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Sample records for phase-resolved spectral analysis

  1. Phase Resolved X-ray Spectral Analysis of Soft IPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekon, Yakup

    2016-07-01

    As a subclass of Cataclysmic Variables, Intermediate Polars (IPs) are magnetic systems which mainly show hard X-ray emission. However, there have been an increasing number of systems that also show a soft emission component arising from reprocessed X-rays from the white dwarf limbs. Due to their relatively short periods, they pose as good canditates to perform phase resolved analysis. In this work, X-ray phase resolved spectral analysis of selected IPs with soft X-ray emission components (such as PQ Gem, V2069 Cyg etc.) over the orbital and/or spin periods will be presented. The analyses will help a better understanding of the complex absorption mechanisms and the nature of the soft X-ray emissions in soft IPs.

  2. Studies of multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for spectral fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    McGown, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    During the past two project periods (7/1/88--12/31/90), we have made significant advances towards our goal of characterizing samples in terms of their dynamic spectral characteristics through the use of phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Specific achievements are discussed, each of which describes a particular area of focus in our studies.

  3. Superorbital Phase-resolved Analysis of SMC X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Chou, Yi; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao

    2013-08-01

    The high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1 is an eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 3.89 days. This system exhibits a superorbital modulation with a period varying between ~40 days and ~65 days. The instantaneous frequency and the corresponding phase of the superorbital modulation can be obtained by a recently developed time-frequency analysis technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We present a phase-resolved analysis of both the spectra and the orbital profiles with the superorbital phase derived from the HHT. The X-ray spectra observed by the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer are fitted well by a blackbody plus a Comptonized component. The plasma optical depth, which is a good indicator of the distribution of material along the line of sight, is significantly anti-correlated with the flux detected at 2.5-25 keV. However, the relationship between the plasma optical depth and the equivalent width of the iron line is not monotonic. There is no significant correlation for fluxes higher than ~35 mCrab but clear positive correlation when the intensity is lower than ~20 mCrab. This indicates that the iron line production is dominated by different regions of this binary system in different superorbital phases. To study the dependence of the orbital profile on the superorbital phase, we obtained the eclipse profiles by folding the All Sky Monitor light curve with the orbital period for different superorbital states. A dip feature, similar to the pre-eclipse dip in Her X-1, lying at orbital phase ~0.6-0.85, was discovered during the superorbital transition state. This indicates that the accretion disk has a bulge that absorbs considerable X-ray emission in the stream-disk interaction region. The dip width is anti-correlated with the flux, and this relation can be interpreted by the precessing tilted accretion disk scenario.

  4. SUPERORBITAL PHASE-RESOLVED ANALYSIS OF SMC X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Chou, Yi; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao E-mail: yichou@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2013-08-10

    The high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1 is an eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 3.89 days. This system exhibits a superorbital modulation with a period varying between {approx}40 days and {approx}65 days. The instantaneous frequency and the corresponding phase of the superorbital modulation can be obtained by a recently developed time-frequency analysis technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We present a phase-resolved analysis of both the spectra and the orbital profiles with the superorbital phase derived from the HHT. The X-ray spectra observed by the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer are fitted well by a blackbody plus a Comptonized component. The plasma optical depth, which is a good indicator of the distribution of material along the line of sight, is significantly anti-correlated with the flux detected at 2.5-25 keV. However, the relationship between the plasma optical depth and the equivalent width of the iron line is not monotonic. There is no significant correlation for fluxes higher than {approx}35 mCrab but clear positive correlation when the intensity is lower than {approx}20 mCrab. This indicates that the iron line production is dominated by different regions of this binary system in different superorbital phases. To study the dependence of the orbital profile on the superorbital phase, we obtained the eclipse profiles by folding the All Sky Monitor light curve with the orbital period for different superorbital states. A dip feature, similar to the pre-eclipse dip in Her X-1, lying at orbital phase {approx}0.6-0.85, was discovered during the superorbital transition state. This indicates that the accretion disk has a bulge that absorbs considerable X-ray emission in the stream-disk interaction region. The dip width is anti-correlated with the flux, and this relation can be interpreted by the precessing tilted accretion disk scenario.

  5. Application of a Phase-resolving, Directional Nonlinear Spectral Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. R.; Sheremet, A.; Tian, M.; Hanson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We describe several applications of a phase-resolving, directional nonlinear spectral wave model. The model describes a 2D surface gravity wave field approaching a mildly sloping beach with parallel depth contours at an arbitrary angle accounting for nonlinear, quadratic triad interactions. The model is hyperbolic, with the initial wave spectrum specified in deep water. Complex amplitudes are generated based on the random phase approximation. The numerical implementation includes unidirectional propagation as a special case. In directional mode, it solves the system of equations in the frequency-alongshore wave number space. Recent enhancements of the model include the incorporation of dissipation caused by breaking and propagation over a viscous mud layer and the calculation of wave induced setup. Applications presented include: a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation, a study of the evolution of a single directional triad, and several preliminary comparisons to wave spectra collected at the USACE-FRF in Duck, NC which show encouraging results although further validation with a wider range of beach slopes and wave conditions is needed.

  6. Phase resolved analysis of the homogeneity of a diffuse dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Kogelheide, Friederike; Bibinov, Nikita; Stapelmann, Katharina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas have already proven their ability of supporting the healing process of chronic wounds. Especially simple configurations like a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), comprising of one driven electrode which is coated with a dielectric layer, are of interest, because they are cost-effective and easy to handle. The homogeneity of such plasmas during treatment is necessary since the whole wound should be treated evenly. In this investigation phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the homogeneity of a DBD. Electron densities and reduced electric field distributions are determined with temporal and spatial resolution and the differences for applied positive and negative voltage pulses are studied.

  7. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, I.; Reinsch, K.; Schwope, A. D.; Schwarz, R.; Walter, F. M.; Burwitz, V.

    2014-02-01

    Context. RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Aims: Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. Methods: We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results: Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36 eV and 7 keV. The spectral fits give evidence of a partially absorbing and a reflection component. Multitemperature models, covering a broader temperature range in the X-ray emitting accretion regions, reproduce the spectra appropriately well. Including archival data, we describe the spectral energy distribution with a combination of models based on a consistent set of parameters and derive a lower limit estimate of the distance d ≳ 750 pc. Conclusions: The high bolometric soft-to-hard flux ratios and short-term variability of the (X-ray) light curves are characteristic of inhomogeneous accretion. RS Cae clearly belongs in the group of polars that show a very strong soft X-ray flux compared to their hard X-ray flux. The different black-body fluxes and similar hard X-ray and optical fluxes during the XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations show that soft and hard X-ray emission are not directly correlated. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  8. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André; Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander; Ole Menzel, Kristoffer

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  9. The outburst decay of the low magnetic field magnetar SWIFT J1822.3-1606: phase-resolved analysis and evidence for a variable cyclotron feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Castillo, Guillermo A.; Israel, Gian Luca; Tiengo, Andrea; Salvetti, David; Turolla, Roberto; Zane, Silvia; Rea, Nanda; Esposito, Paolo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Perna, Rosalba; Stella, Luigi; Pons, José A.; Campana, Sergio; Götz, Diego; Motta, Sara

    2016-03-01

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the low-magnetic field, transient magnetar SWIFT J1822.3-1606 as it approached quiescence. We coherently phase-connect the observations over a time-span of ˜500 d since the discovery of SWIFT J1822.3-1606 following the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) trigger on 2011 July 14, and carried out a detailed pulse phase spectroscopy along the outburst decay. We follow the spectral evolution of different pulse phase intervals and find a phase and energy-variable spectral feature, which we interpret as proton cyclotron resonant scattering of soft photon from currents circulating in a strong (≳1014 G) small-scale component of the magnetic field near the neutron star surface, superimposed to the much weaker (˜3 × 1013 G) magnetic field. We discuss also the implications of the pulse-resolved spectral analysis for the emission regions on the surface of the cooling magnetar.

  10. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  11. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2008-09-23

    Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

  12. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  13. Phase Resolved Cyclotron Spectroscopy of Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dealaman, Shannon J.

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted through the REU program at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory in La Serena, Chile. For this research we reduced and modeled phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy of four AM Her stars: MN Hya, HU Aqu, VV Pup, and QS Tel. Two of the four spectra show good cyclotron harmonics while the other two were taken during a high state with too much noise in the spectra. Using a Constant-Lambda code (Schwope et al., 1990) we modeled the two good spectra and further modeled the harmonic motion of HU Aqr. The models produced for MN Hya gave parameters with a magnetic field strength between 44 MG and 43.4 MG, a plasma temperature between 4.1 keV and 5.6 keV, a log Λ of 4.2 ± 0.3, and a viewing angle set between 83.0 degrees and 70.0 degrees and HU Aqr a magnetic field between 36.0 MG and 37.6 MG, a plasma temperature between 15.0 keV and 15.5 keV, a log Λ of 4.0 ± 0.3, and a viewing angle between 89.5 degrees and 70.5 degrees. This was the first attempt to model MN Hya with a constant lambda code and the first harmonic motion model of HU Aqr.

  14. Phase resolved digital signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Tripathi, Renu; Park, Boris H.; Nassif, Nader

    2002-06-01

    We present phase resolved digital signal processing techniques for Optical Coherence Tomography to correct for the non Gaussian shape of source spectra and for Group Delay Dispersion (GDD). A broadband source centered at 820 nm was synthesized by combining the spectra of two superluminescent diodes to improve axial image resolution in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Spectral shaping was used to reduce the side lobes (ringing) in the axial point spread function due to the non-Gaussian shape of the spectra. Images of onion cells taken with each individual source and the combined sources, respectively, show the improved resolution and quality enhancement in a turbid biological sample. An OCT system operating at 1310 nm was used to demonstrate that the broadening effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) on the coherence function could be eliminated completely by introducing a quadratic phase shift in the Fourier domain of the interferometric signal. The technique is demonstrated by images of human skin grafts with group delay dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm before and after digital processing.

  15. TRIADS: A phase-resolving model for nonlinear shoaling of directional wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, Alex; Davis, Justin R.; Tian, Miao; Hanson, Jeffrey L.; Hathaway, Kent K.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the performance of TRIADS, a numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear, spectral model describing directional wave evolution in intermediate and shallow water. TRIADS simulations of shoaling waves generated by Hurricane Bill, 2009 are compared to directional spectral estimates based on observations collected at the Field Research Facility of the US Army Corps Of Engineers, at Duck, NC. Both the ability of the model to capture the processes essential to the nonlinear wave evolution, and the efficiency of the numerical implementations are analyzed and discussed.

  16. Spectral compressor vibration analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.L.

    1982-02-01

    Studies at GAT have verified that the spectral distribution of energy in gaseous diffusion compressor vibrations contains information pertinent to the state of the compressor's ''health.'' Based on that conclusion, vibration analysis capabilities were included in the CUP computer data acquisition system. In order for that information to be used for diagnosis of incipient failure mechanisms, however, spectral features must be empirically associated with actual malfunctions and validated statistically as diagnostic symptoms. When the system was acquired, indicators were generally unknown except for those associated with unbalance, misalignment, 00 secondary surge and severe resonant blade vibrations. Others must be developed as in-service malfunctions occur. The power spectral density function (PSDF) has historically been used to compute vibration spectra. Accurate, high-resolution power density spectra require long data-acquisition periods which is inconsistent with frequent examinations of all up-rated compressors. Detection of gross spectral changes indicative of a need for detailed analyses has been accomplished at a rate of less than 1 minute per compressor. An optimum analytical sequence will be based on trade offs. Work is in progress to identify additional malfunction indicators and investigate tools other than the PSDF to provide faster diagnoses. 6 figs.

  17. Phase-resolved spectroscopy of Type B quasi-periodic oscillations in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2016-08-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy and apply it to the low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. We show that on the QPO time-scale the spectrum changes not only in normalization, but also in spectral shape. Using several different spectral models which parametrize the blackbody and power-law components seen in the time-averaged spectrum, we find that both components are required to vary, although the fractional rms amplitude of blackbody emission is small, ˜1.4 per cent compared to ˜25 per cent for the power-law emission. However, the blackbody variation leads the power-law variation by ˜0.3 in relative phase (˜110°), giving a significant break in the Fourier lag-energy spectrum that our phase-resolved spectral models are able to reproduce. Our results support a geometric interpretation for the QPO variations where the blackbody variation and its phase relation to the power-law are explained by quasi-periodic heating of the approaching and receding sides of the disc by a precessing Comptonizing region. The small amplitude of blackbody variations suggests that the Comptonizing region producing the QPO has a relatively large scaleheight, and may be linked to the base of the jet, as has previously been suggested to explain the binary orbit inclination-dependence of Type B QPO amplitudes.

  18. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M.; Cullen, P. J.

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  19. Imaging and quantifying Brownian motion of micro- and nanoparticles using phase-resolved Doppler variance optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Soo; Qi, Wenjuan; Zhang, Jun; Kwon, Young Jik; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-03-01

    Different types and sizes of micro- and nanoparticles have been synthesized and developed for numerous applications. It is crucial to characterize the particle sizes. Traditional dynamic light scattering, a predominant method used to characterize particle size, is unable to provide depth resolved information or imaging functions. Doppler variance optical coherence tomography (OCT) measures the spectral bandwidth of the Doppler frequency shift due to the Brownian motion of the particles utilizing the phase-resolved approach and can provide quantitative information about particle size. Spectral bandwidths of Doppler frequency shifts for various sized particles were quantified and were demonstrated to be inversely proportional to the diameter of the particles. The study demonstrates the phase-resolved Doppler variance spectral domain OCT technique has the potential to be used to investigate the properties of particles in highly scattering media. PMID:23515863

  20. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  1. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  2. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  3. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  4. Basic elements of power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of power spectral analysis with emphasis on the Blackman-Tukey method are presented. Short discussions are included on the topics of pre-whitening, frequency and spectral windows, and statistical reliability. Examples are included whenever possible, and a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating a power spectrum is presented.

  5. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  6. Phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detection using heterodyning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungha; McMichael, Robert D.

    We have developed a new phase-resolved ferromagnetic (FMR) detection method using a heterodyne method. Phase resolution is important to determine the characteristics of spin transfer torques in magnetization dynamics under microwave excitation. Specifically, field-like torques and damping-like torques result in magnetization precession with different phases. In this method, we drive spin precession in a Permalloy thin film using microwaves. The resulting precession is detected using 1550 nm laser light, that is modulated at a frequency slightly shifted with respect to the driving frequency. In the reflected light, beating of the spin precession and the light modulation produces an oscillating Kerr rotation signal with a phase equal to the precession phase plus a phase due to the path length difference between the excitation microwave and the optical signal. This detection method eliminates the need for field modulation and allows detection at higher frequencies where the 1/f noise floor is reduced

  7. Phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance using heterodyne detection method

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seungha; Liu, Jason; McMichael, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurement using a heterodyne method. Spin precession is driven by microwave fields and detected by 1550 nm laser light that is modulated at a frequency slightly shifted with respected to the FMR driving frequency. The evolving phase difference between the spin precession and the modulated light produces a slowly oscillating Kerr rotation signal with a phase equal to the precession phase plus a phase due to the path length difference between the excitation microwave signal and the optical signal. We estimate the accuracy of the precession phase measurement to be 0.1 rad. This heterodyne FMR detection method eliminates the need for field modulation and allows a stronger detection signal at higher intermediate frequency where the 1/f noise floor is reduced. PMID:27453957

  8. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  9. Fetal magnetocardiogram recordings and Fourier spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P; Anninos, P A; Lüdinghausen, M V; Kotini, A; Galazios, G; Limberis, B

    1999-07-01

    Power spectral analysis of fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) data was evaluated in 64 pregnancies, using the non-invasive one channel superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID), in order to investigate the power spectral amplitude distribution in the frequency range between 2 and 3 Hz. In all cases with normal and uncomplicated pregnancies, the data from the fetal heart and specifically the QRS complexes, were identifiable and unaffected by any maternal cardiac activity and furthermore the power spectral amplitudes, which varied between 120 and 350 fT/Hz, were directly related to gestational age. PMID:15512338

  10. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  11. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  12. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  13. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  14. Phase-resolved reflectance spectroscopy on layered turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Chance, Britton; Tittel, Frank K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1995-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of layered tissue structures on the phase-resolved reflectance. As a particular example, we consider the affect of the skin, skull, and meninges on noninvasive blood oxygenation determination of the brain. In this case, it's important to know how accurate one can measure the absorption coefficient of the brain through the enclosing layers of different tissues. Experiments were performed on layered gelatin tissue phantoms and the results compared to diffusion theory. It is shown that when a high absorbing medium is placed on top of a low absorbing medium, the absorption coefficient of the lower layer is accessible. In the inverse case, where a low absorbing medium is placed on top of a high absorbing medium, the absorption coefficient of the underlying medium can only be determined if the differences in the absorption coefficient are small, or the top layer is very thin. Investigations on almost absorption and scattering free layers, like the cerebral fluid filled arachnoid, reveal that the determination of the absorption coefficient is barely affected by these kinds of structures.

  15. Spectral derivative feature coding for hyperspectral signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Chakravarty, Sumit

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to hyperspectral signature analysis, called Spectral Derivative Feature Coding (SDFC). It makes use of gradient changes in adjacent bands to characterize spectral variations so as to improve spectral discrimination and identification. In order to evaluate its performance, two binary coding methods, SPectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) are used to conduct comparative analysis. The experimental results demonstrate the proposed SDFC performs more effectively in capturing spectral characteristics.

  16. ISAP: ISO Spectral Analysis Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Babar; Bauer, Otto; Brauher, Jim; Buckley, Mark; Harwood, Andrew; Hur, Min; Khan, Iffat; Li, Jing; Lord, Steve; Lutz, Dieter; Mazzarella, Joe; Molinari, Sergio; Morris, Pat; Narron, Bob; Seidenschwang, Karla; Sidher, Sunil; Sturm, Eckhard; Swinyard, Bruce; Unger, Sarah; Verstraete, Laurent; Vivares, Florence; Wieprecht, Ecki

    2014-03-01

    ISAP, written in IDL, simplifies the process of visualizing, subsetting, shifting, rebinning, masking, combining scans with weighted means or medians, filtering, and smoothing Auto Analysis Results (AARs) from post-pipeline processing of the Infrared Space Observatory's (ISO) Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) and Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) data. It can also be applied to PHOT-S and CAM-CVF data, and data from practically any spectrometer. The result of a typical ISAP session is expected to be a "simple spectrum" (single-valued spectrum which may be resampled to a uniform wavelength separation if desired) that can be further analyzed and measured either with other ISAP functions, native IDL functions, or exported to other analysis package (e.g., IRAF, MIDAS) if desired. ISAP provides many tools for further analysis, line-fitting, and continuum measurements, such as routines for unit conversions, conversions from wavelength space to frequency space, line and continuum fitting, flux measurement, synthetic photometry and models such as a zodiacal light model to predict and subtract the dominant foreground at some wavelengths.

  17. Interactive Spectral Analysis and Computation (ISAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Isaac is a task in the NSO external package for IRAF. A descendant of a FORTRAN program written to analyze data from a Fourier transform spectrometer, the current implementation has been generalized sufficiently to make it useful for general spectral analysis and other one dimensional data analysis tasks. The user interface for Isaac is implemented as an interpreted mini-language containing a powerful, programmable vector calculator. Built-in commands provide much of the functionality needed to produce accurate line lists from input spectra. These built-in functions include automated spectral line finding, least squares fitting of Voigt profiles to spectral lines including equality constraints, various filters including an optimal filter construction tool, continuum fitting, and various I/O functions.

  18. Novel methods for spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, R.; Sumpter, B. G.; Pfeffer, G. A.; Gray, S. K.; Noid, D. W.

    1991-06-01

    In this review article, various techniques for obtaining estimates of parameters related to the spectrum of an underlying process are discussed. These techniques include the conventional nonparametric FFT approach and more recently developed parametric techniques such as maximum entropy, MUSIC, and ESPRIT, the latter two being classified as signal-subspace or eigenvector techniques. These estimators span the spectrum of possible estimators in that extremes of a priori knowledge are assumed (nonparametric versus parametric) and extremes in the underlying model of the observed process (deterministic versus stochastic) are involved. The advantage of parametric techniques is their ability to provide very accurate estimates using data from extremely short time intervals. Several applications of these novel methods for frequency analysis of very short time data are presented. These include calculation of dispersion curves, and the density of vibrational states g(ω) for many-body systems, semiclassical transition frequencies, overtone linewidths, and resonance energies of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for few-body problems.

  19. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  20. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  1. SVD analysis of Aura TES spectral residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis is both a powerful diagnostic tool and an effective method of noise filtering. We present the results of an SVD analysis of an ensemble of spectral residuals acquired in September 2004 from a 16-orbit Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Global Survey and compare them to alternative methods such as zonal averages. In particular, the technique highlights issues such as the orbital variation of instrument response and incompletely modeled effects of surface emissivity and atmospheric composition.

  2. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limtedmore » number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X

  3. Spectral analysis and inversion of experimental codas

    SciTech Connect

    Jannaud, L.R.; Jacquin, C.G. ); Adler, P.M. . Lab. d'Aerothermique)

    1993-03-01

    A method developed for the determination of the characteristic lengths of an heterogeneous medium from the spectral analysis of codas is based on an extension of Aki's theory to anisotropic elastic media. An equivalent Gaussian model is obtained and seems to be in good agreement with the two experimental data sets that illustrate the method. The first set was obtained in a laboratory experiment with an isotropic marble sample. This sample is characterized by a submillimetric length scale that can be directly observed on a thin section. The spectral analysis of codas and their inversion yields an equivalent correlation length that is in good agreement with the observed one. The second data set is obtained in a crosshole experiment at the usual scale of a seismic survey. The codas are recorded, analyzed, and inverted. The analysis yields a vertical characteristic length for the studied subsurface that compares well with the characteristic length measured by seismic and stratigraphic logs.

  4. Pixel Dynamics Analysis of Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in solar observations have led to higher-resolution surface (photosphere) images that reveal bipolar magnetic features operating near the resolution limit during emerging flux events. Further improvements in resolution are expected to reveal even smaller dynamic features. Such photospheric features provide observable indications of what is happening before, during, and after flux emergence, eruptions in the corona, and other phenomena. Visible changes in photospheric active regions also play a major role in predicting eruptions that are responsible for geomagnetic plasma disturbances. A new method has been developed to extract physical information from photospheric data (e.g., SOLIS Stokes parameters) based on the statistics of pixel-by-pixel variations in spectral (absorption or emission) line quantities such as line profile Doppler shift, width, asymmetry, and flatness. Such properties are determined by the last interaction between detected photons and optically thick photospheric plasmas, and may contain extractable information on local plasma properties at sub-pixel scales. Applying the method to photospheric data with high spectral resolution, our pixel-by-pixel analysis is performed for various regions on the solar disk, ranging from quiet-Sun regions to active regions exhibiting eruptions, characterizing photospheric dynamics using spectral profiles. In particular, the method quantitatively characterizes the time profile of changes in spectral properties in photospheric features and provides improved physical constraints on observed quantities.

  5. High speed phase-resolved 2-d UBV photometry of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, A.; Shearer, A.; Redfern, R. M.; Beskin, G. M.; Neizvestny, S. I.; Neustroev, V. V.; Plokhotnichenko, V. L.; Cullum, M.

    2000-11-01

    We report a phase-resolved photometric and morphological analysis of UBV data of the Crab pulsar obtained with the 2-d TRIFFID high speed optical photometer mounted on the Russian 6m telescope. By being able to accurately isolate the pulsar from the nebular background at an unprecedented temporal resolution (1 μs), the various light curve components were accurately fluxed via phase-resolved photometry. Within the UBV range, our datasets are consistent with the existing trends reported elsewhere in the literature. In terms of flux and phase duration, both the peak Full Width Half Maxima and Half Width Half Maxima decrease as a function of photon energy. This is similarly the case for the flux associated with the bridge of emission. Power-law fits to the various light curve components are as follows; alpha = 0.07 +/- 0.19 (peak 1), alpha = -0.06 +/- 0.19 (peak 2) and alpha = -0.44 +/- 0.19 (bridge) - the uncertainty here being dominated by the integrated CCD photometry used to independently reference the TRIFFID data. Temporally, the main peaks are coincident to <= 10 μs although an accurate phase lag with respect to the radio main peak is compromised by radio timing uncertainties. The plateau on the Crab's main peak was definitively determined to be <= 55 μs in extent and may decrease as a function of photon energy. There is no evidence for non-stochastic activity over the light curves or within various phase regions, nor is there evidence of anything akin to the giant pulses noted in the radio. Finally, there is no evidence to support the existence of a reported 60 second modulation suggested to be as a consequence of free precession. Based on observations taken at SAO, Karachai-Cherkessia, Russia

  6. Magnitude and phase-resolved infrared vibrational nanospectroscopy with a swept quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, Edward; Schnell, Martin; Mastel, Stefan; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate a method of rapidly acquiring background-free infrared near-field spectra by combining magnitude and phase resolved scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) with a wavelength-swept quantum cascade laser (QCL). Background-free measurement of both near-field magnitude and phase allows for direct comparison with far-field absorption spectra, making the technique particularly useful for rapid and straightforward nanoscale material identification. Our experimental setup is based on the commonly used pseudo-heterodyne detection scheme, which we modify by operating the interferometer in the white light position; we show this adjustment to be critical for measurement repeatability. As a proof-of-principle experiment we measure the near-field spectrum between 1690 and 1750 cm(-1) of a PMMA disc with a spectral resolution of 1.5 cm(-1). We finish by chemically identifying two fibers on a sample surface by gathering their spectra between 1570 and 1750 cm(-1), each with a measurement time of less than 2.5 minutes. Our method offers the possibility of performing both nanoscale-resolved point spectroscopy and monochromatic imaging with a single laser that is capable of wavelength-sweeping.

  7. [Analysis of typical mangrove spectral reflectance characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Liu, Qing; Li, De-Yi; Zhao, Dong-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    Acquisition of mangrove spectrum properties and detecting the sensitive bands provide technology basis for inverse modeling and estimation by remote sensing for various indexes of mangrove. The typical mangroves of Guangxi Shankou Mangrove Reserve were taken for study objects, the standard spectrum curves of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (Linn.) Savigny, Rhizophora stylosa, Kandelia candel, Avicennia marina, Aegiceras corniculatum, Spartina anglica and mudflat were gained by denoising analysis of field-measured spectrum curves acquired by ASD FieldSpec 2. Analyzing the spectral characteristics and their differences, the authors found that the spectrum curves for various kinds of mangrove are coincident, the bands that appeared with reflection peaks and reflection valleys are basically identical, the within-class differentiated characteristics are comparatively small, the spectrum characteristics of mangroves are obviously different with Spartina anglica and mudflat. In order to gain the quantitative description for within-class differentiated characteristics of mangrove, space distance method, correlation coefficient method and spectral angle mapping method were used to calculate the within-class differentiated characteristics. The division accuracy of correlation coefficient method is higher than spectral angle mapping method which is higher than space distance method, and the result indicates that the spectrum differences of within-class mangrove and Spartina anglica are relatively small with correlation coefficients more than 0.995, and spectrum curve angle cosine values more than 0.95.

  8. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  9. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  10. Protein identification by spectral networks analysis.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Nuno; Tsur, Dekel; Frank, Ari; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2007-04-10

    Advances in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) steadily increase the rate of generation of MS/MS spectra. As a result, the existing approaches that compare spectra against databases are already facing a bottleneck, particularly when interpreting spectra of modified peptides. Here we explore a concept that allows one to perform an MS/MS database search without ever comparing a spectrum against a database. We propose to take advantage of spectral pairs, which are pairs of spectra obtained from overlapping (often nontryptic) peptides or from unmodified and modified versions of the same peptide. Having a spectrum of a modified peptide paired with a spectrum of an unmodified peptide allows one to separate the prefix and suffix ladders, to greatly reduce the number of noise peaks, and to generate a small number of peptide reconstructions that are likely to contain the correct one. The MS/MS database search is thus reduced to extremely fast pattern-matching (rather than time-consuming matching of spectra against databases). In addition to speed, our approach provides a unique paradigm for identifying posttranslational modifications by means of spectral networks analysis. PMID:17404225

  11. Spectral Analysis of Cluster Induced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ravi; Ireland, Peter; Capecelatro, Jesse; Fox, Rodney; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Particle laden turbulent flows are an important feature of many industrial processes such as fluidized bed reactors. The study of cluster-induced turbulence (CIT), wherein particles falling under gravity generate turbulence in the carrier gas via fluctuations in particle concentration, may lead to better models for these processes. We present a spectral analysis of a database of statistically stationary CIT simulations. These simulations were previously performed using a two way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian approach for various mass loadings and particle-scale Reynolds numbers. The Lagrangian particle data is carefully filtered to obtain Eulerian fields for particle phase volume fraction, velocity, and granular temperature. We perform a spectral decomposition of the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy budget. We investigate the contributions to the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy by pressure strain, viscous dissipation, drag exchange, viscous exchange, and pressure exchange over the range of wavenumbers. Results from this study may help develop closure models for large eddy simulation of particle laden turbulent flows.

  12. Spectral characteristic analysis of lung cancer serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao Zhou; Jin, Huiqiang; Liu, Huasheng; Ding, Jianhua; Lin, Junxiu

    2001-10-01

    Spectral changes of lung cancer serum in the process of tumor evolution were investigated in this study. We kept close watch on the tumor progression of a group of patients, and measured their serum spectra using 488.0nm and 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser once a week. There was no apparent change observed in fluorescence spectrum in different period. However, the relative intensity of three Raman peaks (mode A, B and C) decreased every week later. For quantitative analysis of such changes, a parameter Ir (relative intensity of C Raman peak) was introduced and Ir-value was calculated. Calculation showed that Ir-value was degressive with tumor evolution, but (beta) (Ir5145 /Ir4880) varied irregularly. To the end, no Raman peak was observed. We assumed that three Raman peaks were derived from beta carotene. It indicated that the content of beta carotene decreased with the aggravation of lung cancer.

  13. Reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, G J J; Vullings, R; Bergmans, J W M; Oei, S G

    2014-01-01

    Spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability could provide information on fetal wellbeing. Unfortunately, fetal heart rate recordings are often contaminated by artifacts. Correction of these artifacts affects the outcome of spectral analysis, but it is currently unclear what level of artifact correction facilitates reliable spectral analysis. In this study, a method is presented that estimates the error in spectral powers due to artifact correction, based on the properties of the Continuous Wavelet Transformation. The results show that it is possible to estimate the error in spectral powers. The information about this error makes it possible for clinicians to assess the reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate recordings that are contaminated by artifacts. PMID:25570577

  14. Partial spectral analysis of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukić, D.; Denić-Jukić, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryHydrological time series comprise the influences of numerous processes involved in the transfer of water in hydrological cycle. It implies that an ambiguity with respect to the processes encoded in spectral and cross-spectral density functions exists. Previous studies have not paid attention adequately to this issue. Spectral and cross-spectral density functions represent the Fourier transforms of auto-covariance and cross-covariance functions. Using this basic property, the ambiguity is resolved by applying a novel approach based on the spectral representation of partial correlation. Mathematical background for partial spectral density, partial amplitude and partial phase functions is presented. The proposed functions yield the estimates of spectral density, amplitude and phase that are not affected by a controlling process. If an input-output relation is the subject of interest, antecedent and subsequent influences of the controlling process can be distinguished considering the input event as a referent point. The method is used for analyses of the relations between the rainfall, air temperature and relative humidity, as well as the influences of air temperature and relative humidity on the discharge from karst spring. Time series are collected in the catchment of the Jadro Spring located in the Dinaric karst area of Croatia.

  15. Resonant voice: spectral and nasendoscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cara G; Finnegan, Eileen M; Karnell, Michael P

    2005-12-01

    Although resonant voice therapy is a widely used therapeutic approach, little is known about what characterizes resonant voice and how it is physiologically produced. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that resonant voice is produced by narrowing the laryngeal vestibule and is characterized by first formant tuning and more ample harmonics. Videonasendoscopic recordings of the laryngeal vestibule were made during nonresonant and resonant productions of /i/ in six subjects. Spectrums of the two voice types were also obtained. Spectral analysis showed that first formant tuning was exhibited during resonant voice productions and that the degree of harmonic enhancement in the range of 2.0 to 3.5 kHz was related to voice quality: nonresonant voice had the least amount of energy in this range, whereas a resonant-relaxed voice had more energy, and a resonant-bright voice had the greatest amount of energy. Visual-perceptual judgments of the videoendoscopic data indicated that laryngeal vestibule constriction was not consistently associated with resonant voice production. PMID:16301106

  16. Spectral analysis of noisy nonlinear maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Whitson, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    A path integral equation formalism is developed to obtain the frequency spectrum of nonlinear mappings exhibiting chaotic behavior. The one-dimensional map, x/sub n+1/ = f(x/sub n/), where f is nonlinear and n is a discrete time variable, is analyzed in detail. This map is introduced as a paradigm of systems whose exact behavior is exceedingly complex, and therefore irretrievable, but which nevertheless possess smooth, well-behaved solutions in the presence of small sources of external noise. A Boltzmann integral equation is derived for the probability distribution function p(x,n). This equation is linear and is therefore amenable to spectral analysis. The nonlinear dynamics in f(x) appear as transition probability matrix elements, and the presence of noise appears simply as an overall multiplicative scattering amplitude. This formalism is used to investigate the band structure of the logistic equation and to analyze the effects of external noise on both the invariant measure and the frequency spectrum of x/sub n/ for several values of lambda epsilon (0,1).

  17. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-21

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm(-1) resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm(-1) peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm(-1), respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm(-1) agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm(-1) and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm(-1). These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general. PMID:26801040

  18. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  19. Mass changes of microparticles in a plasma observed by a phase-resolved resonance method

    SciTech Connect

    Carstensen, Jan; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2011-03-15

    The influence of a plasma environment on melamine formaldehyde particles is studied. High-precision measurements of the vertical confinement frequency with a phase-resolved resonance method indicate that the particle mass is affected in two ways: the deposition of sputtered material at the particle leads to a mass gain, whereas the outgassing of water causes a mass loss.

  20. Mass changes of microparticles in a plasma observed by a phase-resolved resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstensen, Jan; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    The influence of a plasma environment on melamine formaldehyde particles is studied. High-precision measurements of the vertical confinement frequency with a phase-resolved resonance method indicate that the particle mass is affected in two ways: the deposition of sputtered material at the particle leads to a mass gain, whereas the outgassing of water causes a mass loss.

  1. Quantifying wave-breaking dissipation using nonlinear phase-resolved wave-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Y.; Xiao, W.; Yue, D. K. P.

    2014-12-01

    We propose to understand and quantify wave-breaking dissipation in the evolution of general irregular short-crested wave-fields using direct nonlinear phase-resolved simulations based on a High-Order Spectral (HOS) method (Dommermuth & Yue 1987). We implement a robust phenomenological-based energy dissipation model in HOS to capture the effect of wave-breaking dissipation on the overall wave-field evolution (Xiao et al 2013). The efficacy of this model is confirmed by direct comparisons against measurements for the energy loss in 2D and 3D breaking events. By comparing simulated wave-fields with and without the dissipation model in HOS, we obtain the dissipation field δ(x,y,t), which provides the times, locations and intensity of wave breaking events (δ>δc). This is validated by comparison of HOS simulations with Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM) measurements in the recent ONR Hi-Res field experiment. Figure (a) shows one frame of simulated wave-field (with dissipation model). Figure (b) is the corresponding measurement from ATM, where a large wave breaking event was captured. Figure (c) is the 3D view of the simulated wave-field with the colored region representing dissipation with δ>δc. The HOS predicted high-dissipation area is found to agree well with the measured breaking area. Based on HOS predicted high-dissipation area (δ>δc), we calculate Λ(c) (Phillips 1985), the distribution of total length of breaking wave front per unit surface area per unit increment of breaking velocity c. Figure (d) shows the distribution Λ(c) calculated from HOS. For breaking speeds c greater than 5m/s, the simulated Λ(c) is in qualitative agreement with Phillips theoretical power-law of Λ(c)~c-6. From δ(x,y,t), we further quantify wave breaking by calculating the whitecap coverage rate Wr(t) and energy dissipation rate ΔE'(t), and study the evolution of Wr and ΔE' to understand the role of wave breaking in nonlinear wave-field evolution. We obtain HOS simulations

  2. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements. PMID:23286031

  3. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  4. Spectral Analysis of Rich Network Topology in Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Leting

    2013-01-01

    Social networks have received much attention these days. Researchers have developed different methods to study the structure and characteristics of the network topology. Our focus is on spectral analysis of the adjacency matrix of the underlying network. Recent work showed good properties in the adjacency spectral space but there are few…

  5. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  6. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, A. E.

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  7. Phase-resolved surface pressure and heat-transfer measurements on the blade of a two-stage turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Haldeman, C.W. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Phase-resolved surface pressure, and unsteady pressure measurements are reported for the first-stage blade row of the Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. Measurements were made at 10, 50, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the blade. Phase-resolved and unsteady heat-flux measurements are also reported.

  8. Methods of Spectral Analysis in C++ (MOSAIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engesser, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stellar spectroscopic classification is most often still done by hand. MOSAIC is a project focused on the collection and classification of astronomical spectra using a computerized algorithm. The code itself attempts to accurately classify stellar spectra according to the broad spectral classes within the Morgan-Keenan system of spectral classification, based on estimated temperature and the relative abundances of certain notable elements (Hydrogen, Helium, etc.) in the stellar atmosphere. The methodology includes calibrating the wavelength for pixels across the image by using the wavelength dispersion of pixels inherent with the spectrograph used. It then calculates the location of the peak in the star's Planck spectrum in order to roughly classify the star. Fitting the graph to a blackbody curve is the final step for a correct classification. Future work will involve taking a closer look at emission lines and luminosity classes.

  9. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  10. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  11. Creating diversified response profiles from a single quenchometric sensor element by using phase-resolved luminescence.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Elizabeth C; Bukowski, Rachel M; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Titus, Albert H; Cartwright, Alexander N; Bright, Frank V

    2015-01-05

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions).

  12. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Tehan, Elizabeth C.; Bukowski, Rachel M.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bright, Frank V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions). PMID:25569752

  13. Spectral Analysis in High Radiation Space Backgrounds with Robust Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasche, G. P.; Coldwell, R. L.; Nobel, L. A.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis software is tested for its ability to fit spectra from space. The approach, which emphasizes the background shape function, is uniquely suited to the identification of weak-strength nuclides in high-radiation background environments.

  14. Morphological and Spectral Analysis for the Daedalia Planum Geological Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Carli, C.; Massironi, M.; Sgavetti, M.

    2010-03-01

    Our study has been focused on the Daedalia Planum geological mapping. THEMIS, MOC, HiRISE images were analyzed to perform a stratigraphic and morphological analysis. OMEGA data revealed spectral differences that permitted to improve our mapping.

  15. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  16. New approaches to the analysis of complex samples using fluorescence lifetime techniques and organized media

    SciTech Connect

    Hertz, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a highly sensitive and selective tool for the analysis of complex systems. In order to investigate the efficacy of several steady state and dynamic techniques for the analysis of complex systems, this work focuses on two types of complex, multicomponent samples: petrolatums and coal liquids. It is shown in these studies dynamic, fluorescence lifetime-based measurements provide enhanced discrimination between complex petrolatum samples. Additionally, improved quantitative analysis of multicomponent systems is demonstrated via incorporation of organized media in coal liquid samples. This research provides the first systematic studies of (1) multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dynamic fluorescence spectral fingerprinting of complex samples, and (2) the incorporation of bile salt micellar media to improve accuracy and sensitivity for characterization of complex systems. In the petroleum studies, phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is used to combine spectral and lifetime information through the measurement of phase-resolved fluorescence intensity. The intensity is collected as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths, angular modulation frequency, and detector phase angle. This multidimensional information enhances the ability to distinguish between complex samples with similar spectral characteristics. Examination of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors from factor analysis of phase-resolved and steady state excitation-emission matrices, using chemometric methods of data analysis, confirms that phase-resolved fluorescence techniques offer improved discrimination between complex samples as compared with conventional steady state methods.

  17. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system.

  18. Spectral analysis of reltivistic bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    Particles in a storage ring are oscillating in the longitudinal and transverse dimensions, and therefore, the frequency domain is natural for analyzing many beam generated signals. Information ranging from oscillation frequencies to beam phase space distributions can be extracted from the spectral content of these signals. The spectrum of a single particle is like a Green`s function, and it is the key to understanding the spectrum produced by a beam. Three separate cases are consider in an order of increasing complexity: (1) constant revolution frequency, (2) Frequency Modulation introduced by synchrotron oscillations, and (3) Amplitude Modulation introduced by betatron oscillations.

  19. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  1. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  2. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  3. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  4. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  5. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  6. Pleuropulmonary blastoma: cytogenetic and spectral karyotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Taube, Janis M; Griffin, Constance A; Yonescu, Raluca; Morsberger, Laura; Argani, Pedram; Askin, Frederic B; Batista, Denise A S

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare neoplasm of the pleuropulmonary mesenchyme. The molecular mechanisms underlying the genesis of this tumor are of particular interest as a large number of affected patients as well as their relatives have concurrent disease including additional dysplasia or neoplasia. To date, detailed karyotypes have been published on a limited number of cases. We report clinical, pathologic, and cytogenetic data in 2 cases of PPB including spectral karyotyping in 1 of them. Additionally, we conducted a review of the literature and compiled 15 published karyotypes of this tumor. Gain of chromosome 8 material was a highly prevalent finding in PPB, most times occurring as trisomy, but tetrasomy of the long arm was also frequent. Other occurring abnormalities, in order of observed frequency, included loss of 17p, loss of chromosome 10 or 10q, rearrangement of 11p, loss of chromosome X or Xp, gain of chromosomes/arms 1q, 2, and 7q, and loss of 6q and 18p. Loss of 10q has not been previously emphasized in PPB. The significance of these chromosome findings is discussed in relation to tumorigenesis. PMID:17163790

  7. Spectral Analysis of Synchronization in Mobile Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2011-09-01

    We here analyze a system consisting of agents moving in a two-dimensional space that interact with other agents if they are within a finite range. Considering the motion and the interaction of the agents, the system can be understood as a network with a time-dependent topology. Dynamically, the agents are assumed to be identical oscillators, and the system will eventually reach a state of complete synchronization. In a previous work, we have shown that two qualitatively different mechanisms leading to synchronization in such mobile networks exist, namely global synchronization and local synchronization, depending on the parameters that characterize the oscillatory dynamics and the motion of the agents [1]. In this contribution we show that the spectral pattern differs between the two synchronization mechanisms. For global synchronization the spectrum is flat, which means that all eigenmodes contribute identically. For local synchronization, instead, the synchronization dynamics is determined mostly by the eigenmodes whose eigenvalues are close to zero. This result suggests that the global synchronization mechanism achieves fast synchronization by efficiently using the fast decaying eigenmodes (larger eigenvalues).

  8. Spectral analysis of linear, shift-invariant interpolants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.; Park, Stephen K.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a spectral analysis technique to evaluate the reconstruction/interpolation performance of linear, shift-invariant interpolants is examined. The technique was utilized to measure the performance of cubic hermite, quintic hermite, exponential, cubic, spline, Nu, PCC, Keys cubic, and BAWA cubic interpolants. The performance criterion is based upon the mean square error of the difference between the sampled and reconstructed functions. The reconstruction properties, interpolation functions, and reconstruction filters for the interpolants are studied and compared. It is noted that the spectral analysis technique is applicable to reconstruction algorithms used in signal and image processes, and interpolants used in numerical analysis, computer-aided design, and computer graphics.

  9. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (DEC VAX/VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  10. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hendrix, Donald E.; Smith, Stephen F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system.

  11. Monitoring laser treatment of port wine stains using phase-resolved optical Doppler tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher E.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-04-01

    We used a novel phase-resolved optical Doppler tomographic (ODT) technique, with very high flow velocity sensitivity and high spatial resolution, to image blood flow in port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks in human skin. The variance of blood flow velocity is used to locate the PWS vessels in addition to the regular ODT images. Our device combines an ODT system and laser so that PWS blood flow can be monitored in situ before and after treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical application of ODT to provide a fast semi-quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of PWS laser therapy in situ and in real-time.

  12. Detection of arterial disorders by spectral analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2007-01-01

    This paper intends to an integrated view of the spectral analysis techniques in the detection of arterial disorders. The paper includes illustrative information about feature extraction from signals recorded from arteries. Short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and wavelet transform (WT) were used for spectral analysis of ophthalmic arterial (OA) Doppler signals. Using these spectral analysis methods, the variations in the shape of the Doppler spectra as a function of time were presented in the form of sonograms in order to obtain medical information. These sonograms were then used to compare the applied methods in terms of their frequency resolution and the effects in determination of OA stenosis. The author suggest that the content of the paper will assist to the people in gaining a better understanding of the STFT and WT in the detection of arterial disorders. PMID:17502695

  13. Spectral analysis of lunar analogue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    source. Together with taking an average over ±600 measurements per sample this leads to the best spectral signals that can be acquired with this set-up. Obtained spectra can be tested for accuracy by comparing them with stationary laboratory spectrometers such as the FTIR spectrometer. Future campaigns involving the employment of the spectrometers on the ExoGeoLab lander would prove the applicability of the equipment in the field.

  14. Enveloping Spectral Surfaces: Covariate Dependent Spectral Analysis of Categorical Time Series.

    PubMed

    Krafty, Robert T; Xiong, Shuangyan; Stoffer, David S; Buysse, Daniel J; Hall, Martica

    2012-09-01

    Motivated by problems in Sleep Medicine and Circadian Biology, we present a method for the analysis of cross-sectional categorical time series collected from multiple subjects where the effect of static continuous-valued covariates is of interest. Toward this goal, we extend the spectral envelope methodology for the frequency domain analysis of a single categorical process to cross-sectional categorical processes that are possibly covariate dependent. The analysis introduces an enveloping spectral surface for describing the association between the frequency domain properties of qualitative time series and covariates. The resulting surface offers an intuitively interpretable measure of association between covariates and a qualitative time series by finding the maximum possible conditional power at a given frequency from scalings of the qualitative time series conditional on the covariates. The optimal scalings that maximize the power provide scientific insight by identifying the aspects of the qualitative series which have the most pronounced periodic features at a given frequency conditional on the value of the covariates. To facilitate the assessment of the dependence of the enveloping spectral surface on the covariates, we include a theory for analyzing the partial derivatives of the surface. Our approach is entirely nonparametric, and we present estimation and asymptotics in the setting of local polynomial smoothing.

  15. Progress in Advanced Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Flory, Adam E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Suckow, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    Improvements to a Java based software package developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for display and analysis of radioxenon spectra acquired by the International Monitoring System (IMS) are described here. The current version of the Radioxenon JavaViewer implements the region of interest (ROI) method for analysis of beta-gamma coincidence data. Upgrades to the Radioxenon JavaViewer will include routines to analyze high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) data, Standard Spectrum Method to analyze beta-gamma coincidence data and calibration routines to characterize beta-gamma coincidence detectors. These upgrades are currently under development; the status and initial results will be presented. Implementation of these routines into the JavaViewer and subsequent release is planned for FY 2011-2012.

  16. Detailed spectral analysis of decellularized skin implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Dolgushkin, D. A.; Shalkovsky, P. Y.; Pershutkina, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The resutls of detailed analysis of donor skin implants using Raman spectroscopy method are presented. Fourier-deconvolution method was used to separate overlapping spectrum lines and to improve its informativeness. Based on the processed spectra were introduced coefficients that represent changes in relative concentration of implant components, which determines the quality of implants. It was established that Raman spectroscopy method can be used in assessment of skin implants.

  17. Spectral fatigue analysis of shallow water jacket platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, N.W.M.; Feng, Q.; Schofield, P.; Kirkwood, M.G.; Turner, T.

    1995-12-31

    The spectral analysis approach is a very elegant and computationally efficient method of analyzing the fatigue life of offshore jacket platforms. The primary limitation of the approach is that it assumes linearity of both the structural system and the wave loading mechanism. The approach is now widely used for the analysis of deepwater, dynamically responsive platforms where non-linearities are usually not serious. The new approach provides a better method for choosing the appropriate height of each so called base wave case. This paper presents the results obtained using this new approach, as well as comparative results obtained using the deterministic, spectral and time domain approaches applied with a representative sea state. The results show that the deterministic-spectral method has a considerable amount of potential, especially for new design work where weight savings and/or increased confidence levels may be achieved.

  18. On the Application of Hilbert Spectral Analysis for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Hilbert spectral analysis (Huang et al, 1998, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, A 454, pp 903-995) consisted of two steps: First, the data has to be reduced into a finite number of Intrinsic Mode Function by the Empirical Mode Decomposition method, then the resulting Intrinsic Mode Functions are converted to time-frequency-energy distribution through Hilbert transform. In this approach, the Empirical Mode Functions served as the basis functions with which the data is expanded. This basis function is adaptive, and the decomposition is nonlinear. Furthermore, as the Hilbert transform is a singular transform, it retains a high degree of local information. The instantaneous frequency is determined by differentiation of the phase function; therefore, there is no restriction of the 'uncertainty principle' for all the time-frequency analysis resulting from a priori basis approach. With the adaptive basis and the instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert Spectral analysis can represent data from nonlinear and nonstationary processes without resorting to the harmonics. Another advantage of using instantaneous frequency is the ability to find out frequency from limited length of data, which is a critical problem in climate studies. As the processes driving the climate changes could be both nonlinear and nonstationary, the Hilbert Spectral Analysis could be of great use in examining the underlying mechanisms. A preliminary study based on the length of day data will be presented as example for the application of the Hilbert Spectral Analysis for climate study.

  19. Spectral Synthesis via Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning; Su, Shan-Shan; Kong, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We apply a new statistical analysis technique, the Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis (MF-ICA) in a Bayseian framework, to galaxy spectral analysis. This algorithm can compress a stellar spectral library into a few Independent Components (ICs), and the galaxy spectrum can be reconstructed by these ICs. Compared to other algorithms which decompose a galaxy spectrum into a combination of several simple stellar populations, the MF-ICA approach offers a large improvement in efficiency. To check the reliability of this spectral analysis method, three different methods are used: (1) parameter recovery for simulated galaxies, (2) comparison with parameters estimated by other methods, and (3) consistency test of parameters derived with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that our MF-ICA method can not only fit the observed galaxy spectra efficiently, but can also accurately recover the physical parameters of galaxies. We also apply our spectral analysis method to the DEEP2 spectroscopic data, and find it can provide excellent fitting results for low signal-to-noise spectra.

  20. Spectral analysis of the Elatina series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    1988-01-01

    The Elatina formation in South Australia, which provides a rich fossil record of presumptive solar activity in the late Precambrian, is of great potential significance for the physics of the sun because it contains luminae grouped in cycles of about 12, an appearance suggestive of the solar cycle. Here, the laminae are treated as varves laid down yearly and modulated in thickness in accordance with the late Precambrian sunspot activity for the year of deposition. The purpose is to present a simple structure, or intrinsic spectrum, that will be uncovered by appropriate data analysis.

  1. Spectral analysis of the Elatina varve series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    1988-01-01

    The Elatina formation in South America, which provides a rich fossil record of presumptive solar activity in the late Precambrian, is of great potential significance for the physics of the sun because it contains luminae grouped in cycles of about 12, an appearance suggestive of the solar cycle. Here, the laminae are treated as varves laid down yearly and modulated in thickness in accordance with the late Precambrian sunspot activity for the year of deposition. The purpose is to present a simple structure, or intrinsic spectrum, that will be uncovered by appropriate data analysis.

  2. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax.

  3. Spectral Analysis of a Protein Conformational Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovsky, S.

    2011-06-01

    The existence of conformational switching in proteins, induced by single amino acid mutations, presents an important challenge to our understanding of the physics of protein folding. Sequence-local methods, commonly used to detect structural homology, are incapable of accounting for this phenomenon. We examine a set of proteins, derived from the GA and GB domains of Streptococcus protein G, which are known to show a dramatic conformational change as a result of single-residue replacement. It is shown that these sequences, which are almost identical locally, can have very different global patterns of physical properties. These differences are consistent with the observed complete change in conformation. These results suggest that sequence-local methods for identifying structural homology can be misleading. They point to the importance of global sequence analysis in understanding sequence-structure relationships.

  4. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  5. The Use of Spectral Analysis To Validate Planning Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, James A.

    1974-01-01

    Statistical fit of model predictions to empirical evidence is found to be an insufficient condition for establishing the validity of a planning model where the dynamic behavior is of particular importance. Describes a spectral analysis statistical test that can be used to validate the structure of a planning model by comparing the time series…

  6. Periodicity in Academic Library Circulation: A Spectral Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, William E.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of the cyclic nature of library use focuses on the use of spectral analysis to identify periods in library circulation series and pickup for shelving at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The theoretical context of time and frequency domains is presented. (Author/LRW)

  7. Empirical Mode Decomposition and Hilbert Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.

    1998-01-01

    The difficult facing data analysis is the lack of method to handle nonlinear and nonstationary time series. Traditional Fourier-based analyses simply could not be applied here. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data. This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous energy and frequency as functions of time that give sharp identifications of imbedded structures. The final presentation of the results is an energy-frequency-time distribution, designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. Among the main conceptual innovations is the introduction of the instantaneous frequencies for complicated data sets, which eliminate the need of spurious harmonics to represent nonlinear and nonstationary signals. Examples from the numerical results of the classical nonlinear equation systems and data representing natural phenomena are given to demonstrate the power of this new method. The classical nonlinear system data are especially interesting, for they serve to illustrate the roles played by the nonlinear and nonstationary effects in the energy-frequency-time distribution.

  8. Monitoring sedation levels by EEG spectral analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, M. J.; Preece, A. W.; Green, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time electroencephalographic power spectra were obtained for a group of 37 volunteers undergoing sedation with enflurane at different concentrations in air. In part one, 17 subjects were given 0.5%, 0.75%, and 1.0% for 4 min at each level, and recovery after 5 min was assessed by the Trieger method. There was considerable variation in subject response to the different doses, but adequate sedation was indicated by the presence of a strong alpha rhythm (9-11 Hz) and suppression of frequencies below 5 Hz. Overdose was indicated by an initial shift in the alpha frequency to a lower value (6-7 Hz) followed by the appearance of delta waves (0.5-4 Hz) and loss of alpha waves. In part two, 20 volunteers inhaled enflurane at 0.5% for 10 min to allow adequate absorption, followed by a 10-min recovery period. Equal numbers showed sedation or a failure to respond to enflurane at this concentration. In the responders, sedation was accompanied by a marked shift in the ratio of the power in two frequency bands: 1-4 Hz and 8-12 Hz. Progress of the frequency band power ratio followed closely the state of the subject into sedation, overdose, and recovery. This measure was further improved by the use of multivariate analysis, which showed good discrimination of the alert, sedated, and overdosed states of the subject. PMID:1842161

  9. Superconducting integrated terahertz receiver for spectral analysis of gas compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Filippenko, L. V.; Kalashnikov, K. V.; Kiselev, O. S.; Vaks, V. L.; Domracheva, E. G.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    A new highly sensitive device for analysis of gas compounds in terahertz frequency range based on the superconducting integrated receiver is being developed. Such receiver for spectral research of Earth atmosphere from balloon-borne instrument was developed earlier in Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and successfully operated during several flight missions. In this work, the laboratory setup for gas spectroscopy in the range of 450-700 GHz with the noise temperature below 150 K and spectral resolution better than 0.5 MHz is presented. First results of measurements of NH3 and H2O absorption spectra are obtained.

  10. Spectral characteristics analysis of red tide water in mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tingwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hongliang; Ma, Yi; Gao, Xuemin

    2003-05-01

    Mesocosm ecosystem experiment with seawater enclosed of the red tide was carried out from July to September 2001. We got four species of biology whose quantities of bion are dominant in the red tide. During the whole process from the beginning to their dying out for every specie, in situ spectral measurements were carried out. After data processing, characteristic spectra of red tide of different dominant species are got. Via comparison and analysis of characteristics of different spectra, we find that in the band region between 685 and 735 nanometers, spectral characteristics of red tide is apparently different from that of normal water. Compared to spectra of normal water, spectra of red tide have a strong reflectance peak in the above band region. As to spectra of red tide dominated by different species, the situations of reflectance peaks are also different: the second peak of Mesodinium rubrum spectrum lies between 726~732 nm, which is more than 21nm away from the other dominant species spectra"s Leptocylindrus danicus"s second spectral peak covers 686~694nm; that of Skeletonema costatum lies between 691~693 nm. Chattonella marina"s second spectral peak lies about 703~705 nm. Thus we can try to determine whether red tide has occurred according to its spectral data. In order to monitor the event of red tide and identify the dominant species by the application of the technology of hyperspectral remote sensing, acquiring spectral data of different dominant species of red tide as much as possible becomes a basic work to be achieved for spectral matching, information extraction and so on based on hyperspectral data.

  11. Time frequency analysis of Jovian and Saturnian radio spectral patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Al-Haddad, Emad; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Prominent radio spectral patterns were observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment (RPWS) principally at Jupiter and Saturn. The spectral shapes are displayed in the usual dynamic spectra showing the flux density versus the time and the frequency. Those patterns exhibit well-organized shapes in the time-frequency plane connected with the rotation of the planet. We consider in this analysis the auroral emissions which occurred in the frequency range between 10 kHz and approximately 3 MHz. It concerns the Jovian hectometric emission (HOM) and the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). We show in the case of Jupiter's HOM that the spectral patterns are well-arranged arc structures with curvatures depending on the Jovian rotation. Regarding the SKR emission, the spectral shapes exhibit generally complex patterns, and only sometimes arc structures are observed. We emphasize the curve alterations from vertex-early to vertex-late arcs (and vice versa) and we study their dependences, or not, on the planetary rotations. We also discuss the common physical process at the origin of the HOM and SKR emissions, specifically the spectral patterns created by the interaction between planetary satellites (e.g. Io or Dione) and the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres.

  12. Measurement of electron density with the phase-resolved cut-off probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, Y. H.

    2011-07-15

    The phase resolved cut-off probe method, a precise measurement method for the electron density, was recently proposed [J. H. Kwon et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 081502 (2010)]. This paper presents the measurements of electron density using the method under various experimental conditions (different pressures, powers, chamber volumes, and discharge sources). The result shows that the method is not only in good agreement with the previous method using wave transmittance under various experimental conditions but it is also able to find the cut-off point clearly even under difficult conditions such as high pressure ({approx} 1 Torr), high discharge power, and small plasma volume. The details of the experimental setup, the operating mechanism of the probe method, and the data processing procedure (algorithm) are also addressed. Furthermore, the reliability of the measurement method is investigated by using an electromagnetic field simulation with cold plasma model (CST-Drude model, Computer Simulation Technology).

  13. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  14. Spectral analysis of wave propagation in connected waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gopalakrishnan

    1992-01-01

    The spectral element method combined with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a powerful and versatile tool for analysis of wave propagation problems in connected structures. They are formulated entirely in the frequency domain and use matrix assembly procedures analogous to the finite element method. This thesis extends the approach to connected structures involving non-uniformities and discontinuities. To handle situations involving deep waveguides, spectral elements are formulated based on the higher order waveguide theories of Timoshenko beam and Mindlin-Herrmann rod. Approximate tapered elements (derived using a frequency domain Ritz method) are formulated to handle situations involving member cross-section variations. For waveguides with embedded discontinuities like cracks and holes, the irregular behavior near the discontinuity is isolated by performing Local/Global analysis via the super spectral element concept. Efficient computation of the super element stiffness is the key to the success of the method and it is addressed directly. The formulated element is verified by comparison with the conventional finite element solution. Some interesting problems involving joints, cracks and holes are solved. One of the distinct advantages of the spectral approach is the capability to perform inverse problems. The concept is demonstrated with some illustrative examples involving multiple boundaries.

  15. Species Discrimination of Mangroves using Derivative Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Arun; Gnanappazham, L.

    2014-11-01

    Mangroves are salt tolerant trees or shrubs commonly seen in mudflats of intertidal regions of tropical and subtropical coastlines. Recent advances in field spectroscopic techniques enabled the species level discrimination among closely related vegetation types. In this study we have analysed the laboratory spectroscopy data collected from eight species of Rhizophoraceaea family of mangroves. The spectral data ranges between the wavelength of 350 nm and 2500 nm at a very narrow bandwidth of 1 nm. Preprocessing techniques including smoothing were done on the spectra to remove the noise before compiling it to a spectral library. Derivative analysis of the spectra was done and its corresponding first and second derivatives were obtained. Statistical analysis such as parametric and non-parametric tests were implemented on the original processed spectra as well as their respective first and second order derivatives for the identification of significant bands for species discrimination. Results have shown that red edge region (680 nm - 720 nm) and water vapour absorption region around 1150 nm and 1400 nm are optimal as they were consistent in discriminating species in reflectance spectra as well as in its first and second derivative spectra. C. decandra species is found to be discriminable from other species while reflectance and its derivative spectra were used. Non-parametric statistical analysis gave better results than that of parametric statistical analysis especially in SWIR 2 spectral region (1831 nm - 2500 nm).

  16. CHANDRA PHASE-RESOLVED X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Becker, Werner

    2011-12-20

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 {+-} 0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} (4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find {tau}{sub scat} = 0.147 {+-} 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum-albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat

  17. Chandra Phase-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2011-12-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 ± 0.28) × 10-4 (4.9 × 10-4 is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find τscat = 0.147 ± 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum—albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat-blanketing envelope. The observations allow the pulsar

  18. Raman spectral data denoising based on wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Peng, Fei; Cheng, Qinghua; Xu, Dahai

    2008-12-01

    Abstract As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy (RS) is characterized by the frequency excursion that can show the information of molecule. RS has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial fields. But signals in Raman spectral analysis often have noise, which greatly influences the achievement of accurate analytical results. The de-noising of RS signals is an important part of spectral analysis. Wavelet transform has been established with the Fourier transform as a data-processing method in analytical fields. The main fields of application are related to de-noising, compression, variable reduction, and signal suppression. In de-noising of Raman Spectroscopy, wavelet is chosen to construct de-noising function because of its excellent properties. In this paper, bior wavelet is adopted to remove the noise in the Raman spectra. It eliminates noise obviously and the result is satisfying. This method can provide some bases for practical de-noising in Raman spectra.

  19. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  20. Spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia - A measure of mental effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Craig Thornton, D.; Moray, Neville

    1987-01-01

    The validity of the spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia as a measure of mental effort was investigated using a computer simulation of a hovercraft piloted along a river as the experimental task. Strong correlation was observed between the subjective effort-ratings and the heart-rate variability (HRV) power spectrum between 0.06 and 0.14 Hz. Significant correlations were observed not only between subjects but, more importantly, within subjects as well, indicating that the spectral analysis of HRV is an accurate measure of the amount of effort being invested by a subject. Results also indicate that the intensity of effort invested by subjects cannot be inferred from the objective ratings of task difficulty or from performance.

  1. Investigation of Periodic Nuclear Decay Data with Spectral Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P.; Buncher, J.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, T.; Hoft, A.; Horan, T.; Jenkins, J.; Kerford, J.; Lee, R.; Mattes, J.; Morris, D.; Mudry, R.; Newport, J.; Petrelli, M.; Silver, M.; Stewart, C.; Terry, B.; Willenberg, H.

    2009-12-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay experiments displaying unexplained periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data was from 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston, 32Si decay reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt in Germany. All three data sets possess the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additionally a spectral comparison of the local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and the plasma speed and latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was performed. Following analysis of these six possible causal factors, their reciprocals, and their linear combinations, a possible link between nuclear decay rate fluctuations and the linear combination of the HCS latitude and 1/R motivates searching for a possible mechanism with such properties.

  2. New fast spectral analysis method for solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'Kov, M. V.; Burakov, V. S.; Kiris, V. V.; Raikov, S. N.

    2007-05-01

    We propose a new fast method for direct spectral analysis of solid materials based on laser ablation of the sample in deionized water and real-time transport of the aqueous suspension of nanoparticles into the inductively coupled plasma of an emission spectrometer. As a result, we have all the instrumental and methodological advantages of standard equipment, along with calibration of the spectrometer using standard aqueous solutions.

  3. Spectral fatigue analysis of shallow water jacket platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, N.W.M.; Feng, Q.; Schofield, P.; Kirkwood, M.G.; Turner, T.

    1996-08-01

    The spectral analysis approach is a very elegant and computationally efficient method of analyzing the fatigue life of offshore jacket platforms. The primary limitation of the approach is that it assumes linearity of both the structural system and the wave-loading mechanism. The approach is now widely used for the analysis of deepwater, dynamically responsive platforms where nonlinearities are usually not serious. There are also advantages associated with using the approach for shallow water platforms although nonlinearities then become significant, particularly the wave-loading mechanism. In order to verify the new approach, a time series analysis, including wave-loading nonlinearities, has been adopted to obtain a reference fatigue life. The sea surface elevation spectrum has been decomposed into a set of equivalent harmonic components. The water particle velocities and accelerations were then individually evaluated and the appropriate (Morison`s) wave loading was computed for each time step in the sea surface time history. The structural stress response time history was then calculated, from which a fatigue life estimate was obtained. This paper presents the results obtained using this new approach, as well as comparative results obtained using the deterministic, spectral, and time domain approaches applied with a representative sea state. The results show that the deterministic-spectral method has a considerable amount of potential, especially for new design work where weight savings and/or increased confidence levels may be achieved.

  4. Spectral analysis and modeling of solar flares chromospheric condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Gianna; Graham, David; Kowalski, Adam; Zangrilli, Luca; Simoes, Paulo; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-05-01

    We follow up on our recent analysis of the X1.1 flare SOL2014-09-10T17:45, where we studied the impulsive phase dynamics of tens of individual flaring "kernels", in both coronal (Fe XXI) and chromospheric (MgII) lines observed at high cadence with IRIS.We concentrate here on the chromospheric aspect of the phenomenon, extending the analysis to multiple spectral lines of Mg II, Fe II, Si I, C II. We show that many flaring kernels display high velocity downflows in the spectra of all these chromospheric lines, exhibiting distinct, transient and strongly redshifted spectral components.From modeling using RADYN with the thick-target interpretation, the presence of two spectral components appears to be consistent with a high flux beam of accelerated electrons, characterized by a hard spectrum. In particular the highest energy electrons heat the denser, lower layers of the atmosphere, while the bulk of the beam energy, deposited higher in the atmosphere, is sufficient to produce chromospheric evaporation with a corresponding condensation.

  5. Investigation of spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that velocimetry (LV) generates individual realization velocity data that are randomly or unevenly sampled in time. Spectral analysis of such data to obtain the turbulence spectra, and hence turbulence scales information, requires special techniques. The 'slotting' technique of Mayo et al, also described by Roberts and Ajmani, and the 'Direct Transform' method of Gaster and Roberts are well known in the LV community. The slotting technique is faster than the direct transform method in computation. There are practical limitations, however, as to how a high frequency and accurate estimate can be made for a given mean sampling rate. These high frequency estimates are important in obtaining the microscale information of turbulence structure. It was found from previous studies that reliable spectral estimates can be made up to about the mean sampling frequency (mean data rate) or less. If the data were evenly samples, the frequency range would be half the sampling frequency (i.e. up to Nyquist frequency); otherwise, aliasing problem would occur. The mean data rate and the sample size (total number of points) basically limit the frequency range. Also, there are large variabilities or errors associated with the high frequency estimates from randomly sampled signals. Roberts and Ajmani proposed certain pre-filtering techniques to reduce these variabilities, but at the cost of low frequency estimates. The prefiltering acts as a high-pass filter. Further, Shapiro and Silverman showed theoretically that, for Poisson sampled signals, it is possible to obtain alias-free spectral estimates far beyond the mean sampling frequency. But the question is, how far? During his tenure under 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, the author investigated from his studies on the spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled signals that the spectral estimates can be enhanced or improved up to about 4-5 times the mean sampling frequency by using a suitable

  6. Spectral analysis of SMC X-2 during its 2015 outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Palombara, N.; Sidoli, L.; Pintore, F.; Esposito, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Tiengo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the results of XMM-Newton and Swift observations of SMC X-2 during its last outburst in 2015 October, the first one since 2000. The source reached a very high luminosity (L ˜ 1038 erg s-1), which allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of its timing and spectral properties. We obtained a pulse period Pspin = 2.372267(5) s and a characterization of the pulse profile also at low energies. The main spectral component is a hard (Γ ≃ 0) power-law model with an exponential cut-off, but at low energies we detected also a soft (with kT ≃ 0.15 keV) thermal component. Several emission lines are present in the spectrum. Their identification with the transition lines of highly ionized N, O, Ne, Si, and Fe suggests the presence of photoionized matter around the accreting source.

  7. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  8. Comparison of multivariate calibration methods for quantitative spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.V.; Haaland, D.M. )

    1990-05-15

    The quantitative prediction abilities of four multivariate calibration methods for spectral analyses are compared by using extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The calibration methods compared include inverse least-squares (ILS), classical least-squares (CLS), partial least-squares (PLS), and principal component regression (PCR) methods. ILS is a frequency-limited method while the latter three are capable of full-spectrum calibration. The simulations were performed assuming Beer's law holds and that spectral measurement errors and concentration errors associated with the reference method are normally distributed. Eight different factors that could affect the relative performance of the calibration methods were varied in a two-level, eight-factor experimental design in order to evaluate their effect on the prediction abilities of the four methods. It is found that each of the three full-spectrum methods has its range of superior performance. The frequency-limited ILS method was never the best method, although in the presence of relatively large concentration errors it sometimes yields comparable analysis precision to the full-spectrum methods for the major spectral component. The importance of each factor in the absolute and relative performances of the four methods is compared.

  9. Coefficient of variation spectral analysis: An application to underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herstein, P. D.; Laplante, R. F.

    1983-05-01

    Acoustic noise in the ocean is often described in terms of its power spectral density. Just as in other media, this noise consists of both narrowband and broadband frequency components. A major problem in the analysis of power spectral density measurements is distinguishing between narrowband spectral components of interest and contaminating narrowband components. In this paper, the use of coefficient of variation (Cv) spectrum is examined as an adjunct to the conventional power spectrum to distinguish narrowband components of interest from contaminating components. The theory of the Cv is presented. Coefficients for several classical input distributions are developed. It is shown that Cv spectra can be easily implemented as an adjunct procedure during the computation of the ensemble of averaged power spectra. Power and Cv spectra derived from actual at-sea sonobuoy measurements of deep ocean ambient noise separate narrowband components from narrowband lines of interest in the ensemble of averaged power spectra, these acoustic components of interest can be distinguished in the Cv spectra.

  10. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevin, G.O.

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  11. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes.

    PubMed

    Stevin, G O

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  12. Monitoring Urban Greenness Dynamics Using Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Muye; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Xinyu; Hong, Yang; Wang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Urban greenness is increasingly recognized as an essential constituent of the urban environment and can provide a range of services and enhance residents’ quality of life. Understanding the pattern of urban greenness and exploring its spatiotemporal dynamics would contribute valuable information for urban planning. In this paper, we investigated the pattern of urban greenness in Hangzhou, China, over the past two decades using time series Landsat-5 TM data obtained in 1990, 2002, and 2010. Multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was used to derive vegetation cover fractions at the subpixel level. An RGB-vegetation fraction model, change intensity analysis and the concentric technique were integrated to reveal the detailed, spatial characteristics and the overall pattern of change in the vegetation cover fraction. Our results demonstrated the ability of multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis to accurately model the vegetation cover fraction in pixels despite the complex spectral confusion of different land cover types. The integration of multiple techniques revealed various changing patterns in urban greenness in this region. The overall vegetation cover has exhibited a drastic decrease over the past two decades, while no significant change occurred in the scenic spots that were studied. Meanwhile, a remarkable recovery of greenness was observed in the existing urban area. The increasing coverage of small green patches has played a vital role in the recovery of urban greenness. These changing patterns were more obvious during the period from 2002 to 2010 than from 1990 to 2002, and they revealed the combined effects of rapid urbanization and greening policies. This work demonstrates the usefulness of time series of vegetation cover fractions for conducting accurate and in-depth studies of the long-term trajectories of urban greenness to obtain meaningful information for sustainable urban development. PMID:25375176

  13. Spectral analysis of the Forbush decrease of 13 July 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vainikka, E.; Torsti, J. J.; Valtonen, E.; Lumme, M.; Nieminen, M.; Peltonen, J.; Arvela, H.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum entropy method has been applied in the spectral analysis of high-energy cosmic-ray intensity during the large Forbush event of July 13, 1982. An oscillation with period of about 2 hours and amplitude of 1 to 3% was found to be present during the decrease phase. This oscillation can be related to a similar periodicity in the magnetospheric field. However, the variation was not observed at all neutron monitor stations. In the beginning of the recovery phase, the intensity oscillated with a period of about 10 hours and amplitude of 3%.

  14. Incorporating Endmember Variability into Spectral Mixture Analysis Through Endmember Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.; Wessman, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in canopy structure and biochemistry induces a concomitant variation in the top-of-canopy spectral reflectance of a vegetation type. Hence, the use of a single endmember spectrum to track the fractional abundance of a given vegetation cover in a hyperspectral image may result in fractions with considerable error. One solution to the problem of endmember variability is to increase the number of endmembers used in a spectral mixture analysis of the image. For example, there could be several tree endmembers in the analysis because of differences in leaf area index (LAI) and multiple scatterings between leaves and stems. However, it is often difficult in terms of computer or human interaction time to select more than six or seven endmembers and any non-removable noise, as well as the number of uncorrelated bands in the image, limits the number of endmembers that can be discriminated. Moreover, as endmembers proliferate, their interpretation becomes increasingly difficult and often applications simply need the aerial fractions of a few land cover components which comprise most of the scene. In order to incorporate endmember variability into spectral mixture analysis, we propose representing a landscape component type not with one endmember spectrum but with a set or bundle of spectra, each of which is feasible as the spectrum of an instance of the component (e.g., in the case of a tree component, each spectrum could reasonably be the spectral reflectance of a tree canopy). These endmember bundles can be used with nonlinear optimization algorithms to find upper and lower bounds on endmember fractions. This approach to endmember variability naturally evolved from previous work in deriving endmembers from the data itself by fitting a triangle, tetrahedron or, more generally, a simplex to the data cloud reduced in dimension by a principal component analysis. Conceptually, endmember variability could make it difficult to find a simplex that both surrounds the data

  15. Autoregressive modeling for the spectral analysis of oceanographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Cornillon, Peter; Jackson, Leland B.

    1989-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number and volume of data sets useful for oceanographic studies. Many of these data sets consist of long temporal or spatial series derived from satellites and large-scale oceanographic experiments. These data sets are, however, often 'gappy' in space, irregular in time, and always of finite length. The conventional Fourier transform (FT) approach to the spectral analysis is thus often inapplicable, or where applicable, it provides questionable results. Here, through comparative analysis with the FT for different oceanographic data sets, the possibilities offered by autoregressive (AR) modeling to perform spectral analysis of gappy, finite-length series, are discussed. The applications demonstrate that as the length of the time series becomes shorter, the resolving power of the AR approach as compared with that of the FT improves. For the longest data sets examined here, 98 points, the AR method performed only slightly better than the FT, but for the very short ones, 17 points, the AR method showed a dramatic improvement over the FT. The application of the AR method to a gappy time series, although a secondary concern of this manuscript, further underlines the value of this approach.

  16. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  17. Linear and circular digital spectral analysis of serial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods of digital spectral analysis of unevenly sampled data are developed and illustrated here. One method uses a linear function of time (or space), the other uses circular functions. The circular method turns out to be essentially equivalent to a least-squares sine-wave analysis. The linear, anharmonic method uses only the field of real numbers and elementary algebraic operations, and hence it can be made computationally very fast and accurate. Both methods are very general, properly handling all kinds of time series ranging from simple series consisting only of the times of events to complicated series consisting of pulses with long duty cycles. The two methods are here applied to the analysis of annual mean relative sunspot numbers.

  18. Dictionary-Driven Ischemia Detection From Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP-BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson's r=0.84) with respect to infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP-BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique.

  19. Efficient geometric rectification techniques for spectral analysis algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Pang, S. S.; Curlander, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral analysis algorithm is a viable technique for processing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in near real time throughput rates by trading the image resolution. One major challenge of the spectral analysis algorithm is that the output image, often referred to as the range-Doppler image, is represented in the iso-range and iso-Doppler lines, a curved grid format. This phenomenon is known to be the fanshape effect. Therefore, resampling is required to convert the range-Doppler image into a rectangular grid format before the individual images can be overlaid together to form seamless multi-look strip imagery. An efficient algorithm for geometric rectification of the range-Doppler image is presented. The proposed algorithm, realized in two one-dimensional resampling steps, takes into consideration the fanshape phenomenon of the range-Doppler image as well as the high squint angle and updates of the cross-track and along-track Doppler parameters. No ground reference points are required.

  20. MAC to VAX Connectivity: Heartrate Spectral Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Hasan H.; Faruque, Monazer

    1993-01-01

    The heart rate Spectral Analysis System (SAS) acquires and analyzes, in real-time, the Space Shuttle onboard electrocardiograph (EKG) experiment signals, calculates the heartrate, and applies a Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) to the heart rate. The system also calculates other statistical parameters such as the 'mean heart rate' over specific time period and heart rate histogram. This SAS is used by NASA Principal Investigators as a research tool to determine the effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular system. This is also used to determine if Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) is an effective countermeasure to the orthostatic intolerance experienced by astronauts upon return to normal gravity. In microgravity, astronauts perform the LBNP experiment in the mid deck of the Space Shuttle. The experiment data are downlinked by the orbiter telemetry system, then processed and analyzed in real-time by the integrated Life Sciences Data Acquisition (LSDS) - Spectral Analysis System. The data system is integrated within the framework of two different computer systems, VAX and Macintosh (Mac), using the networking infrastructure to assist the investigators in further understanding the most complex machine on Earth--the human body.

  1. Groupwise shape analysis of the hippocampus using spectral matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Lombaert, Hervé; Lippé, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    The hippocampus is a prominent subcortical feature of interest in many neuroscience studies. Its subtle morphological changes often predicate illnesses, including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or epilepsy. The precise location of structural differences requires a reliable correspondence between shapes across a population. In this paper, we propose an automated method for groupwise hippocampal shape analysis based on a spectral decomposition of a group of shapes to solve the correspondence problem between sets of meshes. The framework generates diffeomorphic correspondence maps across a population, which enables us to create a mean shape. Morphological changes are then located between two groups of subjects. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on a dataset of 42 hippocampus shapes and compared with a state-of-the-art structural shape analysis approach, using spherical harmonics. Difference maps between mean shapes of two test groups demonstrates that the two approaches showed results with insignificant differences, while Gaussian curvature measures calculated between matched vertices showed a better fit and reduced variability with spectral matching.

  2. Open-box spectral clustering: applications to medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Thomas; Kindlmann, Gordon L

    2013-12-01

    Spectral clustering is a powerful and versatile technique, whose broad range of applications includes 3D image analysis. However, its practical use often involves a tedious and time-consuming process of tuning parameters and making application-specific choices. In the absence of training data with labeled clusters, help from a human analyst is required to decide the number of clusters, to determine whether hierarchical clustering is needed, and to define the appropriate distance measures, parameters of the underlying graph, and type of graph Laplacian. We propose to simplify this process via an open-box approach, in which an interactive system visualizes the involved mathematical quantities, suggests parameter values, and provides immediate feedback to support the required decisions. Our framework focuses on applications in 3D image analysis, and links the abstract high-dimensional feature space used in spectral clustering to the three-dimensional data space. This provides a better understanding of the technique, and helps the analyst predict how well specific parameter settings will generalize to similar tasks. In addition, our system supports filtering outliers and labeling the final clusters in such a way that user actions can be recorded and transferred to different data in which the same structures are to be found. Our system supports a wide range of inputs, including triangular meshes, regular grids, and point clouds. We use our system to develop segmentation protocols in chest CT and brain MRI that are then successfully applied to other datasets in an automated manner.

  3. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  4. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-05-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  5. EXSAA: Environmentally-Induced X-ray Spectral Analysis Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, F. W.; Clark, P. E.; Rilee, M. L.; Truszkowski, W.

    2005-05-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is one of the principal means of compositional analysis in the lab and in the field: it will be a central tool in NASA's Exploration Initiative (EI) missions. No currently available XRF software has the generic functionality to provide the basis for XRF experiment design, instrument development, and data interpretation for the suite of prospective EI missions. In response to this need, we have developed EXSAA (Environmentally-induced X-ray Spectral Analysis Automation), a generic, fast, interactive spectral simulation tool which can be used in assessing broadband continuous spectra being generated and detected during reconnaissance missions and field campaigns involving planetary surfaces. The software produces model spectra of detectable environmentally-induced X-ray spectra from fundamental principles for target characteristics and conditions likely to be experienced in remote or in situ planetary missions. Fluorescence is modeled following Jenkins and DeVries (1967); coherent and Compton scattering following Hubbell (1969). The modeling provided is extensible, and a user interface provides for selection of source, detector characteristics, compositional components, and geometry for known targets. An immediate application of the tool is the prediction for mission planning purposes of X-ray flux to be expected for a range of targets and instrumentation. A longer-term application is the model basis for the recovery of surface composition from actual missions, where some parameters (e.g. source flux) will be known, and others obtained from a Bayesian analysis of the observations. Ultimately, EXSAA could function as part of the agent-based SAA Toolkit being developed by a group of physical scientists, systems engineers, and AI practitioners to automate portions of the spectral analysis process. EXSAA could be called on by human or machine agents to provide an understanding of XRF phenomena for tasks including specifically (1

  6. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the High-Magnetic-Field Pulsar B1509-58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Ng, Chi-Yung

    2016-04-01

    We report on timing and spectral analysis of the young, high-magnetic-field pulsar B1509-58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The on-pulsed X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 1.16(2), which is flatter than those determined with RXTE/PCA and NuSTAR. This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra, we clearly identified off-pulsed X-ray emission from the pulsar. The spectrum is best fitted by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ~0.14 keV, which is similar to those of other young and high-magnetic-field pulsars, and lies between those of magnetars and typical rotational-powered pulsars. For the non-thermal emission of PSR B1509-58, we found that the power law component of the off-pulsed emission is significantly steeper than that of the on-pulsed one. We further divided the data into 24 phase bins and found that the photon index varies between 1.0 and 2.0 and anti-correlating with the flux. A similar correlation was also found in the Crab Pulsar, and this requires further theoretical interpretations. This work is supported by a GRF grant of Hong Kong Government under 17300215.

  7. The frustrated total reflection filter. 1. Spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergstein, L; Shulman, C

    1966-01-01

    The method of modal expansion is used to develop a theory for the analysis of frustrated total reflection (FTR) filters or similar layered systems of finite lateral extent. The theory is applied to determine the (spectral) transmission properties of the FTR filter of finite lateral extent (for an incident plane wave propagating in direction of maximum transmission). It is found that the finiteness of the lateral dimensions of the filter has a great effect on the transmission properties of the filter. The results are in agreement with available experimental data and clearly show that the unbounded wave theory (i.e., an analysis which assumes that both the incident electromagnetic radiation and the filter are of infinite lateral extent) cannot be applied to FTR filters even when the lateral filter dimensions are several orders of magnitude larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation.

  8. GBTIDL: Reduction and Analysis of GBT Spectral Line Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganian, P.; Garwood, R. W.; Braatz, J. A.; Radziwill, N. M.; Maddalena, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    GBTIDL is an interactive package for reduction and analysis of spectral line data taken with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The package, written entirely in IDL, consists of straightforward yet flexible calibration, averaging, and analysis procedures (the "GUIDE layer") modeled after the UniPOPS and CLASS data reduction philosophies, a customized plotter with many built-in visualization features, and Data I/O and toolbox functionality that can be used for more advanced tasks. GBTIDL makes use of data structures which can also be used to store intermediate results. The package consumes and produces data in GBT SDFITS format. GBTIDL can be run online and have access to the most recent data coming off the telescope, or can be run offline on preprocessed SDFITS files.

  9. Improved spectral analysis for the motional Stark effect diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Klabacha, J.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from reversed field pinch plasmas in the Madison symmetric torus (MST) have been routinely obtained from fully resolved motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum analyses. Recently, the spectrum fit procedure has been improved by initializing and constraining the fit parameters based on the MSE model in the atomic data and analysis structure. A collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n = 4 and a simple Born approximation for ion-impact cross sections is used for this analysis. Measurement uncertainty is quantified by making MSE measurements with multiple views of a single spatial location, ranging 5%-15% for typical MST operation conditions. A multi-view fit improves the goodness of fit of MSE spectral features and background.

  10. Analysis of exploitable spectral features of target and background materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Max

    2015-10-01

    The spectral behavior of textile camouflage materials in the electro-optical spectral range is analyzed and compared with different backgrounds. It is shown that it will be difficult to develop camouflage materials that match a vegetative background in the NIR and SWIR spectral range. The problem of water absorption spectral features is discussed. In addition the effect of different surface finishing of textiles is shown.

  11. Categorical spectral analysis of periodicity in nucleosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hu; Rube, H. Tomas; Song, Jun S.

    2016-01-01

    DNA helical twist imposes geometric constraints on the location of histone–DNA interaction sites along nucleosomal DNA. Certain 10.5-bp periodic nucleotides in phase with these geometric constraints have been suggested to facilitate nucleosome positioning. However, the extent of nucleotide periodicity in nucleosomal DNA and its significance in directing nucleosome positioning still remain unclear. We clarify these issues by applying categorical spectral analysis to high-resolution nucleosome maps in two yeast species. We find that only a small fraction of nucleosomal sequences contain significant 10.5-bp periodicity. We further develop a spectral decomposition method to show that the previously observed periodicity in aligned nucleosomal sequences mainly results from proper phasing among nucleosomal sequences, and not from a preponderant occurrence of periodicity within individual sequences. Importantly, we show that this phasing may arise from the histones’ proclivity for putting preferred nucleotides at some of the evenly spaced histone–DNA contact points with respect to the dyad axis. We demonstrate that 10.5-bp periodicity, when present, significantly facilitates rotational, but not translational, nucleosome positioning. Finally, although periodicity only moderately affects nucleosome occupancy genome wide, reduced periodicity is an evolutionarily conserved signature of nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start/termination sites. PMID:26893354

  12. Clinical measurements analysis of multi-spectral photoplethysmograph biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, Lasma; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-05-01

    The developed portable multi-spectral photoplethysmograph (MS-PPG) optical biosensor device, intended for analysis of peripheral blood volume pulsations at different vascular depths, has been clinically verified. Multi-spectral monitoring was performed by means of a four - wavelengths (454 nm, 519 nm, 632 nm and 888 nm) light emitted diodes and photodiode with multi-channel signal output processing. Two such sensors can be operated in parallel and imposed on the patient's skin. The clinical measurements confirmed ability to detect PPG signals at four wavelengths simultaneously and to record temporal differences in the signal shapes (corresponding to different penetration depths) in normal and pathological skin. This study analyzed wavelengths relations between systole and diastole peak difference at various tissue depths in normal and pathological skin. The difference between parameters of healthy and pathological skin at various skin depths could be explain by oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin dominance at different wavelengths operated in sensor. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications in dermatology for skin assessment are discussed.

  13. Accuracy Enhancement of Inertial Sensors Utilizing High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Aboelmagd; Armstrong, Justin; El-Shafie, Ahmed; Karamat, Tashfeen; McGaughey, Don; Korenberg, Michael; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    In both military and civilian applications, the inertial navigation system (INS) and the global positioning system (GPS) are two complementary technologies that can be integrated to provide reliable positioning and navigation information for land vehicles. The accuracy enhancement of INS sensors and the integration of INS with GPS are the subjects of widespread research. Wavelet de-noising of INS sensors has had limited success in removing the long-term (low-frequency) inertial sensor errors. The primary objective of this research is to develop a novel inertial sensor accuracy enhancement technique that can remove both short-term and long-term error components from inertial sensor measurements prior to INS mechanization and INS/GPS integration. A high resolution spectral analysis technique called the fast orthogonal search (FOS) algorithm is used to accurately model the low frequency range of the spectrum, which includes the vehicle motion dynamics and inertial sensor errors. FOS models the spectral components with the most energy first and uses an adaptive threshold to stop adding frequency terms when fitting a term does not reduce the mean squared error more than fitting white noise. The proposed method was developed, tested and validated through road test experiments involving both low-end tactical grade and low cost MEMS-based inertial systems. The results demonstrate that in most cases the position accuracy during GPS outages using FOS de-noised data is superior to the position accuracy using wavelet de-noising.

  14. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software package PySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is described

  15. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software packagePySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is

  16. Phase-Resolved Infrared H- and K-Band Spectroscopy of EF Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Homeier, Derek; Johnson, Joni J.; Osborne, Heather L.

    2004-10-01

    We present new phase-resolved H- and K-band spectroscopy of the ultrashort-period magnetic cataclysmic variable EF Eri in its current prolonged ``low'' state obtained using NIRI on Gemini North and NIRSPEC on Keck II. These new data show that the H-band spectrum of EF Eri appears to be dominated by cyclotron emission during the entire orbital cycle. The K-band spectrum of EF Eri is likewise dominated by cyclotron emission during most of an orbital period, but near binary phase 0.0 the secondary star spectrum may be visible. The lack of strong CO or CH4 absorption features and the weakness of the water vapor features in this spectrum, however, suggests the possibility of peculiar abundances for carbon and/or oxygen. We have used the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code to produce model brown dwarf spectra with nonsolar abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, and achieved limited success in fitting the observed spectra. We conclude that strong, highly variable cyclotron emission is responsible for the photometric variation previously reported for EF Eri. The nature of this cyclotron emission is complex: the H-band spectra show that the dominant cyclotron harmonic at phase 0.5 peaks at 1.65 μm, but at phase 0.0 the harmonic peaks near 1.72 μm. At phase 0.5, there is another cyclotron feature present that peaks in between the H and K bands (near 1.93 μm), but at phase 0.0 no such feature is present. These data suggest that cyclotron emission from both poles is occurring. In the high state, the cyclotron emission has been modeled as coming from the pole that is oriented toward the secondary star. One interpretation for the phase 0.5 cyclotron emission is that it originates from the opposite pole. In its current ultralow state, EF Eri reveals no outward signs of accretion (such as H I emission) but continues to have a few, strong cyclotron features. Thus, EF Eri joins the small group of magnetic cataclysmic variables whose accretion rate is so low that they are in the

  17. Effects of ozone exposure on `Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Savio Figueira; Mota, Leonardo; Paiva, Luisa Brito; Couto, Flávio Mota do; Silva, Marcelo Gomes da; Oliveira, Jurandi Gonçalves de; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Miklós, András

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of `Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  18. Effects of ozone exposure on 'Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Savio Figueira; Brito Paiva, Luisa; Mota do Couto, Flavio; Gomes da Silva, Marcelo; Silva Sthel, Marcelo; Vargas, Helion; Mota, Leonardo; Goncalves de Oliveira, Jurandi; Miklos, Andras

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of 'Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  19. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  20. Analysis for simplified optics coma effection on spectral image inversion of coded aperture spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lv, Qunbo; Li, Weiyan; Xiangli, Bin

    2015-09-01

    As a novel spectrum imaging technology was developed recent years, push-broom coded aperture spectral imaging (PCASI) has the advantages of high throughput, high SNR, high stability etc. This coded aperture spectral imaging utilizes fixed code templates and push-broom mode, which can realize the high-precision reconstruction of spatial and spectral information. But during optical lens designing, manufacturing and debugging, it is inevitably exist some minor coma errors. Even minor coma errors can reduce image quality. In this paper, we simulated the system optical coma error's influence to the quality of reconstructed image, analyzed the variant of the coded aperture in different optical coma effect, then proposed an accurate curve of image quality and optical coma quality in 255×255 size code template, which provide important references for design and development of push-broom coded aperture spectrometer.

  1. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  2. Phase-resolved spectroscopy and Kepler photometry of the ultracompact AM CVn binary SDSS J190817.07+394036.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Groot, P. J.; Bloemen, S.; Levitan, D.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Nelemans, G.; Prince, T. A.; Fürst, F.; Geier, S.

    2015-10-01

    Kepler satellite photometry and phase-resolved spectroscopy of the ultracompact AM CVn type binary SDSS J190817.07+394036.4 are presented. The average spectra reveal a variety of weak metal lines of different species, including silicon, sulphur and magnesium as well as many lines of nitrogen, beside the strong absorption lines of neutral helium. The phase-folded spectra and the Doppler tomograms reveal an S-wave in emission in the core of the He I 4471 Å absorption line at a period of Porb = 1085.7 ± 2.8 s identifying this as the orbital period of the system. The Si II, Mg II and the core of some He I lines show an S-wave in absorption with a phase offset of 170° ± 15° compared to the S-wave in emission. The N II, Si III and some helium lines do not show any phase variability at all. The spectroscopic orbital period is in excellent agreement with a period at Porb = 1085.108(9) s detected in the 3 yr Kepler light curve. A Fourier analysis of the Q6-Q17 short-cadence data obtained by Kepler revealed a large number of frequencies above the noise level where the majority shows a large variability in frequency and amplitude. In an Observed-minus-computed analysis, we measured a \\vert dot{P}\\vert ˜ 1.0 × 10-8 s s-1 for some of the strongest variations and set a limit for the orbital period to be \\vert dot{P}\\vert <10^{-10} s s-1. The shape of the phase-folded light curve on the orbital period indicates the motion of the bright-spot. Models of the system were constructed to see whether the phases of the radial velocity curves and the light-curve variation can be combined to a coherent picture. However, from the measured phases neither the absorption nor the emission can be explained to originate in the bright-spot.

  3. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  4. Development of spectral analysis math models and software program and spectral analyzer, digital converter interface equipment design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, W. L.; Robinson, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spectral analyses of angle-modulated communication systems is studied by: (1) performing a literature survey of candidate power spectrum computational techniques, determining the computational requirements, and formulating a mathematical model satisfying these requirements; (2) implementing the model on UNIVAC 1230 digital computer as the Spectral Analysis Program (SAP); and (3) developing the hardware specifications for a data acquisition system which will acquire an input modulating signal for SAP. The SAP computational technique uses extended fast Fourier transform and represents a generalized approach for simple and complex modulating signals.

  5. Spectral Analysis of Broadband Seismic Array Data, Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshy, S.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    We used a spectral analysis method to examine amplitude variations of body waves recorded in the Tien Shan region of central Asia. We used broadband data from the Kyrgyz Network (KNET), Kazakhstan Network (KZNET), and from a set of temporary, PASSCAL stations operated from 1997-2000 we refer to as the Ghengis array. A spectral ratio method similar to that used by Wilson and Pavlis (2000) was employed, but with station AAK used as a reference instead of the array median. Spectral ratios were estimated for all teleseismic events and a larger, intermediate depth events from the Hindu-Kush region for all three-components of ground motion and total signal strength on all components. Results are visualized by maps of amplitude for various frequency bands and through the 4-D animation method introduced by Wilson and Pavlis (2000). Data from Hindu-Kush events showed amplitude variations as much as a factor of 100 across the study area with a strong frequency dependence. The largest variations were at the highest frequencies observed near 15 Hz. Stations in the northwestern part of the Tien Shan array show little variation in amplitude relative to the reference station, AAK. In the central and eastern part of the array, the amplitude estimates are significantly smaller at all frequencies. In contrast, for stations in the western Tien Shan near the Talas-Fergana Fault, and the southern Tien Shan near the Tarim Basin, the amplitude values become much larger than the reference site. The teleseismic data show a different pattern and show a somewhat smaller, overall amplitude variation at comparable frequencies. The northern part of the array again shows small variations relative to the reference stations. There are some amplifications in the southern stations of the array, especially in the Tarim Basin. The higher frequency observations that show large amplifications at stations in the Tarim Basin are readily explained by site effects due to the thick deposits of sediments

  6. X-RAY PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF PSRs B0531+21, B1509-58, AND B0540-69 WITH RXTE

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M. Y.; Lu, F. J.; Qu, J. L.; Zheng, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Han, D. W.

    2012-04-01

    The Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has made hundreds of observations on three famous young pulsars (PSRs) B0531+21 (Crab), B1509-58, and B0540-69. Using the archive RXTE data, we have studied the phase-resolved spectral properties of these pulsars in details. The variation of the X-ray spectrum with phase of PSR B0531+21 is confirmed here much more precisely and more details are revealed than in the previous studies: The spectrum softens from the beginning of the first pulse, turns to harden right at the pulse peak and becomes the hardest at the bottom of the bridge, softens gradually until the second peak, and then softens rapidly. Different from the previous studies, we found that the spectrum of PSR B1509-58 is significantly harder in the center of the pulse, which is also in contrast to that of PSR B0531+21. The variation of the X-ray spectrum of PSR B0540-69 seems similar to that of PSR B1509-58, but with a lower significance. Using about 10 years of data span, we also studied the real time evolution of the spectra of these pulsars, and no significant evolution has been detected. We discuss the constraints of these results on theoretical models of pulsar X-ray emission.

  7. Quantifying wave-breaking dissipation using nonlinear phase-resolved wave-field simulations with a phenomenological-based wave breaking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yusheng; Yue, Dick

    2015-11-01

    We use direct nonlinear phase-resolved simulations based on a High-Order Spectral (HOS) method (Dommermuth & Yue 1987) to understand and quantify wave-breaking dissipation in the evolution of general irregular short-crested wave-fields. We achieve this by incorporating a robust phenomenological-based wave breaking model in HOS simulations to account for energy dissipation. This model can automatically simulate the onset of wave breaking, and the simulated wave-breaking dissipation strength differentiates corresponding to different wave breaking type (such as spilling or plunging breaking waves). The efficacy of this model is confirmed by direct comparisons against measurements for the energy loss in 2D and 3D breaking events. By comparing simulated wave-fields with and without the dissipation model in HOS, we obtain the dissipation field, which provides the times, locations and intensity of wave breaking events. From the dissipation field we further calculate the distribution of total length of breaking wave front per unit surface area per unit increment of breaking velocity (Phillips 1985), and obtain qualitative agreement with Phillips theoretical power-law.

  8. Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 for Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Feiming; Sue, Miles; Peng, Ted; Tan, Harry; Liang, Robert; Kinman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 is the latest version of a computer program that assists in analysis of interference between radio signals of the types most commonly used in Earth/spacecraft radio communications. [An earlier version was reported in Software for Analyzing Earth/Spacecraft Radio Interference (NPO-20422), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 4 (April 2001), page 52.] SAT 6.2 calculates signal spectra, bandwidths, and interference effects for several families of modulation schemes. Several types of filters can be modeled, and the program calculates and displays signal spectra after filtering by any of the modeled filters. The program accommodates two simultaneous signals: a desired signal and an interferer. The interference-to-signal power ratio can be calculated for the filtered desired and interfering signals. Bandwidth-occupancy and link-budget calculators are included for the user s convenience. SAT 6.2 has a new software structure and provides a new user interface that is both intuitive and convenient. SAT 6.2 incorporates multi-tasking, multi-threaded execution, virtual memory management, and a dynamic link library. SAT 6.2 is designed for use on 32- bit computers employing Microsoft Windows operating systems.

  9. Informed spectral analysis: audio signal parameter estimation using side information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourer, Dominique; Marchand, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    Parametric models are of great interest for representing and manipulating sounds. However, the quality of the resulting signals depends on the precision of the parameters. When the signals are available, these parameters can be estimated, but the presence of noise decreases the resulting precision of the estimation. Furthermore, the Cramér-Rao bound shows the minimal error reachable with the best estimator, which can be insufficient for demanding applications. These limitations can be overcome by using the coding approach which consists in directly transmitting the parameters with the best precision using the minimal bitrate. However, this approach does not take advantage of the information provided by the estimation from the signal and may require a larger bitrate and a loss of compatibility with existing file formats. The purpose of this article is to propose a compromised approach, called the 'informed approach,' which combines analysis with (coded) side information in order to increase the precision of parameter estimation using a lower bitrate than pure coding approaches, the audio signal being known. Thus, the analysis problem is presented in a coder/decoder configuration where the side information is computed and inaudibly embedded into the mixture signal at the coder. At the decoder, the extra information is extracted and is used to assist the analysis process. This study proposes applying this approach to audio spectral analysis using sinusoidal modeling which is a well-known model with practical applications and where theoretical bounds have been calculated. This work aims at uncovering new approaches for audio quality-based applications. It provides a solution for challenging problems like active listening of music, source separation, and realistic sound transformations.

  10. Spectral analysis of linear relations and degenerate operator semigroups

    SciTech Connect

    Baskakov, A G; Chernyshov, K I

    2002-12-31

    Several problems of the spectral theory of linear relations in Banach spaces are considered. Linear differential inclusions in a Banach space are studied. The construction of the phase space and solutions is carried out with the help of the spectral theory of linear relations, ergodic theorems, and degenerate operator semigroups.

  11. Spectral analysis based on compressive sensing in nanophotonic structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Yu, Zongfu

    2014-10-20

    A method of spectral sensing based on compressive sensing is shown to have the potential to achieve high resolution in a compact device size. The random bases used in compressive sensing are created by the optical response of a set of different nanophotonic structures, such as photonic crystal slabs. The complex interferences in these nanostructures offer diverse spectral features suitable for compressive sensing.

  12. [A New HAC Unsupervised Classifier Based on Spectral Harmonic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-ming; Wei, Hua-feng; Shi, Gang-qiang; Sun, Yang-yang; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Hyperspectral images classification is one of the important methods to identify image information, which has great significance for feature identification, dynamic monitoring and thematic information extraction, etc. Unsupervised classification without prior knowledge is widely used in hyperspectral image classification. This article proposes a new hyperspectral images unsupervised classification algorithm based on harmonic analysis(HA), which is called the harmonic analysis classifer (HAC). First, the HAC algorithm counts the first harmonic component and draws the histogram, so it can determine the initial feature categories and the pixel of cluster centers according to the number and location of the peak. Then, the algorithm is to map the waveform information of pixels to be classified spectrum into the feature space made up of harmonic decomposition times, amplitude and phase, and the similar features can be gotten together in the feature space, these pixels will be classified according to the principle of minimum distance. Finally, the algorithm computes the Euclidean distance of these pixels between cluster center, and merges the initial classification by setting the distance threshold. so the HAC can achieve the purpose of hyperspectral images classification. The paper collects spectral curves of two feature categories, and obtains harmonic decomposition times, amplitude and phase after harmonic analysis, the distribution of HA components in the feature space verified the correctness of the HAC. While the HAC algorithm is applied to EO-1 satellite Hyperion hyperspectral image and obtains the results of classification. Comparing with the hyperspectral image classifying results of K-MEANS, ISODATA and HAC classifiers, the HAC, as a unsupervised classification method, is confirmed to have better application on hyperspectral image classification. PMID:26717767

  13. Nonlinear Laplacian spectral analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenowitz, N. D.; Giannakis, D.; Majda, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of physical datasets using modern methods developed in machine learning presents unique challenges and opportunities. These datasets typically feature many degrees of freedom, which tends to increase the computational cost of statistical methods and complicate interpretation. In addition, physical systems frequently exhibit a high degree of symmetry that should be exploited by any data analysis technique. The classic problem of Rayleigh Benárd convection in a periodic domain is an example of such a physical system with trivial symmetries. This article presents a technique for analyzing the time variability of numerical simulations of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection at large aspect ratio and intermediate Rayleigh number. The simulated dynamics are highly unsteady and consist of several convective rolls that are distributed across the domain and oscillate with a preferred frequency. Intermittent extreme events in the net heat transfer, as quantified by the time-weighted probability distribution function of the Nusselt number, are a hallmark of these simulations. Nonlinear Laplacian Spectral Analysis (NLSA) is a data-driven method which is ideally suited for the study of such highly nonlinear and intermittent dynamics, but the trivial symmetries of the Rayleigh-Bénard problem such as horizontal shift-invariance can mask the interesting dynamics. To overcome this issue, the vertical velocity is averaged over parcels of similar temperature and height, which substantially compresses the size of the dataset and removes trivial horizontal symmetries. This isothermally averaged dataset, which is shown to preserve the net convective heat-flux across horizontal surfaces, is then used as an input to NLSA. The analysis generates a small number of orthogonal modes which describe the spatiotemporal variability of the heat transfer. A regression analysis shows that the extreme events of the net heat transfer are primarily associated with a family of

  14. Spectral Regression Discriminant Analysis for Hyperspectral Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Wu, J.; Huang, H.; Liu, J.

    2012-08-01

    Dimensionality reduction algorithms, which aim to select a small set of efficient and discriminant features, have attracted great attention for Hyperspectral Image Classification. The manifold learning methods are popular for dimensionality reduction, such as Locally Linear Embedding, Isomap, and Laplacian Eigenmap. However, a disadvantage of many manifold learning methods is that their computations usually involve eigen-decomposition of dense matrices which is expensive in both time and memory. In this paper, we introduce a new dimensionality reduction method, called Spectral Regression Discriminant Analysis (SRDA). SRDA casts the problem of learning an embedding function into a regression framework, which avoids eigen-decomposition of dense matrices. Also, with the regression based framework, different kinds of regularizes can be naturally incorporated into our algorithm which makes it more flexible. It can make efficient use of data points to discover the intrinsic discriminant structure in the data. Experimental results on Washington DC Mall and AVIRIS Indian Pines hyperspectral data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, A.; Chen, J.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Continued advances in solar observations have led to higher-resolution magnetograms and surface (photospheric) images, revealing bipolar magnetic features operating near the resolution limit during emerging flux events and other phenomena used to predict solar eruptions responsible for geomagnetic plasma disturbances. However, line of sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A pixel dynamics model utilizing Stokes I spectral profiles was previously-used to quantify changes in the Doppler shift, width, asymmetry, and tail flatness of Fe I lines at 6301.5 and 6302.5 Å and used pixel-by-pixel line profile fluctuations to characterize quiet and active regions on the Sun. We use this pixel dynamics model with circularly polarized photospheric data (e.g., SOLIS data) to estimate plasma dynamic properties at a sub-pixel level. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties on sub-pixel scales.

  16. Spectral analysis of the gravity and topography of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G.; Frey, Herbert V.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Nerem, R. Steven; Zuber, Maria T.

    1993-01-01

    New spherical harmonic models of the gravity and topography of Mars place important constraints on the structure and dynamics of the interior. The gravity and topography models are significantly phase coherent for harmonic degrees n less than 30 (wavelengths greater than 700 km). Loss of coherence below that wavelength is presumably due to inadequacies of the models, rather than a change in behavior of the planet. The gravity/topography admittance reveals two very different spectral domains: for n greater than 4, a simple Airy compensation model, with mean depth of 100 km, faithfully represents the observed pattern; for degrees 2 and 3, the effective compensation depths are 1400 and 550 km, respectively, strongly arguing for dynamic compensation at those wavelengths. The gravity model has been derived from a reanalysis of the tracking data for Mariner 9 and the Viking Orbiters, The topography model was derived by harmonic analysis of the USGS digital elevation model of Mars. Before comparing gravity and topography for internal structure inferences, we must ensure that both are consistently referenced to a hydrostatic datum. For the gravity, this involves removal of hydrostatic components of the even degree zonal coefficients. For the topography, it involves adding the degree 4 equipotential reference surface, to get spherically referenced values, and then subtracting the full degree 50 equipotential. Variance spectra and phase coherence of orthometric heights and gravity anomalies are addressed.

  17. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time–frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  18. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  19. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  20. Studying soil properties using visible and near infrared spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, S.; Garfagnoli, F.; Innocenti, L.; Chiarantini, L.

    2009-04-01

    This research is carried out inside the DIGISOIL Project, whose purposes are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal measurement technologies, for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going form the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in digital soil mapping. The study area is located in the Virginio river basin, about 30 km south of Firenze, in the Chianti area, where soils with agricultural suitability have a high economic value connected to the production of internationally famous wines and olive oils. The most common soil threats, such as erosion and landslide, may determine huge economic losses, which must be considered in farming management practices. This basin has a length of about 23 km for a basin area of around 60,3 Km2. Geological formations outcropping in the area are Pliocene to Pleistocene marine and lacustrine sediments in beds with almost horizontal bedding. Vineyards, olive groves and annual crops are the main types of land use. A typical Mediterranean climate prevails with a dry summer followed by intense and sometimes prolonged rainfall in autumn, decreasing in winter. In this study, three types of VNIR and SWIR techniques, operating at different scales and in different environments (laboratory spectroscopy, portable field spectroscopy) are integrated to rapidly quantify various soil characteristics, in order to acquire data for assessing the risk of occurrence for typically agricultural practice-related soil threats (swelling, compaction, erosion, landslides, organic matter decline, ect.) and to collect ground data in order to build up a spectral library to be used in image analysis from air-borne and satellite sensors. Difficulties encountered in imaging spectroscopy, such as influence of measurements conditions, atmospheric attenuation, scene dependency and sampling representation are investigated and mathematical pre-treatments, using proper algorithms, are applied and

  1. Spectral analysis of ventilation in elderly subjects awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Pack, A I; Silage, D A; Millman, R P; Knight, H; Shore, E T; Chung, D C

    1988-03-01

    We studied the periodicities of ventilation in elderly subjects using digital comb filtering. Two groups of subjects were studied, those with and without sleep apnea. Measurements were made in wakefulness, stage 1-2 sleep, and where possible in stage 3-4 sleep. For each of the digital filters we calculated the average power of the oscillatory output. To compare subject groups we first specifically determined the average power in the filter with the maximum output. The mean of this measurement was greater in elderly subjects with apnea compared with those without apnea, both during wakefulness and stage 1-2 sleep. In both groups of subjects the cycle time of the major ventilatory oscillations was on the order of 40-60 s. There was no difference in this cycle time between the two groups of subjects in wakefulness or stage 1-2 sleep. Thus, whereas similar oscillatory processes occur in subjects with and without apnea, it is the magnitude of the oscillation that differs between the two groups. These conclusions are supported by analysis of the output of individual filters of the digital comb filter. In both groups, stage 1-2 sleep produced significantly increased oscillations in ventilation. Both in wakefulness and stage 1-2 sleep, significantly greater periodicities occurred in the apneic compared with the nonapneic group. In the few subjects who had sufficient data in stage 3-4 sleep for spectral analysis, ventilatory oscillations were virtually absent in this state. Our data suggest that subjects who develop apnea during sleep have an increased propensity for periodic breathing even while awake.

  2. Power spectral density and coherence analysis of Alzheimer's EEG.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Wei, Xile; Yang, Chen; Deng, Bin

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the abnormalities of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by analyzing 16-scalp electrodes EEG signals and make a comparison with the normal controls. The power spectral density (PSD) which represents the power distribution of EEG series in the frequency domain is used to evaluate the abnormalities of AD brain. Spectrum analysis based on autoregressive Burg method shows that the relative PSD of AD group is increased in the theta frequency band while significantly reduced in the alpha2 frequency bands, particularly in parietal, temporal, and occipital areas. Furthermore, the coherence of two EEG series among different electrodes is analyzed in the alpha2 frequency band. It is demonstrated that the pair-wise coherence between different brain areas in AD group are remarkably decreased. Interestingly, this decrease of pair-wise electrodes is much more significant in inter-hemispheric areas than that in intra-hemispheric areas. Moreover, the linear cortico-cortical functional connectivity can be extracted based on coherence matrix, from which it is shown that the functional connections are obviously decreased, the same variation trend as relative PSD. In addition, we combine both features of the relative PSD and the normalized degree of functional network to discriminate AD patients from the normal controls by applying a support vector machine model in the alpha2 frequency band. It is indicated that the two groups can be clearly classified by the combined feature. Importantly, the accuracy of the classification is higher than that of any one feature. The obtained results show that analysis of PSD and coherence-based functional network can be taken as a potential comprehensive measure to distinguish AD patients from the normal, which may benefit our understanding of the disease.

  3. Spectral analysis of lunar swirls using the data from Spectral Profiler onboard SELENE/Kaguya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Haruyama, J.; Matsunaga, T.; Nakamura, R.; Morota, T.; Hiroi, T.; Yokota, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Sasaki, S.; Ohtake, M.; Honda, C.; Demura, H.

    2011-12-01

    Space weathering causes the change in optical properties, such as darkening, reddening, and decrease of absorption depths of the planetary surfaces. Two competing processes have been proposed so far as the main mechanism of such space weathering; hydrogen irradiation by solar wind and bombardment of micrometeorites [1] [2]. We used the new data set obtained by Spectral Profiler (SP) onboard SELENE/Kaguya which observed the Moon and investigated the optical properties of the representative lunar swirls. We searched for any systematic relationship between the albedo and the maturity, which are represented by the (1) reflectance at 0.75 micron (r0.75) and slopes of the fitted continua or (2) r0.75 and depth/strength of absorption band of 1 micron and 1.3 micron, respectively. Based on the results of our spectral analyses including MGM (Modified Gaussian Model [3]), we try to approach the actual process of space weathering on the Moon. [1] Vernazza, P., Binzel, R. P., Rossi, A., Fulchignoni. M. and Birlan, M., Solar wind as the origin of rapid reddening of asteroid surfaces, Nature, 458, 993-995, doi:10.1038/nature07956, 2009. [2] Sasaki, S., Nakamura, K., Hamabe, Y., Kurahashi, E. & Hiroi, T., Production of iron nanoparticles by laser irradiation in a simulation of lunar-like space weathering, Nature. 410, 555-557, 2001. [3] Sunshine, J. M., Pieters, C. M. & Pratt, S. F., Deconvolution of Mineral Absorption Bands: An Improved Approach, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 6955-6966, 1990.

  4. Comparing passive and active hearing: spectral analysis of transient sounds in bats.

    PubMed

    Goerlitz, Holger R; Hübner, Mathias; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2008-06-01

    In vision, colour constancy allows the evaluation of the colour of objects independent of the spectral composition of a light source. In the auditory system, comparable mechanisms have been described that allows the evaluation of the spectral shape of sounds independent of the spectral composition of ambient background sounds. For echolocating bats, the evaluation of spectral shape is vitally important both for the analysis of external sounds and the analysis of the echoes of self-generated sonar emissions. Here, we investigated how the echolocating bat Phyllostomus discolor evaluates the spectral shape of transient sounds both in passive hearing and in echolocation as a specialized mode of active hearing. Bats were trained to classify transients of different spectral shape as low- or highpass. We then assessed how the spectral shape of an ambient background noise influenced the spontaneous classification of the transients. In the passive-hearing condition, the bats spontaneously changed their classification boundary depending on the spectral shape of the background. In the echo-acoustic condition, the classification boundary did not change although the background- and spectral-shape manipulations were identical in the two conditions. These data show that auditory processing differs between passive and active hearing: echolocation represents an independent mode of active hearing with its own rules of auditory spectral analysis.

  5. Tunneling Spectral Dip Feature in High Tc Cuprates: Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasadzinski, John; Coffey, Liam; Kurter, Cihan; Gray, Ken

    2009-03-01

    A fully self-consistent Eliashberg analysis is presented to analyze the spectral dip feature observed in tunnel junctions on Bi2212. Methods include SIS break junctions, intrinsic Josephson junctions in mesas and SIN junctions from STM. This analysis is presented for a variety of doping levels and the resulting electron-boson spectral function and self-energy is compared with other spectroscopic probes. Evidence of spectral dip features in other high Tc cuprates is presented including Tl2212 to demonstrate the universality of the spectral dip and its relation to the mechanism of pairing.

  6. Hurricane coastal flood analysis using multispectral spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogashawara, I.; Ferreira, C.; Curtarelli, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Flooding is one of the main hazards caused by extreme events such as hurricanes and tropical storms. Therefore, flood maps are a crucial tool to support policy makers, environmental managers and other government agencies for emergency management, disaster recovery and risk reduction planning. However traditional flood mapping methods rely heavily on the interpolation of hydrodynamic models results, and most recently, the extensive collection of field data. These methods are time-consuming, labor intensive, and costly. Efficient and fast response alternative methods should be developed in order to improve flood mapping, and remote sensing has been proved as a valuable tool for this application. Our goal in this paper is to introduce a novel technique based on spectral analysis in order to aggregate knowledge and information to map coastal flood areas. For this purpose we used the Normalized Diference Water Index (NDWI) which was derived from two the medium resolution LANDSAT/TM 5 surface reflectance product from the LANDSAT climate data record (CDR). This product is generated from specialized software called Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS). We used the surface reflectance products acquired before and after the passage of Hurricane Ike for East Texas in September of 2008. We used as end member a classification of estimated flooded area based on the United States Geological Survey (USGS) mobile storm surge network that was deployed for Hurricane Ike. We used a dataset which consisted of 59 water levels recording stations. The estimated flooded area was delineated interpolating the maximum surge in each location using a spline with barriers method with high tension and a 30 meter Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from the National Elevation Dataset (NED). Our results showed that, in the flooded area, the NDWI values decreased after the hurricane landfall on average from 0.38 to 0.18 and the median value decreased from 0.36 to 0.2. However

  7. Spectral analysis of hot helium-rich white dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreizler, S.; Werner, K.

    1996-10-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of most known hot helium-rich white dwarfs of spectral type DO. The stars represent the non-DA white dwarf cooling sequence from the hot end (T_eff_=~120000K) down to the DB gap (T_eff_=~45000K). From medium resolution optical spectra, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and element abundances are determined by means of non-LTE model atmospheres. Compared to previous LTE analyses available for some of the program stars, higher effective temperatures are derived. The existence of the DB gap is confirmed. For the first time reliable surface gravities for a large sample of DO white dwarfs are determined. With the help of theoretical evolutionary tracks the DO masses are determined. We find a mean value of 0.59+/-0.08Msun_ which virtually coincides with the mean masses of the DA and DB white dwarfs. Hydrogen cannot be identified in any optical DO spectrum, which includes the former DOA prototype HZ21. Hence HD149499B remains the only DO white dwarf with a positive (FUV) detection of trace hydrogen in the photosphere. The number ratio of DA/non-DA white dwarfs significantly increases along the cooling sequence and thus corroborates the hydrogen float-up hypothesis as an explanation for the DB gap. From optical, IUE, and HST spectra metal abundances or upper limits could be derived for most DOs, allowing a comprehensive comparison with predictions from diffusion/radiative levitation calculations. A large scatter in metallicities is found, even among objects with similar parameters and no clear trend along the cooling sequence is detectable. This is severely at odds with theoretical predictions. The evolutionary link between DO white dwarfs, the PG1159 stars and DB white dwarfs is discussed, in particular considering the overlapping positions of DO and PG1159 stars in the HR diagram.

  8. Multitaper Spectral Analysis and Wavelet Denoising Applied to Helioseismic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm, R. W.; Gu, Y.; Hill, F.; Stark, P. B.; Fodor, I. K.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of solar normal mode frequencies from helioseismic observations can be improved by using Multitaper Spectral Analysis (MTSA) to estimate spectra from the time series, then using wavelet denoising of the log spectra. MTSA leads to a power spectrum estimate with reduced variance and better leakage properties than the conventional periodogram. Under the assumption of stationarity and mild regularity conditions, the log multitaper spectrum has a statistical distribution that is approximately Gaussian, so wavelet denoising is asymptotically an optimal method to reduce the noise in the estimated spectra. We find that a single m-upsilon spectrum benefits greatly from MTSA followed by wavelet denoising, and that wavelet denoising by itself can be used to improve m-averaged spectra. We compare estimates using two different 5-taper estimates (Stepian and sine tapers) and the periodogram estimate, for GONG time series at selected angular degrees l. We compare those three spectra with and without wavelet-denoising, both visually, and in terms of the mode parameters estimated from the pre-processed spectra using the GONG peak-fitting algorithm. The two multitaper estimates give equivalent results. The number of modes fitted well by the GONG algorithm is 20% to 60% larger (depending on l and the temporal frequency) when applied to the multitaper estimates than when applied to the periodogram. The estimated mode parameters (frequency, amplitude and width) are comparable for the three power spectrum estimates, except for modes with very small mode widths (a few frequency bins), where the multitaper spectra broadened the modest compared with the periodogram. We tested the influence of the number of tapers used and found that narrow modes at low n values are broadened to the extent that they can no longer be fit if the number of tapers is too large. For helioseismic time series of this length and temporal resolution, the optimal number of tapers is less than 10.

  9. Synthesis, spectral, computational and thermal analysis studies of metallocefotaxime antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Ali, Alaa E; Elasala, Gehan S

    2015-01-01

    Cefotaxime metal complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and two mixed metals complexes of (Fe,Cu) and (Fe,Ni) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra. The studies proved that cefotaxime may act as mono, bi, tri and tetra-dentate ligand through oxygen atoms of lactam carbonyl, carboxylic or amide carbonyl groups and nitrogen atom of thiazole ring. From the magnetic measurements and electronic spectral data, octahedral structures were proposed for all complexes. Quantum chemical methods have been performed for cefotaxime to calculate charges, bond lengths, bond angles, dihedral angles, electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), global hardness (η), softness (σ) and the electrophilicity index (ω). The thermal decomposition of the prepared metals complexes was studied by TGA, DTA and DSC techniques. Thermogravimetric studies revealed the presence of lattice or coordinated water molecules in all the prepared complexes. The decomposition mechanisms were suggested. The thermal decomposition of the complexes ended with the formation of metal oxides and carbon residue as a final product except in case of Hg complex, sublimation occur at the temperature range 376.5-575.0 °C so, only carbon residue was produced during thermal decomposition. The orders of chemical reactions (n) were calculated via the peak symmetry method and the activation parameters were computed from the thermal decomposition data. The geometries of complexes may be converted from Oh to Td during the thermal decomposition steps.

  10. Phase-resolved optical emission of dusty rf discharges: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Melzer, Andre; Huebner, Simon; Lewerentz, Lars; Schneider, Ralf; Matyash, Konstantin; Ikkurthi, Ramana

    2011-03-15

    The spectral emission of atoms in a dusty radio frequence (rf) discharge plasma in argon and helium has been measured with a gated ICCD camera. The spatially and temporally resolved emission/excitation of the argon and helium atoms during the rf cycle in the dusty discharge was compared to the dust-free case. In the bulk plasma above the dust cloud, the emission is clearly enhanced in the dusty discharge with respect to the pure discharge, whereas in the sheath the emission is reduced. In addition, the emission of a dusty argon plasma is studied via particle-particle particle-mesh (P{sup 3}M) simulations. The rf dynamics with a single dust particle trapped in the sheath was calculated. Like in the experiment the dust modifies the atomic emission. The spatiotemporal excitation pattern of the experiment is reproduced and a detailed understanding of the difference in excitation of the discharge with and without dust is presented.

  11. Estimation of sub-pixel water area on Tibet plateau using multiple endmembers spectral mixture spectral analysis from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qian; Shi, Jiancheng; Xu, Yuanliu

    2011-12-01

    Water is the basic needs for human society, and the determining factor of stability of ecosystem as well. There are lots of lakes on Tibet Plateau, which will lead to flood and mudslide when the water expands sharply. At present, water area is extracted from TM or SPOT data for their high spatial resolution; however, their temporal resolution is insufficient. MODIS data have high temporal resolution and broad coverage. So it is valuable resource for detecting the change of water area. Because of its low spatial resolution, mixed-pixels are common. In this paper, four spectral libraries are built using MOD09A1 product, based on that, water body is extracted in sub-pixels utilizing Multiple Endmembers Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) using MODIS daily reflectance data MOD09GA. The unmixed result is comparing with contemporaneous TM data and it is proved that this method has high accuracy.

  12. Wavelet and Multitaper spectral analysis of cosmic ray muon and neutron data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. R.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Echer, E.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Vieira, L. E. A.; de Lucas, A.; Dal Lago, A.; Munakata, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Schuch, N. J.

    Many times series in geophysics may contain dominant periodic signals These signals can vary in both amplitude and frequency over long periods of time The wavelet analysis is a powerful toll to spectral analyses of time series because this analysis decomposes a time series into time frequency space simultaneously One gets information on both the amplitude of the interest periodic signal within the series and how this amplitude varies with time In this work we will make a spectral wavelet and multitaper analysis of muon and neutron cosmic ray and compare these two kinds of spectral analysis and particles with each other and will find the mainly periodicities in these time series

  13. Perturbative analysis of spectral singularities and their optical realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali; Rostamzadeh, Saber

    2012-08-01

    We develop a perturbative method of computing spectral singularities of a Schrödinger operator defined by a general complex potential that vanishes outside a closed interval. These can be realized as zero-width resonances in optical gain media and correspond to a lasing effect that occurs at the threshold gain. Their time-reversed copies yield coherent perfect absorption of light that is also known as antilasing. We use our general results to establish the exactness of the nth-order perturbation theory for an arbitrary complex potential consisting of n delta functions, obtain an exact expression for the transfer matrix of these potentials, and examine spectral singularities of complex barrier potentials of arbitrary shape. In the context of optical spectral singularities, these correspond to inhomogeneous gain media.

  14. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    We describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The Technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  15. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  16. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q.

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  17. Source-domain spectral EEG analysis of sports-related concussion via Measure Projection Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Ozgur; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Makeig, Scott; Garudadri, Harinath

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated EEG-based source-level spectral differences between adolescents with sports-related concussions and healthy age matched controls. We transformed resting state EEG collected in both groups to the source domain using Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and computed the component process power spectra. For group-level analysis in the source domain, we used a probabilistic framework, Measure Projection Analysis (MPA), that has advantages over parametric k-means clustering of brain sources. MPA revealed that some frontal brain sources in the concussed group had significantly more power in the beta band (p<;0.005) and significantly less delta (p<;0.01) and theta band power (p<;0.05) than the healthy control group. These results suggest that a shift in spectral profile toward higher frequencies in some frontal brain regions might distinguish individuals with concussion from healthy controls. PMID:26737184

  18. Spectral analysis of chemisorbed CO2 on Mars analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Roush, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this work is to estimate the mass of CO2 that may have been removed to a quasi-stable reservoir on the Martian surface by chemisorption and to estimate the spectral effects of chemisorbed CO2 in remotely-sensed Martian spectra. Our approach is to characterize the conditions most favorable for the formation of carbonate on common terrestrial oxide minerals and to search for infrared spectral bands that result from chemisorption of CO2 molecules onto oxide and other Mars analog materials.

  19. Accelerometer and Gyroscope Based Gait Analysis Using Spectral Analysis of Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study’s purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended. PMID:25140082

  20. Accelerometer and gyroscope based gait analysis using spectral analysis of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study's purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended.

  1. Picosecond spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging with principal component analysis of meibomian glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Nien, Chyong Ly; Miljković, Miloš D.; Diem, Max; Jester, James V.; Potma, Eric. O.

    2011-02-01

    The lipid distribution in the mouse meibomian gland was examined with picosecond spectral anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. Spectral CARS data sets were generated by imaging specific localized regions of the gland within tissue sections at consecutive Raman shifts in the CH2 stretching vibrational range. Spectral differences between the location specific CARS spectra obtained in the lipid-rich regions of the acinus and the central duct were observed, which were confirmed with a Raman microspectroscopic analysis, and attributed to meibum lipid modifications within the gland. A principal component analysis of the spectral data set reveals changes in the CARS spectrum when transitioning from the acini to the central duct. These results demonstrate the utility of picosecond spectral CARS imaging combined with multivariate analysis for assessing differences in the distribution and composition of lipids in tissues.

  2. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  3. [The linearity analysis of ultrahigh temperature FTIR spectral emissivity measurement system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zong-wei; Dai, Jing-min; He, Xiao-wa; Yang, Chun-ling

    2012-02-01

    To study thermal radiation properties of special materials at high temperature in aerospace fields, the ultrahigh temperature spectral emissivity measurement system with Fourier spectrometer has been established. The linearity of system is the guarantee of emissivity measurement precision. Through measuring spectral radiation signals of a blackbody source at different temperatures, the function relations between spectral signal values and blackbody spectral radiation luminance of every spectrum points were calculated with the method of multi-temperature and multi-spectrum linear fitting. The spectral radiation signals of blackbody were measured between 1 000 degrees C and 2 000 degrees C in the spectral region from 3 to 20 microm. The linear relations between spectral signal and theory line at wavelength of 4 microm were calculated and introduced. The spectral response is well good between 4 and 18 microm, the spectral linearity are less than 1% except CO2 strong absorption spectrum regions. The results show that when the errors of measured spectrum radiation and linear fitting theory lines are certain, the higher the temperature, the smaller the spectral errors on emissivity. The linearity analysis of spectrum response is good at eliminating errors caused by individual temperature' disturbance to the spectra.

  4. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%.

  5. Test and analysis of spectral response for UV image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yunsheng; Liu, Jian; Feng, Cheng; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Yijun

    2015-10-01

    The UV image intensifier is one kind of electric vacuum imaging device based on principle of photoelectronic imaging. To achieve solar-blind detection, its spectral response characteristic is extremely desirable. A broad spectrum response measurement system is developed. This instrument uses EQ-99 laser-driven light source to get broad spectrum in the range of 200 nm to 1700 nm. A special preamplifier as well as a test software is work out. The spectral response of the image intensifier can be tested in the range of 200~1700 nm. Using this spectrum response measuring instrument, the UV image intensifiers are tested. The spectral response at the spectral range of 200 nm to 600 nm are obtained. Because of the quantum efficiency of Te-Cs photocathode used in image intens ifier above 280nm wavelength still exists, especially at 280 nm to 320nm.Therefore, high-performance UV filters is required for solar blind UV detection. Based on two sets of UV filters, the influence of solar radiation on solar blind detection is calculated and analyzed.

  6. Statistical Analysis of Spectral Properties and Prosodic Parameters of Emotional Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Přibil, J.; Přibilová, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper addresses reflection of microintonation and spectral properties in male and female acted emotional speech. Microintonation component of speech melody is analyzed regarding its spectral and statistical parameters. According to psychological research of emotional speech, different emotions are accompanied by different spectral noise. We control its amount by spectral flatness according to which the high frequency noise is mixed in voiced frames during cepstral speech synthesis. Our experiments are aimed at statistical analysis of cepstral coefficient values and ranges of spectral flatness in three emotions (joy, sadness, anger), and a neutral state for comparison. Calculated histograms of spectral flatness distribution are visually compared and modelled by Gamma probability distribution. Histograms of cepstral coefficient distribution are evaluated and compared using skewness and kurtosis. Achieved statistical results show good correlation comparing male and female voices for all emotional states portrayed by several Czech and Slovak professional actors.

  7. Spectral compression algorithms for the analysis of very large multivariate images

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2007-10-16

    A method for spectrally compressing data sets enables the efficient analysis of very large multivariate images. The spectral compression algorithm uses a factored representation of the data that can be obtained from Principal Components Analysis or other factorization technique. Furthermore, a block algorithm can be used for performing common operations more efficiently. An image analysis can be performed on the factored representation of the data, using only the most significant factors. The spectral compression algorithm can be combined with a spatial compression algorithm to provide further computational efficiencies.

  8. A phase-resolved XMM-Newton campaign on the colliding-wind binary HD 152248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, H.; Stevens, I. R.; Gosset, E.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.

    2004-05-01

    We report the first results of an XMM-Newton monitoring campaign of the open cluster NGC 6231 in the Sco OB 1 association. This first paper focuses on the massive colliding-wind binary HD 152248, which is the brightest X-ray source of the cluster. The campaign, with a total duration of 180 ks, was split into six separate observations, following the orbital motion of HD 152248. The X-ray flux from this system presents a clear, asymmetric modulation with the phase and ranges from 0.73 to 1.18 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band. The maximum of the emission is reached slightly after apastron. The EPIC spectra are quite soft, and peak around 0.8-0.9 keV. We characterize their shape using several combinations of MEKAL models and power-law spectra and we detect significant spectral variability in the 0.5-2.5 keV energy band. We also perform 2D hydrodynamical simulations using different sets of parameters that closely reproduce the physical and orbital configuration of the HD 152248 system at the time of the six XMM-Newton pointings. This allows a direct confrontation of the model predictions with the constraints deduced from the X-ray observations of the system. We show that the observed variation of the flux can be explained by a variation of the X-ray emission from the colliding-wind zone, diluted by the softer X-ray contribution of the two O-type stars of the system. Our simulations also reveal that the interaction region of HD 152248 should be highly unstable, giving rise to shells of dense gas that are separated by low-density regions. Finally, we perform a search for short-term variability in the light curves of the system and we show that trends are present within several of the 30-ks exposures of our campaign. Further, most of these trends are in good agreement with the orbital motion and provide a direct constraint on the first-order derivative of the flux. In the same context, we also search for long-range correlations in the X-ray data of the

  9. Phase-resolved two-dimensional terahertz spectroscopy including off-resonant interactions beyond the χ(3) limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Carmine; Folpini, Giulia; Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We present the first two-dimensional (2D) terahertz (THz) experiment with three phase-locked THz pulses and a fully phase-resolved detection of the nonlinearly emitted field by electrooptic sampling. In a prototype experiment we study the ultrafast dynamics of nonlinear two-phonon and two-photon interband coherences in the narrow-gap semiconductor InSb. Due to the extraordinarily large optical interband dipole of InSb the experiments were performed in the strongly nonperturbative regime of light-matter interaction allowing for impulsive off-resonant excitation of both two-phonon coherences and two-photon interband coherences, the ultrafast dynamics of which is experimentally observed as a function of the waiting time in the three-pulse 2D experiment. Our novel three-pulse 2D THz spectroscopy paves the way for the detailed investigation of nonlinear quantum coherences in solids and holds potential for an extension to other systems.

  10. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  11. Phase-resolved measurement of electric charge deposited by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, R.; Gerling, T.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Stollenwerk, L.

    2014-01-01

    The surface charge distribution deposited by the effluent of a dielectric barrier discharge driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a dielectric surface has been studied. For the first time, the deposition of charge was observed phase resolved. It takes place in either one or two events in each half cycle of the driving voltage. The charge transfer could also be detected in the electrode current of the jet. The periodic change of surface charge polarity has been found to correspond well with the appearance of ionized channels left behind by guided streamers (bullets) that have been identified in similar experimental situations. The distribution of negative surface charge turned out to be significantly broader than for positive charge. With increasing distance of the jet nozzle from the target surface, the charge transfer decreases until finally the effluent loses contact and the charge transfer stops.

  12. Spectral analysis of dike-induced earthquakes in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Shallow dike intrusions may be accompanied by fault slip above the dikes, a superposition which complicates seismic and geodetic data analyses. The diverse volcano-tectonic and low-frequency local earthquakes accompanying the 2005-2010 large-volume dike intrusions in the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift (Afar), some with fault displacements of up to 3 m at the surface, provide an opportunity to examine the relations among the earthquakes, dike intrusions, and surface ruptures. We apply the frequency index (FI) method to characterize the spectra of swarm earthquakes from six of the dikes. These earthquakes often have broad spectra with multiple peaks, making the usual peak frequency classification method unreliable. Our results show a general bimodal character with high FI earthquakes associated with deeper dikes (top > 3 km subsurface) and low FI earthquakes associated with shallow dikes, indicating that shallow dikes result in earthquakes with more low-frequency content and larger-amplitude surface waves. Low FI earthquakes are more common during dike emplacement, suggesting that interactions between the dike and faults may lead to lower FI. Taken together, likely source processes for low FI earthquakes are shallow hypocenters (<3 km) possibly with surface rupture, slow rupture velocities, and interactions with dike fluids. Strong site effects also heavily influence the earthquake spectral content. Additionally, our results suggest a continuum of spectral responses, implying either that impulsive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and the unusual, emergent earthquakes have similar source processes or that simple spectral analyses, such as FI, cannot distinguish different source processes.

  13. Canonical correlation analysis for assessing the performance of adaptive spectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Paskalova, Biliana; Tyo, J. Scott; Hayat, M. M.

    2005-06-01

    A new class of spectrally adaptive infrared detectors has been reported recently that has a spectral response function that can be altered electronically by controlling the bias voltage of the photodetector. Unlike conventional sensors, these new sensors have ``bands'' that have highly correlated spectral responses. The potential benefit of these sensors is that the number of bands (and their spectral features) used can be adapted to a specific task. The drawback is that there might not be enough spectral diversity to perform detection and classification operations. In this paper we present a new theory that describes the suitability of an arbitrary spectral sensor to perform a specific spectral detection/classification task. This theory is based on the geometric relationships between the sensor space that describes the spectral characteristics of the detector and a scene space that contains the spectra to be observed. We adapt the theory of canonical correlation analysis to provide a rigorous framework for assessing the utility of spectral detectors. We also show that this general theory encompasses traditional band selection methods, but provides much greater flexibility and a more transparent and intuitive explanation of the phenomenology.

  14. Spectral Analysis of Airborne Effluents from Nuclear Facilities and Design of AOTF Spectroradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, E.; Suhre, D.R.; Taylor, L.H.

    1995-03-22

    This report summarizes the spectral analysis and design of an acousto optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectroradiometer for the project SR003. This system will use passive open-path infrared absorption to detect the presence of various source gases.

  15. Spectral and correlation analysis with applications to middle-atmosphere radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, Prabhat K.

    1989-01-01

    The correlation and spectral analysis methods for uniformly sampled stationary random signals, estimation of their spectral moments, and problems arising due to nonstationary are reviewed. Some of these methods are already in routine use in atmospheric radar experiments. Other methods based on the maximum entropy principle and time series models have been used in analyzing data, but are just beginning to receive attention in the analysis of radar signals. These methods are also briefly discussed.

  16. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Siok, C J; Austin, K; Austin-Lafrance, R J; Morgane, P J

    1987-10-01

    Power spectral measures of the EEG obtained from the frontal cortex and hippocampal formation during different vigilance states in the developing rat have been computed and compared. The most significant ontogenetic changes were observed in the hippocampal power spectra obtained during the vigilance state of REM sleep. These spectral analyses have revealed in the hippocampus: (1) a significant increase in the frequency at which the peak power occurs in the theta-frequency (4-11 Hz) band from 14 to 45 days of age; (2) a decrease in the quality factor of the peak from 14 to 45 days of age; (3) a decrease in the relative power co-ordinate for the center of spectral mass associated with the 0-4-Hz frequency band coupled with an increase in the frequency coordinate of the 4-11-Hz frequency band from 14 to 45 days of age, and; (4) a significant decrease in the average percent relative power associated with the 0-4-Hz frequency band from 14 to 22 days of age. For the EEG obtained from the frontal cortex, the major findings of note were: (1) a dominant contribution of relative power in the 0-4-Hz frequency band which was observed at every age and during every vigilance state tested, and; (2) a significant increase in the average percent relative power associated with this band at 18, 22, and 45 days of age. The results of this study provide a quantitative description of the electroencephalographic (EEG) ontogeny of the hippocampal formation and the frontal cortex in the rat. These ontogenetic changes in EEG activity relate closely to development of the internal circuitry and synaptic maturation in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex.

  17. Spectral Analysis of Certain Schrödinger Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mourad E. H.; Koelink, Erik

    2012-09-01

    The J-matrix method is extended to difference and q-difference operators and is applied to several explicit differential, difference, q-difference and second order Askey-Wilson type operators. The spectrum and the spectral measures are discussed in each case and the corresponding eigenfunction expansion is written down explicitly in most cases. In some cases we encounter new orthogonal polynomials with explicit three term recurrence relations where nothing is known about their explicit representations or orthogonality measures. Each model we analyze is a discrete quantum mechanical model in the sense of Odake and Sasaki [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 (2011), 353001, 47 pages].

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and hyper-spectral imaging analysis of pigments on an illuminated manuscript

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melessanaki, K.; Papadakis, V.; Balas, C.; Anglos, D.

    2001-12-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used for the first time in the in-situ identification of pigments in an illuminated manuscript dated from the 12th-13th century AD. Spectral data are presented from the analysis performed on the illumination of an initial letter ‘T’ and on the gold paint used in several parts of the writing. Identification of most pigments, in a nearly non-destructive way, was achieved. In parallel to LIBS, hyper-spectral imaging analysis was performed, which enabled the mapping of the pigments’ spatial distribution on the basis of their characteristic, visible and near infrared absorption spectral features. The identification of the red pigment based on hyper-spectral imaging analysis is demonstrated. Identification of pigments and inks is of great importance for the dating and systematic characterization of illuminated manuscripts and, as shown in this work, a combined analytical approach can provide important and useful information.

  19. The spectral analysis of cyclo-non-stationary signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Baudin, S.; Antoni, J.; Rémond, D.; Eltabach, M.; Sauvage, O.

    2016-06-01

    Condition monitoring of rotating machines in speed-varying conditions remains a challenging task and an active field of research. Specifically, the produced vibrations belong to a particular class of non-stationary signals called cyclo-non-stationary: although highly non-stationary, they contain hidden periodicities related to the shaft angle; the phenomenon of long term modulations is what makes them different from cyclostationary signals which are encountered under constant speed regimes. In this paper, it is shown that the optimal way of describing cyclo-non-stationary signals is jointly in the time and the angular domains. While the first domain describes the waveform characteristics related to the system dynamics, the second one reveals existing periodicities linked to the system kinematics. Therefore, a specific class of signals - coined angle-time cyclostationary is considered, expressing the angle-time interaction. Accordingly, the related spectral representations, the order-frequency spectral correlation and coherence functions are proposed and their efficiency is demonstrated on two industrial cases.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Based on Delayed Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanli; Fu, Jialei; Zhao, Xiaolei; van Wijk, Eduard; Wang, Mei; Nie, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in healthcare; however, it lacks scientific evidence to support the multidimensional therapeutic effects. These effects are based on experience, and, to date, there is no advanced tool to evaluate these experience based effects. In the current study, Chinese herbal materials classified with different cold and heat therapeutic properties, based on Chinese medicine principles, were investigated using spectral distribution, as well as the decay probability distribution based on delayed luminescence (DL). A detection system based on ultraweak biophoton emission was developed to determine the DL decay kinetics of the cold and heat properties of Chinese herbal materials. We constructed a mathematical model to fit the experimental data and characterize the properties of Chinese medicinal herbs with different parameters. The results demonstrated that this method has good reproducibility. Moreover, there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the spectral distribution and the decay probability distribution of Chinese herbal materials with cold and heat properties. This approach takes advantage of the comprehensive nature of DL compared with more reductionist approaches and is more consistent with TCM principles, in which the core comprises holistic views. PMID:27478482

  1. [Spectral features analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean].

    PubMed

    Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Lei, Rui-bo; Li, Qun; Sun, Bo

    2012-04-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate change, and its quick change and impact are the scientists' focus all over the world. The spectra of different kinds of sea ice were measured with portable ASD FieldSpec 3 spectrometer during the long-term ice station of the 4th Chinese national Arctic Expedition in 2010, and the spectral features were analyzed systematically. The results indicated that the reflectance of sea ice covered by snow is the highest one, naked sea ice the second, and melted sea ice the lowest. Peak and valley characteristics of spectrum curves of sea ice covered by thick snow, thin snow, wet snow and snow crystal are very significant, and the reflectance basically decreases with the wavelength increasing. The rules of reflectance change with wavelength of natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice are basically same, the reflectance of them is medium, and that of grey ice is far lower than natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice. It is very significant for scientific research to analyze the spectral features of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and to implement the quantitative remote sensing of sea ice, and to further analyze its response to the global warming.

  2. Spectral Analysis of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Based on Delayed Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jingxiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanli; Fu, Jialei; Zhao, Xiaolei; Yang, Meina; van Wijk, Eduard; Wang, Mei; Nie, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in healthcare; however, it lacks scientific evidence to support the multidimensional therapeutic effects. These effects are based on experience, and, to date, there is no advanced tool to evaluate these experience based effects. In the current study, Chinese herbal materials classified with different cold and heat therapeutic properties, based on Chinese medicine principles, were investigated using spectral distribution, as well as the decay probability distribution based on delayed luminescence (DL). A detection system based on ultraweak biophoton emission was developed to determine the DL decay kinetics of the cold and heat properties of Chinese herbal materials. We constructed a mathematical model to fit the experimental data and characterize the properties of Chinese medicinal herbs with different parameters. The results demonstrated that this method has good reproducibility. Moreover, there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the spectral distribution and the decay probability distribution of Chinese herbal materials with cold and heat properties. This approach takes advantage of the comprehensive nature of DL compared with more reductionist approaches and is more consistent with TCM principles, in which the core comprises holistic views. PMID:27478482

  3. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  4. Phase resolved near-field imaging of propagating waves in infrared tapered slot antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florence, Louis A.; Kinzel, Edward C.; Olmon, Robert L.; Ginn, James C.; Raschke, Markus B.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2012-11-01

    Tapered slot antennas (TSAs) consist of a planar non-resonant structure which couples incident radiation to a propagating waveguide mode. They are commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies because they are fundamentally broadband and have small profiles. Because of their planar layout and broadband response they have recently been scaled to infrared frequencies where they have advantages for sensing and energy harvesting. We use scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) to study the mode transformation of two types of TSA operating in the thermal infrared (λ0 = 10.6 μm) with respect to electric field amplitude and phase. The results agree well with simulation showing both the phase reversal across the tapered slot and the traveling of wave fronts along the tapered slot, yet they also reveal high sensitivity of device performance to inhomogeneities in the geometry or illumination. This study will aid future design and analysis of practical non-resonant antennas operating at optical and infrared frequencies.

  5. [Estimation of Hunan forest carbon density based on spectral mixture analysis of MODIS data].

    PubMed

    Yan, En-ping; Lin, Hui; Wang, Guang-xing; Chen, Zhen-xiong

    2015-11-01

    With the fast development of remote sensing technology, combining forest inventory sample plot data and remotely sensed images has become a widely used method to map forest carbon density. However, the existence of mixed pixels often impedes the improvement of forest carbon density mapping, especially when low spatial resolution images such as MODIS are used. In this study, MODIS images and national forest inventory sample plot data were used to conduct the study of estimation for forest carbon density. Linear spectral mixture analysis with and without constraint, and nonlinear spectral mixture analysis were compared to derive the fractions of different land use and land cover (LULC) types. Then sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm with and without the fraction images from spectral mixture analyses were employed to estimate forest carbon density of Hunan Province. Results showed that 1) Linear spectral mixture analysis with constraint, leading to a mean RMSE of 0.002, more accurately estimated the fractions of LULC types than linear spectral and nonlinear spectral mixture analyses; 2) Integrating spectral mixture analysis model and sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm increased the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density to 81.5% from 74.1%, and decreased the RMSE to 5.18 from 7.26; and 3) The mean value of forest carbon density for the province was 30.06 t · hm(-2), ranging from 0.00 to 67.35 t · hm(-2). This implied that the spectral mixture analysis provided a great potential to increase the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density on regional and global level.

  6. [Estimation of Hunan forest carbon density based on spectral mixture analysis of MODIS data].

    PubMed

    Yan, En-ping; Lin, Hui; Wang, Guang-xing; Chen, Zhen-xiong

    2015-11-01

    With the fast development of remote sensing technology, combining forest inventory sample plot data and remotely sensed images has become a widely used method to map forest carbon density. However, the existence of mixed pixels often impedes the improvement of forest carbon density mapping, especially when low spatial resolution images such as MODIS are used. In this study, MODIS images and national forest inventory sample plot data were used to conduct the study of estimation for forest carbon density. Linear spectral mixture analysis with and without constraint, and nonlinear spectral mixture analysis were compared to derive the fractions of different land use and land cover (LULC) types. Then sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm with and without the fraction images from spectral mixture analyses were employed to estimate forest carbon density of Hunan Province. Results showed that 1) Linear spectral mixture analysis with constraint, leading to a mean RMSE of 0.002, more accurately estimated the fractions of LULC types than linear spectral and nonlinear spectral mixture analyses; 2) Integrating spectral mixture analysis model and sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm increased the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density to 81.5% from 74.1%, and decreased the RMSE to 5.18 from 7.26; and 3) The mean value of forest carbon density for the province was 30.06 t · hm(-2), ranging from 0.00 to 67.35 t · hm(-2). This implied that the spectral mixture analysis provided a great potential to increase the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density on regional and global level. PMID:26915200

  7. Studies on spectral analysis of randomly sampled signals: Application to laser velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David

    1992-01-01

    Spectral analysis is very useful in determining the frequency characteristics of many turbulent flows, for example, vortex flows, tail buffeting, and other pulsating flows. It is also used for obtaining turbulence spectra from which the time and length scales associated with the turbulence structure can be estimated. These estimates, in turn, can be helpful for validation of theoretical/numerical flow turbulence models. Laser velocimetry (LV) is being extensively used in the experimental investigation of different types of flows, because of its inherent advantages; nonintrusive probing, high frequency response, no calibration requirements, etc. Typically, the output of an individual realization laser velocimeter is a set of randomly sampled velocity data. Spectral analysis of such data requires special techniques to obtain reliable estimates of correlation and power spectral density functions that describe the flow characteristics. FORTRAN codes for obtaining the autocorrelation and power spectral density estimates using the correlation-based slotting technique were developed. Extensive studies have been conducted on simulated first-order spectrum and sine signals to improve the spectral estimates. A first-order spectrum was chosen because it represents the characteristics of a typical one-dimensional turbulence spectrum. Digital prefiltering techniques, to improve the spectral estimates from randomly sampled data were applied. Studies show that the spectral estimates can be increased up to about five times the mean sampling rate.

  8. Studies on spectral analysis of randomly sampled signals: Application to laser velocimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, David

    1992-09-01

    Spectral analysis is very useful in determining the frequency characteristics of many turbulent flows, for example, vortex flows, tail buffeting, and other pulsating flows. It is also used for obtaining turbulence spectra from which the time and length scales associated with the turbulence structure can be estimated. These estimates, in turn, can be helpful for validation of theoretical/numerical flow turbulence models. Laser velocimetry (LV) is being extensively used in the experimental investigation of different types of flows, because of its inherent advantages; nonintrusive probing, high frequency response, no calibration requirements, etc. Typically, the output of an individual realization laser velocimeter is a set of randomly sampled velocity data. Spectral analysis of such data requires special techniques to obtain reliable estimates of correlation and power spectral density functions that describe the flow characteristics. FORTRAN codes for obtaining the autocorrelation and power spectral density estimates using the correlation-based slotting technique were developed. Extensive studies have been conducted on simulated first-order spectrum and sine signals to improve the spectral estimates. A first-order spectrum was chosen because it represents the characteristics of a typical one-dimensional turbulence spectrum. Digital prefiltering techniques, to improve the spectral estimates from randomly sampled data were applied. Studies show that the spectral estimates can be increased up to about five times the mean sampling rate.

  9. Perception of complex tones and its analogy to echo spectral analysis in the bat, Megaderma lyra.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, K; Schmidt, S

    1999-02-01

    The gleaning bat Megaderma lyra emits broadband echolocation sounds consisting of multiple frequency components. The present study investigates into which perceptual qualities the spectral characteristics of echoes may be translated in the auditory system of M. lyra. Three bats were trained in a 2-AFC behavioral experiment to classify nine complex tones, which spectrally resembled M. lyra's sonar calls, into two perceptual categories. Then the bats' spontaneous responses to unknown complex tones were recorded. The results show that the animals based their classifications of the complex tones on a sound quality which was mediated by their broadband frequency spectra. The bats used the training stimuli as spectral templates and classified the test stimuli according to their broadband spectral similarity with the learned patterns. Assuming that passive hearing and echo processing are governed by similar perceptual qualities and subject to similar limitations, the perceptual mode which was used by the bats to compare the multicomponent spectral patterns in the reported experiments could serve as a powerful tool for the spectral analysis of M. lyra's multicomponent echoes. The analogy between the perception of complex tones and echo spectral analysis in M. lyra is theoretically elaborated in the "formant-mode" model.

  10. Spectral analysis of wave motion in plane solids with boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.; Doyle, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral formulation is employed whereby in-plane stress waves are synthesized from the superposition of components at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers. The summations are performed using the fast Fourier transform and the Fourier series, respectively. Because the components are discrete, the solution to problems (over the entire field) with completely arbitrary loading, both in time and space, is made tractable. Waves generated from a line load acting on an infinite and semiinfinite plane are first considered. A cascade approach is then adopted for the treatment of these waves incident on a free, fixed, and elastic boundary. At each stage, the results are compared with those obtained from the available classical solutions and/or finite element results. These studies will form the basis for the investigation of in-plane stress waves in multiply layered media.

  11. REM sleep EEG spectral analysis in patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Julie; Stip, Emmanuel; Godbout, Roger

    2008-10-01

    The pathophysiology of schizophrenia includes abnormalities in subcortical-cortical transfer of information that can be studied using REM sleep EEG spectral analysis, a measure that reflects spontaneous and endogenous thalamocortical activity. We recorded 10 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls for two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory, using a 10-electrode EEG montage. Sixty seconds of REM sleep EEG without artifact were analyzed using FFT spectral analysis. Absolute and relative spectral amplitudes of five frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta1 and beta2) were extracted and compared between the two groups. Frequency bands with significant differences were correlated with BPRS positive and negative symptoms scores. Patients with schizophrenia showed lower relative alpha and higher relative beta2 spectral amplitudes compared to healthy controls over the averaged total scalp. Analysis using cortical regions showed lower relative alpha over frontal, central and temporal regions and higher relative beta2 over the occipital region. Absolute spectral amplitude was not different between groups for any given EEG band. However, absolute alpha activity correlated negatively with BPRS positive symptoms scores and correlated positively with negative symptoms scores. Since similar results have been reported following EEG spectral analysis during the waking state, we conclude that abnormalities of subcortical-cortical transfer of information in schizophrenia could be generated by mechanisms common to REM sleep and waking. PMID:18280502

  12. MR PRISM: a spectral analysis tool for the PRISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael

    2006-08-01

    We describe a computer application designed to analyze hyperspectral data collected by the Compact Infrared Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). The application links the spectral, imaging and mapping perspectives on the eventual CRISM dataset by presenting the user with three different ways to analyze the data. One of the goals when developing this instrument is to build in the latest algorithms for detection of spectrally compelling targets on the surface of the Red Planet, so they may be available to the Planetary Science community without cost and with a minimal learning barrier to cross. This will allow the Astrobiology community to look for targets of interest such as hydrothermal minerals, sulfate minerals and hydrous minerals and be able to map the extent of these minerals using the most up-to-date and effective algorithms. The application is programmed in Java and will be made available for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms. Users will be able to embed Groovy scripts into the program in order to extend its functionality. The first collection of CRISM data will occur in September of 2006 and this data will be made publicly available six months later via the Planetary Datasystem (PDS). Potential users in the community should therefore look forward to a release date mid-2007. Although exploration of the CRISM data set is the motivating force for developing these software tools, the ease of writing additional Groovy scripts to access other data sets makes the tools useful for mineral exploration, crop management, and characterization of extreme environments here on Earth or other terrestrial planets. The system can be easily implemented for use by high school, college, and graduate level students.

  13. Highly sensitive index of sympathetic activity based on time-frequency spectral analysis of electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Álvaro D; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Time-domain indices of electrodermal activity (EDA) have been used as a marker of sympathetic tone. However, they often show high variation between subjects and low consistency, which has precluded their general use as a marker of sympathetic tone. To examine whether power spectral density analysis of EDA can provide more consistent results, we recently performed a variety of sympathetic tone-evoking experiments (43). We found significant increase in the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.045 to 0.25 Hz when sympathetic tone-evoking stimuli were induced. The sympathetic tone assessed by the power spectral density of EDA was found to have lower variation and more sensitivity for certain, but not all, stimuli compared with the time-domain analysis of EDA. We surmise that this lack of sensitivity in certain sympathetic tone-inducing conditions with time-invariant spectral analysis of EDA may lie in its inability to characterize time-varying dynamics of the sympathetic tone. To overcome the disadvantages of time-domain and time-invariant power spectral indices of EDA, we developed a highly sensitive index of sympathetic tone, based on time-frequency analysis of EDA signals. Its efficacy was tested using experiments designed to elicit sympathetic dynamics. Twelve subjects underwent four tests known to elicit sympathetic tone arousal: cold pressor, tilt table, stand test, and the Stroop task. We hypothesize that a more sensitive measure of sympathetic control can be developed using time-varying spectral analysis. Variable frequency complex demodulation, a recently developed technique for time-frequency analysis, was used to obtain spectral amplitudes associated with EDA. We found that the time-varying spectral frequency band 0.08-0.24 Hz was most responsive to stimulation. Spectral power for frequencies higher than 0.24 Hz were determined to be not related to the sympathetic dynamics because they comprised less than 5% of the total power. The mean value of time

  14. Highly sensitive index of sympathetic activity based on time-frequency spectral analysis of electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Álvaro D; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Time-domain indices of electrodermal activity (EDA) have been used as a marker of sympathetic tone. However, they often show high variation between subjects and low consistency, which has precluded their general use as a marker of sympathetic tone. To examine whether power spectral density analysis of EDA can provide more consistent results, we recently performed a variety of sympathetic tone-evoking experiments (43). We found significant increase in the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.045 to 0.25 Hz when sympathetic tone-evoking stimuli were induced. The sympathetic tone assessed by the power spectral density of EDA was found to have lower variation and more sensitivity for certain, but not all, stimuli compared with the time-domain analysis of EDA. We surmise that this lack of sensitivity in certain sympathetic tone-inducing conditions with time-invariant spectral analysis of EDA may lie in its inability to characterize time-varying dynamics of the sympathetic tone. To overcome the disadvantages of time-domain and time-invariant power spectral indices of EDA, we developed a highly sensitive index of sympathetic tone, based on time-frequency analysis of EDA signals. Its efficacy was tested using experiments designed to elicit sympathetic dynamics. Twelve subjects underwent four tests known to elicit sympathetic tone arousal: cold pressor, tilt table, stand test, and the Stroop task. We hypothesize that a more sensitive measure of sympathetic control can be developed using time-varying spectral analysis. Variable frequency complex demodulation, a recently developed technique for time-frequency analysis, was used to obtain spectral amplitudes associated with EDA. We found that the time-varying spectral frequency band 0.08-0.24 Hz was most responsive to stimulation. Spectral power for frequencies higher than 0.24 Hz were determined to be not related to the sympathetic dynamics because they comprised less than 5% of the total power. The mean value of time

  15. Principal Components Analysis of Martian NIR Image Cubes to Retrieve Surface Spectral Endmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2016-07-01

    Presented here is a discussion of the complete principal components analysis (PCA) performed on all photometric NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) NSFCAM spectral image sets from 1995–2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral image sets from 2006–2008, detailing the similarities and differences and overall interpretation of the PC dimensional spaces. The purpose of the analysis is to use the PCA to recover surface spectral endmembers to be used in a full radiative transfer modeling program to recover ice cloud optical depths (and thus water content) over diurnal, seasonal, and interannual timescales. The PCA results show considerable consistency across all seasons, and can be optimized to increase the consistency through both spectral and geographic restrictions on the data.

  16. Principal Components Analysis of Martian NIR Image Cubes to Retrieve Surface Spectral Endmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2016-07-01

    Presented here is a discussion of the complete principal components analysis (PCA) performed on all photometric NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) NSFCAM spectral image sets from 1995-2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral image sets from 2006-2008, detailing the similarities and differences and overall interpretation of the PC dimensional spaces. The purpose of the analysis is to use the PCA to recover surface spectral endmembers to be used in a full radiative transfer modeling program to recover ice cloud optical depths (and thus water content) over diurnal, seasonal, and interannual timescales. The PCA results show considerable consistency across all seasons, and can be optimized to increase the consistency through both spectral and geographic restrictions on the data.

  17. Post-analysis report on Chesapeake Bay data processing. [spectral analysis and recognition computer signature extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    The additional processing performed on data collected over the Rhode River Test Site and Forestry Site in November 1970 is reported. The techniques and procedures used to obtain the processed results are described. Thermal data collected over three approximately parallel lines of the site were contoured, and the results color coded, for the purpose of delineating important scene constituents and to identify trees attacked by pine bark beetles. Contouring work and histogram preparation are reviewed and the important conclusions from the spectral analysis and recognition computer (SPARC) signature extension work are summarized. The SPARC setup and processing records are presented and recommendations are made for future data collection over the site.

  18. Technical Training on High-Order Spectral Analysis and Thermal Anemometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, A. A.; Shiplyuk, A. N.; Sidirenko, A. A.; Bountin, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The topics of thermal anemometry and high-order spectral analyses were the subject of the technical training. Specifically, the objective of the technical training was to study: (i) the recently introduced constant voltage anemometer (CVA) for high-speed boundary layer; and (ii) newly developed high-order spectral analysis techniques (HOSA). Both CVA and HOSA are relevant tools for studies of boundary layer transition and stability.

  19. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Transition Operators, Automata Groups and Translation in BBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zuk, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    We give the automata that describe time evolution rules of the box-ball system with a carrier. It can be shown by use of tropical geometry that such systems are ultradiscrete analogues of KdV equation. We discuss their relation with the lamplighter group generated by an automaton. We present spectral analysis of the stochastic matrices induced by these automata and verify their spectral coincidence.

  1. A fluctuation-induced plasma transport diagnostic based upon fast-Fourier transform spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, J. Y.; Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A diagnostic, based on fast Fourier-transform spectral analysis techniques, that provides experimental insight into the relationship between the experimentally observable spectral characteristics of the fluctuations and the fluctuation-induced plasma transport is described. The model upon which the diagnostic technique is based and its experimental implementation is discussed. Some characteristic results obtained during the course of an experimental study of fluctuation-induced transport in the electric field dominated NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma are presented.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  3. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  4. Spectral moments analysis of stops in tracheoesophageal speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, Kimberly; Obert, Kerrie; Fox, Robert Allen

    2002-05-01

    Optimal speech intelligibility is naturally of primary concern for individuals who have had their larynxes removed due to cancer and are now using tracheoesophageal (TE) speech as their primary mode of communication. The current study examines the acoustic characteristics associated with the oral stops /pbtdkg/ produced by TE speakers as compared to normal speakers. Of particular interest are the acoustic differences between these two sets of speakers in oral stop bursts and in the aspiration frication for the voiceless stops. A set of utterances in which these six stops occur in both initial position (CV) and intervocalic position (VCV) before a wide range of English vowels were recorded for each set of speakers. Appropriate acoustic measurements were then made for each stop. These measurements included the spectral moments of the burst and aspiration, VOT, closure duration (for intervocalic stops), and the relative and normalized amplitude levels of the burst and aspiration. Acoustic differences obtained will be discussed as a function of speaker type, phonetic context and, in the case of the TE speaker, experience with the device.

  5. Koopmans' Analysis of Chemical Hardness with Spectral-Like Resolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three approximation levels of Koopmans' theorem are explored and applied: the first referring to the inner quantum behavior of the orbitalic energies that depart from the genuine ones in Fock space when the wave-functions' Hilbert-Banach basis set is specified to solve the many-electronic spectra of spin-orbitals' eigenstates; it is the most subtle issue regarding Koopmans' theorem as it brings many critics and refutation in the last decades, yet it is shown here as an irrefutable “observational” effect through computation, specific to any in silico spectra of an eigenproblem; the second level assumes the “frozen spin-orbitals” approximation during the extracting or adding of electrons to the frontier of the chemical system through the ionization and affinity processes, respectively; this approximation is nevertheless workable for great deal of chemical compounds, especially organic systems, and is justified for chemical reactivity and aromaticity hierarchies in an homologue series; the third and the most severe approximation regards the extension of the second one to superior orders of ionization and affinities, here studied at the level of chemical hardness compact-finite expressions up to spectral-like resolution for a paradigmatic set of aromatic carbohydrates. PMID:23970834

  6. LDA measurements and turbulence spectral analysis in an agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk

    2013-04-01

    During the last years considerable improvement of the derivation of turbulence power spectrum from Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) has been achieved. The irregularly sampled LDA data is proposed to approximate by several methods e.g. Lomb-Scargle method, which estimates amplitude and phase of spectral lines from missing data, methods based on the reconstruction of the auto-correlation function (referred to as correlation slotting technique), methods based on the reconstruction of the time series using interpolation between the uneven sampling and subsequent resampling etc. These different methods were used on the LDA data measured in an agitated vessel and the results of the power spectrum calculations were compared. The measurements were performed in the mixing vessel with flat bottom. The vessel was equipped with four baffles and agitated with a six-blade pitched blade impeller. Three values of the impeller speed (Reynolds number) were tested. Long time series of the axial velocity component were measured in selected points. In each point the time series were analyzed and evaluated in a form of power spectrum.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on spectral interferometry: numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Li, Hui; Duan, Jingyuan; Shi, Ancun; Liu, Yuliang

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a numerical simulation of a phase detecting surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme based on spectral interference. Based on the simulation, we propose a method to optimize various aspects of SPR sensors, which enables better performance in both measurement range (MR) and sensitivity. In the simulation, four parameters including the spectrum of the broadband light source, incident angle, Au film thickness, and refractive index of the prism coupler are analyzed. The results show that it is a good solution for better performance to use a warm white broadband (625-800 nm) light source, a divergence angle of the collimated incident light less than 0.02°, and an optimized 48 nm thick Au film when a visible broadband light source is used. If a near-IR light source is used, however, the Au film thickness should be somewhat thinner according the specific spectrum. In addition, a wider MR could be obtained if a prism coupler with higher refractive index is used. With all the parameters appropriately set, the SPR MR could be extended to 0.55 refractive index units while keeping the sensitivity at a level of 10(-8). PMID:23669838

  8. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time.

  9. PHASE-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND PHOTOMETRY OF V1500 CYGNI, AND A SEARCH FOR SIMILAR OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Randy D.; Lyke, James E. E-mail: jlyke@keck.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    We present phase-resolved near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the classical nova (CN) V1500 Cyg to explore whether cyclotron emission is present in this system. While the spectroscopy do not indicate the presence of discrete cyclotron harmonic emission, the light curves suggest that a sizable fraction of its near-infrared fluxes are due to this component. The light curves of V1500 Cyg appear to remain dominated by emission from the heated face of the secondary star in this system. We have used infrared spectroscopy and photometry to search for other potential magnetic systems among old CNe. We have found that the infrared light curves of V1974 Cyg superficially resemble those of V1500 Cyg, suggesting a highly irradiated companion. The old novae V446 Her and QV Vul have light curves with large amplitude variations like those seen in polars, suggesting they might have magnetic primaries. We extract photometry for 79 old novae from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog and use those data to derive the mean, un-reddened infrared colors of quiescent novae. We also extract WISE data for these objects and find that 45 of them were detected. Surprisingly, a number of these systems were detected in the WISE 22 {mu}m band. While two of those objects produced significant dust shells (V705 Cas and V445 Pup), the others did not. It appears that line emission from their ionized ejected shells is the most likely explanation for those detections.

  10. Spectral Analysis Of Linear, Shift-Invariant Interpolants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.; Park, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Method of analysis provides quantitative measure of reconstruction and interpolation performances of linear, shift-invariant interpolants. Criterion of performance based upon mean-square error of difference between sampled and reconstructed functions. Applicable to reconstruction algorithms used in processing of signals and images and to types of interpolants used in numerical analysis, computer-aided design, and computer graphics.

  11. Spectral characterization as a tool for parchment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radis, Michela; Iacomussi, Paola; Rossi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents an investigation on the correlation between spectral characteristics and conservation conditions of parchment to define a NON invasive methodology able to detect and monitor deterioration process in historical parchment without the need of taking small samples. To verify the feasibility and define the most appropriate measurement method, several samples of contemporary parchments, produced following ancient recipes and coming from different animal species, with different degrees of artificially induced damage, were analyzed. The SRF and STF of each sample were measured in the same point, before and after each step of the artificial ageing treatment. Having at disposal a parchment coming from a whole lamb leather, allowed also the study of the correlations between the variations of SRF - STF and the intrinsic factors of a parchment like the variability of animal skin anatomy and of manufacturing. Analyzing different samples allowed also the definition of the measuring method sensitivity and of reference spectrum for the different animal species parchments with accuracy limits. The definition of a reference spectrum of not damaged parchment with acceptability limits is a necessary step for understanding, through SRF - STF measurements, historical parchments conservation conditions: indeed it is necessary to know if deviations from the reference spectrum are ascribable to damage or only to parchment anatomic/production variability. As a case study, the method has been applied to two historical parchment scrolls stored at the Archivio di Stato di Torino (Italy). The SRF - STF of both scrolls was acquired in several points of the scroll, the average spectrum of each scroll was compared with the reference spectra with the relative tolerance limits, recognizing the animal species and damage alterations and demonstrating the feasibility of the method.

  12. Spectral analysis of the fifth spectrum of indium: In V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swapnil; Tauheed, A.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth spectrum of indium (In V) has been investigated in the grazing and normal incidence wavelength regions. In4+ is a Rh-like ion with the ground configuration 4p64d9 and first excited configurations of the type 4p64d8nℓ (n≥4). The theoretical predications for this ion were made by Cowan's quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock code with superposition of configurations involving 4p64d8(5p+6p+7p+4f+5f+6f), 4p54d10, 4p64d75s(5p+4f) for the odd parity matrix and 4p64d8 (5s+6s+7s+5d+6d), 4p64d7(5s2+5p2) for the even parity system. The spectra used for this work were recorded on 10.7 m grazing and normal incidence spectrographs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (USA) and also on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at Antigonish (Canada). The sources used were a sliding spark and a triggered spark respectively. Two hundred and thirty two energy levels based on the identification of 873 spectral lines have been established, forty six being new. Least squares fitted parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed level structure. The energy levels were optimized using a level optimization computer program (LOPT). Our wavelength accuracy for sharp and unblended lines is estimated to be within ±0.005 Å for λ below 400 Å and ±0.006 Å up to 1200 Å.

  13. Spectral and Morphological Analysis of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Massironi, M.; Carli, C.; Martellato, E.; Pasquarè, G.; Pompilio, L.; Cremonese, G.

    2008-12-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. According to MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope < 5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes < 0.5° and commonly < 0.1°. MOC and THEMIS images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than 1500, even if determining their absolute length is difficult as subsequent lava flows have buried the source vents. MEX/OMEGA data reveal that Daedalia Planum lavas have a spectral shapes comparable to those observed in laboratory for rock slabs of Earth's basalts. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. The Daedalia Planum flow surfaces show several morphological features that remember the inflation fingerprints. This suggests that also Daedalia Planum could have been interested by inflation. However these features appear dissimilar to inflation forms on Elysium Planitia flows. Different degrees of erosion could explain such dissimilarities. In particular Daedalia Planum flow surfaces appear heavily modelled by wind erosion whereas the Elysium Planitia features seem fresher. The different age between the two areas support this hypothesis. Our crater counting dated the most recent Daedalia Planum flows to about 230 Myr , by contrast the Elysium Planitia lava flows range from 100 to 10 My. In conclusion, the inflation process on Martian flows could be more frequent than previously supposed and, consequently, effusion rates and rheological properties of Martian lavas more variable.

  14. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%. PMID:26504638

  15. Spectral analysis of time series of categorical variables in earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Dorador, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Time series of categorical variables often appear in Earth Science disciplines and there is considerable interest in studying their cyclic behavior. This is true, for example, when the type of facies, petrofabric features, ichnofabrics, fossil assemblages or mineral compositions are measured continuously over a core or throughout a stratigraphic succession. Here we deal with the problem of applying spectral analysis to such sequences. A full indicator approach is proposed to complement the spectral envelope often used in other disciplines. Additionally, a stand-alone computer program is provided for calculating the spectral envelope, in this case implementing the permutation test to assess the statistical significance of the spectral peaks. We studied simulated sequences as well as real data in order to illustrate the methodology.

  16. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Spectral analysis as related to C-band radar data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work performed on spectral analysis of data from the C-band radars tracking GEOS-2 and on the development of a data compaction method for the GEOS-2 C-band radar data is described. The purposes of the spectral analysis study were to determine the optimum data recording and sampling rates for C-band radar data and to determine the optimum method of filtering and smoothing the data. The optimum data recording and sampling rate is defined as the rate which includes an optimum compromise between serial correlation and the effects of frequency folding. The goal in development of a data compaction method was to reduce to a minimum the amount of data stored, while maintaining all of the statistical information content of the non-compacted data. A digital computer program for computing estimates of the power spectral density function of sampled data was used to perform the spectral analysis study.

  17. Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

  18. Objective determination of image end-members in spectral mixture analysis of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Forsyth, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral mixture analysis has been shown to be a powerful, multifaceted tool for analysis of multi- and hyper-spectral data. Applications of AVIRIS data have ranged from mapping soils and bedrock to ecosystem studies. During the first phase of the approach, a set of end-members are selected from an image cube (image end-members) that best account for its spectral variance within a constrained, linear least squares mixing model. These image end-members are usually selected using a priori knowledge and successive trial and error solutions to refine the total number and physical location of the end-members. However, in many situations a more objective method of determining these essential components is desired. We approach the problem of image end-member determination objectively by using the inherent variance of the data. Unlike purely statistical methods such as factor analysis, this approach derives solutions that conform to a physically realistic model.

  19. Objective determination of image end-members in spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Forsyth, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral mixture analysis was shown to be a powerful, multifaceted tool for analysis of multi- and hyper-spectral data. The essence of the first phase of the approach is to determine a set of image end-members that best account for the spectral variance in an image cube within a constrained, linear least squares mixing model. The selection of the image end-member is usually achieved using a priori knowledge and successive trial and error solutions to refine the total number and physical location of the end-members. However, in many situations a more objective method of determining these essential components is desired. The problem of image end-member determination was approached objectively by using the inherent variance of the data. Unlike purely statistical methods such as factor analysis, this approach derives solutions that conform to a physically realistic model.

  20. IR spectral analysis for the diagnostics of crust earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarkhodgaev, R. M.; Liperovsky, V. A.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Naumov, D. Ju

    2012-04-01

    In regions of future earthquakes, a few days before the seismic shock, the emanation of radon and hydrogen is being observed, which causes clouds of increased ionisation in the atmosphere. In the present work the possible diagnostics of these clouds using infrared (IR) spectroscopy is considered, which may be important and useful for the general geophysical system of earthquake prediction and the observation of industrial emissions of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Some possible physical processes are analysed, which cause, under the condition of additional ionisation in a pre-breakdown electrical field, emissions in the IR interval. In doing so, the transparency region of the IR spectrum at wavelengths of 7-15 μm is taken into account. This transparency region corresponds to spectral lines of small atmospheric constituents like CH4, CO2, N2O, NO2, NO, and O3. The possible intensities of the IR emissions observable in laboratories and in nature are estimated. The acceleration process of the electrons in the pre-breakdown electrical field before its adhesion to the molecules is analysed. The laboratory equipment for the investigation of the IR absorption spectrum is constructed for the cases of normal and decreased atmospheric pressures. The syntheses of ozone and nitrous oxides are performed in the barrier discharge. It is studied if the products of the syntheses may be used to model atmospheric processes where these components take part. Spectra of products of the syntheses in the wavelength region of 2-10 μm are observed and analysed. A device is created for the syntheses and accumulation of nitrous oxides. Experiments to observe the IR-spectra of ozone and nitrous oxides during the syntheses and during the further evolution of these molecules are performed. For the earthquake prediction, practically, the investigation of emission spectra is most important, but during the laboratory experiments, the radiation of the excited molecules is shifted by a

  1. Spectral analysis of ALH 84001, a meteorite from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Pieters, C.; Mustard, J.; Pratt, S.; Hiroi, T.

    1994-07-01

    ALH 84001 has recently been reclassified as a meteorite from Mars (SNC) and contains more than 90% orthopyroxene with minor chromite and accessory phases of augite, maskelynite, and carbonate. This meteorite represents a new class of igneous material from Mars. We have measured reflectance spectra of ALH 84001 as a chip as a powder, dry sieved to less than 125 microns to compare with previous spectral analyses of SNCs and remote observations of Mars. Spectra of the chip and powder in the visible-to-near-infrared region are shown. These spectra are composites of data measured with the RELAB bidirectional spectrometer from 0.3 to 2.55 microns and a Nicolet FTIR for longer wavelengths. As expected, the spectra of the chip have negative slopes and are significantly darker than the spectrum of the particulate sample, which has a positive slope. The strong absorptions near 1 micron and 2 microns are characteristic of low-Ca pyroxene and have band rninima of 0.925 microns and 1.930 microns. The strong absorption near 3 microns is characteristic of water. There is a distinct flattening in the spectrum between 1.0 and 1.5 microns indicating the presence of an additional absorption. This is interpreted to be the result of Fe(2+) in the M1 site of low-Ca pyroxene. Mid-infrared spectra showing the Christiansen feature and the reststrahlen bands are shown for spectra of the powder and of three different locations on the chip. These spectra exhibit several features in this range, some of which are associated with a specific region on the chip. Each of the spectra includes a doublet reststrahlen peak near 1100/cm, and peaks near 880 and 500/cm, which are typical for low-Ca pyroxenes. Weaker features at 940-1000/cm, 600-750/cm, and 530-560/cm are present in spectra from some locations on the chip, but not others, implying compositional and textural variation.

  2. [Spectral analysis of self-oscillating motility in isolated plasmodial strand of Physarum polycephalum].

    PubMed

    Proskurin, S G; Avsievich, T I

    2014-01-01

    In this study the experimental dependencies of the velocity of shuttle endoplasmic motion in the isolated plasmodial strand of Physarum polycephalum obtained by laser Doppler microscopy are presented. The spectral analysis of the time dependencies of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components. Influence of KCN and SHAM--inhibitors of cellular respiration--leads to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. After removal of the inhibitors the respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillation sources. Based on the spectral analysis the simulated time-dependent velocity of the endoplasmic motion is rather good consistent with experimental data. PMID:25715623

  3. Spectral analysis of the emission current noise exhibited by few layer WS2 nanosheets emitter.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R; Kolhe, Pankaj S; Rout, Chandra S; Late, Dattatray J; More, Mahendra A

    2015-02-01

    Spectral analysis of the field emission (FE) current fluctuations has been carried out at the base pressure ~1×10(-8) mbar. The emission current stability investigated at preset value of 2 µA is characterized by 'step' like fluctuation. The spectral analysis performed on a FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) analyzer revealed that the observed noise is of 1/fα type, with the value of α as ~1.05. The estimated value of α implies that the current fluctuations are mainly due the various processes occurring on atomic scale like adsorption, migration, and/or desorption of the residual gas species on the emitter surface.

  4. Spectral Cytometry Has Unique Properties Allowing Multicolor Analysis of Cell Suspensions Isolated from Solid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Sandrine; Valente, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, initially developed to analyze surface protein expression in hematopoietic cells, has increased in analytical complexity and is now widely used to identify cells from different tissues and organisms. As a consequence, data analysis became increasingly difficult due the need of large multi-parametric compensation matrices and to the eventual auto-fluorescence frequently found in cell suspensions obtained from solid organs. In contrast with conventional flow cytometry that detects the emission peak of fluorochromes, spectral flow cytometry distinguishes the shapes of emission spectra along a large range of continuous wave lengths. The data is analyzed with an algorithm that replaces compensation matrices and treats auto-fluorescence as an independent parameter. Thus, spectral flow cytometry should be capable to discriminate fluorochromes with similar emission peaks and provide multi-parametric analysis without compensation requirements. Here we show that spectral flow cytometry achieves a 21-parametric (19 fluorescent probes) characterization and deals with auto-fluorescent cells, providing high resolution of specifically fluorescence-labeled populations. Our results showed that spectral flow cytometry has advantages in the analysis of cell populations of tissues difficult to characterize in conventional flow cytometry, such as heart and intestine. Spectral flow cytometry thus combines the multi-parametric analytical capacity of the highest performing conventional flow cytometry without the requirement for compensation and enabling auto-fluorescence management. PMID:27500930

  5. Customized spectral band analysis compared with conventional Fourier analysis of heart rate variability in neonates.

    PubMed

    de Beer, N A M; Andriessen, P; Berendsen, R C M; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F; Oetomo, S Bambang

    2004-12-01

    A customized filtering technique is introduced and compared with fast Fourier transformation (FFT) for analyzing heart rate variability (HRV) in neonates from short-term recordings. FFT is classically the most commonly used spectral technique to investigate cardiovascular fluctuations. FFT requires stability of the physiological signal within a 300 s time window that is usually analyzed in adults. Preterm infants, however, show characteristics of rapidly fluctuating heart rate and blood pressure due to an immature autonomic regulation, resulting in non-stationarity of these signals. Therefore neonatal studies use (half-overlapping or moving) windows of 64 s length within a recording time of 2-5 min. The proposed filtering technique performs a filtering operation in the frequency range of interest before calculating the spectrum, which allows it to perform an analysis of shorter periods of only 42 s. The frequency bands of interest are 0.04-0.15 Hz (low frequency, LF) and 0.4-1.5 Hz (high frequency, HF). Although conventional FFT analysis as well as the proposed alternative technique result in errors in the estimation of LF power, due to spectral leakage from the very low frequencies, FFT analysis is more sensitive to this effect. The response times show comparable behavior for both the techniques. Applying both the methods to heart rate data obtained from a neonate before and after atropine administration (inducing a wide range of HRV), shows a very significant correlation between the two methods in estimating LF and HF power. We conclude that a customized filtering technique might be beneficial for analyzing HRV in neonates because it reduces the necessary time window for signal stability.

  6. A spectral analysis of the periodicity hypothesis in cratering records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, Shin

    2004-11-01

    Analysis is made of cratering records, whereby not only the crater ages, but also the sizes can be naturally taken into account. The method adopted is the periodogram analysis first discussed by Lomb. From the crater data based on Grieve's compilation, a period can be derived when a statistical weight of a crater is taken proportional to the size or when a weight proportional to the impact energy is adopted. The period so derived is 37.5 million years. A similar analysis based on Napier's list of craters yields almost the same result. To estimate the significance of the derived period, Monte Carlo experiments have been carried out. It turns out that the probability of occurrence of the derived period due to chance on the null hypothesis of a random distribution of crater ages lies between 0.02 +/- 0.004 and 0.10 +/- 0.009 depending on the data set adopted. The result shows that the level of significance obtained here is higher than in earlier investigations where large craters (with D > 30 km) only are taken into account. A brief discussion is made of the implication of the derived period for the estimates of the Galactic mass density by Stothers and by Hipparcos data analysis.

  7. A Molecular Iodine Spectral Data Set for Rovibronic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kafader, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    A data set of 7,381 molecular iodine vapor rovibronic transitions between the X and B electronic states has been prepared for an advanced undergraduate spectroscopic analysis project. Students apply standard theoretical techniques to these data and determine the values of three X-state constants (image omitted) and four B-state constants (image…

  8. The Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS): Software for integrated analysis of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.; Boardman, J. W.; Heidebrecht, K. B.; Shapiro, A. T.; Barloon, P. J.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS) is a software package developed by the Center for the Study of Earth from Space (CSES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in response to a perceived need to provide integrated tools for analysis of imaging spectrometer data both spectrally and spatially. SIPS was specifically designed to deal with data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), but was tested with other datasets including the Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS), GEOSCAN images, and Landsat TM. SIPS was developed using the 'Interactive Data Language' (IDL). It takes advantage of high speed disk access and fast processors running under the UNIX operating system to provide rapid analysis of entire imaging spectrometer datasets. SIPS allows analysis of single or multiple imaging spectrometer data segments at full spatial and spectral resolution. It also allows visualization and interactive analysis of image cubes derived from quantitative analysis procedures such as absorption band characterization and spectral unmixing. SIPS consists of three modules: SIPS Utilities, SIPS_View, and SIPS Analysis. SIPS version 1.1 is described below.

  9. RADIO-TO-TeV PHASE-RESOLVED EMISSION FROM THE CRAB PULSAR: THE ANNULAR GAP MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. J.; Wang, W.; Qiao, G. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Crab pulsar is a quite young, famous pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. The latest detection of GeV and TeV pulsed emission with an unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio, supplied by the powerful telescopes Fermi, MAGIC, and VERITAS, challenges the current popular pulsar models, and can be a valuable discriminator to justify the pulsar high-energy-emission models. Our work is divided into two steps. First, taking reasonable parameters (the magnetic inclination angle {alpha} = 45 Degree-Sign and the view angle {zeta} = 63 Degree-Sign ), we use the latest high-energy data to calculate radio, X-ray, {gamma}-ray, and TeV light curves from a geometric view to obtain crucial information on emission locations. Second, we calculate the phase-averaged spectrum and phase-resolved spectra for the Crab pulsar and take a theoretical justification from a physical view for the emission properties as found in the first step. It is found that a Gaussian emissivity distribution with the peak emission near the null charge surface in the so-called annular gap (AG) region gives the best modeled light curves. The pulsed radio, X-ray, {gamma}-ray, and TeV emission are mainly generated from the emission of primary particles or secondary particles with different emission mechanisms in the nearly similar region of the AG located in the only magnetic pole, which leads to the nearly 'phase-aligned' multi-wavelength light curves. The emission of peak 1 and peak 2 originates from the AG region near the null charge surface, while the emission of the bridge primarily originates from the core gap (CG) region. The charged particles cannot co-rotate with the pulsar and escape from the magnetosphere, which determines the original flowing primary particles. The acceleration electric field and potential in the AG and CG are huge enough and are in the several tens of neutron star radii. Thus, the primary particles are accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies and produce numerous

  10. Mapping tropical dry forest succession using multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Sen; Yu, Qiuyan; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Feng, Jilu; Rivard, Benoit; Gu, Zhujun

    2015-11-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) in the Americas are considered the first frontier of economic development with less than 1% of their total original coverage under protection. Accordingly, accurate estimates of their spatial extent, fragmentation, and degree of regeneration are critical in evaluating the success of current conservation policies. This study focused on a well-protected secondary TDF in Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP) Environmental Monitoring Super Site, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We used spectral signature analysis of TDF ecosystem succession (early, intermediate, and late successional stages), and its intrinsic variability, to propose a new multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis (MCSMA) method on the shortwave infrared (SWIR) of HyMap image. Unlike most existing iterative mixture analysis (IMA) techniques, MCSMA tries to extract and make use of representative endmembers with spectral and spatial information. MCSMA then considers three criteria that influence the comparative importance of different endmember combinations (endmember models): root mean square error (RMSE); spatial distance (SD); and fraction consistency (FC), to create an evaluation framework to select a best-fit model. The spectral analysis demonstrated that TDFs have a high spectral variability as a result of biomass variability. By adopting two search strategies, the unmixing results showed that our new MCSMA approach had a better performance in root mean square error (early: 0.160/0.159; intermediate: 0.322/0.321; and late: 0.239/0.235); mean absolute error (early: 0.132/0.128; intermediate: 0.254/0.251; and late: 0.191/0.188); and systematic error (early: 0.045/0.055; intermediate: -0.211/-0.214; and late: 0.161/0.160), compared to the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA). This study highlights the importance of SWIR in differentiating successional stages in TDFs. The proposed MCSMA provides a more flexible and generalized means for the best-fit model determination

  11. Photoplethysmographic imaging via spectrally demultiplexed erythema fluctuation analysis for remote heart rate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deglint, Jason; Chung, Audrey G.; Chwyl, Brendan; Amelard, Robert; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wang, Xiao Yu; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Traditional photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) systems use the red, green, and blue (RGB) broadband measurements of a consumer digital camera to remotely estimate a patients heart rate; however, these broadband RGB signals are often corrupted by ambient noise, making the extraction of subtle fluctuations indicative of heart rate difficult. Therefore, the use of narrow-band spectral measurements can significantly improve the accuracy. We propose a novel digital spectral demultiplexing (DSD) method to infer narrow-band spectral information from acquired broadband RGB measurements in order to estimate heart rate via the computation of motion- compensated skin erythema fluctuation. Using high-resolution video recordings of human participants, multiple measurement locations are automatically identified on the cheeks of an individual, and motion-compensated broadband reflectance measurements are acquired at each measurement location over time via measurement location tracking. The motion-compensated broadband reflectance measurements are spectrally demultiplexed using a non-linear inverse model based on the spectral sensitivity of the camera's detector. A PPG signal is then computed from the demultiplexed narrow-band spectral information via skin erythema fluctuation analysis, with improved signal-to-noise ratio allowing for reliable remote heart rate measurements. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed system, a set of experiments involving human motion in a front-facing position were performed under ambient lighting conditions. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system achieves robust and accurate heart rate measurements and can provide additional information about the participant beyond the capabilities of traditional PPGI methods.

  12. Phase-resolved and time-averaged puff motions of an excited stack-issued transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. M.; Huang, R. F.

    2013-07-01

    The dynamics of puff motions in an excited stack-issued transverse jet were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the puffs induced by acoustic excitation were examined using the smoke flow visualization method and high-speed particle image velocimetry. The temporal and spatial evolutions of the puffs were examined using phase-resolved ensemble-averaged velocity fields and the velocity, length scales, and vorticity characteristics of the puffs were studied. The time-averaged velocity fields were calculated to analyze the velocity distributions and vorticity contours. The results show that a puff consists of a pair of counter-rotating vortex rings. An initial vortex ring was formed due to a concentration of vorticity at the lee side of the issuing jet at the instant of the mid-oscillation cycle. A vortex ring rotating in the opposite direction to that of the initial vortex ring was subsequently formed at the upwind side of the issuing jet. These two counter-rotating vortex rings formed a "mushroom" vortex pair, which was deflected by the crossflow and traveled downstream along a time-averaged trajectory of zero vorticity. The trajectory was situated far above the time-averaged streamline evolving from the leading edge of the tube. The velocity magnitudes of the vortex rings at the upwind and the lee side decreased with time evolution as the puffs traveled downstream due to momentum dissipation and entrainment effects. The puffs traveling along the trajectory of zero vorticity caused large velocities to appear above the leading-edge streamline.

  13. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  14. Evaluating spectral indices and spectral mixture analysis for assessing fire severity and adjusting burning efficiency using Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veraverbeke, S.; Hook, S.

    2012-04-01

    Fire severity data are of paramount importance to (i) organize post-fire rehabilitation plans and (ii) reduce uncertainties in wildfire emission estimates by allowing spatio-temporal variability in burning efficiency values. We have used a Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image to assess fire severity of the large 2011 Wallow fire in Arizona, USA. The Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR), differenced NBR (dNBR), Relative dNBR (RdNBR) and the char fraction estimated by Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) were evaluated. Geo Composite Burn Index (GeoCBI) and vegetation mortality data were used as ground truth. Of all remotely sensed measures tested the dNBR had the highest performance (GeoCBI-dNBR R2 = 0.84 and % black trees-dNBR R2 = 0.91), which supports the operational use of the dNBR for post-fire management. Without initial calibration with field data, however, dNBR values lack biophysical meaning. The SMA-derived char fraction also had moderate-high correlations with the field data (GeoCBI-char fraction R2 = 0.66 and % black trees-char fraction R2 = 0.82). The char fractions provide a direct mechanistic link with the fire processes that occurred on the ground. Such data have big potential to adjust burning efficiency values. This is of great importance to reduce uncertainties in wildfire emission estimates.

  15. Stochastic analysis of spectral broadening by a free turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the time-varying shear layer between a harmonic acoustic source and an observer on the frequency content of the observed sound is considered. Experimental data show that the spectral content of the acoustic signal is considerably broadened upon passing through such a shear layer. Theoretical analysis is presented which shows that such spectral broadening is entirely consistent with amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal by the time-varying shear layer. Thus, no actual frequency shift need be hypothesized to explain the spectral phenomenon. Experimental tests were conducted at 2, 4, and 6 kHz and at free jet flow velocities of 10, 20, and 30 m/s. Analysis of acoustic pressure time histories obtained from these tests confirms the above conclusion, at least for the low Mach numbers considered.

  16. Non Destructive Defect Detection by Spectral Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krejcar, Ondrej; Frischer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The potential nondestructive diagnostics of solid objects is discussed in this article. The whole process is accomplished by consecutive steps involving software analysis of the vibration power spectrum (eventually acoustic emissions) created during the normal operation of the diagnosed device or under unexpected situations. Another option is to create an artificial pulse, which can help us to determine the actual state of the diagnosed device. The main idea of this method is based on the analysis of the current power spectrum density of the received signal and its postprocessing in the Matlab environment with a following sample comparison in the Statistica software environment. The last step, which is comparison of samples, is the most important, because it is possible to determine the status of the examined object at a given time. Nowadays samples are compared only visually, but this method can’t produce good results. Further the presented filter can choose relevant data from a huge group of data, which originate from applying FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). On the other hand, using this approach they can be subjected to analysis with the assistance of a neural network. If correct and high-quality starting data are provided to the initial network, we are able to analyze other samples and state in which condition a certain object is. The success rate of this approximation, based on our testing of the solution, is now 85.7%. With further improvement of the filter, it could be even greater. Finally it is possible to detect defective conditions or upcoming limiting states of examined objects/materials by using only one device which contains HW and SW parts. This kind of detection can provide significant financial savings in certain cases (such as continuous casting of iron where it could save hundreds of thousands of USD). PMID:22163742

  17. SearchLight: a freely available web-based quantitative spectral analysis tool (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhat, Prashant; Peet, Michael; Erdogan, Turan

    2016-03-01

    In order to design a fluorescence experiment, typically the spectra of a fluorophore and of a filter set are overlaid on a single graph and the spectral overlap is evaluated intuitively. However, in a typical fluorescence imaging system the fluorophores and optical filters are not the only wavelength dependent variables - even the excitation light sources have been changing. For example, LED Light Engines may have a significantly different spectral response compared to the traditional metal-halide lamps. Therefore, for a more accurate assessment of fluorophore-to-filter-set compatibility, all sources of spectral variation should be taken into account simultaneously. Additionally, intuitive or qualitative evaluation of many spectra does not necessarily provide a realistic assessment of the system performance. "SearchLight" is a freely available web-based spectral plotting and analysis tool that can be used to address the need for accurate, quantitative spectral evaluation of fluorescence measurement systems. This tool is available at: http://searchlight.semrock.com/. Based on a detailed mathematical framework [1], SearchLight calculates signal, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio for multiple combinations of fluorophores, filter sets, light sources and detectors. SearchLight allows for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the compatibility of filter sets with fluorophores, analysis of bleed-through, identification of optimized spectral edge locations for a set of filters under specific experimental conditions, and guidance regarding labeling protocols in multiplexing imaging assays. Entire SearchLight sessions can be shared with colleagues and collaborators and saved for future reference. [1] Anderson, N., Prabhat, P. and Erdogan, T., Spectral Modeling in Fluorescence Microscopy, http://www.semrock.com (2010).

  18. Examining Interindividual Differences in Cyclicity of Pleasant and Unpleasant Affects Using Spectral Analysis and Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Nilam; Chow, Sy-Miin; Bowles, Ryan P.; Wang, Lijuan; Grimm, Kevin; Fujita, Frank; Nesselroade, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Weekly cycles in emotion were examined by combining item response modeling and spectral analysis approaches in an analysis of 179 college students' reports of daily emotions experienced over 7 weeks. We addressed the measurement of emotion using an item response model. Spectral analysis and multilevel sinusoidal models were used to identify…

  19. SVD + factor rotation : a powerful alternative to PCA in spectral image analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Michael Robert

    2008-10-01

    Factor analysis has proven an effective approach for distilling high dimensional spectral-image data into a limited number of components that describe the spatial and spectral characteristics of the imaged sample. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is the most commonly used factor analysis tool; however, PCA constrains both the spectral and abundance factors to be orthogonal, and forces the components to serially maximize the variance that each accounts for. Neither constraint has any basis in physical reality; thus, principal components are abstract and not easily interpreted. The mathematical properties of PCA scores and loadings also differ subtly, which has implications for how they can be used in abstract factor 'rotation' procedures such as Varimax. The Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is a mathematical technique that is frequently used to compute PCA. In this talk, we will argue that SVD itself provides a more flexible framework for spectral image analysis since spatial-domain and spectral-domain singular vectors are treated in a symmetrical fashion. We will also show that applying an abstract rotation in our choice of either the spatial or spectral domain relaxes the orthogonality requirement in the complementary domain. For instance, samples are often approximately orthogonal in a spatial sense, that is, they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. In such cases, rotating the singular vectors in a way designed to maximize the simplicity of the spatial representation yields physically acceptable and readily interpretable estimates of the pure-component spectra. This talk will demonstrate that this approach can achieve excellent results for difficult-to-analyze data sets obtained by a variety of spectroscopic imaging techniques.

  20. Imagination in harmony with science: Spectral analysis as a practical pedagogic tool in the voice studio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundus, Katharin Elaine

    Traditionally, voice teachers have relied on intuition and imagination to impart technical information to their students. Spectral analysis, generated on a personal computer, is now available, affordable and accessible to the twenty-first century voice teacher. These programs provide several acoustical functions using frequency, intensity and time to provide technical information about the human singing voice. This paper advocates the use of this technology as a supplemental and supporting strategy in addition to the traditional pedagogic modes of metaphor and intuition. To begin, the paper examines the acoustical principles that reflect beautiful singing and are necessary to an understanding of spectral analysis. Several figures are used that graphically explain the source-filter theory of vowels and how it is affected by the constant manipulation of a closed-open tube like the human vocal tract. Nine functions of Real Analysis (a spectral analysis program in real time manufactured by Tiger DRS, Inc.) are then examined and explained in relation to the singing voice. The paper goes on to outline a systematic vocal pedagogy in eight parts that can be used in harmony with spectral analysis, portrayed in an octagonal spiral figure. In the fourth chapter, this systematic vocal pedagogy is then integrated with spectral analysis to suggest a holistic and artistic method to use this technology. In a table format, several singing behaviors are identified, both negative and positive; training solutions using Real Analysis functions are outlined for each behavior. The paper concludes by pointing out that this technology is valuable because it teaches teachers about their own voice in a scientific manner and allows them to share this quantifiable information with their students. Furthermore, twenty-first century students are accepting of and eager for new technologies as they learn about their voices. This new technology does not change the traditional goals of voice training

  1. Spectral saliency via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Dai, Jialun; Zhu, Yafei; Zheng, Haiyong; Qiao, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    Suppressing nonsalient patterns by smoothing the amplitude spectrum at an appropriate scale has been shown to effectively detect the visual saliency in the frequency domain. Different filter scales are required for different types of salient objects. We observe that the optimal scale for smoothing amplitude spectrum shares a specific relation with the size of the salient region. Based on this observation and the bottom-up saliency detection characterized by spectrum scale-space analysis for natural images, we propose to detect visual saliency, especially with salient objects of different sizes and locations via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis. We not only provide a new criterion for automatic optimal scale selection but also reserve the saliency maps corresponding to different salient objects with meaningful saliency information by adaptive weighted combination. The performance of quantitative and qualitative comparisons is evaluated by three different kinds of metrics on the four most widely used datasets and one up-to-date large-scale dataset. The experimental results validate that our method outperforms the existing state-of-the-art saliency models for predicting human eye fixations in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  2. Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2012-10-01

    We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more naturally than previously used summary statistics such as the degree distribution. Furthermore, we include the effects of sampling into the analysis, to properly correct for the incompleteness of existing datasets, and have analysed the performance of our method under various degrees of sampling. We consider a number of models focusing not only on the biologically relevant class of duplication models, but also including models of scale-free network growth that have previously been claimed to describe such data. We find a preference for a duplication-divergence with linear preferential attachment model in the majority of the interaction datasets considered. We also illustrate how our method can be used to perform multi-model inference of network parameters to estimate properties of the full network from sampled data.

  3. [Spectral analysis of ceramic-painting pigments from Taosi site].

    PubMed

    Li, Nai-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Min; He, Nu; Mao, Zhen-Wei

    2008-04-01

    Based on the analysis of Raman, IR spectroscopy and XRD methods, the structure of the different pigments and bond in red pigment in the ceramic from Taosi site in Xiangfeng county, Shanxi province was analyzed. It is very prominent that both red and white pigments have been well preserved. The red pigment was identified as HgS, while white pigment is CaCO3, and the bond in red pigment is CaCO3, which was made from white lime, and the reasons for its formation is because of carbon dioxide in air, which was absorbed by white lime over long history. Moreover, it was indicated that the Raman and IR spectra are more effective for identifying the ancient pigments in very few quantities than XRD. Furthermore, the fact that quartz was unfound in vermilion, suggested that the technique for synthetic vermilion might have been known in 4 000 years ago in Taosi site.

  4. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  5. Mass spectral analysis of C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acid derivatives.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Chadha, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria are obtained for the distinction of alpha, beta, gamma, and N-methyl isomers of the C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acids, using mass spectral analysis of the derivatives of these acids. The use of deuterium labeling has helped in the understanding of certain fragmentation pathways.

  6. Kirchhoff's Laws of Spectral Analysis: A Set of Computer Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillmore, James A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A computer program which simulates an interstellar gas and dust cloud has been used to study Kirchhoff's laws of spectral analysis in introductory astronomy courses. The model parameters can be varied to stimulate various effects observed in actual clouds. Students are given exercises to use the program in a manner similar to a lab experiment.…

  7. Library Optimization in EDXRF Spectral Deconvolution for Multi-element Analysis of Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    In multi-element analysis of atmospheric aerosols, attempts are made to fit overlapping elemental spectral lines for many elements that may be undetectable in samples due to low concentrations. Fitting with many library reference spectra has the unwanted effect of raising the an...

  8. [Spectral Analysis of Trace Fluorine Phase in Phosphogypsum].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-tao; Li, Hui-quan; Bao, Wei-jun; Wang, Chen-ye; Li, Song-geng; Lin, Wei-gang

    2015-08-01

    Phosphogypsum, which contains more than 90% of the calcium sulfate dehydrate (CaSO4 · 2H2O), is a kind of important renewable gypsum resources. Unlike the natural gypsum, however, phosphorus, fluorine, organic matter and other harmful impurities in phosphogypsum limit its practical use. To ascertain the existence form, content and phase distribution of trace fluoride in phosphogypsum has important theoretical values in removing trace fluoride effectively. In this present paper, the main existence form and phase distribution of trace fluoride in phosphogypsum was investigated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). The results show that trace fluoride phase mainly includes NaF, KF, CaF2, K2SiF6, Na2SiF6, Na3AlF6, K3AlF6, AlF3 · 3H2O, AlF2.3(OH)0.7 · H2O, Ca5(PO4)3F, Ca10(PO4)6F2. Among them, 4.83% of fluorine exists in the form of fluoride (NaF, KF, CaF2); Accordingly, 8.43% in the form of fluoride phosphate (Ca5(PO4)3F, Ca10(PO4)6F2); 12.21% in the form of fluorine aluminate (Na3AlF6, K3AlF6); 41.52% in the form of fluorosilicate (K2SiF6, Na2SiF6); 33.02% in the form of aluminum fluoride with crystal water (AlF3 · 3H2O, AlF2.3(OH)0.7 · H2O). In the analysis of phase constitution for trace elements in solid samples, the method of combining XPS and EMPA has more advantages. This study also provides theoretical basis for the removal of trace fluorine impurity and the effective recovery of fluorine resources. PMID:26672320

  9. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  10. Synthesis, spectral, computational and thermal analysis studies of metalloceftriaxone antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Elasala, Gehan S.

    2015-03-01

    Binary ceftriaxone metal complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and six mixed metals complexes of (Fe, Cu), (Fe, Co), (Co, Ni), (Co, Cu), (Ni, Cu) and (Fe, Ni) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra. The studies proved that the ligand has different combination modes and all complexes were of octahedral geometry. Molecular modeling techniques and quantum chemical methods have been performed for ceftriaxone to calculate charges, bond lengths, bond angles, dihedral angles, electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), global hardness (η), softness (σ) and the electrophilicity index (ω). The thermal decomposition of the prepared metals complexes was studied by TGA, DTA and DSC techniques. The kinetic parameters and the reaction orders were estimated. The thermal decomposition of all the complexes ended with the formation of metal oxides and carbon residue as a final product except in case of Hg complex, sublimation occurs at the temperature range 297.7-413.7 °C so, only carbon residue was produced during thermal decomposition. The geometries of complexes may be altered from Oh to Td during the thermal decomposition steps. Decomposition mechanisms were suggested.

  11. Spectral Analysis of Cometary X-Rays Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.

    2014-12-01

    To establish contributions from different emission mechanisms within a cometary atmosphere, we perform a theoretical analysis of cometary X-ray emission spectra. We develop a model that generates updated spectra of solar wind charge-exchange emissions together with accurate scattering and fluorescence spectra of solar X-rays by atoms, molecules, and ice/dust particles. Our model also explores scattering and fluorescence spectra for different solar conditions, including spectra induced by solar X-ray flares of different classes and durations. Utilizing our results, the major emission mechanism is determined for both the 0.3-1.0 keV and 1.0-3.0 keV photon energy ranges. Additionally, we compare the modeled spectra of cometary X-rays with cometary observations from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. These comparisons establish upper limits on ice/dust mass production rates, with an emphasis on nanoparticles, for several comets. We conclude with a discussion of the impact of of ice/dust particles in the formation of cometary X-ray emission spectra.

  12. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re=100. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the midplane perpendicular to the axis of a cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space where the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable [see Thiria and Wesfreid, J. Fluids Struct. 25, 654 (2009) for a review] is scrutinized using the experimental data. A method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. PMID:22181499

  13. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re = 100 . Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the mid-plane perpendicular to the axis of cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space were the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable is scrutinized using this experimental data. A novel method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. The present work was supported by the Franco-Argentinian Associated Laboratory in the Physics and Mechanics of Fluids (LIA PMF-FMF).

  14. Electron spin resonance spectral analysis of irradiated royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2014-01-15

    The analysis of unpaired electron components in royal jelly was carried out using electron spin resonance (ESR) with the aim to develop a detection method for irradiated royal jelly. The ESR spectrum of royal jelly had natural signals derived from transition metals, including Fe(3+) and Cu(2+), and a signal line near g=2.00. After irradiation, a new splitting asymmetric spectrum with overall spectrum width ca. 10mT at g=2.004 was observed. The intensities of the signals at g=2.004 increased in proportion to the absorbed dose in samples under different storage conditions: fresh frozen royal jelly and dried royal jelly powder at room temperature. The signal intensity of the fresh frozen sample was stable after irradiation. One year after 10kGy irradiation of dried powder, the signal intensity was sevenfold greater than before irradiation, although the intensity continued to steadily decrease with time. This stable radiation-induced radical component was derived from the poorly soluble constituent of royal jelly.

  15. Atomistic interpretation of solid solution hardening from spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Plendl, J N

    1971-05-01

    From analysis of a series of vibrational spectra of ir energy absorption and laser Raman, an attempt is made to interpret solid solution hardening from an atomistic point of view for the system CaF(2)/SrF(2). It is shown to be caused by the combined action of three atomic characteristics, i.e., their changes as a function of composition. They are deformation of the atomic coordination polyhedrons, overlap of the outer electron shells of the atom pairs, and the ratio of the ionic to covalent share of binding. A striking nonlinear behavior of the three characteristics, as a function of composition, gives maximum atomic bond strength to the 55/45 position of the system CaF(2)/SrF(2), in agreement with the measured data of the solid solution hardening. The curve for atomic bond strength, derived from the three characteristics, is almost identical to the curve for measured microhardness data. This result suggests that the atomistic interpretation, put forward in this paper, is correct.

  16. Spectral Analysis of Spatial Series Data of Pathologic Tissue: A Study on Small Intestine in ICR Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mise, Keiji; Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Ohtomo, Norio

    2009-01-01

    We examined the usefulness of spectral analysis for investigating quantitatively the spatial pattern of pathologic tissue. To interpret the results obtained from real tissue, we constructed a two-dimensional spatial model of the tissue. Spectral analysis was applied to the spatial series data, which were obtained from the real tissue and model. From the results of spectral analysis, spatial patterns of the tissue and model were characterized quantitatively in reference to the frequencies and powers of the spectral peaks in power spectral densities (PSDs). The results for the model were essentially consistent with those for the tissue. It was concluded that the model was capable of adequately explaining the spatial pattern of the tissue. It is anticipated that spectral analysis will become a useful tool for characterizing the spatial pattern of the tissue quantitatively, resulting in an automated first screening of pathological specimens.

  17. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1 Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, J. B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, M. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Although the spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law (photon index Gamma = 1.45+0.01 -0.02 , e-folding energy e(sub f) = 162+9 -8 keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody, with temperature kT(sub BB) = 1.2 +0.0 -0.1 keV), the inclusion of a reflection component does not improve the fit. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona (ADC) models. A slab-geometry ADC model is unable to describe the data. However, a spherical corona, with a total optical depth tau- = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kTc = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X red (exp 2) = 1.55). These models deviate from the data bv up to 7% in the 5-10 keV range. However, considering how successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10-200 keV data, such "photon-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  18. Spectral and Temporal Analysis of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, E. S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, N. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Chaplin, V. L.; Connaughton, V.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes have been well studied both theoretically and by space based instruments. One of the main mysteries about TGFs is the variation in arrival times between the main "hard" pulse and the "soft" Compton tail. It is well known that TGFs may display symmetric and asymmetric time histories; however, little is known about what intrinsic property of the source allows it to behave the way it does. In this study, we use full Monte Carlo simulations, developed by Dwyer at Florida Tech, to characterize the behavior of the TGF timing with respect to atmospheric depth of the source and the TGF source location with respect to the GBM satellite footprint. The simulation generates the full relativistic runaway electron avalanches and propagates the resulting bremsstrahlung photons through the atmosphere and out to satellite altitude. In this analysis, we use the relativistic runaway electron avalanche model to show some of the clear distinctions between the low energy (< 300 keV) and high energy (> 300 keV) components of the TGF. The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has detected TGFs as short as 50 microseconds. Here, we model those results with the Monte Carlo by simulating different source geometries and heights. We also compare other models in the field to our full Monte Carlo results, and attempt to explain the differences. Therefore, the overall goal of this study is to obtain constraints on the parameter space of TGFs in order to learn something physical about individual events.

  19. Continuous monitoring of depth of sedation by EEG spectral analysis in patients requiring mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, E M; Green, J L; Willatts, S M

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-three patients undergoing intensive therapy had continuous EEG recording in an attempt to assess depth of sedation using spectral analysis. Median power frequency (MPF) and spectral edge frequency (SEF) were calculated and correlated with the clinical sedation score and blood concentration of sedative drug. Fifteen patients received isoflurane and eight midazolam. There was no correlation between MPF or SEF and sedation score or blood concentration of drug. These results suggest that no simple measure of the EEG is likely to correlate with depth of sedation in critically ill patients.

  20. Continuous monitoring of depth of sedation by EEG spectral analysis in patients requiring mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, E M; Green, J L; Willatts, S M

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-three patients undergoing intensive therapy had continuous EEG recording in an attempt to assess depth of sedation using spectral analysis. Median power frequency (MPF) and spectral edge frequency (SEF) were calculated and correlated with the clinical sedation score and blood concentration of sedative drug. Fifteen patients received isoflurane and eight midazolam. There was no correlation between MPF or SEF and sedation score or blood concentration of drug. These results suggest that no simple measure of the EEG is likely to correlate with depth of sedation in critically ill patients. PMID:7826794

  1. Time-Resolved Spectral Analysis of Blazar 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosamaria; Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    As electromagnetic (EM) waves from sources such as blazars travel through the intergalactic medium (IGM), they are slowed by electrons; a phenomenon called dispersion delay [2]. We study the propagation effects in emissions of EM waves from blazar source BL 0716+714 by estimating the average electron density, or dispersion measure (DM), of the IGM on a line of sight to the blazar. Measuring the variations in these effects with time allow us to understand the properties of the intervening material. Toward this goal we analyzed months of archived observations of BL 0716+714 taken by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The ATA's correlator produces cross-power vs. frequency spectra for every baseline (distance between a pair of antennas) in ten-second intervals. To reduce this immense load of data we used a technique based on interferometry called bispectrum, which does not depend on complicated array calibration and simplifies our work. The bispectrum multiplies baselines, three at a time, so that they form a closed loop, then the cube root of spectra are averaged [1]. This technique is independent of phase errors associated with any individual antenna and has a better SNR ratio than simply taking the average of all the baselines. We developed a numerical analysis program that takes in archived blazar files containing correlation data, computes the bispectrum, and outputs FITS images for each day of observations. The results show that our observations do not have sufficient sensitivity to reveal blazar variations in the frequency ranges that were studied. It is suggested that future observations at higher frequencies and/or with another telescope having greater sensitivity would reveal the time/frequency dependence of emission structure that would allow measurements of electron content. This work shows that but bispectrum is a useful tool for rapid characterization of interferometer data that does not require interferometer caclibration which could introduce artifacts

  2. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1. 1; Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, Brian A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law with a photon index Gamma = 1.45(+0.01 -0.02) (a value considerably harder 0.02 than typically found), e-folding energy E(sub f) = 162(+9 -8) keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody with temperature kT(sub bb) = 1.2(+0.0 -0.1) keV. Although the 3-30 keV portion of the spectrum can be fit with a reflected power law with Gamma = 1.81 + or - 0.01 and covering fraction f = 0.35 + or - 0.02, the quality of the fit is significantly reduced when the HEXTE data in the 30-100 keV range is included, as there is no observed hardening in the power law within this energy range. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona models of Dove, Wilms & Begelman (1997a) - where the temperature of the corona is determined self-consistently. A spherical corona with a total optical depth pi = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kT(sub c) = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X(exp 2 sub red) = 1.55). These models deviate from red the data by up to 7% in the 5 - 10 keV range, and we discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies. However, considering bow successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10 - 200 keV data, such "pboton-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  3. Spectral Variability among Rocks in Visible and Near Infrared Multispectral Pancam Data Collected at Gusev Crater: Examinations using Spectral Mixture Analysis and Related Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F., III; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit s Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analysed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three endmember mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover s Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional endmembers. In the Columbia Hills there were a number of scenes in which additional rock endmembers were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces, as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are: Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes, but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts.

  4. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  5. Spectral and brain mapping analysis of EEG based on Pwelch in schizophrenic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate and analyze the differences of power spectral distribution in various frequency bands between healthy subjects and schizophrenic patients. Subjects in this study were 8 people consisting of 4 schizophrenic patients and 4 healthy subjects. Subjects were recorded from 12 electrodes with Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG signals were recorded during a resting eye-closed state for 4-6 minutes. Data were extracted and analyzed by centering and filtering, then performed using Welch Periodogram technique for the spectral estimation with a Hamming window. The results of this study showed that delta power spectral in schizophrenic patients increased ten times from healthy subjects; theta power spectral in schizophrenic patients increased three times from healthy subjects; alpha power spectral in schizophrenic patients decreased with an increase of one third of healthy subjects. These results were confirmed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showing there were significant differences between schizophrenic and healthy subjects on delta, theta and alpha brain wave. Based on the results of Brain Mapping analysis showed that there was significant increasing in the activity of delta waves and theta waves in frontal lobe of schizophrenics, whereas the alpha waves indicated a decrease in the occipital lobe in all schizophrenic patients.

  6. Voyager 2 solar plasma and magnetic field spectral analysis for intermediate data sparsity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallana, Luca; Fraternale, Federico; Iovieno, Michele; Fosson, Sophie M.; Magli, Enrico; Opher, Merav; Richardson, John D.; Tordella, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The Voyager probes are the furthest, still active, spacecraft ever launched from Earth. During their 38 year trip, they have collected data regarding solar wind properties (such as the plasma velocity and magnetic field intensity). Unfortunately, a complete time evolution of the measured physical quantities is not available. The time series contains many gaps which increase in frequency and duration at larger distances. The aim of this work is to perform a spectral and statistical analysis of the solar wind plasma velocity and magnetic field using Voyager 2 data measured in 1979, when the gap density is between the 30% and 50%. For these gap densities, we show the spectra of gapped signals inherit the characteristics of the data gaps. In particular, the algebraic decay of the intermediate frequency range is underestimated and discrete peaks result not from the underlaying data but from the gap sequence. This analysis is achieved using five different data treatment techniques coming from the multidisciplinary context: averages on linearly interpolated subsets, correlation without data interpolation, correlation of linearly interpolated data, maximum likelihood data reconstruction, and compressed sensing spectral estimation. With five frequency decades, the spectra we obtained have the largest frequency range ever computed at five astronomical units from the Sun; spectral exponents have been determined for all the components of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Void analysis is also useful in recovering other spectral properties such as micro and integral scales.

  7. Automatic target detection algorithm for foliage-penetrating ultrawideband SAR data using split spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Kapoor, Ravinder; Ressler, Marc A.

    1999-07-01

    We present an automatic target detection (ATD) algorithm for foliage penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data using split spectral analysis. Split spectral analysis is commonly used in the ultrasonic, non-destructive evaluation of materials using wide band pulses for flaw detection. In this paper, we show the application of split spectral analysis for detecting obscured targets in foliage using UWB pulse returns to discriminate targets from foliage, the data spectrum is split into several bands, namely, 20 to 75, 75 to 150, ..., 825 to 900 MHz. An ATD algorithm is developed based on the relative energy levels in various bands, the number of bands containing significant energy (spread of energy), and chip size (number of crossrange and range bins). The algorithm is tested on the (FOPEN UWB SAR) data of foliage and vehicles obscured by foliage collected at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. The paper presents various split spectral parameters used in the algorithm and discusses the rationale for their use.

  8. Analysis of multimode fiber bundles for endoscopic spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Risi, Matthew D.; Makhlouf, Houssine; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the use of a fiber bundle in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems is presented. The fiber bundle enables a flexible endoscopic design and provides fast, parallelized acquisition of the OCT data. However, the multimode characteristic of the fibers in the fiber bundle affects the depth sensitivity of the imaging system. A description of light interference in a multimode fiber is presented along with numerical simulations and experimental studies to illustrate the theoretical analysis. PMID:25967012

  9. A Perturbative Analysis of Synchrotron Spectral Index Variation over the Microwave Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajib; Aluri, Pavan K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we implement a perturbative approach, first proposed by Bouchet & Gispert, to estimate the variation of the spectral index of galactic polarized synchrotron emission, using a linear combination of simulated Stokes Q polarization maps of selected frequency bands from WMAP and Planck observations on a region of sky dominated by the synchrotron Stokes Q signal. We find that a first order perturbative analysis recovers the input spectral index map well. Along with the spectral index variation map, our method provides a fixed reference index, {\\hat{β }}0s, over the sky portion being analyzed. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we find that < {\\hat{β }}0s> =-2.84+/- 0.01, which matches very closely with the position of a peak at {β }s(p)=-2.85 of the empirical probability density function of input synchrotron indices obtained from the same sky region. For thermal dust, the mean recovered spectral index < {\\hat{β }}d> =2.00+/- 0.004 from simulations, matches very well with the spatially fixed input thermal dust spectral index {β }d=2.00. As accompanying results of the method, we reconstruct cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and a synchrotron template components with fixed spectral indices over the entire sky region. We use, in our analysis, full pixel-pixel noise covariance matrices of all frequency bands, estimated from the sky region being analyzed. The perturbative technique of this work (1) can build a model with an arbitrary but sufficient degree of accuracy (and precession) as allowed by the data and (2) can produce maximum likelihood estimators for reference indices and templates asymptotically.

  10. Jupiter Systems Data Analysis Program Galileo Multi-Spectral Analysis of the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda; Carlson, Robert; Smythe, William

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made on this project at the University of Colorado, particularly concerning analysis of data of the galilean moons Io and Europa. The goal of the Io portion of this study is to incorporate Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) measured sulfur dioxide (SO2) frost amounts into models used with Ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) spectra, in order to better constrain SO2 gas amounts determined by the UVS. The overall goal of this portion of the study is to better understand the thickness and distribution of Io's SO2 atmosphere. The goal of the analysis of the Europa data is to better understand the source of the UV absorption feature centered near 280 rim which has been noted in disk-integrated spectra primarily on the trailing hemisphere. The NIMS data indicate asymmetric water ice bands on Europa, particularly over the trailing hemisphere, and especially concentrated in the visibly dark regions associated with chaotic terrain and lines. The UPS data, the first-ever disk-resolved UV spectra of Europa, shown that the UV absorber is likely concentrated in regions where the NIMS data show asymmetric water ice bands. The material that produces both spectral features is likely the same, and we use data from both wavelength regions to better understand this material, and whether it is endogenically or exogenically produced. This work is still in progress at JPL.

  11. Nonlinear complex diffusion approaches based on a novel noise estimation for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear diffusion processes have been widely used for image denoising. In the traditional nonlinear anisotropic diffusion denoising techniques, behavior of the diffusion depends highly on the gradient of image. However, it is difficult to get a good effect if we use these methods to reduce noise in optical coherence tomography images. Because background has the gradient that is very similar to regions of interest, so background noise will be mistaken for edge information and cannot be reduced. Therefore, nonlinear complex diffusion approaches using texture feature(NCDTF) for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography is proposed here, which uses texture feature in OCT images and structural OCT images to remove noise in phase-resolved OCT. Taking into account the fact that texture between background and signal region is different, which can be linked with diffusion coefficient of nonlinear complex diffusion model, we use NCDTF method to reduce noises of structure and phase images first. Then, we utilize OCT structure images to filter phase image in OCT. Finally, to validate our method, parameters such as image SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL), and edge preservation were compared between our approach and median filter, Gaussian filter, wavelet filter, nonlinear complex diffusion filter (NCDF). Preliminary results demonstrate that NCDTF method is more effective than others in keeping edges and denoising for phase-resolved OCT.

  12. A statistical evaluation of spectral fingerprinting methods using analysis of variance and principal component analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six methods were compared with respect to spectral fingerprinting of a well-characterized series of broccoli samples. Spectral fingerprints were acquired for finely-powdered solid samples using Fourier transform-infrared (IR) and Fourier transform-near infrared (NIR) spectrometry and for aqueous met...

  13. Spectral Analysis

    2001-11-01

    SPEX enables the user to interactively create, display, compare, and analyze spectra (in particular gamma-ray spectra). It includes features from the INEEL GAUSS software series and the ORNL DAMM program. Input data is spectrum histograms, energy calibration, peakwidth calibrationb, and peak energy listgs. Output data includes new spectra created from projections, postscript for printing current view, summary log, gaussian fit log, exported energy calibratgion, exported peak lists and banana gates.

  14. [Life table and spectral analysis of endangered plant Taxus chinensis var. mairei population].

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Xingong; Wu, Chengzhen; He, Dongjin; Liao, Chengzhang; Cheng, Yu; Feng, Lei

    2004-06-01

    Based on the investigation in Longxi Mountain National Nature Reserve and the theory of survival analysis, a static life table of Taxus chinensis var. mairei population was worked out, the curves of its survival rate, mortality rate and killing power were drawn, and the population dynamics was analyzed by spectral analysis. The results showed that the survival curve of the population appeared to be a type of Deevey-III, and the high mortality of seeding was one of the important reasons which caused Taxus chinensis var. mairei to be endangered. The spectral analysis of the population showed that there was a marked periodic regularity in the process of natural regeneration of Taxus chinensis var. mairei.

  15. Chemometric analysis for near-infrared spectral detection of beef in fish meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Garrido-Novell, Cristóbal; Pérez-Marín, Dolores; Guerrero-Ginel, José E.; Garrido-Varo, Ana; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the chemometric analysis of near-infrared spectra drawn from hyperspectral images to develop, evaluate, and compare statistical models for the detection of beef in fish meal. There were 40 pure-fish meal samples, 15 pure-beef meal samples, and 127 fish/beef mixture meal samples prepared for hyperspectral line-scan imaging by a machine vision system. Spectral data for 3600 pixels per sample, in which individual spectra was obtain, were retrieved from the region of interest (ROI) in every sample image. The spectral data spanning 969 nm to 1551 nm (across 176 spectral bands) were analyzed. Statistical models were built using the principal component analysis (PCA) and the partial least squares regression (PLSR) methods. The models were created and developed using the spectral data from the purefish meal and pure-beef meal samples, and were tested and evaluated using the data from the ROI in the mixture meal samples. The results showed that, with a ROI as large as 3600 pixels to cover sufficient area of a mixture meal sample, the success detection rate of beef in fish meal could be satisfactory 99.2% by PCA and 98.4% by PLSR.

  16. A comparison of spectral mixture analysis an NDVI for ascertaining ecological variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Carol A.; Bateson, C. Ann; Curtiss, Brian; Benning, Tracy L.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we compare the performance of spectral mixture analysis to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in detecting change in a grassland across topographically-induced nutrient gradients and different management schemes. The Konza Prairie Research Natural Area, Kansas, is a relatively homogeneous tallgrass prairie in which change in vegetation productivity occurs with respect to topographic positions in each watershed. The area is the site of long-term studies of the influence of fire and grazing on tallgrass production and was the site of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) from 1987 to 1989. Vegetation indices such as NDVI are commonly used with imagery collected in few (less than 10) spectral bands. However, the use of only two bands (e.g. NDVI) does not adequately account for the complex of signals making up most surface reflectance. Influences from background spectral variation and spatial heterogeneity may confound the direct relationship with biological or biophysical variables. High dimensional multispectral data allows for the application position of techniques such as derivative analysis and spectral curve fitting, thereby increasing the probability of successfully modeling the reflectance from mixed surfaces. The higher number of bands permits unmixing of a greater number of surface components, separating the vegetation signal for further analyses relevant to biological variables.

  17. Adaptive Filter-bank Approach to Restoration and Spectral Analysis of Gapped Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Petre; Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jian

    2000-10-01

    The main topic of this paper is the nonparametric estimation of complex (both amplitude and phase) spectra from gapped data, as well as the restoration of such data. The focus is on the extension of the APES (amplitude and phase estimation) approach to data sequences with gaps. APES, which is one of the most successful existing nonparametric approaches to the spectral analysis of full data sequences, uses a bank of narrowband adaptive (both frequency and data dependent) filters to estimate the spectrum. A recent interpretation of this approach showed that the filterbank used by APES and the resulting spectrum minimize a least-squares (LS) fitting criterion between the filtered sequence and its spectral decomposition. The extended approach, which is called GAPES for somewhat obvious reasons, capitalizes on the aforementioned interpretation: it minimizes the APES-LS fitting criterion with respect to the missing data as well. This should be a sensible thing to do whenever the full data sequence is stationary, and hence the missing data have the same spectral content as the available data. We use both simulated and real data examples to show that GAPES estimated spectra and interpolated data sequences have excellent accuracy. We also show the performance gain achieved by GAPES over two of the most commonly used approaches for gapped-data spectral analysis, viz., the periodogram and the parametric CLEAN method. This work was partly supported by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research.

  18. Extracting spectral contrast in Landsat Thematic Mapper image data using selective principal component analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.; Kwarteng, A.Y.

    1989-01-01

    A challenge encountered with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data, which includes data from size reflective spectral bands, is displaying as much information as possible in a three-image set for color compositing or digital analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the six TM bands simultaneously is often used to address this problem. However, two problems that can be encountered using the PCA method are that information of interest might be mathematically mapped to one of the unused components and that a color composite can be difficult to interpret. "Selective' PCA can be used to minimize both of these problems. The spectral contrast among several spectral regions was mapped for a northern Arizona site using Landsat TM data. Field investigations determined that most of the spectral contrast seen in this area was due to one of the following: the amount of iron and hematite in the soils and rocks, vegetation differences, standing and running water, or the presence of gypsum, which has a higher moisture retention capability than do the surrounding soils and rocks. -from Authors

  19. Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Zaharov, Viktor; Tetard, Laurene; Thundat, Thomas George; Passian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

  20. Modified multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis for mapping impervious surfaces in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kun; Jin, Xiao; Du, Qian; Du, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    A modified multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MMESMA) approach is proposed for high-spatial-resolution hyperspectral imagery in the application of impervious surface mapping. Different from the original MESMA that usually selects one endmember spectral signature for each land-cover class, the proposed MMESMA allows the selection of multiple endmember signatures for each land-cover class. It is expected that the MMESMA can better accommodate within-class variations and yield better mapping results. Various unmixing models are compared, such as the linear mixing model, linear spectral mixture analysis using the original linear mixture model, original MESMA, and support vector machine using a nonlinear mixture model. Airborne 1-m resolution HySpex and ROSIS data are used in the experiments. For HySpex data, validation based on 25-cm synchronism aerial photography shows that MMESMA performs the best, with the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of the estimated abundance fractions being 13.20% and the correlation coefficient (R2) being 0.9656. For ROSIS data, validation based on simulation shows that MMESMA performs the best, with the RMSE of the estimated abundance fraction being 4.51% and R2 being 0.9878. These demonstrate that the proposed MMESMA can generate more reliable abundance fractions for high-spatial-resolution hyperspectral imagery, which tends to include strong within-class spectral variations.

  1. REDFIT-X: Cross-spectral analysis of unevenly spaced paleoclimate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björg Ólafsdóttir, Kristín; Schulz, Michael; Mudelsee, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Cross-spectral analysis is commonly used in climate research to identify joint variability between two variables and to assess the phase (lead/lag) between them. Here we present a Fortran 90 program (REDFIT-X) that is specially developed to perform cross-spectral analysis of unevenly spaced paleoclimate time series. The data properties of climate time series that are necessary to take into account are for example data spacing (unequal time scales and/or uneven spacing between time points) and the persistence in the data. Lomb-Scargle Fourier transform is used for the cross-spectral analyses between two time series with unequal and/or uneven time scale and the persistence in the data is taken into account when estimating the uncertainty associated with cross-spectral estimates. We use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the uncertainty associated with coherency and phase. False-alarm level is estimated from empirical distribution of coherency estimates and confidence intervals for the phase angle are formed from the empirical distribution of the phase estimates. The method is validated by comparing the Monte Carlo uncertainty estimates with the traditionally used measures. Examples are given where the method is applied to paleoceanographic time series.

  2. Linkages Between Hydrology and Biogeochemistry, Explored via Spectral Analysis of Catchment Hydrochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Feng, X.; Neal, C.

    2002-12-01

    The hydrology and biogeochemistry of small catchments present two linked paradoxes. The first paradox is that streamflow responds promptly to rainfall inputs, but fluctuations in passive tracers (such as water isotopes and chloride) in streamflow are often strongly damped, indicating that storm flow is predominantly 'old' water. The mechanisms by which catchments can store water for months, but then release it in minutes during storm events, are not well understood. The second paradox is that although streamflow concentrations of passive tracers fluctuate very little during storm events, reactive tracers (such as pH, alkalinity, Al, Ca, Mg, Si, DOC, and NO3) are often highly sensitive to discharge. Thus, although baseflow and highflow are both composed mostly of 'old' water, they can have very different chemical signatures. The physical and chemical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. Here we explore these puzzles using spectral analysis of hydrochemical time series from small upland catchments. Spectral analysis shows that catchments act as fractal filters for passive tracers like chloride, converting "white noise" rainfall inputs into fractal "1/f noise" runoff time series (Kirchner et al., Nature 403, 524-527, 2000). These fractal time series can be generated by advection and dispersion of spatially distributed rainfall tracer inputs, as long as the flow system is highly dispersive (Kirchner et al., J. Hydrol. 254, 81-100, 2001). By contrast, spectral analyses of rainfall and streamflow water fluxes show that hydrologic signals are transmitted downslope more rapidly, and with much less dispersion, than passive tracer signals are. Thus small upland catchments transmit hydraulic potentials (which drive runoff) much less dispersively than they transport water itself. Alternative conceptual models for subsurface flow and transport in catchments have distinct spectral signatures; thus spectral methods can be used for model testing as well as

  3. Analysis of Vibration and Noise of Construction Machinery Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and Spectral Correlation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuebiao; Zhou, Yiqi; Yu, Gang; Lu, Dan

    In order to analyze the effect of engine vibration on cab noise of construction machinery in multi-frequency bands, a new method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and spectral correlation analysis is proposed. Firstly, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of vibration and noise signals were obtained by EEMD method, and then the IMFs which have the same frequency bands were selected. Secondly, we calculated the spectral correlation coefficients between the selected IMFs, getting the main frequency bands in which engine vibration has significant impact on cab noise. Thirdly, the dominated frequencies were picked out and analyzed by spectral analysis method. The study result shows that the main frequency bands and dominated frequencies in which engine vibration have serious impact on cab noise can be identified effectively by the proposed method, which provides effective guidance to noise reduction of construction machinery.

  4. Parallel implementation of the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis algorithm for hyperspectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabe, Sergio; Igual, Francisco D.; Botella, Guillermo; Prieto-Matias, Manuel; Plaza, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade, the issue of endmember variability has received considerable attention, particularly when each pixel is modeled as a linear combination of endmembers or pure materials. As a result, several models and algorithms have been developed for considering the effect of endmember variability in spectral unmixing and possibly include multiple endmembers in the spectral unmixing stage. One of the most popular approach for this purpose is the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) algorithm. The procedure executed by MESMA can be summarized as follows: (i) First, a standard linear spectral unmixing (LSU) or fully constrained linear spectral unmixing (FCLSU) algorithm is run in an iterative fashion; (ii) Then, we use different endmember combinations, randomly selected from a spectral library, to decompose each mixed pixel; (iii) Finally, the model with the best fit, i.e., with the lowest root mean square error (RMSE) in the reconstruction of the original pixel, is adopted. However, this procedure can be computationally very expensive due to the fact that several endmember combinations need to be tested and several abundance estimation steps need to be conducted, a fact that compromises the use of MESMA in applications under real-time constraints. In this paper we develop (for the first time in the literature) an efficient implementation of MESMA on different platforms using OpenCL, an open standard for parallel programing on heterogeneous systems. Our experiments have been conducted using a simulated data set and the clMAGMA mathematical library. This kind of implementations with the same descriptive language on different architectures are very important in order to actually calibrate the possibility of using heterogeneous platforms for efficient hyperspectral imaging processing in real remote sensing missions.

  5. A NEW METHOD OF PULSE-WISE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R. E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in

    2013-05-10

    Time-resolved spectral analysis, though a very promising method to understand the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is difficult to implement in practice because of poor statistics. We present a new method for pulse-wise time-resolved spectral study of the individual pulses of GRBs, using the fact that many spectral parameters are either constants or smooth functions of time. We use this method for the two pulses of GRB 081221, the brightest GRB with separable pulses. We choose, from the literature, a set of possible models that includes the Band model, blackbody with a power law (BBPL), and a collection of blackbodies with a smoothly varying temperature profile, along with a power law (mBBPL), and two blackbodies with a power law (2BBPL). First, we perform a time-resolved study to confirm the spectral parameter variations, and then we construct the new model to perform a joint spectral fit. We find that any photospheric emission in terms of blackbodies is required mainly in the rising parts of the pulses and the falling part can be adequately explained in terms of the Band model, with the low-energy photon index within the regime of synchrotron model. Interestingly, we find that 2BBPL is comparable or sometimes even better, though marginally, than the Band model, in all episodes. Consistent results are also obtained for the brightest GRB of Fermi era-GRB 090618. We point out that the method is generic enough to test any spectral model with well-defined parameter variations.

  6. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data.

  7. Polychromatic spectral pattern analysis of ultra-weak photon emissions from a human body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Iwasa, Torai; Tada, Mika

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-weak photon emission (UPE), often designated as biophoton emission, is generally observed in a wide range of living organisms, including human beings. This phenomenon is closely associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal metabolic processes and pathological states induced by oxidative stress. Application of UPE extracting the pathophysiological information has long been anticipated because of its potential non-invasiveness, facilitating its diagnostic use. Nevertheless, its weak intensity and UPE mechanism complexity hinder its use for practical applications. Spectroscopy is crucially important for UPE analysis. However, filter-type spectroscopy technique, used as a conventional method for UPE analysis, intrinsically limits its performance because of its monochromatic scheme. To overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, the authors developed a polychromatic spectroscopy system for UPE spectral pattern analysis. It is based on a highly efficient lens systems and a transmission-type diffraction grating with a highly sensitive, cooled, charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. Spectral pattern analysis of the human body was done for a fingertip using the developed system. The UPE spectrum covers the spectral range of 450-750nm, with a dominant emission region of 570-670nm. The primary peak is located in the 600-650nm region. Furthermore, application of UPE source exploration was demonstrated with the chemiluminescence spectrum of melanin and coexistence with oxidized linoleic acid.

  8. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data. PMID:25647718

  9. Exploring the potential of hyper-spectral imaging for the biogeochemical analysis of varved lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Christoph; Grosjean, Martin; Enters, Dirk; Tylmann, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Varved lake sediments have successfully been used to make inferences about past environmental and climate conditions from annual to multi-millennial scales. Among other proxies, concentrations of sedimentary photopigments have been used for temperature reconstructions. However, obtaining well calibrated annually resolved records from sediments still remains challenging. Most laboratory methods used to analyse lake sediments require physical subsampling and are destructive in the process. Hence, temporal resolution and number of data are limited by the amount of material available in the core. Furthermore, for very low sediment accumulation rates annual subsampling is often very difficult or even impossible. To address these problems we explore hyper-spectral imaging as a new method to analyse lake sediments based on their reflectance spectra in the visible and near infrared spectrum. In contrast to other fast and non-destructive methods like X-ray fluorescence, VIS/NIR reflectance spectrometry distinguishes between biogeochemical substances rather than single elements. Rein (2003) has shown that VIS-RS can be used to detect relative concentrations of sedimentary photopigments (e.g. chlorins, carotenoids) and clay minerals. This study presents an advanced approach using a hyper-spectral camera and remote sensing techniques to infer climate proxy data from reflectance spectra of varved lake sediments. Hyper-spectral imaging allows analysing an entire sediment core in a single measurement, producing a spectral dataset with very high spatial (30x30µm/pixel) and spectral resolutions (~1nm) and a higher spectral range (400-1000nm) compared to previously used spectrophotometers. This allows the analysis of data time series at sub-varve scales or spatial mapping of sedimentary substances (e.g. chlorophyll-a and diagenetic products) at very high resolution. The method is demonstrated on varved lake sediments from northern Poland showing the change of the relative

  10. Preliminary spectral and geologic analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data, Wind River Basin area, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Lang, H. R.; Paylor, E. D.; Alley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) image of the Wind River Basin area in Wyoming is currently under analysis for stratigraphic and structural mapping and for assessment of spectral and spatial characteristics using visible, near infrared, and short wavelength infrared bands. To estimate the equivalent Lambertian surface reflectance, TM radiance data were calibrated to remove atmospheric and instrumental effects. Reflectance measurements for homogeneous natural and cultural targets were acquired about one year after data acquisition. Calibration data obtained during the analysis were used to calculate new gains and offsets to improve scanner response for earth science applications. It is shown that the principal component images calculated from the TM data were the result of linear transformations of ground reflectance. In images prepared from this transform, the separation of spectral classes was independent of systematic atmospheric and instrumental factors. Several examples of the processed images are provided.

  11. Cross spectral analysis to determine the resolution and precision of Jimsphere and windsonde wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve A.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral analysis of wind profiles measured by two systems, one consisting of Jimsphere balloons tracked by two precision tracking radars and the other of the Windsonde and a Meteorological Sounding System (MSS) tracker, was carried out to assess the effective resolution and precision of these two systems. Results obtained from the cross-spectral analysis of seven nearly simultaneous profiles from Jimsphere and MSS-Windsonde releases obtained in March and April, 1985 indicate that the coherence between the Jimsphere and Windsonde profiles was not as strong as between two independent radars tracking the same Jimsphere. The effective vertical resolution for the Jimsphere measurements was 150-300 m, while that for the Windsonde was above 500 m. The amplitude of the incoherent noise in the Jimsphere measurements was approximately 0.25 m/s, while that of the MSS-tracked Windsonde was about 1.2 m/s.

  12. Spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single dye molecules in polymers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, S. V.; Naumov, A. V.; Vainer, Yu. G.; Kador, Lothar

    2012-11-01

    We present a method for the spectrally resolved analysis of fluorescence blinking of single quantum emitters. It is based on the well-known technique of repeated recording of single-molecule (SM) fluorescence excitation spectra. The potential of our approach is presented for the example of single tetra-tert-butylterrylene molecules in an amorphous polymer matrix (polyisobutylene), which exhibit fluorescence blinking at cryogenic temperatures. Measuring the spectral dependence of the blinking statistics improves the possibility to clarify the microscopic nature of the dark state(s) of the emitters. We demonstrate how the blinking statistics can be definitely attributed to conformational changes in the local environment of a SM and how the parameters of the corresponding elementary excitations can be measured. The analysis of the blinking statistics as a function of the optical excitation frequency allows us to discriminate between photo-induced and spontaneous transitions into a dark state.

  13. [Local Regression Algorithm Based on Net Analyte Signal and Its Application in Near Infrared Spectral Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-guang; Lu, Jian-gang

    2016-02-01

    Abstract To overcome the problems of significant difference among samples and nonlinearity between the property and spectra of samples in spectral quantitative analysis, a local regression algorithm is proposed in this paper. In this algorithm, net signal analysis method(NAS) was firstly used to obtain the net analyte signal of the calibration samples and unknown samples, then the Euclidean distance between net analyte signal of the sample and net analyte signal of calibration samples was calculated and utilized as similarity index. According to the defined similarity index, the local calibration sets were individually selected for each unknown sample. Finally, a local PLS regression model was built on each local calibration sets for each unknown sample. The proposed method was applied to a set of near infrared spectra of meat samples. The results demonstrate that the prediction precision and model complexity of the proposed method are superior to global PLS regression method and conventional local regression algorithm based on spectral Euclidean distance.

  14. A New View of Earthquake Ground Motion Data: The Hilbert Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A brief description of the newly developed Empirical Mode Decomposition (ENID) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) method will be given. The decomposition is adaptive and can be applied to both nonlinear and nonstationary data. Example of the method applied to a sample earthquake record will be given. The results indicate those low frequency components, totally missed by the Fourier analysis, are clearly identified by the new method. Comparisons with Wavelet and window Fourier analysis show the new method offers much better temporal and frequency resolutions.

  15. Brake squeal analysis by coupling spectral linearization and modal identification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, P.; Clair, D.; Baillet, L.; Fogli, M.

    2009-11-01

    Brake squeal is induced by self-excited vibrations, consequences of local nonlinearities at the contact interface. This paper deals with a new way to analyze the brake squeal behavior. The proposed method is based on a spectral linearization of the brake nonlinear dynamic response with unilateral contact and friction conditions. The approach enables to identify modal parameters of an equivalent linear system by a combination of the random decrement technique and the Ibrahim time domain method. It is applied to the analysis of a pad/beam squealing contact. The obtained results are compared to the classical complex eigenvalues analysis and nonlinear temporal dynamic finite element analysis ones.

  16. The spectral relationships between NEA and the meteorites: An overview using principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Tholen, D. J.; Bell, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary reservoirs for meteorites is probably the planet-crossing Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Comparing the spectral characteristics of these two populations with each other and with the spectra of the main belt asteroids would provide insight into the dynamical processes that deliver meteorites to Earth. One method for obtaining an overview of general relationships in a large spectral data set is the statistical technique of principal components analysis. This technique quantifies general spectral similarities and reprojects the data in a plot of major axes of variation where distance is a measure of relative similarity. A major caveat should be kept in mind, however, spectra are sensitive to particle size and viewing geometry effects, and near Earth asteroids (NEA's) are probably significantly different from main belt asteroids in both these factors. The analysis was restricted to the spectral range of ECAS filters and included 116 meteorite spectra from the Gaffey (1976) survey and 417 asteroids from the Zellner et. al. (1985) survey of which 13 are planet-crossers. Although thirteen asteroids are not much of a sample on which to base conclusions, a few inferences can be drawn from this exercise. First, the NEA spectral characteristics are, on average, more consistent with the spectra of meteorites than are the main belt asteroids. Second, the S-type NEA's tend to be spectrally more similar to the ordinary chondrite meteorites than the main belt S-types. This suggests that the planet-crossing S-types do not represent the spectral range of the main belt S-type population and that the planet-crossing S-types are on average more like the ordinary chondrites than the main belt S-types. Third, the only direct asteroidal ordinary chondrite analog, the Q-type asteroid, 1862 Apollo, plots well within the field of the ordinary chondrite meteorites and represents the most common meteorite fall type. Finally, it is interesting that the planet

  17. Analysis of Unresolved Spectral Infrared Signature for the Extraction of Invariant Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; Payne, T.; Wilhelm, S.; Gregory, S.; Skinner, M.; Rudy, R.; Russell, R.; Brown, J.; Dao, P.

    2010-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a simple analytical technique for extraction of spectral radiance values for the solar panel and body from an unresolved spectral infrared signature of 3-axis stabilized low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites. It uses data collected by The Aerospace Corporation’s Broad-band Array Spectrograph System (BASS) instrument at the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) site. The observation conditions were such that the signatures were due to the emissive phenomenology and contribution of earthshine was negligible. The analysis is based on a two-facet orientation model of the satellite. This model captures the basic, known behavior of the satellite body and its solar panels. One facet points to nadir and the second facet tracks the sun. The facet areas are unknown. Special conditions are determined on the basis of observational geometry that allows separation of the spectral radiance values of the solar panel and body. These values remain unchanged (i.e., are invariant) under steady illumination conditions even if the signature appears different from one observation to another. In addition, they provide information on the individual spectral makeup of the satellite solar panel and body materials.

  18. A three-dimensional hybrid finite element/spectral analysis of noise radiation from turbofan inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, M. C.; Giles, M. B.

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) analysis of tonal noise radiated from non-axisymmetric turbofan inlets. The novelty of the method is in combining a standard finite element discretisation of the acoustic field in the axial and radial coordinates with a Fourier spectral representation in the circumferential direction. The boundary conditions at the farfield, fan face and acoustic liners are treated using the same spectral representation. The resulting set of discrete acoustic equations are solved employing the well-established BICGSTAB or QMR iterative algorithms and a very effective specialised preconditioner based on the axisymmetric mean geometry and flow field. Numerical examples demonstrate the suitability of the new method to engine configurations with realistic 3D features, such as relatively large degrees of asymmetry and spliced acoustic liners. The examples also illustrate the two advantages of the new method over a traditional 3D finite element approach. The new method requires a significantly smaller number of unknowns as relatively few circumferential Fourier modes in the spectral solution ensure an accurate field representation. Also, due to the effective preconditioner, the spectral linear solver benefits from stable iterations at a high rate of convergence.

  19. Spectral and Image Integrated Analysis of Hyperspectral Data for Waxy Corn Seed Variety Classification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoling; Hong, Hanmei; You, Zhaohong; Cheng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purity of waxy corn seed is a very important index of seed quality. A novel procedure for the classification of corn seed varieties was developed based on the combined spectral, morphological, and texture features extracted from visible and near-infrared (VIS/NIR) hyperspectral images. For the purpose of exploration and comparison, images of both sides of corn kernels (150 kernels of each variety) were captured and analyzed. The raw spectra were preprocessed with Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and derivation. To reduce the dimension of spectral data, the spectral feature vectors were constructed using the successive projections algorithm (SPA). Five morphological features (area, circularity, aspect ratio, roundness, and solidity) and eight texture features (energy, contrast, correlation, entropy, and their standard deviations) were extracted as appearance character from every corn kernel. Support vector machines (SVM) and a partial least squares–discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model were employed to build the classification models for seed varieties classification based on different groups of features. The results demonstrate that combining spectral and appearance characteristic could obtain better classification results. The recognition accuracy achieved in the SVM model (98.2% and 96.3% for germ side and endosperm side, respectively) was more satisfactory than in the PLS-DA model. This procedure has the potential for use as a new method for seed purity testing. PMID:26140347

  20. Lossy hyperspectral image compression tuned for spectral mixture analysis applications on NVidia graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Plaza, Javier; Sánchez, Sergio; Paz, Abel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a computationally efficient approach for lossy compression of remotely sensed hyperspectral images which has been specifically tuned to preserve the relevant information required in spectral mixture analysis (SMA) applications. The proposed method is based on two steps: 1) endmember extraction, and 2) linear spectral unmixing. Two endmember extraction algorithms: the pixel purity index (PPI) and the automatic morphological endmember extraction (AMEE), and a fully constrained linear spectral unmixing (FCLSU) algorithm have been considered in this work to devise the proposed lossy compression strategy. The proposed methodology has been implemented in graphics processing units (GPUs) of NVidiaTM type. Our experiments demonstrate that it can achieve very high compression ratios when applied to standard hyperspectral data sets, and can also retain the relevant information required for spectral unmixing in a computationally efficient way, achieving speedups in the order of 26 on a NVidiaTM GeForce 8800 GTX graphic card when compared to an optimized implementation of the same code in a dual-core CPU.

  1. Quantitative Spectral Morphology Analysis of Unusually Red and Blue L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camnasio, Sara; Alam, Munazza Khalida; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mace, Gregory N.; Martin, Emily; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Brown Dwarfs in New York City (BDNYC)

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to constrain the properties of photometric color outliers, we present a quantitative spectral morphology analysis of medium-resolution NIRSPEC (R~2,000), SpeX cross-dispersed (R~2,000), Palomar TripleSpec (R~2600), and Magellan FIRE (R~6000) J-band spectra for a sample of unusually red and blue L dwarfs. Some red L dwarfs are low surface gravity, young objects whose spectra present weak Na I doublets and FeH absorption bands, but strong VO features (Cruz et al. 2009). Some blue L dwarfs are subdwarfs with low metallicity spectral features such as greater H2 absorption, stronger metal hydride bands, and enhanced TiO absorption (Burgasser et al 2008c). We fit 3rd order polynomials to the pseudo-continuum in order to provide a quantitative comparison of spectral morphology with other peculiar L dwarfs, field standards, young L dwarfs, and L subdwarf. The results indicated that the coefficients of the fit correlate with spectral type, but are independent of color. This newly found trend provides a parameter which can be utilized as an additional tool in characterizing quantifiable differences in the spectra of brown dwarfs. Furthermore, this method can be applied in studying the atmospheric properties of exoplanets, given their similarities with brown dwarfs in mass and photospheric properties.

  2. Application of Spectral Mixture Analysis to Urban Land use/Land cover Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argany, M.; Sarajian, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    Remote sensing satellite imagery represent important source of information for urban analysis. But because of large spatial pixel sizes for multispectral and hyperspectral sensors that numerous disparate substances can contribute to the spectrum measured from a single pixel, spectral unmixing algorithms can be used to determine the land use/land cover and sub pixel data. In this paper, in order to determine the individual constituent materials present in pixels, the linear spectral unmixing method has been used. By using the linear spectral unmixing method, the components in mixed pixels are identified, and by performing inverse operation, the proportions of the materials are determined and the measured spectrum of a mixed pixel is decomposed into a collection of constituent spectra, or endmembers. Accordingly, a set of corresponding fractions, or abundances, that indicate the proportion of each endmember present in the pixel are specified. Endmembers normally correspond to familiar objects in the scene, and here they are green vegetation, impervious surface, soil and shade, etc. So, in the next stage endmembers have been selected using Pixel Purity Index (PPI) to find the most spectrally pure pixels. The PPI was computed by repeatedly projecting n-dimensional scatter plots on to a random unit vector. In the final stage, abundances have been extracted by an inversion algorithm and fraction images have been made. Study area in this paper is Karaj city and ETM+ image taken by Landsat satellite has been used.

  3. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  4. Spectral analysis on the group of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, V. V.; Volchkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    For the group G of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc the problem of spectral analysis is considered for subspaces \\mathscr{U}\\subset C(G) which are invariant under right shifts by elements of G and conjugations by elements of the rotation subgroup. It turns out that, in contrast to subspaces of C(G) which are merely invariant under right shifts, \\mathscr{U} contains a minimal subspace with the above properties. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  5. Optimal error analysis of spectral methods with emphasis on non-constant coefficients and deformed geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maday, Yvon; Ronquist, Einar M.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical analysis of spectral methods when non-constant coefficients appear in the equation, either due to the original statement of the equations or to take into account the deformed geometry, is presented. Particular attention is devoted to the optimality of the discretization even for low values of the discretization parameter. The effect of some overintegration is also addressed, in order to possibly improve the accuracy of the discretization.

  6. Spectral analysis of CFB data: Predictive models of Circulating Fluidized Bed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Miller, A.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Spectral analysis of CFB data obtained at Illinois Institute of Technology shows that the frequencies of pressure oscillations are less than 0.1 Hertz and that they increase with solids volume fraction to the usual value of one Hertz obtained in bubbling beds. These data are consistent with the kinetic theory interpretation of density wave propagation.

  7. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  8. Identification of neuronal network properties from the spectral analysis of calcium imaging signals in neuronal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tibau, Elisenda; Valencia, Miguel; Soriano, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks. PMID:24385953

  9. Evaluating the validity of spectral calibration models for quantitative analysis following signal preprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Grant, Edward

    2012-11-01

    When paired with high-powered chemometric analysis, spectrometric methods offer great promise for the high-throughput analysis of complex systems. Effective classification or quantification often relies on signal preprocessing to reduce spectral interference and optimize the apparent performance of a calibration model. However, less frequently addressed by systematic research is the affect of preprocessing on the statistical accuracy of a calibration result. The present work demonstrates the effectiveness of two criteria for validating the performance of signal preprocessing in multivariate models in the important dimensions of bias and precision. To assess the extent of bias, we explore the applicability of the elliptic joint confidence region (EJCR) test and devise a new means to evaluate precision by a bias-corrected root mean square error of prediction. We show how these criteria can effectively gauge the success of signal pretreatments in suppressing spectral interference while providing a straightforward means to determine the optimal level of model complexity. This methodology offers a graphical diagnostic by which to visualize the consequences of pretreatment on complex multivariate models, enabling optimization with greater confidence. To demonstrate the application of the EJCR criterion in this context, we evaluate the validity of representative calibration models using standard pretreatment strategies on three spectral data sets. The results indicate that the proposed methodology facilitates the reliable optimization of a well-validated calibration model, thus improving the capability of spectrophotometric analysis.

  10. Discrimination of weeds in brassica crops using optical spectral reflectance and leaf texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, John F.; Ross, David W.; Tsheko, R.; Kennedy, Duncan D.; Muir, Andrew Y.; Fleming, John

    1999-01-01

    Optical spectral reflectance and image analysis techniques were investigated as possible solutions to discriminate crop and weed plants. The range of pants included two brassica crop species, a cereal crop and eight weed species. Spectral signatures were obtained form optical reflectance measurement taken with a spectrophotometer in reflectance mode in the region between 700 and 1350 nm. Algorithms were developed based on multivariate statistical analysis of the plant reflectance spectra. By minimizing wavebands of interest for certain crop/weed combinations, better than 95 percent discrimination accuracy was obtained for only two or three waveband measures. Using filters at these wavebands it was possible to easily segregate corp from weed plants in images. Discrimination on the basis of leaf texture was investigated using textural signatures for whole leaves derived from a gray level co-occurrence matrix of nearest- neighbor pixel intensity. Textural features of leaves were expressed in the form of feature vectors comprising nine textural parameters extracted from the co-occurrence matrix. A numerical Bayesian classifier was used to classify leaves based on minimum distance between a mean feature vector determined form a training set and the test feature vector. A mean discrimination accuracy of 90 percent was achieved between al plant species and almost 100 percent separation was achieved between the crop and weeds. The results show that a combination of spectral imaging and texture analysis may provide a robust method of discrimination with potential for real time application.

  11. The measurement and analysis of leaf spectral reflectance of two stands of loblolly pine populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Anthony D.

    1993-01-01

    My research was conducted under the mentorship of Dr. Jeff Luvall. I worked at Marshall from June 1 through August 6, 1993. My proposal is titled 'The Measurement and Analysis of Leaf Spectral Reflectance of Two Stands of Loblolly Pine Populations.' The populations for this study were chosen from a larger population of 31 families managed by the International Forest Seed Company, Odenville, Alabama. The technology for mobile ground base spectral detecting is new and therefore the majority of time, June 2 through July 9, was spent on learning the techniques of the Spectrometer 2 spectroradiometer used in the gathering of spectra information. The activities included in the learning process were as follows: calibration of the equipment, programming the associated computer for data management, operation of the spectral devices, and input and output of data. From July 12 through August 3 the time was spent on learning the 'STATGRAP' computer software. This software will be used in the analysis of the data retrieved by the Spectrometer 2 spectroradiometer. Dr. Greg Carter, at Stennis, a colleague of Dr. Luvall, has been conducting similar work with different instruments and procedures and has agreed to host us for a training session on data gathering and analysis. This visit, which has previously planned for July 9, 1993, but had to be postponed because of schedule conflicts, is now confirmed for August 18-22, 1993. This trip to Stennis will provide the knowledge for conducting the field operations in my study, i.e., gathering of data and file conversions.

  12. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  13. An Excel-based implementation of the spectral method of action potential alternans analysis.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Action potential (AP) alternans has been well established as a mechanism of arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. Proper interpretation of AP alternans requires a robust method of alternans quantification. Traditional methods of alternans analysis neglect higher order periodicities that may have greater pro-arrhythmic potential than classical 2:1 alternans. The spectral method of alternans analysis, already widely used in the related study of microvolt T-wave alternans, has also been used to study AP alternans. Software to meet the specific needs of AP alternans analysis is not currently available in the public domain. An AP analysis tool is implemented here, written in Visual Basic for Applications and using Microsoft Excel as a shell. This performs a sophisticated analysis of alternans behavior allowing reliable distinction of alternans from random fluctuations, quantification of alternans magnitude, and identification of which phases of the AP are most affected. In addition, the spectral method has been adapted to allow detection and quantification of higher order regular oscillations. Analysis of action potential morphology is also performed. A simple user interface enables easy import, analysis, and export of collated results.

  14. Spectral analysis for the mineralogical characterization of planosols in NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Diego; Souza, Deorgia; Rocha, Washington

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to conduct a spectral characterization in two soil profiles located in the northeast of Brazil proposing relations between the pedogenetic evolution and the environmental settings generated from the characteristics of Planosols analyzed and the presence of minerals identified by spectral pattern obtained in a laboratory. The methodological procedures were divided into the characterization of the study area, theoretical framework, field work with sampling, sample preparation, measurement in the laboratory, processing of spectral data, analysis and interpretation of results and a vegetation index calculation for aid in the environmental characterization. It is possible to see that: i) both profiles have similar spectral characterized patterns; ii) the horizons A and E show higher reflectance compared with B and C; iii) Minerals 2: 1 and 1: 1, such as montmorillonite and kaolinite can be identified; iv) Planosols are fragile to erosion. In both profiles, the C horizon less weathered and B horizon iluvial show intense absorption bands at 1400nm, 1900nm and 2200nm. These absorption bands indicate the existence of mineralogy 2: 1 on the horizons of the soils analyzed. In both profiles were found small peaks absorption in 2265nm, corresponding to gibbsite. The occurrence of this type of mineral is more common in highly weathered soils or old surfaces of erosion, which is reflected in small intensities of absorption observed in this analysis since these are of little-weathered soils of the Brazilian semiarid region. Spectral analysis and morphology described in the two profiles show difficulties for the growth of vegetation, which is consistent with NDVI values found, ranging from -0.32 to 0.61with a predominance of 0.19. These factors lead to the intensification of erosion. Erosion is characterized as one of the main indicators of environmental degradation, causing loss of important elements of the soil, which creates consequently a reduction in fertility

  15. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2003-12-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  16. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  17. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  18. Spectral analysis of the primary flight focal plane arrays for the thermal infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-06-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on board the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a two-channel, push-broom imager that will continue Landsat thermal band measurements of the Earth. The core of the instrument consists of three Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays whose data are combined to effectively produce a linear array of 1850 pixels for each band with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 meters and a swath width of 185 kilometers. In this push-broom configuration, each pixel may have a slightly different band shape. An on-board blackbody calibrator is used to correct each pixel. However, depending on the scene being observed, striping and other artifacts may still be present in the final data product. The science-focused mission of LDCM requires that these residual effects be understood. The analysis presented here assisted in the selection of the three flight QWIP arrays. Each pixel was scrutinized in terms of its compliance with TIRS spectral requirements. This investigation utilized laboratory spectral measurements of the arrays and filters along with radiometric modeling of the TIRS instrument and environment. These models included standard radiometry equations along with complex physics-based models such as the MODerate spectral resolution TRANsmittance (MODTRAN) and Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tools. The laboratory measurements and physics models were used to determine the extent of striping and other spectral artifacts that might be present in the final TIRS data product. The results demonstrate that artifacts caused by the residual pixel-to-pixel spectral non-uniformity are small enough that the data can be expected to meet the TIRS radiometric and image quality requirements.

  19. Comparative spectral analysis between the functionality of the human eye and of the optical part of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2015-02-01

    A software that comparatively analysis the spectral functionality of the optical part of the human eye and of the optical image acquisition system of the digital camera, is presented. Comparisons are done using demonstrative images which present the spectral color transformations of an image that is considered the test object. To perform the simulations are presented the spectral models and are computed their effects on the colors of the spectral image, during the propagation of the D48 sun light through the eye and the optics of the digital camera. The simulations are made using a spectral image processing algorithm which converts the spectral image into XYZ color space, CIE CAM02 color appearance model and then into RGB color space.

  20. Spectral variability among rocks in visible and near-infrared mustispectral Pancam data collected at Gusev crater: Examinations using spectral mixture analysis and related techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J.F.; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analyzed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three end-member mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover's Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional end-members. In the Columbia Hills, there were a number of scenes in which additional rock end-members were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined, and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks, which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron-bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Spectral variability among rocks in visible and near-infrared multispectral Pancam data collected at Gusev crater: Examinations using spectral mixture analysis and related techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F.; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analyzed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three end-member mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover's Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional end-members. In the Columbia Hills, there were a number of scenes in which additional rock end-members were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined, and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks, which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron-bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts.

  2. Multivariat least-squares methods applied to the quantitative spectral analysis of multicomponent samples

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.; Easterling, R.G.; Vopicka, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In an extension of earlier work, weighted multivariate least-squares methods of quantitative FT-IR analysis have been developed. A linear least-squares approximation to nonlinearities in the Beer-Lambert law is made by allowing the reference spectra to be a set of known mixtures, The incorporation of nonzero intercepts in the relation between absorbance and concentration further improves the approximation of nonlinearities while simultaneously accounting for nonzero spectra baselines. Pathlength variations are also accommodated in the analysis, and under certain conditions, unknown sample pathlengths can be determined. All spectral data are used to improve the precision and accuracy of the estimated concentrations. During the calibration phase of the analysis, pure component spectra are estimated from the standard mixture spectra. These can be compared with the measured pure component spectra to determine which vibrations experience nonlinear behavior. In the predictive phase of the analysis, the calculated spectra are used in our previous least-squares analysis to estimate sample component concentrations. These methods were applied to the analysis of the IR spectra of binary mixtures of esters. Even with severely overlapping spectral bands and nonlinearities in the Beer-Lambert law, the average relative error in the estimated concentration was <1%.

  3. Identification of mineral compositions in some renal calculi by FT Raman and IR spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Tonannavar, J; Deshpande, Gouri; Yenagi, Jayashree; Patil, Siddanagouda B; Patil, Nikhil A; Mulimani, B G

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper accurate and reliable Raman and IR spectral identification of mineral constituents in nine samples of renal calculi (kidney stones) removed from patients suffering from nephrolithiasis. The identified mineral components include Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate (COM, whewellite), Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate (COD, weddellite), Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate Hexahydrate (MAPH, struvite), Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate (CHPD, brushite), Pentacalcium Hydroxy Triphosphate (PCHT, hydroxyapatite) and Uric Acid (UA). The identification is based on a satisfactory assignment of all the observed IR and Raman bands (3500-400c m(-1)) to chemical functional groups of mineral components in the samples, aided by spectral analysis of pure materials of COM, MAPH, CHPD and UA. It is found that the eight samples are composed of COM as the common component, the other mineral species as common components are: MAPH in five samples, PCHT in three samples, COD in three samples, UA in three samples and CHPD in two samples. One sample is wholly composed of UA as a single component; this inference is supported by the good agreement between ab initio density functional theoretical spectra and experimental spectral measurements of both sample and pure material. A combined application of Raman and IR techniques has shown that, where the IR is ambiguous, the Raman analysis can differentiate COD from COM and PCHT from MAPH.

  4. Identification of mineral compositions in some renal calculi by FT Raman and IR spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonannavar, J.; Deshpande, Gouri; Yenagi, Jayashree; Patil, Siddanagouda B.; Patil, Nikhil A.; Mulimani, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper accurate and reliable Raman and IR spectral identification of mineral constituents in nine samples of renal calculi (kidney stones) removed from patients suffering from nephrolithiasis. The identified mineral components include Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate (COM, whewellite), Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate (COD, weddellite), Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate Hexahydrate (MAPH, struvite), Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate (CHPD, brushite), Pentacalcium Hydroxy Triphosphate (PCHT, hydroxyapatite) and Uric Acid (UA). The identification is based on a satisfactory assignment of all the observed IR and Raman bands (3500-400 cm- 1) to chemical functional groups of mineral components in the samples, aided by spectral analysis of pure materials of COM, MAPH, CHPD and UA. It is found that the eight samples are composed of COM as the common component, the other mineral species as common components are: MAPH in five samples, PCHT in three samples, COD in three samples, UA in three samples and CHPD in two samples. One sample is wholly composed of UA as a single component; this inference is supported by the good agreement between ab initio density functional theoretical spectra and experimental spectral measurements of both sample and pure material. A combined application of Raman and IR techniques has shown that, where the IR is ambiguous, the Raman analysis can differentiate COD from COM and PCHT from MAPH.

  5. Dynamic Power Spectral Analysis of Solar Measurements from Photospheric, Chromospheric, and Coronal Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouwer, S. D.; Pap, J.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    An important aspect in the power spectral analysis of solar variability is the quasistationary and quasiperiodic nature of solar periodicities. In other words, the frequency, phase, and amplitude of solar periodicities vary on time scales ranging from active region lifetimes to solar cycle time scales. Here, researchers employ a dynamic, or running, power spectral density analysis to determine many periodicities and their time-varying nature in the projected area of active sunspot groups (S sub act). The Solar Maximum Mission/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (SMM/ACRIM) total solar irradiance (S), the Nimbus-7 MgII center-to-wing ratio (R (MgII sub c/w)), the Ottawa 10.7 cm flux (F sub 10.7), and the GOES background x ray flux (X sub b) for the maximum, descending, and minimum portions of solar cycle 21 (i.e., 1980 to 1986) are used. The technique dramatically illustrates several previously unrecognized periodicities. For example, a relatively stable period at about 51 days has been found in those indices which are related to emerging magnetic fields. The majority of solar periodicities, particularly around 27, 150 and 300 days, are quasiperiodic because they vary in amplitude and frequency throughout the solar cycle. Finally, it is shown that there are clear differences between the power spectral densities of solar measurements from photospheric, chromospheric, and coronal sources.

  6. Application of spatial features to satellite land-use analysis. [spectral signature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Hornung, R.; Berry, J.

    1975-01-01

    A Level I land-use analysis of selected training areas of the Colorado Front Range was carried out using digital ERTS-A satellite imagery. Level I land-use categories included urban, agriculture (irrigated and dryland farming), rangeland, and forests. The spatial variations in spectral response for these land-use classes were analyzed using discrete two-dimensional Fourier transforms to isolate and extract spatial features. Analysis was performed on ERTS frame 1352-17134 (July 10, 1973) and frame number 1388-17131 (August 15, 1973). On training sets, spatial features yielded 80 to 100 percent classification accuracies with commission errors ranging from 0 to 20 percent.

  7. Systematic spectral analysis of GX 339-4: Influence of Galactic background and reflection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Corbel, S.; Coriat, M.

    2016-05-01

    Black hole X-ray binaries display large outbursts, during which their properties are strongly variable. We develop a systematic spectral analysis of the 3-40 keV {RXTE}/PCA data in order to study the evolution of these systems and apply it to GX 339-4. Using the low count rate observations, we provide a precise model of the Galactic background at GX 339-4's location and discuss its possible impact on the source spectral parameters. At higher fluxes, the use of a Gaussian line to model the reflection component can lead to the detection of a high-temperature disk, in particular in the high-hard state. We demonstrate that this component is an artifact arising from an incomplete modeling of the reflection spectrum.

  8. Recent Applications of Higher-Order Spectral Analysis to Nonlinear Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Dunn, Shane; Strganac, Thomas W.; Powers, Edward J.; Stearman, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Recent applications of higher-order spectral (HOS) methods to nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena are presented. Applications include the analysis of data from a simulated nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus and from F-18 flight flutter tests. A MATLAB model of the Texas A&MUniversity s Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) is used to generate aeroelastic transients at various conditions including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). The Gaussian or non-Gaussian nature of the transients is investigated, related to HOS methods, and used to identify levels of increasing nonlinear aeroelastic response. Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18 flight flutter test data is presented and analyzed. The data includes high-quality measurements of forced responses and LCO phenomena. Standard power spectral density (PSD) techniques and HOS methods are applied to the data and presented. The goal of this research is to develop methods that can identify the onset of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, such as LCO, during flutter testing.

  9. Paleo-productivity changes revealed by spectral analysis performed on coccoliths assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Eliana; Ornella Amore, Filomena; Perugia, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    functions plus a new function created in order to evaluate cross-wavelet power spectra. Auto-spectral analysis aims to describe the distribution of variance contained in each single signal over frequency or wavelength, while cross-spectral analysis correlates two time series in the frequency domain (Trauth, 2009). We have performed spectral analyses using the complex Fourier transform and the Short time Fourier transform. Both the transforms lose any kind of time information in transforming the signal from time to frequency domain (Jenkins and Watt, 1968). These transforms don't allow us to individuate when an event occurred in the past. In order to overcome this limit we have also applied Wavelet analysis which represents frequency content of a signal over the time thus it allows us to visualize when an event occurred into time domain (Torrence and Compo, 1998; Prokoph and El Bilali, 2008; Grinsted et al., 2004). Moreover we have performed a simple cross and a cross-spectral analysis between different proxy groups to discover their possible correlations into time and frequency domains. References. Berger, A., 1978. J. Atmos. Sc., 35 (12): 2362-2367. Baumann, K.-H., and Freitag, T., 2004. Marine Micropaleontology 52: 195-215. Giraudeau, J., Monteiro, P.M.S., Nikodemus, K., 1993. Mar. Micropalaeontol. 22: 93- 110. Grinsted, A., Moore, J. C., and Jevrejeva, S., 2004. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics 11: 561-566. Huybers, P., 2006. Science 313: 508-511. Jenkins, G. M., and Watt, D. G., 1968. Holden Day, pp. 410, Oakland. Loutre, M. F., Paillard, D., Vimeux, F., and Cortijo, E., 2004. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 221, 1-14. McIntyre, A., and Bè, A.H.W., 1967. Deep-Sea Res. 14, pp. 561-597. Prokoph, A., and El Bilali, H., 2008. Math Geosciences 40: 575-586. Torrence, C., and Compo, G. P., 1998. Bulletin of American Meteorological Society 79:61-78. Trauth, M.H., 2009. Springer 288 p. Winter, A., and Siesser, W., 1994. Cambridge University Press 242 p.

  10. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Evans, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear operator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approximation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage fraction of stochastic histories from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem to test the models for symmetric operators. In general, the derived approximations show good agreement with measured computational results. (authors)

  11. A complete spectral analysis of the flare of the quasar 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadun, Alberto C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1983 quasar outburst of the source 3C 273 is investigated by studying several months of radio-frequency and UV data that represent about six decades of frequency. The data are analyzed to account for the differences inherent in various photometric systems, and adjustments are made for reddening and line emission. Individual wavelengths are delineated in light curves which indicate distinct periods of burst activity for specific wavelengths. The spectrum of the flare is characterized by a trend in which the critical wavelength evolves toward longer wavelengths as the outburst progresses. It is suggested that the data are consistent with a model of an expanding gas cloud that emits Doppler-boosted synchrotron radiation. The spectral curves, light curves, and the spectral index are of use in the analysis of similar phenomena when VLBI data of superluminal motion are incorporated.

  12. Solid optical ring interferometer for high-throughput feedback-free spectral analysis and filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Petrak, B.; Peiris, M.; Muller, A.

    2015-02-15

    We describe a simple and inexpensive optical ring interferometer for use in high-resolution spectral analysis and filtering. It consists of a solid cuboid, reflection-coated on two opposite sides, in which constructive interference occurs for waves in a rhombic trajectory. Due to its monolithic design, the interferometer’s resonance frequencies are insensitive to environmental disturbances over time. Additional advantages are its simplicity of alignment, high-throughput, and feedback-free operation. If desired, it can be stabilized with a secondary laser without disturbance of the primary signal. We illustrate the use of the interferometer for the measurement of the spectral Mollow triplet from a quantum dot and characterize its long-term stability for filtering applications.

  13. Spectral domain analysis of electromagnetic wave scattering by an infinite plane metallic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazunori; Noda, Takeaki; Matsunaga, Toshiaki

    1987-01-01

    A new method, based on the spectral domain analysis, is presented for solving the electromagnetic wave scattering by an infinite plane metallic grating. The key point of the present method is discretization of spectral formulation in terms of the sampling theorem. Two different polarizations, transverse magnetic and transverse electric excitations, are considered here. The accuracy of the present method is examined numerically by comparison with the rigorous Wiener-Hopf solutions which are applicable only to a special case. Since the end effect of a conducting strip is taken into account analytically, final results show enough convergence to evaluate the near fields as well as the far fields with small matrix calculations. Some numerical examples are shown mainly for surface current distributions to clarify the differences between the two different polarizations.

  14. [Study on a method of selecting calibration samples in NIR spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Qin, Chong; Chen, Wen-Wen; He, Xiong-Kui; Zhang, Lu-Da; Ma, Xiang

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper, a simple but novel method based on maximum linearly independent group was introduced into near-infrared (NIR) spectral analysis for selecting representative calibration samples. The experiment materials contained 2,652 tobacco powder samples, with 1,001 samples randomly selected as prediction set, and the others as representative sample candidate set from which calibration sample set was selected. The method of locating maximum linearly independent vectors was used to select representative samples from the spectral vectors of representative samples candidate set. The arithmetic was accomplished by function rref(X,q) in Matlab. The maximum linearly independent spectral vectors were treated as calibration samples set. When different calculating precision q was given, different amount of representative samples were acquired. The selected calibration sample set was used to build regression model to predict the total sugar of tobacco powder samples by PLS. The model was used to analyze 1001 samples in the prediction set. When selecting 32 representative samples, the model presented a good predictive veracity, whose predictive mean relative error was 3.6210%, and correlation coefficient was 0.9643. By paired-samples t-test, we found that the difference between the predicting result of model obtained by 32 samples and that obtained by 146 samples was not significant (alpha=0.05). Also, we compared the methods of randomly selecting calibration samples and maximum linearly independent selection by their predicting effects of models. In the experiment, correspondingly, six calibration sample sets were selected, one of which included 28 samples, while the others included 32, 41, 76, 146 and 163 samples respectively. The method of maximum linearly independent selecting samples turned out to be obviously better than that of randomly selecting. The result indicated that the proposed method can not only effectively enhance the cost-effectiveness of NIR

  15. Investigation of computational and spectral analysis methods for aeroacoustic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanel, Florence O.

    1995-01-01

    Most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) schemes are not adequately accurate for solving aeroacoustics problems, which have wave amplitudes several orders of magnitude smaller yet with frequencies larger than the flow field variations generating the sound. Hence, a computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithm should have minimal dispersion and dissipation features. A dispersion relation preserving (DRP) scheme is, therefore, applied to solve the linearized Euler equations in order to simulate the propagation of three types of waves, namely: acoustic, vorticity, and entropy waves. The scheme is derived using an optimization procedure to ensure that the numerical derivatives preserve the wave number and angular frequency of the partial differential equations being discretized. Consequently, simulated waves propagate with the correct wave speeds and exhibit their appropriate properties. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions, compatible with the DRP scheme and derived from the asymptotic solutions of the governing equations, are also implemented. Numerical simulations are performed to test the effectiveness of the DRP scheme and its boundary conditions. The computed solutions are shown to agree favorably with the exact solutions. The major restriction appears to be that the dispersion relations can be preserved only for waves with wave lengths longer than four or five spacings. The boundary conditions are found to be transparent to the outgoing disturbances. However, when the disturbance source is placed closer to a boundary, small acoustic reflections start appearing. CAA generates enormous amounts of temporal data which needs to be reduced to understand the physical problem being simulated. Spectral analysis is one approach that helps us in extracting information which often can not be easily interpreted in the time domain. Thus, three different methods for the spectral analysis of numerically generated aeroacoustic data are studied. First, the

  16. ACCOUNTING FOR CALIBRATION UNCERTAINTIES IN X-RAY ANALYSIS: EFFECTIVE AREAS IN SPECTRAL FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunsook; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Ratzlaff, Pete; Siemiginowska, Aneta E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: rpete@head.cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-20

    While considerable advance has been made to account for statistical uncertainties in astronomical analyses, systematic instrumental uncertainties have been generally ignored. This can be crucial to a proper interpretation of analysis results because instrumental calibration uncertainty is a form of systematic uncertainty. Ignoring it can underestimate error bars and introduce bias into the fitted values of model parameters. Accounting for such uncertainties currently requires extensive case-specific simulations if using existing analysis packages. Here, we present general statistical methods that incorporate calibration uncertainties into spectral analysis of high-energy data. We first present a method based on multiple imputation that can be applied with any fitting method, but is necessarily approximate. We then describe a more exact Bayesian approach that works in conjunction with a Markov chain Monte Carlo based fitting. We explore methods for improving computational efficiency, and in particular detail a method of summarizing calibration uncertainties with a principal component analysis of samples of plausible calibration files. This method is implemented using recently codified Chandra effective area uncertainties for low-resolution spectral analysis and is verified using both simulated and actual Chandra data. Our procedure for incorporating effective area uncertainty is easily generalized to other types of calibration uncertainties.

  17. Time and spectral analysis methods with machine learning for the authentication of digital audio recordings.

    PubMed

    Korycki, Rafal

    2013-07-10

    This paper addresses the problem of tampering detection and discusses new methods that can be used for authenticity analysis of digital audio recordings. Nowadays, the only method referred to digital audio files commonly approved by forensic experts is the ENF criterion. It consists in fluctuation analysis of the mains frequency induced in electronic circuits of recording devices. Therefore, its effectiveness is strictly dependent on the presence of mains signal in the recording, which is a rare occurrence. This article presents the existing methods of time and spectral analysis along with their modifications as proposed by the author involving spectral analysis of residual signal enhanced by machine learning algorithms. The effectiveness of tampering detection methods described in this paper is tested on a predefined music database. The results are compared graphically using ROC-like curves. Furthermore, time-frequency plots are presented and enhanced by reassignment method in purpose of visual inspection of modified recordings. Using this solution, enables analysis of minimal changes of background sounds, which may indicate tampering. PMID:23481673

  18. Applying spectral peak area analysis in near-infrared spectroscopy moisture assays.

    PubMed

    Brülls, Mikael; Folestad, Staffan; Sparén, Anders; Rasmuson, Anders; Salomonsson, John

    2007-05-01

    Spectral peak area analysis has in this study been shown to be a viable method in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) moisture assays. The study also shows that the required number of calibration samples can be minimized, and the method is, therefore, especially suitable for moisture assays in early formulation development and in-situ process monitoring. Diffuse NIRS was utilized in the development of moisture assays for the model compounds polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and also for a lyophilized formulation. Reference data were obtained using coulometric Karl Fischer titration. The NIRS measurements were performed through the bottoms of the sample vials using either a Fourier Transform-Near-Infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer fitted with a diffuse reflectance probe or a dispersive single beam spectrometer. The ratios of the peak areas of a water peak at 5200 cm(-1) and a reference peak were evaluated using linear regression analysis. The spectral peak area analysis method was compared with a conventional partial least squares regression method. The moisture assays were verified using independent test sets. The investigated moisture range was 0-22% for the samples of PVP, 0-8.5% for the samples of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and 0.5-8.5% for the samples of the lyophilized formulation. The results of the spectral peak area analysis and the conventional partial least squares regression were similar, but the peak area method was more robust and could also make accurate predictions for lyophilized PVP samples, although the calibration set consisted of non-lyophilized samples. The peak area method required fewer calibration samples than the conventional partial least squares regression method.

  19. Senegalese land surface change analysis and biophysical parameter estimation using NOAA AVHRR spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Toll, David L.; Kennard, Ruth L.

    1989-01-01

    Surface biophysical estimates were derived from analysis of NOAA Advanced Very High Spectral Resolution (AVHRR) spectral data of the Senegalese area of west Africa. The parameters derived were of solar albedo, spectral visible and near-infrared band reflectance, spectral vegetative index, and ground temperature. Wet and dry linked AVHRR scenes from 1981 through 1985 in Senegal were analyzed for a semi-wet southerly site near Tambacounda and a predominantly dry northerly site near Podor. Related problems were studied to convert satellite derived radiance to biophysical estimates of the land surface. Problems studied were associated with sensor miscalibration, atmospheric and aerosol spatial variability, surface anisotropy of reflected radiation, narrow satellite band reflectance to broad solar band conversion, and ground emissivity correction. The middle-infrared reflectance was approximated with a visible AVHRR reflectance for improving solar albedo estimates. In addition, the spectral composition of solar irradiance (direct and diffuse radiation) between major spectral regions (i.e., ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and middle-infrared) was found to be insensitive to changes in the clear sky atmospheric optical depth in the narrow band to solar band conversion procedure. Solar albedo derived estimates for both sites were not found to change markedly with significant antecedent precipitation events or correspondingly from increases in green leaf vegetation density. The bright soil/substrate contributed to a high albedo for the dry related scenes, whereas the high internal leaf reflectance in green vegetation canopies in the near-infrared contributed to high solar albedo for the wet related scenes. The relationship between solar albedo and ground temperature was poor, indicating the solar albedo has little control of the ground temperature. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the derived visible reflectance were more sensitive to antecedent

  20. Cistanches identification based on fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with principal component analysis and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jia; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuanpeng; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Ruiyi; Ma, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) was used to identify Cistanche deserticola, Cistanche tubulosa and Cistanche sinensis, which are traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. The fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system acquired the spectral images of 40 cistanche samples, and through image denoising, binarization processing to make sure the effective pixels. Furthermore, drew the spectral curves whose data in the wavelength range of 450-680 nm for the study. Then preprocessed the data by first-order derivative, analyzed the data through principal component analysis and artificial neural network. The results shows: Principal component analysis can generally distinguish cistanches, through further identification by neural networks makes the results more accurate, the correct rate of the testing and training sets is as high as 100%. Based on the fluorescence spectral imaging technique and combined with principal component analysis and artificial neural network to identify cistanches is feasible.

  1. The Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS) - Interactive visualization and analysis of imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.; Boardman, J. W.; Heidebrecht, K. B.; Shapiro, A. T.; Barloon, P. J.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Center for the Study of Earth from Space (CSES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has developed a prototype interactive software system called the Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS) using IDL (the Interactive Data Language) on UNIX-based workstations. SIPS is designed to take advantage of the combination of high spectral resolution and spatial data presentation unique to imaging spectrometers. It streamlines analysis of these data by allowing scientists to rapidly interact with entire datasets. SIPS provides visualization tools for rapid exploratory analysis and numerical tools for quantitative modeling. The user interface is X-Windows-based, user friendly, and provides 'point and click' operation. SIPS is being used for multidisciplinary research concentrating on use of physically based analysis methods to enhance scientific results from imaging spectrometer data. The objective of this continuing effort is to develop operational techniques for quantitative analysis of imaging spectrometer data and to make them available to the scientific community prior to the launch of imaging spectrometer satellite systems such as the Earth Observing System (EOS) High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS).

  2. Linear Spectral Analysis of Plume Emissions Using an Optical Matrix Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    Plume spectrometry provides a means to monitor the health of a burning rocket engine, and optical matrix processors provide a means to analyze the plume spectra in real time. By observing the spectrum of the exhaust plume of a rocket engine, researchers have detected anomalous behavior of the engine and have even determined the failure of some equipment before it would normally have been noticed. The spectrum of the plume is analyzed by isolating information in the spectrum about the various materials present to estimate what materials are being burned in the engine. Scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer to discriminate the spectral peaks of the many species present in the plume. Researchers at the Stennis Space Center Demonstration Testbed Facility (DTF) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer observing a 1200-lb. thrust engine. At this facility, known concentrations of contaminants can be introduced into the burn, allowing for the confirmation of diagnostic algorithms. While the high resolution of the measured spectra has allowed greatly increased insight into the functioning of the engine, the large data flows generated limit the ability to perform real-time processing. The use of an optical matrix processor and the linear analysis technique described below may allow for the detailed real-time analysis of the engine's health. A small optical matrix processor can perform the required mathematical analysis both quicker and with less energy than a large electronic computer dedicated to the same spectral analysis routine.

  3. Mixing of surface materials investigated by spectral mixture analysis with the Moon Mineralogy Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Pieters, Carle M.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Boardman, Joseph W.; Mustard, John F.; M, Sunshine, Jessica; Tompkins, Stephanie; Green, Robert O.

    2010-05-01

    Mapping of surface units on the Moon, as well as identification and quantification of mineralogical components is the main task of the imaging spectrometer Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) [1] onboard Chandrayaan-1. In spectral analysis, mixing of surface materials need to be considered because they may have implications for the interpretation of the lithology. Materials that are juxtaposed within the field of view result on linear combinations of reflectance spectra [2]. Lateral contamination by remote components [e.g. 3,4], minerals in a rock [5,6], coatings [e.g. 7-9] and adjacency effects due to scattered light [10], are non-linear processes. In the present study, we perform linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) [11] using the Multiple-Endmember Linear Spectral-Unmixing Model (MELSUM, [12,13]) that allows limiting the number of components used in a model and guarantees positive mixing coefficients, and the sum of the mixing coefficients constrained to one. We use MELSUM both for spectral endmembers selection and to produce corresponding image fractions. This method is convenient for an initial assessment of large data sets [13] prior to using more quantitative methods for compositional analysis [5,6]. We have used a mosaic of all M3 images that cover ~80% of the surface and 10-20 nm spectral sampling. In order to avoid the effects of thermal emission, the analysis is performed in the range 0.4-2.18 μm (65 channels). A sphere-based Lommel-Seeliger photometric correction has been performed to standardize the effects of the geometry of illumination at large scale [14]. From a global scale, resulting spectral endmembers describe the most abundant components at the surface of the Moon: Anorthosite, high-calcium pyroxene (HCP), low calcium pyroxene (LCP) and olivine. Plagioclase-rich soils (anorthosite) are detected in the highlands, especially in the south hemisphere, with few spots in fresh impact craters (e.g. Copernicus). HCP and olivine are highly correlated with

  4. Evaluation of FTIR spectroscopy as diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer using spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liu; Sun, Xuejun; Chao, Zhang; Zhang, Shiyun; Zheng, Jianbao; Gurung, Rajendra; Du, Junkai; Shi, Jingsen; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhang, Yuanfu; Wu, Jinguang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm FTIR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer. 180 freshly removed colorectal samples were collected from 90 patients for spectrum analysis. The ratios of spectral intensity and relative intensity (/I1460) were calculated. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Fisher's discriminant analysis (FDA) were applied to distinguish the malignant from normal. The FTIR parameters of colorectal cancer and normal tissues were distinguished due to the contents or configurations of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Related to nitrogen containing, water, protein and nucleic acid were increased significantly in the malignant group. Six parameters were selected as independent factors to perform discriminant functions. The sensitivity for FTIR in diagnosing colorectal cancer was 96.6% by discriminant analysis. Our study demonstrates that FTIR can be a useful technique for detection of colorectal cancer and may be applied in clinical colorectal cancer diagnosis.

  5. Atropine unmasks bed-rest effect - A spectral analysis of cardiac interbeat intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Goldwater, Danielle; Bhargava, Valmik

    1986-01-01

    Heart rate spectral data obtained for 10 male subjects between 35-49 years following orthostatic tolerance testing with lower body negative pressure prebed rest and after 7-10 days of bed rest, while on placebo and after intravenous atropine are analyzed. Comparison of the spectral atropine rms for subjects prebed rest and after bed rest reveal a decrease from 63 + or - 24 ms to 40 + or - 23 ms. It is observed that heart rate interval variability for subjects after bed rest and with atropine is reduced; the heart rate at bed rest with atropine is increased from 70.4 + or - 12.4 beats/min prebed rest to 83.7 + or - 18.9 beats/min; and the exercise tolerance time for subjects in the atropine prebed-rest phase (658 + or - 352 s) is higher than the bed-rest phase (505 + or - 252 s). It is noted that bed rest impairs the cardiovascular capacity to adaptively modulate physiological responses, atropine exposes bed-rest deconditioning effects, and spectral analysis is useful for studying the effects of bed-rest deconditioning on cardiac dynamics.

  6. Discriminating lava flows of different age within Nyamuragira's volcanic field using spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Canters, Frank; Solana, Carmen; Ma, Weiwei; Chen, Longqian; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    In this study, linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) is used to characterize the spectral heterogeneity of lava flows from Nyamuragira volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo, where vegetation and lava are the two main land covers. In order to estimate fractions of vegetation and lava through satellite remote sensing, we made use of 30 m resolution Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) imagery. 2 m Pleiades data was used for validation. From the results, we conclude that (1) LSMA is capable of characterizing volcanic fields and discriminating between different types of lava surfaces; (2) three lava endmembers can be identified as lava of old, intermediate and young age, corresponding to different stages in lichen growth and chemical weathering; (3) a strong relationship is observed between vegetation fraction and lava age, where vegetation at Nyamuragira starts to significantly colonize lava flows ∼15 years after eruption and occupies over 50% of the lava surfaces ∼40 years after eruption. Our study demonstrates the capability of spectral unmixing to characterize lava surfaces and vegetation colonization over time, which is particularly useful for poorly known volcanoes or those not accessible for physical or political reasons.

  7. Accurate palm vein recognition based on wavelet scattering and spectral regression kernel discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasir, Selma; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Farokhi, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    Palm vein recognition (PVR) is a promising new biometric that has been applied successfully as a method of access control by many organizations, which has even further potential in the field of forensics. The palm vein pattern has highly discriminative features that are difficult to forge because of its subcutaneous position in the palm. Despite considerable progress and a few practical issues, providing accurate palm vein readings has remained an unsolved issue in biometrics. We propose a robust and more accurate PVR method based on the combination of wavelet scattering (WS) with spectral regression kernel discriminant analysis (SRKDA). As the dimension of WS generated features is quite large, SRKDA is required to reduce the extracted features to enhance the discrimination. The results based on two public databases-PolyU Hyper Spectral Palmprint public database and PolyU Multi Spectral Palmprint-show the high performance of the proposed scheme in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. The proposed approach scored a 99.44% identification rate and a 99.90% verification rate [equal error rate (EER)=0.1%] for the hyperspectral database and a 99.97% identification rate and a 99.98% verification rate (EER=0.019%) for the multispectral database.

  8. JOINT SUZAKU AND XMM-NEWTON SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF THE SOUTHWEST CYGNUS LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, Denis; Hassan, Mohammed

    2013-02-10

    We carry out a joint spectral analysis of the Cygnus Loop using data from all six detectors combined from Suzaku and XMM-Newton. This had not been done before, but if a spectral model is physically realistic, it is required that it be consistent with data from different instruments. Thus, our results are an important verification of spectral models for the Cygnus Loop. One of the prominent features of the Cygnus Loop is the bright 'V' region near the southwest rim. We choose this region, in part, because it has been observed by both Suzaku and XMM-Newton. We divide the field of view into 12 box-shaped regions, such that each contains 9000-13,000 photons in the Suzaku-XIS1 camera. A non-equilibrium ionization model with variable abundances (VNEI) or a two-component VNEI model is found to fit the observations. Resulting electron temperatures and ionization timescales are inversely related, consistent with an origin in density variations by a factor of {approx}3. Element abundances and temperature are strongly correlated, which can be explained by mixing in the outer hydrogen-rich envelope of ejecta: Heavy-element-rich regions have higher velocity to reach this far out from the center of the Cygnus Loop, resulting in higher shock temperature for more element-rich regions.

  9. Analysis for signal-to-noise ratio of hyper-spectral imaging FTIR interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xun-niu; Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng

    2013-08-01

    Signal-to-noise Ratio of hyper-spectral imaging FTIR interferometer system plays a decisive role on the performance of the instrument. It is necessary to analyze them in the development process. Based on the simplified target/background model, the energy transfer model of the LWIR hyper-spectral imaging interferometer has been discussed. The noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR) and its influencing factors of the interferometer system was analyzed, and the signal-to-noise(SNR) was calculated by using the properties of NESR and incident radiance. In a typical application environment, using standard atmospheric model of USA(1976 COESA) as a background, and set a reasonable target/background temperature difference, and take Michelson spatial modulation Fourier Transform interferometer as an example, the paper had calculated the NESR and the SNR of the interferometer system which using the commercially LWIR cooled FPA and UFPA detector. The system noise sources of the instrument were also analyzed in the paper. The results of those analyses can be used to optimize and pre-estimate the performance of the interferometer system, and analysis the applicable conditions of use different detectors. It has important guiding significance for the LWIR interferometer spectrometer design.

  10. Objective indicators of pasture degradation from spectral mixture analysis of Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Asner, Gregory P.; Stone, Thomas A.; Neill, Christopher; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-01

    Degradation of cattle pastures is a management concern that influences future land use in Amazonia. However, "degradation" is poorly defined and has different meanings for ranchers, ecologists, and policy makers. Here we analyze pasture degradation using objective scalars of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV), and exposed soil (S) derived from Landsat imagery. A general, probabilistic spectral mixture model decomposed satellite spectral reflectance measurements into subpixel estimates of PV, NPV, and S covers at ranches in western and eastern Amazonia. Most pasture management units at all ranches fell along a single line of decreasing PV with increasing NPV and S, which could be considered a degradation continuum. The ranch with the highest stocking densities and most intensive management had greater NPV and S than a less intensively managed ranch. The number of liming, herbiciding, and disking treatments applied to each pasture management unit was positively correlated with NPV and negatively correlated with PV. Although these objective scalars revealed signs of degradation, intensive management kept exposed soil to <40% cover and maintained economically viable cattle production over several decades. In ranches with few management inputs, the high PV cover in young pastures declined with increasing pasture age, while NPV and S increased, even where grazing intensity was low. Both highly productive pastures and vigorous regrowth of native vegetation cause high PV values. Analysis of spectral properties holds promise for identifying areas where grazing intensity has exceeded management inputs, thus increasing coverage of senescent foliage and exposed soil.

  11. DFT analysis and spectral characteristics of Celecoxib a potent COX-2 inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, B.; Kannappan, V.; Sathyanarayanamoorthi, V.

    2016-10-01

    Extensive quantum mechanical studies are carried out on Celecoxib (CXB), a new generation drug to understand the vibrational and electronic spectral characteristics of the molecule. The vibrational frequencies of CXB are computed by HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The theoretical scaled vibrational frequencies have been assigned and they agreed satisfactorily with experimental FT-IR and Raman frequencies. The theoretical maximum wavelength of absorption of CXB are calculated in water and ethanol by TD-DFT method and these values are compared with experimentally determined λmax values. The spectral and Natural bonds orbital (NBO) analysis in conjunction with spectral data established the presence of intra molecular interactions such as mesomeric, hyperconjugative and steric effects in CXB. The electron density at various positions and reactivity descriptors of CXB indicate that the compound functions as a nucleophile and establish that aromatic ring system present in the molecule is the site of drug action. Electronic distribution and HOMO - LUMO energy values of CXB are discussed in terms of intra-molecular interactions. Computed values of Mulliken charges and thermodynamic properties of CXB are reported.

  12. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  13. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.

  14. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Peter, Hardi; Wang, Linghua

    2016-03-01

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the "wave + beam flow" kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  15. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set which is free from long-term instrument drift, then perform scientific analysis using the data set. During the current period of performance, 29 February 1996 through 31 August 1996, we finalized the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 characterization using internal data. This included updating the instrument's electronic, photomultiplier tube gain, wavelength, diffuser degradation, and goniometric calibrations. We have also completed the SSBUV characterization, 1989-1994, and produced SSBUV irradiances for the first seven SSBUV flights. Both of these steps were needed before the long-term calibration of the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set via SSBUV can be undertaken. A second major aspect of this work is to compare solar spectral irradiances from the SBUV/2 instruments and SSBUV with corresponding data from other instruments. In the preceding six months, SSBUV data from the ATLAS-3 (November 1994) mission were compared to coincident SUSIM ATLAS-3 data. The GOME instrument was launched by the European Space Agency in early 1995 and began making solar irradiance measurements in May 1995. Working with GOME scientists, we are using SSBUV data to validate the GOME solar irradiance data. Based in part on those findings, the GOME absolute calibration data were reanalyzed.

  16. An analysis of spectral envelope-reduction via quadratic assignment problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Alan; Pothen, Alex

    1994-01-01

    A new spectral algorithm for reordering a sparse symmetric matrix to reduce its envelope size was described. The ordering is computed by associating a Laplacian matrix with the given matrix and then sorting the components of a specified eigenvector of the Laplacian. In this paper, we provide an analysis of the spectral envelope reduction algorithm. We described related 1- and 2-sum problems; the former is related to the envelope size, while the latter is related to an upper bound on the work involved in an envelope Cholesky factorization scheme. We formulate the latter two problems as quadratic assignment problems, and then study the 2-sum problem in more detail. We obtain lower bounds on the 2-sum by considering a projected quadratic assignment problem, and then show that finding a permutation matrix closest to an orthogonal matrix attaining one of the lower bounds justifies the spectral envelope reduction algorithm. The lower bound on the 2-sum is seen to be tight for reasonably 'uniform' finite element meshes. We also obtain asymptotically tight lower bounds for the envelope size for certain classes of meshes.

  17. Power spectral analysis of blood pressure fluctuations during sleep in normal and decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, N; Sakai, K; Sei, H; Salvert, D; Vanni-Mercier, G; Yamamoto, M; Jouvet, M

    1994-03-01

    Arterial blood pressure fluctuations during sleep were investigated with power analysis technique in both normal and decerebrate cats. In the initial postoperative stage lasting about 3 to 4 days, intact cats displayed, during paradoxical sleep, phasic increases in arterial blood pressure which were superimposed on a tonic hypotension. In the later chronic stage, however, the animals showed the phasic hypertension being superimposed on the background of a tonic hypertension. Regardless of these stages, the blood pressure during paradoxical sleep exhibited a 1/f-like spectrum, expressed by the power spectral density which is inversely proportional to the Fourier frequency f. On the other hand, a power spectral profile of the blood pressure during slow wave sleep presented a white noise-like pattern within the same frequency range of 0.1-0.01 Hz. After brainstem transections at the pontomesencephalic border, the cats exhibited consistently a sustained fall in blood pressure during paradoxical sleep and the power spectral density of the blood pressure displayed a white noise-like pattern throughout the survival periods of one month or more. These observations indicate that the blood pressure fluctuations in the 1/f spectrum during paradoxical sleep originate in rostral brain structures. PMID:8042895

  18. Radiative Transfer Modeling, Spectral Analysis, and Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L.; Ganapol, B.; Furfaro, R.; Kramer, P.; Armstrong, R.; Gleason, A.; Torres, J.

    2004-12-01

    The calcium carbonate structures of tropical coral reefs protect coastlines from storms, create habitats for the world's greatest marine biodiversity, provide nurseries for many marine species; play essential roles in carbon and CO2 cycles, are major protein sources for many local populations, and are vital for sustainable economies of many societies. The world's reefs are in peril due to climate change and anthropogenic activity caused by rapidly growing populations in coastal zones. An important contribution to coral reef research is improved spectral distinction of reef components indicative of reef condition, including physical and biological degradation. Unfortunately, relatively little is known concerning the spectral properties of coral or how coral architecture reflect/transmit light. New insights into optical processes of corals can lead to improved interpretation of remote sensing data and forecasting of immediate or long-term impacts such as bleaching and disease in coral and algal overgrowth. We are investigating the spatial/spectral properties required to remotely sense changes in reef biological and physical properties by coupling spectral analysis of in situ spectra with a new coral-specific radiative transfer model. The first model development phase (CorMOD) imposes a scattering baseline that is constant regardless of coral condition, and further specifies that coral is optically thick. Evolution of the model is towards a coral-specific radiative transfer model that includes coral biochemical concentrations, specific absorptivities of coral components, and transmission measurements from coral surfaces. We present our field collected in situ spectra and resultant output relative absorption profiles of coral from CorMOD. Further, we will present NASA AVIRIS data and in situ spectra collection of coral and seagrass to support the AVIRIS mission that was collected during August 2004 for Florida Keys and Puerto Rico.

  19. Mapping vegetation in Yellowstone National Park using spectral feature analysis of AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Despain, D.G.; Clark, R.N.; Livo, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of vegetation on the landscape can be used to investigate ecosystem functioning. The sizes and movements of animal populations can be linked to resources provided by different plant species. This paper demonstrates the application of imaging spectroscopy to the study of vegetation in Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) using spectral feature analysis of data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data, acquired on August 7, 1996, were calibrated to surface reflectance using a radiative transfer model and field reflectance measurements of a ground calibration site. A spectral library of canopy reflectance signatures was created by averaging pixels of the calibrated AVIRIS data over areas of known forest and nonforest vegetation cover types in Yellowstone. Using continuum removal and least squares fitting algorithms in the US Geological Survey's Tetracorder expert system, the distributions of these vegetation types were determined by comparing the absorption features of vegetation in the spectral library with the spectra from the AVIRIS data. The 0.68 ??m chlorophyll absorption feature and leaf water absorption features, centered near 0.98 and 1.20 ??m, were analyzed. Nonforest cover types of sagebrush, grasslands, willows, sedges, and other wetland vegetation were mapped in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone. Conifer cover types of lodgepole pine, whitebark pine, Douglas fir, and mixed Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir forests were spectrally discriminated and their distributions mapped in the AVIRIS images. In the Mount Washburn area of Yellowstone, a comparison of the AVIRIS map of forest cover types to a map derived from air photos resulted in an overall agreement of 74.1% (kappa statistic = 0.62).

  20. Gravitational-wave signal from binary neutron stars: A systematic analysis of the spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezzolla, Luciano; Takami, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    A number of works have shown that important information on the equation of state of matter at nuclear density can be extracted from the gravitational waves emitted by merging neutron-star binaries. We present a comprehensive analysis of the gravitational-wave signal emitted during the inspiral, merger, and postmerger of 56 neutron-star binaries. This sample of binaries, arguably the largest studied to date with realistic equations of state, spans six different nuclear-physics equations of state and ten masses, allowing us to sharpen a number of results recently obtained on the spectral properties of the gravitational-wave signal. Overall we find the following: (i) for binaries with masses differing no more than 20%, the frequency at gravitational-wave amplitude's maximum is related quasiuniversally with the tidal deformability of the two stars; (ii) the spectral properties vary during the postmerger phase, with a transient phase lasting a few milliseconds after the merger and followed by a quasistationary phase; (iii) when distinguishing the spectral peaks between these two phases, a number of ambiguities in the identification of the peaks disappear, leaving a simple and robust picture; (iv) using properly identified frequencies, quasiuniversal relations are found between the spectral features and the properties of the neutron stars; (v) for the most salient peaks analytic fitting functions can be obtained in terms of the stellar tidal deformability or compactness. Altogether, these results support the idea that the equation of state of nuclear matter can be constrained tightly when a signal in gravitational waves from binary neutron stars is detected.

  1. Clusters versus FPGAs for spectral mixture analysis-based lossy hyperspectral data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing number of airborne and satellite platforms that incorporate hyperspectral imaging spectrometers has soon created the need for efficient storage, transmission and data compression methodologies. In particular, hyperspectral data compression is expected to play a crucial role in many remote sensing applications. Many efforts have been devoted to designing and developing lossless and lossy algorithms for hyperspectral imagery. However, most available lossy compression approaches have largely overlooked the impact of mixed pixels and subpixel targets, which can be accurately modeled and uncovered by resorting to the wealth of spectral information provided by hyperspectral image data. In this paper, we develop a simple lossy compression technique which relies on the concept of spectral unmixing, one of the most popular approaches to deal with mixed pixels and subpixel targets in hyperspectral analysis. The proposed method uses a two-stage approach in which the purest spectral signatures (also called endmembers) are first extracted from the input data, and then used to express mixed pixels as linear combinations of endmembers. Analytical and experimental results are presented in the context of a real application, using hyperspectral data collected by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory over the World Trade Center area in New York City, right after the terrorist attacks of September 11th. These data are used in this work to evaluate the impact of compression using different methods on spectral signature quality for accurate detection of hot spot fires. Two parallel implementations are developed for the proposed lossy compression algorithm: a multiprocessor implementation tested on Thunderhead, a massively parallel Beowulf cluster at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and a hardware implementation developed on a Xilinx Virtex-II FPGA device. Combined, these parts offer a thoughtful perspective on the potential and emerging challenges of incorporating parallel

  2. EN FACE SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY OUTER RETINAL ANALYSIS AND RELATION TO VISUAL ACUITY

    PubMed Central

    Kiernan, Daniel F.; Zelkha, Ruth; Hariprasad, Seenu M.; Lim, Jennifer I.; Blair, Michael P.; Mieler, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe a method of en face visualization and quantification of the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction area, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and association with visual acuity. Methods Case series of 74 eyes in 53 patients. Central 1-mm and 400-mm en face areas were analyzed with a computer algorithm. Results The presence or absence of inner segment/outer segment junction was visible on both spectral-domain optical coherence tomography en face and retinal cross sections. Thirty eyes (40.6%) had no retinal pathology and an average logMAR visual acuity of 0.116. Twenty-five eyes (33.8%) had intraretinal edema, with visual acuity of 0.494. Nineteen eyes had nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (dry age-related macular degeneration, 25.6%), with visual acuity of 0.392. In all eyes, central 1-mm and 400-µm en face areas were 58.3 ± 25.0% and 56.4 ± 26.0%, which showed significant correlation with visual acuity (Pearson correlation, r = −0.66 and −0.56, both P < 0.001). This correlation was greater than correlation of visual acuity with central subfield thickness (r = 0.39, P < 0.001), macular volume (r = 0.36, P = 0.002), and average macular thickness (r = 0.37, P = 0.001). However, no variables were significantly correlated with dry age-related macular degeneration eyes. Conclusion Central en face inner segment/outer segment junction areas are significantly correlated with visual acuity in most eyes. This may correlate better with visual acuity than other spectral-domain optical coherence tomography values, as a reflection of photoreceptor integrity. Dry age-related macular degeneration may disrupt the plane used to formulate the en face display. Advancements in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography may provide routine en face visualization analysis. PMID:22466459

  3. Power Spectral Density Analysis of Electrodermal Activity for Sympathetic Function Assessment.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Alvaro D; Aljama-Corrales, Tomas; Charleston-Villalobos, Sonia; Chon, Ki H

    2016-10-01

    Time-domain features of electrodermal activity (EDA), the measurable changes in conductance at the skin surface, are typically used to assess overall activation of the sympathetic system. These time domain features, the skin conductance level (SCL) and the nonspecific skin conductance responses (NS.SCRs), are consistently elevated with sympathetic nervous arousal, but highly variable between subjects. A novel frequency-domain approach to quantify sympathetic function using the power spectral density (PSD) of EDA is proposed. This analysis was used to examine if some of the induced stimuli invoke the sympathetic nervous system's dynamics which can be discernible as a large spectral peak, conjectured to be present in the low frequency band. The resulting indices were compared to the power of low-frequency components of heart rate variability (HRVLF) time series, as well as to time-domain features of EDA. Twelve healthy subjects were subjected to orthostatic, physical and cognitive stress, to test these techniques. We found that the increase in the spectral powers of the EDA was largely confined to 0.045-0.15 Hz, which is in the prescribed band for HRVLF. These low frequency components are known to be, in part, influenced by the sympathetic nervous dynamics. However, we found an additional 5-10% of the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.15-0.25 Hz with all three stimuli. Thus, dynamics of the normalized sympathetic component of the EDA, termed EDASympn, are represented in the frequency band 0.045-0.25 Hz; only a small amount of spectral power is present in frequencies higher than 0.25 Hz. Our results showed that the time-domain indices (the SCL and NS.SCRs), and EDASympn, exhibited significant increases under orthostatic, physical, and cognitive stress. However, EDASympn was more responsive than the SCL and NS.SCRs to the cold pressor stimulus, while the latter two were more sensitive to the postural and Stroop tests. Additionally, EDASympn exhibited an

  4. A comparative analysis of MODIS based spectral indices for drought monitoring over fire prone vegetation types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccamo, G.; Chisholm, L. A.; Bradstock, R.; Puotinen, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Drought is a complex natural hazard with severe impacts on ecosystems. Several studies have highlighted links between drought spatio-temporal patterns and wildfire behaviour. Recent research showed drought can affect the development of catastrophic fires through influence on the spatial connectivity of dry fuel patches. Wildfires that are initiated at isolated ignition points (‘within patch scale’) can propagate non-linearly across landscapes (“among-patches”) if fuels are sufficiently dry and connected. Consequently, accurate mapping of drought at fine spatial resolution represents a priority to monitor “among-patches” continuity of flammable fuels in fire prone regions. Traditional methods of drought monitoring are based on meteorological indices (MI) calculated from weather stations data. The network of weather stations is often sparse and inadequate to produce fine spatial resolution surfaces of MI especially across remote forested areas. Spectral indices (SI) based on satellite data provide sound and cost-effective alternatives to MI, offering spatially dense information regularly recorded over large areas across a wide range of wavelengths. Since a considerable number of SI have been proposed as drought monitoring tool, the selection of the most appropriate index for a specific region represents an essential operation to ensure efficiency in drought mapping. In this study we propose a comprehensive analysis to evaluate the performance of a wide range of Vis, NIR and SWIR based SI towards drought condition monitoring over fire prone vegetation types, using the Sydney Basin bioregion (Australia) as case study. All spectral indices were derived from reflectance data sets obtained from MODIS Terra time series (2000-2009). The relationships between SI and drought conditions were analysed using a meteorological index (Standardized Precipitation Index, SPI) as rainfall deficiency indicator. The spatial and temporal co-variability between SPI and spectral

  5. Hyper-spectral imaging: A promising tool for quantitative pigment analysis of varved lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Christoph; Grosjean, Martin; Tylmann, Wojciech

    2015-04-01

    Varved lake sediments are good archives for past environmental and climate conditions from annual to multi-millennial scales. Among other proxies, concentrations of sedimentary photopigments have been used for temperature reconstructions. However, obtaining well calibrated annually resolved records from sediments still remains challenging. Most laboratory methods used to analyse lake sediments require physical subsampling and are destructive in the process. Hence, temporal resolution and number of data are limited by the amount of material available in the core. Furthermore, for very low sediment accumulation rates annual subsampling is often very difficult or even impossible. To address these problems we explore hyper-spectral imaging as a non-destructive method to analyse lake sediments based on their reflectance spectra in the visible and near infrared spectrum. In contrast to other scanning methods like X-ray fluorescence, VIS/NIR reflectance spectrometry distinguishes between biogeochemical substances rather than single elements. Among others Rein (2003) has shown that VIS-RS can be used to detect relative concentrations of sedimentary photopigments (e.g. chlorins, carotenoids) and clay minerals. In this study hyper-spectral imaging is used to infer ecological proxy data from reflectance spectra of varved lake sediments. Hyper-spectral imaging permits the measurement of an entire sediment core in a single run at high spatial (30x30µm/pixel) and spectral resolutions (~2.8nm) within the visual to near infrared spectrum (400-1000nm). This allows the analysis of data time series and spatial mapping of sedimentary substances (e.g. chlorophylls/bacterio-chlorophylls and diagenetic products) at sub-varve scales. The method is demonstrated on two varved lake sediments from northern Poland showing the distributions of relative concentrations of two types of sedimentary pigments (Chlorophyll-a + derivatives and Bacterio-pheophytin-a) within individual varve years. The

  6. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Lakićević, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (λ 3.2 mm to 450 μm), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ∼ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ≲ α ≲ –0.1 across the western regions, with α ∼ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  7. Analysis of the pre-retinal opacities in Gaucher Disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography.

    PubMed

    Sheck, Leo H N; Wilson, Callum J; Vincent, Andrea L

    2012-12-01

    Fundal opacities have been reported in patients with Gaucher disease, a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, prior to the advent of optical coherent tomography. This report provides a detailed analysis of the fundal opacities in a 14-year-old girl with genetically proven Gaucher disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography. It illustrates clearly that these opacities were pre-retinal opacities located at the vitreo-retinal interface associated with localized posterior vitreous detachments, rather than vitreous opacities as previously suggested in the literature. PMID:22950450

  8. Spectral analysis of natural solar ultraviolet B to promote synthesis of vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Min-Wei; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Han-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a spectral analysis system for the measurement of solar ultraviolet B over long durations. The proposed system provides high resolution at low cost in a highly robust and flexible format. We obtained information pertaining to the absolute irradiance of sunlight in a fixed location with the aim of identifying the best period in which to seek exposure to the sun with regard to maximizing the synthesis of vitamin D while minimizing damage to the skin. This study also provides a means of establishing a database for the development of healthy lamp technology.

  9. A principal component analysis to interpret the spectral electrical behaviour of sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzoli, Silvia; Giudici, Mauro; Huisman, Johan Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) measurements provide the opportunity to evaluate both conduction and polarization processes occurring in a porous medium. Conduction properties are related to the pore volume (for coarse grained materials) and also to the pore surface (for fine grained materials), whereas polarization properties are mainly controlled by the pore surface. Thus, SIP is a valuable survey method and its applicability ranges from aquifer characterization to organic and inorganic contaminant detection. However, the high number of factors affecting the spectral electrical behaviour still prevents an easy and unambiguous interpretation of SIP measurements. Controlled laboratory experiments by different research groups have shown that the resistivity phase depends on pore/grain size distribution, clay percentage, specific surface area, water saturation/conductivity and packing, among other factors. In the analysis of natural samples, all these variables are often simultaneously unknown and the direct application of the laboratory-derived empirical relationships between geophysical and sedimentological properties is not trivial. In this framework, we performed SIP laboratory measurements on unconsolidated alluvial samples of the Po river and Lambro river depositional units (Northern Italy). These samples were fully saturated with NaCl solutions with increasing electrical conductivity. SIP measurements were analysed using a Debye Decomposition technique and by fitting two Cole-Cole-type models (i.e. the Cole-Cole and the Generalized Cole-Cole). A principal component analysis was then applied separately on the three different subsets of model parameters. The main aims of this analysis were: i) to cluster the samples according to their spectral properties; ii) to evaluate differences and similarities of the fitting models in terms of the most significant combinations of parameters able to describe the overall variability within the dataset; iii) to analyse

  10. Method and system for calibrating acquired spectra for use in spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Blackwood, Larry G.

    2010-09-14

    A method for calibrating acquired spectra for use in spectral analysis includes performing Gaussian peak fitting to spectra acquired by a plurality of NaI detectors to define peak regions. A Na and annihilation doublet may be located among the peak regions. A predetermined energy level may be applied to one of the peaks in the doublet and a location of a hydrogen peak may be predicted based on the location of at least one of the peaks of the doublet. Control systems for calibrating spectra are also disclosed.

  11. Spectral analysis of natural solar ultraviolet B to promote synthesis of vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Min-Wei; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Han-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a spectral analysis system for the measurement of solar ultraviolet B over long durations. The proposed system provides high resolution at low cost in a highly robust and flexible format. We obtained information pertaining to the absolute irradiance of sunlight in a fixed location with the aim of identifying the best period in which to seek exposure to the sun with regard to maximizing the synthesis of vitamin D while minimizing damage to the skin. This study also provides a means of establishing a database for the development of healthy lamp technology.

  12. Spectral analysis of photo-induced delayed luminescence from human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Lanzanò, Luca; Privitera, Simona; Tudisco, Salvatore; Scordino, Agata

    2007-07-01

    The UVA induced Delayed Luminescence (DL), has been measured in vivo in the forearm skin of some healthy volunteers of different sex and age during several periods of the year. An innovative instrument able to detect, in single photon counting mode, the spectrum and the time trend of the DL emission has been used. The measured differences in the time trends of the spectral components may be related to the sex and the age. The potential development of a new analysis technique based on this phenomenon is discussed.

  13. The Formal Underpinnings of the Response Functions Used in X-Ray Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John E.

    2001-02-01

    This work provides an in-depth mathematical description of the response functions that are used for spatial and spectral analysis of X-ray data. The use of such functions is well known to anyone familiar with the analysis of X-ray data where they may be identified with the quantities contained in the ancillary response file (ARF), the redistribution matrix file (RMF), and the exposure map. Starting from first principles, explicit mathematical expressions for these functions, for both imaging and dispersive modes, are arrived at in terms of the underlying instrumental characteristics of the telescope including the effects of pointing motion. The response functions are presented in the context of integral equations relating the expected detector count rate to the source spectrum incident upon the telescope. Their application to the analysis of several source distributions is considered. These include multiple, possibly overlapping, spectrally distinct point sources, as well as extended sources. Assumptions and limitations behind the usage of these functions, as well as their practical computation, are addressed.

  14. Prior-knowledge-based spectral mixture analysis for impervious surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinshui; He, Chunyang; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhu, Shuang; Shuai, Guanyuan

    2014-01-03

    In this study, we developed a prior-knowledge-based spectral mixture analysis (PKSMA) to map impervious surfaces by using endmembers derived separately for high- and low-density urban regions. First, an urban area was categorized into high- and low-density urban areas, using a multi-step classification method. Next, in high-density urban areas that were assumed to have only vegetation and impervious surfaces (ISs), the Vegetation-Impervious model (V-I) was used in a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) with three endmembers: vegetation, high albedo, and low albedo. In low-density urban areas, the Vegetation-Impervious-Soil model (V-I-S) was used in an SMA analysis with four endmembers: high albedo, low albedo, soil, and vegetation. The fraction of IS with high and low albedo in each pixel was combined to produce the final IS map. The root mean-square error (RMSE) of the IS map produced using PKSMA was about 11.0%, compared to 14.52% using four-endmember SMA. Particularly in high-density urban areas, PKSMA (RMSE = 6.47%) showed better performance than four-endmember (15.91%). The results indicate that PKSMA can improve IS mapping compared to traditional SMA by using appropriately selected endmembers and is particularly strong in high-density urban areas.

  15. The program XEASY for computer-supported NMR spectral analysis of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Xia, T H; Billeter, M; Güntert, P; Wüthrich, K

    1995-07-01

    A new program package, XEASY, was written for interactive computer support of the analysis of NMR spectra for three-dimensional structure determination of biological macromolecules. XEASY was developed for work with 2D, 3D and 4D NMR data sets. It includes all the functions performed by the precursor program EASY, which was designed for the analysis of 2D NMR spectra, i.e., peak picking and support of sequence-specific resonance assignments, cross-peak assignments, cross-peak integration and rate constant determination for dynamic processes. Since the program utilizes the X-window system and the Motif widget set, it is portable on a wide range of UNIX workstations. The design objective was to provide maximal computer support for the analysis of spectra, while providing the user with complete control over the final resonance assignments. Technically important features of XEASY are the use and flexible visual display of 'strips', i.e., two-dimensional spectral regions that contain the relevant parts of 3D or 4D NMR spectra, automated sorting routines to narrow down the selection of strips that need to be interactively considered in a particular assignment step, a protocol of resonance assignments that can be used for reliable bookkeeping, independent of the assignment strategy used, and capabilities for proper treatment of spectral folding and efficient transfer of resonance assignments between spectra of different types and different dimensionality, including projected, reduced-dimensionality triple-resonance experiments.

  16. Spectral characterization of V-type asteroids - II. A statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieva, S.; Dotto, E.; Lazzaro, D.; Perna, D.; Fulvio, D.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several small basaltic V-type asteroids have been identified all around the main belt. Most of them are members of the Vesta dynamical family, but an increasingly large number appear to have no link with it. The question that arises is whether all these basaltic objects do indeed come from Vesta. To find the answer to the above questioning, we decided to perform a statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and mineralogical properties of a large sample of V-types, with the objective to highlight similarities and differences among them, and shed light on their unique, or not, origin. The analysis was performed using 190 visible and near-infrared spectra from the literature for 117 V-type asteroids. The asteroids were grouped according to their dynamical properties and their computed spectral parameters compared. Comparison was also performed with spectral parameters of a sample of HED meteorites and data of the surface of Vesta taken by the VIR instrument on board of the Dawn spacecraft. Our analysis shows that although most of the V-type asteroids in the inner main belt do have a surface composition compatible with an origin from Vesta, this seem not to be the case for V-types in the middle and outer main belt.

  17. Visualization techniques to aid in the analysis of multi-spectral astrophysical data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugel, Edward W.; Domik, Gitta O.; Ayres, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this project was to support the scientific analysis of multi-spectral astrophysical data by means of scientific visualization. Scientific visualization offers its greatest value if it is not used as a method separate or alternative to other data analysis methods but rather in addition to these methods. Together with quantitative analysis of data, such as offered by statistical analysis, image or signal processing, visualization attempts to explore all information inherent in astrophysical data in the most effective way. Data visualization is one aspect of data analysis. Our taxonomy as developed in Section 2 includes identification and access to existing information, preprocessing and quantitative analysis of data, visual representation and the user interface as major components to the software environment of astrophysical data analysis. In pursuing our goal to provide methods and tools for scientific visualization of multi-spectral astrophysical data, we therefore looked at scientific data analysis as one whole process, adding visualization tools to an already existing environment and integrating the various components that define a scientific data analysis environment. As long as the software development process of each component is separate from all other components, users of data analysis software are constantly interrupted in their scientific work in order to convert from one data format to another, or to move from one storage medium to another, or to switch from one user interface to another. We also took an in-depth look at scientific visualization and its underlying concepts, current visualization systems, their contributions, and their shortcomings. The role of data visualization is to stimulate mental processes different from quantitative data analysis, such as the perception of spatial relationships or the discovery of patterns or anomalies while browsing through large data sets. Visualization often leads to an intuitive understanding of the

  18. Cloud cover analysis with Arctic Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data. II - Classification with spectral and textural measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral and textural characteristics of polar clouds and surfaces for a 7-day summer series of AVHRR data in two Arctic locations are examined, and the results used in the development of a cloud classification procedure for polar satellite data. Since spatial coherence and texture sensitivity tests indicate that a joint spectral-textural analysis based on the same cell size is inappropriate, cloud detection with AVHRR data and surface identification with passive microwave data are first done on the pixel level as described by Key and Barry (1989). Next, cloud patterns within 250-sq-km regions are described, then the spectral and local textural characteristics of cloud patterns in the image are determined and each cloud pixel is classified by statistical methods. Results indicate that both spectral and textural features can be utilized in the classification of cloudy pixels, although spectral features are most useful for the discrimination between cloud classes.

  19. Numerical simulation validation of nonuniform, nonharmonic analysis of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Tetsuya; Inuzuka, Yuya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Misawa, Tadanobu

    2015-03-01

    In spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), the limited resolution of the spectrometer causes nonuniformity of the interference signal. The latter, in turn, causes the sensitivity of SD-OCT to decrease, thereby limiting the imaging range and decreasing the axial resolution. We addressed this problem by applying nonuniform, nonharmonic analysis (NUNHA) with software that features high-frequency resolution without interpolation. We demonstrate the application of NUNHA in SD-OCT and compare it with conventional frequency analysis methods by simulating nonuniform interference signals. The results suggest that application of NUNHA in SD-OCT can provide acquisition of a clearer tomographic image, accurate analysis of fine and complex structures, and preservation of resolution and sensitivity at regions deep within a sample. This is because it reduces the influence of nonuniformity caused by the spectrometer and is unaffected by distortion due to interpolation.

  20. Catching the radio flare in CTA 102. III. Core-shift and spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Savolainen, T.; Mimica, P.; Kadler, M.; Lobanov, A. P.; Zensus, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. The temporal and spatial spectral evolution of the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied with multi-frequency, multi-epoch very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) observations. The combination of both morphological (kinematical) and spectral parameters can be used to derive source-intrinsic physical properties, such as the magnetic field and the nonthermal particle density. Such a study is of special interest during the high states of activity in AGNs, since VLBI observations can provide estimates of the location of the flaring site. Furthermore, we can trace the temporal variations in the source-intrinsic parameters during the flare, which may reflect the interaction between the underlying plasma and a traveling shock wave. The source CTA 102 exhibited such a radio flare around 2006. Aims: In the first two papers of this series (Papers I and II), we analyzed the single-dish light curves and the VLBI kinematics of the blazar CTA 102 and suggested a shock-shock interaction between a traveling and a standing shock wave as a possible scenario to explain the observed evolution of the component associated to the 2006 flare. In this paper we investigate the core shift and spectral evolution to test our hypothesis of a shock-shock interaction. Methods: We used eight multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations to analyze the temporal and spatial evolution of the spectral parameters during the flare. We observed CTA 102 between May 2005 and April 2007 using the VLBA at six different frequencies spanning from 2 GHz up to 86 GHz. After the calibrated VLBA images were corrected for opacity, we performed a detailed spectral analysis. We developed methods for aligning the images and extracting the uncertainties in the spectral parameters. From the derived values we estimated the magnetic field and the density of the relativistic particles and combined those values with the kinematical changes provided from the long-term VLBA monitoring

  1. On the construction of a new stellar classification template library for the LAMOST spectral analysis pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Peng; Luo, Ali; Li, Yinbi; Tu, Liangping; Wang, Fengfei; Zhang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Hou, Wen; Kong, Xiao; Wu, Yue; Zuo, Fang; Yi, Zhenping; Zhao, Yongheng; Chen, Jianjun; Du, Bing; Guo, Yanxin; Ren, Juanjuan; Pan, Jingchang; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Jie E-mail: weipeng@nao.cas.cn; and others

    2014-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral analysis pipeline, called the 1D pipeline, aims to classify and measure the spectra observed in the LAMOST survey. Through this pipeline, the observed stellar spectra are classified into different subclasses by matching with template spectra. Consequently, the performance of the stellar classification greatly depends on the quality of the template spectra. In this paper, we construct a new LAMOST stellar spectral classification template library, which is supposed to improve the precision and credibility of the present LAMOST stellar classification. About one million spectra are selected from LAMOST Data Release One to construct the new stellar templates, and they are gathered in 233 groups by two criteria: (1) pseudo g – r colors obtained by convolving the LAMOST spectra with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz filter response curve, and (2) the stellar subclass given by the LAMOST pipeline. In each group, the template spectra are constructed using three steps. (1) Outliers are excluded using the Local Outlier Probabilities algorithm, and then the principal component analysis method is applied to the remaining spectra of each group. About 5% of the one million spectra are ruled out as outliers. (2) All remaining spectra are reconstructed using the first principal components of each group. (3) The weighted average spectrum is used as the template spectrum in each group. Using the previous 3 steps, we initially obtain 216 stellar template spectra. We visually inspect all template spectra, and 29 spectra are abandoned due to low spectral quality. Furthermore, the MK classification for the remaining 187 template spectra is manually determined by comparing with 3 template libraries. Meanwhile, 10 template spectra whose subclass is difficult to determine are abandoned. Finally, we obtain a new template library containing 183 LAMOST template spectra with 61 different MK classes by combining it with the current library.

  2. Spectral analysis of bilateral or alternate-site kindling-induced afterdischarges in the rabbit hippocampi.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Komei; Kogure, Shinichi

    2012-09-01

    Kindling is one of the popular animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study following the previous results obtained using unilateral hippocampal kindling (UK), we performed spectral analysis of bilateral or alternate-site kindling-induced afterdischarges (ADs) in the rabbit hippocampi. Eight and ten adult rabbits were used for bilateral kindling (BK) and alternate-site kindling (AK), respectively. Kindling stimuli consisted of a train of biphasic pulses (1ms duration each) of 50Hz for 1s, with suprathreshold intensity for AD. The stimulations were applied simultaneously to the bilateral hippocampi in the BK and were delivered to the right and left hippocampus once every 24h in the AK. Motor responses were classified into five stages according to the conventional criteria. All animals in BK as well as AK developed stage 5 convulsions. This contrasts to the result of UK (kindled: 50%; incomplete: 50%). We normalized power spectral density (PSD) and monitored the changes in the proportion of lower frequency band component (LFB: 0-9Hz) and the higher frequency band (HFB: 12-30Hz). BK animals showed a significantly large decrement (0.5 times, p<0.01) in LFB component at the final stage compared to the initial stage, but a very large increment (4.7 times) in HFB component. Likewise, AK animals exhibited a significantly large decrement (0.6 times, p<0.01) in LFB component at the final stage, but a very large increment (3.6 times) in HFB component. Correlation analyses were performed between the HFB component and AD duration, interictal discharge frequency, and behavioral stages during kindling progression. Very strong positive correlations were found in both kindling animals. Chronological spectral analysis of seizure discharges, resulting in a pattern of LFB decrement accompanied by HFB increment, is a convenient tool to investigate epileptic disorders and diagnose epileptic states.

  3. Signals embedded in the OBS records, in light of Gabor Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.; Wang, Y.; Chang, C.; Lee, C.

    2005-12-01

    Since the last decades, seismological survey has been expanded to marine area, with goal of making up the deficiency of seismogenic study outside the land. Although teleseismic data can resolve plate boundaries location and certain seismic parameters for great earthquake, local seismogenic frame can be merely emerged by the seismic network in situ. The Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS), therefore, is developing for this kind of purpose and becoming an important facility for seismological study. This work introduces a synthesized spectral method to analyze the seismograms recorded by 15 OBS deployed at the Okinawa trough in 14 days (Nov. 19 ~Dec. 2, 2003). Geological background of Okinawa trough is well known to correspond with the back-arc spreading in the regime of the Philippine Sea plate subducting northward beneath the Eurasia plate. As the complex affections at sea bottom, for instance, strong current, slope slumping, turbidite flow, and even sea animal attack, the OBS seismogram show a rather noisy sequence in comparison with the record on land. However, hundreds of tectonic earthquake can be extracted from such noisy records (done by Drs. Lin and Sibuet). Our job is to sort out the signals with the distinguishable sources by means of a systematically spectral analysis. The continuous wavelet transform and short-term Fourier transform, both taking Gaussian function as kernel, are synthesized as the Gabor transform in data process. The use of a limited Gaussian window along time axis with negligible low frequency error can largely enhance the stability of discrete Fourier spectrum. With a proper window factor selection, the Gabor transform can improve the resolution of spectrogram in time domain. We have converted the OBS records into spectrograms to detect the variation of signal causes. Up-to-date, some tremors signals and strong current oscillations have been told apart from these continuous records with varied frequency composing. We anticipate the further

  4. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  5. Photoacoustic simulation of microvessel bleeding: spectral analysis and its implication for monitoring vascular-targeted treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Hysi, Eno; Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    The destruction of blood vessels is a commonly used cancer therapeutic strategy. Bleeding consequently follows and leads to the accumulation of blood in the interstitium. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is well positioned to detect bleeding due to its sensitivity to hemoglobin. After treatment vascular disruption can occur within just a few hours, which leads to bleeding which might be detected using PA to assess therapeutic effectiveness. Deep micro-vessels cannot typically be resolved using acoustic-resolution PA. However, spectral analysis of PA signals may still permit assessment of bleeding. This paper introduces a theoretical model to simulate the PA signals from disrupted vessels using a fractal model. The fractal model uses bifurcated-cylinder bases to represent vascular trees. Vessels have circular absorption cross-sections. To mimic bleeding from blood vessels, the diffusion of hemoglobin from micro-vessels was simulated. The PA signals were computed and in the simulations were detected using a linear array transducer (30 MHz center frequency) for four different vascular trees (at 256 axial spatial locations/tree). The Fourier Transform of each beam-formed PA signal was computed and the power spectra were fitted to a straight line within the -6 dB bandwidth of the receiving transducer. When comparing the power spectra before and after simulated bleeding, the spectral slope and mid-band fit (MBF) parameters decreased by 0.12 dB/MHz and 2.12 dB, while the y-intercept did not change after 1 hour of simulated bleeding. The results suggest that spectral PA analysis is sensitive to changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of hemoglobin in tissue, and changes due to bleeding can be detected without the need to resolve individual vessels. The simulations support the applicability of PA imaging in cancer treatment monitoring by detecting micro-vessel disruption.

  6. XMM-Newton and Swift observations of WZ Sagittae: spectral and timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Kuulkers, E.; De Paolis, F.; Mukai, K.; Ingrosso, G.; Maiolo, B. M. T.

    2014-06-01

    Context. WZ Sagittae is the prototype object of a subclass of dwarf novae with rare and long (super)outbursts, in which a white dwarf primary accretes matter from a low mass companion. High-energy observations offer the possibility of a better understanding of the disk-accretion mechanism in WZ Sge-like binaries. Aims: We used archival XMM-Newton and Swift data to characterize the X-ray spectral and temporal properties of WZ Sge in quiescence. Methods: We performed a detailed timing analysis of the simultaneous X-ray and UV light curves obtained with the EPIC and OM instruments on board XMM-Newton in 2003. We employed several techniques in this study, including a correlation study between the two curves. We also performed an X-ray spectral analysis using the EPIC data and Swift/XRT data obtained in 2011. Results: We find that the X-ray intensity is clearly modulated at a period of ≃28.96 s, confirming previously published preliminary results. We find that the X-ray spectral shape of WZ Sge remains practically unchanged between the XMM-Newton and Swift observations. However, after correcting for interstellar absorption, the intrinsic luminosity is estimated to be LXUna = (2.65 ± 0.06) × 1030 erg s-1 and LXUna = (1.57 ± 0.03) × 1030 erg s-1 in 2003 and 2011, respectively. During the Swift/XRT observation, the observed flux is a factor ≃2 lower than that observed by XMM-Newton but is similar to the quiescent levels that are observed various times before the 2001 outburst.

  7. Spectral principal component analysis of mid-infrared spectra of a sample of PG QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wei-Hao; He, Zhi-Cheng; Green, Richard; Shi, Yong; Ge, Xue; Liu, Wen-Shuai

    2016-03-01

    A spectral principal component (SPC) analysis of a sample of 87 Palomar-Green (PG) QSOs at z < 0.5 is presented for their mid-infrared spectra from Spitzer Space Telescope. We have derived the first five eigenspectra, which account for 85.2 per cent of the mid-infrared spectral variation. It is found that the first eigenspectrum represents the mid-infrared slope, forbidden emission line strength and 9.7 μm silicate feature; the 3rd and 4th eigenspectra represent the silicate features at 18 and 9.7 μm, respectively. With the principal components (PC) from optical principal component analysis, we find that there is a medium strong correlation between spectral SPC1 and PC2 (accretion rate). It suggests that more nuclear contribution to the near-IR spectrum leads to the change of mid-IR slope. We find mid-IR forbidden lines are suppressed with higher accretion rate. A medium strong correlation between SPC3 and PC1 (Eddington ratio) suggests a connection between the silicate feature at 18 μm and the Eddington ratio. For the ratio of the silicate strength at 9.7 μm to that at 18 μm, we find a strong correlation with PC2 (accretion rate or QSO luminosity). We also find that there is a medium strong correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and PC2. It implies a correlation between SFR and the central accretion rate in PG QSOs.

  8. MITIGATING THE EFFECT OF NON-STATIONARITY IN SPECTRAL ANALYSIS – AN APPLICATION TO NEONATE HEART RATE ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Niforatos, Nickie; du Plessis, Adré

    2015-01-01

    In order to mitigate the effect of non-stationarity in frequency domain analysis of data, we propose a modification to the power spectral estimation, a widely used technique to characterize physiological signals. Spectral analysis requires partitioning data into smaller epochs determined by the desired frequency resolution. The modified approach proposed here involves dividing the data within each epoch by the standard deviation of the data for that epoch. We applied this modified approach to cardiac beat-to-beat interval data recorded from a newborn infant undergoing hypothermia treatment for birth asphyxia. The critically ill infant had episodes of tachyarrhythmia, distributed sporadically throughout the study, which affected the stationarity of the heart rate. Over the period of continuous heart rate recording, the infant’s clinical course deteriorated progressively culminating in death. Coinciding with this clinical deterioration, the heart rate signal showed striking changes in both low-frequency and high-frequency power indicating significant impairment of the autonomic nervous system. The standard spectral approach failed to capture these phenomena because of the non-stationarity of the signal. Conversely, the modified approach proposed here captured the deteriorating physiology of the infant clearly. PMID:24290914

  9. [Analysis and Correction of Spectral Curvature in Hadamard Transform Spectrometer with DMD].

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiang-qian; Liu, Hua; Lu, Zhen-wu; Wang, Xiao-duo; Dang, Bo-shi; Chen, Xiang-zi; Wang, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Due to the advantages of its low cost and high utilization rate of light energy and no moving parts, Hadamard transform spectrometer with DMD has become a focus in the research of spectrometer. In order to solve the reduction of spectral resolution caused by the spectral curvature of Hadamard transform spectrometer with DMD (Digital Micro-mirror Device), the spectral aliasing in the spectrometer was investigated. Firstly, the mathematical relationship of spectral aliasing to radius of spectral curvature was deduced. Then, two procedures were proposed to solve the spectral aliasing. One is making the DMD encoded spectral band accordant with the standard spectral band as far as possible by adjusting the DMD-encoded stripe, and another is correcting remaining spectral aliasing by means of data processing. Finally, by analyzing and correcting spectral curvature in six situations of the curvature radius of 15.8 x 10⁴, 7.8 x 10⁴, 9.7 x 10⁴ µm and etc, we fit out the relationship of spectral aliasing and spectrum correction effect of spectral-curvature to the curvature radius. The simulation indicates that the spectral resolution increases to the resolution of optical system. It shows that the proposed methods are universal, simple and effective in the improvement of spectral resolution.

  10. Field hyperspectral data analysis for discriminating spectral behavior of tea plantations under various management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Manjunath, K. R.; Meenakshi; Bala, Renu; Sud, R. K.; Singh, R. D.; Panigrahy, Sushma

    2013-08-01

    The quality and yield of tea depends upon management of tea plantations, which takes into account the factors like type, age of plantation, growth stage, pruning status, light conditions, and disease incidence. Recognizing the importance of hyperspectral data in detecting minute spectral variations in vegetation, the present study was conducted to explore applicability of such data in evaluating these factors. Also stepwise discriminant analysis and principal component analysis were conducted to identify the appropriate bands for accessing the above mentioned factors. The Green region followed by NIR region was found as most appropriate best band for discriminating different types of tea plants, and the tea in sunlit and shade condition. For discriminating age of plantation, growth stage of tea, and diseased and healthy bush, Blue region was most appropriate. The Red and NIR regions were best bands to discriminate pruned and unpruned tea. The study concluded that field hyperspectral data can be efficiently used to know the plantation that need special care and may be an indicator of tea productivity. The spectral signature of these characteristics of tea plantations may also be used to classify the hyperspectral satellite data to derive these parameters at regional scale.

  11. Automated classification of multi-spectral MR images using Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Geng-Cheng; Wang, Wen-June; Wang, Chuin-Mu; Sun, Sheng-Yih

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable instrument in medical science owing to its capabilities in soft tissue characterization and 3D visualization. A potential application of MRI in clinical practice is brain parenchyma classification. This work proposes a novel approach called "Unsupervised Linear Discriminant Analysis (ULDA)" to classify and segment the three major tissues, i.e. gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), from a multi-spectral MR image of the human brain. The ULDA comprises two processes, namely Target Generation Process (TGP) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classification. TGP is a fuzzy-set process that generates a set of potential targets from unknown information, and applies these targets to train the optimal division boundary by LDA, such that three tissues GM, WM and CSF are separated. Finally, two sets of images, namely computer-generated phantom images and real MR images are used in the experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of ULDA. Experiment results reveal that UDLA segments a multi-spectral MR image much more effectively than either FMRIB's Automated Segmentation Tool (FAST) or Fuzzy C-means (FC). PMID:20044236

  12. SweetNET: A Bioinformatics Workflow for Glycopeptide MS/MS Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Toledo, Alejandro Gomez; Noborn, Fredrik; Nilsson, Jonas; Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno; Larson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Glycoproteomics has rapidly become an independent analytical platform bridging the fields of glycomics and proteomics to address site-specific protein glycosylation and its impact in biology. Current glycopeptide characterization relies on time-consuming manual interpretations and demands high levels of personal expertise. Efficient data interpretation constitutes one of the major challenges to be overcome before true high-throughput glycopeptide analysis can be achieved. The development of new glyco-related bioinformatics tools is thus of crucial importance to fulfill this goal. Here we present SweetNET: a data-oriented bioinformatics workflow for efficient analysis of hundreds of thousands of glycopeptide MS/MS-spectra. We have analyzed MS data sets from two separate glycopeptide enrichment protocols targeting sialylated glycopeptides and chondroitin sulfate linkage region glycopeptides, respectively. Molecular networking was performed to organize the glycopeptide MS/MS data based on spectral similarities. The combination of spectral clustering, oxonium ion intensity profiles, and precursor ion m/z shift distributions provided typical signatures for the initial assignment of different N-, O- and CS-glycopeptide classes and their respective glycoforms. These signatures were further used to guide database searches leading to the identification and validation of a large number of glycopeptide variants including novel deoxyhexose (fucose) modifications in the linkage region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. PMID:27399812

  13. Global analysis of microscopic fluorescence lifetime images using spectral segmentation and a digital micromirror spatial illuminator.

    PubMed

    Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Whelan, Maurice P

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is very demanding from a technical and computational perspective, and the output is usually a compromise between acquisition/processing time and data accuracy and precision. We present a new approach to acquisition, analysis, and reconstruction of microscopic FLIM images by employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) as a spatial illuminator. In the first step, the whole field fluorescence image is collected by a color charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Further qualitative spectral analysis and sample segmentation are performed to spatially distinguish between spectrally different regions on the sample. Next, the fluorescence of the sample is excited segment by segment, and fluorescence lifetimes are acquired with a photon counting technique. FLIM image reconstruction is performed by either raster scanning the sample or by directly accessing specific regions of interest. The unique features of the DMD illuminator allow the rapid on-line measurement of global good initial parameters (GIP), which are supplied to the first iteration of the fitting algorithm. As a consequence, a decrease of the computation time required to obtain a satisfactory quality-of-fit is achieved without compromising the accuracy and precision of the lifetime measurements. PMID:19021324

  14. [Vegetation index estimation by chlorophyll content of grassland based on spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Chen, Xiu-Wan; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Huai-Yu; Zhu, Han

    2014-11-01

    Comparing the methods of existing remote sensing research on the estimation of chlorophyll content, the present paper confirms that the vegetation index is one of the most practical and popular research methods. In recent years, the increasingly serious problem of grassland degradation. This paper, firstly, analyzes the measured reflectance spectral curve and its first derivative curve in the grasslands of Songpan, Sichuan and Gongger, Inner Mongolia, conducts correlation analysis between these two spectral curves and chlorophyll content, and finds out the regulation between REP (red edge position) and grassland chlorophyll content, that is, the higher the chlorophyll content is, the higher the REIP (red-edge inflection point) value would be. Then, this paper constructs GCI (grassland chlorophyll index) and selects the most suitable band for retrieval. Finally, this paper calculates the GCI by the use of satellite hyperspectral image, conducts the verification and accuracy analysis of the calculation results compared with chlorophyll content data collected from field of twice experiments. The result shows that for grassland chlorophyll content, GCI has stronger sensitivity than other indices of chlorophyll, and has higher estimation accuracy. GCI is the first proposed to estimate the grassland chlorophyll content, and has wide application potential for the remote sensing retrieval of grassland chlorophyll content. In addition, the grassland chlorophyll content estimation method based on remote sensing retrieval in this paper provides new research ideas for other vegetation biochemical parameters' estimation, vegetation growth status' evaluation and grassland ecological environment change's monitoring.

  15. Spectral analysis of irregular roughness artifacts measured by atomic force microscopy and laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Luo, Tingting; Ma, Chengfu; Huang, Wenhao; Gao, Sitian

    2014-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements on a series of specially designed roughness artifacts were performed and the results characterized by spectral analysis. As demonstrated by comparisons, both AFM and LSM can image the complex structures with high resolution and fidelity. When the surface autocorrelation length increases from 200 to 500 nm, the cumulative power spectral density spectra of the design, AFM and LSM data reach a better agreement with each other. The critical wavelength of AFM characterization is smaller than that of LSM, and the gap between the measured and designed critical wavelengths is reduced with an increase in the surface autocorrelation length. Topography measurements of surfaces with a near zero or negatively skewed height distribution were determined to be accurate. However, obvious discrepancies were found for surfaces with a positive skewness owing to more severe dilations of either the solid tip of the AFM or the laser tip of the LSM. Further surface parameter evaluation and template matching analysis verified that the main distortions in AFM measurements are tip dilations while those in LSM are generally larger and more complex.

  16. Spectral decomposition aids AVO analysis in reservoir characterization: A case study of Blackfoot field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung Yoon, Wang; Farfour, Mohammed

    2012-09-01

    Blackfoot field, Alberta, Canada, has produced oil and gas from a Glauconitic compound incised valley-system. In this area channels can be filled with sands and/or shales. Differentiation of prospective channel sands and non-productive shales was always problematic due to the similarity in P-wave impedance of these two lithotypes. We study the spectral decomposition response to the hydrocarbons presence in the Glauconitic channel of Early Cretaceous age. From previous AVO analysis and modeling, a strong Class III AVO anomaly has been observed at the top of the porous sandstone in the upper valley, whereas shale had a very different AVO response. Furthermore, AVO inversion revealed additional information about lithology and fluid content in the channel. Our workflow starts from selecting a continuous horizon that was close and conforms to the channel interval; we then run spectral analyses for the channel area. Short Window Fourier Transform workflow could successfully image the channel's stratigraphic features and confirm results obtained from AVO analysis and inversion run on the data before being stacked. Additionally, the producing oil wells in the sand-fill channel were found to be correlating with high spectrum amplitude; while the dry wells in the shale-plugged channel fell in low amplitude anomaly.

  17. SweetNET: A Bioinformatics Workflow for Glycopeptide MS/MS Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Toledo, Alejandro Gomez; Noborn, Fredrik; Nilsson, Jonas; Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno; Larson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Glycoproteomics has rapidly become an independent analytical platform bridging the fields of glycomics and proteomics to address site-specific protein glycosylation and its impact in biology. Current glycopeptide characterization relies on time-consuming manual interpretations and demands high levels of personal expertise. Efficient data interpretation constitutes one of the major challenges to be overcome before true high-throughput glycopeptide analysis can be achieved. The development of new glyco-related bioinformatics tools is thus of crucial importance to fulfill this goal. Here we present SweetNET: a data-oriented bioinformatics workflow for efficient analysis of hundreds of thousands of glycopeptide MS/MS-spectra. We have analyzed MS data sets from two separate glycopeptide enrichment protocols targeting sialylated glycopeptides and chondroitin sulfate linkage region glycopeptides, respectively. Molecular networking was performed to organize the glycopeptide MS/MS data based on spectral similarities. The combination of spectral clustering, oxonium ion intensity profiles, and precursor ion m/z shift distributions provided typical signatures for the initial assignment of different N-, O- and CS-glycopeptide classes and their respective glycoforms. These signatures were further used to guide database searches leading to the identification and validation of a large number of glycopeptide variants including novel deoxyhexose (fucose) modifications in the linkage region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

  18. Spectral analysis of the 1976 aeromagnetic survey of Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blank, H. Richard; Sadek, Hamdy S.

    1983-01-01

    Harrat Rahat, an extensive plateau of Cenozoic mafic lava on the Precambrian shield of western Saudi Arabia, has been studied for its water resource and geothermal potential. In support of these investigations, the thickness of the lava sequence at more than 300 points was estimated by spectral analysis of low-level aeromagnetic profiles utilizing the integral Fourier transform of field intensity along overlapping profile segments. The optimum length of segment for analysis was determined to be about 40 km or 600 field samples. Contributions from two discrete magnetic source ensembles could be resolved on almost all spectra computed. The depths to these ensembles correspond closely to the flight height (300 m), and, presumably, to the mean depth to basement near the center of each profile segment. The latter association was confirmed in all three cases where spectral estimates could be directly compared with basement depths measured in drill holes. The maximum thickness estimated for the lava section is 380 m and the mean about 150 m. Data from an isopach map prepared from these results suggest that thickness variations are strongly influenced by pre-harrat, north-northwest-trending topography probably consequent on Cenozoic faulting. The thickest zones show a rough correlation with three axially-disposed volcanic shields.

  19. Spectral Analysis Methods for the Robust Measurement of the Flexural Rigidity of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Valdman, David; Atzberger, Paul J.; Yu, Dezhi; Kuei, Steve; Valentine, Megan T.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of biopolymers can be determined from a statistical analysis of the ensemble of shapes they exhibit when subjected to thermal forces. In practice, extracting information from fluorescence microscopy images can be challenging due to low signal/noise ratios and other artifacts. To address these issues, we develop a suite of tools for image processing and spectral data analysis that is based on a biopolymer contour representation expressed in a spectral basis of orthogonal polynomials. We determine biopolymer shape and stiffness using global fitting routines that optimize a utility function measuring the amount of fluorescence intensity overlapped by such contours. This approach allows for filtering of high-frequency noise and interpolation over sporadic gaps in fluorescence. We use benchmarking to demonstrate the validity of our methods, by analyzing an ensemble of simulated images generated using a simulated biopolymer with known stiffness and subjected to various types of image noise. We then use these methods to determine the persistence lengths of taxol-stabilized microtubules. We find that single microtubules are well described by the wormlike chain polymer model, and that ensembles of chemically identical microtubules show significant heterogeneity in bending stiffness, which cannot be attributed to sampling or fitting errors. We expect these approaches to be useful in the study of biopolymer mechanics and the effects of associated regulatory molecules. PMID:22404937

  20. G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H

    2005-06-20

    Redox state is one of the most important factors that affect color of glasses. Recently, optical properties and redox state of the glass melts have been studied at TNO by A.J. Faber [1]. Spectral measurements up to 4 {micro}m into the infrared region were taken. The focus of similar studies [2] was on the redox state of iron. In glassware production, the control of color is mainly dependent upon the experience of the operators. When the color varies due to changes in processing conditions, batching or furnace contamination, usually little can be done but to scrap the entire batch. This can result in significant down time and waste of energy to melt and refine the glass. For small glass companies, detecting out-of-specification color variation early in the melting process means savings on labor and energy costs. In larger color glass operations, early detection may provide means to correct or save the batch. Monitoring the redox state of the glass melt can be used to effectively control the quality of glass products. An in-line redox sensor has been tested in industrial environment [3]. Thermal emission spectroscopy is a non-contact, real-time sensing technique. The collection of a spectrum takes only a few seconds or less. This may allow on-line analysis of the glass melt or hot glass products. For a specific glass product, a series of spectra with different processing parameters could be collected and analyzed. The sensing system would be able to detect a deviation from the normal conditions and signal the operator a change has occurred. The primary goal of this GPLUS effort is to find a practical solution for color monitoring. In this project, we proposed to conduct initial experiments of spectral characterization of colored glasses from the designated glass industry members of the Society for Glass Science and Practices. The work plan contained three stages: (1) Obtain glass samples and use spectroscopy analysis at ORNL to measure basic spectral characteristics

  1. Abacus: a computational tool for extracting and pre-processing spectral count data for label-free quantitative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fermin, Damian; Basrur, Venkatesha; Yocum, Anastasia K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2011-04-01

    We describe Abacus, a computational tool for extracting spectral counts from MS/MS data sets. The program aggregates data from multiple experiments, adjusts spectral counts to accurately account for peptides shared across multiple proteins, and performs common normalization steps. It can also output the spectral count data at the gene level, thus simplifying the integration and comparison between gene and protein expression data. Abacus is compatible with the widely used Trans-Proteomic Pipeline suite of tools and comes with a graphical user interface making it easy to interact with the program. The main aim of Abacus is to streamline the analysis of spectral count data by providing an automated, easy to use solution for extracting this information from proteomic data sets for subsequent, more sophisticated statistical analysis.

  2. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    PubMed

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  3. The analysis of forest policy using Landsat multi-spectral scanner data and geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Brass, J. A.; Norman, S. D.; Tosta-Miller, N.

    1984-01-01

    The role of Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) data for forest policy analysis in the state of California has been investigated. The combined requirements for physical, socio-economic, and institutional data in policy analysis were studied to explain potential data needs. A statewide MSS data and general land cover classification was created from which country-wide data sets could be extracted for detailed analyses. The potential to combine point sample data with MSS data was examined as a means to improve specificity in estimations. MSS data was incorporated into geographic information systems to demonstrate modeling techniques using abiotic, biotic, and socio-economic data layers. The review of system configurations to help the California Department of Forestry (CDF) acquire the capability demonstrated resulted in a sequence of options for implementation.

  4. Principal Components Analysis on the spectral Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function of ceramic colour standards.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A; Campos, J; Rabal, A M; Pons, A; Hernanz, M L; Corróns, A

    2011-09-26

    The Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is essential to characterize an object's reflectance properties. This function depends both on the various illumination-observation geometries as well as on the wavelength. As a result, the comprehensive interpretation of the data becomes rather complex. In this work we assess the use of the multivariable analysis technique of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) applied to the experimental BRDF data of a ceramic colour standard. It will be shown that the result may be linked to the various reflection processes occurring on the surface, assuming that the incoming spectral distribution is affected by each one of these processes in a specific manner. Moreover, this procedure facilitates the task of interpolating a series of BRDF measurements obtained for a particular sample.

  5. Self-Potential data inversion through the integration of spectral analysis and tomographic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Rani, Payal; Avella, Adolfo

    2016-05-01

    An integrated approach to interpret Self-Potential (SP) anomalies based on spectral analysis and tomographic methods is presented. The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is used for providing accurate estimates of the depth of the anomaly source. The 2D tomographic inversion technique, based on the underground Charge Occurrence Probability (COP) function, is, then, used to fully characterize the anomalous body, as the MEM is not helpful in delineating the shape of the anomaly source. The proposed integrated approach is applied for the inversion of synthetic SP data generated by geometrically simple anomalous bodies, such as cylinders and inclined sheets. This numerical study has allowed the determination of mathematical relationships between zero lines of the COP distributions, the polarization angles and the positions along the profile of the causative sources, which have been of great help for interpreting the related SP anomalies. Finally, the analysis of field examples shows the high potential applicability of the proposed integrated approach for SP data inversion.

  6. Prediction of traffic convective instability with spectral analysis of the Aw-Rascle-Zhang model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belletti, Francois; Huo, Mandy; Litrico, Xavier; Bayen, Alexandre M.

    2015-10-01

    This article starts from the classical Aw-Rascle-Zhang (ARZ) model for freeway traffic and develops a spectral analysis of its linearized version. A counterpart to the Froude number in hydrodynamics is defined that enables a classification of the nature of vehicle traffic flow using the explicit solution resulting from the analysis. We prove that our linearization about an equilibrium is stable for congested regimes and unstable otherwise. NGSIM data for congested traffic trajectories is used so as to confront the linearized model's predictions to actual macroscopic behavior of traffic. The model is shown to achieve good accuracy for speed and flow. In particular, it accounts for the advection of oscillations on boundaries into the interior domain where the PDE under study is solved.

  7. Frequency-domain nonlinear regression algorithm for spectral analysis of broadband SFG spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Yuhan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Wei; Wang, Zhaohui

    2016-03-01

    The resonant spectral bands of the broadband sum frequency generation (BB-SFG) spectra are often distorted by the nonresonant portion and the lineshapes of the laser pulses. Frequency domain nonlinear regression (FDNLR) algorithm was proposed to retrieve the first-order polarization induced by the infrared pulse and to improve the analysis of SFG spectra through simultaneous fitting of a series of time-resolved BB-SFG spectra. The principle of FDNLR was presented, and the validity and reliability were tested by the analysis of the virtual and measured SFG spectra. The relative phase, dephasing time, and lineshapes of the resonant vibrational SFG bands can be retrieved without any preset assumptions about the SFG bands and the incident laser pulses. PMID:26974068

  8. Coastal wetlands analysis from ERTS MSS digital data and field spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, V.; Schubert, J.

    1974-01-01

    Classification, delineation and evaluation of coastal wetlands can be made on the basis of major vegetative associations. To produce wetland maps, two vegetation-analysis look-up tables were developed for use in the ERTS ANALYSIS System. These look-up tables are based on Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) digital values in Multispectral Scanner (MSS) bands 4, 5, and 7 and were developed using seasonal spectral reflectance measurements from field observations. Computer-generated maps at an approximate scale of 1:20,000 were produced for the primary test site, Chincoteague Marsh, Virginia. There is a high degree of accuracy in the identification of wetland features and plant associations. The classification was also tested on other Atlantic coast salt marshes and a brackish marsh in the Chesapeake Bay.

  9. Spectral and network methods in the analysis of correlation matrices of stock returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimo, Tapio; Saramäki, Jari; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Kaski, Kimmo

    2007-09-01

    Correlation matrices inferred from stock return time series contain information on the behaviour of the market, especially on clusters of highly correlating stocks. Here we study a subset of New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) traded stocks and compare three different methods of analysis: (i) spectral analysis, i.e. investigation of the eigenvalue-eigenvector pairs of the correlation matrix, (ii) asset trees, obtained by constructing the maximal spanning tree of the correlation matrix, and (iii) asset graphs, which are networks in which the strongest correlations are depicted as edges. We illustrate and discuss the localisation of the most significant modes of fluctuation, i.e. eigenvectors corresponding to the largest eigenvalues, on the asset trees and graphs.

  10. Efficient rational Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method with domain decomposition for optical waveguides modal analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdrabou, Amgad; Heikal, A M; Obayya, S S A

    2016-05-16

    We propose an accurate and computationally efficient rational Chebyshev multi-domain pseudo-spectral method (RC-MDPSM) for modal analysis of optical waveguides. For the first time, we introduce rational Chebyshev basis functions to efficiently handle semi-infinite computational subdomains. In addition, the efficiency of these basis functions is enhanced by employing an optimized algebraic map; thus, eliminating the use of PML-like absorbing boundary conditions. For leaky modes, we derived a leaky modes boundary condition at the guide-substrate interface providing an efficient technique to accurately model leaky modes with very small refractive index imaginary part. The efficiency and numerical precision of our technique are demonstrated through the analysis of high-index contrast dielectric and plasmonic waveguides, and the highly-leaky ARROW structure; where finding ARROW leaky modes using our technique clearly reflects its robustness.

  11. GBTIDL: A New Package for Reduction and Analysis of GBT Spectral Line Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganian, P.; Garwood, R. W.; Braatz, J. A.; Radziwill, N. M.; Maddalena, R. J.

    2006-07-01

    GBTIDL {http://gbtidl.sourceforge.net} is an interactive package for the reduction and analysis of spectral line data taken with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The software is written entirely in IDL. The top level user interface (the GUIDE layer) consists of a set of straightforward and flexible calibration, averaging, and analysis procedures modeled after the UniPOPS {http://www.cv.nrao.edu/unipops} and CLASS data reduction philosophies and command-line interface styles. In addition, GBTIDL provides a customized plotter with many built-in visualization features, and data I/O and toolbox functions that can be used for more advanced tasks. GBTIDL makes use of data structures that represent calibrated or uncalibrated spectra, and the package operates on these structures as a straightforward calculator. SDFITS data are used for I/O. GBTIDL can be run online, giving users access to the most recent data coming off the telescope, or it can be run offline.

  12. Self-Potential data inversion through the integration of spectral analysis and tomographic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Rani, Payal; Avella, Adolfo

    2016-08-01

    An integrated approach to interpret Self-Potential (SP) anomalies based on spectral analysis and tomographic methods is presented. The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is used for providing accurate estimates of the depth of the anomaly source. The 2-D tomographic inversion technique, based on the underground charge occurrence probability (COP) function, is, then, used to fully characterize the anomalous body, as the MEM is not helpful in delineating the shape of the anomaly source. The proposed integrated approach is applied for the inversion of synthetic SP data generated by geometrically simple anomalous bodies, such as cylinders and inclined sheets. This numerical study has allowed the determination of mathematical relationships between zero lines of the COP distributions, the polarization angles and the positions along the profile of the causative sources, which have been of great help for interpreting the related SP anomalies. Finally, the analysis of field examples shows the high potential applicability of the proposed integrated approach for SP data inversion.

  13. Spectral analysis of the intra-group medium in the NGC 2300 group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Mulchaey, John S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Burstein, David

    1996-01-01

    The results of spectral and spatial analysis of overlapping Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) scanning imaging spectroradiometer (SIS) observations of the NGC 2300 group are presented. The spatial analysis of the co-added fields reveals that the diffuse X-ray gas can be traced to at least 25 arcmin. The temperature of the gas was found to be approximately 0.88 keV. The mass of gas within 0.33 Mpc is equal to 1.39 x 10(exp 12) solar mass. Comparing the mass of the galaxies plus the mass of hot gas the total mass of the system yields an observed baryonic fraction of 12 percent to 18 percent.

  14. Spectral Analysis of PG 1034+001, the Exciting Star of Hewett 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, J. W.; Mahsereci, M.; Ringat, E.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2011-01-01

    PG 1034+001 is an extremely hot, helium-rich DO-type star that excites the planetary nebula Hewett 1 and large parts of the surrounding interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of an ongoing spectral analysis by means of non-LTE model atmospheres that consider most elements from hydrogen to nickel. This analysis is based on high-resolution ultraviolet (FUSE, IUE) and optical (VLT/UVES, KECK) data. The results are compared with those of PG 1034+001's spectroscopic twin, the DO star PG 0038+ 199. Keywords. stars: abundances, stars: AGB and post-AGB, stars: atmospheres, stars: evolution, stars: individual (PG 1034+001, PG 0038+ 199), planetary nebulae: individual (Hewett 1)

  15. Multidimensional spectral analysis of the ultrasonic radiofrequency signal for characterization of media.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Simona; Vannacci, Enrico; Biagi, Elena; Masotti, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The importance of the analysis of the radiofrequency signal is by now recognized in the field of tissue characterization via ultrasound. The RF signal contains a wealth of information and structural details that are usually lost in the B-Mode representation. The HyperSPACE (Hyper SPectral Analysis for Characterization in Echography) algorithm presented by the authors in previous papers for clinical applications is based on the radiofrequency ultrasonic signal. The present work describes the method in detail and evaluates its performance in a repeatable and standardized manner, by using two test objects: a commercial test object that simulates the human parenchyma, and a laboratory-made test object consisting of human blood at different dilution values. In particular, the sensitivity and specificity in discriminating different density levels were estimated. In addition, the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio was also evaluated.

  16. Correlation software algorithm for portable laser spectral analysis of heavy metal dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owsik, J.; Jach, K.

    2011-12-01

    A novel correlation algorithm for laser spectral analyser (LSA) has been created for simultaneous determination of heavy metals' content in condensed matters, particularly in soils. This work is devoted to the design of a portable laser spectroscopy device for material contamination analysis using software with an original correlation algorithm. Detection sensitivity that can be achieved using this technique varies within 10-100 ppm. It has been demonstrated that acceptable results may be achieved during in-situ measurements. For a huge number of heavy metals, the limits of detection, which were determined experimentally with respect to unpolluted soil sample are lower. This system may provide fast in-situ analysis of heavy metal content and it uses optical fibre sensors.

  17. Flame stability monitoring and characterization through digital imaging and spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Duo; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Hao; Yan, Yong

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation and evaluation of an instrumentation system for the stability monitoring and characterization of combustion flames. The system, incorporating optical sensing, image processing and spectral analysis techniques, is designed to monitor a range of flame characteristic parameters. The stability of the flame is assessed through statistical analysis of the flame parameters obtained. Embedded computer techniques are employed to ensure the compactness and robustness of the system. Experiments were conducted on a gas-fired combustion test rig to evaluate the system. The impact of equivalence ratio on the stability of the gaseous flame is investigated. Further trials were carried out on a 9 MWth heavy-oil-fired combustion test facility. The impact of the swirl vane angle of tertiary air on the oil-fired flames is studied. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the system for the monitoring and characterization of the flame stability.

  18. Assessment of synthetic winds through spectral modelling, rainflow count analysis and statistics of increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Hans Georg; Chougule, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    While wind energy industry growing rapidly and siting of wind turbines onshore as well as offshore is increasing, many wind engineering model tools have been developed for the assessment of loads on wind turbines due to varying wind speeds. In order to have proper wind turbine design and performance analysis, it is important to have an accurate representation of the incoming wind field. To ease the analysis, tools for the generation of synthetic wind fields have been developed, e.g the widely used TurbSim procedure. We analyse respective synthetic data sets on one hand in view of the similarity of the spectral characteristics of measured and synthetic sets. In addition, second order characteristics with direct relevance to load assessment as given by the statistics of increments and rainflow count results are inspected.

  19. Spectral analysis of stellar light curves by means of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, R.; Ciaramella, A.; Milano, L.; Barone, F.; Longo, G.

    1999-06-01

    Periodicity analysis of unevenly collected data is a relevant issue in several scientific fields. In astrophysics, for example, we have to find the fundamental period of light or radial velocity curves which are unevenly sampled observations of stars. Classical spectral analysis methods are unsatisfactory to solve the problem. In this paper we present a neural network based estimator system which performs well the frequency extraction in unevenly sampled signals. It uses an unsupervised Hebbian nonlinear neural algorithm to extract, from the interpolated signal, the principal components which, in turn, are used by the MUSIC frequency estimator algorithm to extract the frequencies. The neural network is tolerant to noise and works well also with few points in the sequence. We benchmark the system on synthetic and real signals with the Periodogram and with the Cramer-Rao lower bound. This work was been partially supported by IIASS, by MURST 40\\% and by the Italian Space Agency.

  20. Improved Cloud and Snow Screening in MAIAC Aerosol Retrievals Using Spectral and Spatial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Kokrkin, S.

    2012-01-01

    An improved cloud/snow screening technique in the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is described. It is implemented as part of MAIAC aerosol retrievals based on analysis of spectral residuals and spatial variability. Comparisons with AERONET aerosol observations and a large-scale MODIS data analysis show strong suppression of aerosol optical thickness outliers due to unresolved clouds and snow. At the same time, the developed filter does not reduce the aerosol retrieval capability at high 1 km resolution in strongly inhomogeneous environments, such as near centers of the active fires. Despite significant improvement, the optical depth outliers in high spatial resolution data are and will remain the problem to be addressed by the application-dependent specialized filtering techniques.

  1. Use of a laser for the spectral analysis of semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karyakin, A. V.; Akhmanova, M. V.; Kaygorodov, V. A.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional applications of lasers for emission spectroscopy involving direct recording of light pulses of an evaporated substance emitted from the sample under the action of the laser light (direct method) were examined. Use of the laser light for conversion of the substance to a vapor and feeding the vapors into the conventional source of emission such as arc, sparks, etc. (the so called 2 stage excitation) were studied for use in the spectral analysis, of semiconductors. The direct method has a high reproducibility (5-7%); the 2 stage excitation method, characterized by the same intensity as obtained with the conventional constant, current arc, has better reproducibility than the direct method (15-20%). Both methods can be used for the analysis of samples without prior preparation. Advantages of these methods are the elimination of impurities picked up during trituration of the samples into powders and shortening of the analytical procedures.

  2. Feature-enhanced spectral similarity measure for the analysis of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingbo; Niu, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    In hyperspectral remote sensing, the surface compositional material can be identified by means of spectral matching algorithms. In many cases, the importance of each spectral band to measure spectral similarity is different, whereas the traditional spectral matching algorithms implicitly assume all wavelength-dependent absorption features are equal. This may yield an unsatisfactory performance for spectral matching. To remedy this deficiency, we propose methods called feature-enhanced spectral similarity measures. They are hybrids of the spectral matching algorithms combined with a feature-enhanced space projection, termed feature-enhanced spectral angle measure, feature-enhanced Euclidean distance measure, feature-enhanced spectral correlation measure, and feature-enhanced spectral information divergence. The proposed methods creatively project the original spectra into spectral feature-enhanced space, in which important features for measuring the spectral similarity will be increased to a high degree, whereas features of low importance will be suppressed. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches, performances are compared on real hyperspectral image data from Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer. The proposed methods are found to possess significant improvements over the original four spectral matching algorithms.

  3. Assessment of heart rate variability during alterations in stress: complex demodulation vs. spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Frank H; Grossman, Paul; Roth, Walton T

    2005-01-01

    Complex demodulation (CDM) has been proposed as a method for the analysis of high- and low-frequency variabilities of heart rate and blood pressure under non-stationary conditions. In contrast to power spectral analysis, CDM provides time-dependent changes in signal amplitude and frequency on a continuous basis and may yield insights into short-term alterations in autonomic regulation. In particular, CDM may be uniquely suited for quantifying changes in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) at the onset of acute physical or mental stress conditions. In a simulation analysis we generated R-R interval time series within a normal physiological range that represented different typical sources of non-stationarity present during varying stress. Sources of non-stationarity included abrupt changes in a) mean level (from 1000 to 500 ms within 60 sec), b) oscillatory amplitude (from 50 to 10 ms), c) oscillatory frequency (from 0.2 to 0.4 Hz), and d) a combination of the above. In general, CDM-estimated amplitude and frequency accurately reproduced characteristics of the simulation data under all conditions, even after substantial noise and a 0.09 Hz oscillation were added. However, during some transitions CDM estimates fluctuated around the true values for up to 15 sec before they stabilized. Compared to CDM, power spectral analysis results were less informative since they did not allow the disentangling of unique contributions of distinct amplitudes and frequencies at different time points. Our analyses indicate that CDM provides a powerful means of continuously assessing time-dependent changes in RSA during varying physical or mental stress. CDM may also hold promise for a range of physiological and environmental non-steady state conditions where rapid dynamic alterations in autonomic control are likely to occur.

  4. Robust spectral analysis of videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant frequency (DF) analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images is a new method to detect small intestinal periodicities that may result from mechanical rhythms such as peristalsis. Longer periodicity is related to greater image texture at areas of villous atrophy in celiac disease. However, extraneous features and spatiotemporal phase shift may mask DF rhythms. Method The robustness of Fourier and ensemble averaging spectral analysis to compute DF was tested. Videocapsule images from the distal duodenum of 11 celiac patients (frame rate 2/s and pixel resolution 576 × 576) were analyzed. For patients 1, 2, ... 11, respectively, a total of 10, 11, ..., 20 sequential images were extracted from a randomly selected time epoch. Each image sequence was artificially repeated to 200 frames, simulating periodicities of 0.2, 0.18, ..., 0.1Hz, respectively. Random white noise at four different levels, spatiotemporal phase shift, and frames with air bubbles were added. Power spectra were constructed pixel-wise over 200 frames, and an average spectrum was computed from the 576 × 576 individual spectra. The largest spectral peak in the average spectrum was the estimated DF. Error was defined as the absolute difference between actual DF and estimated DF. Results For Fourier analysis, the mean absolute error between estimated and actual DF was 0.032 ± 0.052Hz. Error increased with greater degree of random noise imposed. In contrast, all ensemble average estimates precisely predicted the simulated DF. Conclusions The ensemble average DF estimate of videocapsule images with simulated periodicity is robust to noise and spatiotemporal phase shift as compared with Fourier analysis. Accurate estimation of DF eliminates the need to impose complex masking, extraction, and/or corrective preprocessing measures. PMID:21906318

  5. Spectral analysis of atmospheric composition: application to surface ozone model-measurement comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowdalo, Dene R.; Evans, Mathew J.; Sofen, Eric D.

    2016-07-01

    Models of atmospheric composition play an essential role in our scientific understanding of atmospheric processes and in providing policy strategies to deal with societally relevant problems such as climate change, air quality, and ecosystem degradation. The fidelity of these models needs to be assessed against observations to ensure that errors in model formulations are found and that model limitations are understood. A range of approaches are necessary for these comparisons. Here, we apply a spectral analysis methodology for this comparison. We use the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, a method similar to a Fourier transform, but better suited to deal with the gapped data sets typical of observational data. We apply this methodology to long-term hourly ozone observations and the equivalent model (GEOS-Chem) output. We show that the spectrally transformed observational data show a distinct power spectrum with regimes indicative of meteorological processes (weather, macroweather) and specific peaks observed at the daily and annual timescales together with corresponding harmonic peaks at one-half, one-third, etc., of these frequencies. Model output shows corresponding features. A comparison between the amplitude and phase of these peaks introduces a new comparison methodology between model and measurements. We focus on the amplitude and phase of diurnal and seasonal cycles and present observational/model comparisons and discuss model performance. We find large biases notably for the seasonal cycle in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere where the amplitudes are generally overestimated by up to 16 ppbv, and phases are too late on the order of 1-5 months. This spectral methodology can be applied to a range of model-measurement applications and is highly suitable for Multimodel Intercomparison Projects (MIPs).

  6. Spectral data analysis of rock and mineral in Hatu Western Junggar Region, Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhou, Kefa; Zhang, Nannan; Wang, Jinlin

    2014-11-01

    Mineral resources are important material basis for the survival and development of human society. The development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology, which has made direct identification of minerals or mineral aggregates become possible, paves a new way for the application of remote sensing geology. The West Junggar region is located Xinjiang west verge of Junggar, with ore-forming geological conditions be richly endowed by nature and huge prospecting potentiality. The area has very good outcrop exposure with almost no vegetation cover, which is a natural test new method of remote sensing geological exploration. The characteristic of rock and mineral spectrum is not only the physical base of geological remote sensing technical application but also the base of the quantificational analysis of geological remote sensing, and the study of reflectance spectrum is the main content in the basic research of remote sensing. In this study, we collected the outdoor and indoor reflectance spectrum of rocks and minerals by using a spectroradiometer (ASD FieldSpec FR, ASD, USA), which band extent varied from 350 to 2,500 nm. Basin on a great deal of spectral data for different kinds of rocks and minerals, we have analyzed the spectrum characteristics and change of seven typical mineral rocks. According to the actual conditions, we analyzed the data noise characteristic of the spectrum and got rid of the noise. Meanwhile, continuum removed technology was used to remove the environmental background influence. Finally, in order to take full advantage of multi-spectrum data, ground information is absolutely necessary, and it is important to build a representative spectral library. We build the spectral library of rocks and minerals in Hatu, which can be used for features investigation, mineral classification, mineral mapping and geological prospecting in Hatu Western Junggar region by remote sensing. The result of this research will be significant to the research of

  7. Thermal infrared spectral analysis of compacted fine-grained mineral mixtures: implications for spectral interpretation of lithified sedimentary materials on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C.; Rogers, D.

    2012-12-01

    optically thin grains in the compacted mixture. Inclusion of loose powder (<10 μm) sample spectra improves mineral abundance estimates for some mixtures. In general, mineral abundances are predicted to within +/- 10% (absolute) for approximately 60% of our samples; thus far, there are no clear trends in which cases produce better model results. With the exception of pyroxene/feldspar ratios being consistently overestimated, there are no consistent trends in over- or under-estimation of minerals. The results described here are based on the unsubstantiated assumption that areal abundance on the pellet surface is equal to the volume abundance. Thus future work will include micro-imaging of our samples to constrain areal abundance. We will also prepareclay mixtures using a wetting/drying sequence rather than pressure, and expand our set of samples to include additional mixture combinations to further characterize the spectral behavior of compacted mixtures. This work will be directly applicable to analysis of TES and Mini-TES data of lithified sedimentary deposits.

  8. Wide-band X-ray spectral and timing analysis of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiragi, Kazuyoshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Mizuno, Motohiro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yamasaki, Tomonori

    X-ray spectra of AGNs contain conplex features such as the continuum, emission line, ab-sorption, reflection component, high energy cut-off. These features are thought to reflect the material structure around AGN, and X-ray studies can clarify a physical geometry of AGNs. Especially, the hard X-ray observation above 10 keV is important to measure the reflection component. So far, hard X-ray studies of time variation of AGN spectra have been limited because of high background rate. Suzaku HXD achieve the highest S/N ratio by an effective background rejection. Combining the data with the XIS soft X-ray date, we can study the AGN X-ray spectra in more detail than ever. Here, we report the spectral and timing analysis of 14 Seyfert galaxies observed with Suzaku, in order to decompose each spectral component. The reflection component via a torus is considered to be less variable, while the varible component is considered to come from the central engine directly. Using this consideration, we tried to decompose a direct component and a reflection component. We compared the spectral parameters obtained by spectral fitting with direct nuclear plus reflection with those obtained from the difference spectra between high and low state. In particular, we forcus attention on the power-law index, reflection fraction, and the Fe-Ka line. As a result, the photon index, the Fe line intensity, and the refrection component is almost the same between high and low state. However, some of them are not the case, and the equivalent width of Fe-Ka line against the best-fit reflection component is unreasonable for some objects. These indicate that two-component model is valid for most of Seyfert galaxies, but the behavior of some Seyfert galaxies cannot be explained by two-conmponent model. Highly ionized Fe-K lines are observed as both emission and absorption, and some objects show a time variability of these lines. We will report this matter.

  9. Spectral Analysis of Ultraweak Chemiluminescence from Kidney Bean Leaf Infested with Tetranychus Kanzawai Kishida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Ryuzou; Miike, Tohru; Okabe, Hirotaka; Uefune, Masayoshi; Takabayashi, Junji; Takagi, Masami; Kai, Shoichi

    2005-02-01

    We performed the spectral analysis of ultraweak-photon emissions from kidney bean leaves infested by the kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae). We also measured the spectrum of photon emissions from artificially wounded leaves, and compared the result with spectral data obtained from the mite-infested leaves. Photon emissions from both the mite-infested and wounded leaves primarily consisted of wavelengths ranging from 500 to 700 nm, and photon intensity at these wavelengths increased steadily after perturbation. In contrast, photon intensity of the mite-infested leaves at 300-400 nm exhibited only differential changes; it began increasing at 20 h, and showed two peaks at 72 and 120 h. We previously reported that photon emissions from infested leaves might be the result of both insect damage and plant self-protection. Plant defensive responses, such as herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV), are induced by insect elicitors via insect damage. Therefore, photon intensity at 500-700 nm might be related to direct injury (physiological stress), while photon intensity at 300-400 nm may signify a physiological (biochemical)-action-related defensive response.

  10. Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

  11. Rapid estimation of compost enzymatic activity by spectral analysis method combined with machine learning.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Das, Bhabani S; Ali, Md Nasim; Li, Bin; Sarathjith, M C; Majumdar, K; Ray, D P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using visible near-infrared (VisNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as an easy, inexpensive, and rapid method to predict compost enzymatic activity, which traditionally measured by fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA-HR) assay. Compost samples representative of five different compost facilities were scanned by DRS, and the raw reflectance spectra were preprocessed using seven spectral transformations for predicting compost FDA-HR with six multivariate algorithms. Although principal component analysis for all spectral pretreatments satisfactorily identified the clusters by compost types, it could not separate different FDA contents. Furthermore, the artificial neural network multilayer perceptron (residual prediction deviation=3.2, validation r(2)=0.91 and RMSE=13.38 μg g(-1) h(-1)) outperformed other multivariate models to capture the highly non-linear relationships between compost enzymatic activity and VisNIR reflectance spectra after Savitzky-Golay first derivative pretreatment. This work demonstrates the efficiency of VisNIR DRS for predicting compost enzymatic as well as microbial activity.

  12. New approach to ECE measurements based on Hilbert-transform spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Divin, Yuriy

    2015-03-01

    Spectroscopy of Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) has been established as adequate diagnostic technique for fusion research machines. Among various instruments for ECE diagnostics, only Fourier-transform spectrometers with Martin-Puplett interferometers can measure electron cyclotron radiation in a broadband frequency range from 70 to 1000 GHz. Before these measurements, a complete system including a frontend radiation collector, a transmission line, an interferometer and a radiation detector should be absolutely calibrated. A hot/cold calibration source and data-averaging technique are used to calibrate the total ECE diagnostic system. It takes long time to calibrate the ECE system because of the low power level of the calibration source and high values of the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the detection system. A new technique, Hilbert-transform spectral analysis, is proposed for the ITER plasma ECE spectral measurements. An operation principle, characteristics and advantages of the corresponding Hilbert-transform spectrum analyser (HTSA) based on a high-Tc Josephson detector are discussed. Due to lower NEP-values of the Josephson detector, this spectrum analyser might demonstrate shorter calibration times than that for the Martin-Puplett interferometer.

  13. Monitoring of oscillatory characteristics of pulverized coal flames through image processing and spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.; Yan, Y.; Colechin, M.; Hill, R.

    2006-02-15

    This paper presents the monitoring of the oscillatory characteristics of pulverized coal flames using image processing and spectral analysis techniques. The instrumentation system employed in this investigation is an integral part of a multifunctional flame monitoring system, being capable of monitoring the oscillatory frequency of a flame on a two-dimensional and concurrent basis. A quantitative flicker frequency is defined as the power-density-weighted mean frequency over the spectral range to represent the oscillatory characteristics of a specific region of the flame. Digital filtering techniques incorporating direct gray-level thresholding and wavelet shrinkage algorithms are employed to reduce background noise from flame images and white noise from the resulting flame frequency signal. A series of tests was undertaken on an industrial-scale coal-fired combustion test facility (CTF) under a range of operating conditions. Relationships between the measured flame oscillatory frequency and the process data including emissions are identified. Results obtained demonstrate that the flame oscillatory frequency responds in predictable ways to the effects of operating conditions on the dynamic nature of the flame.

  14. [An improved characteristic spectral selection method for multicomponent gas quantitative analysis based on Tikhonov regularization].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Er-Zhen; Li, Zhe-Bu; Meng, Yong-Peng; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, an improved approach to the TR characteristic spectral selection is presented. For this approach, two ideas of TR1-norm and TR2-norm are used, two constraint items, spectral line distance and minimizing absolute value of coefficient are introduced, and a general formula of ill-posed optimization problem is established. The formula can reduce effectively the errors caused by experienced and experimental method when used in determining the regular matrix and parameter. Finally, the improved approach presented in the paper was used in the analysis of alkane gas mixture, with methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane and iso-pentane included. The concentration range is 0.01%-20%. The experimental results show that the predicting error square is only 2.6 x 10(-4), and the coefficient of determination is 0. 959 2, which means that preceding accuracy is high, and that the practicability of TR regularization has been enhanced. PMID:23285876

  15. Analysis of the SN 1987A neutrinos with a flexible spectral shape

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2005-09-15

    We analyze the neutrino events from the supernova (SN) 1987A detected by the Kamiokande-II (KII) and Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven (IMB) experiments. For the time-integrated flux we assume a quasithermal spectrum of the form (E/E{sub 0}){sup {alpha}}e{sup -({alpha}{sup +1})E/E{sub 0}} where {alpha} plays the role of a spectral index. This simple representation not only allows one to fit the total energy E{sub tot} emitted in {nu}{sub e} and the average energy , but also accommodates a wide range of shapes, notably antipinched spectra that are broader than a thermal distribution. We find that the pile-up of low-energy events near threshold in KII forces the best-fit value for {alpha} to the lowest value of any assumed prior range. This applies to the KII events alone as well as to a common analysis of the two data sets. The preference of the data for an 'unphysical' spectral shape implies that one can extract meaningful values for and E{sub tot} only if one fixes a prior value for {alpha}. The tension between the KII and IMB data sets and theoretical expectations for is not resolved by an antipinched spectrum.

  16. Impact and management of physiological calibration in spectral analysis of blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Hintsala, Heidi; Hautala, Arto J.; Ikäheimo, Tiina M.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.; Tiinanen, Suvi; Seppänen, Tapio; Tulppo, Mikko P.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological calibration (Physiocal) improves the quality of continuous blood pressure (BP) signal from finger. However, the effects of Physiocal on spectral characteristics of systolic BP (SBP) variability are not well-known. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Physiocal may alter the results on SBP variability when compared with BP recording without Physiocal. Continuous BP was recorded simultaneously from fingers of both arms during 10-min standing by two Nexfin devices, one with (ON) and the other without (OFF) Physiocal (n = 19). Missing SBP values in ON signal were linearly interpolated over Physiocal sequences (ONinter). The OFF signal was analyzed without any corrections (OFFreference) and after linear interpolation of corresponding sequences when Physiocal appeared in the ON signal (OFFinter). Mean low frequency power of SBP oscillations (LFSBP, 0.04–0.15 Hz) did not differ between the OFFreference, OFFinter, and ONinter. However, LFSBP deviated more from OFFreference when analyzed from ONinter compared with the analysis from OFFinter [median (interquartile range): 14.7 (4.6–38.6) vs. 0.9 (0.5–1.8) %, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, the use of Physiocal had a significant effect on the spectral SBP variability that overwhelms the impact of linear interpolation of short data sequences. Therefore, caution is needed when comparing SBP variability between BP datasets acquired with and without Physiocal. PMID:25520670

  17. Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability in traumatic quadriplegic humans.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Miyake, S; Kumashiro, M; Ogata, H; Yoshimura, O

    1990-06-01

    This study investigated the spontaneous beat-to-beat variabilities in R-R intervals of six traumatic neurologically complete quadriplegic (QP) males and six age-matched healthy males (control) while they were at rest in the supine position in a climatic chamber (temperature 30 degrees C, relative humidity 60%) by means of autoregressive power spectral analysis. As shown by earlier studies, in the control group there were two major spectral components, a high-frequency (HF) component [center frequency 0.30 +/- 0.02 (SE) Hertz equivalent (Hz eq), power 767.5 +/- 384.6 ms2] and a low-frequency (LF) component (0.11 +/- 0.01 Hz eq, 707.5 +/- 198.8 ms2). On the contrary, in the QP group, only the HF component was observed (0.30 +/- 0.02 Hz eq, 421.8 +/- 134.7 ms2). The results suggest that 1) the disappearance of the LF component in the QP subject is presumably caused by the interruption of the spinal pathways linking supraspinal cardiovascular centers with the peripheral sympathetic outflow, and 2) the cervical spinal sympathetic pathways may be instrumental in the genesis of the LF component in humans.

  18. Rapid estimation of compost enzymatic activity by spectral analysis method combined with machine learning.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Das, Bhabani S; Ali, Md Nasim; Li, Bin; Sarathjith, M C; Majumdar, K; Ray, D P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using visible near-infrared (VisNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as an easy, inexpensive, and rapid method to predict compost enzymatic activity, which traditionally measured by fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA-HR) assay. Compost samples representative of five different compost facilities were scanned by DRS, and the raw reflectance spectra were preprocessed using seven spectral transformations for predicting compost FDA-HR with six multivariate algorithms. Although principal component analysis for all spectral pretreatments satisfactorily identified the clusters by compost types, it could not separate different FDA contents. Furthermore, the artificial neural network multilayer perceptron (residual prediction deviation=3.2, validation r(2)=0.91 and RMSE=13.38 μg g(-1) h(-1)) outperformed other multivariate models to capture the highly non-linear relationships between compost enzymatic activity and VisNIR reflectance spectra after Savitzky-Golay first derivative pretreatment. This work demonstrates the efficiency of VisNIR DRS for predicting compost enzymatic as well as microbial activity. PMID:24398221

  19. Spectral Analysis of EEG in Familial Alzheimer's Disease with E280A Presenilin-1 Mutation Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rene; Lopera, Francisco; Alvarez, Alfredo; Fernandez, Yuriem; Galan, Lidice; Quiroz, Yakeel; Bobes, Maria Antonieta

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis is susceptible to detect early functional changes in familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) preclinical stages. Three groups of subjects were selected from five extended families with hereditary AD: a Probable AD group (18 subjects), an asymptomatic carrier (ACr) group (21 subjects), with the mutation but without any clinical symptoms of dementia, and a normal group of 18 healthy subjects. In order to reveal significant differences in the spectral parameter, the Mahalanobis distance (D2) was calculated between groups. To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this statistic D2, the ROC models were used. The ROC curve was summarized by accuracy index and standard deviation. The D2 using the parameters of the energy in the fast frequency bands shows accurate discrimination between normal and ACr groups (area ROC = 0.89) and between AD probable and ACr groups (area ROC = 0.91). This is more significant in temporal regions. Theses parameters could be affected before the onset of the disease, even when cognitive disturbance is not clinically evident. Spectral EEG parameter could be firstly used to evaluate subjects with E280A Presenilin-1 mutation without impairment in cognitive function. PMID:24551475

  20. Spectral Analysis of EEG in Familial Alzheimer's Disease with E280A Presenilin-1 Mutation Gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rene; Lopera, Francisco; Alvarez, Alfredo; Fernandez, Yuriem; Galan, Lidice; Quiroz, Yakeel; Bobes, Maria Antonieta

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis is susceptible to detect early functional changes in familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) preclinical stages. Three groups of subjects were selected from five extended families with hereditary AD: a Probable AD group (18 subjects), an asymptomatic carrier (ACr) group (21 subjects), with the mutation but without any clinical symptoms of dementia, and a normal group of 18 healthy subjects. In order to reveal significant differences in the spectral parameter, the Mahalanobis distance (D (2)) was calculated between groups. To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this statistic D (2), the ROC models were used. The ROC curve was summarized by accuracy index and standard deviation. The D (2) using the parameters of the energy in the fast frequency bands shows accurate discrimination between normal and ACr groups (area ROC = 0.89) and between AD probable and ACr groups (area ROC = 0.91). This is more significant in temporal regions. Theses parameters could be affected before the onset of the disease, even when cognitive disturbance is not clinically evident. Spectral EEG parameter could be firstly used to evaluate subjects with E280A Presenilin-1 mutation without impairment in cognitive function.

  1. a Maximum Entropy Model of the Bearded Capuchin Monkey Habitat Incorporating Topography and Spectral Unmixing Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Bernardes, S.; Nibbelink, N.; Biondi, L.; Presotto, A.; Fragaszy, D. M.; Madden, M.

    2012-07-01

    Movement patterns of bearded capuchin monkeys (Cebus (Sapajus) libidinosus) in northeastern Brazil are likely impacted by environmental features such as elevation, vegetation density, or vegetation type. Habitat preferences of these monkeys provide insights regarding the impact of environmental features on species ecology and the degree to which they incorporate these features in movement decisions. In order to evaluate environmental features influencing movement patterns and predict areas suitable for movement, we employed a maximum entropy modelling approach, using observation points along capuchin monkey daily routes as species presence points. We combined these presence points with spatial data on important environmental features from remotely sensed data on land cover and topography. A spectral mixing analysis procedure was used to generate fraction images that represent green vegetation, shade and soil of the study area. A Landsat Thematic Mapper scene of the area of study was geometrically and atmospherically corrected and used as input in a Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) procedure and a linear spectral unmixing approach was used to generate the fraction images. These fraction images and elevation were the environmental layer inputs for our logistic MaxEnt model of capuchin movement. Our models' predictive power (test AUC) was 0.775. Areas of high elevation (>450 m) showed low probabilities of presence, and percent green vegetation was the greatest overall contributor to model AUC. This work has implications for predicting daily movement patterns of capuchins in our field site, as suitability values from our model may relate to habitat preference and facility of movement.

  2. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  3. Optical spectral analysis of ultra-weak photon emission from tissue culture and yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerudová, Michaela; Červinková, Kateřina; Hašek, Jiří; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) could be utilized for non-invasive diagnostic of state of biological systems and for elucidation of underlying mechanisms of UPE generation. Optical spectra of UPE from differentiated HL-60 cells and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were investigated. Induced photon emission of neutrophil-like cells and spontaneous photon emission of yeast cells were measured using highly sensitive photomultiplier module Hamamatsu H7360-01 in a thermally regulated light-tight chamber. The respiratory burst of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells was induced with the PMA (phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate). PMA activates an assembly of NADPH oxidase, which induces a rapid formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Long-pass edge filters (wavelength 350, from 400 to 600 with 25 nm resolution and 650 nm) were used for optical spectral analysis. Propagation of error of indirect measurements and standard deviation were used to assess reliability of the measured spectra. Results indicate that the photon emission from both cell cultures is detectable in the six from eight examined wavelength ranges with different percentage distribution of cell suspensions, particularly 450-475, 475-500, 500-525, 525-550, 550-575 and 575-600 nm. The wavelength range of spectra from 450 to 550 nm coincides with the range of photon emission from triplet excited carbonyls (350-550 nm). The both cells cultures emitted photons in wavelength range from 550 to 600 nm but this range does not correspond with any known emitter. To summarize, we have demonstrated a clear difference in the UPE spectra between two organisms using rigorous methodology and error analysis.

  4. M3 spectral analysis of lunar swirls and the link between optical maturation and surface hydroxyl formation at magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, G.Y.; Besse, S.; Dhingra, D.; Nettles, J.; Klima, R.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Clark, R.N.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J. W.; Taylor, L.A.; Pieters, C.M.; Boardman, J.; McCord, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the lunar swirls using data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3). The improved spectral and spatial resolution of M3 over previous spectral imaging data facilitates distinction of subtle spectral differences, and provides new information about the nature of these enigmatic features. We characterized spectral features of the swirls, interswirl regions (dark lanes), and surrounding terrain for each of three focus regions: Reiner Gamma, Gerasimovich, and Mare Ingenii. We used Principle Component Analysis to identify spectrally distinct surfaces at each focus region, and characterize the spectral features that distinguish them. We compared spectra from small, recent impact craters with the mature soils into which they penetrated to examine differences in maturation trends on- and off-swirl. Fresh, on-swirl crater spectra are higher albedo, exhibit a wider range in albedos and have well-preserved mafic absorption features compared with fresh off-swirl craters. Albedoand mafic absorptions are still evident in undisturbed, on-swirl surface soils, suggesting the maturation process is retarded. The spectral continuum is more concave compared with off-swirl spectra; a result of the limited spectral reddening being mostly constrained to wavelengths less than ???1500 nm. Off-swirl spectra show very little reddening or change in continuum shape across the entire M3 spectral range. Off-swirl spectra are dark, have attenuated absorption features, and the narrow range in off-swirl albedos suggests off-swirl regions mature rapidly. Spectral parameter maps depicting the relative OH surface abundance for each of our three swirl focus regions were created using the depth of the hydroxyl absorption feature at 2.82 ??m. For each of the studied regions, the 2.82 ??m absorption feature is significantly weaker on-swirl than off-swirl, indicating the swirls are depleted in OH relative to their surroundings. The spectral characteristics of the swirls and adjacent terrains from

  5. Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Narrowand Broad-band Spectral Systems: Analysis and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Gregory B.

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) are important holographic optical elements in many spectral systems. Using multiple volume gratings, whether multiplexed or arranged sequentially, provides advantages to many types of systems in overall efficiency, dispersion performance, flexibility of design, etc. However, the use of multiple gratings---particularly when the gratings are multiplexed in a single holographic optical element (HOE)---is subject to inter-grating coupling effects that ultimately limit system performance. Analyzing these coupling effects requires a more complex mathematical model than the straightforward analysis of a single volume grating. We present a matrix-based algorithm for determining diffraction efficiencies of significant coupled waves in these multiplexed grating holographic optical elements (HOEs). Several carefully constructed experiments with spectrally multiplexed gratings in dichromated gelatin verify our conclusions. Applications of this theory to broad- and narrow-band systems are explored in detailed simulations. Broadband systems include spectrum splitters for diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells. Volume Bragg gratings can serve as effective spectrum splitters, but the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit ultimate performance. We explore broadband multi-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in sandwiched arrangements where individual single-grating HOEs are placed in series, and in multiplexed arrangements where multiple gratings are recorded in a single HOE. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems

  6. Improvements to a Grating-Based Spectral Imaging Microscope and Its Application to Reflectance Analysis of Blue Pen Inks.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Leilani C; Miller, Kathleen P; Webb, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    A modified design of a chromatically resolved optical microscope (CROMoscope), a grating-based spectral imaging microscope, is described. By altering the geometry and adding a beam splitter, a twisting aberration that was present in the first version of the CROMoscope has been removed. Wavelength adjustment has been automated to decrease analysis time. Performance of the new design in transmission-absorption spectroscopy has been evaluated and found to be generally similar to the performance of the previous design. Spectral bandpass was found to be dependent on the sizes of apertures, and the smallest measured spectral bandpass was 1.8 nm with 1.0 mm diameter apertures. Wavelength was found to be very linear with the sine of the grating angle (R(2) = 0.9999995), and wavelength repeatability was found to be much better than the spectral bandpass. Reflectance spectral imaging with a CROMoscope is reported for the first time, and this reflectance spectral imaging was applied to blue ink samples on white paper. As a proof of concept, linear discriminant analysis was used to classify the inks by brand. In a leave-one-out cross-validation, 97.6% of samples were correctly classified. PMID:26162719

  7. Spectral Analysis by XANES Reveals that GPNMB Influences the Chemical Composition of Intact Melanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    T Haraszti; C Trantow; A Hedberg-Buenz; M Grunze; M Anderson

    2011-12-31

    GPNMB is a unique melanosomal protein. Unlike many melanosomal proteins, GPNMB has not been associated with any forms of albinism, and it is unclear whether GPNMB has any direct influence on melanosomes. Here, melanosomes from congenic strains of C57BL/6J mice mutant for Gpnmb are compared to strain-matched controls using standard transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (XANES). Whereas electron microscopy did not detect any ultrastructural changes in melanosomes lacking functional GPNMB, XANES uncovered multiple spectral phenotypes. These results directly demonstrate that GPNMB influences the chemical composition of melanosomes and more broadly illustrate the potential for using genetic approaches in combination with nano-imaging technologies to study organelle biology.

  8. Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy for Volumetric and Spectral Analysis of Histological and Immunochemical Samples**

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Chi; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an imaging modality with superb penetration depth and excellent absorption contrast. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that this technique can advance quantitative analysis of conventional chromogenic histochemistry. Because OR-PAM can quantify the absorption contrast at different wavelengths, it is feasible to spectrally resolve the specific biomolecules involved in a staining color. Furthermore, the tomographic capability of OR-PAM allows for non-invasive volumetric imaging of a thick sample without microtoming it. By immunostaining the sample with different chromogenic agents, we further demonstrated the ability of OP-PAM to resolve different types of cells in a co-culture sample with imaging depths up to 1 mm. Taken together, the integration of OR-PAM with (immuno)histochemistry offers a simple and versatile technique with broad applications in cell biology, pathology, tissue engineering, and related biomedical studies. PMID:24961608

  9. Spectral analysis of laser Doppler signals in real time using digital processing.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, G

    1994-01-01

    A versatile spectrum analyser was developed to generate and display laser Doppler shift signals, and derived parameters, continuously in real time using a digital signal processing chip. A major attraction of the system is that it is entirely programmable, so that both the algorithms and the attributes of the system, such as window function and frame overlap, can be easily altered. It was used to investigate the relative merits of a variety of algorithms using a blood-flow phantom. An index based on the first moment of the Doppler power spectrum was found to be the most reliable flow indicator, with linearity extending towards a velocity of 5 mm s-1 for a blood haematocrit of 5%. The system is not limited to analysis based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT), and is suitable for non-linear techniques such as maximum entropy spectral estimation (MESE). PMID:8162263

  10. Analysis of the signal fall-off in spectral domain optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Eggert, M.; Koch, P.; Hüttmann, G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the individual spectrometer components on the depth dependent sensitivity fall-off (roll-off) in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is investigated. We present a method for the characterization of the roll-off in SD-OCT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. The MTF of different image sensors was measured in a newly developed setup, which uses the interference of two coherent light beams. Different contributions, i.e. diffraction, aberrations and sampling effects, to the MTF of a spectrometer of commercially available SD-OCT systems is calculated and is compared with roll-off measurements. The difference was below -2 dB at 90 % of the maximum measurement depth.

  11. M.S.L.A.P. Modular Spectral Line Analysis Program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1991-01-01

    MSLAP is a software for analyzing spectra, providing the basic structure to identify spectral features, to make quantitative measurements of this features, and to store the measurements for convenient access. MSLAP can be used to measure not only the zeroth moment (equivalent width) of a profile, but also the first and second moments. Optical depths and the corresponding column densities across the profile can be measured as well for sufficiently high resolution data. The software was developed for an interactive, graphical analysis where the computer carries most of the computational and data organizational burden and the investigator is responsible only for all judgement decisions. It employs sophisticated statistical techniques for determining the best polynomial fit to the continuum and for calculating the uncertainties.

  12. Tidal frequencies in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Catherine; Takai, Helio

    2016-03-01

    Tidal frequencies are observed in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements performed by the MARIACHI experiment over a period of seven years. The prominent peaks from the frequency spectrum correspond to tidal frequencies S1,S2,S3,K1,P1 and Ψ1 . We will present these results and compare them to the regular density oscillations from balloon sounding data. We interpret the observed data as being the effect of regular atmospheric density oscillations induced by the thermal heating of layers in Earth's atmosphere. As the density of the atmosphere varies, the altitude where particles are produced varies accordingly. As a consequence, the muon decay path elongates or contracts, modulating the number of muons detected at ground level. The role of other tidal effects, including geomagnetic tides, will also be discussed.

  13. Bayesian semiparametric power spectral density estimation with applications in gravitational wave data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2015-09-01

    The standard noise model in gravitational wave (GW) data analysis assumes detector noise is stationary and Gaussian distributed, with a known power spectral density (PSD) that is usually estimated using clean off-source data. Real GW data often depart from these assumptions, and misspecified parametric models of the PSD could result in misleading inferences. We propose a Bayesian semiparametric approach to improve this. We use a nonparametric Bernstein polynomial prior on the PSD, with weights attained via a Dirichlet process distribution, and update this using the Whittle likelihood. Posterior samples are obtained using a blocked Metropolis-within-Gibbs sampler. We simultaneously estimate the reconstruction parameters of a rotating core collapse supernova GW burst that has been embedded in simulated Advanced LIGO noise. We also discuss an approach to deal with nonstationary data by breaking longer data streams into smaller and locally stationary components.

  14. Spectral analysis of lung cancer serum using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Deli

    2006-02-01

    Spectral changes of lung cancer serum in the process of tumor evolution was investigated in this study. We kept close watch on the tumor progression of a group of patients, and measured their serum spectra using 488.0nm and 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser once a week. There was no apparent change observed in fluorescence spectrum in different period. However, the relative intensity of three Raman peaks (mode A, B and C) decreased every week later. For quantitative analysis of such changes, a parameter Ir (relative intensity of C Raman peak) was introduced and Ir-value was calculated. Calculation showed that Ir-value was degressive with tumor evolution, but β (Ir5145 /Ir4880) varied irregularly. To the end, no Raman peak was observed. We assumed that three Raman peaks were derived from beta carotene. It indicated that the content of beta carotene decreased with the aggravation of lung cancer.

  15. Quantitative measurement of phase variation amplitude of ultrasonic diffraction grating based on diffraction spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Meiyan Zeng, Yingzhi; Huang, Zuohua

    2014-09-15

    A new method based on diffraction spectral analysis is proposed for the quantitative measurement of the phase variation amplitude of an ultrasonic diffraction grating. For a traveling wave, the phase variation amplitude of the grating depends on the intensity of the zeroth- and first-order diffraction waves. By contrast, for a standing wave, this amplitude depends on the intensity of the zeroth-, first-, and second-order diffraction waves. The proposed method is verified experimentally. The measured phase variation amplitude ranges from 0 to 2π, with a relative error of approximately 5%. A nearly linear relation exists between the phase variation amplitude and driving voltage. Our proposed method can also be applied to ordinary sinusoidal phase grating.

  16. Spectral analysis of Chinese language: Co-occurrence networks from four literary genres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei; Chen, Guanrong

    2016-05-01

    The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of a network contain essential information about its topology. For each of the Chinese language co-occurrence networks constructed from four literary genres, i.e., essay, popular science article, news report, and novel, it is found that the largest eigenvalue depends on the network size N, the number of edges, the average shortest path length, and the clustering coefficient. Moreover, it is found that their node-degree distributions all follow a power-law. The number of different eigenvalues, Nλ, is found numerically to increase in the manner of Nλ ∝ log N for novel and Nλ ∝ N for the other three literary genres. An "M" shape or a triangle-like distribution appears in their spectral densities. The eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue is mostly localized to a node with the largest degree. For the above observed phenomena, mathematical analysis is provided with interpretation from a linguistic perspective.

  17. Spectral analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and frequency domain collocation. [to estimate gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eren, K.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical background in spectral analysis as applied to geodetic applications is summarized. The resolution (cut-off frequency) of the GEOS 3 altimeter data is examined by determining the shortest wavelength (corresponding to the cut-off frequency) recoverable. The data from some 18 profiles are used. The total power (variance) in the sea surface topography with respect to the reference ellipsoid as well as with respect to the GEM-9 surface is computed. A fast inversion algorithm for matrices of simple and block Toeplitz matrices and its application to least squares collocation is explained. This algorithm yields a considerable gain in computer time and storage in comparison with conventional least squares collocation. Frequency domain least squares collocation techniques are also introduced and applied to estimating gravity anomalies from GEOS 3 altimeter data. These techniques substantially reduce the computer time and requirements in storage associated with the conventional least squares collocation. Numerical examples given demonstrate the efficiency and speed of these techniques.

  18. Spectral Entropy Based Neuronal Network Synchronization Analysis Based on Microelectrode Array Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Fikret E.; Välkki, Inkeri; Mikkonen, Jarno E.; Leone, Chiara; Lenk, Kerstin; Tanskanen, Jarno M. A.; Hyttinen, Jari A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Synchrony and asynchrony are essential aspects of the functioning of interconnected neuronal cells and networks. New information on neuronal synchronization can be expected to aid in understanding these systems. Synchronization provides insight in the functional connectivity and the spatial distribution of the information processing in the networks. Synchronization is generally studied with time domain analysis of neuronal events, or using direct frequency spectrum analysis, e.g., in specific frequency bands. However, these methods have their pitfalls. Thus, we have previously proposed a method to analyze temporal changes in the complexity of the frequency of signals originating from different network regions. The method is based on the correlation of time varying spectral entropies (SEs). SE assesses the regularity, or complexity, of a time series by quantifying the uniformity of the frequency spectrum distribution. It has been previously employed, e.g., in electroencephalogram analysis. Here, we revisit our correlated spectral entropy method (CorSE), providing evidence of its justification, usability, and benefits. Here, CorSE is assessed with simulations and in vitro microelectrode array (MEA) data. CorSE is first demonstrated with a specifically tailored toy simulation to illustrate how it can identify synchronized populations. To provide a form of validation, the method was tested with simulated data from integrate-and-fire model based computational neuronal networks. To demonstrate the analysis of real data, CorSE was applied on in vitro MEA data measured from rat cortical cell cultures, and the results were compared with three known event based synchronization measures. Finally, we show the usability by tracking the development of networks in dissociated mouse cortical cell cultures. The results show that temporal correlations in frequency spectrum distributions reflect the network relations of neuronal populations. In the simulated data, CorSE unraveled the

  19. Two-dimensional correlation analysis and waterfall plots for detecting positional fluctuations of spectral changes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Soo Ryeon; Noda, Isao; Lee, Chang-Hee; Lee, Phil Ho; Hwang, Hyonseok; Jung, Young Mee

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the potentials and pitfalls of using various waterfall plots, such as conventional waterfall plots, two-dimensional (2D) gradient maps, moving window two-dimensional analysis (MW2D), perturbation-correlation moving window two-dimensional analysis (PCMW2D), and moving window principal component analysis two-dimensional correlation analysis (MWPCA2D), in the detection of the existence of band position shifts. Waterfall plots of the simulated spectral datasets are compared with conventional 2D correlation spectra. Different waterfall plots give different features in differentiating the behaviors of frequency shift versus two overlapped bands. Two-dimensional correlation spectra clearly show the very characteristic cluster pattern for both band position shifts and two overlapped bands. The vivid pattern differences are readily detectable in various waterfalls plots. Various types of waterfall plots of temperature-dependent infrared (IR) spectra of ethylene glycol, which does not have the actual band shift but only two overlapped bands, and of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of 2 wt% acetone in a mixed solvent of CHCl(3)/CCl(4) demonstrate that waterfall plots are not able to unambiguously detect the difference between real band shift and two overlapped bands. Thus, the presence or lack of the asynchronous 2D butterfly pattern seems like the most effective diagnostic tool for band shift detection. PMID:21396181

  20. A spectral analysis of an integrated photomixer/antenna in a homodyne terahertz photomixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Han-Cheol; Park, Seong-Ook; Kang, Kwang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    An analysis has been carried out to estimate the spectral characteristics of an integrated photomixer/antenna in a homodyne photomixing system. The analysis adopts the impedance mismatch factor and Friis power transmission formula used in communication links based on the conventional analysis theory of a terahertz photomixer. The analysis and experimental results have proved that an impedance matching condition between the impedance of a photomixer and the input impedance of an antenna is directly related with photomixing terahertz wave generation. The Friis formula is introduced to calculate the propagation loss of the wave from a transmitter to a receiver in a homodyne photomixing system. A log-periodic antenna was used to ensure a high dynamic range in a broad frequency region. The dynamic range of the homodyne terahertz photomixing system was about 60 dB near 100 GHz and decreased with an increasing frequency from 10 GHz to 1000 GHz. The measured results agree well with the theoretically analyzed results and prove that the terahertz photomixing power is closely related to impedance mismatch factor and it could be estimated in the homodyne terahertz photomixing system without a terahertz power detector.