC) from the Paleozoic terranes of Western Europe. Two seismic reflection lines from the PolandSPAN™ experiment were used to image the deep structure at the SW margin of the EEC. Lines PL-5300 and PL-5400 run NE-SW in central and northern Poland, respectively. The seismic interpretation down to top of basement was integrated with 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling to highlight the structure of the deep crust. Both the gravity and magnetic models show a suture that welds together two blocks at the base of crust. However, top of basement above the suture dips uniformly to the SW and is overlain by undisturbed lower Paleozoic and younger sediments. By implication, the suture must have developed in the Precambrian and both crustal blocks amalgamated belong to the EEC. Consequently, the Caledonian suture, formed by the closure of the Tornquist Ocean between Avalonia and Baltica, must be located farther southwest beneath thick upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments.

  19. The influence of changing plate kinematics on a continental transform fault; the example of the Dead Sea Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J.; Brun, J. P.; Cloetingh, S.

    2003-04-01

    The Dead Sea Fault Zone forms the boundary between the Sinai and Arabian plates and links the Red Sea spreading center in the South to the Taurus Mountains in the North. From field observations along the Southern part of the Dead Sea Fault zone (DSFZ) and investigations in the Red Sea area it has been suggested that the Arabian plate moves northward along the DSFZ by a rotation along an Euler pole that for the last 4 Ma years is located at 33°N23°E. It has also been suggested that this Euler pole was located about 5° more to the West during the first episode of movement. This change in motion of the Arabian plate coincides with the initiation of the main subsidence in the Dead Sea basin and the Gulf of Aqaba. The geometry and timing of deformation along the Northern segment of the DSFZ is much less constrained and different models have been proposed for the history of this segment. To study the influence of the change in plate motion on the DSFZ, a series of laboratory experiments has been performed. Special attention is being paid to the influence of rheologies on the system, the development of the fault zones geometry in time and with depth and wether a new rotational pole forces the initiation of a new fault or that the movement is accommodated by trenspression-transtension along the old fault.

  20. Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

  1. Style of Plate Spreading Derived from the 2008-2014 Velocity Field Across the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, V.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Ofeigsson, B.; Sturkell, E.; Einarsson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland is a subaerial part of the divergent boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates. At this latitude, the full spreading between the plates is accommodated by the NVZ. We derived the plate boundary velocity field from GPS campaign and continuous measurements between 2008 and 2014, a time period free of any magma intrusion. Average velocities were estimated in the ITRF08 reference frame. The overall extension is consistent with 18 mm/yr in the 104°N direction spreading, in accordance with the MORVEL2010 plate motion model. We find that a 40km-wide band along the plate boundary accommodates about 75% of the full plate velocities. Within this zone, the average strain rate is approximately 0.35 μstrain/yr. The deformation field and the strain rate are, however, much affected by other sources of deformations in the NVZ. These include magmatic sources at the most active volcanic centers, glacial rebound near the ice-caps and geothermal power-plant water extraction. Magmatic sources include a shallow magma chamber deflation under Askja caldera, as well as under Þeistareykir and eventual deep magma inflation north of Krafla volcano. Vatnajökull ice cap melting causes large uplift and outward displacements in the southern part of the NVZ. The two geothermal power-plants near Krafla are inducing local deflations. Our GPS velocities show a 35° change in the direction of the plate boundary axis north of Askja volcano that we infer to be linked to the geometric arrangement of volcanic systems within the NVZ.We use a simple arctangent model to describe the plate spreading to provide constraints on the location and the locking depth of the spreading axis. For that purpose we divided the area in short overlapping segments having the same amount of GPS points along the plate spreading direction and inverted for the location of the center of the spreading axis and locking depth. With this simple model we can account for most

  2. Programmable phase plate for tool modification in laser machining applications

    DOEpatents

    Thompson Jr., Charles A.; Kartz, Michael W.; Brase, James M.; Pennington, Deanna; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-04-06

    A system for laser machining includes a laser source for propagating a laser beam toward a target location, and a spatial light modulator having individual controllable elements capable of modifying a phase profile of the laser beam to produce a corresponding irradiance pattern on the target location. The system also includes a controller operably connected to the spatial light modulator for controlling the individual controllable elements. By controlling the individual controllable elements, the phase profile of the laser beam may be modified into a desired phase profile so as to produce a corresponding desired irradiance pattern on the target location capable of performing a machining operation on the target location.

  3. Micro-Fresnel-Zone-Plate Array on Flexible Substrate for Large Field-of-View and Focus Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Fernandes, Jayer; Kanhere, Aditi; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-01-01

    Field of view and accommodative focus are two fundamental attributes of many imaging systems, ranging from human eyes to microscopes. Here, we present arrays of Fresnel zone plates fabricated on a flexible substrate, which allows for the adjustment of both the field of view and optical focus. Such zone plates function as compact and lightweight microlenses and are fabricated using silicon nanowires. Inspired by compound eyes in nature, these microlenses are designed to point along various angles in order to capture images, offering an exceptionally wide field of view. Moreover, by flexing the substrate, the lens position can be adjusted, thus achieving axial focus scanning. An array of microlenses on a flexible substrate was incorporated into an optical system to demonstrate high resolution imaging of objects located at different axial and angular positions. These silicon based microlenses could be integrated with electronics and have a wide range of potential applications, from medical imaging to surveillance. PMID:26515117

  4. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  5. Tectono-stratigraphic signature of a rapid multistage subsiding rift basin in the Tyrrhenian-Apennine hinge zone (Italy): A possible interaction of upper plate with subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milia, Alfonsa; Torrente, Maurizio M.

    2015-05-01

    The Campania Plain is a rapidly subsiding Quaternary basin that formed on the eastern margin of the Tyrrhenian Sea in association with the younger phase of Tyrrhenian rifting. It is located in the hinge area between the Apennines fold-thrust belt and the Tyrrhenian extensional backarc basin. By combining original stratigraphic analyses of well logs and seismic profiles we built a basin subsidence curve, mapped the fault pattern of the Campania Plain and analyzed the impact of the block faulting on the sedimentology and stratigraphic architecture of the basin fill. Well data indicate that the Quaternary succession consists of offshore, shoreface and coal-bearing coastal plain deposits arranged to form thick aggradational and retrogradational units. The sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well logs permitted us to recognize thirteen depositional sequences and the stratigraphic signatures of the rift stages. The study area corresponds to a sediment overfilled/balanced infill basin type that resulted from superposition of several rifting events characterized by high rates of basin subsidence. Taking into account the geological data of the adjacent areas, we propose a Pliocene-Quaternary rifting evolution of the upper Tyrrhenian plate consisting of four episodes. Two peculiar features of the Tyrrhenian rifting are a skip of the extensional axial zone eastwards leaving the previous zone of high strain localization (Vavilov basin), followed by a dramatic change (90°) of the direction of extension. Because these Tyrrhenian features cannot be accounted for by the current rifting models we hypothesized a link between the evolution of upper plate and subducting slab. The proposed geodynamic scenario is characterized by a progressive rupture of the subducting plate and formation of extensional basins in the upper plate.

  6. Fabrication of large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for smoothing focal plane intensity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.; Dixit, S.; Thomas, I.; Perry, M.

    1996-04-26

    We have fabricated large aperture (40-cm) kinoform phase plates for producing super-Gaussian focal plane intensity profiles. The continuous phase screen, designed using a new iterative procedure, was fabricated in fused silica as a 16-level, one-wave deep rewrapped phase profile using a lithographic process and wet etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. The observed far-field contains 94% of the incident energy inside the desired spot.

  7. A Bayesian approach for Inter-seismic Inter-plate Coupling Probabilities for the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.

    2009-12-01

    We aim to characterize the apparent extent of plate coupling on subduction zone megathrusts with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology. In this study we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, where we ask not for a single optimum model, but rather for a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models, exploiting the full potential of Bayesian methods to completely characterize the model parameter space. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we use the Bayesian approach to provide the inter-seismic inter-plate coupling probabilities that are consistent with physically plausible a-priori information and available geodetic measurements. We highlight the importance of using the vertical component of the velocity field to properly constrain the downdip limit of the coupled zone, and also we show how the chosen parameterization of the model plays an important role along with the a-priori, and a-posteriori information on the model parameters. We apply this methodology in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction zone (12S - 24S) with the desire to understand the state of inter-seismic coupling on that margin. We obtain patch like features for the probability of 100% apparent inter-seismic coupling with higher values located between 15km and 60km depth. The larger of these features are located in the regions associated with the rupture process of the 2001 (Mw 8.4) Arequipa and the 2007 (Mw 8.0) Pisco Earthquakes, both occurred after the time period where the measurements take place; and the region identified as the Arica bend seismic gap, which has not experienced a large earthquake since 1877.

  8. Plate boundary forces in the vicinity of Trinidad-the-transition from transpression to transtension in the Southern Caribbean plate boundary zones

    SciTech Connect

    Algar, S.T.; Pindell, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Deformation in the southern Caribbean plate boundary zones as recorded in the Northern Range of Trinidad initiated in the Oligocene with northward vergent gravity sliding of Northern Range sediments due to uplift and oversteepening of the previously passive margin by the eastward migration of the Caribbean flexural forebulge. Progressive east-southeast transvergence of the Caribbean Plate with respect to South America overthrust incorporated the Northern Range sediments into the Caribbean accretionary prism, thrusting them south-southeast to produce a Middle Miocene transpressive foreland fold and thrust belt in southern Trinidad. Late Miocene deformation within Trinidad was increasingly dominated by right-lateral strike-slop (RLSS) faulting, at the expense of transpressive compressional features. Right-stepping of RLSS motion initiated the Gulf of Paria and Caroni pull-apart basins, Since Early Pliocene these basins and other areas to the north of Trinidad have undergone north-south extension in addition to east-west trending RLSS. Such extension caused the northward withdrawal of Caribbean terranes from atop of the Northern Range, Resulting in rapid isostatically induced uplift (approximately 0.5 mmyr[sup -1]). This change in deformation style may relate to a hitherto unrecognized shift in the relative motion of the eastern Caribbean Plate with respect to South America: from east-southeast-directed transpression to east-northeast-directed transtension.

  9. Western Renewable Energy Zones, Phase 1: QRA Identification Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pletka, R.; Finn, J.

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ) Initiative Phase 1 Qualified Resource Area identification process, including the identification and economic analysis of Qualified Resource Areas (QRAs) and 'non-REZ' resources. These data and analyses will assist the Western US in its renewable energy transmission planning goals. The economic analysis in this report produced the input data for the WREZ Generation and Transmission model, which is a screening-level model to determine the optimal routing for and cost of delivering renewable energy from QRAs to load centers throughout the Western Interconnection. In June 2009, the Western Governors' Association accepted the Western Governors' Association WREZ Phase 1 Report in which the QRAs were mapped and the entire WREZ Phase 1 process was explained in general. That same month the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory released the WREZ Generation and Transmission Model (GTM), which was also developed by Black & Veatch. This report details the assumptions and methodologies that were used to produce the maps and resource analyses in the WGA report as well as the economic data used by the WREZ GTM. This report also provides the results of the non-REZ resource analysis for the first time in the WREZ initiative.

  10. The Biological Sensor for Detection of Bacterial Cells in Liquid Phase Based on Plate Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Irina; Zaitsev, Boris; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Guliy, Olga; Ignatov, Oleg; Teplykh, Andrey

    The interactions "bacterial cells - bacteriophages", "bacterial cells - antibodies" and "bacterial cells - mini- antibodies" directly in liquid phase were experimentally investigated with a help of acoustic sensor. The acoustic sensor under study represents two-channel delay line based on the plate of Y-X lithium niobate. One channel of delay line was electrically shorted, the second channel was electrically open. The liquid container was glued on plate surface between transducers of delay line. The dependencies of the change in phase and insertion loss on concentration of bacteriophages, antibodies, and mini- antibodies were obtained for both channels of delay line.

  11. Volta phase plate cryo-EM of the small protein complex Prx3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshouei, Maryam; Radjainia, Mazdak; Phillips, Amy J.; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Mitra, Alok K.; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Danev, Radostin

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-EM of large, macromolecular assemblies has seen a significant increase in the numbers of high-resolution structures since the arrival of direct electron detectors. However, sub-nanometre resolution cryo-EM structures are rare compared with crystal structure depositions, particularly for relatively small particles (<400 kDa). Here we demonstrate the benefits of Volta phase plates for single-particle analysis by time-efficient cryo-EM structure determination of 257 kDa human peroxiredoxin-3 dodecamers at 4.4 Å resolution. The Volta phase plate improves the applicability of cryo-EM for small molecules and accelerates structure determination.

  12. Phase Velocity Method for Guided Wave Measurements in Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, E.; Galarza, N.; Rubio, B.; Otero, J. A.

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer is a well-recognized material for aeronautic applications. Its plane structure has been widely used where anisotropic characteristics should be evaluated with flaw detection. A phase velocity method of ultrasonic guided waves based on a pitch-catch configuration is presented for this purpose. Both shear vertical (SV) and shear horizontal (SH) have been studied. For SV (Lamb waves) the measurements were done at different frequencies in order to evaluate the geometrical dispersion and elastic constants. The results for SV are discussed with an orthotropic elastic model. Finally experiments with lamination flaws are presented.

  13. A wide-angle seismic survey of the Hecataeus Ridge, south of Cyprus: a microcontinental block from the African plate docked in a subduction zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Ayda; Welford, Kim; Hall, Jeremy; Hübscher, Christian; Louden, Keith; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Cyprus lies at the southern edge of the Aegean-Anatolian microplate, caught in the convergence of Africa and Eurasia. Subduction of the African plate below Cyprus has probably ceased and this has been attributed to the docking in the subduction zone of the Eratosthenes Seamount microcontinental fragment on the northern edge of the African plate. In early 2010, on R.V. Maria S. Merian, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey to test the hypothesis that the Hecataeus Ridge, another possible microcontinental block lying immediately offshore SE Cyprus, might be related to an earlier docking event. The upper crust of southern Cyprus is dominated by ophiolites, with seismic velocities of up to 7 km s-1. A wide angle seismic profile along Hecataeus Ridge was populated with 15 Canadian and German ocean-bottom seismographs at 5 km intervals and these recorded shots from a 6000 cu. in. air gun array, fired approximately every 100 m. Rough topography of the seabed has made picking of phases and their modelling a demanding task. Bandpass and coherency filtering have enabled us to pick phases out to around 80 km. Tomographic inversion of short-range first arrivals provided an initial model of the shallow sub-seabed structure. Forward modelling by ray-tracing, using the code of Zelt and Smith, was then used to model crustal structure down to depths of around 20 km, with occasional evidence of reflections from deeper boundaries (Moho?). Modelling results provide good control on P-wave velocities in the top 20 km and some indications of deeper events. There is no evidence of true velocities approaching 7 km/s in the top 20 km below the Ridge that might indicate the presence of ophiolitic rocks. Regional gravity and magnetic field data tend to support this proposition. We thus conclude that Hecataeus Ridge is not composed of characteristically ophiolitic, Cyprus (upper plate) crust, and it might well be derived from the African (lower) plate.

  14. Practical factors affecting the performance of a thin-film phase plate for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danev, Radostin; Glaeser, Robert M.; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    A number of practical issues must be addressed when using thin carbon films as quarter-wave plates for Zernike phase-contrast electron microscopy. We describe, for example, how we meet the more stringent requirements that must be satisfied for beam alignment in this imaging mode. In addition we address the concern that one might have regarding the loss of some of the scattered electrons as they pass through such a phase plate. We show that two easily measured parameters, (1) the low-resolution image contrast produced in cryo-EM images of tobacco mosaic virus particles and (2) the fall-off of the envelope function at high resolution, can be used to quantitatively compare the data quality for Zernike phase-contrast images and for defocused bright-field images. We describe how we prepare carbon-film phase plates that are initially free of charging or other effects that degrade image quality. We emphasize, however, that even though the buildup of hydrocarbon contamination can be avoided by heating the phase plates during use, their performance nevertheless deteriorates over the time scale of days to weeks, thus requiring their frequent replacement in order to maintain optimal performance. PMID:19157711

  15. Comment on Sub-15 nm Hard X-Ray Focusing with a New Total-Reflection Zone Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Eliot D

    2011-01-01

    Takano et al. report the focusing of 10-keV X-rays to a size of 14.4 nm using a total-reflection zone plate (TRZP). This focal size is at the diffraction limit for the optic's aperture. This would be a noteworthy result, since the TRZP was fabricated using conventional lithography techniques. Alternative nanofocusing optics require more demanding fabrication methods. However, as I will discuss in this Comment, the intensity distribution presented by Takano et al. (Fig. 4 of ref. 1) is more consistent with the random speckle pattern produced by the scattering of a coherent incident beam by a distorted optic than with a diffraction-limited focus. When interpreted in this manner, the true focal spot size is {approx}70 nm: 5 times the diffraction limit. When a coherent photon beam illuminates an optic containing randomly distributed regions which introduce different phase shifts, the scattered diffraction pattern consists of a speckle pattern. Each speckle will be diffraction-limited: the peak width of a single speckle depends entirely on the source coherence and gives no information about the optic. The envelope of the speckle distribution corresponds to the focal spot which would be observed using incoherent illumination. The width of this envelope is due to the finite size of the coherently-diffracting domains produced by slope and position errors in the optic. The focal intensity distribution in Fig. 4 of ref. 1 indeed contains a diffraction-limited peak, but this peak contains only a fraction of the power in the focused, and forms part of a distribution of sharp peaks with an envelope {approx}70 nm in width, just as expected for a speckle pattern. At the 4mm focal distance, the 70 nm width corresponds to a slope error of 18 {micro}rad. To reach the 14 nm diffraction limit, the slope error must be reduced to 3 {micro}rad. Takano et al. have identified a likely source of this error: warping due to stress as a result of zone deposition. It will be interesting to see

  16. Neotectonics of the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean): Structural evolution of an oceanic strike-slip plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Huchon, P.; Bourget, J.; Sorbier, M.; Zaragosi, S.; Rabaute, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Owen Fracture Zone is a 800 km-long fault system that accommodates the dextral strike-slip motion between India and Arabia plates. Because of slow pelagic sedimentation rates that preserve the seafloor expression of the fault since the Early Pliocene, the fault is clearly observed on bathymetric data. It is made up of a series of fault segments separated by releasing and restraining bends, including a major pull-apart basin at latitude 20°N. Some distal turbiditic channels from the Indus deep-sea fan overlap the fault system and are disturbed by its activity, thus providing landmarks to date successive stages of fault activity and structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone from Pliocene to Present. We determine the durability of relay structures and the timing of their evolution along the principal displacement zone, from their inception to their extinction. We observe subsidence migration in the 20°N basin, and alternate activation of fault splays in the vicinity of the Qalhat seamount. The present-day Owen Fracture Zone is the latest stage of structural evolution of the 20-Myr-old strike-slip fault system buried under Indus turbiditic deposits whose activity started at the eastern foot of the Owen Ridge when the Gulf of Aden opened. The evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 3-6 Myr reflects a steady state plate motion between Arabia and India, such as inferred by kinematics for the last 20 Myr period. The structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 20 Myr, including fault segments propagation and migration, pull-apart basin opening and extinction, seems to be characterized by a progressive reorganization of the fault system, and does not require any major kinematics change.

  17. Effect of metachronal phasing on the pumping efficiency of oscillating plate arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Mary; Kiger, Ken T.; Abdelaziz, Khaled; Balaras, Elias

    2014-05-01

    A programmable oscillating plate array was constructed in order to study the detailed hydrodynamics of external pumping by a series of oscillating plates at Reynolds numbers on the order of 10. The array was modeled after the geometry and kinematics found in the nymphal mayfly (Ephemeroptera) Centroptilum triangulifer, and consisted of five plates, each of which could be actuated independently for stroke and pitch. Scaled tests were performed at a Reynolds number, Re = fL {g/2}/ ν = 18, with a single stroke kinematic pattern modeled after the living animal. In mayflies, and in many other oscillating plate systems, an antiplectic metachronal wave is used with a phase delay of approximately 90°, which corresponds to a travelling wave that moves from posterior to anterior with a wavelength of approximately four plates. In order to better understand possible reasons for why the animal system might favor the observed phase lag, ensemble-correlation stereo PIV measurements were made to reconstruct the unsteady three-dimensional phase averaged flow field at a resolution that allowed a uniform and converged estimate of the net pumped flux and the total energy dissipation within and around the vicinity of the gill array. The results indicate that the baseline case offered an optimal spot in the mass flux of fluid pumped through the array per unit energy expended, while also providing a great deal of flexibility in modifying the stroke amplitude without interference effects from adjacent gills.

  18. Characteristics of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuang; Hou, Lixin; Liu, Xiuhuan; Gao, Yanjun; Li, Xinlu; Wang, Qi; Chen, Zhanguo; Jia, Gang; Zheng, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The polarities of a kind of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystal were extensively investigated by microscopy, chemical etching, XPS, Raman scattering, and current-voltage measurements. The {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces of the cBN samples can be easily distinguished by optical microscope as there are a lot of defects incorporate in {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors serving as the color centers, while the {1 1 1}B sectors have less defects and are nearly colorless. Both XPS and Raman spectra also revealed the uneven distributions of N vacancies and substitutional impurities in cBN crystals. The determination of {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces can also be verified by the results of the chemical etching because the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have much faster etch rates than the {1 1 1}B faces. According to XPS, the {1 1 1}B faces have more C and O contaminations than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, however the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have larger atomic ratio of B:N after surface cleaning by Ar+ sputtering. In the Raman spectra of the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors of cBN, several small broad infrared-active phonon bands emerge nearby TO and LO modes because of the disorder-activated Raman scattering. As for the {1 1 1}B sectors, this phenomenon disappears. In addition, the {1 1 1}B faces have much smaller leakage current than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, which indicates that the {1 1 1}B sectors have higher crystalline quality.

  19. Variation of seismic coupling with slab detachment and upper plate structure along the western Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laigle, Mireille; Sachpazi, Maria; Hirn, Alfred

    2004-10-01

    The western Hellenic subduction zone is characterized by a trenchward velocity of the upper plate. In the Ionian islands segment, complete seismic coupling is achieved, as is predicted by standard plate-tectonic models in which there is no slab pull force because the slab has broken off. The moderate local seismic moment rate relates to a shallow downdip limit for the seismogenic interface. This characteristic may be attributed to the ductility of the lower crust of the upper plate, which allows a décollement between the upper crust of the overriding plate and the subducting plate. Farther south, a deeper downdip limit of the seismogenic interface is indicated by thrust-faulting earthquakes, which persist much deeper in western Crete. A correspondingly larger downdip width of this seismogenic zone is consistent with the suggested larger maximum magnitude of earthquakes here. However, since the seismic moment release rate seems to be moderate in the Peloponnese and western Crete, like in in the Ionian islands, this seismically active interface cannot maintain complete seismic coupling across its larger downdip width. A cause may be the lateral addition of overweight to the part of the slab still attached in Crete, by the free fall of its part that has broken off from the surface further north. This increased slab pull reduces the compressive normal stress across the seismogenic interface and thus causes partial seismic coupling in its shallower part. However, the width of this part may provide an additional area contributing to slip in large earthquakes, which may nucleate deeper on stick-slip parts of the interface. Hints at anomalies in structure and seismicity, which need to be resolved, may relate to the present location of the edge of the tear in the slab.

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of phase relations and metasomatism in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, P.; Oliot, E.; Marquer, D.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile shear zones have been recognized for a long time as privileged sites of intense fluid-rock interactions in the crust. In most cases they induce focused changes in mineralogy and bulk chemical composition (metasomatism) which in turn may control the deformation and fluid-migration processes. Therefore understanding these processes requires in a first step to be able to model phase relations in such open system. In this contribution, emphasizes in placed on metasomatic aspects of the problem. Indeed , in many ductile shear zones reported in metagranites, deformation and fluid-rock interactions are associated with gain in MgO and losses of CaO and Na2O (K2O is also a mobile component but it can be either gained or lost). Although the mineralogical consequences of this so-called Mg-metasomatism are well-documented (replacement of K-feldspar into phengite, breakdown of plagioclase into ab + ep, crystallization of chlorite), the origin of this coupled mass-transfer is still unknown. We have performed a forward modeling of phase relationships using petrogenetic grids and pseudosections that consider variations in chemical potential (μ) of the mobile elements (MgO, CaO, Na2O). Chemical potential gradients being the driving force of mass transfer, μ-μ diagrams are the most appropriate diagrams to model open systems where fluid-rock interactions are prominent. Chemical potential diagrams are equivalent to activity diagrams but our approach differs from previous work because (1) solid solutions are taken into account (2) phase relations are modeled in a more realistic chemical system (Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O) and (3) the use of pseudosections allows to predict changes of the mineralogy (modes, composition) for the specific bulk composition studied. A particular attention is paid to the relationships between component concentrations and chemical potentials, which is not obvious in multi-component system. The studied shear zone is located in the Grimsel

  1. Rayleigh phase velocities in the upper mantle of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, L.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary, located in Southern California, presents an opportunity to study a unique tectonic process that has been shaping the plate tectonic setting of the western North American and Mexican Pacific margin since the Miocene. This is one of the few locations where the interaction between a migrating oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone can be studied. The rapid subduction of the Farallon plate outpaced the spreading rate of the East Pacific Rise rift system causing it to be subducted beneath southern California and northern Mexico 30 Ma years ago. The details of microplate capture, reorganization, and lithospheric deformation on both the Pacific and North American side of this boundary is not well understood, but may have important implications for fault activity, stresses, and earthquake hazard analysis both onshore and offshore. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by an array of 34 ocean bottom seismometers deployed offshore southern California for a 12 month duration from August 2010 to 2011. Our array recorded teleseismic earthquakes at distances ranging from 30° to 120° with good signal-to-noise ratios for magnitudes Mw ≥ 5.9. The events exhibit good azimuthal distribution and enable us to solve simultaneously for Rayleigh wave phase velocities and azimuthal anisotropy. Fewer events occur at NE back-azimuths due to the lack of seismicity in central North America. We consider seismic periods between 18 - 90 seconds. The inversion technique considers non-great circle path propagation by representing the arriving wave field as two interfering plane waves. This takes advantage of statistical averaging of a large number of paths that travel offshore southern California and northern Mexico allowing for improved resolution and parameterization of lateral seismic velocity variations at lithospheric and sublithospheric depths. We present phase velocity results for periods sampling mantle structure down to 150 km depth along the

  2. Along-Strike Electrical Conductivity Variations in the Incoming Plate and Shallow Forearc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.; Bedrosian, P.; Egbert, G. D.; Livelybrooks, D.; Parris, B. A.; Schultz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetotelluric Observations of Cascadia using a Huge Array (MOCHA) experiment was carried out to study the nature of the seismogenic locked zone and the down-dip transition zone where episodic tremor and slip (ETS) originates. This amphibious magnetotelluric (MT) data set consists of 8 offshore and 15 onshore profiles crossing from just seaward of the trench to the western front of the Cascades, with a north-south extent spanning from central Oregon to central Washington. The 71 offshore stations and the 75 onshore stations (red triangles in the image below) fit into the broader context of the more sparsely sampled EarthScope MT transportable array (black triangles) and other previous and pending MT surveys (other symbols). These data allows us to image variations in electrical conductivity along distinct segments of the Cascadia subduction zone defined by ETS recurrence intervals. Since bulk conductivity in this setting depends primarily on porosity, fluid content and temperature, the conductivity images created from the MOCHA data offer unique insights on fluid processes in the crust and mantle, and how the distribution of fluid along the plate interface relates to observed variations in ETS behavior. This abstract explores the across- and along-strike variations in the incoming plate and the shallow offshore forearc. In particular we examine how conductivity variations, and the inferred fluid content and porosity variations, are related to tectonic segmentation, seismicity and deformation patterns, and arc magma variations along-strike. Porosity inferred in the forearc crust can be interpreted in conjunction with active and passive seismic imaging results and may provide new insights on the origin of recently observed extremely high heat flow values. A companion abstract (Parris et al.) examines the deeper conductivity structure of the locked and ETS zones along the plate interface in order to identify correlations between ETS occurrence rates and inferred

  3. Biaxial nematic phase stability and demixing behaviour in monolayers of rod-plate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; González-Pinto, Miguel; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-09-21

    We theoretically study the phase behaviour of monolayers of hard rod-plate mixtures using a fundamental-measure density functional in the restricted-orientation (Zwanzig) approximation. Particles can rotate in 3D but their centres of mass are constrained to be on a flat surface. In addition, we consider both species to be subject to an attractive potential proportional to the particle contact area on the surface and with adsorption strengths that depend on the species type. Particles have board-like shape, with sizes chosen using a symmetry criterion: same volume and same aspect ratio κ. Phase diagrams were calculated for κ = 10, 20 and 40 and different values of adsorption strengths. For small adsorption strengths the mixtures exhibit a second-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic transition for molar fraction of rods 0 ≤x≲ 0.9. In the uniaxial nematic phase the particle axes of rods and plates are aligned perpendicular and parallel to the monolayer, respectively. At the transition, the orientational symmetry of the plate axes is broken, and they orient parallel to a director lying on the surface. For large and equal adsorption strengths the mixture demixes at low pressures into a uniaxial nematic phase, rich in plates, and a biaxial nematic phase, rich in rods. The demixing transition is located between two tricritical points. Also, at higher pressures and in the plate-rich part of the phase diagram, the system exhibits a strong first-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic phase transition with a large density coexistence gap. When rod adsorption is considerably large while that of plates is small, the transition to the biaxial nematic phase is always of second order, and its region of stability in the phase diagram considerably widens. At very high pressures the mixture can effectively be identified as a two-dimensional mixture of squares and rectangles which again demixes above a certain critical point. We also studied the relative stability of uniform

  4. Biaxial nematic phase stability and demixing behaviour in monolayers of rod-plate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; González-Pinto, Miguel; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-09-21

    We theoretically study the phase behaviour of monolayers of hard rod-plate mixtures using a fundamental-measure density functional in the restricted-orientation (Zwanzig) approximation. Particles can rotate in 3D but their centres of mass are constrained to be on a flat surface. In addition, we consider both species to be subject to an attractive potential proportional to the particle contact area on the surface and with adsorption strengths that depend on the species type. Particles have board-like shape, with sizes chosen using a symmetry criterion: same volume and same aspect ratio κ. Phase diagrams were calculated for κ = 10, 20 and 40 and different values of adsorption strengths. For small adsorption strengths the mixtures exhibit a second-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic transition for molar fraction of rods 0 ≤x≲ 0.9. In the uniaxial nematic phase the particle axes of rods and plates are aligned perpendicular and parallel to the monolayer, respectively. At the transition, the orientational symmetry of the plate axes is broken, and they orient parallel to a director lying on the surface. For large and equal adsorption strengths the mixture demixes at low pressures into a uniaxial nematic phase, rich in plates, and a biaxial nematic phase, rich in rods. The demixing transition is located between two tricritical points. Also, at higher pressures and in the plate-rich part of the phase diagram, the system exhibits a strong first-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic phase transition with a large density coexistence gap. When rod adsorption is considerably large while that of plates is small, the transition to the biaxial nematic phase is always of second order, and its region of stability in the phase diagram considerably widens. At very high pressures the mixture can effectively be identified as a two-dimensional mixture of squares and rectangles which again demixes above a certain critical point. We also studied the relative stability of uniform

  5. Magnetorheological Finishing for Imprinting Continuous Phase Plate Structure onto Optical Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Dixit, S N; Genin, F Y; Brocious, W F

    2004-01-05

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been developed to manufacture continuous phase plates (CPP's) and custom phase corrective structures on polished fused silica surfaces. These phase structures are important for laser applications requiring precise manipulation and control of beam-shape, energy distribution, and wavefront profile. The MRF's unique deterministic-sub-aperture polishing characteristics make it possible to imprint complex topographical information onto optical surfaces at spatial scale-lengths approaching 1 mm. In this study, we present the results of experiments and model calculations that explore imprinting two-dimensional sinusoidal structures. Results show how the MRF removal function impacts and limits imprint fidelity and what must be done to arrive at a high quality surface. We also present several examples of this imprinting technology for fabrication of phase correction plates and CPPs for use at high fluences.

  6. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand Plate boundary zone: implications for the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2015-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plate. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone of continental lithosphere up to 250 km wide. I investigate the implications of the short-term kinematics for the strength of the deforming lithosphere. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses to determine both the regional structure of the crust, which ranges from 20 to 50 km thick, and fields of buoyancy stress (or GPE per unit volume). Deformation over thousands of years is quantified in terms of velocity and strain rate fields, based on an inversion of neotectonic fault slip and palaeomagnetic data, in the context of the short-term relative plate motions. Forces on the subduction megathrust, as well as deviatoric stresses in the behind subduction region, are calculated from simple 2-D force balances across the Hikurangi Margin, given negligible deviatoric stresses at the along-strike transition between backarc extension and compression. Average megathrust shear stresses are in the range 6-15 MPa, and average lithospheric stresses <20 MPa in the overriding plate. The regional lithospheric strength of the plate boundary zone, assuming a viscous rheology (Newtonian or power law), is determined from an inversion of the field of gradients of buoyancy stress (averaged over either the top 25 km of the crust, or 100-km-thick lithosphere) and strain rate, using the thin sheet stress balance equations, calibrated with the subduction force balance analysis. Effective viscosities for the deforming lithosphere and/or crust are in the range 0.1-5 × 1021 Pa s, with marked weakening in zones of high strain rate, and an abrupt transition to viscosities >1022 Pa s at the margins of the rigid plates. If lateral variations in effective viscosity are only due to non-Newtonian behaviour, these data indicate a bulk power law rheology, with

  7. Radiocarbon evidence for extensive plate-boundary rupture about 300 years ago at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Atwater, B.F.; Bobrowsky, P.T.; Bradley, L.-A.; Clague, J.J.; Carver, G.A.; Darienzo, M.E.; Grant, W.C.; Krueger, H.W.; Sparks, R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stuiver, M.

    1995-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, a region of converging tectonic plates along the Pacific coast of North America, has a geological history of very large plate-boundary earthquakes1,2, but no such earthquakes have struck this region since Euro-American settlement about 150 years ago. Geophysical estimates of the moment magnitudes (Mw) of the largest such earthquakes range from 8 (ref. 3).to 91/2 (ref. 4). Radiocarbon dating of earthquake-killed vegetation can set upper bounds on earthquake size by constraining the length of plate boundary that ruptured in individual earthquakes. Such dating has shown that the most recent rupture, or series of ruptures, extended at least 55 km along the Washington coast within a period of a few decades about 300 years ago5. Here we report 85 new 14C ages, which suggest that this most recent rupture (or series) extended at least 900 km between southern British Columbia and northern California. By comparing the 14C ages with written records of the past 150 years, we conclude that a single magnitude 9 earthquake, or a series of lesser earthquakes, ruptured most of the length of the Cascadia subduction zone between the late 1600s and early 1800s, and probably in the early 1700s.

  8. Broadband polarization gratings for efficient liquid crystal display, beam steering, spectropolarimetry, and Fresnel zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chulwoo

    displays is the polymer-PG display, which allows an immediate brightness improvement (up to a factor of two) of conventional LC displays by replacing absorbing polarizers with achromatic PGs as thin, transmissive polymer films. We demonstrate the first proof-of-concept prototype projector based on the polymer-PG display and we also discuss optical design considerations and challenges toward a viable solution for our ultrabright pico-projector applications of the polymer-PG display. Second, two novel beam steering concepts based on the PG diffraction have been proposed. The polarization-sensitive diffraction of the PGs provides very attractive beam steering operations with ultra-high efficiency over wide steering angles by all-thin-plate electro-optical systems. We developed a non-mechanical, wide-angle beam steering system using stacked PGs and LC waveplates, and we also demonstrated a continuous beam steering using two rotating PGs, named the Risley grating as a thin-plate version of the Risley prism. The third PG application is in imaging and non-imaging spectropolarimetry. We have shown a snapshot, hyperspectral, full-Stokes polarimeter using inline PGs and quarter-waveplates. The use of PGs as a new polarimetric element for astronomical instruments in the mid-wave IR wavelengths also has been proposed to overcome current limitations of existing IR polarimeters. In the last part of this Dissertation, we introduce a polarization-type Fresnel zone plates (P-FZPs), comprising of spatially distributed linear birefringence or concentric PG (CPG) patterns. Effective fabrication methods of P-FZPs have been developed using polarization holography based on the Michelson interferometer and photoalignment of LC materials. We demonstrated high-quality P-FZPs, which exhibit ideal Fresnel-type lens effects, formed as both LC polymer films and electro-optical LC devices. We also discuss the polarization-selective lens properties of the P-FZPs as well as their electro-optical switching

  9. Effect of phase delay on the pumping efficiency of a multi-plate gill array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Mary; Kiger, Ken

    2011-11-01

    In nature, pumping by oscillating appendage arrays (used for respiration, feeding or locomotion) have been noted to exhibit distinct patterns of movement depending on their intended function and Reynolds number. One thing that is typically in common, however, is that a phase lag of 60 to 90 degrees between adjacent appendages is used for many low to intermediate Reynolds number conditions (10 to 10000). To understand why this trait is commonly exhibited, a robotic oscillating plate array modeled after a nymphal mayfly was constructed that permitted stroke, pitch and phase lag variation between adjacent plates. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain three-dimensional velocity data, allowing computation of the net pumping rate and flow induced dissipation for five cases, focusing on the role of the gill plate interactions and their dependence on the phase lag between adjacent gills. The results indicate that mayfly gills most likely use a phase lag of 90° because it produces the highest net mass flow rate while consuming the least amount of energy. Measurements indicate that this occurs as a balance between excessive dissipation during close-approach events while optimizing favorable hydrodynamic interactions between adjacent plates. Work supported by NSF under grant CBET0730907.

  10. Planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The high selectivity of the adsorption layer for low-boiling alkanes is shown, the separation factor (α) couple iso-butane / butane is 1.9 at a column temperature of 50 °C.The paper presents sorption and selective properties of planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the stationary phase.

  11. Single-Phase Drive Ultrasonic Linear Motor Using a Linked Twin Square Plate Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Keiji; Tamura, Hideki; Masuda, Kentaro; Takano, Takehiro

    2013-07-01

    A novel linear motion ultrasonic motor, which uses a single resonance mode driven by a single phase and has the same motor characteristics for operation in reverse directions, is developed. An in-plane breathing mode in the square plate is strongly driven by the transverse effect of a piezoelectric ceramic. A stator resonator consists of twin square plates linked by V-shaped beams. Only one side of the square plate can be excited by the resonance of the breathing mode, when the other passive side plate is electrically opened so that the effective elasticities and the resonant frequencies between both plates are different; as a result, the friction edge of the resonator vibrates in a slant locus to move a load slider. The reverse operation is easily obtained by switching the driving side of the square plates. We designed the stator resonator by FEM analysis and fabricated a prototype for our experiment. The prototype motor showed good characteristics, for example, a moving slider velocity of 100 mm/s, a thrust force of 3.5 N, and an efficiency of 30% when the preload was 10 N, the input effective voltage was 5 V, and the input power was 1.2 W.

  12. Paleomagnetic constraints on Cenozoic deformation along the northwest margin of the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone through New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Gillian M.; Michalk, Daniel M.; Little, Timothy A.

    2012-02-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, a zone of oblique continental convergence and transform motion. The actively deforming region offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of deformation, including vertical-axis rotation of rigid blocks within a transcurrent plate boundary zone. We present and interpret paleomagnetic data from three new and three previously published sites from the NW part of the South Island (NW Nelson region), where sedimentary strata dated between 36 and 10 Ma overlie the crystalline Paleozoic basement assemblages of the Gondwana margin. Compared with reference directions from the Australian apparent polar wander path, none of the results provide evidence of post-Eocene vertical-axis rotation. This suggests that for the past 36 Myr NW Nelson has remained a strong, coherent block that has moved as a contiguous part of the Australian plate. This is in marked contrast to the strongly rotated nature of more outboard accreted terranes to the east. For example, the Hikurangi Margin in the North Island (NW of the Alpine Fault) and the Marlborough region in the NE of the South Island (SE of the Alpine Fault), have both undergone diverse clockwise rotations of up to 140° since the early Paleogene. The NW tip of the South Island seems to have acted as a rigid backstop relative to these more complex oroclinal deformations. We infer that, because of its relatively stiff bulk rheology, it has not been drawn into the distributed plate boundary rotational deformation associated with the New Zealand Orocline.

  13. Propagation of structured light beams after multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumala, Yisa S.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents propagation dynamics of structured light (complex light) containing optical vortices after it has undergone multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate (SPP) device having a nonzero surface reflection. In the calculations, the thick-plate approximation is assumed as it is expected to give a more accurate representation of the standard geometry of an SPP device from a low-surface reflection to a high-surface reflection. Calculations showing the propagation of counter-rotating optical vortices are presented, and the effect of the statistical nature of photons on the observation of the angular intensity modulation of the beam is discussed.

  14. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Coates, C.W.; Wilson, T.J.

    1982-05-19

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composite are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  15. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP) expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    PubMed

    Gee, Stephen T; Milgram, Sharon L; Kramer, Kenneth L; Conlon, Frank L; Moody, Sally A

    2011-01-01

    Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP) contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P) axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO)-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+)) and neural plate border zone (pax3(+)), while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland), as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF) at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the first to show

  16. Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials (series 11)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness (ductile and brittle) of the HAZ of welds and of A 302 grade B (A302B) plate materials typical of those used fabricating older RPVs. The initial plate material of emphasis will be A302B steel, not the A302B modified with nickel additions. This decision was made by the NRC following a survey of the materials of construction for RPBs in operating U.S. nuclear plants. Reference 1 was used for the preliminary survey, and the information from that report was revised by NRC staff based on information contained in the licensee responses to Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, {open_quotes}Reactor Vessel Structural Integrity, 10CFR50.54(f).{close_quotes} The resulting survey showed a total of eight RPVs with A302B, ten with A302B (modified), and one with A302 grade A plate. Table 5.1 in the previous semiannual report provides a summary of that survey. For the HAZ portion of the program, the intent is to examine HAZ material in the A302B (i.e., with low nickel content) and in A302B (modified) or A533B-1 (i.e., with medium nickel content). During this reporting period, two specific plates were identified as being applicable to this task. One plate is A302B and the other is A302B (modified). The A302B plate (43 x 42 x 7 in.) will be prepared for welding, while the A302B (modified) plate already contains a commercially produced weld (heat 33A277, Linde 0091 flux). These plates were identified from a list of ten materials provided by Mr. E. Biemiller of Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). The materials have been requested from YAEC for use in this irradiation task, and arrangements are being made with YAEC for procurement of the plates mentioned above.

  17. Deformation kinematics along oblique convergent plate boundary zones in the western United States, Japanese Islands, and Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen-Tu, Bingming

    transmitted from the Japan trench. Horizontal strain rate and velocity field that accommodate India-Eurasia plate motion in Pakistan are determined based on constraints from geological and geodetic information in the region. The optimal model that yields a strain rate field consistent with observed geologic, seismologic, and geodetic data gives 17--28 mm/yr of left-lateral strike-slip motion along the Chaman fault zone, 3--6 mm/yr of east-west convergence and 5--14 mm/yr of north-south left-lateral shear across the roughly NS trending Sulaiman Range. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Preliminary design of a zone plate based hard X-ray monochromatic diffraction nanoprobe for materials studies at APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhonghou; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Shu, Deming; Xu, Ruqing; Schmidt, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at studies of the micro/nano-structures of a broad range materials and electronic devices, Advance Photon Source (APS) is developing a dedicated diffraction nanoprobe (DNP) beamline for the needs arising from a multidiscipline research community. As a part of the APS Upgrade Project, the planed facility, named Sub-micron 3-D Diffraction (S3DD) beamline1, integrates the K-B mirror based polychromatic Laue diffraction and the Fresnel zone-plate based monochromatic diffraction techniques that currently support 3D/2D microdiffraction programs at the 34-ID-E and 2-ID-D of the APS, respectively. Both diffraction nanoprobes are designed to have a 50-nm or better special resolution. The zone-plate based monochromatic DNP has been preliminarily designed and will be constructed at the sector 34-ID. It uses an APS-3.0-cm period or APS-3.3-cm period undulator, a liquid-nitrogen cooled mirror as its first optics, and a water cooled small gap silicon double-crystal monochromator with an energy range of 5-30 keV. A set of zone plates have been designed to optimize for focusing efficiency and the working distance based on the attainable beamline length and the beam coherence. To ensure the nanoprobe performance, high stiffness and high precision flexure stage systems have been designed or demonstrated for optics mounting and sample scanning, and high precision temperature control of the experimental station will be implemented to reduce thermal instability. Designed nanoprobe beamline has a good management on thermal power loading on optical components and allows high degree of the preservation of beam brilliance for high focal flux and coherence. Integrated with variety of X-ray techniques, planed facility provides nano-XRD capability with the maximum reciprocal space accessibility and allows micro/nano-spectroscopy studies with K-edge electron binding energies of most elements down to Vanadium in the periodic table. We will discuss the preliminary design of the zone-plate

  19. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-10-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices.

  20. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  1. Overriding plate deformation and variability of fore-arc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-10-01

    In nature, subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that influence the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present dynamic laboratory models of progressive subduction in three-dimensional space, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed, and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, particularly focusing on overriding plate deformation. The results indicate that the variation in far-field boundary conditions has an influence on the slab geometry, subduction partitioning, and trench migration partitioning. Our models also indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of back-arc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, and Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (250-700 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. In addition, our models indicate that the style of fore-arc deformation (shortening or extension) is influenced by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed setup is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature, and accretionary configuration. Furthermore, the model can explain back-arc and fore-arc extension at the Calabria subduction zone since the latest middle Miocene as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting induced strong trench suction, driving fore-arc extension, and

  2. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-15

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  3. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  4. Fraunhofer diffraction of the plane wave by a multilevel (quantized) spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2008-01-15

    We obtain an analytical expression in the form of a finite sum of plane waves that describes the paraxial scalar Fraunhofer diffraction of a limited plane wave by a multilevel (quantized) spiral phase plate (SPP) bounded by a polygonal aperture. For several topological charges of the SPP we numerically obtain the minimal number of SPP sectors for which the RMS between the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for multilevel and continuous SPP does not exceed 2%.

  5. Surface modes in "photonic cholesteric liquid crystal-phase plate-metal" structure.

    PubMed

    Vetrov, S Ya; Pyatnov, M V; Timofeev, I V

    2014-05-01

    The light transmission spectrum has been calculated for a "cholesteric liquid crystal-phase plate-metal" structure. It is shown that the system can have an isolated waveguide surface mode with characteristics efficiently controllable by external fields acting on the cholesteric. The degree of localization of surface modes and the transmission coefficients have been found to differ considerably for the light of different polarizations. PMID:24784092

  6. Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Lopez-Vegas, Alberto M.

    2012-01-01

    Kinematic similarities between the Sumatra and Puerto Rico Trenches highlight the potential for a mega-earthquake along the Puerto Rico Trench and the generation of local and trans-Atlantic tsunamis. We used the horizontal components of continuous GPS (cGPS) measurements from 10 sites on NE Caribbean islands to evaluate strain accumulation along the North American (NA) - Caribbean (CA) plate boundary. These sites move westward and slightly northward relative to CA interior at rates ≤2.5 mm/y. Provided this motion originates in the subduction interface, the northward motion suggests little or no trench-perpendicular thrust accumulation and may in fact indicate divergence north of Puerto Rico, where abnormal subsidence, bathymetry, and gravity are observed. The Puerto Rico Trench, thus, appears unable to generate mega-earthquakes, but damaging smaller earthquakes cannot be discounted. The westward motion, characterized by decreasing rate with distance from the trench, is probably due to eastward motion of CA plate impeded at the plate boundary by the Bahamas platform. Two additional cGPS sites in Mona Passage and SW Puerto Rico move to the SW similar to Hispaniola and unlike the other 10 sites. That motion relative to the rest of Puerto Rico may have given rise to seismicity and normal faults in Mona Rift, Mona Passage, and SW Puerto Rico.

  7. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A composite map produced by combining 90 passes of SST data show good agreement with conventional GEM models. The SEASAT altimeter data were deduced and found to agree with both the SST and GEM fields. The maps are dominated (especially in the east) by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkedly close correlation with plate age. Most anomalies in the east half of the Pacific could be partly caused by regional differences in plate age. The amplitude of these geoid or gravity anomalies caused by age differences should decrease with absolute plate age, and large anomalies (approximately 3 m) over old, smooth sea floor may indicate a further deeper source within or perhaps below the lithosphere. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration was considered. A plume emanating from a buoyant layer 100 km thick and 10,000 times less viscous than the surrounding mantle should have a diameter of about 400 km and must ascend at about 10 cm/yr to arrive still anomalously hot in the uppermost mantle.

  8. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony; Nielsen, Tove; Jokat, Wilfried; Thybo, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone - East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic unconformity (IMU), which marks the termination of syn-rift deposition in the deep-sea basins and onset of: (i) thermo-mechanical coupling across the GFZ, (ii) basin compression, and (iii) contourite deposition, north of the EGR. The onset of coupling across the GFZ is constrained by results of 2-D flexural backstripping. We explain the thermo-mechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf-progradation on the NE Greenland margin. Given an estimated middle-to-late Miocene (~15-10 Ma) age of the IMU, we speculate that the event is synchronous with uplift of the East and West Greenland margins. The correlation between margin uplift and plate-motion changes further indicates that the uplift was triggered by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intra-plate stresses related to global tectonics.

  9. Free-Standing Zone Plate Optimized for He II 30.4 nm Solar Irradiance Measurements Having High Accuracy and Stability in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; McMullin, D. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.; Chang, C.; Jones, A. R.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    A zone plate was designed to record the He II 30.4 nm solar irradiance, was fabricated using electron beam lithography, and was absolutely calibrated using the NIST SURF synchrotron. The zone plate has an open support grid identical to those used to successfully launch transmission gratings in previous solar radiometers and is otherwise free-standing with no support membrane that would absorb EUV radiation. The measured efficiency of 3.0 ± 0.1% at 30.4 nm is consistent with detailed modeling of the efficiency and accounting for the geometrical transmittance of the support grid. The binary nature of the zone plate, consisting of opaque gold bars and open spaces with no support membrane, results in excellent long-term stability in space against contamination, radiation damage, and other effects that could alter the efficiency and instrument throughput. The zone plate's focusing property enables the rejection of out-of-band radiation by small apertures and high signal to background values that are superior to previous radiometers. The 4 mm outer diameter of the zone plate and the 25 mm focal length for 30.4 nm radiation enable a compact instrument that is attractive for small CubeSats and other space flight missions where resources are extremely limited.

  10. Dynamics of intra-oceanic subduction initiation, part 2: supra-subduction zone ophiolite formation and metamorphic sole exhumation in context of absolute plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Peters, K.; Spakman, W.; Guilmette, C.; Thieulot, C.; Plumper, O.; Guerer, D.; Brouwer, F. M.; Aldanmaz, E.; Kaymakci, N.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing subduction initiation is key for understanding the coupling between plate tectonics and underlying mantle. Here we focus on supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites and how their formation links to intra-oceanic subduction initiation in an absolute plate motion frame. SSZ ophiolites form the majority of exposed oceanic lithosphere fragments and are widely recognized to have formed during intra-oceanic subduction initiation. Structural, petrological, geochemical, and plate kinematic constraints on their kinematic evolution show that SSZ crust forms at forearc spreading centers at the expense of a mantle wedge, thereby flattening the nascent slab. This leads to the typical inverted pressure gradients found in metamorphic soles that form at the subduction plate contact below and during SSZ crust crystallization. Former spreading centers are preserved in forearcs when subduction initiates along transform faults or off-ridge oceanic detachments. We show how these are reactivated when subduction initiates in the absolute plate motion direction of the inverting weakness zone. Upon inception of slab-pull due to e.g. eclogitization, the sole is separated from the slab, remains welded to the thinned overriding plate lithosphere and can become intruded by mafic dikes upon asthenospheric influx into the mantle wedge. We propound that most ophiolites thus formed under special geodynamic circumstances and may not be representative of normal oceanic crust. Our study highlights how far-field geodynamic processes and absolute plate motions may force intra-oceanic subduction initiation as key towards advancing our understanding of the entire plate tectonic cycle.

  11. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  12. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Cameron W.; Wilson, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composites are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component so as to provide a surface of essentially the malleable component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  13. Detection and quantification of delamination in laminated plates from the phase of appropriate guided wave modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-01-01

    Applicability of specific Lamb wave modes for delamination detection and quantification in a laminated aluminum plate is investigated. The Lamb modes were generated in the plate using a broadband piezoelectric transducer structured with a rigid electrode. Appropriate excitation frequencies and modes for inspection were selected from theoretical dispersion curves. Sensitivity of antisymmetric and symmetric modes for delamination detection and quantification has been investigated using the Hilbert-Huang transform. The mode conversion phenomenon of Lamb waves during progressive delamination is observed. The antisymmetric mode is found to be more reliable for delamination detection and quantification. In this investigation, the changes in the phase of guided Lamb wave modes are related to the degree of delamination, unlike other studies, where mostly the attenuation of the propagating waves has been related to the extent of the internal damage, such as cracks and corrosions. Appropriate features for delamination detection and quantification are extracted from the experimental data.

  14. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  15. Sub-5 nm hard x-ray point focusing by a combined Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror and multilayer zone plate.

    PubMed

    Döring, F; Robisch, A L; Eberl, C; Osterhoff, M; Ruhlandt, A; Liese, T; Schlenkrich, F; Hoffmann, S; Bartels, M; Salditt, T; Krebs, H U

    2013-08-12

    Compound optics such as lens systems can overcome the limitations concerning resolution, efficiency, or aberrations which fabrication constraints would impose on any single optical element. In this work we demonstrate unprecedented sub-5 nm point focusing of hard x-rays, based on the combination of a high gain Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system and a high resolution W/Si multilayer zone plate (MZP) for ultra-short focal length f. The pre-focusing allows limiting the MZP radius to below 2 μm, compatible with the required 5 nm structure width and essentially unlimited aspect ratios, provided by enabling fabrication technology based on pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and focused ion beam (FIB).

  16. Subduction Zone Geometry and Pre-seismic Tectonic Constraints From the Andaman Micro- plate Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Rajendran, K.; C. P, R.

    2007-12-01

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega-thrust rupture broke along the narrow fore-arc sliver boundary of the Indo- Burmese collision. Earlier events of 1679 (M~7.5), 1941 (M 7.7), 1881 (M~7.9) and 2002 (Mw 7.3) generated spatially restricted ruptures along this margin. Spatio-temporal analysis of the pre-seismic earthquakes showed dense seismicity in the back-arc region but negligible activity towards the trench. The hypocentral distribution highlights the shallow subduction at the northern segment, which becomes steeper and deeper to the south. The pre-earthquake stress distribution, inferred from the P and T-axes of earthquake faulting mechanisms, represents the compressional fore-arc and extensional back-arc stress regimes. Shallow NNE-SSW under- thrusting and NNW-SSE opening up of the marginal sea basin stresses were observed and this trend changes to NE-SW to N-S at intermediate depths. We collected three epochs of campaign mode GPS data along the arc from May 2002 to September 2004. These observations show nearly pure convergence along the Andaman trench prior to the earthquake. During this period the GPS sites moved westward relative to India at ~5.5 mm/yr, consistent with the earlier results. Along arc GPS velocity vectors suggest that the Andaman trench is part of a purely slip partitioned boundary, with the strike- slip component of the India-Sunda relative plate motion being taken up on the transform fault in the Andaman Sea or on the West Andaman Fault, and the convergent component on the Andaman trench. Although near normal convergence was observed, it sampled only a fraction of a possible full Andaman microplate convergence velocity, because elastic deformation from the locked shallow megathrust caused displacements toward the overriding plate, that is, away from India. Based on the Indian plate velocity and Andaman spreading rates, this component amounts to ~85% of the pre-seismic convergence. These geodetic velocities represent the present day geologic

  17. Upper plate deformation and seismic barrier in front of Nazca subduction zone: The Chololo Fault System and active tectonics along the Coastal Cordillera, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Lacan, Pierre; Tavera, Hernando; Bondoux, Francis

    2008-11-01

    The South America plate boundary is one of the most active subduction zone. The recent Mw = 8.4 Arequipa 2001 earthquake ruptured the subduction plane toward the south over 400 km and stopped abruptly on the Ilo Peninsula. In this exact region, the subduction seismic crisis induced the reactivation of continental fault systems in the coastal area. We studied the main reactivated fault system that trends perpendicular to the trench by detailed mapping of fault related-geomorphic features. Also, at a longer time scale, a recurrent Quaternary transtensive tectonic activity of the CFS is expressed by offset river gullies and alluvial fans. The presence of such extensional fault systems trending orthogonal to the trench along the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru is interpreted to reflect a strong coupling between the two plates. In this particular case, stress transfer to the upper plate, at least along the coastal fringe, appears to have induced crustal seismic events that were initiated mainly during and after the 2001 earthquake. The seafloor roughness of the subducting plate is usually thought to be a cause of segmentation along subduction zones. However, after comparing and discussing the role of inherited structures within the upper plate to the subduction zone segmentation in southern Peru, we suggest that the continental structure itself may exert some feedback control on the segmentation of the subduction zone and thus participate to define the rupture pattern of major subduction earthquakes along the southern Peru continental margin.

  18. Phase equilibria and plate-fluid interfacial tensions for associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dong; Li, Xiao-Sen

    2006-08-28

    The excess Helmholtz free energy functional for associating hard sphere fluid is formulated by using a modified fundamental measure theory [Y. X. Yu and J. Z. Wu, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10156 (2002)]. Within the framework of density functional theory, the thermodynamic properties including phase equilibria for both molecules and monomers, equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions and isotherms of excess adsorption, average molecule density, average monomer density, and plate-fluid interfacial tension for four-site associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores are investigated. The phase equilibria inside the hard slit pores and attractive slit pores are determined according to the requirement that temperature, chemical potential, and grand potential in coexistence phases should be equal and the plate-fluid interfacial tensions at equilibrium states are predicted consequently. The influences of association energy, fluid-solid interaction, and pore width on phase equilibria and equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions are discussed.

  19. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  20. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony B.; Nielsen, Tove; Jokat, Wilfried; Thybo, Hans; Dahl-Jensen, Trine

    2016-02-01

    Tectonic models predict that following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their postrift evolution. However, postbreakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic unconformity (IMU), which marks the termination of synrift deposition in the deep-sea basins and onset of (i) thermomechanical coupling across the GFZ, (ii) basin compression, and (iii) contourite deposition, north of the EGR. The onset of coupling across the GFZ is constrained by results of 2-D flexural backstripping. We explain the thermomechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf progradation on the NE Greenland margin. Given an estimated middle to late Miocene (~15-10 Ma) age of the IMU, we speculate that the event is synchronous with uplift of the east and west Greenland margins. The correlation between margin uplift and plate motion changes further indicates that the uplift was triggered by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intraplate stresses related to global tectonics.

  1. Mantle convection with plates and mobile, faulted plate margins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, S; Gurnis, M

    1995-02-10

    A finite-element formulation of faults has been incorporated into time-dependent models of mantle convection with realistic rheology, continents, and phase changes. Realistic tectonic plates naturally form with self-consistent coupling between plate and mantle dynamics. After the initiation of subduction, trenches rapidly roll back with subducted slabs temporarily laid out along the base of the transition zone. After the slabs have penetrated into the lower mantle, the velocity of trench migration decreases markedly. The inhibition of slab penetration into the lower mantle by the 670-kilometer phase change is greatly reduced in these models as compared to models without tectonic plates. PMID:17813909

  2. Aquitard contaminant storage and flux resulting from dense nonaqueous phase liquid source zone dissolution and remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional diffusion model was used to investigate the effects of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone dissolution and remediation on the storage and release of contaminants from aquitards. Source zone dissolution was represented by a power-law source depleti...

  3. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  4. GPS Constraints on Continental Deformation in the Africa-Arabia-Eurasia Continental Collision Zone and Implications for the Dynamics of Plate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilinger, R.; McClusky, S.; Vernant, P.

    2005-12-01

    We present a GPS-derived velocity field (1988-2005) for the zone of interaction of the Arabian, African (Nubian and Somalian), and Eurasian plates. The velocity field indicates counterclockwise rotation of a broad area of the Earth's surface that includes the Arabian plate, adjacent parts of the Zagros and central Iran, Turkey, and the Aegean/Peloponnesus (>7 x 106 km2 5% of the Earth's total surface area) at rates in the range of 20 to 30 mm/yr. This relatively rapid motion occurs within the framework of the slow-moving (<5 mm/yr relative motions) Eurasian, Nubian, and Somalian plates. The circulatory pattern of motion increases in rate towards the Hellenic trench system, suggesting to us that subduction in the eastern Mediterranean is the dominant process responsible for regional deformation. Using seismic and other geophysical and geological information, we develop an elastic block model and use the GPS velocity field to estimate relative block motions. We constrain present-day motions of the Nubian, Somalian, Arabian, and Eurasian plates (relative Euler vectors), regional deformation within the inter-plate zone, and slip rates for major faults. With some important exceptions, geodetic slip rates for major block-bounding structures are comparable to geologic rates estimated for the most recent geological period (3-5 Ma). We find that the convergence of Arabia with Eurasia is accommodated in large part by lateral transport within the interior part of the collision zone and lithospheric shortening along the Caucasus and Zagros mountain belts around the periphery of the collision zone, with little fault-normal convergence within eastern Turkey and the Lesser Caucasus. In addition, we find that the principal boundary between the westerly moving Anatolian plate and Arabia (East Anatolian fault) is presently characterized by pure left-lateral strike slip with no fault-normal convergence and possibly small extension, implying that "extrusion", in the sense of pushing

  5. Young tectonics of a complex plate boundary zone: Indentation, rotation, and escape in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. K.; Ruppert, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    Convergence of thick crust of the Yakutat block with the southern margin of Alaska is widely recognized as a dominant influence on the tectonics of Alaska since at least late Miocene time. It is less clear how this convergence relates to the distribution, type, and orientation of geologic structures, and to the boundaries between the tectonic provinces that they define. We propose that convergence of Yakutat block includes two distinct components that influence deformation and topography in different ways: 1) The crust of the exposed, southern Yakutat block is too thick to subduct, which has caused the collisional St. Elias orogen. Detachment of the upper part of the mafic basement allows delamination and sinking of the remaining mafic crust and lithospheric mantle. The collisional orogen drives rigid counterclockwise rotation of the southern Alaska block south of the arcuate, right-lateral Denali fault. The western boundary of this block is a zone of distributed contraction in the western Alaska Range and Cook Inlet. 2) The northern part of the Yakutat block is thin enough to subduct but thick and buoyant enough to cause localized flat-slab subduction orthogonal to rotation of the southern Alaska block. Consequences include the gently antiformal Talkeetna Mountains that span the forearc basin, a gap in the magmatic arc, and a basement-involved fold-and-thrust belt in the northern Alaska Range. An arcuate oroclinal hinge from southern Alaska to the northeastern Brooks Range reflects indentation since at least Paleocene time. Traction above the subducted Yakutat block along the southern part of this hinge drives current indentation. North of the subducted Yakutat block, indentation is reflected by left-lateral block rotation that accommodates shortening between the Denali and Tintina faults and by contraction farther north along the northern edge of the arcuate northeastern Brooks Range. Western Alaska accommodates both northward indentation and westward convergence

  6. Experimental investigation on focusing characteristics of a He-Ne laser using circular Fresnel zone plate for high-precision alignment of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2012-05-15

    We experimentally investigate the focusing characteristics of a He-Ne laser at the focal region for the high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators using a circular Fresnel zone plate. The laser wave passing through the Fresnel zone plate having a focal length of 66.7 m propagates for a 268-m-long distance at atmospheric pressure. A new laser-based alignment system using Fresnel zone plates as the alignment targets is discussed. The transverse displacement of the focused spot of the laser is measured as a function of the displacement of the target by a detector installed at the focal point. Systematic studies on the focusing characteristics and alignment precision have been successfully conducted in this experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, and the alignment precision of the target is determined to be less than {+-}30 {mu}m. In this study, we perform a detailed experimental investigation on the laser propagation and focusing characteristics using the circular Fresnel zone plate at the focal region along with theoretical calculations.

  7. Ultra-thin optical vortex phase plate based on the metasurface and the angular momentum transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Yan; Guo, Zhongyi; Li, Rongzhen; Zhang, Jingran; Zhang, Anjun; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-04-01

    The ultra-thin optical vortex phase plate (VPP) has been designed and investigated based on the metasurface of the metal rectangular split-ring resonators (MRSRRs) array. The circularly polarized incident light can convert into corresponding cross-polarization transmission light, and the phase and the amplitude of cross-polarization transmission light can be simultaneously governed by modulating two arms of the MRSRR. The MRSRR has been arranged in a special order for forming an ultra-thin optical VPP that can covert a plane wave into a vortex beam with a variety of the topological charges, and the transformation between spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been discussed in detail. The multi-spectral characteristics of the VPP have also been investigated, and the operating bandwidth of the designed VPP is 190 nm (in the range of 710-900 nm), which enable a potential implication for integrated optics and vortex optics.

  8. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  9. GPS constraints on continental deformation in the Africa-Arabia-Eurasia continental collision zone and implications for the dynamics of plate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilinger, Robert; McClusky, Simon; Vernant, Philippe; Lawrence, Shawn; Ergintav, Semih; Cakmak, Rahsan; Ozener, Haluk; Kadirov, Fakhraddin; Guliev, Ibrahim; Stepanyan, Ruben; Nadariya, Merab; Hahubia, Galaktion; Mahmoud, Salah; Sakr, K.; Arrajehi, Abdullah; Paradissis, Demitris; Al-Aydrus, A.; Prilepin, Mikhail; Guseva, Tamara; Evren, Emre; Dmitrotsa, Andriy; Filikov, S. V.; Gomez, Francisco; Al-Ghazzi, Riad; Karam, Gebran

    2006-05-01

    The GPS-derived velocity field (1988-2005) for the zone of interaction of the Arabian, African (Nubian, Somalian), and Eurasian plates indicates counterclockwise rotation of a broad area of the Earth's surface including the Arabian plate, adjacent parts of the Zagros and central Iran, Turkey, and the Aegean/Peloponnesus relative to Eurasia at rates in the range of 20-30 mm/yr. This relatively rapid motion occurs within the framework of the slow-moving (˜5 mm/yr relative motions) Eurasian, Nubian, and Somalian plates. The circulatory pattern of motion increases in rate toward the Hellenic trench system. We develop an elastic block model to constrain present-day plate motions (relative Euler vectors), regional deformation within the interplate zone, and slip rates for major faults. Substantial areas of continental lithosphere within the region of plate interaction show coherent motion with internal deformations below ˜1-2 mm/yr, including central and eastern Anatolia (Turkey), the southwestern Aegean/Peloponnesus, the Lesser Caucasus, and Central Iran. Geodetic slip rates for major block-bounding structures are mostly comparable to geologic rates estimated for the most recent geological period (˜3-5 Myr). We find that the convergence of Arabia with Eurasia is accommodated in large part by lateral transport within the interior part of the collision zone and lithospheric shortening along the Caucasus and Zagros mountain belts around the periphery of the collision zone. In addition, we find that the principal boundary between the westerly moving Anatolian plate and Arabia (East Anatolian fault) is presently characterized by pure left-lateral strike slip with no fault-normal convergence. This implies that "extrusion" is not presently inducing westward motion of Anatolia. On the basis of the observed kinematics, we hypothesize that deformation in the Africa-Arabia-Eurasia collision zone is driven in large part by rollback of the subducting African lithosphere beneath

  10. Focal length measurement based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase plate.

    PubMed

    Dashtdar, Masoomeh; Mohammad-Ali Hosseini-Saber, S

    2016-09-10

    A method based on the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step is introduced for measuring effective focal length (EFL) and back focal length (BFL) of optical imaging systems. It is shown that, as a transparent plane-parallel plate is illuminated at a boundary region by a monochromatic beam of light, Fresnel diffraction occurs because of the abrupt change in phase imposed by the finite change in refractive index at the plate boundary. Variation of the incident angle in a convergent (or divergent) beam of light causes the periodic intensity along the central fringe of the diffraction pattern. The measurement of the extrema position of the intensity distribution accurately provides the EFL and BFL. The technique is easy to apply and can measure a wide range of both positive and negative focal lengths. The measuring setup can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises. As examples of this technique, the EFLs of five different lenses are experimentally obtained. The results are quite consistent with the values indicated by the lens manufacturer.

  11. New long trace profiler based on phase plate diffraction for optical metrology of SSRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Danhua; Xiao, Tiqiao; Du, Guohao; Wen, Li; Luo, Hongxin; Xia, Shaojian; Xu, Hongjie

    2006-09-01

    A long trace profiler LTP-1200, with a novel f-θ system based on phase plate diffraction and a scanning range up to 1200mm, has been developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The central dark line in the diffraction pattern generated by a π phase plate is taken as the positioning benchmark. A magnet levitated linear rail with very high accuracy is used. A granite bench is employed to reduce deformation due to self-gravity of the rail. The focused diffraction pattern is recorded with an area charge-coupled device. The generalized regression neural network algorithm is adopted to improve the beam positioning precision. The static stability of LTP-1200 in 5h is 0.14μrad, and the repeatability reaches 0.05μrad in a common laboratory without any special control of temperature, air turbulence, etc. Calibration tests were carried out with a high precision autocollimator and a standard spherical mirror, respectively. Results show the high performance and reliability of the LTP-1200.

  12. Focal length measurement based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase plate.

    PubMed

    Dashtdar, Masoomeh; Mohammad-Ali Hosseini-Saber, S

    2016-09-10

    A method based on the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step is introduced for measuring effective focal length (EFL) and back focal length (BFL) of optical imaging systems. It is shown that, as a transparent plane-parallel plate is illuminated at a boundary region by a monochromatic beam of light, Fresnel diffraction occurs because of the abrupt change in phase imposed by the finite change in refractive index at the plate boundary. Variation of the incident angle in a convergent (or divergent) beam of light causes the periodic intensity along the central fringe of the diffraction pattern. The measurement of the extrema position of the intensity distribution accurately provides the EFL and BFL. The technique is easy to apply and can measure a wide range of both positive and negative focal lengths. The measuring setup can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises. As examples of this technique, the EFLs of five different lenses are experimentally obtained. The results are quite consistent with the values indicated by the lens manufacturer. PMID:27661386

  13. New long trace profiler based on phase plate diffraction for optical metrology of SSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Danhua; Xiao Tiqiao; Du Guohao; Wen Li; Luo Hongxin; Xia Shaojian; Xu Hongjie

    2006-09-15

    A long trace profiler LTP-1200, with a novel f-{theta} system based on phase plate diffraction and a scanning range up to 1200 mm, has been developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The central dark line in the diffraction pattern generated by a {pi} phase plate is taken as the positioning benchmark. A magnet levitated linear rail with very high accuracy is used. A granite bench is employed to reduce deformation due to self-gravity of the rail. The focused diffraction pattern is recorded with an area charge-coupled device. The generalized regression neural network algorithm is adopted to improve the beam positioning precision. The static stability of LTP-1200 in 5 h is 0.14 {mu}rad, and the repeatability reaches 0.05 {mu}rad in a common laboratory without any special control of temperature, air turbulence, etc. Calibration tests were carried out with a high precision autocollimator and a standard spherical mirror, respectively. Results show the high performance and reliability of the LTP-1200.

  14. Predictive model for toluene degradation and microbial phenotypic profiles in flat plate vapor phase bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirpuri, R.; Sharp, W.; Villaverde, S.; Jones, W.; Lewandowski, Z.; Cunningham, A.

    1997-06-01

    A predictive model has been developed to describe degradation of toluene in a flat-plate vapor phase bioreactor (VPBR). The VPBR model incorporates kinetic, stoichiometric, injury, and irreversible loss coefficients from suspended culture studies for toluene degradation by P. putida 54G and measured values of Henry`s law constant and boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid and liquid-biofilm interface. The model is used to estimate the performance of the reactor with respect to toluene degradation and to predict profiles of toluene concentration and bacterial physiological state within the biofilm. These results have been compared with experimentally determined values from a flat plate VPBR under electron acceptor and electron donor limiting conditions. The model accurately predicts toluene concentrations in the vapor phase and toluene degradation rate by adjusting only three parameters: biomass density and rates of death and endogenous decay. Qualitatively, the model also predicts gradients in the physiological state cells in the biofilm. This model provides a rational design for predicting an upper limit of toluene degradation capability in a VPBR and is currently being tested to assess applications for predicting performance of bench and pilot-scale column reactors.

  15. Seismic imaging of the western Hellenic subduction zone: A link between slab buoyancy, differential rollback, and upper-plate deformation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F. D.; Rondenay, S.; Zhang, H.; Olive, J. L.; Royden, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Hellenic subduction zone is located in the east-central Mediterranean region and exhibits large variations in convergence rate along its western edge. Differences in the lithosphere entering the subduction zone are believed to drive the different rates of convergence. While seismic reflection data has shown a transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere along the foreland, no detailed images of the mantle-wedge structure are available to test this hypothesis. Here, we present the results of several seismic imaging studies to constrain the structure of the lower and upper plates along the western Hellenic subduction zone (WHSZ). These studies exploit data from two temporary arrays of 40 broadband seismometers that were deployed across Greece in a northern line (NL, across Northern Greece) and southern line (SL, across Peloponnesus, Attica, and Evia), each roughly perpendicular to the trench axis. Over 50 high-quality teleseismic events were processed from each line using a 2D teleseismic migration algorithm based on the Generalized Radon Transform and a 3D receiver function algorithm that includes dipping interfaces. In addition, a 3D P-wave velocity model was constructed by applying double-difference tomography to ~7000 local earthquakes. Seismic images from each method all show a N60E dipping slab beneath both NL and SL. From the migration images, we interpret a ~10 km thick low-velocity layer beneath SL as subducted oceanic crust and a ~20 km thick low-velocity layer beneath NL as subducted continental crust. The two imaged subducted crusts connect smoothly with results from seismic reflection data obtained updip. However, the ~20 km thick continental crust we observe in the upper mantle beneath NL is less than the ~30 km thick crust observed in seismic reflection data from the foreland, which suggests that ~10 km of continental crust is being scraped off and attached to the upper plate. When compared along strike, the two profiles show that the oceanic

  16. Micro-Fresnel Zone Plate Optical Devices Using Densely Accumulated Ray Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment generally relates to an optical device suitable for use with an optical medium for the storage and retrieval of data. The optical device includes an illumination means for providing a beam of optical radiation of wavelength .lamda. and an optical path that the beam of optical radiation follows. The optical device also includes a diffractive optical element defined by a plurality of annular sections. The plurality of annular sections having a first material alternately disposed with a plurality of annular sections comprising a second material. The diffractive optical element generates a plurality of focal points and densely accumulated ray points with phase contrast phenomena and the optical medium is positioned at a selected focal point or ray point of the diffractive optical element.

  17. Overview of the multilayer-Fresnel zone plate and the kinoform lens development at MPI for intelligent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunca Sanli, Umut; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Schütz, Gisela

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate goal of our research is to develop novel fabrication methods for high efficiency and high resolution X-ray optics. To this end, we have been pursuing the fabrication of several innovative diffractive/refractive optics designs. One such optic is the multilayer type Fresnel zone plate (ML-FZP). Our fabrication process relies on the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of two materials on a smooth glass fiber followed by a focused ion beam (FIB) based slicing and polishing. The ALD process allows much smaller outermost zone widths than the standard electron beam lithography based FZPs, meaning FZPs with potentially higher resolutions. Moreover, by depositing the multilayer on a cm long glass-fiber FZPs with very high optical thicknesses can be fabricated that can efficiently focus harder X-rays as well. A 21 nm half-pitch resolution was achieved using the ML-FZPs. Another optic we have been working on is the kinoform lens, which is a refractive/diffractive optic with a 100 % theoretical focusing efficiency. Their fabrication is usually realized by using approximate models which limit their success. Recently the fabrication of real kinoform lenses has been successfully realized in our lab via gray-scale direct-write ion beam lithography without any approximations. The lenses have been tested in the soft X-ray range achieving up to ~90 % of the calculated efficiency which indicates outstanding replication of the designed profile. Here we give an overview of our research and discuss the future challenges and opportunities for these optics.

  18. Continuous distributed phase-plate advances for high-energy laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Zuegel, J. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Cao, D.; Fochs, S.; Radha, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The distributed phase plate (DPP) design code Zhizhoo’ has been used to design full- aperture, continuous near-field transmission optics for a wide variety of high-fidelity focal-spot shapes for high-energy laser systems: OMEGA EP, Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS), and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The envelope shape, or profile, of the focal spot affects the hydrodynamics of directly driven targets in these laser systems. Controlling the envelope shape to a high degree of fidelity impacts the quality of the ablatively driven implosions. The code Zhizhoo’ not only produces DPP's with great control of the envelope shape, but also spectral and gradient control as well as robustness from near-field phase aberrations. The focal-spot shapes can take on almost any profile from symmetric to irregular patterns and with high fidelity relative to the objective function over many decades of intensity. The control over the near-field phase spectrum and phase gradients offer greater manufacturability of the full- aperture continuous surface-relief pattern. The flexibility and speed of the DPP design code Zhizhoo’ will be demonstrated by showing the wide variety of successful designs that have been made and those that are in progress.

  19. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  20. Hard X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging by a Reflection Zone Plate in the Presence of Astigmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Braig, Christoph; Lochel, Heike; Hafner, Aljosa; Firsov, Alexander; Rehanek, Jens; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Wojcik, Michael; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen; Erko, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of an off-axis x-ray reflection zone plate to perform wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, on-axis point focusing, and two-dimensional imaging is demonstrated by means of one and the same diffractive optical element (DOE) at a synchrotron radiation facility. The resolving power varies between 3×101 and 4×102 in the range of 7.6 keV to 9.0 keV, with its maximum at the design energy of 8.3 keV. This result is verified using an adjustable entrance slit, by which horizontal (H) and vertical (V) focusing to 0.85 μm(H) and 1.29 μm(V) is obtained near the sagittal focal plane of the astigmatic configuration. An angular and axial scan proves an accessible field of view of at least 0.6 arcmin × 0.8 arcmin and a focal depth of ±0.86 mm. Supported by the grating efficiency of around 17.5% and a very short pulse elongation, future precision x-ray fluorescence and absorption studies of transition metals at their K-edge on an ultrashort timescale could benefit from our findings.

  1. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  2. Technical Basis for Gas-Phase Vadose Zone Remediation Technologies at Hanford: A Review - 12186

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Oostrom, M.; Szecsody, J.E.; Strickland, C.E.; Chronister, G.B.; Benecke, M.W.

    2012-07-01

    In situ vadose zone remediation approaches are being evaluated as potential options to mitigate the transport of inorganic and radionuclide contaminants from the vadose zone to the groundwater. Some of the candidate approaches are based on changing the contaminant or subsurface conditions in a way that slows downward migration of the contaminants through the vadose zone using amendments delivered in the gas-phase. Two promising approaches that have undergone testing at Hanford include soil desiccation to address technetium-99 contamination and ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium. For soil desiccation, a dry gas is injected to desiccate a targeted portion of the subsurface and thereby decrease contaminant movement by removing moisture and decreasing the hydraulic conductivity of the desiccated zone. Ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium relies on changing the pore water chemistry, primarily through pH changes, to induce dissolution and precipitation processes that decrease the amount of mobile uranium in the vadose zone. (authors)

  3. SEARCHING FOR PLANETS IN HOLEY DEBRIS DISKS WITH THE APODIZING PHASE PLATE

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkat, Tiffany; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Smith, Paul S.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2015-02-10

    We present our first results from a high-contrast imaging search for planetary mass companions around stars with gapped debris disks, as inferred from the stars' bright infrared excesses. For the six considered stars, we model the disks' unresolved infrared spectral energy distributions in order to derive the temperature and location of the disk components. With VLT/NaCo Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraphic L'-band imaging, we search for planetary mass companions that may be sculpting the disks. We detect neither disks nor companions in this sample, confirmed by comparing plausible point sources with archival data. In order to calculate our mass sensitivity limit, we revisit the stellar age estimates. One target, HD 17848, at 540 ± 100 Myr old is significantly older than previously estimated. We then discuss our high-contrast imaging results with respect to the disk properties.

  4. Removing volatile contaminants from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Hoag, G.E.; Marley, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Organic liquids inadvertently spilled and then distributed in the unsaturated zone can pose a long-term threat to ground water. Many of these substances have significant volatility, and thereby establish a premise for contaminant removal from the unsaturated zone by inducing advective air-phase transport with wells screened in the unsaturated zone. In order to focus attention on the rates of mass transfer from liquid to vapour phases, sand columns were partially saturated with gasoline and vented under steady air-flow conditions. The ability of an equilibrium-based transport model to predict the hydrocarbon vapor flux from the columns implies an efficient rate of local phase transfer for reasonably high air-phase velocities. Thus the success of venting remediations will depend primarily on the ability to induce an air-flow field in a heterogeneous unsaturated zone that will intersect the distributed contaminant. To analyze this aspect of the technique, a mathematical model was developed to predict radially symmetric air flow induced by venting from a single well. This model allows for in-situ determinations of air-phase permeability, which is the fundamental design parameter, and for the analysis of the limitations of a single well design. A successful application of the technique at a site once contaminated by gasoline supports the optimism derived from the experimental and modeliing phases of this study, and illustrates the well construction and field methods used to document the volatile contaminant recovery. ?? 1989.

  5. Influence of the Density Structure of the Caribbean Plate Forearc on the Static Stress State and Asperity Distribution along the Costa Rican Seismogenic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Gutknecht, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the forearc region along the Central American Subduction Zone shows a series of trench-parallel, positive gravity anomalies with corresponding gravity lows along the trench and toward the coast. These features extend from Guatemala to northern Nicaragua. However, the Costa Rican segment of the forearc does not follow this pattern. In this region, the along-trench gravity low is segmented, the coastal low is absent, and the forearc gravity high is located onshore at the Nicoya Peninsula which overlies the seismogenic zone. Geodetic and seismological studies along the Costa Rican Subduction Zone suggest the presence of coupled areas beneath the Nicoya Peninsula prior to the 2012, magnitude Mw 7.6 earthquake. These areas had previously been associated with asperities. Previous publications have proposed a mechanical model for the generation of asperities along the Chilean convergent margin based on the structure of the overriding plate above the seismogenic zone in which dense igneous bodies disturb the state of stress on the seismogenic zone and may influence seismogenic processes. In Costa Rica, surface geology and gravity data indicate the presence of dense basalt/gabbro crust overlying the seismogenic zone where the coupling is present. Bouguer anomaly values in this region reach up to 120×10-5 m/s2, which are the highest for Costa Rica. In this work, the state of stress on the Cocos-Caribbean plate interface is calculated based on the geometry and mass distribution of a 3D density model of the subduction zone as interpreted from gravity data from combined geopotential models. Results show a correlation between the coupled areas at the Nicoya Peninsula and the presence of stress anomalies on the plate interface. The stress anomalies are calculated for the normal component of the vertical stress on the seismogenic zone and are interpreted as being generated by the dense material which makes up the forearc in the area. The dense material of the Nicoya

  6. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles island arc: A structural analysis of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Amanda Gail

    2007-12-01

    The Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc is an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. The Leeward Antilles islands (Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire) are located offshore western Venezuela, within the obliquely convergent diffuse plate boundary zone. Outcrop analysis, microthermometry, and 2D marine seismic reflection data provide evidence of three generations of regional deformation since the Late Cretaceous. Outcrop analysis of structural features, including faults, joints, and veins, characterizes the kinematic history of the islands. Fluid inclusion analysis of quartz and calcite veins coupled with apatite fission-track dating provides the island exhumation history. Finally, marine reflection seismic data processing and interpretation of newly acquired data elucidates offshore structures to integrate with our onshore results. The oldest regional deformation, resulting in both ductile (D1) and brittle (F 1) structures, is attributed to displacement partitioning along the arcuate Caribbean plate boundary. Associated crustal thinning initiated island exhumation, at a rate of 0.18 km/my, from a maximum burial depth of 6 km in the Late Cretaceous (˜89 Ma). Coeval with D1/F1 deformation and exhumation, stretching of the island arc resulted in extensive basin rifting that separated the island blocks. At ˜55 Ma, a change in the relative motion of the Caribbean plate altered plate boundary dynamics. Displacement along the right-lateral Caribbean transform fault and Oca - San Sebastian - El Pilar strike-slip fault system created a wrench tectonic regime within the diffuse plate boundary zone. A second generation of brittle structures (F2) developed while the islands were at a maximum burial depth of 2 km during the Paleocene/Eocene. Since ˜45 Ma, continued motion along the strike-slip fault systems and oblique plate convergence resulted in the youngest generation of structural features (F3). Regional

  7. What is responsible for development of the Asian-Pacific transition zone: The geodynamics of oceanic plates or the Asian continent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    The main unusual feature of tectogenesis of the Asian-Pacific transition zone in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic consists in the formation of left-lateral strike-slip faults, which form the East Asian global shear zone with paragenesis of its constituent variously oriented fault systems. Paragenetic analysis has revealed that continental blocks of the Asian-Pacific transition zone were displaced along systems of transit left-lateral strike-slip faults of the East Asian global shear zone by hundreds of kilometers in the southerly to southwesterly direction due to tectonic activity of the Asian continent, which drifted southwestward. This process was accompanied by the formation of compression and extension structures. Otherwise, it is difficult to explain the structuring of the overhanging margin of the continent by subduction of oceanic lithospheric plates in the northerly to northwesterly direction opposite relative to the displacement of the continental crust as is usually thought.

  8. The 2014 Mw6.2 Eketahuna earthquake, Hikurangi subduction zone - normal faulting in the subducted Pacific Plate crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Francois-Holden, C.; Hamling, I. J.; Ristau, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 January 20th M6.2 Eketahuna earthquake occurred in the subducted crust of the Pacific plate at the Hikurangi subduction zone, beneath North Island, New Zealand. Moment tensor analysis together with aftershock relocations show that this event was an oblique-normal faulting intraplate event, with hypocentre depth ca.30 km, and with rupture on a northwest-dipping fault extending through the subducted crust up to the subduction megathrust at ca.18-20 km depth. More than 3500 aftershocks were subsequently recorded by the New Zealand GeoNet network, with only minor migration of the aftershocks away from the inferred mainshock rupture, and with very few aftershocks within +/- 1 km of the subduction megathrust. The megathrust in this particular region is inferred to be interseismically locked with no seismic or aseismic slip, although slow slip is occurring ca.15-30 km down-dip (Wallace et al, 2013). Similar oblique-normal faulting events have previously occurred along the Hikurangi subduction margin, including in 1985 (ML5.7) and 1990 (Mw6.2). Earlier earthquakes in 1942 (Mw6.8) and 1921 (Mw6.8) are also inferred to have occurred at a similar depth within the subducted crust. The 1990 earthquake sequence occurred ~40 km along-strike from the 2014 Eketahuna event, and involved a Mw6.2 oblique-normal faulting event in the subducted crust, which was quickly followed by a Mw6.4 event in the overlying crust, with both thrust and dextral strike-slip components, possibly responding to deeper aseismic slip. Deeper earthquakes of similar type at other subduction margins are thought to be high stress drop. We calculate the stress drops of the mainshock and larger aftershocks, using a direct wave, empirical Green's function (EGF) approach that includes measurement uncertainties and objective criteria for assessing the quality of each spectral ratio (Abercrombie, 2013). We compare the results to those for earthquakes in other tectonic regions of New Zealand, calculated using

  9. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  10. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones: New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the NNW-SSE transtensive fault system connecting the Alfeo seamount and the Etna volcano (Alfeo-Etna Fault, AEF). A second, NW-SE crustal discontinuity, the Ionian Fault (IF), separates two lobes of the CA subduction complex (Western and Eastern Lobes) and impinges on the Sicilian coasts south of the Messina Straits. Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles shows that: 1) the IF and the AEF are transfer crustal tectonic features bounding a complex deformation zone, which produces the downthrown of the Western lobe along a set of transtensive fault strands; 2) during Pleistocene times, transtensive faulting reactivated structural boundaries inherited from the Mesozoic Tethyan domain which acted as thrust faults during the Messinian and Pliocene; and 3) the IF and the AEF, and locally the Malta escarpment, accommodate a recent tectonic event coeval and possibly linked to the Mt. Etna formation. Regional geodynamic models show that, whereas AEF and IF are neighboring fault systems, their individual roles are different. Faulting primarily resulting from the ESE retreat of the Ionian slab is expressed in the northwestern part of the IF. The AEF, on the other hand, is part of the overall dextral shear deformation, resulting from differences in Africa-Eurasia motion between the western and eastern sectors of the Tyrrhenian margin of northern Sicily, and accommodating diverging motions in the adjacent compartments, which results in rifting processes within the Western Lobe of the Calabrian Arc accretionary wedge. As such, it is primarily associated with Africa-Eurasia relative motion.

  11. Motion on upper-plate faults during subduction zone earthquakes: Case of the Atacama Fault System, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, J. P.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    Motion on the Atacama Fault System (AFS) in northern Chile is driven by Andean subduction zone processes. We use two approaches, observational and theoretical, to evaluate how the AFS and other forearc faults responded to coseismic stress induced by one well-studied megathrust earthquake, the 1995 Mw = 8.1 Antofagasta event. We use synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) to search for small-scale coseismic and postseismic deformation on individual faults. The InSAR data are ambiguous: some images show offset consistent with coseismic faulting on the Paposo segment of the AFS and others lack such signal. The fact that we do not observe the fault-like displacement in all coseismic interferograms suggests that atmospheric contamination, not tectonic deformation, is responsible for the signal. To explore the capacity of the earthquake to trigger motion on upper plate faults, we use seven published slip maps constrained by geodetic and/or seismic data to calculate static and dynamic Coulomb stress change (CSC) on faults in the Antofagasta region. The static CSC field varies between models and depends on the distribution of coseismic interplate slip. On the basis of the CSC distribution predicted by our preferred model constrained by all available data, we suggest it was unlikely that the Antofagasta earthquake directly triggered normal motion on the AFS, and the InSAR data are consistent with this null result. Field reports of normal faulting related to the earthquake may reflect recent (but not coseismic) motion or highly localized behavior not representative of the regional coseismic stress field.

  12. Three-dimensional model of plate geometry and velocity model for Nankai Trough seismogenic zone based on results from structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, A.; Shimomura, N.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneda, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. In order to reduce a great deal of damage to coastal area from both strong ground motion and tsunami generation, it is necessary to understand rupture synchronization and segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. For a precise estimate of the rupture zone of the Nankai megathrust event based on the knowledge of realistic earthquake cycle and variation of magnitude, it is important to know the geometry and property of the plate boundary of the subduction seismogenic zone. To improve a physical model of the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone, the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle and reflection (MCS) seismic study, and long-term observation has been conducted since 2008. Marine active source seismic data have been acquired along grid two-dimensional profiles having the total length of ~800km every year. A three-dimensional seismic tomography using active and passive seismic data observed both land and ocean bottom stations have been also performed. From those data, we found that several strong lateral variations of the subducting Philippine Sea plate and overriding plate corresponding to margins of coseismic rupture zone of historical large event occurred along the Nankai Trough. Particularly a possible prominent reflector for the forearc Moho is recently imaged in the offshore side in the Kii channel at the depth of ~18km which is shallower than those of other area along the Nankai Trough. Such a drastic variation of the overriding plate might be related to the existence of the segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. Based on our results derived from seismic studies, we have tried to make a geometrical model of the Philippine Sea plate and a three-dimensional velocity structure model of the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone. In this presentation, we will summarize major results of out seismic studies, and

  13. Neutron Diffraction Residual Strain Tensor Measurements Within The Phase IA Weld Mock-up Plate P-5

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Camden R

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has worked with NRC and EPRI to apply neutron and X-ray diffraction methods to characterize the residual stresses in a number of dissimilar metal weld mockups and samples. The design of the Phase IA specimens aimed to enable stress measurements by several methods and computational modeling of the weld residual stresses. The partial groove in the 304L stainless steel plate was filled with weld beads of Alloy 82. A summary of the weld conditions for each plate is provided in Table 1. The plates were constrained along the long edges during and after welding by bolts with spring-loaded washers attached to the 1-inch thick Al backing plate. The purpose was to avoid stress relief due to bending of the welded stainless steel plate. The neutron diffraction method was one of the methods selected by EPRI for non-destructive through thickness strain and stress measurement. Four different plates (P-3 to P-6) were studied by neutron diffraction strain mapping, representing four different welding conditions. Through thickness neutron diffraction strain mappings at NRSF2 for the four plates and associated strain-free d-zero specimens involved measurement along seven lines across the weld and at six to seven depths. The mountings of each plate for neutron diffraction measurements were such that the diffraction vector was parallel to each of the three primary orthogonal directions of the plate: two in-plane directions, longitudinal and transverse, and the direction normal to the plate (shown in left figure within Table 1). From the three orthogonal strains for each location, the residual stresses along the three plate directions were calculated. The principal axes of the strain and stress tensors, however, need not necessarily align with the plate coordinate system. To explore this, plate P-5 was selected for examination of the possibility that the principal axes of strain are not along the sample coordinate system axes. If adequate data could

  14. Constraints on Subduction Zone Temperatures and Chemical Fluxes from Accessory Phase Saturation in Subducted Sediments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, J.; Skora, S.

    2009-12-01

    A global correlation between the incompatible trace element chemistry of subducted sediments and that of magmas erupted through the overlying plate testifies to the important role that sediments play in controlling magmagenesis. We report new experimental data on the high pressure (3 GPa) and temperature (700-1300 °C) phase relations of hydrous red clay to evaluate the role of residual accessory phases in controlling the incompatible trace element chemistry of sediment-derived fluids. A particular focus is monazite, which preferentially incorporates LREE and Th, exerting a powerful control on the fluid Th/LREE ratio. Given that arc magmas appear to inherit the Th/LREE ratio of the associated subducting sediment, understanding monazite solubility and stability has the potential to provide new constraints on temperature at the slab surface, a parameter that is notoriously hard to pin down by other means. Experiments on red clay with H2O structurally bound in hydrous minerals (<2 wt%) produced negligible melt fractions for any reasonable temperatures. Experiments with 7-15 wt% added H2O produced copious melting at temperatures only 50-100°C above the solidus (c. 720 °C), e.g. with 15 wt% added H2O, the red clay is >50% molten at 800 °C. Irrespective of the amount of added H2O the residual assemblage comprised garnet and kyanite up to the liquidus (1250 °C with 7 wt% H2O). Phengite is present ≤800 °C; ilmenite and rutile persist to c. 1000 °C; quartz/coesite-out temperature decreases from 1000 °C with 7 wt% H2O to 800 °C with 15%. Monazite was stable to 950 °C in the Th- and LREE-doped starting materials that we used. The trace element contents of the residual melts in equilibrium with monazite-thorite solid solutions were used, in conjunction with published data, to develop a thermodynamic model of LREE and Th solubility in sediment-derived fluids. These models were used to calculate the stability of monazite in a red clay with natural LREE and Th levels

  15. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  16. Impact of The N - S Fracture Zone Along The Indo-Australia Plate Analyzed from Local Seismic Data In The Western Offshore of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Huang, B. S.; Lee, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large subduction earthquake have repeatedly occurred along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones where the Indo-Australia plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate. We have analyzed earthquake data from local seismic network along the Sumatra region that provided by the Meteorology Climatology Geophysical Agencies of Indonesia (MCGAI), giving a reliable P-wave velocity model by using joint inversion of picked P-wave travel time using VELEST and a re-scanned single channel seismic reflection of Sumatra cruise I and II. As much as 1,503 events are being analyzed, that is from two years and three months of data recording (2009/04 - 2011/07). The VELEST and DD technique are used to relocate all events by forcing the obtained velocity model. It is found that the surface deformation and earthquake cluster are strongly influenced by the impact of an N - S subparalel fracture zone along the Indo-Australia plate. This also explains the seismic gaps along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones. So far, the intriguing seismogenic behaviour and forearc structure are not well explained by the existing models. Therefore, the planned IODP Expedition 362 is trying to ground truth the scientific questions. The aftershock earthquake data are huge, but they will provide a gateway to help the understanding of this shallow megathrust slip and reduce its devastated harzards.

  17. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Doughty, Christine; Gasperikova, Erika; Peterson, John; Conrad, Mark; Cook, Paul; Tiemi, Onishi

    2011-03-31

    This is the 2nd report on the three-year program of the 2nd phase of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement. As such, this report is a compendium of the results by Kiho et al. (2011) and those by LBNL.

  18. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase I). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilde, T.W.C.

    1984-08-01

    The objective was to determine the fate of sediments at convergent lithospheric plate boundaries. The study focuses on the structures of the Circum-Pacific trenches and shallow portions of the associated subduction zones. Sediment distribution and the nature of sediment deformation was defined through the various stages of plate convergence to determine if the sediments are subducted or accreted. The controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion were determined. 50 figs. (ACR)

  19. 3.9 Å structure of the nucleosome core particle determined by phase-plate cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eugene Y D; Vogirala, Vinod K; Inian, Oviya; Wong, Andrew S W; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Plitzko, Juergen M; Danev, Radostin; Sandin, Sara

    2016-09-30

    The Volta phase plate is a recently developed electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) device that enables contrast enhancement of biological samples. Here we have evaluated the potential of combining phase-plate imaging and single particle analysis to determine the structure of a small protein-DNA complex. To test the method, we made use of a 200 kDa Nucleosome Core Particle (NCP) reconstituted with 601 DNA for which a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure is known. We find that the phase plate provides a significant contrast enhancement that permits individual NCPs and DNA to be clearly identified in amorphous ice. The refined structure from 26,060 particles has an overall resolution of 3.9 Å and the density map exhibits structural features consistent with the estimated resolution, including clear density for amino acid side chains and DNA features such as the phosphate backbone. Our results demonstrate that phase-plate cryo-EM promises to become an important method to determine novel near-atomic resolution structures of small and challenging samples, such as nucleosomes in complex with nucleosome-binding factors.

  20. 3.9 Å structure of the nucleosome core particle determined by phase-plate cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eugene Y.D.; Vogirala, Vinod K.; Inian, Oviya; Wong, Andrew S.W.; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Plitzko, Juergen M.; Danev, Radostin; Sandin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The Volta phase plate is a recently developed electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) device that enables contrast enhancement of biological samples. Here we have evaluated the potential of combining phase-plate imaging and single particle analysis to determine the structure of a small protein–DNA complex. To test the method, we made use of a 200 kDa Nucleosome Core Particle (NCP) reconstituted with 601 DNA for which a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure is known. We find that the phase plate provides a significant contrast enhancement that permits individual NCPs and DNA to be clearly identified in amorphous ice. The refined structure from 26,060 particles has an overall resolution of 3.9 Å and the density map exhibits structural features consistent with the estimated resolution, including clear density for amino acid side chains and DNA features such as the phosphate backbone. Our results demonstrate that phase-plate cryo-EM promises to become an important method to determine novel near-atomic resolution structures of small and challenging samples, such as nucleosomes in complex with nucleosome-binding factors. PMID:27563056

  1. Seismic ACROSS Transmitter Installed at Morimachi above the Subducting Philippine Sea Plate for the Test Monitoring of the Seismogenic Zone of Tokai Earthquake not yet to Occur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitomo, T.; Kumazawa, M.; Masuda, T.; Morita, N.; Torii, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yoshikawa, S.; Katsumata, A.; Yoshida, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Here we report the first seismic monitoring system in active and constant operation for the wave propagation characteristics in tectonic region just above the subducting plate driving the coming catastrophic earthquakes. Developmental works of such a system (ACROSS; acronym for Accurately Controlled, Routinely Operated, Signal System) have been started in 1994 at Nagoya University and since 1996 also at TGC (Tono Geoscience Center) of JAEA promoted by Hyogoken Nanbu Earthquakes (1995 Jan.17, Mj=7.3). The ACROSS is a technology system including theory of signal and data processing based on the brand new concept of measurement methodology of Green function between a signal source and observation site. The works done for first generation system are reported at IWAM04 and in JAEA report (Kumazawa et al.,2007). The Meteorological Research Institute of JMA has started a project of test monitoring of Tokai area in 2004 in corporation with Shizuoka University to realize the practical use of the seismic ACROSS for earthquake prediction researches. The first target was set to Tokai Earthquake not yet to take place. The seismic ACROSS transmitter was designed so as to be appropriate for the sensitive monitoring of the deep active fault zone on the basis of the previous technology elements accumulated so far. The ground coupler (antenna) is a large steel-reinforced concrete block (over 20m3) installed in the basement rocks in order to preserve the stability. Eccentric moment of the rotary transmitter is 82 kgm at maximum, 10 times larger than that of the first generation. Carrier frequency of FM signal for practical use can be from 3.5 to 15 Hz, and the signal phase is accurately controlled by a motor with vector inverter synchronized with GPS clock with a precision of 10-4 radian or better. By referring to the existing structure model in this area (Iidaka et al., 2003), the site of the transmitting station was chosen at Morimachi so as to be appropriate for detecting the

  2. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  3. Bathymetry of the Sunda margin, Indonesia: morphological features of the upper plate slopes relate to the location and extent of the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Weinrebe, W.; Kopp, H.; Flueh, E. R.; Ladage, S.; Papenberg, C. A.; Planert, L.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake history shows that the Sunda subduction zone of the Indonesian margin produces great earthquakes offshore Sumatra, whereas earthquakes of comparable magnitude are lacking offshore Java and the Lesser Sunda islands. We use morphological structures in multibeam bathymetric data across the forearc to identify the extent of the seismogenic zone (SZ). The updip limit of the SZ is associated with a distinct slope break at the seawordmost part of the outer arc high off Java and the Lesser Sunda islands. In contrast, the slope break is rather indistinctive off large parts of Sumatra. The inner wedge shows differences along the Indonesian margin. Uniform trench-parallel ridge structures lie off Java and Lesser Sunda islands, whereas non-uniform trench-parallel outer arc high structures consisting of several broad tectonic ridges off Sumatra shape the seaward part of the inner wedge. The landward termination of the inner wedge ridge structure and a shallow upper plate mantle at a depth range of ~15-25 km at Java and the Lesser Sunda islands coincide with the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone. In contrast the outer arc ridges off Sumatra are wider and partly elevated above sea level forming the forearc islands. Here, the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone is situated at depths of ~30-40 km, which coincides predominantly with a deeper upper plate mantle. Sunda Strait marks a transition zone between the Sumatra and Java margins. We find the differences along the Sunda margin, especially the wider extent of the seismogenic zone off Sumatra, producing larger earthquakes, to result from the interaction of different age and subduction direction of the oceanic plate. We attribute a major role to the sediment income and continental/island arc upper plate nature of Sumatra/Java influencing the composition and deformation style along the forearc and subduction fault. Off Sumatra the SZ is up to more than twice as wide as off Java and the Sunda islands, enlarging the

  4. Simple method for the analysis of food dyes on reversed-phase thin-layer plates.

    PubMed

    Oka, H; Ikai, Y; Kawamura, N; Yamada, M; Inoue, H; Ohno, T; Inagaki, K; Kuno, A; Yamamoto, N

    1987-12-18

    A technique for the determination of food dyes using reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography on octadecyl-modified silica is described. A solvent system containing 5.0% aqueous sodium sulphate solution enables good separation of the food dyes. Their separation is dependent on the pH of the solvent system, good separation among all dyes being obtained between pH 6.0 and 7.0. The determination of thirteen dyes can be achieved by a combination of methanol-acetonitrile-5.0% aqueous sodium sulphate solution (3:3:10) (solvent system A) and methanol-methyl ethyl ketone-5.0% aqueous sodium sulphate solution (1:1:1) (solvent system B). Solvent system A was used for the determination of Tartrazine, Amaranth, Indigo Carmine, New Coccine, Sunset Yellow FCF, Allura Red AC, Fast Green FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF and for the screening of Acid Red (R-106), Eosin (R-103), Erythrosin (R-3), Rose Bengale (R-105) and Phloxine (R-104). When the spots of R-3, R-103, R-104, R-105 and R-106 appear on the plate, their determination can be achieved by using solvent system B. Each calibration graph was linear between 0.2 and 1.0 micrograms.

  5. Searching for Planets in Holey Debris Disks with the Apodizing Phase Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkat, Tiffany; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Hinz, Philip M.; Smith, Paul S.

    2015-02-01

    We present our first results from a high-contrast imaging search for planetary mass companions around stars with gapped debris disks, as inferred from the stars' bright infrared excesses. For the six considered stars, we model the disks' unresolved infrared spectral energy distributions in order to derive the temperature and location of the disk components. With VLT/NaCo Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraphic L'-band imaging, we search for planetary mass companions that may be sculpting the disks. We detect neither disks nor companions in this sample, confirmed by comparing plausible point sources with archival data. In order to calculate our mass sensitivity limit, we revisit the stellar age estimates. One target, HD 17848, at 540 ± 100 Myr old is significantly older than previously estimated. We then discuss our high-contrast imaging results with respect to the disk properties. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, ESO under program numbers 090.C-0148(A) and 091.C-0457(A)

  6. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  7. Crustal structure and configuration of the subducting Philippine Sea plate beneath the Pacific coast industrial zone in Japan inferred from receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, T.; Iidaka, T.; Sakai, S.; Hirata, N.

    2012-12-01

    We apply receiver function (RF) analyses to estimate the crustal structure and configuration of the subducting Philippine Sea (PHS) plate beneath the Pacific coast industrial zone stretching from Tokyo to Fukuoka in Japan. Destructive earthquakes often occurred at the plate interface of the PHS plate, and seismic activities increase after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) around the Tokyo metropolitan area. Investigation on the crustal structure is the key to understanding the stress concentration and strain accumulation process, and information on configuration of the subducting plate is important to mitigate future earthquake disasters. In this study, we searched for the best-correlated velocity structure model between an observed receiver function at each station and synthetic ones by using a grid search method. Synthetic RFs were calculated from many assumed one-dimensional velocity structures that consist of four layers with positive velocity steps. Observed receiver functions were stacked without considering back azimuth or epicentral distance. We further constructed the vertical cross-sections of depth-converted RF images transformed the lapse time of time series to depth by using the estimated structure models. Telemetric seismographic network data covered on the Japanese Islands including the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network, which constructed under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan area and maintained by Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters, are used. We selected events with magnitudes greater or equal to 5.0 and epicentral distance between 30 and 90 degrees based on USGS catalogues. As a result, we clarify spatial distributions of the crustal S-wave velocities. Estimated average one-dimensional S-wave velocity structure is approximately equal to the JMA2011 structural model although the velocity from the ground surface to 5 km in depth is slow. In particular

  8. The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone - early Palaeozoic strike-slip plate boundary or Ediacaran rifted margin of Baltica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Lewandowski, Marek; Buffenmeyer, Vinton; Green, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is the longest European tectonic and geophysical lineament extending from the Baltic Sea in the northwest to the Black Sea in the southeast. This tectonic feature defines a transition between the thick crust of the East European Craton (EEC) and the thinner crust of the Palaeozoic Platform to the southwest. Being a profound zone of crustal and lithospheric thickness perturbation, the TTZ has usually been considered a Caledonian tectonic suture formed due to the closure of the Tornquist Ocean. The suture was hypothesised to originate from the collision between Baltica and Avalonia or large-scale strike-slip displacement along strike of the Caledonian Orogen. However, some minority views postulated the continuation of Baltica crystalline basement farther to the southwest up to the Elbe Lineament and the margin of the Variscan Belt. We studied the ION Geophysical PolandSPAN survey that consists of 10 regional, seismic depth profiles covering the SW margin of the EEC and the TTZ in Poland. Since the PolandSPAN profiles image to ~30 km depth their interpretation was integrated with the potential fields data and earlier results of refraction sounding to better image the deep structure of the TTZ. Our data show that the NW and central sections of the TTZ correspond, at the Moho level, to a relatively narrow crustal keel and a significant Moho step at the transition from the EEC to the Palaeozoic Platform. However, top of basement above the TTZ is smooth and moderately sloping towards the southwest. In the central part of the TTZ, top of Precambrian is covered by undisturbed lower Palaeozoic sediments. In contrast, the lower Palaeozoic sediments are involved in a latest Silurian, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt along the NW section of the TTZ, where the sharply defined Caledonian Deformation Front adjoins a rigid basement buttress above the TTZ. Finally, the crustal keel is mostly missing from the SE section of the TTZ. Instead, this

  9. Role of the offshore Pedro Banks left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in the plate tectonic evolution of the northern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.; Saunders, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous workers, mainly mapping onland active faults on Caribbean islands, defined the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone as a 200-km-wide bounded by two active and parallel strike-slip faults: the Oriente fault along the northern edge of the Cayman trough with a GPS rate of 14 mm/yr, and and the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) with a rate of 5-7 mm/yr. In this study we use 5,000 km of industry and academic data from the Nicaraguan Rise south and southwest of the EPGFZ in the maritime areas of Jamaica, Honduras, and Colombia to define an offshore, 700-km-long, active, left-lateral strike-slip fault in what has previously been considered the stable interior of the Caribbean plate as determined from plate-wide GPS studies. The fault was named by previous workers as the Pedro Banks fault zone because a 100-km-long segment of the fault forms an escarpment along the Pedro carbonate bank of the Nicaraguan Rise. Two fault segments of the PBFZ are defined: the 400-km-long eastern segment that exhibits large negative flower structures 10-50 km in width, with faults segments rupturing the sea floor as defined by high resolution 2D seismic data, and a 300-km-long western segment that is defined by a narrow zone of anomalous seismicity first observed by previous workers. The western end of the PBFZ terminates on a Quaternary rift structure, the San Andres rift, associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism and thickening trends indicating initial rifting in the Late Miocene. The southern end of the San Andreas rift terminates on the western Hess fault which also exhibits active strands consistent with left-lateral, strike-slip faults. The total length of the PBFZ-San Andres rift-Southern Hess escarpment fault is 1,200 km and traverses the entire western end of the Caribbean plate. Our interpretation is similar to previous models that have proposed the "stable" western Caribbean plate is broken by this fault whose rate of displacement is less than the threshold

  10. Testing Single Phase IGBT H-Bridge Switch Plates for the High Voltage Converter Modulator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Anderson, David E; Solley, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Three IGBT H-bridge switching networks are used in each High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) system at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to generate drive currents to three boost transformer primaries switching between positive and negative bus voltages at 20 kHz. Every switch plate assembly is tested before installing it into an operational HVCM. A Single Phase Test Stand has been built for this purpose, and it is used for adjustment, measurement and testing of different configurations of switch plates. This paper will present a description of the Test Stand configuration and discuss the results of testing switch plates with two different types of IGBT gate drivers currently in use on the HVCM systems. Comparison of timing characteristics of the original and new drivers and the resulting performance reinforces the necessity to replace the original H-bridge network drivers with the upgraded units.

  11. Physical property and Textural transition across the Unconformity and Major Seismic Reflectors in the Upper plate of the Costa Rica Subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    At the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula, the Cocos plate and Cocos Ridge subduct under the Caribbean plate along the Middle America Trench, creating active seismicity. In this region, the Caribbean plate is characterized by a well-consolidated, high velocity framework material beneath the slope sediments, but the nature of the upper plate material is yet unknown. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 334 and 344, the unconformity between the slope sediments (Unit 1) and upper plate material (Units 2 and 3) consisting of lithic sedimentary units was penetrated at mid-slope Site 1380. In the current study, to characterize the compaction behavior of the upper plate material, we investigate the physical properties, texture and composition of the sediments at Site 1380 by conducting microstructural observations, resistivity measurements, particle size analyses, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. The microstructures of sediments observed through the microscope tend to develop dense and cohesive textures in low porosity sediments, and particle size changes across several unconformities. In particular, the small particle-sized lithic fragments compose larger bodies and form cohesive structures. The cross correlation between measured particle size and shipboard porosity show negative correlation especially at Unit 2, indicating that larger sized particles form smaller or fewer pores. From the results of XRF and XRD analyses, we found that Al, K, Ti tend to concentrate in the higher porosity sediments of Unit 1, whereas Si, Ca, P, Mg, Na, and Mn concentrate in the lower porosity sediments of Unit 2 and 3. The higher concentration in Mg, Na, Mn, Si may be due to minerals such as chlorite, serpentine, amphibole, and sodium manganese. The crossplots between porosity and element concentration show negative correlations in Mg, Na, and Mn with porosity, suggesting that the minerals rich in these elements may relate with the

  12. Error-compensating phase-shifting algorithm for surface shape measurement of transparent plate using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    When measuring the surface shape of a transparent sample using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry, the calculated phase is critically determined by not only phase-shift errors, but also by coupling errors between higher harmonics and phase-shift errors. This paper presents the derivation of a 13-sample phase-shifting algorithm that can compensate for miscalibration and first-order nonlinearity of phase shift, coupling errors, and bias modulation of the intensity, and has strong suppression of the second reflective harmonic effect. The characteristics of the 13-sample algorithm are estimated with respect to Fourier representation in the frequency domain. The phase error of measurement performed using the 13-sample algorithm is discussed and compared with those of measurements obtained using other conventional phase-shifting algorithms. Finally, the surface shape of a fused silica wedge plate obtained using a wavelength tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 13-sample algorithm are presented. The experimental results indicate that the surface shape measurement accuracy for a transparent fused silica plate is 3 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is discussed by comparing the amplitudes of the crosstalk noise calculated using other conventional algorithms.

  13. Spiral phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams with non-zero radial index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, G.; Carli, M.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2015-03-01

    The work of design, fabrication and characterization of spiral phase plates for the generation of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with non-null radial index is presented. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate layers over glass substrates. The optical response of these phase optical elements was measured and the purity of the experimental beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The farfield intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analyses. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. A novel application consisting in the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is shown. A numerical code based on iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of the phase pattern of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under LG beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements.

  14. Efficient focusing of 8 keV X-rays with multilayer Fresnel zone plates fabricated by atomic layer deposition and focused ion beam milling

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Marcel; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Weigand, Markus; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) recently showed significant improvement by focusing soft X-rays down to ∼10 nm. In contrast to soft X-rays, generally a very high aspect ratio FZP is needed for efficient focusing of hard X-rays. Therefore, FZPs had limited success in the hard X-ray range owing to difficulties of manufacturing high-aspect-ratio zone plates using conventional techniques. Here, employing a method of fabrication based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling, FZPs with very high aspect ratios were prepared. Such multilayer FZPs with outermost zone widths of 10 and 35 nm and aspect ratios of up to 243 were tested for their focusing properties at 8 keV and shown to focus hard X-rays efficiently. This success was enabled by the outstanding layer quality thanks to ALD. Via the use of FIB for slicing the multilayer structures, desired aspect ratios could be obtained by precisely controlling the thickness. Experimental diffraction efficiencies of multilayer FZPs fabricated via this combination reached up to 15.58% at 8 keV. In addition, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy experiments at 1.5 keV were carried out using one of the multilayer FZPs and resolved a 60 nm feature size. Finally, the prospective of different material combinations with various outermost zone widths at 8 and 17 keV is discussed in the light of the coupled wave theory and the thin-grating approximation. Al2O3/Ir is outlined as a promising future material candidate for extremely high resolution with a theoretical efficiency of more than 20% for as small an outermost zone width as 10 nm at 17 keV. PMID:23592622

  15. Efficient focusing of 8 keV X-rays with multilayer Fresnel zone plates fabricated by atomic layer deposition and focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marcel; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Weigand, Markus; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-05-01

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) recently showed significant improvement by focusing soft X-rays down to ~10 nm. In contrast to soft X-rays, generally a very high aspect ratio FZP is needed for efficient focusing of hard X-rays. Therefore, FZPs had limited success in the hard X-ray range owing to difficulties of manufacturing high-aspect-ratio zone plates using conventional techniques. Here, employing a method of fabrication based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling, FZPs with very high aspect ratios were prepared. Such multilayer FZPs with outermost zone widths of 10 and 35 nm and aspect ratios of up to 243 were tested for their focusing properties at 8 keV and shown to focus hard X-rays efficiently. This success was enabled by the outstanding layer quality thanks to ALD. Via the use of FIB for slicing the multilayer structures, desired aspect ratios could be obtained by precisely controlling the thickness. Experimental diffraction efficiencies of multilayer FZPs fabricated via this combination reached up to 15.58% at 8 keV. In addition, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy experiments at 1.5 keV were carried out using one of the multilayer FZPs and resolved a 60 nm feature size. Finally, the prospective of different material combinations with various outermost zone widths at 8 and 17 keV is discussed in the light of the coupled wave theory and the thin-grating approximation. Al2O3/Ir is outlined as a promising future material candidate for extremely high resolution with a theoretical efficiency of more than 20% for as small an outermost zone width as 10 nm at 17 keV.

  16. The N-Terminal Cleavage of Chondromodulin-I in Growth-Plate Cartilage at the Hypertrophic and Calcified Zones during Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Shigenori; Kondo, Jun; Takimoto, Aki; Sano-Takai, Hiroko; Guo, Long; Shukunami, Chisa; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hiraki, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Chondromodulin-I (ChM-I) is a 20–25 kDa anti-angiogenic glycoprotein in cartilage matrix. In the present study, we identified a novel 14-kDa species of ChM-I by immunoblotting, and purified it by immunoprecipitation with a newly raised monoclonal antibody against ChM-I. The N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that it was an N-terminal truncated form of ChM-I generated by the proteolytic cleavage at Asp37-Asp38. This 14-kDa ChM-I was shown by the modified Boyden chamber assay to have very little inhibitory activity on the VEGF-A-induced migration of vascular endothelial cells in contrast to the intact 20–25 kDa form of ChM-I (ID50 = 8 nM). Immunohistochemistry suggested that 20–25 kDa ChM-I was exclusively localized in the avascular zones, i.e. the resting, proliferating, and prehypertrophic zones, of the cartilaginous molds of developing long bone, whereas the 14-kDa form of ChM-I was found in hypertrophic and calcified zones. Immunoblotting demonstrated that mature growth-plate chondrocytes isolated from rat costal cartilage actively secrete ChM-I almost exclusively as the intact 20–25 kDa form into the medium in primary culture. Taken together, our results suggest that intact 20–25 kDa ChM-I is stored as a component of extracellular matrix in the avascular cartilage zones, but it is inactivated by a single N-terminal proteolytic cleavage in the hypertrophic zone of growth-plate cartilage. PMID:24710035

  17. Modeled temperatures and fluid source distributions for the Mexican subduction zone: Effects of hydrothermal circulation and implications for plate boundary seismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Matthew; Spinelli, Glenn A.; Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng

    2016-02-01

    In subduction zones, spatial variations in pore fluid pressure are hypothesized to control the sliding behavior of the plate boundary fault. The pressure-temperature paths for subducting material control the distributions of dehydration reactions, a primary control on the pore fluid pressure distribution. Thus, constraining subduction zone temperatures are required to understand the seismic processes along the plate interface. We present thermal models for three margin-perpendicular transects in the Mexican subduction zone. We examine the potential thermal effects of vigorous fluid circulation in a high-permeability aquifer within the basaltic basement of the oceanic crust and compare the results with models that invoke extremely high pore fluid pressures to reduce frictional heating along the megathrust. We combine thermal model results with petrological models to determine the spatial distribution of fluid release from the subducting slab and compare dewatering locations with the locations of seismicity, nonvolcanic tremor, slow-slip events, and low-frequency earthquakes. Simulations including hydrothermal circulation are most consistent with surface heat flux measurements. Hydrothermal circulation has a maximum cooling effect of 180°C. Hydrothermally cooled crust carries water deeper into the subduction zone; fluid release distributions in these models are most consistent with existing geophysical data. Our models predict focused fluid release, which could generate overpressures, coincident with an observed ultraslow layer (USL) and a region of nonvolcanic tremor. Landward of USLs, a downdip decrease in fluid source magnitude could result in the dissipation in overpressure in the oceanic crust without requiring a downdip increase in fault zone permeability, as posited in previous studies.

  18. Extreme Ultraviolet Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Garg, Rashi; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Liu, Yanwei; Wood, Obert

    2005-11-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) zone plate microscopy provides high resolution imaging of EUV masks; (2) using phase plates in the back focal plane of the objective lens can provide contrast mechanisms for measurement of the phase shift from defects on the mask; (3) the first high resolution EUV Zernike phase contrast images have been acquired; and (4) future work will include phase contrast mode in reflection from an EUV mask to directly measure the reflectivity and phase shift from defects.

  19. Science Road Map for Phase 2 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Mann, Frederick M.

    2008-08-18

    Phase 1 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program (TFVZP) developed information on the nature and extent of vadose zone contamination in the tank farms through field studies, laboratory analyses and experiments, and historical data searches; assembled data and performed tank-farm risk analysis; and initiated interim corrective actions to lessen the impacts of tank leak contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and external collaborators at universities and U.S. Department of Energy user facilities sampled and analyzed contaminant plumes. These types of activities will continue during Phase 2 of the TFVZP to refine and expand scientific understanding of the subsurface beneath tank farms, especially of water movement, residual waste leaching, and contaminant transport.

  20. Seismicity and crustal structure in the Orozco Fracture Zone: Project Rose Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Toru; Ibrahim, Abou-Bakr K.; Latham, Gary V.

    1982-10-01

    A total of 301 earthquakes were recorded in the vicinity of the Orozco fracture zone by seven Texas ocean bottom seismograph stations during the 2-week period of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment (ROSE) (phase II). Using data from the entire ROSE array, hypocenters of 50 earthquakes were determined. These revealed two distinct zones of seismic activity within the fracture zone. In addition to these earthquake families, many very small events were detected by a station located very close to the spreading center of the East Pacific Rise. The magnitudes of these earthquakes, defined by their duration times, were so small that most of them were recorded only at this station (station 14) in continual or swarmlike occurrences. The slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of these events is significantly larger than those of other earthquake groups detected during the experiment, i.e., they appear to have an unusually high b value. These results suggest that this new population of earthquakes may be associated with volcanic activity or stress release within highly fractured crustal material. Refraction studies in the fracture zone reveal the presence of a rather high-velocity crustal layer (6.9-7.0 km/s) beneath the experiment zone. The Moho velocity and the crustal thickness are estimated at 7.8 km/s and 6.2 km, respectively.

  1. A simple and cost-effective solid-phase protein nano-assay using polyacrylamide-coated glass plates.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A

    2015-02-01

    A new solid-phase protein nano-assay is suggested for simple and sensitive estimation of protein content in sample buffers (a 1-μl sample is sufficient for analysis). The assay is different from conventional "on-filter" assays in that it uses inexpensive fully transparent polyacrylamide gel (PAAG)-coated glass plates as solid support and, thus, combines the convenience of "on-membrane" staining with the sensitivity and ease of documentation of "in-gel" staining (and, therefore, is especially suited for standard lab gel documentation systems). The PAAG plates assay is compatible with all dyes for in-gel protein staining. Depending on the sensitivity of the staining protocol, the assay can be used in macro-, micro-, and nano-assay formats. We also describe a low-cost two-component colloidal Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 (CBB G-250) staining protocol for fast quantitative visualization of proteins spotted on a PAAG plate (the detection limit is up to 2 ng of proteins even when using a Nikon CoolPix digital camera and white light transilluminator instead of a gel scanner). The suggested colloidal CBB G-250 protocol could also be used for visualizing nano-amounts of proteins in polyacrylamide gels. The PAAG plate assay could be useful for proteomic applications and, in general, for all cases where a fast, sensitive, and easily documentable cost-effective solid-phase protein assay is required. PMID:25449300

  2. The Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone: A component of upper plate extension of the subduction transform edge propagator fault linking Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J.; Aksu, A. E.; Elitez, I.; Yaltırak, C.; Çifçi, G.

    2014-11-01

    The Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, that mark the convergent boundary of the African and Aegean-Anatolian plates, are offset along a subduction transform edge propagator ('STEP') fault running NE-SW along the Pliny and Strabo Trenches. The continuation of the fault to the northeast through the Rhodes Basin and into SW Anatolia is assessed. Seismic reflection profiles show that the structural architecture of the northern sector of the Rhodes Basin includes a large crustal-scale fold-thrust belt which is overprinted by numerous faults with small extensional stratigraphic separations. A protracted episode of convergence in the Miocene resulted in the development of a prominent NE-SW-striking and NW-verging fold-thrust belt in the Rhodes Basin. The absence of evaporites in the Rhodes Basin and several seaward prograded vertically stacked Quaternary delta successions resting at 2500-3500 m water depth collectively suggest that the Rhodes Basin must have remained above the depositional base of marine evaporite environment during the Messinian and that the region must have subsided very rapidly during the Pliocene-Quaternary. During the Pliocene-Quaternary, a NE-SW-trending belt developed across the Rhodes Basin: while the structural framework of this belt was characterised by reactivated thrusts in the central portion of the basin, a prominent zone of NE-SW-striking and NW- and SE-dipping faults with extensional separations developed in the northern portion of the basin. Two seismic profiles running parallel to the present-day coastline provide the much needed linkage between the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone onland and the reactivated thrusts in central Rhodes Basin, and show that the Pliocene-Quaternary zone of high-angle faults with extensional separations clearly link with the similarly trending and dipping strike-slip faults onland in the Eşen Valley, thus providing the continuity between the Pliny-Strabo Trenches in the southwest and the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone in the

  3. Capillary zone electrophoresis for separation and quantitative determination of mexiletine and its main phase I metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Claudio; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    The simultaneous separation and quantification of the analytes within the minimum analysis time and the maximum resolution and efficiency are the main objectives in the development of a capillary electrophoretic method for the determination of solutes. In this paper we describe a specific, sensitive and robust method, using capillary zone electrophoresis with internal standard and UV detection, for the separation and quantification of the anti-arrhythmic drug mexiletine, its main phase I metabolites, and its main nitrogenous degradation product. PMID:23826880

  4. The metallogenic role of east-west fracture zones in South America with regard to the motion of lithospheric plates (with an example from Brazil)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kutina, J.; Carter, William D.; Lopez, F.X.

    1978-01-01

    The role of east-west fracture zones in South America is discussed with regard to global fracturing and the motion of lithospheric plates. A set of major NW-trending lineaments has been derived which show a tendency to be spaced equidistantly and may correspond to a set of east-west fractures in the "pre-drift" position of the South American plate. Statistical analysis of linears in the ERTS-mosaics shows that NW-fractures are also among the most important ones in the Andes region, suggesting that the above major lineaments extend into the basement of the Andes. Some of the old major fractures, trending east-west in the present orientation of South America, are discussed and their NE orientation in the pre-drift position of the plate is considered. An example of structural control of ore deposition in the Brazilian Shield is presented, using the maps of the RADAM Project. It is concluded that the small tin-bearing granitic bodies concentrated in the region of Sao Felix do Xingu in the state of Para represent upper parts of an unexposed granitoid massif which is controlled by the intersection of a major east-west fracture zone probably represents westward extension of the Patos Lineament of the easternmost part of Brazil, connected with the east-west fracture zone of the Para state through the basement of the Maranhao Basin (Sineclise do Maranhao-Piaui). It is expected that the proposed "Patos-Para Lineament" extends further westward and may similarly control, at intersections with fractures of other trends, some mineralization centers in the western part of the state of Para and in the state of Amazonas.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction study of the splitter plate in a TBCC exhaust system during mode transition phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuai; Xu, Jinglei; Mo, Jianwei; Gu, Rui; Pang, Lina

    2015-07-01

    Splitter plate plays an important role in a turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) exhaust system during the mode transition phase when turbojet engine and ramjet engine operate simultaneously. Dissimilar pressure distribution on both sides of the plate has a potential origin in the aeroelastic coupling, which is an interesting topic while few research works have devoted to that aspect. To better understand the aeroelastic behavior of the plate and the corresponding dynamic flow features, an integrated fluid-structure interaction simulation is conducted under one particular operation condition during mode transition phase in the TBCC exhaust system. A finite-volume-based CFD solver FLUENT is adopted to solve the unsteady Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations. ABAQUS, a finite-element-method-based CSD solver, is employed to compute the plate elastic deformation. A two-way interaction between the fluid and the structure is accomplished by the mesh-based parallel-code coupling interface (MpCCI) in a loosely-coupled manner. The accuracy of the coupling procedure is validated for the flutter of a flat plate in supersonic flow. Then, features of steady flow field of the TBCC exhaust system are discussed, followed by the investigation of the aeroelastic phenomenon of the splitter plate and the evolution process of the flow field pattern. Finally, performances variation of the exhaust system is obtained and discussed. The results show that the plate vibrates with decaying amplitude and reaches a dynamic stable state eventually. The thrust, lift and pitch moment of the TBCC exhaust system are increased by 0.68%, 2.82% and 5.86%, respectively, compared with the corresponding values in steady state which does not take into account the fluid-structure interaction effects. The analysis reveals the importance of considering the fluid-structure interaction effects in designing the splitter plate in the TBCC exhaust system and demonstrates the availability of the present coupled

  6. Slab stagnation and buckling in the mantle transition zone: Rheology, phase transition, trench migration, and seismic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig; Cizkova, Hana

    2014-05-01

    Subducting slabs may exhibit buckling instabilities and consequent folding behavior in the mantle transition zone for various combinations of dynamical parameters, accompanied by temporal variations in dip angle, plate velocity, and trench retreat. Parameters governing such behavior include both viscous forces (slab and mantle rheology) and buoyancy forces (slab thermal structure and mineral phase relations). 2D numerical experiments show that many parameter sets lead to slab deflection at the base of the transition zone, typically accompanied by quasi-periodic oscillations (consistent with previous scaling analyses) in largely anticorrelated plate and rollback velocities, resulting in undulating stagnant slabs as buckle folds accumulate subhorizontally atop the lower mantle. Slab interactions with mantle phase transitions are important components of this process (Bina and Kawakatsu, 2010; Čížková and Bina, 2013). For terrestrial parameter sets, trench retreat is found to be nearly ubiquitous, and trench advance is quite rare - due to both rheological structure and ridge-push effects (Čížková and Bina, 2013). Recent analyses of global plate motions indicate that significant trench advance is also rare on Earth, being largely restricted to the Izu-Bonin arc (Matthews et al., 2013). Consequently, we explore the conditions necessary for terrestrial trench advance through dynamical models involving the unusual geometry associated with the Philippine Sea region. Detailed images of buckled stagnant slabs are difficult to resolve due to smoothing effects inherent in seismic tomography, but velocity structures computed for compositionally layered slabs, using laboratory data on relevant mineral assemblages, can be spatially low-pass filtered for comparison with tomographic images of corresponding resolution. When applied to P-wave velocity anomalies from stagnant slab material beneath northeast China, model slabs which undulate due to compound buckling fit

  7. A rotating condenser and off-axis zone plate monochromator for the TXM at the undulator U41 at BESSY II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, B.; Guttmann, P.; Hambach, D.; Schneider, G.; Weiß, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2001-07-01

    The Göttingen transmission X-ray microscope at the low emittance electron storage ring BESSY II uses the concept of dynamical aperture synthesis (Reynolds, DeVelis, Parrent, Thomson (Eds.), The New Physical Optics Notebook, SPIE, 1990, pp. 536-548) for the object illumination. The concept is well suited as a condenser, as it can match any required numerical aperture of the TXM objective. Furthermore, a novel off-axis transmission zone-plate monochromator is included, which can generate a monochromaticity of several thousand in the object illumination.

  8. Eclogites and related metamorphism in the North America-Caribbean plate boundary: An example from the Motagua fault zone, Guatemala (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimori, T.; Hernandez Pineda, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    Active volcanic arcs and strike-slip fault systems characterize the present-day Caribbean Plate margins. The northern boundary of the Caribbean plate in Guatemala is the Motagua fault zone (MFZ). Along the MFZ in central and eastern Guatemala, eclogite- and jadeitite-bearing serpentinite-matrix mélange are exposed stretching ˜200 km on either side of the Motagua-Polochic fault system. The MFZ eclogites and related high-pressure metamorphic rocks represent key evidence for testing existing competing Caribbean plate tectonic models (e.g., Harlow et al., 2008, GSA Abs. Prog. 40:452). The presence of lawsonite-eclogite and jadeite-eclogite with lawsonite-blueschist-facies overprinting in the south of the MFZ (Tsujimori et al., 2006, GSA Spec. Paper 403:147-68) indicates that the geotherm in the paleo-subduction zone is very low. Protoliths for these high-pressure rocks consist of uppermost oceanic crust including MORB-origin greenstones and cherts with minor trench turbidites. Epidote-paragonite-eclogites of layered gabbroic origin occur in the north of the MFZ. Although some N-MFZ eclogites record amphibolite-facies hydration and new mineral growth, eclogitic garnets preserve lawsonite-pseudomorph and glaucophane, suggesting a cold subduction zone. The lack of ubiquitous lawsonite in northern eclogites may be attributed to due to water under-saturated conditions. Considering recent geochronology that implies a coeval eclogite-facies metamorphism at ˜130 Ma (Bruekener et al., 2009, EPSL284:228-35) and petrologic similarities of host serpentinized spinel-lherzolite on either side of the MFZ, we can tentatively reconstruct the succession of a fragmented eclogite-facies metamorphosed oceanic crust. However, the correct interpretation of the paleo-subduction record and further understanding of a cold subduction-zone process at paleo-Caribbean plate margin requires a more comprehensive approach to focus on in-situ geochemical and isotopic analyses of prograde metamorphic

  9. Millimeter wave imaging at up to 40 frames per second using an optoelectronic photo-injected Fresnel zone plate lens antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Gallacher, Thomas F.; Søndenâ, Rune; Macfarlane, David G.

    2016-05-01

    Optoelectronic methods are promising for rapid and highly reconfigurable beam steering across the microwave to the terahertz range. In particular, the photo-injected Fresnel zone plate antenna (piFZPA) offers high speed, wide angle, precise beam steering with good beam quality, to enable video rate millimeter wave imagery with no moving parts. We present a piFZPA demonstrator based on a commercial digital light projector (DLP) and high power laser which achieves steering rates up to 17,500 beams per second at 94 and 188 GHz. We also demonstrate radar imaging at 94 GHz at frame rates of 40 Hz (2D PPI) and 7 Hz (3D volumetric).

  10. Monitoring of slip at the transition zone on the plate interface estimated from non-volcanic deep low-frequency tremors in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, R.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Obara, K.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    In southwestern Japan, non-volcanic deep low-frequency (DLF) tremors (e.g., Obara, 2002) and short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs; e.g., Obara et al., 2004) occur in temporal and spatial coincidence with the active stages of DLF tremors (Obara et al., 2004). Based on this feature, Hiramatsu et al. (2008) proposed a method to monitor slip at the transition zone between the locked and aseismic slip zones on the plate interface using DLF tremors. In this study, we applied the method as the same way of previous studies (Hiramatsu et al., 2008; Hirose et al., 2010) and estimated the long-term average slip rate at the transition zone from DLF tremors in southwestern Japan. We also estimated the slip distributions of S-SSEs from DLF tremors using the modified envelope correlation method (ECM) tremor catalog (Maeda and Obara, 2009) and the hourly centroid tremor catalog (Obara et al., 2010) along with the ECM tremor catalog (Obara, 2002) in southwestern Japan. The modified ECM applied both the differential travel time and the spatial distribution of mean square amplitudes to estimate a tremor's spatial location and radiation energy. The hourly centroid tremor catalog is constructed using a clustering process to estimate centroid locations, revealing clear depth-dependent behavior of the tremor activity. The cumulative seismic moment from 2001 to 2009 increases at a constant rate, indicating a constant moment release rate in the long-term average. We estimated slip rate at the transition zone using the formula ˙ {M0} = μ S_˙ {U}, where ˙ {M0} is the moment release rate, μ the rigidity, S the fault area that is related to the slip of S-SSEs in each region, and ˙ {U} the slip rate. We obtained the slip rates of 4.1 ± 0.5 cm/yr, 3.7 ± 0.6 cm/yr, and 2.6 ± 0.2 cm/yr in the western Shikoku, northern Kii peninsula, and Tokai regions, respectively, at the transition zone through the analyzed period. The slip deficit rate at the transition zone in each region is 2.6cm/yr, 2

  11. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  12. Shear wave anisotropy in textured phase D and constraints on deep water recycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Angelika D.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Nisr, Carole; Evans, Shaun R.; Debord, Regis; Merkel, Sébastien

    2013-09-01

    Regions of low seismic velocity and high shear anisotropies in cold subducted slabs have often been related to anisotropic fabrics in hydrous phases mainly induced by slab deformation. The interpretation of these seismic anomalies in terms of hydration thus relies on a better knowledge of the elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms of candidate hydrous phases. Here we investigate the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in phase D [MgSi2H2O6, 10-18 wt% H2O], the ultimate water carrier in hydrous subducted peridotite. The samples were deformed non-hydrostatically up to 48 GPa in a diamond anvil cell and the texture and strength were obtained from analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns collected in radial diffraction geometry. We find that at low strains the layered structure of phase D displays strong 0001 texture, where the stacking fault axis (c-axis) preferentially align parallel to the compression axis. A subsidiary 101¯0 texture develops at higher strains. Plasticity simulations in polycrystalline aggregates using a viscoplastic self-consistent model suggest that these LPO patterns are consistent with shape preferred orientation mechanism during the first compaction steps and, with dominant easy glide on basal planes and harder first order pyramidal slip, respectively, upon further compression. We find that phase D displays the lowest strength and the highest anisotropy among phases in hydrous peridotite in the uppermost lower mantle and might thus control the shear wave anisotropy generated in subducted slabs below the transition zone. We further evaluate the effect of textured phase D on the seismic velocity structure and shear wave anisotropy of deformed hydrous peridotite and compare the results to seismic observations in Tonga subduction. We show that 16 vol% of phase D in hydrous subducted peridotite is required to explain the negative velocity anomalies of 3%, the extent of shear wave splitting (0.9±0.3%) and the shear wave ray

  13. Large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on Nova and the Beamlet Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.C.; Dixit, S.N.; Thomas, I.M.; Martin, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1997-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that spatial beam smoothing (homogenization) is essential in coupling the laser energy to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. For the indirect drive approach to ICF, it is desirable to distribute the laser energy into a uniformly speckled profile that has a flat-top super-Gaussian envelope (8th power or higher) and contains greater than 95% of the energy inside the super-Gaussian profile. Spatial smoothing is easily achieved by introducing a binary random phase plate (RPP) in the beam. This produces a homogenized far-field pattern which consists of an overall envelope function determined by the RPP element superimposed with a fine scale speckle pattern arising due to the interference among the various RPP elements. Although easy to fabricate and currently in routine use in many fusion laboratories, the binary RPPs do not meet the ICF requirements stated above since the far-field intensity profile is restricted to essentially an Airy function containing only 84% (an upper limit) of the energy inside the central spot. Approaches using lenslet arrays (refractive or diffractive) have limited use since they operate in the quasi-far-field and have a short depth of focus. The limitations of the RPPs can be overcome by relaxing the binary phase constraint. We have recently presented 5 continuously varying phase screens for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profiles. Called kinoform phase plates (KPPs), these phase screens offer complete flexibility in tailoring the focal plane envelope and, at the same time, increasing the energy efficiency inside the focal spot. In this paper we discuss the design and fabrication of such kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on the Nova and the Beamlet lasers. Since the phase plates are used at the end of the laser chain, KPPs on Nova and Beamlet have to be fabricated on large aperture optics (65-cm diameter and 40-cm square substrates respectively). The following

  14. Initial phase zone for phase locking to the resonance, using “main condition” of phase stability in DC-biased single-sided multipactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mostajeran, M.

    2014-05-15

    In the present work, the concept of accurate phase stability is employed to study a DC-biased single-sided multipactor. A “main condition” of phase stability was introduced in our previous studies of two-sided multipactors [M. Mostajeran, J. Instrum. 8, P04024 (2013); M. Mostajeran and M. Lamehi Rachti, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 615, 1–5 (2010)]. Using the same condition and assuming zero initial velocity for the secondary electrons, a regime of multipactors outside the resonance zones is found. The theoretical results are then verified by numerical simulation.

  15. A comparative study of zone axis pattern maps from decagonal phases with varying periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganathan, S. . Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore . Dept. of Metallurgy); Singh, A. . Dept. of Metallurgy); Mukhopadhyay, N.K.; Weatherly, G.C. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1994-02-01

    The discovery in 1985 of the decagonal phase with periodicity in one direction and quasiperiodicity in the other two directions has excited considerable interest. This was followed by the observation that the periodicity perpendicular to the quasiperiodicity plane can assume multiple values on n = [1,2,3,4]x0.4 nm. The mapping of reciprocal spaces of these phases, labelled t[sub 2n], by electron diffraction is important in the context of atomic models for the decagonal phase. While partial determinations have been available for T[sub 4] context of atomic models for the decagonal phase. While partial determinations have been available for T[sub 4] [Al-Co], T[sub 6][Al-Mn] and T[sub 8] [Al-Fe], [Al-Pd], the recent complete determination of zone axis pattern maps [ZAPM] and Kikuchi maps of T[sub 6] [Al-Mn] with 1.24 nm periodicity and T[sub 4][Al-Cu-Co-Si] with 0.8 nm periodicity is a tour de force by Kelton and his co-workers. These papers coupled with the complete mapping of the HOLZ line and Kikuchi line patterns of the T[sub 2][Al-Co-Ni] with 0.4 nm periodicity permit the authors to put in perspective the ZAPM of all the four decagonal phases and in addition predict patterns for the T[sub 8] phase for which a complete experimental determination is still lacking.

  16. Nightside auroral zone and polar cap ion outflow as a function of substorm size and phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.; Germany, G. A.; Lund, E. J.

    2004-02-01

    Because the high latitude ionosphere is an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere under active conditions, we have undertaken a study of the way ion outflow from the nightside auroral zone and polar cap respond to substorm activity. We have combined data from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar with ion upflow measurements from the TEAMS instrument on the FAST spacecraft to construct a picture of ion upflow from these regions as a function of substorm size and as a function of time relative to substorm onset. We use data taken during solar minimum in the northern hemisphere between December 1996 and February 1997. We find that the total nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate (averaged over substorm phase) depends on the size of the substorm, increasing by about a factor of 10 for both O+ and H+ from the smallest to the largest substorms in our study. The combined outflow rate from both the polar cap and the nightside auroral zone goes up by a factor of 7 for both ions for the same change in conditions. Regardless of storm size, the nightside auroral zone outflow rate increases by about a factor of 2 after onset, reaching its peak level after about 20 min. These results indicate that the change in the nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate that accompanies substorm onset is not as significant as the change from low to high magnetic activity. As a consequence, the prompt increase in the near earth plasma sheet energy density of O+ and H+ ions that accompanies onset [, 1996] is likely due to local energization of ions already present rather than to the sudden arrival and energization of fresh ionospheric plasma.

  17. Laves phase in alloy 718 fusion zone — microscopic and calorimetric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Manikandan, S.G.K.; Sivakumar, D.; Prasad Rao, K.; Kamaraj, M.

    2015-02-15

    Microstructural characterization of alloy 718 fusion zone welded with both solid solution and age hardenable filler metal has been done. The microsegregation and the aging response were studied by employing three levels of weld cooling rate. Gas Tungsten Arc welding process was used. The fusion zone of solid solution filler metal has been responding to the aging treatment due to the weld process conditions and weld metal chemistry. However the weld metal composition was modified due to the higher molybdenum (Mo) content in solid solution filler metal. The effect of this modification on the phase reaction temperatures was studied and the same was compared with the conventional filler metal. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Interdendritic segregation has been controlled by weld cooling rate. • Laves phase formation has been studied with cooling rate and weld metal chemistry. • Aging response with solid solution filler metal has been demonstrated. • Reduction in Laves phase and alloying element segregation has been confirmed. • Reaction temperatures were found modified because of Mo addition.

  18. Characterization of second-phase plates in a Gd5Ge3 intermetallic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qing; Chumbley, Leonard S.

    2013-05-16

    Rare-earth compounds based on the stoichiometry R5(SixGe1-x)4 (R = rare-earth elements) exhibit many unusual features, including possessing R5(SixGe1-x)3 thin plates which always precipitate from the matrix despite efforts to suppress their formation. In an effort to better understand the unique relationship between these two intermetallic alloy systems, the bulk microstructure of the compound Gd5Ge3 was examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy. Surprisingly, SEM examination revealed a series of thin plates present in the Gd5Ge3 matrix similar to what is seen in Gd5Ge4. TEM observation revealed that a role reversal had occurred, with the thin plates possessing the orthorhombic structure and composition of Gd5Ge4. The orientation relationship between Gd5Ge4 thin plates and the Gd5Ge3 matrix was determined to be Graphic the same relationship reported for Gd5Ge3 plates precipitating from a Gd5Ge4 matrix. However, by exchanging the respective roles of the phases as regards matrix vs. precipitate, the total number of precipitation variants seen can be increased from two to six. The persistence with which these two intermetallic systems co-exist is truly unique. However, understanding exactly the kinetic and thermodynamic conditions that lead to their unique relationship is hampered by the high formation temperatures at which the observed reaction occurs.

  19. Planar gas chromatography column on glass plate with nanodispersed silica as the stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.; Agafonov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the GC column in the plane of the glass plate with the adsorption layer nanodispersed silica. Created gas chromatographic column allows to separate a mixture of five alkanes from pentane to nonane in isothermal (90 ° C) mode less than one minute.

  20. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  1. Reactive Transport Modeling of Vadose Zone Contamination: Feedback between Reactions and Gas-Phase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.

    2007-05-01

    The unsaturated zone acts as a buffer zone for contaminants on their way to the water table but can also attenuate the emission of contaminants leaving the subsurface environment through the gas phase. A reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport has been developed to investigate the processes that contribute to the generation and attenuation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. In particular, the model is suitable to study the feedback processes between advective-diffusive gas transport and geochemical reactions. The model is also able to estimate diffusive and advective contributions to gas transport in multicomponent systems. Two model applications are presented that investigate gas transport and reactions in mine tailings and at a site with organic contamination. In mine tailings, atmospheric oxygen transported into the sediment column is consumed in the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Gas volume loss caused by the consumption of atmospheric oxygen drives advective fluxes. In the absence of carbonate minerals, the advective component accounts for 16 % of the net oxygen flux into the column, while, in a carbonate-rich system, advection accounts for 10 % of the net oxygen flux. Dissolution of carbonate minerals has a moderating effect on advective gas transport since carbon dioxide can partially compensate for the depletion of oxygen. At an oil spill site, volatilization and degradation of organic contaminants cause advective and diffusive fluxes of organic vapors away from the source zone. At early stages, volatilization dominates and oxidation of these organic vapors attenuates the emission of contaminants to the atmosphere. The contribution of advection to organic vapor fluxes is significant initially but decreases with time. At later stages, the oil source becomes depleted of its most volatile fraction, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and heavier n-alkanes results in the production of methane. Up to 15 % of methane

  2. Research of beam conditioning technologies using continuous phase plate, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhu, Na; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and implemented on the SG-III laser facility. After using these techniques, the far field distribution of SG-Ⅲ laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. The output spectrums of the cascade phase modulators used for Multi-FM SSD were stable and the FM-to-AM effect can be restrained. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate that when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of preamplifier and main amplifiers with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, 0.57 with CPP+PS and 0.84 with only CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied. The PS plates were manufactured and equipped on SG-III laser facility for LPI research. Combined beam smoothing and polarization manipulation were also studied to solve the LPI problem. Results indicate that through adjusting dispersion directions of SSD beams in a quad, two dimensional SSD can be obtained. Using polarization control plate (PCP), polarization on the near field and far field can be manipulated, providing new method to solve LPI problem in indirect drive laser fusion.

  3. Vertical tectonics at a continental crust-oceanic plateau plate boundary zone: Fission track thermochronology of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagómez, Diego; Spikings, Richard; Mora, AndréS.; GuzmáN, Georgina; Ojeda, GermáN.; CortéS, Elizabeth; van der Lelij, Roelant

    2011-08-01

    The topographically prominent Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta forms part of a faulted block of continental crust located along the northern boundary of the South American Plate, hosts the highest elevation in the world (˜5.75 km) whose local base is at sea level, and juxtaposes oceanic plateau rocks of the Caribbean Plate. Quantification of the amount and timing of exhumation constrains interpretations of the history of the plate boundary, and the driving forces of rock uplift along the active margin. The Sierra Nevada Province of the southernmost Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta exhumed at elevated rates (≥0.2 Km/My) during 65-58 Ma in response to the collision of the Caribbean Plateau with northwestern South America. A second pulse of exhumation (≥0.32 Km/My) during 50-40 Ma was driven by underthrusting of the Caribbean Plate beneath northern South America. Subsequent exhumation at 40-25 Ma (≥0.15 Km/My) is recorded proximal to the Santa Marta-Bucaramanga Fault. More northerly regions of the Sierra Nevada Province exhumed rapidly during 26-29 Ma (˜0.7 Km/My). Further northward, the Santa Marta Province exhumed at elevated rates during 30-25 Ma and 25-16 Ma. The highest exhumation rates within the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta progressed toward the northwest via the propagation of NW verging thrusts. Exhumation is not recorded after ˜16 Ma, which is unexpected given the high elevation and high erosive power of the climate, implying that rock and surface uplift that gave rise to the current topography was very recent (i.e., ≤1 Ma?), and there has been insufficient time to expose the fossil apatite partial annealing zone.

  4. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-07-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  5. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  6. Teleseismic receiver and transfer function modeling of OBS data: Resolving plate structure in the locked zone of Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Teleseismic receiver function studies in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone have resolved structures associated with deep fluid cycling, such as the basalt-to-eclogite reaction and overpressure of the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the serpentinization of the forearc mantle wedge. Unfortunately, the updip extent of the overpressured zone and its possible control on the transition from episodic slow slip to seismic slip occur offshore and are not resolved in those studies. The Cascadia Initiative has provided an opportunity to extend our capabilities to study the locked zone using teleseismic receiver functions from the deployment of a dense line of ocean-bottom seismograph (OBS) stations offshore of Washington State, from the trench to the coastline. However, high quality receiver functions using OBS data are notoriously difficult to obtain and to interpret due to the presence of a water column that produces P-wave reverberation above the recording stations. Here we model receiver functions for a variety of oceanic lithospheric structures to investigate the possibilities and limitations of receiver functions using OBS data. These modeling results indicate that receiver functions from OBS data are difficult to interpret in the presence of marine sediments, but shallow-water sites in subduction zone forearcs are suitable for constraining various crustal elements around the locked megathrust fault. We also propose using a complementary approach based on transfer function modeling that bypasses receiver functions altogether and estimates crustal properties directly from the waveforms. Using real data examples from the Cascadia Initiative, we show how calculated receiver and transfer functions can be used to constrain seismic properties of the crust in both shallow (Cascadia forearc) and deep (Juan de Fuca Ridge) ocean settings. Interestingly, the elevated P-to-S velocity ratio of the downgoing oceanic crust interpreted as high pore-fluid pressure extends

  7. Comparative analysis of equatorial and auroral-zone phase scintillation data. Technical report, 13 March 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Dabbs, T.M.

    1986-10-01

    A comparison is made between equatorial and auroral-zone phase scintillation. The spectral characteristics of weak-scatter phase-scintillation data collected at two equatorial ground stations are contrasted with similar data collected at two auroral-zone ground stations. An automated, multisegmented fitting procedure was used to determine these characteristics. Three types of spectra were found. Despite temporal and spatial differences, the two equatorial data sets have similar spectral characteristics. The auroral-zone sets are also similar. In contrast, the spectral characteristics of the two latitude regions are quite different from each other.

  8. Improving the treatment of non-aqueous phase TCE in low permeability zones with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Comfort, Steve; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Dvorak, Bruce

    2014-03-15

    Treating dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) embedded in low permeability zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate (MnO4(-)) into LPZs to treat high concentrations of TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into a LPZ that was spiked with non-aqueous phase (14)C-TCE. The treatments we evaluated included permanganate paired with: (i) a shear-thinning polymer (xanthan); (ii) stabilization aids that minimized MnO2 rind formation and (iii) a phase-transfer catalyst. In addition, we quantified the ability of these flooding solutions to improve TCE destruction under batch conditions by developing miniature LPZ cylinders that were spiked with (14)C-TCE. Transport experiments showed that MnO4(-) alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with non-aqueous phase TCE, due to a distinct and large MnO2 rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. By including xanthan with MnO4(-), the sweeping efficiency increased (90%) but rind formation was still evident. By including the stabilization aid, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. Batch experiments using LPZ cylinders allowed longer contact times between the flooding solutions and the DNAPL and results showed that SHMP+MnO4(-) improved TCE destruction by ∼16% over MnO4(-) alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%). These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in low permeable zones.

  9. Variation of b and p values from aftershocks sequences along the Mexican subduction zone and their relation to plate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aftershock sequences along the Mexican subduction margin (between coordinates 110ºW and 91ºW) were analyzed by means of the p value from the Omori-Utsu relation and the b value from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. We focused on recent medium to large (Mw > 5.6) events considered susceptible of generating aftershock sequences suitable for analysis. The main goal was to try to find a possible correlation between aftershock parameters and plate characteristics, such as displacement rate, age and segmentation. The subduction regime of Mexico is one of the most active regions of the world with a high frequency of occurrence of medium to large events and plate characteristics change along the subduction margin. Previous studies have observed differences in seismic source characteristics at the subduction regime, which may indicate a difference in rheology and possible segmentation. The results of the analysis of the aftershock sequences indicate a slight tendency for p values to decrease from west to east with increasing of plate age although a statistical significance is undermined by the small number of aftershocks in the sequences, a particular feature distinctive of the region as compared to other world subduction regimes. The b values show an opposite, increasing trend towards the east even though the statistical significance is not enough to warrant the validation of such a trend. A linear regression between both parameters provides additional support for the inverse relation. Moreover, we calculated the seismic coupling coefficient, showing a direct relation with the p and b values. While we cannot undoubtedly confirm the hypothesis that aftershock generation depends on certain tectonic characteristics (age, thickness, temperature), our results do not reject it thus encouraging further study into this question.

  10. Liquid-phase mass transfer in a downward-coflow plate column

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, V.A.; Chekhov, O.S.; Stepanov, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    The authors investigate mass exchange as a function of the hydraulic parameters of plate columns with downward direct flow. A schematic representation of the installation employed for the study is shown. It consists of six separate sections each 100 mm long and 99 mm i.d. The number of plates was varied in the tests from 1 to 5 without changing the working volume of the column. Liquid test samples were taken during the tests at the inlet to the apparatus over definite time intervals. The sodium sulfite concentration in the solution was determined iodometrically. Typical curves are shown of the change in the sulfite concentration with time for different hydrodynamic programs. The functional relationship between the mass-output coefficient and the hydraulic parameters was determined in terms of the specific energy dissipation of the gas-liquid stream on the plate. An equation was used to process the experimental data statistically. The results of statistical treatment of the test data is shown.

  11. Vortex characteristics of Fraunhofer diffractions of a plane wave by a spiral phase plate limited by pseudoring polygonal apertures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiqin; Wang, Taofen; Zhu, Kaicheng

    2008-08-15

    We introduce a multilevel spiral phase plate (SPP) limited by a pseudoring polygonal aperture (PRPA). Such an SPP has the advantages of easier fabrication and greater suppression of the sidelobes of the diffraction field over that generated with a polygonal aperture (PA). The Fraunhofer diffraction fields generated by an SPP with a PRPA or with a PA have the same topological charge features and a similar diffraction pattern. Numerical evaluations show that the maximum bright annular-intensity difference between the diffraction patterns for the SPP with a PRPA and that of a PA does not exceed 3% under optimal design parameters.

  12. Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarm-shear zones: Implications for the Nevadan orogeny and North American plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.B.; Saleeby, J.B. )

    1992-08-01

    A cogenetic and coeval tonalitic and mafic dike swarm has been identified within a southern fragment (the Owens Mountain area) of the western Foothills terrane (California). The dikes were mylonitized and transposed (rotated into subparallel orientation) during emplacement, from 155 to 148 Ma (U-Pb zircon data), which coincides in time with the Nevadan orogeny. Steeply southeast-plunging fold axes and S-fold geometries indicate a sinistral-sense of shear, possibly with some dip-slip motion as well. This shear zone may be the southern and possibly deeper extension of the Bear Mountains fault zone. This and other Late Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarms record a complex pattern of sinistral-sense transtension-transpression that developed at the apparent-polar-wander J2 cusp ([approximately] 150 Ma) and during subsequent, rapid, northwestward acceleration of North America. The Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny is a manifestation of these dramatic changes in magnitude and direction of North American motion.

  13. Continuous contour phase plates for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.N.; Rushford, M.C.; Thomas, I.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-08-09

    We present fully continuous phase screens for producing super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles. Such phase screens are constructed with the assumption of either circular symmetric near-field and far-field profiles or a separable phase screen in Cartesian co-ordinates. In each case, the phase screen is only a few waves deep. Under illumination by coherent light, such phase screens produce high order super-Gaussian profiles in the focal plane with high energy content effects of beam aberrations on the focal profiles and their energy content are also discussed.

  14. Near Fault Observatories (NFO) services and integration plan for European Plate Observing System (EPOS) Implementation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2016-04-01

    Coherently with the EPOS vision aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth Sciences supporting research for a more sustainable society, we are working on the integration of NFOs and services implementation facilitating their data and products discovery and usage. NFOs are National Research Infrastructures (NRI) consisting of advanced networks of multi-parametric sensors continuously monitoring the chemical and physical processes related to the common underlying Earth instabilities governing active faults evolution and the genesis of earthquakes. These infrastructures will enable advancements in understanding of earthquakes generation processes and associated ground shaking due to their high-quality near-source multidisciplinary data. In EPOS-IP seven NFOs are going to be linked: 1) the Altotiberina and 2) Irpinia Observatories in Italy, 3) Corinth in Greece, 4) South-Iceland Seismic Zone, 5) Valais in Switzerland, 6) Marmara Sea (GEO Supersite) in Turkey and 7) Vrancea in Romania. EPOS-IP aims to implement integrated services from a technical, legal, governance and financial point of view. Accordingly, our first effort within this first core group of NFOs will be establishing legal governance for such a young community to ensure a long-term sustainability of the envisaged services including the full adoption of the EPOS data policy. The establishment of a Board including representatives of each NFO formally appointed by the Institutions supporting the NRI is a basic requirement to provide and validate a stable governance mechanism supporting the initiatives finalised to the services provision. Extremely dense networks and less common instruments deserve an extraordinary work on data quality control and description. We will work on linking all the NFOs in a single distributed network of observatories with instrumental and monitoring standards based on common protocols for observation, analysis, and data access and distributed channels. We will rely on

  15. GPS and Geologic Deformation Rates Agree to Within Uncertainties in the Arabia-Africa- Eurasia Zone of Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.

    2008-12-01

    Geodetically-derived motions for Arabia and Nubia relative to Eurasia agree within 1 standard deviation with plate rates estimated from geologic observations (McQuarrie et al., GRL, 2003) for the past 11 Myr for Nubia and greater than 25 Myr for Arabia. Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from an elastic block model constrained by GPS agree within uncertainties (about +/- 15 percent) with geologically determined, long-term slip rates in this complex area of plate interaction. Detailed geomorphological studies of the central North Anatolian fault (NAF) constrained by quantitative dating (Kozaci et a al., Geology, 2007) indicate slip rates that agree within uncertainties, but appear to be systematically lower than geodetic rates. While real rate changes of a few mm/yr cannot be ruled out at present, we note that geodetic inversions for coseismic fault slip on the NAF, and most other faults well constrained by geodetic observations, indicate larger slip at depth than at the surface. If this difference persists throughout the earthquake deformation cycle, it would account for the small difference in geodetic and geologic rates. Extrapolating present-day geodetic motions for Arabia relative to Nubia and Somalia to the time of initiation of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden extension indicates that Arabia separated from Nubia and Somalia simultaneously along the full extent of both rifts at about 25 Myr BP, consistent with independent geologic estimates for the style, and age of initiation of Red Sea extension (Omar and Steckler, 1995, Science). In addition, structural offsets across the Gulf of Suez (GoS) and Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) are consistent with a transfer of strain form the GoS to the GoA at around 12 Ma BP, roughly consistent with the age on initiation of the Dead Sea fault system. We further show that the apparent discrepancy between geodetic deformation of the Aegean (plate-like motion with low internal deformation), and geologic deformation (extensive crustal thinning

  16. Fluid budgets at convergent plate margins: Implications for the extent and duration of fault-zone dilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Faults at convergent plate boundaries are important conduits for fluid escape, and recent evidence suggests that fluid expulsion along them is both transient and heterogeneous. For the Nankai and Barbados convergent margins, we have used numerical models to investigate the long-term partitioning of expelled fluids between diffuse flow and flow along connected high-permeability fault conduits. For a simple case of spatial heterogeneity, we estimated the extent of high-permeability conduits necessary to maintain a balance between incoming and expelled fluids. For the case of transient expulsion, we constrained the duration of elevated permeability required to balance the fluid budgets. Comparison of modeled and observed geochemical profiles suggests that the initiation of connected flow conduits is delayed with respect to the time of accretion into each accretionary complex and may be related to burial below a critical depth, either where the overlying wedge is sufficiently thick to prevent fluid escape to the sea floor or where sediments behave brittlely.

  17. Relationship between phase difference and coefficient of restitution during low velocity foreign object transverse damage of composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    This work discusses a model to correlate the coefficient of restitution of low velocity transverse impacts of graphite-epoxy laminates with the residual deformation or central deflection at the end of the impact event. It is assumed that the energy absorbed by the target can be calibrated in terms of residual deflection, and thereby in terms of phase difference between the occurrence of impact force and central deflection to their maximas. Analysis was modeled on the basis of the experience from impact tests. Predictions are compared with the test results of impacted circular and flat plates. Experimentally measured values of coefficient of restitution and phase difference agreed well with the predicted relationship between them.

  18. Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

    2006-04-05

    Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources

  19. Thermochemical Analysis of Phases Formed at the Interface of a Mg alloy-Ni-plated Steel Joint during Laser Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Ali M.; Chartrand, Patrice; Weckman, David C.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2013-04-01

    The thermodynamic stability of precipitated phases at the steel-Ni-Mg alloy interface during laser brazing of Ni-plated steel to AZ31B magnesium sheet using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire has been evaluated using FactSage thermochemical software. Assuming local chemical equilibrium at the interface, the chemical activity-temperature-composition relationships of intermetallic compounds that might form in the steel-Ni interlayer-AZ92 magnesium alloy system in the temperature range of 873 K to 1373 K (600 °C to 1100 °C) were estimated using the Equilib module of FactSage. The results provided better understanding of the phases that might form at the interface of the dissimilar metal joints during the laser brazing process. The addition of a Ni interlayer between the steel and the Mg brazing alloy was predicted to result in the formation of the AlNi, Mg2Ni, and Al3Ni2 intermetallic compounds at the interface, depending on the local maximum temperature. This was confirmed experimentally by laser brazing of Ni electro-plated steel to AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire. As predicted, the formation of just AlNi and Mg2Ni from a monotectic and eutectic reaction, respectively, was observed near the interface.

  20. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite by a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hua; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The oxidation of ammonium sulfite in the ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process was investigated in a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor in this paper. The effect of several parameters, including capacitance and peak pulse voltage of discharge system, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate on the oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite was reviewed. The oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite could reach 47.2% at the capacitance, the peak pulse voltage, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate equal to 2 nF, -24.6 k V, 35 mm and 4 L min-1 within treatment time of 40 min The experimental results indicate that the gas phase pulsed discharge system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrode can oxide the ammonium sulfite. The oxidation rate increased with the applied capacitance and peak pulse voltage and decreased with the electrode gap. As the bubbling gas flow rate increased, the oxidation rate increased first and then tended to reach a stationary value. These results would be important for the process optimization of the (NH4)2SO3 to (NH4)2SO4 oxidation.

  1. Uppermost mantle Pn Velocity of the Arabian Plate, a Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Lazki, A. I.; Al-Damegh, K. S.; Al-Enizi, A.; Elhusain, I.; Al-Mahrooqi, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Arabian plate represents a unique tectonic setup. The uniqueness of this plate is its boundaries that constitute the three known types of plate boundaries. The Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden represent the south and southwest plate boundary with Africa plate. Farther north the Dead Sea Fault system represents the remainder of the northwestern boundary with Africa plate. Continent-continent collision along the Bitlis-Zagros Suture zones represents the northern and northeastern boundary with Eurasia plate. Farther south the convergent plate boundary is manifested by the Makran Subduction Zone. Finally, the Owen and Murray Transform Faults represent the southeast boundary of Arabia with India plate. The broad objective of this study is to map uppermost mantle Pn velocity and anisotropy within the Arabian plate and around its boundaries. Zones that are along the north and the northeast boundaries of Arabia plate historically and in recent years has been effected by devastating earthquakes, a recent example is the Bam earthquake on December, 2003. In this region, accurate earthquake location is essential to delineate seismically active zones, where, without proper velocity models for the region, located earthquake may have large location error. In this preliminary study we present uppermost mantle Pn velocity tomography results of the north and northeastern regions of Arabia plate. We used in this study Pn phase data from the bulletins of Oman Seismic Network, Saudi Seismic Network, Kuwait Seismic Network, International Seismological Center and the National Earthquake Information Center,USA.

  2. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  3. The Vincent Fault in the San Gabriel Mtns, southern California, USA: a modified plate boundary shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Haoran; Platt, John

    2015-04-01

    The Vincent Fault in southern California separates the ocean-affiliated Pelona schist of Late Cretaceous age in the footwall from a Meso-Proterozoic gneiss complex and Mesozoic granitoid rocks in the hanging wall. The Vincent fault has been regarded as the original megathrust formed during Laramide flat-slab subduction. Our new pressure, temperature and geochronologic data from the rocks in the hanging wall and the footwall indicate that the Vincent fault has undergone post-subduction modification. The Pelona schist in the San Gabriel Mtns was metamorphosed up to high-pressure greenschist facies. The peak metamorphic temperature given by laser Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material is 518.9 ± 19.6°C, consistent with the temperature range of 515-550°C from the quartz c-axis opening-angle thermometer. The peak pressure yielded by Si-in-muscovite barometry is 10.5 ± 1 kbar. The upper ~50 m of the Pelona schist was then mylonitized together with the lower 500-800 m of the hanging wall, which overprinted the pre-existing texture. Mylonitization produced a strong ESE-trending lineation in both rock units, with a consistent ESE sense of shear: opposite to what would be predicted by E-directed subduction. Pressure and temperature of mylonitization of the Pelona schist and the lower part of the hangingwall mylonite zone constrained by the Ti-in-quartz thermobarometer and Si-in-muscovite barometer is around ~4.7 kbar and 372 to 425°C; whereas the upper part of the mylonite zone was equilibrated at ~2.4 kbar and ~365°C. The quartz c-axis fabric opening-angle thermometer also gives a temperature range from 360 to 420°C in the entire mylonite zone. Mylonitization therefore took place during exhumation and cooling of the Pelona Schist. Fission track ages of detrital zircons from both the footwall and the hanging wall of the Vincent fault cluster around 46.7 ± 5.9 Ma, indicating that both footwall and hanging wall had cooled to ~200°C by that time. No other major

  4. [Distribution of Luliconazole in Nail Plate by In Vitro Permeation and Efficacy by Zone of Inhibition Test after Treatment of Luliconazole Nail Solution].

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Miyamae, Akiko; Arai, Masakazu; Minemura, Aya; Nozawa, Akira; Kubota, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the character of luliconazole nail solution we have developed, we investigated luliconazole distribution and antifungal activity in nail plate. An in vitro permeation study which measured luliconazole concentration of sliced nail in the transverse direction after treatment of luliconazole nail solution was conducted to investigate for concentration dependency and the influences of nail thickness and treatment duration. When 0.2, 1, 3, 5, and 7.5% luliconazole nail solutions were used, luliconazole was detected in the all the layers of nail and there was a concentration gradient from the dorsal side to deep nail layers. The luliconazole concentration was almost same after 14-day treatment with 5% luliconazole nail solution when using nails of different thicknesses. And we confirmed that concentration of luliconazole into the nail was increased depending on the treatment duration. In zone of inhibition test after 14-day treatment, 5% luliconazole nail solution showed statistically high formation rate of zones of inhibition compared to 8% ciclopirox nail lacquer. Above all, these data suggested that 5% luliconazole nail solution has the potential to show high therapeutic effect for onychomycosis.

  5. Lithospheric failure and intra-plate volcanism in response to intense yielding: An example from the Greenland Fracture Zone, North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, A.; Watts, A. B.

    2012-04-01

    The Greenland Fracture Zone (GFZ) in the northern NE Atlantic outlines a 200 km long boundary between oceanic crust in the Greenland Basin and highly thinned, continental crust beneath the East Greenland Ridge (EGR). Seismic reflection, refraction and Bouguer anomaly data show evidence of significant crustal flexure across the GFZ. We argue that the flexure is caused by mechanical loading/unloading on a normal fault that dips towards the Greenland Basin. Simple 2D flexure modeling show that the best fit elastic thickness for 50 Ma crust in the Greenland Basin is only 10 km. We interpret the low elastic thickness as the result of intense yielding and a possible break in the oceanic lithosphere. This interpretation is supported by indications of a buried volcano of possible middle Miocene age, which is located above the point of greatest crustal curvature and at a site of abrupt changes in geometry of post-middle Miocene sedimentary seismic sequences. We associate the failure and associated intra-plate volcanism with multiple vertical tectonic events at the GFZ throughout the Cenozoic. Finally, seismic evidence is shown of pervasive bending-related faulting along the entire fracture-zone trench slope, some of which penetrate several kilometers into the upper mantle.

  6. Dating deformation - Lifetimes of phases vs. lifetimes of crystals and pulsed motion along fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sumit

    2016-04-01

    these rocks are the ages of peak of metamorphism in the presence of melt, rather than from the prograde path. When these information are combined with those from phase equilibria and geospeedometry, a systematic P-T-t history of the rocks may be constructed and as a result, a history of pulsed motion along the MCT may be obtained. Dates of rocks from the MCT zone itself, on the other hand, preserve one point in the P-T-t evolution. It can be shown that different isotopic systems (e.g. Lu-Hf in garnet vs. U-Th-Pb in monazites or zircons) preserve dates from different stages of this pulsed history and interpolating linearly between them to obtain rates of motion may give misleading results. Combination of both kinds of information with proper attention to the P-T history of the rocks yields the most internally consistent picture of motion along the fault zone. Ref: Anzckiewicz, R., Chakraborty, S., Dasgupta, S., Mukhopadhyay, D., Koltonik, K.: Timing, duration and inversion of prograde Barrovian metamorphism constrained by high resolution Lu-Hf garnet dating: A case study from the Sikkim Himalaya, NE India; Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 407, Pages 70 - 81, DOI: 10.1016/j.eps1.2014.09.035

  7. A recent phase of accretion along the southern Costa Rican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, Nathan L.; McIntosh, Kirk D.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.; Ranero, César R.

    2016-06-01

    In 2011 we acquired a 3D seismic reflection volume across the Costa Rica margin NW of the Osa Peninsula to investigate the complex structure and the development of the seismogenic zone within the Costa Rican subduction zone in the vicinity of recent International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) drilling. In contrast to previous interpretations, these newly acquired seismic images show that the margin wedge is composed of a layered fabric that is consistent with clastic sediments, similar to materials recovered from IODP drilling, that have been thrust and thickened into thrust-bounded folded sequences. These structures are consistent with a balanced sequence that has been frontally accreted in the context of an accretionary model. We interpret these sequences as sediment originally deposited on the subducting crust in a trench basin created by the southward migration of the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean triple junction, and accreted during recent margin subduction that also accelerated with passage of the triple junction. The margin is composed of relatively rapidly accreted sediment that was added to the margin during a phase of accretion within the last ∼5 Ma that was probably preceded throughout the Neogene by periods of non-accretion or erosion.

  8. Effects of dead zones in multiple-quantum-well binary-phase modulators on optical interconnections.

    PubMed

    Inbar, H; Taghizadeh, M R

    1998-02-10

    We investigate the effects of inactive regions [dead zones (DZ's)] in multiple-quantum-well binary-phase modulators used for free-space dynamic optical interconnection applications. Results, however, have implications for other types of pixelated spatial light modulators (SLM's). To our knowledge, the effects of DZ's in SLM's have not before been thoroughly studied in a context other than optical correlation. We investigate the DZ's (considered to be either opaque or transmissive) as a feature that may be exploited in system design, calculating light efficiency and fidelity as a function of DZ fractional width. It is shown that in particular cases an appropriate choice of DZ width would lead to an optical interconnection with substantially improved cross-talk performance.

  9. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase III, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Zimmerman, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads.

  10. Holocene faulting in the Bellingham forearc basin: upper-plate deformation at the northern end of the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Cascadia forearc takes up most of the strain transmitted northward via the Oregon Coast block from the northward-migrating Sierra Nevada block. The north-south contractional strain in the forearc manifests in upper-plate faults active during the Holocene, the northern-most components of which are faults within the Bellingham Basin. The Bellingham Basin is the northern of four basins of the actively deforming northern Cascadia forearc. A set of Holocene faults, Drayton Harbor, Birch Bay, and Sandy Point faults, occur within the Bellingham Basin and can be traced from onshore to offshore using a combination of aeromagnetic lineaments, paleoseismic investigations and scarps identified using LiDAR imagery. With the recognition of such Holocene faults, the northernmost margin of the actively deforming Cascadia forearc extends 60 km north of the previously recognized limit of Holocene forearc deformation. Although to date no Holocene faults are recognized at the northern boundary of the Bellingham Basin, which is 15 km north of the international border, there is no compelling tectonic reason to expect that Holocene faults are limited to south of the international border.

  11. Subduction zones beneath Indonesia imaged by Rayleigh wave phase velocity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Yang, T.; Harmon, N.

    2013-12-01

    Situated at the junction of several tectonic plates including Indian-Australia, Eurasia, and Philippine Sea, the Indonesian archipelago is one of the most tectonically complex regions on earth with subductions, collisions and accretions occurring along and within its boundaries. A high-resolution lithospheric and upper mantle model, therefore, is needed to understand these complex processes beneath this region. We present a phase velocity model derived from teleseismic Rayleigh waves recorded at seismic stations in this region. We use the modified version of the two-plane wave tomography, in which the non-planar effects of surface wave propagation such as multipathing and scattering are accounted for by two plane wave interference and using of finite frequency kernels. We measure the amplitudes and phases at 16 individual periods ranging from 20s to 150s for the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves at over 30 stations. 254 earthquakes are selected from global events greater than Ms 5.5 in the distance range of 25°- 150°. To account for the wavefield inconsistencies among stations for each earthquake due to the large scale of our study region, we divide the seismic array into 4 groups of stations in the two-plane wave parameter inversion. The phase velocity maps from our preliminary results show coherent features between adjacent periods. The most dominant structure in phase velocity maps for all periods is the strong fast-velocity belts beneath Sunda Trench, Java Trench, Timor Trough and the trenches around Celebes Sea, which shift gradually toward the subduction directions. The strength of the high velocity anomaly varies among trenches, likely suggesting the different age of subducting slabs. In addition, a velocity contrast in the middle of Borneo appears to mark the Lupar Line, a boundary between the stable Sundaland continental core and fragments of ophiolitic and Asian continental material accreted to Borneo during the Cretaceous. The 3-D shear wave structure

  12. Geochemistry of subalkaline and alkaline extrusives from the Kermanshah ophiolite, Zagros Suture Zone, Western Iran: implications for Tethyan plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, A. Mohamad; Hassanipak, A. A.

    1999-06-01

    The Kermanshah ophiolite is a highly dismembered ophiolite complex that is located in western Iran and belongs to the Zagros orogenic system. The igneous rocks of this complex consist of both mantle and crustal suites and include peridotites (dunite and harzburgite), cumulate gabbros, diorites, and a volcanic sequence that exhibits a wide range in composition from subalkaline basalts to alkaline basalts to trachytes. The associated sedimentary rocks include a variety of Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous deep- and shallow-water sedimentary rocks (e.g., dolomite, limestone, and pelagic sediments, including umber). Also present are extensive units of radiolarian chert. The geochemical data clearly identifies some of the volcanic rocks to have formed from two distinct types of basaltic melts: (i) those of the subalkaline suite, which formed from an initial melt with a light rare earth elements (LREE) enriched signature and incompatible trace element patterns that suggest an island arc affinity; and (ii) those of the alkaline suite with LREE-enriched signature and incompatible trace element patterns that are virtually identical to typical oceanic island basalt (OIB) pattern. The data also suggests that the trachytes were derived from the alkaline source, with fractionation controlled by extensive removal of plagioclase and to a lesser extent clinopyroxene. The presence of compositionally diverse volcanics together with the occurrence of a variety of Triassic-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and radiolarian chert indicate that the studied volcanic rocks from the Kermanshah ophiolite represent off-axis volcanic units that were formed in intraplate oceanic island and island arc environments in an oceanic basin. They were located on the eastern and northern flanks of one of the spreading centers of a ridge-transform fault system that connected Troodos to Oman prior to its subduction under the Eurasian plate.

  13. Accurate measurements of vadose zone fluxes using automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters: A synopsis of results from the Spydia research facility, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Barkle, Greg; Stenger, Roland; Moorhead, Brian; Wall, Aaron; Clague, Juliet

    2014-05-01

    Automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters (AETLs) are arguably the most accurate method to measure unsaturated water and contaminant fluxes below the root zone at the scale of up to 1 m². The AETL technique utilizes a porous sintered stainless-steel plate to provide a comparatively large sampling area with a continuously controlled vacuum that is in "equilibrium" with the surrounding vadose zone matric pressure to ensure measured fluxes represent those under undisturbed conditions. This novel lysimeter technique was used at an intensive research site for investigations of contaminant pathways from the land surface to the groundwater on a sheep and beef farm under pastoral land use in the Tutaeuaua subcatchment, New Zealand. The Spydia research facility was constructed in 2005 and was fully operational between 2006 and 2011. Extending from a central access caisson, 15 separately controlled AETLs with 0.2 m² surface area were installed at five depths between 0.4 m and 5.1 m into the undisturbed volcanic vadose zone materials. The unique setup of the facility ensured minimum interference of the experimental equipment and external factors with the measurements. Over the period of more than five years, a comprehensive data set was collected at each of the 15 AETL locations which comprises of time series of soil water flux, pressure head, volumetric water contents, and soil temperature. The soil water was regularly analysed for EC, pH, dissolved carbon, various nitrogen compounds (including nitrate, ammonia, and organic N), phosphorus, bromide, chloride, sulphate, silica, and a range of other major ions, as well as for various metals. Climate data was measured directly at the site (rainfall) and a climate station at 500m distance. The shallow groundwater was sampled at three different depths directly from the Spydia caisson and at various observation wells surrounding the facility. Two tracer experiments were conducted at the site in 2009 and 2010. In the 2009

  14. Morphological Evolution of Electrochemically Plated/Stripped Lithium Microstructures Investigated by Synchrotron X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu; Zielke, Lukas; Markötter, Henning; Hilger, André; Zhou, Dong; Moroni, Riko; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-08-23

    Due to its low redox potential and high theoretical specific capacity, Li metal has drawn worldwide research attention because of its potential use in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O2. Unfortunately, uncontrollable growth of Li microstructures (LmSs, e.g., dendrites, fibers) during electrochemical Li stripping/plating has prevented their practical commercialization. Despite various strategies proposed to mitigate LmS nucleation and/or block its growth, a fundamental understanding of the underlying evolution mechanisms remains elusive. Herein, synchrotron in-line phase contrast X-ray tomography was employed to investigate the morphological evolution of electrochemically deposited/dissolved LmSs nondestructively. We present a 3D characterization of electrochemically stripped Li electrodes with regard to electrochemically plated LmSs. We clarify fundamentally the origin of the porous lithium interface growing into Li electrodes. Moreover, cleavage of the separator caused by growing LmS was experimentally observed and visualized in 3D. Our systematic investigation provides fundamental insights into LmS evolution and enables us to understand the evolution mechanisms in Li electrodes more profoundly. PMID:27463258

  15. Phase transformations during the Ag-In plating and bonding of vertical diode elements of multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klochko, N. P. Khrypunov, G. S.; Volkova, N. D.; Kopach, V. R.; Lyubov, V. N.; Kirichenko, M. V.; Momotenko, A. V.; Kharchenko, N. M.; Nikitin, V. A.

    2013-06-15

    The conditions of the bonding of silicon multijunction solar cells with vertical p-n junctions using Ag-In solder are studied. The compositions of electrodeposited indium films on silicon wafers silver plated by screen printing and silver and indium films fabricated by layer-by-layer electrochemical deposition onto the surface of silicon vertical diode cells silver plated in vacuum are studied. Studying the electrochemical-deposition conditions, structure, and surface morphology of the grown layers showed that guaranteed bonding is provided by 8-min heat treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C under the pressure of a stack of metallized silicon wafers; however, the ratio of the indium and silver layer thicknesses should not exceed 1: 3. As this condition is satisfied, the solder after wafer bonding has the InAg{sub 3} structure (or InAg{sub 3} with an Ag phase admixture), due to which the junction melting point exceeds 700 Degree-Sign C, which guarantees the functioning of such solar cells under concentrated illumination.

  16. A solid-phase Bcr-Abl kinase assay in 96-well hydrogel plates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Mand, Michael R; Veach, Darren R; Parker, Laurie L; Clarkson, Bayard; Kron, Stephen J

    2008-04-01

    Regulated phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as c-Abl, is critical to cellular homeostasis. In turn, once deregulated as in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) fusion protein Bcr-Abl, PTKs can promote cancer onset and progression. The dramatic success of the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib as therapy for CML has inspired interest in other PTKs as targets for cancer drug discovery. Here we report a novel PTK activity and inhibition screening method using hydrogel-immobilized peptide substrates. Using acrylate crosslinkers, we tether peptides via terminal cysteines to thiol-presenting hydrogels in 96-well plates. These surfaces display low background and high reproducibility, allowing semiquantitative detection of peptide phosphorylation by recombinant c-Abl or by Bcr-Abl activity in cell extracts using traditional anti-phosphotyrosine immunodetection and chemifluorescence. The capabilities of this assay are demonstrated by performing model screens for inhibition with several commercially available PTK inhibitors and a collection of pyridopyrimidine Src/Abl dual inhibitors. This assay provides a practical method to measure the activity of a single kinase present in a whole cell lysate with high sensitivity and specificity as a valuable means for efficient small molecule screening.

  17. Testing for an Absence of Regional Shortening (or Extension) Across the Caribbean - South American Plate Boundary Zone (PBZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altimira, A.; Bird, D.

    2005-12-01

    Rotations among North American (NOAM), African, South American (SOAM) and Caribbean (CARIB) Plates for the past 60 My indicate dominant right-lateral transform motion and perhaps either shortening or extension across the CARIB-SOAM PBZ. Our testable model indicates that: From 60-45 Ma SOAM moved southward ca.200 km with respect to NOAM as CARIB squeezed into the Atlantic forcing the Yucatan and Grenada basins to open. Since 45 Ma CARIB has moved only east carrying fragments of the Caribbean Great Arc that had struck the west coast of SOAM at ca.70 Ma and shearing the passive margin of SOAM in a ca.250 km wide right-lateral transform PBZ between the thick continental lithosphere of SOAM and the thick oceanic plateau lithosphere of CARIB. Pull-aparts in the PBZ include the Falcon, Cariaco and Gulf of Paria basins and flower structure thrust belts include, the Serrania del Interior, Villa de Cura, Araya-Paria peninsula and the Northern Range of Trinidad. These thrust belts generated the loads that formed the East Venezuelan 150 km wide foreland basin. This model requires that: (1) all igneous and high P/T metamorphic ages in the thrust belts of Venezuela were acquired at or before ca. 70 Ma when the Great Arc of the Caribbean struck the west coast of SOAM; (2) Younger igneous ages in the northern part of the PBZ represent fragments of the southern end of the Lesser Antillean arc dragged into the PBZ as the arc slid by; and (3) Deformation in the PBZ began no earlier than the local time of passage of the southern end of the Lesser Antillean arc except in the Gulf of Paria region where halokinesis began earlier. Collision of the Panama arc (ca.7Ma) caused shortening on the west coast of SOAM and 70 km of northward escape of the triangular Maracaibo prism bounded by the Bocono and Santa Marta strike-slip faults and by a deep lithospheric-scale thrust. Restoring the Maracaibo prism aligns the Cuisa and Oca faults with the CARIB-SOAM east-west trending PBZ.

  18. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of CO adsorption on the surface of single phase hexagonally plate ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Amin; Firooz, Azam Anaraki; Beheshtian, Javad; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali

    2014-10-01

    A simple low temperature hydrothermal method has been investigated for synthesis of single phase hexagonally plate ZnO microstructure. The synthesized ZnO was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) photoluminescence spectrum (PL) and ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) to investigate the surface morphology, crystallographic phase, optical properties and used as a sensor for detection of CO gas molecules. It was observed that the ZnO microstructures were uniform size, single phase and symmetrical, with a hexagonal shape and height of ∼250 nm. The optical band gap value of this sample was calculated to be about 3.22 eV, which show a red shift with theoretical method. High-resolution TEM images indicate that all the microstructures are single crystals with a [0 0 1] direction growth. We studied the gas response of this sample to 500 ppm CO over a temperature range of 200-400 °C and compared with theoretical results. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the structure and electronic properties of ZnO with simulating the adsorption process of CO gas on the ZnO (1 0 1) surface. The theoretical results were in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Intermittent Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, P. G.; Behn, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Intermittent Plate Tectonics A basic premise of Earth Science is that plate tectonics has been continuously operating since it began early in Earth's history. Yet, plate-tectonic theory itself, specifically the collisional phase of the Wilson Cycle, constitutes a process that is capable of stopping all plate motion. The plausibility of a plate-tectonic hiatus is most easily illustrated by considering the expected future of the present-day plate-tectonic configuration. Since the opening of the Atlantic at ~200 ma, the area of the Atlantic basin has been growing at the expense of the Pacific. If this trend continues, relative plate motion models predict that in ~350 my, the Pacific Ocean basin will effectively close leading to widespread continent-continent collisions. Since a continent-continent collision represents the termination of subduction locally, the accumulated effect of all collisions is to stop subduction globally. In this scenario, ridges would then stop spreading and young oceanic lithosphere would cool, reaching a steady-state thickness of 100 km in about 80 my, based on the properties of oceanic lithosphere today. This would constitute the stoppage of plate tectonics. The presumption that plate tectonics never stops in the face of continental collisions is equivalent to requiring that subduction flux is approximately constant through time, such that subduction initiation roughly balances subduction termination. Such a balance then raises several questions about the subduction initiation process. When and how does subduction initiate? Is there a detectible relationship between subduction cessation and subduction initiation? We can gain some guidance into these questions by examining the plate motion history over the last 200 my. Subduction initiation has occurred over the last 80 my in three intra- oceanic subduction zones: Aleutians, Marianas-Izu-Bonin and Tonga-Kermadec in the Pacific basin. In these cases, however, subduction initiation would not

  1. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  2. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Shantha S. N.; Umino, Norihito; Hasegawa, Akira; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2009-07-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ~30° at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  3. Seismicity near the slip maximum of the 1960 Mw 9.5 Valdivia earthquake (Chile): Plate interface lock and reactivation of the subducted Valdivia Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Thorwart, Martin; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Claudia; Comte, Diana; Bataille, Klaus; Iglesia, Paula; Prezzi, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the processes behind subduction-related hazards is an important responsibility and major challenge for the Earth sciences. Few areas demonstrate this as clearly as south-central Chile, where some of the largest earthquakes in human history have occurred. We present the first observation of local seismicity in the Villarrica region (39°-40°S), based on a temporary local network of 55 stations installed from the Chilean coast into the Argentinian back-arc for one year. While consistent with the Chilean national catalog (SSN), our results allow us to observe smaller magnitudes with a completeness of about 2.0 and image the geometry of the Wadati-Benioff Zone from the Chile Trench down to 200 km. Offshore, a gap in interplate seismicity is observed in the region of the 1960 Valdivia earthquake slip. Above the interface, two offshore seismicity clusters possibly indicate ongoing stress relaxation. In the subducting Nazca Plate, we find a prominent seismicity cluster along the extrapolated trace of the oceanic Valdivia Fracture Zone (VFZ). The seismicity cluster is observed between 70 and 130 km depth and comprises mainly strike-slip events. It indicates weakening and reactivation of the major VFZ by dehydration of oceanic crust and mantle. Interpreting the subducted VFZ section as a localized reservoir of potential fluid release offers an explanation for the Villarrica volcanic complex that is located above the reactivated VFZ and shows the highest volcanic activity in South America. Crustal seismicity is observed near Puyehue volcano, which recently started to erupt (June 2011).

  4. Analysis of the morphology and deformation of the collision zone between the Muertos thrust belt and the aseismic Beata Ridge in the NE Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja Bruña, J.; Carbo-Gorosabel, A.; Llanes Estrada, M.; Munoz Martin, A.; Druet, M.; Gómez, M.; ten Brink, U. S.; Vitolla, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Beata Ridge is an aseismic bathymetric high located in the center of the Caribbean plate whose evolution is not yet well understood. The present collision between the Beata Ridge and the island arc at the Hispaniola island region may be driven by a small N-S component of compression. The basin-and-range physiography of southern Hispaniola, the turn and termination of the Muertos thrust belt and the surprisingly sharp termination of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault Zone seem to be related with this collision process. Swath bathymetry data and reflection seismic profiles acquired during the 2009 CARIBENORTE cruise aboard the Spanish R/V Hesperides, together with reprocessed multichannel seismic profiles provide the basis of the analysis of the morphology and deformation of the western end of the Muertos thrust belt and the northern aseismic Beata Ridge. The 650 km-long Muertos thrust belt turns progressively from E-W to N and then becomes narrower and disappears in the collision zone with the NNE-SSW trending Beata Ridge. The collision is evidenced because the active Muertos thrust belt has a southward transport direction and the NNE-SSW trending Beata Ridge acts as a basement high in the foreland area. The deep and elongated Muertos Trough located at the toe of the thrust belt, becomes narrower and progressively shallower and then sharply disappears at 70.9W and 18.1N. Both the thrust belt and the trough are replaced westward by a steep insular slope characterized by a dense network of submarine canyons draining to the south and east from the Bahoruco peninsula and the Ocoa and Azua Bays. The northern Beata Ridge shows a strongly asymmetrical cross-shape, with a main steep fault-scarp showing a maximum bathymetrical step of 4300 m-high in the western side and a gentler eastern slope formed by an alternation of terraces, interior basins and subsidiary ridges. Generally subsidiary ridges are N-S trending and then sub-parallel to the NNE-SSW trending main

  5. SCREENING MODEL FOR NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID TRANS- PORT IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING GREEN-AMPT AND KINEMATIC WAVE THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, a screening model for flow of a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and associated chemical transport in the vadose zone is developed. The model is based on kinematic approximation of the governing equations for both the NAPL and a partitionable chemical constituent. Th...

  6. A compact "water-window" microscope with 60-nm spatial resolution based on a double stream gas-puff target and Fresnel zone plate optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F.; Adjei, Daniel; Bartnik, Andrzej; Kostecki, Jerzy; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Vondrová, Šárka; Turňová, Jana; Fok, Tomasz; Jančarek, Alexandr; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Radiation with shorter illumination wavelength allows for extension of the diffraction limit towards nanometer scale, which is a straightforward way to significantly improve a spatial resolution in photon based microscopes. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from the so called "water window" spectral range, λ=2.3-4.4 nm, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast, providing much better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast is obtained because of selective absorption of radiation by carbon and water, being constituents of the biological samples. We present a desk-top system, capable of resolving 60 nm features in few seconds exposure time. We exploit the advantages of a compact, laser-plasma SXR source, based on a double stream nitrogen gas puff target, developed at the Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology. The source, emitting quasi-monochromatic, incoherent radiation, in the "water widow" spectral range at λ = 2.88 nm, is coupled with ellipsoidal, grazing incidence condenser and Fresnel zone plate objective. The construction of the microscope with some recent images of test and real samples will be presented and discussed.

  7. Unsaturated zone gas-phase VOC biodegradation: The importance of water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, P.A.; Hunt, J.R.; Firestone, M.K.

    1996-11-01

    Bioremediation of the unsaturated zone using indigenous microorganisms holds promise as a cost-effective and environmentally-compatible cleanup option. Both field and laboratory results indicate that microbial decomposition of hydrocarbon vapors in some subsurface soils may occur and that forced air advection, called bioventing, through such systems increases the overall cleanup rate by enhancing volatilization and gas phase mass transfer to microbial communities. More conclusive evidence of biological removal stems from carbon dioxide isotopic analysis during field studies or from measuring the percent of recovered label in {sup 14}C laboratory studies. Despite the evidence supporting in situ bioremediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of laboratory and field studies to date can best be described as phenomenalistic. If in situ bioremediation is to be cost-effectively engineered, a firm understanding of related process factors and an ability to control those factors must be gained. Sims et al. proposed five environmental factors that influence microbial activity during bioremediation: (1) available soil water, (2) oxygen, (3) redox potential, (4) pH, (5) nutrients, and (6) temperature. The authors propose that soil water potential is a limiting constraint, and in fact is the unifying determinant of many individual factors deemed important to VOC biodegradation in unsaturated soils. 59 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Insights into a fossil plate interface of an erosional subduction zone: a tectono-metamorphic study of the Tianshan metamorphic belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayet, Lea; Moritz, Lowen; Li, Jilei; Zhou, Tan; Agard, Philippe; John, Timm; Gao, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone seismicity and volcanism are triggered by processes occurring at the slab-wedge interface as a consequence of metamorphic reactions, mass-transfer and deformation. Although the shallow parts of subduction zones (<30-40 km) can be partly accessed by geophysical methods, the resolution of these techniques is insufficient to characterize and image the plate interface at greater depths (>60km). In order to better understand the plate interface dynamics at these greater depths, one has to rely on the rock record from fossil subduction zones. The Chinese Tianshan metamorphic belt (TMB) represents an ideal candidate for such studies, because structures are well exposed with exceptionally fresh high-pressure rocks. Since previous studies from this area focused on fluid-related processes and its metamorphic evolution was assessed on single outcrops, the geodynamic setting of this metamorphic belt is unfortunately heavily debated. Here, we present a new geodynamic concept for the TMB based on detailed structural and petrological investigations on a more regional scale. A ~11km x 13km area was extensively covered, together with E-W and N-S transects, in order to produce a detailed map of the TMB. Overall, the belt is composed of two greenschist-facies units that constitute the northern and southern border of a large high-pressure (HP) to ultra high-pressure (UHP) unit in the center. This HP-UHP unit is mainly composed of metasediments and volcanoclastic rocks, with blueschist, eclogite and carbonate lenses. Only the southern part of the HP-UHP unit is composed of the uppermost part of an oceanic crust (e.g., pillow basalts and deep-sea carbonates). From south to north, the relative abundance and size of blueschist massive boudins and layers (as well as eclogite boudins) decreases and the sequence is increasingly interlayered with metasedimentary and carbonate-rich horizons. This indicates that the subducted material was dominated by trench filling made of

  9. The impact of an efficient collection sites location on the zoning phase in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo Manni, Andrea Manni, Emanuele Toraldo, Massimiliano

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We study the problems of locating collection areas and zoning the service territory in a municipal waste management system. • We investigate the impact that an efficient collection sites location has on the subsequent zoning phase. • On a real-world test case, we show that the proposed approach could allow achieving significant monetary savings. - Abstract: In this paper, we study two decisional problems arising when planning the collection of solid waste, namely the location of collection sites (together with bin allocation) and the zoning of the service territory, and we assess the potential impact that an efficient location has on the subsequent zoning phase. We first propose both an exact and a heuristic approach to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, and to decide the capacities and characteristics of the bins to be located at each collection site. A peculiar aspect we consider is that of taking into account the compatibility between the different types of bins when allocating them to collection areas. Moreover, we propose a fast and effective heuristic approach to identify homogeneous zones that can be served by a single collection vehicle. Computational results on data related to a real-life instance show that an efficient location is fundamental in achieving consistent monetary savings, as well as a reduced environmental impact. These reductions are the result of one vehicle less needed to perform the waste collection operations, and an overall traveled distance reduced by about 25% on the average.

  10. Generation of Plates In Numerical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    A threedimensional numerical model is employed to investigate with an appropriate rheology how the mantle convection system organizes itself into a state, exhibiting essential features of plate tectonics. While a strongly temperature dependent viscosity leads to a stagnant lid, mobilization of the surface appears if an additional yield-stress criterion is taken into account. During short periods, parts of the surface move like plates. These periods are interrupted by phases in which a stagnant lid exists. Besides plate-like motion we observe other features like the migration of subduction-zones. Adding further a pressure dependence of the viscosity leads to change to a more con- tinuous plate-like behaviour. Once plates have formed, the surface moves essentially steady throughout the modelled time. This model evolves into a state displaying ex- tended rigidly moving plates, surrounded by localized areas with high deformation.

  11. Formation of Plates in Numerical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2001-12-01

    In a threedimensional numerical model we demonstrate that with an appropriate rheology the mantle convection system organizes itself into a state, exhibiting essential features of plate tectonics. While a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity leads to a stagnant lid, mobilization of the surface appears if an additional yield-stress criterion is taken into account. During short periods, parts of the surface move like plates. These periods are interrupted by phases in which a stagnant lid exists. Besides plate-like motion we observe other features like the migration of subduction-zones. Adding further a pressure dependence of the viscosity leads to change from the episodic to a more continuous plate-like behavior. Once plates have formed, the surface moves essentially steady throughout the modelled time. This models evolves into a state displaying extended rigidly moving plates, surrounded by localized areas with high deformation.

  12. Influence of mushy zone constant on the solid-liquid phase change process modeled by enthalpy-porosity technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the effects of mushy zone constant on the melting and solidification processes simulation with enthalpy-porosity technique are investigated. The isothermal melting and solidification of gallium enclosed by a rectangular container is studied using a transient two-dimensional finite volume based model. A wide range of mushy zone constants are considered in the study of the thermal and fluid flow characteristics of the system. The results indicate that increasing the mushy zone constant value up to a limit leads to the acceleration of the solidification process, while it decreases the melting rate. However, the further increase of the constant does not affect the phase change process in melting and solidification. It is found that the mushy zone constant has a significant influence on the temperature distribution adjacent to the melt front as well as the morphology of the solid-liquid interface. This is due to the effect of mushy zone constant on the flow in the mushy region and liquid layers nearby. The results also reveal that the increase of mushy zone constant results in the decrease of average wall heat flux in both melting and solidification processes.

  13. A New Arabia-Africa-Eurasia GPS Velocity Field (1994-2014) and E Mediterranean Block Model: Implications for Continental Deformation in a Zone of Active Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; Floyd, M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Karakhanian, A.; Kadirov, F. A.; Sokhadze, G.; ArRajehi, A.; Nankali, H. R.; Georgiev, I.; Ganas, A.; Paradissis, D.; McClusky, S.; Gomez, F. G.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present new GPS velocities for the Arabia-Africa-Eurasia region determined with GAMIT/GLOBK (>830 velocities) spanning the period 1994-2014. Here we consider the E Mediterranean region of plate interaction. We use DEFNODE software to develop block models and estimate slip rates on major faults and strain of some blocks. The wrms of residual velocities from our new model is 1.3 mm/yr. We identify small E-W extension within the newly defined Anatolian block confined to a 100-200 km wide zone south of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) reaching 2-3 mm/yr with rates increasing towards the west. Possible causes we consider include, un-modeled postseismic effects of the 1999 Izmit/Duzce earthquake sequence, continuing post-seismic effects of the 20th Century sequence of M>7 earthquakes, and/or toroidal sub-lithospheric flow towards the subducting Hellenic slab. The overall strain rate of the Marmara Sea block is dominantly N-S extension, and the Van block, N-S compression. Present slip rates along the NAF increase from E to W, 22-24 mm/yr along the E to E-central segment and 27-28 mm/yr along the W segment. We quantify extension in the G. of Corinth, central Greece, and G. of Evia; the W, central and E sections of the Hellenic Trench are shortening with extension in the back-arc. The W Hellenic Trench and W Peloponnese have right-lateral strike-slip and the E Hellenic Trench, left-lateral ss. N-S extension (2-4 mm/yr) in N Greece and the N Aegean Sea extends at least to 42°N. Arabia-Sinai left-lateral motion across the Dead Sea Fault is ~5 mm/yr along the S segment; significant residual velocities along the N and S segments indicate lower slip rates in the N and require fault segmentation to account for slip rate variations along strike. We identify E-W contraction of the Arabian (Persian) Gulf (~3-5 mm/yr) that extends into the E part of the Arabian Plate. We will quantify and present these and other observed deformation patterns and discuss their tectonic implications.

  14. Quantitative phase retrieval with arbitrary pupil and illumination

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Waller, Laura

    2015-10-02

    We present a general algorithm for combining measurements taken under various illumination and imaging conditions to quantitatively extract the amplitude and phase of an object wave. The algorithm uses the weak object transfer function, which incorporates arbitrary pupil functions and partially coherent illumination. The approach is extended beyond the weak object regime using an iterative algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the method on measurements of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) multilayer mask defects taken in an EUV zone plate microscope with both a standard zone plate lens and a zone plate implementing Zernike phase contrast.

  15. Quantitative phase retrieval with arbitrary pupil and illumination.

    PubMed

    Claus, Rene A; Naulleau, Patrick P; Neureuther, Andrew R; Waller, Laura

    2015-10-01

    We present a general algorithm for combining measurements taken under various illumination and imaging conditions to quantitatively extract the amplitude and phase of an object wave. The algorithm uses the weak object transfer function, which incorporates arbitrary pupil functions and partially coherent illumination. The approach is extended beyond the weak object regime using an iterative algorithm. We demonstrate the method on measurements of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) multilayer mask defects taken in an EUV zone plate microscope with both a standard zone plate lens and a zone plate implementing Zernike phase contrast. PMID:26480180

  16. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Fernandez Baca, J.A.; David, S.A.; Hubbard, C.R.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances stain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition dudng welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 {plus_minus} 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa {plus_minus} 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 {times} l0{minus}4 compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  17. Evidence of phase nucleation during olivine diffusion creep: a new perspective for mantle strain localization and Plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precigout, J.; Stunitz, H.; Le Breton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle strain localization is of great importance for lithosphere dynamics, but the cause for this phenomenon still remains very elusive, particularly in conditions of the strong and ductile uppermost mantle. Based on Griggs-type experiments, we show here that strain localization arises from solution transfer at olivine-pyroxene interfaces while olivine deforms by low-temperature creep. Deforming olivine (70%) plus diopside (30%) aggregates at 900°C and 1.2 GPa in presence of water, these experiments produce typical ductile shear zones which develop during substantial drop of the sample strength. At these conditions, olivine deforms through low-temperature plasticity and weakens, partly due to dynamic recrystallization driven by grain boundary migration. However, although substantial, this weakening alone does not promote strain localization, which only occurs if secondary phases are present. Indeed, the presence of clinopyroxene (CPx) leads to the formation of a fine-grained olivine-CPx mixture (~0.1 micron grain size) that extends in thin layers from the tips of CPx. Because of phase mixing and grain growth inhibition that stabilize the extremely small grain size, these layers deform through grain-size-sensitive creep, promoting further weakening of the sample. Together with strain-induced olivine weakening, this mixture-related weakening acts as a critical process for strain to localize. Furthermore, the presence of mixture with fluid inclusions in cracks of CPx indicate that new olivine and CPx crystallize from a fluid phase, in favor of chemically driven solution transfer at CPx boundaries. Our findings thus emphasize solution transfer as a start-up process for strain localization, provided that olivine aggregates weaken during plastic flow, as documented for low-temperature creep.

  18. Wide injection zone compression in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gilar, Martin; McDonald, Thomas S; Johnson, Jay S; Murphy, James P; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-04-17

    Chromatographic zone broadening is a common issue in microfluidic chromatography, where the sample volume introduced on column often exceeds the column void volume. To better understand the propagation of wide chromatographic zones on a separation device, a series of MS Excel spreadsheets were developed to simulate the process. To computationally simplify these simulations, we investigated the effects of injection related zone broadening and its gradient related zone compression by tracking only the movements of zone boundaries on column. The effects of sample volume, sample solvent, gradient slope, and column length on zone broadening were evaluated and compared to experiments performed on 0.32mm I.D. microfluidic columns. The repetitive injection method (RIM) was implemented to generate experimental chromatograms where large sample volume scenarios can be emulated by injecting two discrete small injection plugs spaced in time. A good match between predicted and experimental RIM chromatograms was observed. We discuss the performance of selected retention models on the accuracy of predictions and use the developed spreadsheets for illustration of gradient zone focusing for both small molecules and peptides. PMID:25748538

  19. Reflected and mode-converted seismic waves within the shallow aleutian subduction zone, southern Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, C.D.; Page, R.A.; Lahr, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Pronounced secondary phases observed in local recordings of quarry shots and earthquakes on the southern Kenai Peninsula are identified as reflected P and S and converted S-to-P phases originating within four depth ranges: in the upper few kilometers of the Cook Inlet Tertiary basin, at midcrustal depths within the overthrust North American plate, at about 35 km depth near the top of the Wadati-Benioff seismic zone in proximity to the inferred interplate megathrust, and at about 5-10 km below the megathrust in the subducted Pacific plate. The positions and origins of the mid-upper plate (MUP) discontinuity and similar reflectors are discussed. It appears the the MUP discontinuity is seismically inactive and does not represent a brittle-ductile transition zone within the upper plate. The two converted S-to-P phases generated near the top of the subducted plate could indicate a low velocity zone associated with subducted oceanic crust. -after Authors

  20. Analysis of gaseous-phase stable and radioactive isotopes in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, I.C.; Haas, H.H.; Weeks, E.P.; Thorstenson, D.C.

    1985-12-31

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project of the US Department of Energy provides that agency with data for evaluating volcanic tuff beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine its suitability for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste. Thickness of the unsaturated zone, which consists of fractured, welded and nonwelded tuff, is about 1640 to 2460 feet (500 to 750 meters). One question to be resolved is an estimate of minimum ground-water traveltime from the disturbed zone of the potentail repository to the accessible environment. Another issue is the potential for diffusive or convective gaseous transport of radionuclides from an underground facility in the unsaturated zone to the accessible environment. Gas samples were collected at intervals to a depth of 1200 feet from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for major atmospheric gases; carbon dioxide in the samples was analyzed for carbon-14 activity and for {delta}2!{sup 3}C; water vapor in the samples was analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18. These data could provide insight into the nature of unsaturated zone transport processes. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Estimation of primary drainage three-phase relative permeability for organic liquid transport in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Leonardo I; Demond, Avery H

    2003-11-01

    The modeling of transport of organic liquid contaminants through the vadose zone often requires three-phase relative permeabilities. Since these are difficult to measure, predictive models are usually used. The objective of this study is to assess the ability of eight common models to predict the drainage relative permeability to oil in a three-phase system (water-oil-air). A comparison of the models' estimates using data set from Oak [Oak, M.J., 1990. Three-phase relative permeability of water-wet Berea. In: Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Paper SPE/Doe 20183. Tulsa, OK, April 22-25] showed that they provide very different predictions for the same system. The goodness of the models does not increase with the amount of data or computation that the models require. Also, the calculations showed how different interpretations of the models and of the terminology associated with them can significantly impact the predictions. Thus, considerable error may be introduced into the simulations of organic liquid transport in the vadose zone depending on the selection and interpretation of the three-phase relative permeability model.

  2. Phase decomposition of γ-U (bcc) in U-10 wt% Mo fuel alloy during hot isostatic pressing of monolithic fuel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Eriksson, N.; Newell, R.; Keiser, D. D.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2016-11-01

    Eutectoid decomposition of γ-phase (cI2) into α-phase (oC4) and γ‧-phase (tI6) during the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of the U-10 wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy was investigated using monolithic fuel plate samples consisting of U10Mo fuel alloy, Zr diffusion barrier and AA6061 cladding. The decomposition of the γ-phase was observed because the HIP process is carried out near the eutectoid temperature, 555 °C. Initially, a cellular structure, consisting of γ‧-phase surrounded by α-phase, developed from the destabilization of the γ-phase. The cellular structure further developed into an alternating lamellar structure of α- and γ‧-phases. Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, qualitative and quantitative microstructural analyses were carried out to identify the phase constituents, and elucidate the microstructural development based on time-temperature-transformation diagram of the U10Mo alloy. The destabilization of γ -phase into α- and γ‧-phases would be minimized when HIP process was carried out with rapid ramping/cooling rate and dwell temperature higher than 560 °C.

  3. Gas-Phase Treatment of Technetium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-09-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) is present in the vadose zone of the Hanford Central Plateau and is a concern with respect to the protection of groundwater. The persistence, limited natural attenuation mechanisms, and geochemical behavior of Tc-99 in oxic vadose zone environments must be considered in developing effective alternatives for remediation. This report describes a new in situ geochemical manipulation technique for decreasing Tc-99 mobility using a combination of geochemical Tc-99 reduction with hydrogen sulfide gas and induced sediment mineral dissolution with ammonia vapor, which create conditions for deposition of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of Tc-99. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine changes in Tc-99 mobility in vadose zone sediment samples to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment under a variety of operational and sediment conditions.

  4. Present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone from inversion of focal mechanism solutions: A successful trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard M., Franck A.; Castilla, Raymi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a compilation of 16 present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone (PBZ), and particularly in western and along northern Venezuela. As a trial, these new stress tensors along PBZ have been calculated from inversion of 125 focal mechanism solutions (FMS) by applying the Angelier & Mechler's dihedral method, which were originally gathered by the first author and published in 2005. These new tensors are compared to those 59 tensors inverted from fault-slip data measured only in Plio-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, compiled in Audemard et al. (2005), which were originally calculated by several researchers through the inversion methods developed by Angelier and Mechler or Etchecopar et al. The two sets of stress tensors, one derived from geological data and the other one from seismological data, compare very well throughout the PBZ in terms of both stress orientation and shape of the stress tensor. This region is characterized by a compressive strike-slip (transpressional senso lato), occasionally compressional, regime from the southern Mérida Andes on the southwest to the gulf of Paria in the east. Significant changes in direction of the maximum horizontal stress (σH = σ1) can be established along it though. The σ1 direction varies progressively from nearly east-west in the southern Andes (SW Venezuela) to between NW-SE and NNW-SSE in northwestern Venezuela; this direction remaining constant across northern Venezuela, from Colombia to Trinidad. In addition, the σV defined by inversion of focal mechanisms or by the shape of the stress ellipsoid derived from the Etchecopar et al.'s method better characterize whether the stress regime is transpressional or compressional, or even very rarely trantensional at local scale. The orientation and space variation of this regional stress field in western Venezuela results from the addition of the two major neighbouring interplate maximum horizontal stress orientations (

  5. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  7. CO2 phase mutation by fluctuating water table in the vadose zone over a CCS site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, W.; Ha, S. W.; Kim, H. H.; Kim, T. W.; Lee, S. S.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the feasible plans to control greenhouse gas emissions. In order to be more perfect, the plan has to prove that the injected CO2 gas will not be leaking. Even if CO2 leaking happens, we should possess a technique which provides information on specific aquifer system before critical effect to ground and subsurface environments. Many parameters have been utilized for early detection before risk to environments by sensing CO2 gas concentration, electric conductivity, pH, and ion analysis. However, these are not enough to all CCS sites for leakage detection. For example, the importance of gas leaking path is emphasized because finding the dominant gas flow path can reduce risk and provide a quick estimation. Herein, we investigate dissolved solute degassing and vertical flow from saturated zone to unsaturated zone in shallow depth aquifer. Especially we focused on the water table fluctuation effect. Based on field data and basic parameters, we perform a pilot scale gas injection test and calculate gas flow saturation with STOMP simulator. The CO2 gas concentrations at different depth levels according to amount of injected CO2 infused water, CO2 gas saturation in vadose zone have different concentration values. If we estimate this phenomenon in vadose zone by using CO2 gas detection method, we could presume that the CO2 dissolved in shallow groundwater is degassing and flow upward into vadose zone. However, the concentration level and change patterns are not same and will be changed according to the pattern of water table fluctuation. This study could be usefully applied to strategic CCS environmental monitoring of CO2 leakage.Acknowledgement: Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003).

  8. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  9. Seismic signature of ultra-high pressure hydrous phases in subduction zones and constrains on water recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. D.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic anomalies in deep slabs including low velocity zones and seismic anisotropies have often been attributed to the presence of hydrated regions. Superhydrous phase B and phase D which can respectively contain up to 5.8 wt.% and 10 wt.% of water are considered as important water carriers in cold slabs. Phase equilibrium studies have also shown that these phases can represent up to 50 vol.% in water saturated peridotites [1]. Recent Brillouin scattering experiments performed at ambient conditions have revealed the potential for both phases to be responsible for the observed negative velocity anomalies [2]. In addition, due to their layered structure both phases may easily align in a stress field and therefore significantly contribute to observed seismic anisotropies. The detailed knowledge of their seismic properties at high pressure is therefore essential to infer the hydration state of deep subducted slabs. Here, we report the single-crystal elastic properties of superhydrous phase B (chemical composition Mg10.4Si3.1H2.7O18) using Brillouin scattering in the diamond anvil cell. The results on the elasticity studies are combined with previous plasticity studies on phase D [3] and most plausible slip systems of superhydrous B to evaluate the velocity contrast between hydrous and anhydrous peridotites and the contribution of these phases to seismic anisotropy in deep subducted slabs. The results will be discussed in the light of seismic observations to draw a better picture of water recycling via subduction beyond 410 km depth. [1] Iwamori, H. (2004), Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 227, 57-71. [2] Rosa, A.D., C. Sanchez-Valle and S. Ghosh (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L06304. [3] Rosa A.D., et al. (2011) Abstract DI44A-03 Fall AGU Meeting 2011.

  10. Necking and spheroidization of {alpha}{sub 2} plates in lamellar microstructure of a hot-deformed two-phase TiAl alloy during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.C. |; Chen, G.L.; Wang, J.G.; Ye, H.Q.

    1998-03-13

    It is well known that two-phase TiAl alloys exhibit better mechanical properties than single phase {gamma}-TiAl alloys. Recently Kim reported that the thermomechanical treatments (TMT) or thermomechanical processing (TMP) for TiAl alloys can significantly change the microstructures resulting in an improved balanced mechanical properties. Besides changes in grain size, lamellar spacing and the ratio of {gamma} to {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae, TMT or TMP may also lead to the formation of numerous dislocations and deformation twins, and various nonequilibrium structures of lamellar interfaces. Chen et al. have observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) that hot-deformation results in {alpha}{sub 2}/{gamma} and {gamma}/{gamma} interfaces with numerous ledges, so the boundary plane is no longer parallel to the (111){sub {gamma}} or (0001){sub {alpha}{sub 2}} plane, and some interfacial ledges correspond to 1/3 [111] Frank partial dislocations in {gamma} plate, as consistent with the deviation of (111){sub {gamma}} from being parallel to (0001){sub {alpha}{sub 2}} plane near the {alpha}{sub 2}/{gamma} interface. The thermal instability of the deformed {alpha}{sub 2}/{gamma} lamellar microstructure, such as necking and spheroidization of {alpha}{sub 2} plates, formation of subgrains in plates and recrystallization, has been recently studied. However, no report has been made on the detailed evolution of deformed microstructure during annealing. This paper reports some TEM observations on necking and spheroidization of {alpha}{sub 2} plates in a hot-deformed two-phase TiAl alloy upon subsequent short-time annealing.

  11. Elasticity and thermodynamics of the 3.65 Å phase in subduction zone settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Speziale, S.; Marquardt, H.; Jahn, S.; Wunder, B.; Koch-Müller, M.; Liermann, H.

    2013-12-01

    How efficiently water is transported into the deeper realms of the Earth is related to the stability of hydrous phases. And to evaluate whether these hydrous phases are indeed stabilized in the hydrated lithosphere, it is important to constrain the elasticity of the hydrous phases and relate them with the geophysical observations. Based on experimental phase stability studies, 3.65 Å phase [MgSi(OH)6] (Wunder et al., 2011) is an important candidate phase for transporting water into the deep interior of the Earth. In this study, we present the equation of state, full elastic constant tensor, and its pressure dependence. In addition, we also evaluate the fundamental thermodynamic quantities and speculate on the factors that are likely to affect and enhance the thermal stability of the 3.65 Å phase and thus its efficiency in transporting water. We use a combination of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and ab initio simulations to constrain the equation of state and elasticity of the 3.65 Å phase. We find that the pressure-volume results for the 3.65 Å phase are well represented by a third order Birch-Murnaghan finite strain formulation, with K0 = 84 GPa, K' = 5.0 and V0 = 194.5 Å3. The bulk sound velocities of the 3.65 Å phase are significantly faster compared to the layered hydrous phases stable at lower pressure conditions and may not be distinguishable from the major mantle phases such as high-pressure clino-enstatite phase. The full elastic constant tensor reveals significant anisotropy with AVP = 10 %, AVS1 = 23 %, and AVS2 = 20 % at pressures corresponding to the lower part of the upper mantle. Reference Wunder, B., Wirth, R., Koch-Müller, M., 2011. The 3.65 Å phase in the system MgO-SiO2-H2O: Synthesis, composition, and structure. American Mineralogist, 96, 1207-1214. Acknowledgements MM is supported by US NSF grant # EAR 1250477 and also acknowledges computing resources (EAR130015) from XSEDE (OCI-1053575).

  12. Using vapor phase tomography to measure the spatial distribution of vapor concentrations and flux for vadose-zone VOC sources.

    PubMed

    Mainhagu, J; Morrison, C; Brusseau, M L

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  13. Using Vapor Phase Tomography to Measure the Spatial Distribution of Vapor Concentrations and Flux for Vadose-Zone VOC Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Morrison, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  14. Using vapor phase tomography to measure the spatial distribution of vapor concentrations and flux for vadose-zone VOC sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of the four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were used along with pressure and the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site.

  15. High hydrogen peroxide concentration in the feed-zone affects bioreactor cell productivity with liquid phase oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pritish; Ghosh, Kaushik; Suraishkumar, G K

    2008-06-01

    Liquid phase oxygen supply strategy (LPOS), in which hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is used to supply oxygen to the bioreactor, leads to low cell productivity despite high specific productivities of relevant metabolites. We hypothesized that high H(2)O(2) concentrations in the feed-zone led to local cell death, which in turn, lead to lower cell productivity. To test the hypothesis, a mathematical model was developed. Bacillus subtilis 168 was used as the model system in this study. The model simulations of cell concentrations in the bioreactor-zone were verified with the experimental results. The feed-zone H(2)O(2) concentrations remained 12-14 times higher than bulk bioreactor concentrations. The high local concentrations are expected to cause local cell killing, which explains the decrease in overall cell production by 50% at 300 rpm compared to conventional cultivation. Further, among the four different feed strategies studied using the model, dissolved oxygen (DO) controlled H(2)O(2) feed strategy caused least local cell killing and improved overall cell production by 34%.

  16. Using Vapor Phase Tomography to Measure the Spatial Distribution of Vapor Concentrations and Flux for Vadose-zone VOC Sources

    PubMed Central

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were combined with the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site. PMID:25835545

  17. Relative importance of gas-phase diffusive and advective tichloroethene (TCE) fluxes in the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Won; Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2002-07-15

    It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure changes can induce gas flow in the unsaturated zone to such an extent that the advective flux of organic vapors in unsaturated-zone soil gas can be significant relative to the gas-phase diffusion flux of these organic vapors. To test this hypothesis, a series of field measurements and computer simulations were conducted to simulate and compare diffusion and advection fluxes at a trichloroethene-contaminated field site at Picatinny Arsenal in north-central New Jersey. Moisture content temperature, and soil-gas pressure were measured at multiple depths (including at land surface) and times for three distinct sampling events in August 1996, October 1996, and August 1998. Gas pressures in the unsaturated zone changed significantly over time and followed changes measured in the atmosphere. Gas permeability of the unsaturated zone was estimated using data from a variety of sources, including laboratory gas permeability measurements made on intact soil cores from the site, a field air pump test, and calibration of a gas-flow model to the transient, one-dimensional gas pressure data. The final gas-flow model reproduced small pressure gradients as observed in the field during the three distinct sampling events. The velocities calculated from the gas-flow model were used in transient, one-dimensional transport simulations to quantify advective and diffusive fluxes of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere as a function of time for each sampling event. Effective diffusion coefficients used for these simulations were determined from independent laboratory measurements made on intact soil cores collected from the field site. For two of the three sampling events (August 1996 and August 1998), the TCE gas-phase diffusion flux at land surface was significantly greater than the advection flux over the entire sampling period. For the second sampling event (October 1996), the advection flux was frequently larger than the

  18. Geologically current plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  19. Formation of III–V ternary solid solutions on GaAs and GaSb plates via solid-phase substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil’ev, V. I.; Gagis, G. S. Kuchinskii, V. I.; Danil’chenko, V. G.

    2015-07-15

    Processes are considered in which ultrathin layers of III–V ternary solid solutions are formed via the delivery of Group-V element vapors to GaAs and GaSb semiconductor plates, with solid-phase substitution reactions occurring in the surface layers of these plates. This method can form defect-free GaAs{sup 1–x}P{sup x}, GaAs{sup x}Sb{sup 1–x}, and GaP{sup x}Sb{sup 1–x} layers with thicknesses of 10–20 nm and a content x of the embedded components of up to 0.04.

  20. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  1. Significance of groundwater flux on contaminant concentration and mass discharge in the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated zone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianting; Sun, Dongmin

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flowing through residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone will cause NAPL dissolution and generate large contaminant plume. The use of contaminant mass discharge (CMD) measurements in addition to NAPL aqueous phase concentration to characterize site conditions and assess remediation performance is becoming popular. In this study, we developed new and generic numerical models to investigate the significance of groundwater flux temporal variations on the NAPL source dynamics. The developed models can accommodate any temporal variations of groundwater flux in the source zone. We examined the various features of groundwater flux using a few selected functional forms of linear increase/decrease, gradual smooth increase/decrease, and periodic fluctuations with a general trend. Groundwater flux temporal variations have more pronounced effects on the contaminant mass discharge dynamics than the aqueous concentration. If the groundwater flux initially increases, then the reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) vs. NAPL mass reduction (MR) relationship is mainly downward concave. If the groundwater flux initially decreases, then CMDR vs. MR relationship is mainly upward convex. If the groundwater flux variations are periodic, the CMDR vs. MR relationship tends to also have periodic variations ranging from upward convex to downward concave. Eventually, however, the CMDR vs. MR relationship approaches 1:1 when majority of the NAPL mass becomes depleted. PMID:27500747

  2. Significance of groundwater flux on contaminant concentration and mass discharge in the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianting; Sun, Dongmin

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flowing through residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone will cause NAPL dissolution and generate large contaminant plume. The use of contaminant mass discharge (CMD) measurements in addition to NAPL aqueous phase concentration to characterize site conditions and assess remediation performance is becoming popular. In this study, we developed new and generic numerical models to investigate the significance of groundwater flux temporal variations on the NAPL source dynamics. The developed models can accommodate any temporal variations of groundwater flux in the source zone. We examined the various features of groundwater flux using a few selected functional forms of linear increase/decrease, gradual smooth increase/decrease, and periodic fluctuations with a general trend. Groundwater flux temporal variations have more pronounced effects on the contaminant mass discharge dynamics than the aqueous concentration. If the groundwater flux initially increases, then the reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) vs. NAPL mass reduction (MR) relationship is mainly downward concave. If the groundwater flux initially decreases, then CMDR vs. MR relationship is mainly upward convex. If the groundwater flux variations are periodic, the CMDR vs. MR relationship tends to also have periodic variations ranging from upward convex to downward concave. Eventually, however, the CMDR vs. MR relationship approaches 1:1 when majority of the NAPL mass becomes depleted.

  3. Significance of groundwater flux on contaminant concentration and mass discharge in the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminated zone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianting; Sun, Dongmin

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flowing through residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone will cause NAPL dissolution and generate large contaminant plume. The use of contaminant mass discharge (CMD) measurements in addition to NAPL aqueous phase concentration to characterize site conditions and assess remediation performance is becoming popular. In this study, we developed new and generic numerical models to investigate the significance of groundwater flux temporal variations on the NAPL source dynamics. The developed models can accommodate any temporal variations of groundwater flux in the source zone. We examined the various features of groundwater flux using a few selected functional forms of linear increase/decrease, gradual smooth increase/decrease, and periodic fluctuations with a general trend. Groundwater flux temporal variations have more pronounced effects on the contaminant mass discharge dynamics than the aqueous concentration. If the groundwater flux initially increases, then the reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) vs. NAPL mass reduction (MR) relationship is mainly downward concave. If the groundwater flux initially decreases, then CMDR vs. MR relationship is mainly upward convex. If the groundwater flux variations are periodic, the CMDR vs. MR relationship tends to also have periodic variations ranging from upward convex to downward concave. Eventually, however, the CMDR vs. MR relationship approaches 1:1 when majority of the NAPL mass becomes depleted.

  4. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  5. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  6. In-situ Phase transformation study in fine grained heat affected zone of Grade 91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Yu, Xinghua; Komizo, Prof. Y; Terasaki, Prof. H

    2014-01-01

    Creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels such as the 9 Cr steel [ASTM A387 Grade 91] are widely used as tubing and piping in the new generation of fossil fired power plants. Microstructures in the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) may significantly reduce creep strength leading Type IV failures. Current research suggest that reducing pre-weld tempering temperature from 760 C (HTT) to 650 C (LTT) has the potential to double the creep life of these welds. To understand this improvement, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) measurement with synchrotron radiation was used to characterize the microstructure evolution during fine grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycling of grade 91 steel. The measurements showed both M23C6 (M=Fe, Cr) and MX (M=Nb, V; X=C,N) are present in the sample after the HTT condition. Near equilibrium fraction of M23C6 was measured in high temperature tempering condition (HTT, 760 C). However, the amount of M23C6 in LTT condition was very low since the diffraction peaks are close to the background. During simulated FGHAZ thermal cycling, the M23C6 partially dissolved in HTT sample. Interestingly, MX did not dissolve in both LTT and HTT samples. Hypothesis for correlation of M23C6 carbide distribution and pre-mature creep failure in FGHAZ will be made.

  7. Crustal structure and evolution of the southern Juan de Fuca plate from wide-angle seismic data: Insights into the hydration state of the incoming plate off Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Carton, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-channel seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction seismic experiment was conducted on the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate to investigate the evolution of the plate from accretion to its subduction at the Cascadia margin. Hydration of the upper crust (UC) of the JdF Plate is well documented, but the state of hydration of the lower crust (LC) and upper mantle (UM] remains to be investigated. A 2D P-wave velocity model of the plate is derived from a joint reflection-refraction travel-time inversion of wide-angle seismic data. Stacked MCS reflection images together with modeled sedimentary velocities define an increasing thickness of sedimentary cover of up to 2.7km. Evidence for bending-related faulting is identified in coincident MCS images both indirectly as faulting in the sedimentary layer [Gibson, et al., this meeting] and directly as dipping crustal reflectors [Han et al., this meeting]. Three first order features are evident in the patterns of crustal velocity variations along the profile. 1: Crustal velocities at 150-250 km landward of the spreading ridge (~5 Ma age) show reduced velocities up to -0.20 km/s in comparison to velocities in younger crust (~3 Ma) 100-150 km from the ridge. This decrease in velocities is coincident with a propagator wake. 2: Upper crustal velocities begin to increase at 170km from the deformation front (DF), which coincides with the first evidence of faulting from sedimentary offsets. Crustal velocities start a decreasing trend at 80km from the DF where fault throws are seen to begin increasing trend landward. 3: UC velocities in the region of directly imaged crustal faulting (40km from trench) increase ~0.5km/s at the DF, while LC velocities decrease ~0.3km/s. The contrasting behavior in the upper and lower crust may indicate that bending promotes hydrothermal circulation in the outer rise. Circulation may be vigorous enough within the sediments/UC so that any residual shallow porosity is clogged with alteration products

  8. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  9. Phase 2 development of Great Lakes algorithms for Nimbus-7 coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Great Lakes designed to evaluate the application of the NIMBUS-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). Atmospheric and water optical models were used to relate surface and subsurface measurements to satellite measured radiances. Absorption and scattering measurements were reduced to obtain a preliminary optical model for the Great Lakes. Algorithms were developed for geometric correction, correction for Rayleigh and aerosol path radiance, and prediction of chlorophyll-a pigment and suspended mineral concentrations. The atmospheric algorithm developed compared favorably with existing algorithms and was the only algorithm found to adequately predict the radiance variations in the 670 nm band. The atmospheric correction algorithm developed was designed to extract needed algorithm parameters from the CZCS radiance values. The Gordon/NOAA ocean algorithms could not be demonstrated to work for Great Lakes waters. Predicted values of chlorophyll-a concentration compared favorably with expected and measured data for several areas of the Great Lakes.

  10. Densitometric HPTLC method for qualitative, quantitative analysis and stability study of Coenzyme Q10 in pharmaceutical formulations utilizing normal and reversed-phase silica gel plates.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, Maged Saad; Alam, Prawez; Alqasoumi, Saleh Ibrahim

    2016-03-01

    Two simple, precise and stability-indicating densitometric HPTLC method were developed and validated for qualitative and quantitative analysis of Coenzyme Q10 in pharmaceutical formulations using normal-phase (Method I) and reversed phase (Method II) silica gel TLC plates. Both methods were developed and validated with 10×20 cm glass-backed plates coated with 0.2 mm layers of either silica gel 60 F254 (E-Merck, Germany) using hexane-ethyl acetate (8.5:1.5 v/v) as developing system (Method I) or RP-18 silica gel 60 F254 (E-Merck, Germany) using methanol-acetone (4:6 v/v) as mobile phase (Method II). Both analyses were scanned with a densitometer at 282 nm. Linearity was found in the ranges 50-800 ng/spot (r(2)=0.9989) and 50-800 ng/spot (r(2)=0.9987) for Method I and Method II respectively. Stability of Coenzyme Q10 was explored by the two methods using acid, base, hydrogen peroxide, temperature and different solvents. Due to the efficiency of the method in separating Coenzyme Q10 from other ingredients including its degradation products, it can be applied for quality control, standardization of different pharmaceutical formulations and stability study.

  11. NDT process using Lamb waves generated/detected by ultrasonic phased array probes for the defect detection in metallic and composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleux, A.; Micheau, P.; Castaings, M.

    2013-01-01

    One gel-coupled multi-element matrix ultrasonic probe is driven using the phased array principle, for launching/detecting pure Lamb modes in/from different directions along various types of plates, and taking into account the modes frequency and angular dispersive effects. It allows rapid inspection of large structures, from one remote fixed position of the probe. The set-up and principle of the process are presented, as well as its measured performances in terms of modal selectivity and directivity. Finally examples of defect detection are shown.

  12. Application of a Persistent Dissolved-phase Reactive Treatment Zone for Mitigation of Mass Discharge from Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J.C.; Brusseau, M.L.; Carroll, K.C.; Plaschke, M.; Fuhrig, L.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the development and effectiveness of a persistent dissolved-phase treatment zone, created by injecting potassium permanganate solution, for mitigating discharge of contaminant from a source zone located in a relatively deep, low-permeability formation. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone comprising dissolved- and sorbed-phase mass is present in lower permeability strata adjacent to a sand/gravel unit in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. The results of bench-scale studies conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site indicated that natural oxidant demand was low, which would promote permanganate persistence. The reactive zone was created by injecting a permanganate solution into multiple wells screened across the interface between the lower-permeability and higher-permeability units. The site has been monitored for nine years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. Permanganate continues to persist at the site, and a substantial and sustained decrease in DCE concentrations in groundwater has occurred after the permanganate injection.. These results demonstrate successful creation of a long-term, dissolved-phase reactive-treatment zone that reduced mass discharge from the source. This project illustrates the application of in-situ chemical oxidation as a persistent dissolved-phase reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass discharge into groundwater. PMID:26300570

  13. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  14. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  15. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  16. Vapor-phase interactions and diffusion of organic solvents in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the interactions and static movement of 37 organic solvents as vapors through the unsaturated soil zone. The physicochemical interactions of the organic vapors with unsaturated soil materials were emphasized with focus on diffusive, and adsorptive interactions. Fick's Law and porous media diffusion coefficients for most of the solvent vapors were either compiled or estimated; coefficients were not available for some of the fluorinated solvents. The adsorption of some of the solvent vapors by silica was concluded to be due to hydrogen bond formation with surface silanol groups. Heats of adsorption data for different adsorbents were also compiled. There were very few data on the adsorption of these solvent vapors by soils, but it appears that the magnitude of adsorption of nonpolar solvents is reduced as the relative humidity of the vapor-solid system is increased. Consequently, the interaction of the vapors may then separated into two processes; (1) gas-water partitioning described by Henry's Law constants, and (2) solid-water adsorption coefficients which may be estimated from liquid-solid partition coefficients (Kd values). ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  17. Field study of using naturally occurring radon to assess the dense non-aqueous phase liquid distribution in saturated zone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Tsung; Tung, Tien-Hsing; Wang, Lung-Chang; Lu, Chih-Jen

    2014-02-01

    The concept of radon deficiency such as the ratios of radon concentrations to the maximum measured value of a sample batch was employed as the survey methodology for this study to investigate contamination sources in an industrial zone that was suspected of causing subsurface dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination. The results showed that radon concentrations in certain wells were significantly lower than that in uncontaminated regions. Radon concentrations in groundwater are influenced by the in situ bioremediation of vegetable oil, which causes abnormal reductions of the radon in groundwater because radon partitions into vegetable oil and results in more variable for the radon deficit method to showing the impacts of remediation. Six contaminated regions were identified by integrating radon concentration ratios (divided into low (L), middle (M), and high (H) levels) and DNAPL concentrations (divided into low (L) and high (H) levels). Contaminated regions in the LH, MH, and HH categories are located in the vicinity of the contamination source, and those in the HL category are located far from the source zone. The ML and LL categories indicate the involvement of unknown factors, and that additional analyses are required to uncover the facts that affect radon and DNAPL concentrations.

  18. Generation of plate tectonics via grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    Weakening and shear localization in the lithosphere are essential ingredients for understanding how and whether plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The grain-damage and pinning mechanism of Bercovici & Ricard (2012) for lithospheric shear--localization proposes that damage to the interface between phases in a polycrystalline material like peridotite (composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene) increases the number of small Zener pinning surfaces that constrain mineral grains to ever smaller sizes regardless of creep mechanism. This effect allows a self-softening feedback in which damage and grain-reduction can co-exist with a grain-size dependent diffusion creep rheology; moreoever, grain growth and weak-zone healing are greatly impeded by Zener pinning thereby leading to long-lived relic weak zones. This mechanism is employed in two-dimensional flow calculations to test its ability to generate toroidal (strike-slip) motion from convective type flow and to influence plate evolution. The fluid dynamical calculations employ source-sink driven flow as a proxy for convective poloidal flow (upwelling/downwelling and divergent/convergent motion), and the coupling of this flow with non-linear rheological mechanisms excites toroidal or strike-slip motion. The numerical experiments show that pure dislocation-creep rheology, and grain-damage without Zener pinning (as occurs in a single-phase assemblages) permit only weak localization and toroidal flow; however, the full grain-damage with pinning readily allows focussed localization and intense, plate-like toroidal motion and strike-slip deformation. Rapid plate motion changes are also tested with abrupt rotations of the source-sink field after a plate-like configuration is developed; the post-rotation flow and material property fields are found to never recover or lose memory of the original configuration, leading to suboptimally aligned plate boundaries (e.g., strike-slip margins non

  19. Quasi-phase-matching high harmonic generation using trains of pulses produced using an array of birefringent plates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kevin; Robinson, Tom; Hooker, Simon M

    2012-03-12

    Quasi-phase-matched high harmonic generation using trains of up to 8 counter-propagating pulses is explored. For trains of up to 4 pulses the measured enhancement of the harmonic signal scales with the number of pulses N as (N + 1)², as expected. However, for trains with N > 4, no further enhancement of the harmonic signal is observed. This effect is ascribed to changes of the coherence length Lc within the generating medium. Techniques for overcoming the variation of Lc are discussed. The pressure dependence of quasi-phase-matching is investigated and the switch from true-phase-matching to quasi-phase-matching is observed.

  20. Inter- and intra-plate deformation at North American plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beavan, John

    1986-01-01

    Alaska tectonics and earthquake hazard studies; Southern California tectonics (block rotation); spreading near the Salton Trough; California plate motion (fault zone kinematics); and Caribbean plate motion investigations are examined.

  1. 24 CFR 3280.5 - Data plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (f) Reference to the roof load zone and wind load zone for which the home is designed and duplicates... certificate and insulation zone map required by §§ 3280.510 and 3280.511. The Wind Zone Map on the Data Plate shall also contain the statement: This home has not been designed for the higher wind pressures...

  2. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D. A.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto subduction about 4Ga, evident in geochemical analysis from ancient cratons, to global tectonics by 3-2.7Ga, suggests that plates and plate boundaries spread globally over a 1Gyr period. We hypothesize that when sufficient lithospheric damage, which promotes shear-localization and long-lived weak zones, combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of plate boundaries and eventually fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We demonstrate this process with an idealized model of pressure-driven flow (wherein a low pressure zone is equivalent to downwelling suction or slab pull) in a lithosphere that self-weakens according to a mylonitic-type polycrystalline grain-damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. v.202-203, pp27-55, 2012). In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, four successive orthogonal rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damage zones that are inherited to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even as flow is only driven by subduction. For Venus' hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which is compatible with observations. After plates are developed, continued changes in driving forces combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor and micro plates.

  3. Plate Tectonics: From Initiation of Subduction to Global Plate Motions (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Plates are driven by buoyancy forces distributed in the mantle, within cooling oceanic plates (ridge push) and within subducted slabs. Although the case is often made that subducted slabs provide the principle driving force on plate motion, consensus has not been achieved. This is at least partially due to the great difficulty in realistically capturing the role of slabs in observationally-constrained models as slabs act to drive and resist plate motions through their high effective viscosity. Slab buoyancy acts directly on the edge of the plate (slab pull), while inducing mantle flow that tends to drag both subducting and overriding plates toward the trench. While plates bend during subduction they undergo a form of 'plastic failure' (as evident through faulting, seismicity and reduction of flexural parameters at the outer trench wall). The birth of a new subduction zone, subduction initiation, provides important insight into plate motions and subduction dynamics. About half of all subduction zones initiated over the Cenozoic and the geophysical and geological observations of them provide first order constraints on the mechanics of how these margins evolved from their preexisting tectonic state to self-sustaining subduction. We have examples of subduction initiation at different phases of the initiation process (e.g. early versus late) as well as how margins have responded to different tectonic forcings. The consequences of subduction initiation are variable: intense trench roll back and extensive boninitic volcanism followed initiation of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc while both were absent during Aleutian arc initiation. Such differences may be related to the character of the preexisting plates, the size of and forces on the plates, and how the lithosphere was initially bending during initiation. I will address issues associated with the forces driving plate tectonics and initiating new subduction zones from two perspectives. A common thread is the origin and

  4. Two mechanisms of rephasal of circadian rhythms in response to a 180 deg phase shift /simulated 12-hr time zone change/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroshia, C. W.; Winget, C. M.; Bond, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A model developed by Wever (1966) is considered. The model describes the behavior of circadian rhythms in response to photoperiod phase shifts simulating time zone changes, as a function of endogenous periodicity, light intensity, and direction of phase shift. A description is given of an investigation conducted to test the model upon the deep body temperature rhythm in unrestrained subhuman primates. An evaluation is conducted regarding the applicability of the model in predicting the type and duration of desynchronization induced by simulated time zone changes as a function of endogenous periodicity.

  5. Plate-mantle coupling from post-Pangea plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    keels impinge on asthenospheric flow to increase shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. However, plates with significant cratonic fragments exhibit short-lived (~10 Myr) accelerations, such as the rapid motion of the Indian plate that is correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement, highlighting the necessity to analyse plate velocities over long geological timeframes. By evaluating factors controlling plate velocities in the post-Pangea timeframe, simple principles can be applied to highlight potential plate velocity artefacts for Paleozoic and earlier times for which no hotspot tracks, nor in-situ seafloor spreading histories, are preserved. Based on the post-Pangea timeframe, a principle that can be applied to pre-Pangea times is that plates with less than ~50% continental area can reach RMS velocities of ~20 cm/yr, while plates with more than 50% continental fraction do not exceed RMS velocities of ~10 cm/yr. Similarly, plates with large portions of continental or cratonic area with RMS velocities exceeding ~15 cm/yr for more than ~10 Myr should be flagged as potential artefacts requiring further justification of plate driving forces in such scenarios.

  6. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as

  7. Fiscal Year 2009 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-36 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-10

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present fiscal year (FY) 2009 results of Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) characterization activities for exposure unit (EU) Z2-36 in Zone 2 at the East Tennessee technology Park (ETTP). The ETTP is located in the northwest corner of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and encompasses approximately 5000 acres that have been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx} 1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx} 800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx} 2800 acres). Zone 2 comprises the highly industrial portion of ETTP and consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the DVS and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Main Plant Group DQO Scoping Package (July 2006) and the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007a) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document EU Z2-36 DVS characterization results; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs, and (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS

  8. Plate electrode arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Wooldridge, J.E.

    1982-06-01

    An electrode plate arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator including a plurality of essentially identical plate assemblies secured in an opposing fashion to the opposite sides of a gridlike mounting frame extending across the interior of the precipitator. The plate assemblies on the upstream side of the frame include an ionizing zone for the dirty gas stream which feeds into serially aligned collecting zones in the opposing assemblies which in turn feed into a deionizing zone in the plate assemblies on the downstream side of the frame.

  9. Prognostic significance of S-phase fractions in peritumoral invading zone analyzed by laser scanning cytometry in patients with high-grade glioma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, SYOICHI; MORII, KEN; TAKAHASHI, HITOSHI; FUJII, YUKIHIKO; YAMANAKA, RYUYA

    2016-01-01

    The predominant characteristic of malignant glioma is the presence of invading tumor cells in the peritumoral zone. Distinguishing between tumor cells and normal cells in a peritumoral lesion is challenging. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the cell-cycle phase measurements of fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from the peritumoral invading zone of high-grade gliomas using laser scanning cytometry. A total of 12 high-grade gliomas (2 anaplastic astrocytomas and 10 glioblastomas) were studied. The tumor core and peritumoral invading zone of each tumor specimen were investigated. Tissue sections (50 µm) from the paraffin blocks were deparaffinized, rehydrated and enzymatically disintegrated, and the cells in suspension were stained with propidium iodide and placed on microscope slides. A slight trend for an increased S-phase fraction in the peritumoral invading zone compared with the tumor core was observed (P=0.24). Additionally, there was a trend for a decrease in the overall survival time of patients with increasing peritumoral invading zone S-phase fraction (P=0.12). These data suggest that laser scanning cytometry is a powerful and clinically relevant tool for the objective analysis of the cell cycle in malignant gliomas. PMID:26998130

  10. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  11. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-09

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  12. ⁵⁷Fe polarization-dependent synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy using a diamond phase plate and an iron borate nuclear Bragg monochromator.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takaya; Imai, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Ryo; Seto, Makoto; Mibu, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Energy-domain (57)Fe polarization-dependent synchrotron radiation Mössbauer spectroscopy was developed by using a diamond X-ray phase plate and an iron borate nuclear Bragg monochromator. The former controls the polarization of the incident synchrotron radiation X-rays and the latter filters the (57)Fe-Mössbauer radiation with a narrow bandwidth of ∼3.4 Γ0 (Γ0 ≃ 4.7 neV: natural linewidth of the (57)Fe nucleus) from the broadband synchrotron radiation. The developed nuclear diffraction optics allowed (57)Fe-Mössbauer studies to be performed with various polarization states, i.e. linear polarization, circular polarization and non-polarization. In this paper, the spectrometer system, beam characterization, performance-test experiments and a grazing-incidence Mössbauer measurement of an isotope-enriched ((57)Fe: 95%) iron thin film are described. PMID:25723944

  13. Effect of soil moisture dynamics on dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) spill zone architecture in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Valocchi, Albert J; Werth, Charles J

    2007-03-20

    The amount, location, and form of NAPL in contaminated vadose zones are controlled by the spatial distribution of water saturation and soil permeability, the NAPL spill scenario, water infiltration events, and vapor transport. To evaluate the effects of these processes, we used the three-phase flow simulator STOMP, which includes a new permeability-liquid saturation-capillary pressure (k-S-P) constitutive model. This new constitutive model considers three NAPL forms: free, residual, and trapped. A 2-D vertical cross-section with five stratigraphic layers was assumed, and simulations were performed for seven cases. The conceptual model of the soil heterogeneity was based upon the stratigraphy at the Hanford carbon tetrachloride (CT) spill site. Some cases considered co-disposal of NAPL with large volumes of wastewater, as also occurred at the Hanford CT site. In these cases, the form and location of NAPL were most strongly influenced by high water discharge rates and NAPL evaporation to the atmosphere. In order to investigate the impact of heterogeneity, the hydraulic conductivity within the lower permeability layer was modeled as a realization of a random field having three different classes. For six extreme cases of 100 realizations, the CT mass that reached the water table varied by a factor of two, and was primarily controlled by the degree of lateral connectivity of the low conductivity class within the lowest permeability layer. The grid size at the top boundary had a dramatic impact on NAPL diffusive flux just after the spill event when the NAPL was present near the ground surface. NAPL evaporation with a fine grid spacing at the top boundary decreased CT mass that reached the water table by 74%, compared to the case with a coarse grid spacing, while barometric pumping had a marginal effect for the case of a continuous NAPL spill scenario considered in this work. For low water infiltration rate scenarios, the distribution of water content prior to a NAPL

  14. Effect of soil moisture dynamics on dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) spill zone architecture in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Valocchi, Albert J; Werth, Charles J

    2007-03-20

    The amount, location, and form of NAPL in contaminated vadose zones are controlled by the spatial distribution of water saturation and soil permeability, the NAPL spill scenario, water infiltration events, and vapor transport. To evaluate the effects of these processes, we used the three-phase flow simulator STOMP, which includes a new permeability-liquid saturation-capillary pressure (k-S-P) constitutive model. This new constitutive model considers three NAPL forms: free, residual, and trapped. A 2-D vertical cross-section with five stratigraphic layers was assumed, and simulations were performed for seven cases. The conceptual model of the soil heterogeneity was based upon the stratigraphy at the Hanford carbon tetrachloride (CT) spill site. Some cases considered co-disposal of NAPL with large volumes of wastewater, as also occurred at the Hanford CT site. In these cases, the form and location of NAPL were most strongly influenced by high water discharge rates and NAPL evaporation to the atmosphere. In order to investigate the impact of heterogeneity, the hydraulic conductivity within the lower permeability layer was modeled as a realization of a random field having three different classes. For six extreme cases of 100 realizations, the CT mass that reached the water table varied by a factor of two, and was primarily controlled by the degree of lateral connectivity of the low conductivity class within the lowest permeability layer. The grid size at the top boundary had a dramatic impact on NAPL diffusive flux just after the spill event when the NAPL was present near the ground surface. NAPL evaporation with a fine grid spacing at the top boundary decreased CT mass that reached the water table by 74%, compared to the case with a coarse grid spacing, while barometric pumping had a marginal effect for the case of a continuous NAPL spill scenario considered in this work. For low water infiltration rate scenarios, the distribution of water content prior to a NAPL

  15. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  16. Peculiarities of the precipitation of nanosized ɛ-phase copper particles in ferrite plates of lamellar pearlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, I. A.; Stepanova, N. V.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Razumakov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The fine structure of pearlite in alloys with the structure of gray cast iron that contain 1.6 and 10.8 wt% copper has been studied using transmission electron microscopy. Peculiarities of the formation of the nanosized particles of the ɛ-phase in ferrite lamellae of the pearlite have been determined and their influence on the character of the dislocation structure in the ferrite constituent of the pearlite has been demonstrated. It has been found that the Kurdyumov-Sachs orientation relationship is established between the particles of the ɛ and α phases. In the investigated cast irons, the formation of nanosized ɛ-copper particles results in the growth of pearlite hardness by 35 HV and 84 HV, respectively.

  17. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  18. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements

  19. Using nonlinear forecasting to learn the magnitude and phasing of time-varying sediment suspension in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, B.E.; Rubin, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    complete description of the dynamical forcing of the flow (including accelerations and wave phase and shape) responsible for sediment suspension. Incorporating such a velocity history and a lag time into the formulation of the forcing for time-dependent models for sediment suspension in the surf zone will greatly increase our ability to predict suspended-sediment transport.

  20. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  1. Involvement of the German Research Center for GeoSciences (GFZ) in the EPOS Implementation Phase 2015-18 (European Plate Observing System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lauterjung, J.

    2015-12-01

    Under the Horizon 2020 Programme INFRADEV-3, the European Commission (EC) has awarded a prioritized grant for the establishment of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) during a four-year Implementation Phase 2015-18. As laid in detail during the EPOS Preparatory Phase 2010-14, the EPOS cyberinfrastructure will be established as an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) and it will encompass the implementation of both the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS) for solid Earth Science and a multitude of EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). As one of the 29 awardees of the EC grant, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) will play an important role in the implementation of EPOS and its Thematic and Integrated Core Services. The presented poster will give an overview of GFZ's involvement in the different Work Packages, including administrative tasks (WP3 Harmonization) as well as the technical implementation efforts (WP7 ICS Development, WP8 Seismology, WP11 Volcano Observations, WP12 Satellite Data, WP13 Geomagnetic Observations, WP14 Anthropogenic Hazards, WP15 Geological Information and Modelling, WP16 Multi-Scale Laboratories and WP17 Geo Energy Test Beds).

  2. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy. Some (75%) or all (100%) of the damaged zone was cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and plates that had been repaired.

  3. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium-Titanium Nitride Mixed-Phase Layers for Direct-Plate Liner and Copper Diffusion Barrier Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, Adam James

    Current interconnect networks in semiconductor processing utilize a sputtered TaN diffusion barrier, Ta liner, and Cu seed to improve the adhesion, microstructure, and electromigration resistance of electrochemically deposited copper that fills interconnect wires and vias. However, as wire/via widths shrink due to device scaling, it becomes increasingly difficult to have the volume of a wire/via be occupied with ECD Cu which increases line resistance and increases the delay in signal propagation in IC chips. A single layer that could serve the purpose of a Cu diffusion barrier and ECD Cu adhesion promoter could allow ECD Cu to occupy a larger volume of a wire/via, leading to a decrease in line resistance and decrease in signal delay. Previous work has shown RuTaN, RuWCN, and RuCo films can act as Cu diffusion barriers and be directly platable to thickness of 2-3nm. However, other material selections may prove as effective or possibly better. Mixed-phase films of ruthenium titanium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated for their performance as a Cu diffusion barrier and as a surface for the direct plating of ECD Cu. All Ru was deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) while TiN was deposited by either thermal ALD or PEALD. RuTiN, films with thermal ALD TiN and a Ru:Ti of 20:1 showed barrier performance comparable to PVD TaN at 3-4 nm thickness and 15 nm planar films were directly platable. Follow up work is certainly needed for this material set, yet initial results indicate RuTiN could serve as an effective direct plate liner for Cu interconnects.

  4. San Andres Rift, Nicaraguan Shelf: A 346-Km-Long, North-South Rift Zone Actively Extending the Interior of the "Stable" Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, L. C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andres rift (SAR) is an active, 015°-trending, bathymetric and structural rift basin that extends for 346 km across the Nicaraguan platform and varies in bathymetric width from 11-27 km and in water depth from 1,250 to 2,500 m. We used four 2D regional seismic lines tied to two offshore, industry wells located west of the SAR on the Nicaraguan platform to map normal faults, transfer faults, and possibly volcanic features with the rift. The Colombian islands of San Andres (26 km2) and Providencia (17 km2) are footwall uplifts along west-dipping, normal fault bounding the eastern margin of the rift. Mapping indicates the pre-rift section is Late Cretaceous to Oligocene in age and that the onset of rifting began in the early to middle Miocene as shown by wedging of the Miocene and younger sedimentary fill controlled by north-south-striking normal faults. Structural restorations at two locations across the rift shows that the basin opened mainly by dip-slip fault motions producing a total, east-west extension of 18 km in the north and 15 km in the south. Structural restoration shows the rift formed on a 37-km-wide, elongate basement high - possibly of late Cretaceous, volcanic origin and related to the Caribbean large igneous province. Previous workers have noted that the SAR is associated with province of Pliocene to Quaternary seamounts and volcanoes which range from non-alkaline to mildly alkaline, including volcanic rocks on Providencia described as andesites and rhyolites. The SAR forms one of the few recognizable belts of recorded seismicity within the Caribbean plate. The origin of the SAR is related to Miocene and younger left-lateral displacement along the Pedro Banks fault to the north and the southwestern Hess fault to the south. We propose that the amount of left-lateral displacement that created the rift is equivalent to the amount of extension that formed it: 18-20 km.

  5. Thermal Models of the Costa Rica - Nicaragua Subduction Zone: the Effect of a Three-Dimensional Oceanic Plate Structure and Hydrothermal Circulation in the Temperature Distribution and Mantle Wedge Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, J. C.; Currie, C. A.; He, J.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last years several 2D thermo-mechanical models of the Costa Rica - Nicaragua Subduction Zone (CNSZ) have studied the thermal distribution of sections of the fault. Such investigations allow us to understand temperature-related aspects of subduction zones, like volcanism and megathrust earthquake locations. However, certain features of the CNSZ limit the range of applicability of 2D models. In the CNSZ, geochemical trends and seismic anisotropy studies reveal a 3D mantle wedge flow that departs from the 2D corner flow. The origin of this flow are dip variations (20o to 25o between Nicaragua and Costa Rica) and the presence of a slab window in Panama that allows material to flow into the mantle wedge. Also, the Central America trench has abrupt variations in surface heat flux that contrasts with steady changes in plate age and convergence rate. These variations have been attributed to hydrothermal circulation (HC), which effectively removes heat from the oceanic crust.In this project we analyze the thermal structure of the CNSZ. The objective is to study dehydration and metamorphic reactions, as well as the length of the megathrust seismogenic zone. We created 3D finite-element models that employ a dislocation creep rheology for the mantle wedge. Two aspects make our models different from previous studies: an up-to-date 3D slab geometry, and an implementation of HC by introducing a conductive proxy in the subducting aquifer, allowing us to model convective heat transport without the complex, high-Rayleigh number calculations. A 3D oceanic boundary condition that resembles the along-strike changes in surface heat flux is also employed. Results show a maximum mantle wedge flow rate of 4.69 cm/yr in the along-strike direction, representing more than 50% of the slab convergence rate. With respect to 2D models, analysis shows this flow changes temperatures by ~100 C in the mantle wedge near areas of strong slab curvature. Along the subducting interface, there is

  6. Influence of overriding plate velocity changes on slab dip and deformation: insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Hertgen, Solenn; Martinod, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Over geological times, plate reorganization associated with mantle convection led to changes in absolute plate velocities, which may in turn have impacted the geometry of the subducting plate as well as the overriding plate regime of deformation. Indeed, previous studies have shown a very good correlation between the absolute motion of the overriding plate on one hand and slab dip and overriding plate deformation on the other hand: extension and steep slab are associated with an overriding plate moving away from the trench while shortening and shallow slab occur if the upper plate goes the other way. However, these correlations are established when subduction has reached a steady-state regime and for a constant motion of the overriding plate over the subducting plate, which may not always be the case on Earth. The response of the subduction system to changes in absolute overriding plate velocity still remain an open question. In this study, we conducted a set of 3-D mantle-scale laboratory models of subduction in which we incrementally changed the velocity of the overriding plate to reproduce changes of velocities that may arise from variations of far-field boundary conditions in Nature. We first show that strain rates in the overriding plate are correlated with overriding plate absolute velocity but also that the regime of deformation adjusts rapidly to changes of velocity. This may explain for instance why despite the subduction has been continuous beneath South America since at least the middle Jurassic, shortening along its active margin is only recorded episodically, the main phases of Andean orogeny roughly corresponding to periods of South American plate westward acceleration. We also show that slab dip adjusts to changes of overriding plate velocity but it requires several Myr before it stabilizes. It may explain why the correlation between absolute overriding plate motion and slab dip from the analysis of present-day subduction zones is only moderate, part

  7. The petrogenesis of the Early Permian Variscan granites of the Cornubian Batholith: Lower plate post-collisional peraluminous magmatism in the Rhenohercynian Zone of SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, B.; Shail, Robin K.; Andersen, Jens C. Ø.

    2016-09-01

    The Early Permian Cornubian Batholith was generated during an extensional regime following Variscan convergence within the Rhenohercynian Zone of SW England. Its component granites can be classified, using mineralogical, textural and geochemical criteria, into five main types, all of which are peraluminous (A/CNK > 1.1): G1 (two-mica), G2 (muscovite), G3 (biotite), G4 (tourmaline) and G5 (topaz). G1 granites formed through up to 20% muscovite and minor biotite dehydration melting of a metagreywacke source at moderate temperatures and pressures (731-806 °C, > 5 kbar). Younger G3 granites formed through higher temperature, lower pressure (768-847 °C, < 4 kbar) biotite-dominated melting of a similar source. Partial melting was strongly influenced by the progressive lower-mid crustal emplacement of mafic igneous rocks during post-Variscan extension and a minor (< 5%-10%) mantle-derived component in the granites is possible. Two distinct fractionation series, G1-G2 and G3-G4, are defined using whole-rock geochemical and mineral chemical data. Variations in the major elements, Ba, Sr and Rb indicate that G1 and G3 granites underwent 15%-30% fractionation of an assemblage dominated by plagioclase, alkali feldspar and biotite to form more evolved G2 and G4 granites, respectively. Decreasing whole-rock abundances of Zr, Th and REE support the fractionation of zircon, monazite, apatite and allanite. Subsolidus alteration in G2 and G4 granites is indicated by non-primary muscovite and tourmaline and modification of major and trace element trends for G3-G4 granites, particularly for P2O5 and Rb. Topaz (G5) granites show low Zr, REE and extreme enrichment in Rb (up to 1530 ppm) and Nb (79 ppm) that cannot be related in a straightforward manner to continued differentiation of the G1-G2 or G3-G4 series. Instead, they are considered to represent partial melting, mediated by granulite facies fluids, of a biotite-rich restite following extraction of G1 and/or G3 magmas; they do

  8. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-07-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  9. Magnetocaloric effect in a dual-phase coupled LaFe11Si2 crystal prepared by a modified high-pressure zone-melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shutong; Fang, Yue; Zhai, Qijie; Luo, Zhiping; Zheng, Hongxing

    2016-10-01

    A modified high-pressure optical zone-melting technique was adopted to grow a rare-earth-based LaFe11Si2 crystal in the present work. Dual-phase coupled microstructure was obtained where aligned α(Fe) phase distributed in the La(Fe,Si)13 matrix. Magnetic measurements showed that the produced crystal underwent a second-order magnetic transition in the vicinity of 250 K. Under a magnetic field change of 30 kOe, the refrigeration capacity (RC) of the produced crystal reached up to 162 J/kg. It was confirmed that zone-melting crystal growth technique is an effective approach to strikingly enhance the magnetocaloric effect of La-Fe-Si refrigeration materials.

  10. The Impact of Mass Movement and Fluid Flow during Ridge Subduction inferred from Physical Properties and Zeolite Assemblage in the Upper Plate Slope of the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula is known as an erosive margin with active seismicity and the subduction of the Cocos Ridge. One of the major unknowns in this margin is the nature of the unconformity at the base of the slope sediments in the upper plate and the high velocity materials below. To investigate the geologic processes across the unconformity, we examined the consolidation state and mineral assemblages of the sediments at the mid-slope Site 1380 drilled during IODP Expedition 344 by conducting microstructural observation, particle size analysis, X-ray fluorescence/diffraction analysis and resistivity measurement. The general compaction trend is controlled primarily by grain-size sorting and the physical property transition is likely caused by massive sediment removal under normal fault regime, thickness of which range between ~600-850 m determined from the composite porosity-depth curve. Across the unconformity between the late Pliocene~late Pleistocene silty clay (Unit 1) and late Pliocene~early Pleistocene clayey siltstone (Unit 2), the mineral/element components of the sediments is marked by the transitions in zeolite compositions; Unit 1 consists of laumontite and heulandite, whereas below the unconformity, Unit 2 sediments contain analcime, laumontite, and heulandite, but laumontite become less abundant at lower depth. The experienced temperature of the sediments in Unit 2 is estimated to have reached between ~86 and 122℃ as inferred from analcime burial diagenesis. This may correspond with the greater depth range prior to mass movement and normal faulting. The initial analcime burial diagenetic zone was likely cut off by the sediment removal across the unconformity, and later overprinted by high temperature fluid along the boundary forming laumontite and heulandite in the vicinity. These results illustrate that ridge subduction has substantial potential to cause mass movement, an extensional stress regime, and fluid flow from

  11. Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-08-20

    An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impacts of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL-type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at later time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

  12. Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Valocchi, Albert J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2008-09-26

    An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impact of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at late time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

  13. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; N'Diaye, M.; Galicher, R.; Dohlen, K.; Baudoz, P.; Caillat, A.; Rousset, G.; Soummer, R.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Specific high-contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Aims: Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. Methods: First, we consider the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components, and the quality control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared with numerical simulations to check agreement with the performance predictions. Results: With the manufactured prototype and using a dark hole technique based on the self-coherent camera, we obtain contrast levels down to 2 × 10-8 between 5 and 17λ0/D in monochromatic light (640 nm). We also reach contrast levels of 4 × 10-8 between 7 and 17λ0/D in broadband (λ0 = 675 nm, Δλ = 250 and Δλ/λ0 = 40%), which demonstrates the excellent chromatic performance of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Conclusions: The performance reached by the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to detect and spectrally characterize old or light gaseous planets.

  14. Late middle ( ) Miocene Segmentation of an Eocene-early Miocene carbonate megabank on the Northern Nicaragua Rise tied to the tectonic activity at the North America/Caribbean plate boundary zone

    SciTech Connect

    Droxler, A.; Cunningham, A. ); Hine, A.C.; Hallock, P.; Duncan, D. ); Rosencrantz, E.; Buffler, R. ); Robinson, E. )

    1993-02-01

    The Northern Nicaragua Rise (NNR) is comprised today of the eastern Honduras/Nicaragua and southern Jamaica carbonate shelves, and a series of relatively small detached carbonate banks (i.e., Pedro, Rosalind, Serranilla, Diriangen, and Bawika Banks) separated from each other by intervening basins and seaways. The NNR basins and seaways, because of their common north trending orientation, have been previously interpreted as Paleocene, Eocene, and possibly Oligocene rifts, becoming progressively younger from the eastern to the western part of NNR. Results from three recent (1988 and 1992) high resolution seismic surveys within these major seaways and basins, (1) Walton Basin, (2) Pedro Channel, and (3) seaways and Serranilla Basin on the western side of the NNR, show that the present bank and basin configuration evolved from a once continuous megabank that covered the entire length of the NNR, including the Island of Jamaica from Eocene through early Miocene times. In the late middle ( ) Miocene, this megabank progressively broke up into a series of smaller banks, basins and seaways, mainly as the result of tectonic movements related to the overall strike-slip displacement within the North American and Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone of the Cayman Trough. At the same time (late middle Miocene), the most eastern portion of the megabank was uplifted and today forms most of central and south Jamaica. The timing of the megabank segmentation has tentatively been constrained by dating several blocks of shallow water limestone dredged from parts of the megabank outcropping on the sea floor of different seaways.

  15. FIRST RESULTS FROM VERY LARGE TELESCOPE NACO APODIZING PHASE PLATE: 4 {mu}m IMAGES OF THE EXOPLANET {beta} PICTORIS b

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Girard, Julien H. V.; Kasper, Markus; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Chauvin, Gael; Apai, Daniel; Boccaletti, Anthony; Hinz, Philip M.; Lenzen, Rainer

    2010-10-10

    Direct imaging of exoplanets requires both high contrast and high spatial resolution. Here, we present the first scientific results obtained with the newly commissioned apodizing phase plate coronagraph (APP) on VLT/NACO. We detected the exoplanet {beta} Pictoris b in the narrowband filter centered at 4.05 {mu}m (NB4.05). The position angle (209.{sup 0}13 {+-} 2.{sup 0}12) and the projected separation to its host star (0.''354 {+-} 0.''012, i.e., 6.8 {+-} 0.2 AU at a distance of 19.3 pc) are in good agreement with the recently presented data from Lagrange et al. Comparing the observed NB4.05 magnitude of 11.20 {+-} 0.23 mag to theoretical atmospheric models, we find a best fit with a 7-10 M {sub Jupiter} object for an age of 12 Myr, again in agreement with previous estimates. Combining our results with published L' photometry, we can compare the planet's [L' - NB4.05] color to that of cool field dwarfs of higher surface gravity suggesting an effective temperature of {approx}1700 K. The best-fit theoretical model predicts an effective temperature of {approx}1470 K, but this difference is not significant given our photometric uncertainties. Our results demonstrate the potential of NACO/APP for future planet searches and provide independent confirmation as well as complementary data for {beta} Pic b.

  16. A new approach to the application of solid phase extraction disks with LC-MS/MS for the analysis of drugs on a 96-well plate format.

    PubMed

    Cudjoe, Erasmus; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-11-01

    A new 96-well disk solid phase extraction sample preparation technique which does not involve vacuum pumps integrated with liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) was developed for high throughput determination of benzodiazepines (nordiazepam, diazepam, lorazepam and oxazepam). In addition, the method completely allows the re-use of the SPE disk membranes for subsequent analyses after re-conditioning. The method utilizes a robotic autosampler for parallel extractions in a 96-well plate format. Results have been presented for independent extractions from three matrices; phosphate buffer solution, urine, and plasma. Factors affecting data reproducibility, extraction kinetics, sample throughput, and reliability of the system were investigated and optimized. A total time required per sample was 0.94 min using 96-well format. Method reproducibility was < or =9% relative standard deviation for all three matrices. Limits of detection and quantitation recorded were respectively in the range 0.02-0.15 and 0.2-2.0 ng/mL with linearity ranging from 0.2 to 500 ng/mL for all matrices.

  17. Experimental and numerical analyses on a plate heat exchanger with phase change for waste heat recovery at off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, Roberto; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Di Battista, Davide; Fatigati, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyzes the performances of an evaporator for small scale waste heat recovery applications based on bottoming Organic Rankine Cycles with net output power in the range 2-5 kW. The heat recovery steam generator is a plate heat exchanger with oil as hot stream and an organic fluid on the cold side. An experimental characterization of the heat exchanger was carried out at different operating points measuring temperatures, pressures and flow rates on both sides. The measurement data further allowed to validate a numerical model of the evaporator whereas heat transfer coefficients were evaluated comparing several literature correlations, especially for the phase-change of the organic fluid. With reference to a waste heat recovery application in industrial compressed air systems, multiple off-design conditions were simulated considering the effects of oil mass flow rate and temperature on the superheating of the organic fluid, a key parameter to ensure a proper operation of the expansion machine, thus of the energy recovery process.

  18. MRF Applications: On the Road to Making Large-Aperture Ultraviolet Laser Resistant Continuous Phase Plates for High-Power Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Hachkowski, M R; Nelson, A; Xin, K

    2006-10-26

    Over the past two years we have developed MRF tools and procedures to manufacture large-aperture (430 X 430 mm) continuous phase plates (CPPs) that are capable of operating in the infrared portion (1053 nm) of high-power laser systems. This is accomplished by polishing prescribed patterns of continuously varying topographical features onto finished plano optics using MRF imprinting techniques. We have been successful in making, testing, and using large-aperture CPPs whose topography possesses spatial periods as low as 4 mm and surface peak-to-valleys as high as 8.6 {micro}m. Combining this application of MRF technology with advanced MRF finishing techniques that focus on ultraviolet laser damage resistance makes it potentially feasible to manufacture large-aperture CPPs that can operate in the ultraviolet (351 nm) without sustaining laser-induced damage. In this paper, we will discuss the CPP manufacturing process and the results of 351-nm/3-nsec equivalent laser performance experiments conducted on large-aperture CPPs manufactured using advanced MRF protocols.

  19. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  20. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  1. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Smith, M.L.

    1993-10-25

    This Charter provides the basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to conduct Phase III of the ``Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant`` Project. The purpose of this Charter is to define the Project and establish an Oversight Committee management structure together with responsibilities and commitments. This Charter establishes a commitment on the part of the signing agencies to participate in a Phase III EPZ analysis to refine existing EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant. These agencies agree to commit resources to this Project to fulfill their identified roles. The specific types and levels of resources committed by each agency will be determined as part of the Project planning process. This Charter does not commit any agency to any specific level of effort or resources. It does, however, commit these agencies to support the Phase III analysis to completion.

  2. Effects of Electron Beam Welding on Microstructure, Microhardness, and Electrical Conductivity of Cu-Cr-Zr Alloy Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanigalpula, P. K. C.; Chatterjee, Arya; Pratihar, D. K.; Jha, M. N.; Derose, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam welding on the microstructure, microhardness, and electrical conductivity of precipitation-hardened Cu-0.804%Cr-0.063%Zr (wt.%) alloy plates were investigated. Experiments were carried out following a central composite design of experiments. Five welding schedules yielding the higher hardness were chosen and then were subjected to standard metallographic and various microscopy techniques to reveal the type, morphology, and distribution of the precipitates and to obtain the sub-structural information from the weld zone. X-ray diffraction studies revealed predominant formation of intermetallic phases in the welded zones of some of the samples, which could have resulted in higher hardness and better electrical conductivity compared to those of other ones. Microhardness values in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone were found to be less than that of the parent material. The mechanism of damage in Cu-Cr-Zr plates due to welding was also explained.

  3. TOMOGRAPHY OF PLASMA FLOWS IN THE UPPER SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE USING TIME-DISTANCE INVERSION COMBINING RIDGE AND PHASE-SPEED FILTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Svanda, Michal

    2013-09-20

    The consistency of time-distance inversions for horizontal components of the plasma flow on supergranular scales in the upper solar convection zone is checked by comparing the results derived using two k-{omega} filtering procedures-ridge filtering and phase-speed filtering-commonly used in time-distance helioseismology. I show that both approaches result in similar flow estimates when finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are used. I further demonstrate that the performance of the inversion improves (in terms of a simultaneously better averaging kernel and a lower noise level) when the two approaches are combined together in one inversion. Using the combined inversion, I invert for horizontal flows in the upper 10 Mm of the solar convection zone. The flows connected with supergranulation seem to be coherent only for the top {approx}5 Mm; deeper down there is a hint of change of the convection scales toward structures larger than supergranules.

  4. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  5. Phosphoinositide-3-kinases p110α and p110β mediate S phase entry in astroglial cells in the marginal zone of rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rabea; Fischer, Catharina; Wilmes, Thomas; Heimrich, Bernd; Distel, Vanessa; Klugbauer, Norbert; Meyer, Dieter K

    2013-01-01

    In cells cultured from neocortex of newborn rats, phosphoinositide-3-kinases of class I regulate the DNA synthesis in a subgroup of astroglial cells. We have studied the location of these cells as well as the kinase isoforms which facilitate the S phase entry. Using dominant negative (dn) isoforms as well as selective pharmacological inhibitors we quantified S phase entry by nuclear labeling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Only in astroglial cells harvested from the marginal zone (MZ) of the neocortex inhibition of phosphoinositide-3-kinases reduced the nuclear labeling with BrdU, indicating that neocortical astroglial cells differ in the regulation of proliferation. The two kinase isoforms p110α and p110β were essential for S phase entry. p110α diminished the level of the p27(Kip1) which inactivates the complex of cyclin E and CDK2 necessary for entry into the S phase. p110β phosphorylated and inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β which can prevent S-phase entry. Taken together, both isoforms mediated S phase in a subgroup of neocortical astroglial cells and acted via distinct pathways.

  6. 234U /238U and 230Th /234U activity ratios in mineral phases of a lateritic weathered zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowson, Richard T.; Short, Stephen A.; Davey, Brian G.; Gray, David J.

    1986-08-01

    A selective phase extraction procedure was developed for the identification of the significant phases of a typical deep soil profile sampled in the vicinity of the Ranger No. 1 uranium ore body, Alligator Rivers region, N.T., Australia. The significant phases were identified as amorphous iron oxide, crystalline iron oxide and a clay/quartz resistate. The distribution of 238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra between the phases was measured. The results indicated that the amorphous iron oxide phase is in adsorption/desorption equilibrium with the ground water. The crystalline iron oxide phase contains a chemical control, the kinetics of which are commensurate with or less than the half-life of 230Th (7.52 × 10 4 y). The clay/quartz resistate is enriched in 238U descendants in such a way that they are not readily accessible to the ground water.

  7. Scale-Up Information for Gas-Phase Ammonia Treatment of Uranium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2014-09-01

    Uranium is present in the vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau and is of concern for protection of groundwater. The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau identified gas-phase treatment and geochemical manipulation as potentially effective treatment approaches for uranium and technetium in the Hanford Central Plateau vadose zone. Based on laboratory evaluation, use of ammonia vapor was selected as the most promising uranium treatment candidate for further development and field testing. While laboratory tests have shown that ammonia treatment effectively reduces the mobility of uranium, additional information is needed to enable deployment of this technology for remediation. Of importance for field applications are aspects of the technology associated with effective distribution of ammonia to a targeted treatment zone, understanding the fate of injected ammonia and its impact on subsurface conditions, and identifying effective monitoring approaches. In addition, information is needed to select equipment and operational parameters for a field design. As part of development efforts for the ammonia technology for remediation of vadose zone uranium contamination, field scale-up issues were identified and have been addressed through a series of laboratory and modeling efforts. This report presents a conceptual description for field application of the ammonia treatment process, engineering calculations to support treatment design, ammonia transport information, field application monitoring approaches, and a discussion of processes affecting the fate of ammonia in the subsurface. The report compiles this information from previous publications and from recent research and development activities. The intent of this report is to provide technical information about these scale-up elements to support the design and operation of a field test for the ammonia treatment technology.

  8. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in the South Tropical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takao M.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-10-01

    It is essential to know scattering properties (e.g., scattering phase function) of clouds for determination of vertical cloud structure. However, we cannot derive those from ground-based and Earth-orbit observations because of the limitation of solar phase angle as viewed from the Earth. Then, most previous studies have used the scattering phase function deduced from the Pioneer 10/IPP data (blue: 440 nm, red: 640nm) [Tomasko et al., 1978]. There are two shortcomings in the Pioneer scattering phase function. One is that we have to use this scattering phase function at red as a substitute for analyses of imaging photometry using CH4 bands (center: 727 and 890 nm), although clouds should have wavelength dependency. The other is that the red pass band of IPP was so broad (595-720 nm) that this scattering phase function in red just show wavelength-averaged scattering properties of clouds. To provide a new reference scattering phase function with wavelength dependency, we have analyzed the Cassini/ISS data in BL1 (451 nm), CB1 (619 nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  9. Mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence for mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones whose interpretation remains elusive. In this study I estimate the strain-induced mid mantle fabric and associated seismic anisotropy developing in 3D petrological-thermo-mechanical subduction models where the slab is either stagnating over the 660 km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle. The modelling of synthetic lattice-preferred-orientation (LPO) development of wadsleyite and perovskite has been calibrated with results from deformational experiments and ab-initio atomic scale models, and the single crystal elastic tensor of the different mineral phases is scaled by local P-T conditions. The lower transition zone (ringwoodite + garnet) is assumed to be isotropic. Mid mantle fabric develops in proximity of the subducting slab where deformation and stresses are high, except at depths where upwelling or downwelling material undergoes phase transformations, yielding to LPO reset. The upper transition zone (wadsleyite + garnet) is characterized by weak transverse isotropy (2-3%) with symmetry axes oriented and fast S wave polarized dip-normal. A slightly stronger transverse isotropy develops in the lower mantle (perovskite + periclase), where the symmetry axes, the polarization of the fast S wave and the maximum Vp and dVs are parallel to the slab dip and subduction direction. For stagnating slab models this translates into negative and positive radial anisotropy in the upper transition zone and lower mantle back-arc, respectively, minimum delay times for vertically travelling shear waves and large shear wave splitting for waves propagating horizontally in the lower mantle. These results may help in reconciling the seismic anisotropy patterns observed in some subduction zones with subduction-induced deformation, such as those measured in the mid mantle between the Australian plate and the New Hebrides-Tonga-Kermadec trenches that I interpret as related to stagnating

  10. Characterization and Testing of Monolithic RERTR Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser; J. F. Jue; D. E. Burkes

    2007-03-01

    Monolithic fuel plates are being developed for application in research reactors throughout the world. These fuel plates are comprised of a U-Mo alloy foil encased in aluminum alloy cladding. Three different fabrication techniques have been looked at for producing monolithic fuel plates: hot isostatic pressing (HIP), transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB), and friction stir welding (FSW). Of these three techniques, HIP and FSW are currently being emphasized. As part of the development of these fabrication techniques, fuel plates are characterized and tested to determine properties like hardness and the bond strength at the interface between the fuel and cladding. Testing of HIPed samples indicates that the foil/cladding interaction behavior depends on the Mo content in the U-Mo foil, the measured hardness values are quite different for the fuel, cladding, and interaction zone phase and Ti, Zr and Nb are the most effective diffusion barriers. For FSW samples, there is a dependence of the bond strength at the foil/cladding interface on the type of tool that is employed for performing the actual FSW process.

  11. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction

  12. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  13. This-layer chromatography/electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry system: analysis of rhodamine dyes separated on reversed-phase C8 plates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    The direct analysis of separated rhodamine dyes on reversed-phase C{sub 8} thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling/electrospray emitter probe coupled with a triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer is presented. This report represents continuing work to advance the performance metrics and utility of this basic surface sampling electrospray mass spectrometry system for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography plates. Experimental results examining the role of sampling probe spray end configuration on liquid aspiration rate and gas-phase ion signal generated are discussed. The detection figures-of-merit afforded by full-scan, automated product ion and selected reaction monitoring modes of operation were examined. The effect of different eluting solvents on mass spectrum signal levels with the reversed-phase C{sub 8} plate was investigated. The combined effect of eluting solvent flow-rate and development lane surface scan rate on preservation of chromatographic resolution was also studied. Analysis of chromatographically separated red pen ink extracts from eight different pens using selected reaction monitoring demonstrated the potential of this surface sampling electrospray mass spectrometry system for targeted compound analysis with real samples.

  14. Megathrust-zone heterogeneity and megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Huang, Z.; Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the detailed 3-D seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle under the Northeast Japan and Southwest Japan arcs and its implications for the generation of large megathrust earthquakes. The earthquakes under the forearc region under the Pacific Ocean and back-arc region under the Japan Sea are relocated precisely using sP depth phases. P and S wave arrival-time data from many relocated aftershocks of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) are added to determine the updated 3-D Vp and Vs models of the Tohoku forearc region. Significant structural heterogeneities are revealed in the interplate megathrust zone under the Tohoku forearc. Three low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exist off Sanriku, off Fukushima and off Ibaraki. There is a correlation between the velocity variation and the distribution of large thrust-type earthquakes (M ≥ 6.0) that occurred from 1900 to 2011, including the foreshock, mainshock and aftershocks of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The low-V patches in the megathrust zone may contain subducted sediments and fluids associated with slab dehydration, thus the subducting Pacific plate and the overriding continental plate may become weakly coupled or even decoupled in the low-V areas. In contrast, the high-velocity (high-V) patches in the megathrust zone may result from subducted oceanic ridges, seamounts and other topographic highs on the Pacific seafloor that become asperities where the subducting Pacific plate and the overriding continental plate are strongly coupled. Thus tectonic stress tends to accumulate in these high-V areas for a relatively long time during subduction, leading to the nucleation of large and great earthquakes in those areas. The off-Miyagi high-V zone, where the Tohoku-oki mainshock and its largest foreshock occurred, corresponds to the area with large coseismic slip (> 25 m) during the Tohoku-oki mainshock. This indicates that the off-Miyagi high-V zone is a large asperity in the megathrust zone that

  15. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  16. Removal of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from the separated liquid phase of hog manure by the multi-zone BioCAST technology.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Laleh; Alimahmoodi, Mahmood; Afroze, Niema; Godbout, Stephane; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2013-06-15

    The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) at concentrations of 960 ± 38 to 2400 ± 96 mg/L, 143 ± 9 to 235 ± 15 mg/L and 25 ± 2 to 57 ± 4 mg/L, respectively, from the separated liquid phase of hog manure by the multi-zone BioCAST technology is discussed. Despite the inhibitory effect of hog waste toward microbial activities, removal efficiencies up to 89.2% for COD, 69.2% for TN and 47.6% for TP were obtained during 185 d of continuous operation. The free ammonia inhibition was postulated to be responsible for the steady reduction of COD and TP removal with the increase of TN/TP ratio from 3.6 to 5.8. On the contrary, the increase of COD/TN ratio from 4.8 to 14.1 improved the removal of all contaminants. Nitrogen removal did not show any dependence on the COD/TP ratio, despite the steady increase of COD and TP removal with this ratio in the range of 19.3-50.6. The removal efficiencies of organic and inorganic contaminants increased progressively owing to the adaptation of microbial biomass, resulting from the presence of suspended biomass in the mixed liquor that circulated continuously between the three zones of aerobic, microaerophilic and anoxic, as well as the attached biomass immobilized inside the aerobic zone.

  17. M3B2 and M5B3 Formation in Diffusion-Affected Zone During Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Hu, Xiaobing; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-01

    Precipitates in the diffusion-affected zone (DAZ) during transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys were observed and investigated. Small size and dendritic-shaped precipitates were identified to be M3B2 borides and intergrowth of M3B2/M5B3 borides. The orientation relationships among M3B2, M5B3, and matrix were determined using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Composition characteristics of these borides were also analyzed by TEM energy-dispersive spectrometer. Because this precipitating phenomenon deviates from the traditional parabolic transient liquid phase bonding model which assumed a precipitates free DAZ during TLP bonding, some correlations between the deviation of the isothermal solidification kinetics and these newly observed precipitating behaviors were discussed and rationalized when bonding the interlayer containing the high diffusivity melting point depressant elements and substrates of low solubility.

  18. Extension rate determination through the analysis of high-resolution LiDAR dataset and cosmogenic dating of the Fish Lake Valley fault zone: Implications for Pacific-North America plate boundary deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, P. N.; Dolan, J. F.; Frankel, K. L.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-04-01

    The oblique normal-dextral Fish Lake valley fault (FLVF) accommodates much of the Pacific-North America plate boundary deformation in the northern part of the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). New geologic slip rates from FLVF, near the California/Nevada border, provide constraints on the kinematic relationships among the major faults in this complex part of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. Analysis of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data (1 m horizontal resolution and a decimeter vertical accuracy), coupled with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be geochronology, provides new insights into the late Pleistocene extension rate of this fault system. Right-lateral shear accommodates most of the deformation on the NW-striking FLVF, but fault segments that strike approximately N exhibit predominantly normal slip. This extension is manifest by east- to southeast- and west- to northwest- dipping normal fault scarps cutting late Pleistocene alluvial fans. LiDAR data are crucial to the recognition and analysis of these fault strands, allowing for a comprehensive study of all normal fault scarps that would be otherwise nearly impossible. The high vertical resolution of the LiDAR-derived digital elevation models, plus the ease of analysis using geographic information systems (GIS) software allow for the precise measurement of cumulative scarp heights across numerous scarps. Using these measurements and cosmogenic 10Be dates of the faulted alluvial fans we present the extension rates on the FLVF at four different locations, from south to north: Furnace Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Perry Aiken Creek, and Indian Creek. The vertical component of oblique slip (measured in ArcGIS 9.2 using LiDAR-derived DEMs) along the FLVF at Furnace Creek = 25 ± 1.3 m, Wildhorse Creek = 42 ± 2.1 m, Perry Aiken Creek = 85 ± 4.3 m, and Indian Creek = 75 ± 3.8 m. Previous work by Frankel et al. (2007, GRL) reported cosmogenic nuclide 10Be ages from the offset Furance Creek and Indian Creek

  19. Water delivery to the Habitable zone and impact probabilities in the early phases of planetary systems in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, D.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Eggl, S.; Dvorak, R.

    2014-11-01

    By now, observations of exoplanets have found more than 50 binary star systems hosting 71 planets. We expect these numbers to increase as more than 70Â % of the main sequence stars in the solar neighbourhood are members of binary or multiple systems. The planetary motion in binary star systems depends strongly on both the parameters of the stellar system (stellar separation and eccentricity) and the architecture of the planetary system (number of planets and their orbital behaviour). In case a terrestrial planet moves in the so-called habitable zone (HZ) of its host star, the habitability of such a planet depends on many parameters. A crucial factor is certainly the amount of water. Water is the main ingredient defining an habitable planet. Therefore, the main question we would like to answer in our study is if a dry or almost dry planet can be fed with water by a bombardement of wet small bodies in such binary systems. First simulations of planetary formation in such systems show the stochastic behaviour of the water to mass ratio of planetary embryos (Haghighipour and Raymond 2007). After the embryo formation, a remnent disc of small bodies can be found around the main star. It mainly contains asteroids and comets whose initial water distribution depends on their position relative to the snow-line. After the gas dissipation, the disc is free to move under gravitation. They can interact with embryos located in the habitable zone and thus alter their initial water content. In our study, we consider different binary star configurations of G, K and M for the secondary star (the primary is a G-type), with various ranges of semi-major axis (from 25 AU to 100 AU) and eccentricity (from 0.1 to 0.5), and analyse the dynamics of small bodies moving under the gravitational perturbation of the binary star system, a Jupiter-like planet and an Earth-like planet, where the latter is randomly placed in the habitable zone. We mainly focus on water-rich asteroids with semi

  20. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  1. Semiautomatic fracture zone tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Matthews, Kara J.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Mazzoni, Aline; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Myhill, Robert; Chandler, Michael T.

    2015-07-01

    Oceanic fracture zone traces are widely used in studies of seafloor morphology and plate kinematics. Satellite altimetry missions have resulted in high-resolution gravity maps in which all major fracture zones and other tectonic fabric can be identified, and numerous scientists have digitized such lineaments. We have initiated a community effort to maintain low-cost infrastructure that allows seafloor fabric lineaments to be stored, accessed, and updated. A key improvement over past efforts is our processing software (released as a GMT5 supplement) that allows for semiautomatic corrections to previously digitized fracture zone traces given improved gridded data sets. Here we report on our seafloor fabric processing tools, which complement our database of seafloor fabric lineations, magnetic anomaly identifications, and plate kinematic models.

  2. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Zimmerman, G.A.

    1994-03-14

    During Phase 3 of the EPZ project, a sitewide analysis will be performed applying a spectrum-of-accidents approach to both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials release scenarios. This analysis will include the MCA but will be wider in scope and will produce options for the State of Colorado for establishing a bounding EPZ that is intended to more comprehensively update the interim, preliminary EPZ developed in Phase 2. EG&G will propose use of a hazards assessment methodology that is consistent with the DOE Emergency Management Guide for Hazards Assessments and other methods required by DOE orders. This will include hazards, accident, safety, and risk analyses. Using this methodology, EG&G will develop technical analyses for a spectrum of accidents. The analyses will show the potential effects from the spectrum of accidents on the offsite population together with identification of offsite vulnerable zones and areas of concern. These analyses will incorporate state-of-the-art technology for accident analysis, atmospheric plume dispersion modeling, consequence analysis, and the application of these evaluations to the general public population at risk. The analyses will treat both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials and mixtures of both released accidentally to the atmosphere. DOE/RFO will submit these results to the State of Colorado for the State`s use in determining offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. In addition, the results will be used for internal Rocky Flats Plant emergency planning.

  3. On the Origin of Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of plate tectonics was Earth's defining moment. How and when platetectonics started is shrouded in mystery because of the paucity of observations in theArchean as well the challenge of understanding how plates are generated. The damage theoryof lithospheric weakening by grain-reduction provides a physical framework for plategeneration. This model builds on grain-scale processes to elucidate planetary-scaletectonics, and is consistent with lab and field observations of polycrystalline rocks andlithospheric shear zones. The grain-damage model accounts for the evolution of damage andhealing (by grain growth) at various planetary conditions, hence predicts plate boundaryformation and longevity, and how they depend on surface environment. For example, the onset of prototectonics is predicted to require clement conditions tokeep healing from erasing weak zones; conversely, cool conditions possibly requiredtectonics to draw down primordial CO2. Thus whether tectonics preceded a cool climate (andwater) or vice versa is immaterial as they likely needed each other or neither wouldexist. Sparse evidence that prototectonics co-initiated with liquid water hints at thelink between tectonics, water and surface conditions. The establishment of wide-spread plate tectonics started between >4Ga and 2.7Ga, and mayhave taken over a billion years to develop. Under Earth-like conditions, combininggrain-damage with intermittent Archean protosubduction produces persistent weak zones thataccumulate to yield well developed plates within 1Gyrs. In contrast, Venus' hottersurface conditions promotes healing and prohibits weak zone accumulation, which explainswhy plate tectonics failed to spread on our sister planet. Damage and weak-zone inheritance may also influence plate evolution and reorganization inthe modern era. Changes in plate direction, such as reflected in the Emperor-Hawaiianbend, leave weak zones misaligned with plate motion, causing oblique plate boundaries

  4. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses

  5. Plate-tectonic boundary formation by grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David

    2015-04-01

    Shear weakening in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. I present continued work on a theoretical model for lithospheric shear-localization and plate generation through damage, grain evolution and Zener pinning in two-phase (polycrystalline) lithospheric rocks. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, with damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary shear-localizing feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. This theory has been applied recently to the emergence of plate tectonics in the Archean by transient subduction and accumulation of plate boundaries over 1Gyr, as well as to rapid slab detachment and abrupt tectonic changes. New work explores the saturation of interface damage at low interface curvature (e.g., because it is associated with larger grains that take up more of the damage, and/or because interface area is reduced). This effect allows three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress; a small-grain-size high-shear state in diffusion creep, a large grain-size low shear state in dislocation creep, and an intermediate state (often near the deformation map phase-boundary). The low and high grain-size states are stable, while the intermediate one is unstable. This implies that a material deformed at a given stress can acquire two stable deformation regimes, a low- and high- shear state; these are indicative of plate-like flows, i.e, the coexistence of both slowly deforming plates

  6. Modeling phase transformation behavior during thermal cycling in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    An implicit finite-difference analysis was used to model the diffusion-controlled transformation behavior in a ternary system. The present analysis extends earlier work by examining the transformation behavior under the influence of multiple thermal cycles. The analysis was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system to simulate the microstructural development in austenitic stainless steel welds. The ferrite-to-austenite transformation was studied in an effort to model the response of the heat-affected zone to multiple thermal cycles experienced during multipass welding. Results show that under some conditions, a transformation ``inertia`` exists that delays the system`s response when changing from cooling to heating. Conditions under which this ``inertia`` is most influential were examined. It was also found that under some conditions, the transformation behavior does not follow the equilibrium behavior as a function of temperature. Results also provide some insight into effect of composition distribution on transformation behavior.

  7. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for the quantification of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the vadose zone: Performance evaluation for heterogeneous NAPL distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    A partitioning tracer test based on gas-phase diffusion in the vadose zone yields estimates of the residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation. The present paper investigates this technique further by studying diffusive tracer breakthrough curves in the vadose zone for a heterogeneous NAPL distribution. Tracer experiments were performed in a lysimeter with a horizontal layer of artificial kerosene embedded in unsaturated sand. Tracer disappearance curves at the injection point and tracer breakthrough curves at some distance from the injection point were measured inside and outside of the NAPL layer. A numerical code was used to generate independent model predictions based on the physicochemical sand, NAPL, and tracer properties. The measured and modeled tracer breakthrough curves were in good agreement confirming the validity of important modeling assumptions such as negligible sorption of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracers to the uncontaminated sand and their fast reversible partitioning between the soil air and the NAPL phase. Subsequently, the model was used to investigate different configurations of NAPL contamination. The experimental and model results show that the tracer disappearance curves of a single-well diffusive partitioning tracer test (DPTT) are dominated by the near-field presence of NAPL around the tip of the soil gas probe. In contrast, breakthrough curves of inter-well tracer tests reflect the NAPL saturation in between the probes, although there is no unique interpretation of the tracer signals if the NAPL distribution is heterogeneous. Numerical modeling is useful for the planning of a DPTT application. Simulations suggest that several cubic meters of soil can be investigated with a single inter-well partitioning tracer test of 24-hour duration by placing the injection point in the center of the investigated soil volume and probes at up to 1 m distance for the monitoring of gaseous tracers.

  8. Density-modified displacement for dense nonaqueous-phase liquid source-zone remediation: density conversion using a partitioning alcohol.

    PubMed

    Ramsburg, C Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D

    2002-05-01

    Entrapped and pooled dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) often persist in aquifers and serve as a long-term source of groundwater contamination. To address the problematic nature of DNAPL remediation, a surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) technology, density-modified displacement (DMD), has been developed which significantly reduces the risk of downward migration of displaced DNAPLs. The DMD method is designed to accomplish DNAPL density conversion through the introduction of a partitioning alcohol, n-butanol (BuOH), in a predisplacement flood using conventional horizontal flushing schemes. Subsequent displacement and recovery of the resulting LNAPL is achieved by flushing with a low-interfacial tension surfactant solution. The objective of this study was to investigate density conversion of two representative DNAPLs, chlorobenzene (CB) and trichloroethene (TCE). A series of batch experiments was performed to assess changes in NAPL composition, density, and phase behavior as a function of BuOH mole fraction. Experimental results were used to develop contaminant/BuOH/water ternary phase diagrams and to elucidate regions of contrasting NAPL density. UNIQUAC calculations are presented to support measured compositional and phase behavior data. Density conversion of CB and TCE, relative to water, occurred at NAPL BuOH mole fractions of 0.38 and 0.50, respectively. Significant incorporation of water into the organic phase was observed at relatively high BuOH mole fractions and was shown to limit changes in NAPL composition and density. Interfacial tensions between CB-NAPL and TCE-NAPL and a 6% (by wt) BuOH aqueous solution were found to decrease with increasing NAPL BuOH mole fraction, although in both cases the measured values remained above 2.5 dyn/cm. Total trapping number calculations suggest that, in most aquifer formations, density conversion can be achieved without premature NAPL displacement using a 6% (by wt) BuOH aqueous solution.

  9. Progress in thermomechanical control of steel plates and their commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Ichikawa, Kazutoshi

    2012-04-01

    The water-cooled thermomechanical control process (TMCP) is a technology for improving the strength and toughness of water-cooled steel plates, while allowing control of the microstructure, phase transformation and rolling. This review describes metallurgical aspects of the microalloying of steel, such as niobium addition, and discusses advantages of TMCP, for example, in terms of weldability, which is reduced upon alloying. Other covered topics include the development of equipment, distortions in steel plates, peripheral technologies such as steel making and casting, and theoretical modeling, as well as the history of property control in steel plate production and some early TMCP technologies. We provide some of the latest examples of applications of TMCP steel in various industries such as shipbuilding, offshore structures, building construction, bridges, pipelines, penstocks and cryogenic tanks. This review also introduces high heat-affected-zone toughness technologies, wherein the microstructure of steel is improved by the addition of fine particles of magnesium-containing sulfides and magnesium- or calcium-containing oxides. We demonstrate that thanks to ongoing developments TMCP has the potential to meet the ever-increasing demands of steel plates.

  10. Mantle Rheology and Plate Tectonics: Damage and Inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y. R.; Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.

    2014-12-01

    The specific rheology of the lithosphere that allows the existence of plate tectonics on Earth is poorly understood. This rheology must explain why plate tectonics initiated on Earth but not on Venus, which has very similar size and gravity, but also how changes in plate motion can occur on time scales more rapid than that of the deeper convection (~100 myrs). We suggest that a key ingredient of this rheology is the coupling of the grain size evolution of the polycrystalline rocks that constitute the mantle, with the flow. We demonstrate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, 2012) with a composite rheology, which are compatible with field and laboratory observations. Our model predicts that the grain size is controlled by an dynamic equilibrium where deformation tends to reduce the grain sizes which otherwise would spontaneously increase. The presence of secondary phases is crucial as it eases the grain size reduction and inhibits their too fast recoveries. The resulting time-dependent rheology is non-linear, leads to localisation on time scales much shorter than those of the typical transit time of mantle convection but has also a long healing time. These characteristics of fast damage and long term memory is shown in simple models to spontaneously generate plates on a planet with Earth's parameters. For Venus hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread. This rheology also explains how subducting slabs can be rapidly detached when a buoyant crust is drawn into subduction and therefore how rapid plate changes can occur.

  11. Fiscal Year 2010 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-32 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-02-01

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORJO 1-2161 &D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORIO 1 -2224&D3) (RDRJRAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone I exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together, which allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was completed for the EU addressed in this document (EU Z2-32). The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-32. (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results. (4) Describe the remedial action performed in the K-1066-G Yard in EU Z2-32. Approximately 18.4 acres are included in the EU

  12. Brucite as an important phase of the shallow mantle wedge: Evidence from the Shiraga unit of the Sanbagawa subduction zone, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hirokazu; Endo, Shunsuke; Wallis, Simon R.; Nagaya, Takayoshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Asahara, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Large parts of the shallow mantle wedge are thought to be hydrated due to release of fluids from the subducting slab and serpentinization of the overlying mantle rocks. If serpentinization proceeds under low SiO2 activity, brucite can be a major phase in the low-temperature (< 450 °C) part of the serpentinized mantle wedge, but only very few natural examples have been documented. A combined petrological, geochemical, and geological study shows that brucite is widely distributed in the wedge mantle-derived Shiraga metaserpentinite body in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt of SW Japan. Thermodynamic modeling combined with bulk rock composition and point counting indicates that the original fully hydrated shallow parts of the Sanbagawa mantle wedge contained ~ 10-15 vol.% brucite before the onset of exhumation of the Shiraga body and before peak metamorphic conditions. A distinct zone of brucite-free essentially monomineralic antigorite serpentinite occurs limited to a 100-m-thick marginal zone of the body. This indicates a limited degree of Si-metasomatism by slab-derived fluids in the shallow mantle wedge. The presence of brucite may strongly affect the H2O budget and mechanical properties of serpentinite; these should be taken into consideration when examining the behavior of the shallow mantle wedge.

  13. Motile Geobacter dechlorinators migrate into a model source zone of trichloroethene dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Experimental evaluation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Jo; Miroshnikov, Alexey; Haest, Pieter Jan; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2014-12-01

    Microbial migration towards a trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) could facilitate the bioaugmentation of TCE DNAPL source zones. This study characterized the motility of the Geobacter dechlorinators in a TCE to cis-dichloroethene dechlorinating KB-1™ subculture. No chemotaxis towards or away from TCE was found using an agarose in-plug bridge method. A second experiment placed an inoculated aqueous layer on top of a sterile sand layer and showed that Geobacter migrated several centimeters in the sand layer in just 7 days. A random motility coefficient for Geobacter in water of 0.24 ± 0.02 cm2·day- 1 was fitted. A third experiment used a diffusion-cell setup with a 5.5 cm central sand layer separating a DNAPL from an aqueous top layer as a model source zone to examine the effect of random motility on TCE DNAPL dissolution. With top layer inoculation, Geobacter quickly colonized the sand layer, thereby enhancing the initial TCE DNAPL dissolution flux. After 19 days, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement was only 24% lower than with an homogenous inoculation of the sand layer. A diffusion-motility model was developed to describe dechlorination and migration in the diffusion-cells. This model suggested that the fast colonization of the sand layer by Geobacter was due to the combination of random motility and growth on TCE.

  14. Boride Zone Formation in Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Pairings of Parent Superalloy Materials with Different Compositions and Grain Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, S.; Singer, R. F.

    2013-05-01

    Two nickel-base superalloys are joined via transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding with boron as the MPD. Boride formation is observed in the parent materials at some distance from the solid/liquid interface. The boron concentration profile over the joint is measured with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). Boron concentration peaks are observed corresponding to the boride formation. Boron distribution is discussed on the basis of theoretical predictions in the literature. It is concluded that diffusion of another element is necessary to explain the results with the second element influencing the solubility of boron.

  15. A model for the effective diffusion of gas or the vapor phase in a fractured media unsaturated zone driven by periodic atmospheric pressure fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    There is evidence for migration of tritiated water vapor through the tuff in the unsaturated zone from the buried disposal shafts located on a narrow mesa top at Area G, Los Alamos, NM. Field data are consistent with an effective in-situ vapor phase diffusion coefficient of 1.5x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup s}/s, or a factor of 60 greater than the binary diffusion coefficient for water vapor in air. A model is derived to explain this observation of anomolously large diffusion, which relates an effective vapor or gas phase diffusion coefficient in the fractured porous media to the subsurface propagation of atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The near surface (unattenuated) diffusion coefficient is independent of mode period under the simplified assumptions of a complete {open_quote}mixing mechanism{close_quote} for the effective diffusion process. The unattenuated effective diffusion driven by this barometric pumping is proportional to an average media permeability times the sum of the square of pressure mode amplitudes, while the attenuation length is proportional to the squarer root of the product of permeability times mode period. There is evidence that the permeability needed to evaluate the pressure attenuation length is the in-situ value, approximately that of the matrix. The diffusion which results using Area G parameter values is negligible in the matrix but becomes large at the effective permeability of the fractured tuff matrix. The effective diffusion coefficient predicted by this model, due to pressure fluctuations and the observed fracture characteristics, is in good agreement with the observed in-situ diffusion coefficient for tritium field measurements. It is concluded that barometric pumping in combination with the enhanced permeability of the fractured media is a likely candidate to account for the observed in-field migration of vapor in the near surface unsaturated zone at Area G.

  16. Intermittent plate tectonics?

    PubMed

    Silver, Paul G; Behn, Mark D

    2008-01-01

    Although it is commonly assumed that subduction has operated continuously on Earth without interruption, subduction zones are routinely terminated by ocean closure and supercontinent assembly. Under certain circumstances, this could lead to a dramatic loss of subduction, globally. Closure of a Pacific-type basin, for example, would eliminate most subduction, unless this loss were compensated for by comparable subduction initiation elsewhere. Given the evidence for Pacific-type closure in Earth's past, the absence of a direct mechanism for termination/initiation compensation, and recent data supporting a minimum in subduction flux in the Mesoproterozoic, we hypothesize that dramatic reductions or temporary cessations of subduction have occurred in Earth's history. Such deviations in the continuity of plate tectonics have important consequences for Earth's thermal and continental evolution.

  17. Time course of morphine's effects on adult hippocampal subgranular zone reveals preferential inhibition of cells in S phase of the cell cycle and a subpopulation of immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Arguello, A A; Harburg, G C; Schonborn, J R; Mandyam, C D; Yamaguchi, M; Eisch, A J

    2008-11-11

    Opiates, such as morphine, decrease neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ), raising the possibility that decreased neurogenesis contributes to opiate-induced cognitive deficits. However, there is an incomplete understanding of how alterations in cell cycle progression and progenitor maturation contribute to this decrease. The present study examined how morphine regulates progenitor cell cycle, cell death and immature SGZ neurons (experiment 1) as well as the progression of SGZ progenitors through key stages of maturation (experiment 2). In experiment 1, mice received sham or morphine pellets (s.c., 0 and 48 h) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) 2 h prior to sacrifice (24, 72 or 96 h). Morphine decreased both the number of S phase and total cycling cells, as there were fewer cells immunoreactive (IR) for the S phase marker BrdU and the cell cycle marker Ki67. The percentage of Ki67-IR cells that were BrdU-IR was decreased after 24 but not 96 h of morphine, suggesting a disproportionate effect on S phase cells relative to all cycling cells at this time point. Cell death (activated caspase-3 counts) was increased after 24 but not 96 h. In experiment 2, nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice given BrdU 1 day prior to morphine or sham surgery (0 and 48 h, sacrifice 96 h) had fewer Ki67-IR cells, but no change in BrdU-IR cell number, suggesting that this population of BrdU-IR cells was less sensitive to morphine. Interestingly, examination of key stages of progenitor cell maturation revealed that morphine increased the percent of BrdU-IR cells that were type 2b and decreased the percent that were immature neurons. These data suggest that chronic morphine decreases SGZ neurogenesis by inhibiting dividing cells, particularly those in S phase, and progenitor cell progression to a more mature neuronal stage.

  18. Grain-damage hysteresis and plate tectonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2016-04-01

    Shear localization in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The theoretical model for grain-damage and pinning in two-phase polycrystalline rocks provides a frame-work for understanding lithospheric shear weakening and plate-generation, and is consistent with laboratory and field observations of mylonites. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, and damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between crystalline phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary positive self-weakening feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. However, the suppression of interface damage at low interface curvature (wherein inter-grain mixing is inefficient and other energy sinks of deformational work are potentially more facile) causes a hysteresis effect, in which three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress coexist: (1) a stable, large-grain, weakly-deforming state, (2) a stable, small-grain, rapidly-deforming state analogous to ultramylonites, and (3) an unstable, intermediate grain-size state perhaps comparable to protomylonites. A comparison of the model to field data suggests that shear-localized zones of small-grain mylonites and ultra-mylonites exist at a lower stress than the co-existing large-grain porphyroclasts, rather than, as predicted by paleopiezometers or paleowattmeters, at a much higher stress; this interpretation of field data thus allows localization to relieve instead of accumulate stress. The model also predicts that a lithosphere that

  19. Tectonic speed limits from plate kinematic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The motion of plates and continents on the planet's surface are a manifestation of long-term mantle convection and plate tectonics. Present-day plate velocities provide a snapshot of this ongoing process, and have been used to infer controlling factors on the speeds of plates and continents. However, present-day velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative periods of time. To address this shortcoming, we use a plate tectonic reconstruction approach to extract time-dependent plate velocities and geometries from which root mean square (RMS) velocities are computed, resulting in a median RMS plate speed of ∼ 4 cm /yr over 200 Myr. Linking tectonothermal ages of continental lithosphere to the RMS plate velocity analysis, we find that the increasing portions of plate area composed of continental and/or cratonic lithosphere significantly reduces plate speeds. Plates with any cratonic portion have a median RMS velocity of ∼ 5.8 cm /yr, while plates with more than 25% of cratonic area have a median RMS speed of ∼ 2.8 cm /yr. The fastest plates (∼ 8.5 cm /yr RMS speed) have little continental fraction and tend to be bounded by subduction zones, while the slowest plates (∼ 2.6- 2.8 cm /yr RMS speed) have large continental fractions and usually have little to no subducting part of plate perimeter. More generally, oceanic plates tend to move 2-3 times faster than continental plates, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The slower motion of continental plates is compatible with deep keels impinging on asthenospheric flow and increasing shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. We also find that short-lived (up to ∼ 10 Myr) rapid accelerations of Africa (∼100 and 65 Ma), North America (∼100 and 55 Ma) and India (∼ 130 , 80 and 65 Ma) appear to be correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement. By evaluating

  20. The Seismic Coupling of Subduction Zones Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, C.; Campos, J.

    2012-04-01

    The nature of seismic coupling for many of the world's subduction zones has been reevaluated. Geodetic estimates of seismic coupling obtained from GPS measurements of upper plate deformation during the interseismic period are summarized. We compared those with new estimates of seismic coupling obtained from seismological data. The results show that with a few notable exceptions the results using the two methods agree to within about 10%. The seismological estimates have been greatly improved over those made 20-30 years ago because of an abundance of paleoseismological data that greatly extend the temporal record of great subduction earthquakes and by the occurrence, in the intervening years, of an unusual number of great and giant earthquakes that have filled in some of the most critical holes in the seismic record. The data also, again with a few notable exceptions, support the frictional instability theory of seismic coupling, and in particular, the test of that theory made by Scholz and Campos [1995]. Overall, the results support their prediction that high coupling occurs for subduction zones subjected to high normal forces with a switch to low coupling occurring fairly abruptly as the normal force decreases below a critical value. There is also considerable variation of coupling within individual subduction zones. Earthquake asperities correlate with areas of high coupling and hence have a semblance of permanence, but the rupture zones and asperity distributions of great earthquakes may differ greatly between seismic cycles because of differences in the phase of seismic flux accumulation.

  1. The seismic coupling of subduction zones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Christopher H.; Campos, Jaime

    2012-05-01

    The nature of seismic coupling for many of the world's subduction zones has been reevaluated. Geodetic estimates of seismic coupling obtained from GPS measurements of upper plate deformation during the interseismic period are summarized. We compared those with new estimates of seismic coupling obtained from seismological data. The results show that with a few notable exceptions the two methods agree to within about 10%. The seismological estimates have been greatly improved over those made 20-30 years ago because of an abundance of paleoseismological data that greatly extend the temporal record of great subduction earthquakes and by the occurrence, in the intervening years, of an unusual number of great and giant earthquakes that have filled in some of the most critical holes in the seismic record. The data also, again with a few notable exceptions, support the frictional instability theory of seismic coupling, and in particular, the test of that theory made by Scholz and Campos (1995). Overall, the results support their prediction that high coupling occurs for subduction zones subjected to high normal forces with a switch to low coupling occurring fairly abruptly as the normal force decreases below a critical value. There is also considerable variation of coupling within individual subduction zones. Earthquake asperities correlate with areas of high coupling and hence have a semblance of permanence, but the rupture zones and asperity distributions of great earthquakes may differ greatly between seismic cycles because of differences in the phase of seismic flux accumulation.

  2. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  3. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  4. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOEpatents

    Hollands, K. G. Terry; Sibbitt, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  5. Water supplement by silica diagenesis in cold subduction zone: an implication for the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hina, S.; Hamada, Y.; Kameda, J.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kimura, G.

    2011-12-01

    The fluid existing at plate interfaces in subduction zone makes a strong effect on seismicity and fault slip of the plate boundary megathrusts. As a source of the fluid, pore fluid included in subducting sedimentsand dehydration reaction of clay minerals have been discussed in detail, however, dewatering from siliceous sediments such as diatom and radiolarian ooze are poorly investigated in spite of their major occurrence in old oceanic plate. Silica in the siliceous sediment is transformed from amorphous silica into quartz via cristobalite phase (Opal A → Opal CT → Quartz) releasing structured water. In this study, we evaluate the amount of dehydration from siliceous sediment in subducting plate. Silica diagenesis and dehydration are calculated quantitatively introducing reaction kinetics (Mizutani, 1970) and temperature profile models of the Japan Trench, a cold type subduction zone where the siliceous sediments subduct in (Peacock and Wang, 1999; Wang and Suyehiro, 1999; Wada and Wang, 2009; Kimura et al., submitted). As a result, through this diagenetic conversion, structured water of silica minerals is released as much as 140g/m^2/year at shallow plate boundary (~13km depth below the sea floor), where the temperature is about ~100 -~120°C. This water should generate an excess pore pressure which drops effective stress and rock strength along the décollement. Dehydration of silica can play an important role in slip propagation to shallow portion of plate boundary as the Grate Tohoku Earthquake (9 March 2011).

  6. Sorption and phase distribution of ethanol and butanol blended gasoline vapours in the vadose zone after release.

    PubMed

    Ugwoha, Ejikeme; Andresen, John M

    2014-03-01

    The sorption and phase distribution of 20% ethanol and butanol blended gasoline (E20 and B20) vapours have been examined in soils with varying soil organic matter (SOM) and water contents via laboratory microcosm experiments. The presence of 20% alcohol reduced the sorption of gasoline compounds by soil as well as the mass distribution of the compounds to soil solids. This effect was greater for ethanol than butanol. Compared with the sorption coefficient (Kd) of unblended gasoline compounds, the Kd of E20 gasoline compounds decreased by 54% for pentane, 54% for methylcyclopentane (MCP) and 63% for benzene, while the Kd of B20 gasoline compounds decreased by 39% for pentane, 38% for MCP and 49% for benzene. The retardation factor (R) of E20 gasoline compounds decreased by 53% for pentane, 53% for MCP and 48% for benzene, while the R of B20 gasoline compounds decreased by 39% for pentane, 37% for MCP and 38% for benzene. For all SOM and water contents tested, the Kd and R of all gasoline compounds were in the order of unblended gasoline > B20 > E20, indicating that the use of high ethanol volume in gasoline to combat climate change could put the groundwater at greater risk of contamination.

  7. Chemical zoning and colour changes in the phases of the sodalite group from the Mt. Vulture haüynophyre lava (Potenza-italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muro, A.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Principe, C.

    2003-04-01

    The haüynophyre is a sulfur-rich differentiated lava flow erupted from a parasitic vent of the Vulture volcano (Potenza-Italy). This porphyritic lithotype (43 vol%) is characterised by a very high content (20-30 vol%) of feldspathoids belonging to the sodalite group. Chemical and structural analysis of the sodalite-group minerals has led to the identification of i) a colourless to white nosean, ii) a blue to light-blue haüyne, and iii) a black to grey haüyne. Numerous phenocrysts present a resorbed core and/or a pronounced concentric division into zones with a complex colour sequence. The X-ray diffraction study (XRPD through Gandolfi technique and single crystal structure refinements) has confirmed the occurrence of nosean and has allowed to discard the presence of lazurite. All the analysed crystals, those chromatically homogeneous as well as the zoned ones, have marked core-rim chemical variations. Nosean crystals contain small pyrite inclusions and are characterised by an evolution from a Ca-K poor core to Ca-K rich rim. K_2O content increases towards the rim in blue haüyne, while Na_2O/CaO ratio remains almost constant. Black haüyne has chemical characteristics intermediate between the nosean and the blue haüyne-end members and has the highest S/Cl ratio in the core. Black and blue haüyne have similar patterns of depletion in REE and most other highly lithophile elements relative to the bulk rock. Positive anomaly for the Eu content and spinel composition are indicative of high fO_2 conditions in the magmas in which both haüyne varieties formed. Higher contents of compatible (Sr, Ba) and semicompatible (Ta) elements characterise the black phase. A high Fe content in the black variety could be at least in part responsible for the chromatic difference. Limited contamination by sedimentary evaporites and probably mixing between a sulfur-rich black haüyne-bearing magma and a more cooled magma having stable blue haüyne and nosean is proposed to explain

  8. Growth of lamellar pearlite in the weld zone between dissimilar steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the welds between high-carbon pearlitic and chromium-nickel austenitic steel workpieces performed by flash butt welding. It has been established that lamellar pearlite colonies alloyed with chromium and nickel are formed in the weld zones between dissimilar steels. Thin austenite interlayers have been detected in the center of ferrite plates. The structure formed presents the C-F-A-F-C-F-A-F (and so on) sequence of three plate-shaped phases. The ferrite-cementite structure in alloyed-pearlite colonies is finer than that in unalloyed pearlite.

  9. Use of frequency-dependent multi-offset phase analysis of surface waves for a riparian zone characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignoli, Giulio; Gervasio, Isabella; Brancatelli, Giuseppe; Boaga, Jacopo; Della Vedova, Bruno; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Multi-offset phase analysis (MOPA) of seismic surface waves has been developed as an alternative technique for the lateral variation sensitive extraction of dispersion curves. One of the goals of MOPA is to increase the lateral resolution with respect of the more traditional surface wave methods, and, consequently, to allow a more detailed investigation of the subsurface in terms of 2D shear wave velocity distribution. However, in the published literature, there are still few examples of field applications of this promising technique. The standard MOPA makes possible to calculate, frequency-by-frequency, the derivative of the phase (retrieved by the seismogram) with respect to offset and, by doing that, to extract the information concerning the Rayleigh wave velocity as a function of frequency (i.e., the dispersion curve) with a lateral resolution that depends on the length of the window used to calculate the derivative. Here, we describe a novel MOPA implementation characterized by a moving window with a frequency-dependent width. The window's length is in fact chosen to be smaller for higher frequencies (investigating the shallower layers) and increasingly larger at lower frequencies (where the longer wavelengths supply information about the deeper formations). This approach is clearly in accordance with the physics of the method (the smaller footprint of the shorter wavelengths provides spatially detailed information, while larger wavelengths inevitably average, to some degree, the soil spatial variations). Hence, this frequency-dependent MOPA maximizes the lateral resolution at high frequencies, while assuring stability at the lower frequencies. In this way, we can retrieve the shallow lateral variability with high accuracy and, and the same time, obtain a robust surface wave velocity measurement at depth. The extracted dispersion curves (one for each receiver location) can be then inverted providing an S-wave velocity section. Here we discuss the application

  10. Coseismic and interseismic displacements at a subduction zone - a parameter study using finite-element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Hampel, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Tide-gauge and geodetic measurements of coseismic and interseismic displacements in the forearc of subduction zones showed that the coastal region undergoes uplift during the interseismic phase and subsidence during the coseismic phase, while opposite vertical movements are observed in the neighbouring regions (e.g., Savage & Thatcher 1992; Hyndman & Wang 1995). Horizontal displacements during the interseismic phase are typically directed landward, whereas the forearc moves seaward during the earthquake (e.g., Klotz et al. 1999). Here we use two-dimensional finite-element modelling to evaluate how the friction coefficient along the plate interface, the length and the position of the downdip end of the locked zone affect the coseismic and interseismic displacements. Our model consists of a deformable, rheologically stratified upper plate and an undeformable oceanic plate, which rotates at a prescribed angular velocity (cf. Cailleau & Oncken, 2008). The frictional plate interface is divided - from the trench to the base of the continental lithosphere - into a seismogenic zone, a transition zone and a landward free slip zone. During an initial phase, the seismogenic zone is locked, which leads to the accumulation of elastic strain in the forearc. During the subsequent coseismic phase, the strain is released and causes sudden slip of several meters on the plate interface. During the next interseismic phase, the seismogenic zone is locked again. Our model results show patterns of vertical and horizontal displacements that are in general agreement with geodetically observed patterns. A sensitivity analysis reveals that the magnitude of the vertical displacements is strongly influenced by the friction coefficients of the seismogenic zone and the transition zone. The location of the zones of maximum interseismic uplift and coseismic subsidence in the coastal regions depends on the length and position of the locked zone. Preliminary results from three-dimensional models

  11. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles Inferred from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in South Tropical Zone III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-12-01

    nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  12. Peri-infarct zone characterized by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is directly associated with the inflammatory activity during acute phase myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Quinaglia e Silva, Jose C; Coelho-Filho, Otavio Rizzi; Andrade, Joalbo M; Quinaglia, Thiago; Modolo, Rodrigo G P; Almeida, Breno O; van der Geest, Rob J; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Coelho, Otavio Rizzi; Sposito, Andrei C

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced systemic inflammatory activity (SIA) during myocardial infarction (MI) and the extent of the peri-infarct zone characterized by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRi) are both associated with increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The present study investigated the existence of association between these two phenomena in 98 patients (55 ± 10 years) with ST segment elevation MI. Plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were measured on admission (D1) and on the fifth day post-MI (D5). CMRi was performed 2 weeks after MI to quantify peri-infarct zone (PIZ). Between D1 and D5, the increase in CRP (6.0 vs. 5.6 times; p = 0.02), IL-2 (3.6 vs. 3.4 times; p = 0.04) and tumor necrosis factor type α (TNF-α; 4.6 vs. 3.9 times; p = 0.001) were higher in patients with PIZ above the median than in the counterparts. PIZ was correlated with CRP-D5 (r = 0.69), delta-CRP (r = 0.7), IL-2-D5 (r = 0.5), delta-IL-2 (r = 0.6), TNF-α