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Sample records for phase-resolved spectral analysis

  1. Application of a Phase-resolving, Directional Nonlinear Spectral Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. R.; Sheremet, A.; Tian, M.; Hanson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We describe several applications of a phase-resolving, directional nonlinear spectral wave model. The model describes a 2D surface gravity wave field approaching a mildly sloping beach with parallel depth contours at an arbitrary angle accounting for nonlinear, quadratic triad interactions. The model is hyperbolic, with the initial wave spectrum specified in deep water. Complex amplitudes are generated based on the random phase approximation. The numerical implementation includes unidirectional propagation as a special case. In directional mode, it solves the system of equations in the frequency-alongshore wave number space. Recent enhancements of the model include the incorporation of dissipation caused by breaking and propagation over a viscous mud layer and the calculation of wave induced setup. Applications presented include: a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation, a study of the evolution of a single directional triad, and several preliminary comparisons to wave spectra collected at the USACE-FRF in Duck, NC which show encouraging results although further validation with a wider range of beach slopes and wave conditions is needed.

  2. Wind growth and wave breaking in higher-order spectral phase resolved wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, R.; Walker, D. T.

    2016-02-01

    Wind growth and wave breaking are a integral parts of the wave evolution. Higher-OrderSpectral models (HoS) describing the non-linear evolution require empirical models for these effects. In particular, the assimilation of phase-resolved remotesensing data will require the prediction and modeling of wave breaking events.The HoS formulation used in this effort is based on fully nonlinear model of O. Nwogu (2009). The model for wave growth due to wind is based on the early normal and tangential stress model of Munk (1947). The model for wave breaking contains two parts. The first part initiates the breaking events based on the local wave geometry and the second part is a model for the pressure field, which acting against the surface normal velocity extracts energy from the wave. The models are tuned to balance the wind energy input with the breaking wave losses and to be similarfield observations of breaking wave coverage. The initial wave field, based on a Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum for 10 meter wind speed of 5-15 m/s, defined over a region of up to approximate 2.5 km on a side with the simulation running for several hundreds of peak wave periods. Results will be presented describing the evolution of the wave field.Sponsored by Office of Naval Research, Code 322

  3. Studies of multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for spectral fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    McGown, L.B.

    1989-01-01

    During the first project period, we have explored several different aspects of phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (PRFS) for the fingerprinting of complex samples. It should be noted that our goal is not only fingerprinting'' per se, but also includes the characterization of complex samples with respect to dynamic interactions of luminescent molecules with each other and with sample matrix constituents. Each area of investigation is discussed in the following sections.

  4. Multidimensional Data Formats for Phase-Resolved Fluorimetric Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-09

    development of fluorescence lifetime selectivity in multicomponent analysis. Our conclusions are that (1) sodium taurocholate and other bile salt ...studies of the bile salt , sodium taurocholate (NaTC) have led to a better understanding of the fundamental aggregation properties of NaTC, including...studies of sodium taurocholate micelles and development of the fluorescence lifetime Vfilteringq concept. Both of these areas are central to the continued

  5. Phase resolved analysis of the homogeneity of a diffuse dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Kogelheide, Friederike; Bibinov, Nikita; Stapelmann, Katharina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas have already proven their ability of supporting the healing process of chronic wounds. Especially simple configurations like a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), comprising of one driven electrode which is coated with a dielectric layer, are of interest, because they are cost-effective and easy to handle. The homogeneity of such plasmas during treatment is necessary since the whole wound should be treated evenly. In this investigation phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the homogeneity of a DBD. Electron densities and reduced electric field distributions are determined with temporal and spatial resolution and the differences for applied positive and negative voltage pulses are studied.

  6. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André; Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander; Ole Menzel, Kristoffer

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  7. Wide-field human photoreceptor morphological analysis using phase-resolved sensorless adaptive optics swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) systems capable of 3D high resolution imaging have been applied to posterior eye imaging in order to resolve the fine morphological features in the retina. Human cone photoreceptors have been extensively imaged and studied for the investigation of retinal degeneration resulting in photoreceptor cell death. However, there are still limitations of conventional approaches to AO in the clinic, such as relatively small field-of-view (FOV) and the complexities in system design and operation. In this research, a recently developed phase-resolved Sensorless AO Swept Source based OCT (SAO-SS-OCT) system which is compact in size and easy to operate is presented. Owing to its lens-based system design, wide-field imaging can be performed up to 6° on the retina. A phase stabilization unit was integrated with the OCT system. With the phase stabilized OCT signal, we constructed retinal micro-vasculature image using a phase variance technique. The retinal vasculature image was used to align and average multiple OCT volumes acquired sequentially. The contrast-enhanced photoreceptor projection image was then extracted from the averaged volume, and analyzed based on its morphological features through a novel photoreceptor structure evaluation algorithm. The retinas of twelve human research subjects (10 normal and 2 pathological cases) were measured in vivo. Quantitative parameters used for evaluating the cone photoreceptor mosaic such as cell density, cell area, and mosaic regularity are presented and discussed. The SAO-SS-OCT system and the proposed photoreceptor evaluation method has significant potential to reveal early stage retinal diseases associated with retinal degeneration.

  8. The outburst decay of the low magnetic field magnetar SWIFT J1822.3-1606: phase-resolved analysis and evidence for a variable cyclotron feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Castillo, Guillermo A.; Israel, Gian Luca; Tiengo, Andrea; Salvetti, David; Turolla, Roberto; Zane, Silvia; Rea, Nanda; Esposito, Paolo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Perna, Rosalba; Stella, Luigi; Pons, José A.; Campana, Sergio; Götz, Diego; Motta, Sara

    2016-03-01

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the low-magnetic field, transient magnetar SWIFT J1822.3-1606 as it approached quiescence. We coherently phase-connect the observations over a time-span of ˜500 d since the discovery of SWIFT J1822.3-1606 following the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) trigger on 2011 July 14, and carried out a detailed pulse phase spectroscopy along the outburst decay. We follow the spectral evolution of different pulse phase intervals and find a phase and energy-variable spectral feature, which we interpret as proton cyclotron resonant scattering of soft photon from currents circulating in a strong (≳1014 G) small-scale component of the magnetic field near the neutron star surface, superimposed to the much weaker (˜3 × 1013 G) magnetic field. We discuss also the implications of the pulse-resolved spectral analysis for the emission regions on the surface of the cooling magnetar.

  9. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; ODell, Stephen L.; Paerels, Frits; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner E.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    We present here the first phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar that covers all pulse phases. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. Analysis of the pulse-averaged spectrum measures interstellar photoelectric absorption and scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase measures the low-energy X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with large statistical uncertainty. The data are used to set a new upper limit to any thermal component.

  10. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  11. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  12. Scene analysis without spectral analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigne, Alain

    2003-04-01

    Auditory scene analysis is often described in terms of grouping stimulus components. Components, once grouped, are assigned to one source or another [A. S. Bregman, Auditory Scene Analysis (MIT, Cambridge, MA, 2002)]. The actual grouping must operate on whatever representation is available within the auditory nervous system. An obvious hypothesis is that correlates of individual stimulus components are created by peripheral spectral analysis. However, peripheral frequency resolution is limited. The number of resolved partials is between 5 and 8 for a harmonic complex in isolation, but resolution must necessarily be less good for the interleaved components of concurrent sources. Source amplitudes are rarely equal, and partials of a weaker source must be particularly hard to resolve. The question is thus: given the paucity of resolved elements to group, how does the auditory system perform the grouping? A number of possibilities will be reviewed. One is that partials not resolved peripherally are somehow resolved centrally (a modern version of the ``second filter'' hypothesis). Another is that scene analysis does not operate by grouping resolved elements, but instead by modifying directly unresolved entities, for example by time-domain processing.

  13. Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    reasons for spectral fitting being a supplement to the standard energy spectrum ROI method. Fermi- Kurie plot Given the difficulty in fitting a beta...continuum, it is important to find an alternative method. A Fermi- Kurie plot (Krane 1988) is one method, which allows a beta spectrum to be plotted ...corrective function takes into account the initial and final spin and polarity states. A rb itr ar y un its Figure 6. Fermi- Kurie plot . T (MeV

  14. Phase resolved digital signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Tripathi, Renu; Park, Boris H.; Nassif, Nader

    2002-06-01

    We present phase resolved digital signal processing techniques for Optical Coherence Tomography to correct for the non Gaussian shape of source spectra and for Group Delay Dispersion (GDD). A broadband source centered at 820 nm was synthesized by combining the spectra of two superluminescent diodes to improve axial image resolution in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Spectral shaping was used to reduce the side lobes (ringing) in the axial point spread function due to the non-Gaussian shape of the spectra. Images of onion cells taken with each individual source and the combined sources, respectively, show the improved resolution and quality enhancement in a turbid biological sample. An OCT system operating at 1310 nm was used to demonstrate that the broadening effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) on the coherence function could be eliminated completely by introducing a quadratic phase shift in the Fourier domain of the interferometric signal. The technique is demonstrated by images of human skin grafts with group delay dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm before and after digital processing.

  15. Data analysis techniques: Spectral processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The individual steps in the data processing scheme applied to most radars used for wind sounding are analyzed. This processing method uses spectral analysis and assumes a pulse Doppler radar. Improvement in the signal to noise ratio of some radars is discussed.

  16. TRIADS: A phase-resolving model for nonlinear shoaling of directional wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, Alex; Davis, Justin R.; Tian, Miao; Hanson, Jeffrey L.; Hathaway, Kent K.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the performance of TRIADS, a numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear, spectral model describing directional wave evolution in intermediate and shallow water. TRIADS simulations of shoaling waves generated by Hurricane Bill, 2009 are compared to directional spectral estimates based on observations collected at the Field Research Facility of the US Army Corps Of Engineers, at Duck, NC. Both the ability of the model to capture the processes essential to the nonlinear wave evolution, and the efficiency of the numerical implementations are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Maximum entropy spectral analysis for streamflow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huijuan; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Configurational entropy spectral analysis (CESAS) is developed with spectral power as a random variable for streamflow forecasting. It is found that the CESAS derived by maximizing the configurational entropy yields the same solution as by the Burg entropy spectral analysis (BESA). Comparison of forecasted streamflows by CESAS and BESA shows less than 0.001% difference between the two analyses and thus the two entropy spectral analyses are concluded to be identical. Thus, the Burg entropy spectral analysis and two configurational entropy spectral analyses form the maximum entropy spectral analysis.

  18. Spectral analysis of multiple time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubman, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Application of spectral analysis for mathematically determining relationship of random vibrations in structures and concurrent events in electric circuits, physiology, economics, and seismograms is discussed. Computer program for performing spectral analysis of multiple time series is described.

  19. Characteristics of intra-left atrial flow dynamics and factors affecting formation of the vortex flow – analysis with phase-resolved 3-dimensional cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Takehara, Yasuo; Sano, Makoto; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Masataka; Wakayama, Tetsuya; Alley, Marcus; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    The intra-left atrial (LA) blood flow from pulmonary veins (PVs) to the left ventricle (LV) changes under various conditions and might affect global cardiac function. By using phase-resolved 3-dimensional cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D-Flow), the intra-LA vortex formation was visualized and the factors affecting the intra-LA flow dynamics were examined. Thirty-two patients with or without organic heart diseases underwent 4D-Flow and transthoracic echocardiography. The intra-LA velocity vectors from each PV were post-processed to delineate streamline and pathline images. The vector images revealed intra-LA vortex formation in 20 of 32 patients. All the vortices developed during the late systolic and early diastolic phases and were directed counter-clockwise when viewed from the subjects' cranial side. The flow vectors from the right PVs lengthened predominantly toward the mitral valves and partly toward the LA appendage, whereas those from the left PVs directed rightward along the posterior wall and joined the vortex. Patients with vortex had less organic heart diseases, smaller LV and LA volume, and greater peak flow velocity and volume mainly in the left PVs, although the flow directions from each PV or PV areas did not differ. 4D-Flow can clearly visualize the intra-LA vortex formation and analyze its characteristic features. The vortex formation might depend on LV and LA volume and on flow velocity and volume from PVs.

  20. PSR J1023+0038: phase-resolved optical spectroscopy and continued X-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.; Casares, J.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Shahbaz, T.

    2014-02-01

    After the state change of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 in mid 2013 (ATels #5513, #5514, #5515, #5516, #5534), we performed orbital phase resolved optical spectroscopy in order to study the evolution of the emission lines and constrain the properties of the accretion disk during the ongoing active period. We obtained 22 low-resolution (ACAM, spectral resolution ~ 400 km/s) spectra of the system using the 4-meter William Herschel Telescope on La Palma on 2013-12-16 starting at 02:34 UTC, covering about 85% of the (4.8 hr) binary orbit.

  1. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  2. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  3. Phase-resolved acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenjuan; Chen, Ruimin; Chou, Lidek; Liu, Gangjun; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-11-01

    Many diseases involve changes in the biomechanical properties of tissue, and there is a close correlation between tissue elasticity and pathology. We report on the development of a phase-resolved acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography method (ARF-OCE) to evaluate the elastic properties of tissue. This method utilizes chirped acoustic radiation force to produce excitation along the sample's axial direction, and it uses phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the vibration of the sample. Under 500-Hz square wave modulated ARF signal excitation, phase change maps of tissue mimicking phantoms are generated by the ARF-OCE method, and the resulting Young's modulus ratio is correlated with a standard compression test. The results verify that this technique could efficiently measure sample elastic properties accurately and quantitatively. Furthermore, a three-dimensional ARF-OCE image of the human atherosclerotic coronary artery is obtained. The result indicates that our dynamic phase-resolved ARF-OCE method can delineate tissues with different mechanical properties.

  4. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  5. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  6. Basic elements of power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of power spectral analysis with emphasis on the Blackman-Tukey method are presented. Short discussions are included on the topics of pre-whitening, frequency and spectral windows, and statistical reliability. Examples are included whenever possible, and a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating a power spectrum is presented.

  7. Phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance using heterodyne detection method

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seungha; Liu, Jason; McMichael, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurement using a heterodyne method. Spin precession is driven by microwave fields and detected by 1550 nm laser light that is modulated at a frequency slightly shifted with respected to the FMR driving frequency. The evolving phase difference between the spin precession and the modulated light produces a slowly oscillating Kerr rotation signal with a phase equal to the precession phase plus a phase due to the path length difference between the excitation microwave signal and the optical signal. We estimate the accuracy of the precession phase measurement to be 0.1 rad. This heterodyne FMR detection method eliminates the need for field modulation and allows a stronger detection signal at higher intermediate frequency where the 1/f noise floor is reduced. PMID:27453957

  8. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  9. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  10. Fetal magnetocardiogram recordings and Fourier spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P; Anninos, P A; Lüdinghausen, M V; Kotini, A; Galazios, G; Limberis, B

    1999-07-01

    Power spectral analysis of fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) data was evaluated in 64 pregnancies, using the non-invasive one channel superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID), in order to investigate the power spectral amplitude distribution in the frequency range between 2 and 3 Hz. In all cases with normal and uncomplicated pregnancies, the data from the fetal heart and specifically the QRS complexes, were identifiable and unaffected by any maternal cardiac activity and furthermore the power spectral amplitudes, which varied between 120 and 350 fT/Hz, were directly related to gestational age.

  11. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  12. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  13. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  14. Atomic Data for Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene

    Collisional excitation and ionization cross sections suitable to highly excited states of the target atom at low and intermediate kinetic energy of the scattering particle have been derived following the semiclassical Impact Parameter approximation. An analytical expression for cross section involving transitions with Δ l > 1 has been obtained when the semiclassical requirement and the Ehrhardt conditions are valid. The analytical cross sections are explicit functions of the initial quantum number of the target atom, the incident velocity of the colliding particle and Δ n (for bound-bound transitions), allowing a generalization to any transition needed in a spectral modeling code. The cross sections obtained with the Impact Parameter approximation present a close agreement with previous theoretical results for dipole and quadrupole (Δ l = 2) cross sections of bound-bound transitions. Results of octupolar (Δ l = 3) cross sections are also given for Δ n = 1 and Δ n = 2 and a wide range of incident energies. The results indicate that the cross sections corresponding to transitions with Δ l > 1 are significant up to incident energies about 100 times the transition energy. The Impact Parameter cross sections for bound-free transitions present a very good agreement with experimental values, in particular at low incident energies.

  15. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  16. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  17. Spectral Analysis of Columbia River Estuary Currents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    D-A1i6i 689 SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY CURRENTS 1/2 (U) ARMY E GINEER VATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKCSBURG MS HYDRAULICS LAB B...26 PART IV: ANALYSIS PROCEDURES. .................... 29 *PART V: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .. ................. 32 Astoria Winds...45 eStation T11B..........................46 Station T12. .......................... 46 Summary of Results

  18. Spectral derivative feature coding for hyperspectral signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Chakravarty, Sumit

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to hyperspectral signature analysis, called Spectral Derivative Feature Coding (SDFC). It makes use of gradient changes in adjacent bands to characterize spectral variations so as to improve spectral discrimination and identification. In order to evaluate its performance, two binary coding methods, SPectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) are used to conduct comparative analysis. The experimental results demonstrate the proposed SDFC performs more effectively in capturing spectral characteristics.

  19. ISAP: ISO Spectral Analysis Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Babar; Bauer, Otto; Brauher, Jim; Buckley, Mark; Harwood, Andrew; Hur, Min; Khan, Iffat; Li, Jing; Lord, Steve; Lutz, Dieter; Mazzarella, Joe; Molinari, Sergio; Morris, Pat; Narron, Bob; Seidenschwang, Karla; Sidher, Sunil; Sturm, Eckhard; Swinyard, Bruce; Unger, Sarah; Verstraete, Laurent; Vivares, Florence; Wieprecht, Ecki

    2014-03-01

    ISAP, written in IDL, simplifies the process of visualizing, subsetting, shifting, rebinning, masking, combining scans with weighted means or medians, filtering, and smoothing Auto Analysis Results (AARs) from post-pipeline processing of the Infrared Space Observatory's (ISO) Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) and Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) data. It can also be applied to PHOT-S and CAM-CVF data, and data from practically any spectrometer. The result of a typical ISAP session is expected to be a "simple spectrum" (single-valued spectrum which may be resampled to a uniform wavelength separation if desired) that can be further analyzed and measured either with other ISAP functions, native IDL functions, or exported to other analysis package (e.g., IRAF, MIDAS) if desired. ISAP provides many tools for further analysis, line-fitting, and continuum measurements, such as routines for unit conversions, conversions from wavelength space to frequency space, line and continuum fitting, flux measurement, synthetic photometry and models such as a zodiacal light model to predict and subtract the dominant foreground at some wavelengths.

  20. Interactive Spectral Analysis and Computation (ISAAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Isaac is a task in the NSO external package for IRAF. A descendant of a FORTRAN program written to analyze data from a Fourier transform spectrometer, the current implementation has been generalized sufficiently to make it useful for general spectral analysis and other one dimensional data analysis tasks. The user interface for Isaac is implemented as an interpreted mini-language containing a powerful, programmable vector calculator. Built-in commands provide much of the functionality needed to produce accurate line lists from input spectra. These built-in functions include automated spectral line finding, least squares fitting of Voigt profiles to spectral lines including equality constraints, various filters including an optimal filter construction tool, continuum fitting, and various I/O functions.

  1. [Raman spectral analysis of theanine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Jian; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-Zeng; Huang, Zu-Fang; Chen, Jie-Si; Lin, Duo; Xi, Gang-Qin

    2011-11-01

    The L-theanine was tested using confocal Raman microscopy. Obvious Raman bands were showed in the range of 250 -1 700 and 2 800-3 000 cm(-1). The Raman bands were assigned with a preliminary analysis and the characteristic vibrational modes were gained in different range of wave numbers. Eight strong Raman bands were observed in the Raman spectra at 321, 900, 938, 1 153, 1 312, 1 358, 1 454 and 1 647 cm(-1), respectively. They are the characteristic Raman bands of L-theanine. The results showed that Raman spectroscopy might be a new kind of precise, direct and fast detecting method for theanine.

  2. Spectral analysis of multiplex Raman probe signatures.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Barry R; Dentinger, Claire E; Nguyen, Lienchi N; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Jingwu; Allen, April N; Chan, Selena; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2008-11-25

    Raman nanoparticle probes are an emerging new class of optical labels for interrogation of physiological and pathological processes in bioassays, cells, and tissues. Although their unique emission signatures are ideal for multiplexing, the full potential of these probes has not been realized because conventional analysis methods are inadequate. We report a novel spectral fitting method that exploits the entire spectral signature to quantitatively extract individual probe signals from multiplex spectra. We evaluate the method in a series of multiplex assays using unconjugated and antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic nanoparticles (COINs). Results show sensitive multiplex detection of small signals (<2% of total signal) and similar detection limits in corresponding 4-plex and singlet plate binding assays. In a triplex assay on formalin-fixed human prostate tissue, two antibody-conjugated COINs and a conventional fluorophore are used to image expression of prostate-specific antigen, cytokeratin-18, and DNA. The spectral analysis method effectively removes tissue autofluorescence and other unknown background, allowing accurate and reproducible imaging (area under ROC curve 0.89 +/- 0.03) at subcellular spatial resolution. In all assay systems, the error attributable to spectral analysis constitutes spectral fitting method provides (1) quantification of signals from multiplex spectra with overlapping peaks, (2) robust spot-by-spot removal of unknown background, (3) the opportunity to quantitatively assess the analysis error, (4) elimination of operator bias, and (5) simple automation appropriate for high-throughput analysis. The simple implementation and universal applicability of this approach significantly expands the potential of Raman probes for quantitative in vivo and ex vivo multiplex analysis.

  3. [Comparison of two spectral mixture analysis models].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin-Jun; Lin, Qi-Zhong; Li, Ming-Xiao; Wang, Li-Ming

    2009-10-01

    A spectral mixture analysis experiment was designed to compare the spectral unmixing effects of linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) and constraint linear spectral mixture analysis (CLSMA). In the experiment, red, green, blue and yellow colors were printed on a coarse album as four end members. Thirty nine mixed samples were made according to each end member's different percent in one pixel. Then, field spectrometer was located on the top of the mixed samples' center to measure spectrum one by one. Inversion percent of each end member in the pixel was extracted using LSMA and CLSMA models. Finally, normalized mean squared error was calculated between inversion and real percent to compare the two models' effects on spectral unmixing. Results from experiment showed that the total error of LSMA was 0.30087 and that of CLSMA was 0.37552 when using all bands in the spectrum. Therefore, LSMA was 0.075 less than that of CLSMA when the whole bands of four end members' spectra were used. On the other hand, the total error of LSMA was 0.28095 and that of CLSMA was 0.29805 after band selection. So, LSMA was 0.017 less than that of CLSMA when bands selection was performed. Therefore, whether all or selected bands were used, the accuracy of LSMA was better than that of CLSMA because during the process of spectrum measurement, errors caused by instrument or human were introduced into the model, leading to that the measured data could not mean the strict requirement of CLSMA and therefore reduced its accuracy: Furthermore, the total error of LSMA using selected bands was 0.02 less than that using the whole bands. The total error of CLSMA using selected bands was 0.077 less than that using the whole bands. So, in the same model, spectral unmixing using selected bands to reduce the correlation of end members' spectra was superior to that using the whole bands.

  4. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  5. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  6. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limted number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence

  7. SVD analysis of Aura TES spectral residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis is both a powerful diagnostic tool and an effective method of noise filtering. We present the results of an SVD analysis of an ensemble of spectral residuals acquired in September 2004 from a 16-orbit Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Global Survey and compare them to alternative methods such as zonal averages. In particular, the technique highlights issues such as the orbital variation of instrument response and incompletely modeled effects of surface emissivity and atmospheric composition.

  8. SVD analysis of Aura TES spectral residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis is both a powerful diagnostic tool and an effective method of noise filtering. We present the results of an SVD analysis of an ensemble of spectral residuals acquired in September 2004 from a 16-orbit Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Global Survey and compare them to alternative methods such as zonal averages. In particular, the technique highlights issues such as the orbital variation of instrument response and incompletely modeled effects of surface emissivity and atmospheric composition.

  9. Tomographic spectral imaging: analysis of localized corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Microanalysis is typically performed to analyze the near surface of materials. There are many instances where chemical information about the third spatial dimension is essential to the solution of materials analyses. The majority of 3D analyses however focus on limited spectral acquisition and/or analysis. For truly comprehensive 3D chemical characterization, 4D spectral images (a complete spectrum from each volume element of a region of a specimen) are needed. Furthermore, a robust statistical method is needed to extract the maximum amount of chemical information from that extremely large amount of data. In this paper, an example of the acquisition and multivariate statistical analysis of 4D (3-spatial and 1-spectral dimension) x-ray spectral images is described. The method of utilizing a single- or dual-beam FIB (w/o or w/SEM) to get at 3D chemistry has been described by others with respect to secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The basic methodology described in those works has been modified for comprehensive x-ray microanalysis in a dual-beam FIB/SEM (FEI Co. DB-235). In brief, the FIB is used to serially section a site-specific region of a sample and then the electron beam is rastered over the exposed surfaces with x-ray spectral images being acquired at each section. All this is performed without rotating or tilting the specimen between FIB cutting and SEM imaging/x-ray spectral image acquisition. The resultant 4D spectral image is then unfolded (number of volume elements by number of channels) and subjected to the same multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approach that has proven successful for the analysis of lower-dimension x-ray spectral images. The TSI data sets can be in excess of 4Gbytes. This problem has been overcome (for now) and images up to 6Gbytes have been analyzed in this work. The method for analyzing such large spectral images will be described in this presentation. A comprehensive 3D chemical analysis was performed on several corrosion specimens

  10. Terahertz Josephson spectral analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, A. V.; Gundareva, I. I.; Lyatti, M. V.; Volkov, O. Y.; Pavlovskiy, V. V.; Poppe, U.; Divin, Y. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Principles of Hilbert-transform spectral analysis (HTSA) are presented and advantages of the technique in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are discussed. THz HTSA requires Josephson junctions with high values of characteristic voltages I c R n and dynamics described by a simple resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. To meet these requirements, [001]- and [100]-tilt YBa2Cu3O7‑x bicrystal junctions with deviations from the RSJ model less than 1% have been developed. Demonstrators of Hilbert-transform spectrum analyzers with various cryogenic environments, including integration into Stirling coolers, are described. Spectrum analyzers have been characterized in the spectral range from 50 GHz to 3 THz. Inside a power dynamic range of five orders, an instrumental function of the analyzers has been found to have a Lorentz form around a single frequency of 1.48 THz with a spectral resolution as low as 0.9 GHz. Spectra of THz radiation from optically pumped gas lasers and semiconductor frequency multipliers have been studied with these spectrum analyzers and the regimes of these radiation sources were optimized for a single-frequency operation. Future applications of HTSA will be related with quick and precise spectral characterization of new radiation sources and identification of substances in the THz frequency range.

  11. The Advantage of Cyclic Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    it provides a richer domain for signal analysis; and (3) the theory of spectral correlation allows a much more complete mechanism for modeling ...stationarity assumption and are in fact better modelled as cyclostationary processes where the statis- tical parameters of the signals are assumed to be varying...6.0 APPLICATIONS OF THE CYCLOSTATIONARY MODEL ................ 14 6.1 DETECTION .................................... 15 6.2 CLASSIFICATION

  12. [EEG spectral analysis of caffeine effects].

    PubMed

    Künkel, H

    1976-01-01

    Spectral EEG analysis is shown to quantify the centrally stimulating effects of caffeine. Comparing the effects of coffee, decaffeinated coffee, caffeine solution and placebo results in two groups of substances: coffee and caffeine solution on one side, decaffeinated coffee and placebo on the other. The within-group differences are negligible, whereas the between-group differences are highly significant. It may be concluded that caffeine is the effective factor. This study gives no valid evidence confirming possible effects of other coffee ingredients.

  13. Comprehensive timing and X-ray spectral analysis of GX 1+4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serim, M. M.; Şahiner, Ş.; Çerri-Serim, D.; İnam, S. Ç.; Baykal, A.

    2017-08-01

    We present the analysis of RXTE-PCA observations of GX 1+4 between 2001 March 3 and 2003 January 31 together with the CGRO-BATSE X-ray flux and frequency derivative time series between 1991 and 1999. From the timing analysis of RXTE-PCA observations, we are able to phase connect pulse arrival times of the source within two different time intervals and obtain corresponding timing solutions. Using these pulse arrival times, we contribute to long-term pulse frequency history of the source. We look for episodic correlations and anti-correlations between the torque and X-ray luminosity using the CGRO-BATSE X-ray flux and frequency derivative time series and find that the correlation state of GX 1+4 seems to change on ∼100-200 d long intervals. We estimate the torque noise of the source and observe the flickering noise (f-1). We measure the longest observed time-scale for a noise process amongst accretion-powered X-ray pulsars by extending the noise estimate for a time-scale ranging from 31 d to 44 yr. Spectral analysis of individual RXTE-PCA observations indicates a significant correlation between the iron line flux and the unabsorbed X-ray flux. Pulse-phase-resolved spectra of the source indicate a broadening of iron line complex at the bin corresponding to the pulse minimum.

  14. Spectral analysis of the VLBI pole path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuberi, Midhat; Smylie, Doug E.

    2009-12-01

    Modern observations of polar motion, using techniques such as Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), have reduced error levels by as much as three orders of magnitude, compared to classical astronometric methods. Here we focus on VLBI observations which are characteristically unequally spaced. We develop a very effective method of spectral analysis for unequally spaced time sequences. First, the least squares fit to the representation of the sequence by the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is calculated, weighting the observations by the inverse square of the accompanying standard error. The coefficient matrix of the normal equations of this fit is nearly singular. It is subjected to a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). In the usual application of SVD singular values are eliminated in order to improve the stability of the numerical system but no criterion is given for how many singular values to eliminate. To overcome this shortcoming, we introduce the Parseval condition which relates the mean square in the time domain to that in the frequency domain. Singular values are eliminated until Parseval's theorem is satisfied. Typically, the mean square in the frequency domain is many orders of magnitude too large. As singular values are eliminated, starting with the smallest and working upward, the mean square in the frequency domain appears to decrease monotonically until the Parseval relation is satisfied. Once the DFTs are found, spectral analysis and the estimation of confidence intervals proceed in the standard way. We perform a spectral analysis of the polar motion on 24.5 years of observations by using a Welch Overlapping Segment Analysis (WOSA) with four record segments of 14-year length with 75% overlap. Parameters of the Chandler wobble resonance are found as well as a detailed spectrum.

  15. [Analysis of typical mangrove spectral reflectance characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Liu, Qing; Li, De-Yi; Zhao, Dong-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    Acquisition of mangrove spectrum properties and detecting the sensitive bands provide technology basis for inverse modeling and estimation by remote sensing for various indexes of mangrove. The typical mangroves of Guangxi Shankou Mangrove Reserve were taken for study objects, the standard spectrum curves of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (Linn.) Savigny, Rhizophora stylosa, Kandelia candel, Avicennia marina, Aegiceras corniculatum, Spartina anglica and mudflat were gained by denoising analysis of field-measured spectrum curves acquired by ASD FieldSpec 2. Analyzing the spectral characteristics and their differences, the authors found that the spectrum curves for various kinds of mangrove are coincident, the bands that appeared with reflection peaks and reflection valleys are basically identical, the within-class differentiated characteristics are comparatively small, the spectrum characteristics of mangroves are obviously different with Spartina anglica and mudflat. In order to gain the quantitative description for within-class differentiated characteristics of mangrove, space distance method, correlation coefficient method and spectral angle mapping method were used to calculate the within-class differentiated characteristics. The division accuracy of correlation coefficient method is higher than spectral angle mapping method which is higher than space distance method, and the result indicates that the spectrum differences of within-class mangrove and Spartina anglica are relatively small with correlation coefficients more than 0.995, and spectrum curve angle cosine values more than 0.95.

  16. Phase-Resolved Surface Plasmon Interferometry of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Justin A.; Berweger, Samuel; O'Callahan, Brian T.; Raschke, Markus B.

    2014-08-01

    The surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of graphene reflect the microscopic spatial variations of underlying electronic structure and dynamics. Here, we excite and image the graphene SPP response in phase and amplitude by near-field interferometry. We develop an analytic cavity model that can self-consistently describe the SPP response function for edge, grain boundary, and defect SPP reflection and scattering. The derived SPP wave vector, damping, and carrier mobility agree with the results from more complex models. Spatial variations in the Fermi level and associated variations in dopant concentration reveal a nanoscale spatial inhomogeneity in the reduced conductivity at internal boundaries. The additional SPP phase information thus opens a new degree of freedom for spatial and spectral graphene SPP tuning and modulation for optoelectronics applications.

  17. [Spectral electromyographic analysis of essential tremor].

    PubMed

    Ivanova-Smolenskaia, I A; Kandel', E I; Andreeva, E A; Smirnova, S N; Khutorskaia, O E

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of computerized statistical analysis of the spectral parameters of the circumscribing electromyogram in patients with essential tremor (ET), making use of objective frequency and amplitude parameters. The results have shown that ET differed from physiological tremor not only by amplitude but also by frequency characteristics. Four groups of patients have been identified which differed in relation to both parameters. Clear-cut criteria have been defined which may be used in the differential diagnosis between ET and parkinsonism-associated tremor. It has been suggested that the pathological mechanisms of ET and parkinsonism-associated tremor differ in their location.

  18. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  19. Power spectral analysis of the foetal magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Rassi, D; Lewis, M J

    1995-05-01

    The results of power spectral analysis of foetal magnetocardiographic (FMCG) data, acquired using a DC-SQUID-based system, are reported. Similar analyses have been previously reported using foetal electrocardiographic data, but it is believed that our work represents one of the first attempts to analyse, in the frequency domain, the magnetic fields produced by foetal cardiac activity. Analysis of the data in this way may enable the integrity of the foetal nervous system, and thus the status of the foetus as a whole, to be monitored and evaluated during a significant part of the antenatal period. The results obtained are discussed with reference to the probable underlying physiological mechanisms. This preliminary study highlights some of the advantages of FMCG as a novel, non-invasive technique for obtaining clinically useful information. Fourier analysis of the FMCG data is likely to yield new information, not only about cardiac function but also about the foetal central nervous system.

  20. Spectral analysis of allogeneic hydroxyapatite powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, P. E.; Timchenko, E. V.; Pisareva, E. V.; Vlasov, M. Yu; Red’kin, N. A.; Frolov, O. O.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the application of Raman spectroscopy to the in vitro analysis of the hydroxyapatite powder samples produced from different types of animal bone tissue during demineralization process at various acid concentrations and exposure durations. The derivation of the Raman spectrum of hydroxyapatite is attempted by the analysis of the pure powders of its known constituents. Were experimentally found spectral features of hydroxyapatite, based on analysis of the line amplitude at wave numbers 950-965 cm-1 ((PO4)3- (ν1) vibration) and 1065-1075 cm-1 ((CO3)2-(ν1) B-type replacement). Control of physicochemical properties of hydroxyapatite was carried out by Raman spectroscopy. Research results are compared with an infrared Fourier spectroscopy.

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  2. Least Squares Moving-Window Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jong

    2017-01-01

    Least squares regression is proposed as a moving-windows method for analysis of a series of spectra acquired as a function of external perturbation. The least squares moving-window (LSMW) method can be considered an extended form of the Savitzky-Golay differentiation for nonuniform perturbation spacing. LSMW is characterized in terms of moving-window size, perturbation spacing type, and intensity noise. Simulation results from LSMW are compared with results from other numerical differentiation methods, such as single-interval differentiation, autocorrelation moving-window, and perturbation correlation moving-window methods. It is demonstrated that this simple LSMW method can be useful for quantitative analysis of nonuniformly spaced spectral data with high frequency noise.

  3. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  4. Spectral Analysis of Cluster Induced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ravi; Ireland, Peter; Capecelatro, Jesse; Fox, Rodney; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Particle laden turbulent flows are an important feature of many industrial processes such as fluidized bed reactors. The study of cluster-induced turbulence (CIT), wherein particles falling under gravity generate turbulence in the carrier gas via fluctuations in particle concentration, may lead to better models for these processes. We present a spectral analysis of a database of statistically stationary CIT simulations. These simulations were previously performed using a two way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian approach for various mass loadings and particle-scale Reynolds numbers. The Lagrangian particle data is carefully filtered to obtain Eulerian fields for particle phase volume fraction, velocity, and granular temperature. We perform a spectral decomposition of the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy budget. We investigate the contributions to the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy by pressure strain, viscous dissipation, drag exchange, viscous exchange, and pressure exchange over the range of wavenumbers. Results from this study may help develop closure models for large eddy simulation of particle laden turbulent flows.

  5. Exoplanetary Detection by Multifractal Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sahil; del Sordo, Fabio; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2017-05-01

    Owing to technological advances, the number of exoplanets discovered has risen dramatically in the last few years. However, when trying to observe Earth analogs, it is often difficult to test the veracity of detection. We have developed a new approach to the analysis of exoplanetary spectral observations based on temporal multifractality, which identifies timescales that characterize planetary orbital motion around the host star and those that arise from stellar features such as spots. Without fitting stellar models to spectral data, we show how the planetary signal can be robustly detected from noisy data using noise amplitude as a source of information. For observation of transiting planets, combining this method with simple geometry allows us to relate the timescales obtained to primary and secondary eclipse of the exoplanets. Making use of data obtained with ground-based and space-based observations we have tested our approach on HD 189733b. Moreover, we have investigated the use of this technique in measuring planetary orbital motion via Doppler shift detection. Finally, we have analyzed synthetic spectra obtained using the SOAP 2.0 tool, which simulates a stellar spectrum and the influence of the presence of a planet or a spot on that spectrum over one orbital period. We have demonstrated that, so long as the signal-to-noise-ratio >= 75, our approach reconstructs the planetary orbital period, as well as the rotation period of a spot on the stellar surface.

  6. Exoplanetary Detection by Multifractal Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sahil; Del Sordo, Fabio; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to technological advances, the number of exoplanets discovered has risen dramatically in the last few years. However, when trying to observe Earth analogs, it is often difficult to test the veracity of detection. We have developed a new approach to the analysis of exoplanetary spectral observations based on temporal multifractality, which identifies timescales that characterize planetary orbital motion around the host star and those that arise from stellar features such as spots. Without fitting stellar models to spectral data, we show how the planetary signal can be robustly detected from noisy data using noise amplitude as a source of information. For observation of transiting planets, combining this method with simple geometry allows us to relate the timescales obtained to primary and secondary eclipse of the exoplanets. Making use of data obtained with ground-based and space-based observations we have tested our approach on HD 189733b. Moreover, we have investigated the use of this technique in measuring planetary orbital motion via Doppler shift detection. Finally, we have analyzed synthetic spectra obtained using the SOAP 2.0 tool, which simulates a stellar spectrum and the influence of the presence of a planet or a spot on that spectrum over one orbital period. We have demonstrated that, so long as the signal-to-noise-ratio ≥ 75, our approach reconstructs the planetary orbital period, as well as the rotation period of a spot on the stellar surface.

  7. Spectral analysis of oscillatory neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Miller, W L; Sigvardt, K A

    1998-04-30

    Oscillatory dynamics are found at all levels of the nervous system. The goal of our current research on the control of rhythmic motor output by the lamprey spinal cord is to determine the features of neuronal coupling that lead to stable oscillatory activity and precisely-controlled intersegmental phase. Since our experimental manipulations can greatly increase the variability of the ventral root bursting pattern, it is important for us to employ a data analysis method which remains valid independent of this variability. Traditional analysis approaches which rely on identification of burst event times do not generally satisfy this requirement. In this paper, we illustrate the application of a straightforward statistically-based method for determining important parameters of oscillatory motor circuits using Fourier spectral analysis of spike trains. The frequency, phase, and their variabilities can be quantified; and the relative strength of coupling between different parts of the circuit can be tested for statistical significance. The approach we adopt is highly convenient for neuroscientists who study oscillatory systems as it operates directly on trains of action potentials stored as lists of event times (point-processes). Basic concepts and practical issues concerning use of Fourier analysis are discussed.

  8. Towards an understanding of the Of?p star HD191612: phase-resolved multiwavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Rauw, Gregor; Pollock, A. M. T.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Howarth, Ian D.

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of phase-resolved X-ray and optical observations of the peculiar hot star HD191612 (Of?p). This star is known to display line-profile variations that are recurrent with a period of 538d and its spectrum was found to present the signature of a magnetic field. In the X-rays, it is slightly overluminous compared to the canonical LX/LBOL) relation and appears brighter when the optical lines are strongest. Our XMM-Newton observations further reveal that the X-ray spectrum of HD191612 exhibits rather broad lines and is dominated by a `cool' (0.2-0.6keV) thermal component, two characteristics at odds with the proposed magnetic rotator model. We also report for the first time the low-level variability of the metallic (absorption/emission) lines and HeII absorptions that appear to be associated with radial-velocity shifts. Finally, we compare our results with observations of the early-type stars and discuss several possible scenarios. Based on observations collected at the Haute-Provence Observatory (France) and with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA). E-mail: naze@astro.ulg.ac.be ‡ Post-doctoral Researcher FNRS (Belgium). § Research Associate FNRS (Belgium). ¶ Operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  9. A CO Spectral Analysis of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannah, Sara; Salyk, Colette

    2017-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis describing the absorbing components of four stars with known protoplanetary disks: V1057 Cygni, W3 IRS5, LkHα 225S, and IRAS 19110+1045. Keck NIRSPEC observations of the M-band of the four sources allowed for the analysis of the P- and R-branch fundamental rovibrational absorption lines of carbon monoxide, as well as the H I Pfund-β emission line when present. These lines act as tracers of disk evolution and accretion, respectively, and allow us to determine the structure and physical features of the absorbing components. We find high temperatures, column densities and intense blueshifts in the spectra of V1057 Cygni, W3 IRS5, and LkHα 225S, which we tentatively determine to be indicative of absorption through polar outflows. IRAS 19110+11045 presents a lower column density, small redshift, moderate temperature, and high accretion rate. We surmise that the absorption spectrum in IRAS 19110+1045 is due to the disk itself as it is heated by accretion.

  10. Experimental Spectral Analysis of SALMON/STERLING Decoupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-30

    surface waves at station PLMS ( Poplarville , Mississippi) at a distance of 27 km shows a SALMON/STERLING compressional phase spectral ratio tending to a...Characteristics of the Data 12 ANALYSIS OF SALMON/STERLING SPECTRAL RATIO, AT POPLARVILLE , RAYLEIGH, 21 PICAYUNE ANALYSIS OF SALMON/(STERLING NOISE) SPECTRAL...et al., 1968). Signals at Poplarville . 7 Sample broadband recordings of SALMON, STERLING, and HE; 18 vertical, radial, and transverse components made

  11. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-21

    In this report we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm-1 resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (HR-BB-SFG-VS) of the –CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows for the first time the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral lineshapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity SFG-VS spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt lineshape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall lineshape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ±0.02 cm-1 peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm-1 and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm-1, respectively, for the –CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm-1 agrees quantitatively with a Voigt lineshape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm-1 and a inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm-1. These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the lineshapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  12. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and the Voigt line shapes in the phase-resolved and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-21

    In this report, we show that the ability to measure the sub-1 cm(-1) resolution phase-resolved and intensity high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectra of the -CN stretch vibration of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on the z-cut α-quartz surface allows the direct comparison and understanding of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in the imaginary and intensity SFG vibrational spectral line shapes in detail. The difference of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the imaginary and intensity sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy spectra of the same vibrational mode is the signature of the Voigt line shape and it measures the relative contribution to the overall line shape from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in SFG vibrational spectra. From the phase-resolved and intensity spectra, we found that the FWHM of the 2238.00 ± 0.02 cm(-1) peak in the phase-resolved imaginary and intensity spectra is 19.2 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and 21.6 ± 0.4 cm(-1), respectively, for the -CN group of the 8CB LB monolayer on the z-cut α-quartz crystal surface. The FWHM width difference of 2.4 cm(-1) agrees quantitatively with a Voigt line shape with a homogeneous broadening half width of Γ = 5.29 ± 0.08 cm(-1) and an inhomogeneous standard derivation width Δω = 5.42 ± 0.07 cm(-1). These results shed new lights on the understanding and interpretation of the line shapes of both the phase-resolved and the intensity SFG vibrational spectra, as well as other incoherent and coherent spectroscopic techniques in general.

  13. Mass changes of microparticles in a plasma observed by a phase-resolved resonance method

    SciTech Connect

    Carstensen, Jan; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2011-03-15

    The influence of a plasma environment on melamine formaldehyde particles is studied. High-precision measurements of the vertical confinement frequency with a phase-resolved resonance method indicate that the particle mass is affected in two ways: the deposition of sputtered material at the particle leads to a mass gain, whereas the outgassing of water causes a mass loss.

  14. Quantifying wave-breaking dissipation using nonlinear phase-resolved wave-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Y.; Xiao, W.; Yue, D. K. P.

    2014-12-01

    We propose to understand and quantify wave-breaking dissipation in the evolution of general irregular short-crested wave-fields using direct nonlinear phase-resolved simulations based on a High-Order Spectral (HOS) method (Dommermuth & Yue 1987). We implement a robust phenomenological-based energy dissipation model in HOS to capture the effect of wave-breaking dissipation on the overall wave-field evolution (Xiao et al 2013). The efficacy of this model is confirmed by direct comparisons against measurements for the energy loss in 2D and 3D breaking events. By comparing simulated wave-fields with and without the dissipation model in HOS, we obtain the dissipation field δ(x,y,t), which provides the times, locations and intensity of wave breaking events (δ>δc). This is validated by comparison of HOS simulations with Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM) measurements in the recent ONR Hi-Res field experiment. Figure (a) shows one frame of simulated wave-field (with dissipation model). Figure (b) is the corresponding measurement from ATM, where a large wave breaking event was captured. Figure (c) is the 3D view of the simulated wave-field with the colored region representing dissipation with δ>δc. The HOS predicted high-dissipation area is found to agree well with the measured breaking area. Based on HOS predicted high-dissipation area (δ>δc), we calculate Λ(c) (Phillips 1985), the distribution of total length of breaking wave front per unit surface area per unit increment of breaking velocity c. Figure (d) shows the distribution Λ(c) calculated from HOS. For breaking speeds c greater than 5m/s, the simulated Λ(c) is in qualitative agreement with Phillips theoretical power-law of Λ(c)~c-6. From δ(x,y,t), we further quantify wave breaking by calculating the whitecap coverage rate Wr(t) and energy dissipation rate ΔE'(t), and study the evolution of Wr and ΔE' to understand the role of wave breaking in nonlinear wave-field evolution. We obtain HOS simulations

  15. Spectral analysis using the CCD Chirp Z-transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversole, W. L.; Mayer, D. J.; Bosshart, P. W.; Dewit, M.; Howes, C. R.; Buss, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The charge coupled device (CCD) Chirp Z transformation (CZT) spectral analysis techniques were reviewed and results on state-of-the-art CCD CZT technology are presented. The CZT algorithm was examined and the advantages of CCD implementation are discussed. The sliding CZT which is useful in many spectral analysis applications is described, and the performance limitations of the CZT are studied.

  16. Power Spectral Density Error Analysis of Spectral Subtraction Type of Speech Enhancement Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Peter

    2006-12-01

    A theoretical framework for analysis of speech enhancement algorithms is introduced for performance assessment of spectral subtraction type of methods. The quality of the enhanced speech is related to physical quantities of the speech and noise (such as stationarity time and spectral flatness), as well as to design variables of the noise suppressor. The derived theoretical results are compared with the outcome of subjective listening tests as well as successful design strategies, performed by independent research groups.

  17. Hepatic extraction fraction of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals measured using spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Mochizuki, T; Ikezoe, J

    1999-11-01

    Measuring the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) of a hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical helps to differentiate hepatocyte from biliary tract diseases, and it is generally performed using deconvolution analysis. In this study, we measured HEF using spectral analysis. With spectral analysis, HEF was calculated from (the sum of the spectral data obtained by spectral analysis--the highest frequency component of the spectrum) divided by (the sum of the spectral data) x 100 (%). We applied this method to dynamic liver scintigraphic data obtained from six healthy volunteers and from 46 patients with various liver diseases, using 99Tcm-N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT). We also measured HEF using deconvolution analysis, in which the modified Fourier transform technique was employed. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis correlated closely with those obtained by deconvolution analysis (r = 0.925), suggesting our method is valid. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis decreased as the severity of liver disease progressed. The values were 100.0 +/- 0.0%, 94.7 +/- 13.6%, 76.2 +/- 27.4%, 45.7 +/- 15.6%, 82.7 +/- 24.2% and 95.2 +/- 11.8% (mean +/- S.D.) for the normal controls (n = 6), mild liver cirrhosis (n = 16), moderate liver cirrhosis (n = 11), severe liver cirrhosis (n = 5), acute hepatitis (n = 8) and chronic hepatitis groups (n = 6), respectively. The HEF was obtained more simply and rapidly by spectral analysis than by deconvolution analysis. The results suggest that our method using spectral analysis can be used as an alternative to the conventional procedure using deconvolution analysis for measuring HEF.

  18. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  19. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements.

  20. Spectral analysis methods for automatic speech recognition applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinam, Venkata Neelima Devi

    In this thesis, we evaluate the front-end of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) systems, with respect to different types of spectral processing methods that are extensively used. A filter bank approach for front end spectral analysis is one of the common methods used for spectral analysis. In this work we describe and evaluate spectral analysis based on Mel and Gammatone filter banks. These filtering methods are derived from auditory models and are thought to have some advantages for automatic speech recognition work. Experimentally, however, we show that direct use of FFT spectral values is just as effective as using either Mel or Gammatone filter banks, provided that the features extracted from the FFT spectral values take into account a Mel or Mel-like frequency scale. It is also shown that trajectory features based on sliding block of spectral features, computed using either FFT or filter bank spectral analysis are considerably more effective, in terms of ASR accuracy, than are delta and delta-delta terms often used for ASR. Although there is no major performance disadvantage to using a filter bank, simplicity of analysis is a reason to eliminate this step in speech processing. These assertions hold for both clean and noisy speech.

  1. Phase-resolved surface pressure and heat-transfer measurements on the blade of a two-stage turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Haldeman, C.W. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Phase-resolved surface pressure, and unsteady pressure measurements are reported for the first-stage blade row of the Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. Measurements were made at 10, 50, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the blade. Phase-resolved and unsteady heat-flux measurements are also reported.

  2. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, A. E.

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  3. Spectral Analysis of Rich Network Topology in Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Leting

    2013-01-01

    Social networks have received much attention these days. Researchers have developed different methods to study the structure and characteristics of the network topology. Our focus is on spectral analysis of the adjacency matrix of the underlying network. Recent work showed good properties in the adjacency spectral space but there are few…

  4. Spectral Analysis of Rich Network Topology in Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Leting

    2013-01-01

    Social networks have received much attention these days. Researchers have developed different methods to study the structure and characteristics of the network topology. Our focus is on spectral analysis of the adjacency matrix of the underlying network. Recent work showed good properties in the adjacency spectral space but there are few…

  5. Spectral Analysis and Filter Theory in Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttkus, Burkhard; Newcomb, R. C.

    This book gives a comprehensive picture of the present stage of development of spectral analysis and filter theory in geophysics. The principles and theories behind classical and modern methods are described and the effectiveness of these methods is assessed; selected examples of their practical application in geophysics are discussed. The modern methods include, for example, spectral analysis by fitting random models to the data, the maximum-entropy and maximum-likelihood spectral analysis procedures, the Wiener and Kalman filters, homomorphic deconvolution, and adaptive procedures for non-stationary processes. This book represents a valuable aid in education and research and for solving practical problems in geophysics and related disciplines.

  6. Creating diversified response profiles from a single quenchometric sensor element by using phase-resolved luminescence.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Elizabeth C; Bukowski, Rachel M; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Titus, Albert H; Cartwright, Alexander N; Bright, Frank V

    2015-01-05

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions).

  7. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Tehan, Elizabeth C.; Bukowski, Rachel M.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bright, Frank V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions). PMID:25569752

  8. SpectralNET--an application for spectral graph analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Forman, Joshua J; Clemons, Paul A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2005-10-19

    Graph theory provides a computational framework for modeling a variety of datasets including those emerging from genomics, proteomics, and chemical genetics. Networks of genes, proteins, small molecules, or other objects of study can be represented as graphs of nodes (vertices) and interactions (edges) that can carry different weights. SpectralNET is a flexible application for analyzing and visualizing these biological and chemical networks. Available both as a standalone .NET executable and as an ASP.NET web application, SpectralNET was designed specifically with the analysis of graph-theoretic metrics in mind, a computational task not easily accessible using currently available applications. Users can choose either to upload a network for analysis using a variety of input formats, or to have SpectralNET generate an idealized random network for comparison to a real-world dataset. Whichever graph-generation method is used, SpectralNET displays detailed information about each connected component of the graph, including graphs of degree distribution, clustering coefficient by degree, and average distance by degree. In addition, extensive information about the selected vertex is shown, including degree, clustering coefficient, various distance metrics, and the corresponding components of the adjacency, Laplacian, and normalized Laplacian eigenvectors. SpectralNET also displays several graph visualizations, including a linear dimensionality reduction for uploaded datasets (Principal Components Analysis) and a non-linear dimensionality reduction that provides an elegant view of global graph structure (Laplacian eigenvectors). SpectralNET provides an easily accessible means of analyzing graph-theoretic metrics for data modeling and dimensionality reduction. SpectralNET is publicly available as both a .NET application and an ASP.NET web application from http://chembank.broad.harvard.edu/resources/. Source code is available upon request.

  9. SpectralNET – an application for spectral graph analysis and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Joshua J; Clemons, Paul A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    Background Graph theory provides a computational framework for modeling a variety of datasets including those emerging from genomics, proteomics, and chemical genetics. Networks of genes, proteins, small molecules, or other objects of study can be represented as graphs of nodes (vertices) and interactions (edges) that can carry different weights. SpectralNET is a flexible application for analyzing and visualizing these biological and chemical networks. Results Available both as a standalone .NET executable and as an ASP.NET web application, SpectralNET was designed specifically with the analysis of graph-theoretic metrics in mind, a computational task not easily accessible using currently available applications. Users can choose either to upload a network for analysis using a variety of input formats, or to have SpectralNET generate an idealized random network for comparison to a real-world dataset. Whichever graph-generation method is used, SpectralNET displays detailed information about each connected component of the graph, including graphs of degree distribution, clustering coefficient by degree, and average distance by degree. In addition, extensive information about the selected vertex is shown, including degree, clustering coefficient, various distance metrics, and the corresponding components of the adjacency, Laplacian, and normalized Laplacian eigenvectors. SpectralNET also displays several graph visualizations, including a linear dimensionality reduction for uploaded datasets (Principal Components Analysis) and a non-linear dimensionality reduction that provides an elegant view of global graph structure (Laplacian eigenvectors). Conclusion SpectralNET provides an easily accessible means of analyzing graph-theoretic metrics for data modeling and dimensionality reduction. SpectralNET is publicly available as both a .NET application and an ASP.NET web application from . Source code is available upon request. PMID:16236170

  10. Methods of Spectral Analysis in C++ (MOSAIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engesser, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stellar spectroscopic classification is most often still done by hand. MOSAIC is a project focused on the collection and classification of astronomical spectra using a computerized algorithm. The code itself attempts to accurately classify stellar spectra according to the broad spectral classes within the Morgan-Keenan system of spectral classification, based on estimated temperature and the relative abundances of certain notable elements (Hydrogen, Helium, etc.) in the stellar atmosphere. The methodology includes calibrating the wavelength for pixels across the image by using the wavelength dispersion of pixels inherent with the spectrograph used. It then calculates the location of the peak in the star's Planck spectrum in order to roughly classify the star. Fitting the graph to a blackbody curve is the final step for a correct classification. Future work will involve taking a closer look at emission lines and luminosity classes.

  11. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  12. Spectral analysis of deformed random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalan, Sarika

    2009-10-01

    We study spectral behavior of sparsely connected random networks under the random matrix framework. Subnetworks without any connection among them form a network having perfect community structure. As connections among the subnetworks are introduced, the spacing distribution shows a transition from the Poisson statistics to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics of random matrix theory. The eigenvalue density distribution shows a transition to the Wigner’s semicircular behavior for a completely deformed network. The range for which spectral rigidity, measured by the Dyson-Mehta Δ3 statistics, follows the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics depends upon the deformation of the network from the perfect community structure. The spacing distribution is particularly useful to track very slight deformations of the network from a perfect community structure, whereas the density distribution and the Δ3 statistics remain identical to the undeformed network. On the other hand the Δ3 statistics is useful for the larger deformation strengths. Finally, we analyze the spectrum of a protein-protein interaction network for Helicobacter, and compare the spectral behavior with those of the model networks.

  13. Spectral identity mapping for enhanced chemical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John F., II

    2005-03-01

    Advances in spectral imaging instrumentation during the last two decades has lead to higher image fidelity, tighter spatial resolution, narrower spectral resolution, and improved signal to noise ratios. An important sub-classification of spectral imaging is chemical imaging, in which the sought-after information from the sample is its chemical composition. Consequently, chemical imaging can be thought of as a two-step process, spectral image acquisition and the subsequent processing of the spectral image data to generate chemically relevant image contrast. While chemical imaging systems that provide turnkey data acquisition are increasingly widespread, better strategies to analyze the vast datasets they produce are needed. The Generation of chemically relevant image contrast from spectral image data requires multivariate processing algorithms that can categorize spectra according to shape. Conventional chemometric techniques like inverse least squares, classical least squares, multiple linear regression, principle component regression, and multivariate curve resolution are effective for predicting the chemical composition of samples having known constituents, but are less effective when a priori information about the sample is unavailable. To address these problems, we have developed a fully automated non-parametric technique called spectral identity mapping (SIMS) that reduces the dependence of spectral image analysis on training datasets. The qualitative SIMS method provides enhanced spectral shape specificity and improved chemical image contrast. We present SIMS results of infrared spectral image data acquired from polymer coated paper substrates used in the manufacture of pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. In addition, we compare the SIMS results to results from spectral angle mapping (SAM) and cosine correlation analysis (CCA), two closely related techniques.

  14. Spectral Analysis in High Radiation Space Backgrounds with Robust Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasche, G. P.; Coldwell, R. L.; Nobel, L. A.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis software is tested for its ability to fit spectra from space. The approach, which emphasizes the background shape function, is uniquely suited to the identification of weak-strength nuclides in high-radiation background environments.

  15. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  17. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  18. A spectral analysis of ablating meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxam, K.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2017-09-01

    Meteor ablation features in the spectral lines occurring at 394, 436, 520, and 589 nm were observed using a four-camera spectral system between September and December 2015. In conjunction with this multi-camera system the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory was used to observe the orbital parameters and fragmentation of these meteors. In total, 95 light curves with complete data in the 520 and 589 nm filters were analyzed; some also had partial or complete data in the 394 nm filter, but no usable data was collected with the 436 nm filter. Of the 95 events, 70 exhibited some degree of differential ablation, and in all except 3 of these 70 events the 589 nm filter started or ended sooner compared with the 520 nm filter, indicating early ablation at the 589 nm wavelength. In the majority of cases the meteor showed evidence of fragmentation regardless of the type of ablation (differential or uniform). A surprising result was the lack of correlation found concerning the KB parameter, linked to meteoroid strength, and differential ablation. In addition, 22 shower-associated meteors were observed; Geminids showed mainly slight differential ablation, while Taurids were more likely to ablate uniformly.

  19. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  20. Phase-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Transient Grating Enhances the Capabilities of 2D IR Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geun Young; Kim, Yung Sam

    2017-02-09

    2D IR echo spectroscopy, with high sensitivity and femtosecond time resolution, enables us to understand structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems. Application of this experimental technique on weakly absorbing samples, however, had been limited by the precise and unambiguous phase determination of the echo signals. In this study, we propose a new experimental scheme that significantly increases the phase stability of the involved IR pulses. We have demonstrated that the incorporation of phase-resolved heterodyne-detected transient grating (PR-HDTG) spectroscopy greatly enhances the capabilities of 2D IR spectroscopy. The new experimental scheme has been used to obtain 2D IR spectra on weakly absorbing azide ions (N3(-)) in H2O (absorbance ∼0.025), free of phase ambiguity even at large waiting times. We report the estimated spectral diffusion time scale (1.056 ps) of azide ions in aqueous solution from the 2D IR spectra and the vibrational lifetime (750 ± 3 fs) and the reorientation time (1108 ± 24 fs) from the PR-HDTG spectra.

  1. Modern spectral analysis techniques for blood flow velocity and spectral measurements with pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    David, J Y; Jones, S A; Giddens, D P

    1991-06-01

    Four spectral analysis techniques were applied to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic quadrature signals to compare the relative merits of each technique for estimation of flow velocity and Doppler spectra. The four techniques were 1) the fast Fourier transform method, 2) the maximum likelihood method, 3) the Burg autoregressive algorithm, and 4) the modified covariance approach to autoregressive modeling. Both simulated signals and signals obtained from an in vitro flow system were studied. Optimal parameter values (e.g., model orders) were determined for each method, and the effects of signal-to-noise ratio and signal bandwidth were investigated. The modern spectral analysis techniques were shown to be superior to Fourier techniques in most circumstances, provided the model order was chosen appropriately. Robustness considerations tended to recommend the maximum likelihood method for both velocity and spectral estimation. Despite the restrictions of steady laminar flow, the results provide important basic information concerning the applicability of modern spectral analysis techniques to Doppler ultrasonic evaluation of arterial disease.

  2. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  3. Spectral analysis of clock noise: a primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, Donald B.

    2006-08-01

    The statistical characterization of clock noise is important for understanding how well a clock can perform in applications where timekeeping is important. The usual frequency domain characterization of clock noise is the power spectrum. We present a primer on how to estimate the power spectrum of clock noise given a finite sequence of measurements of time (or phase) differences between two clocks. The simplest estimator of the spectrum is the periodogram. Unfortunately this estimator is often problematic when applied to clock noise. Three estimators that overcome the deficiencies of the periodogram are the sinusoidal multitaper spectral estimator, Welch's overlapped segment averaging estimator and Burg's autoregressive estimator. We give complete details on how to calculate these three estimators. We apply them to two examples of clock noise and find that they all improve upon the periodogram and give comparable results. We also discuss some of the uses for the spectrum and its estimates in the statistical characterization of clock noise.

  4. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  5. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  6. Real-time phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography by use of optical Hilbert transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Ding, Zhihua; Ren, Hongwu; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a novel real-time phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography system that uses optical Hilbert transformation. When we use a resonant scanner in the reference arm of the interferometer, with an axial scanning speed of 4 kHz, the frame rate of both structural and Doppler blood-flow imaging with a size of 100 by 100 pixels is 10 Hz. The system has high sensitivity and a larger dynamic range for measuring the Doppler frequency shift that is due to moving red blood cells. Real-time images of in vivo blood flow in human skin obtained with this interferometer are presented.

  7. The phase-resolved photoacoustic method to indicate chemical assignments of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilotti, J. G.; Somer, A.; Costa, G. F.; Ribeiro, M. A.; Bonardi, C.; Cruz, G. K.; Gómez, S. L.; Beltrame, F. L.; Medina, A. N.; Sato, F.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Novatski, A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the phase-resolved photoacoustic method was applied to provide specific information on the chemical assignments of paracetamol in the near-infrared region. Two broad bands, centered at 1370 and 1130 nm, were well-resolved using this method, making it possible to assign the peaks centered at 1398, 1355 and 1295 nm to a C-H combination from a CH3 structure and the peak at 1305 nm to a C-H combination from the aromatic ring. This information represents a new finding in chemical studies regarding this medicament.

  8. Pleuropulmonary blastoma: cytogenetic and spectral karyotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Taube, Janis M; Griffin, Constance A; Yonescu, Raluca; Morsberger, Laura; Argani, Pedram; Askin, Frederic B; Batista, Denise A S

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare neoplasm of the pleuropulmonary mesenchyme. The molecular mechanisms underlying the genesis of this tumor are of particular interest as a large number of affected patients as well as their relatives have concurrent disease including additional dysplasia or neoplasia. To date, detailed karyotypes have been published on a limited number of cases. We report clinical, pathologic, and cytogenetic data in 2 cases of PPB including spectral karyotyping in 1 of them. Additionally, we conducted a review of the literature and compiled 15 published karyotypes of this tumor. Gain of chromosome 8 material was a highly prevalent finding in PPB, most times occurring as trisomy, but tetrasomy of the long arm was also frequent. Other occurring abnormalities, in order of observed frequency, included loss of 17p, loss of chromosome 10 or 10q, rearrangement of 11p, loss of chromosome X or Xp, gain of chromosomes/arms 1q, 2, and 7q, and loss of 6q and 18p. Loss of 10q has not been previously emphasized in PPB. The significance of these chromosome findings is discussed in relation to tumorigenesis.

  9. Spectral LiDAR analysis for terrain classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIver, Charles A.; Metcalf, Jeremy P.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2017-05-01

    Data from the Optech Titan airborne laser scanner were collected over Monterey, CA, in three wavelengths (532 nm, 1064 nm, and 1550 nm), in May 2016, by the National Center for Airborne LiDAR Mapping (NCALM). Analysis techniques have been developed using spectral technology largely derived from the analysis of spectral imagery. Data are analyzed as individual points, vs techniques that emphasize spatial binning. The primary tool which allows for this exploitation is the N-Dimensional Visualizer contained in the ENVI software package. The results allow for significant improvement in classification accuracy compared to results obtained from techniques derived from standard LiDAR analysis tools

  10. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (DEC VAX/VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  11. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (DEC VAX/VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  12. Solution of the voter model by spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, William; Lim, Chjan

    2015-01-01

    An exact spectral analysis of the Markov propagator for the voter model is presented for the complete graph and extended to the complete bipartite graph and uncorrelated random networks. Using a well-defined Martingale approximation in diffusion-dominated regions of phase space, which is almost everywhere for the voter model, this method is applied to compute analytically several key quantities such as exact expressions for the m time-step propagator of the voter model, all moments of consensus times, and the local times for each macrostate. This spectral method is motivated by a related method for solving the Ehrenfest urn problem and by formulating the voter model on the complete graph as an urn model. Comparisons of the analytical results from the spectral method and numerical results from Monte Carlo simulations are presented to validate the spectral method.

  13. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, D.E.; Smith, S.F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems is disclosed. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system. 12 figs.

  14. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hendrix, Donald E.; Smith, Stephen F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system.

  15. Enhancement of spectral resolution and optical rejection ratio of Brillouin optical spectral analysis using polarization pulling.

    PubMed

    Preussler, Stefan; Zadok, Avi; Wiatrek, Andrzej; Tur, Moshe; Schneider, Thomas

    2012-06-18

    High-resolution, wide-bandwidth optical spectrum analysis is essential to the measuring and monitoring of advanced optical, millimeter-wave, and terahertz communication systems, sensing applications and device characterization. One category of high-resolution spectrum analyzers reconstructs the power spectral density of a signal under test by scanning a Brillouin gain line across its spectral extent. In this work, we enhance both the resolution and the optical rejection ratio of such Brillouin-based spectrometers using a combination of two techniques. First, two Brillouin loss lines are superimposed upon a central Brillouin gain to reduce its bandwidth. Second, the vector attributes of stimulated Brillouin scattering amplification in standard, weakly birefringent fibers are used to change the signal state of polarization, and a judiciously aligned output polarizer discriminates between amplified and un-amplified spectral contents. A frequency resolution of 3 MHz, or eight orders of magnitude below the central optical frequency, is experimentally demonstrated. In addition, a weak spectral component is resolved in the presence of a strong adjacent signal, which is 30 dB stronger and detuned by only 60 MHz. The measurement method involves low-bandwidth direct detection, and does not require heterodyne beating. The measurement range of the proposed method is scalable to cover the C + L bands, depending on the tunable pump source. The accuracy of the measurements requires that the pump frequencies are well calibrated.

  16. Laboratory Study Using Novel Imaging Techniques For Phase Resolved Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S.; Haus, B. K.; Laxague, N.

    2016-02-01

    There exists a significant gap in the synoptic observational records of the spatial structure of the wavy sea surface. This is especially true for short scale gravity waves and capillarity waves which are important to ocean wave field modeling and remote sensing. These waves are critically linked to a number of air-sea interaction processes. To address that aspect, here we present preliminary findings and results from a laboratory experiment done in a wind-wave flume set up in ASIST (Air Sea Interaction Saltwater Tank) within the Surge-Structure-Atmosphere Interaction (SUSTAIN) facility at the University of Miami. This effort is part of an on-going study to provide in situ data and validation for phase resolved wave modeling and better understanding of air-ocean coupling by resolving the temporal evolution of the three dimensional water surface under varying mechanical and wind excitations. State of the art laser slope gauges, polarimetric cameras, and high frame rate CCDs were used to observe the surface topography and wave crest development. Additionally an infrared camera was used to examine the fine-scale fluctuations in the surface temperature. These observations provide a series of benchmark experiments for phase resolved numerical modeling of ocean waves.

  17. Enveloping Spectral Surfaces: Covariate Dependent Spectral Analysis of Categorical Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Krafty, Robert T.; Xiong, Shuangyan; Stoffer, David S.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Hall, Martica

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by problems in Sleep Medicine and Circadian Biology, we present a method for the analysis of cross-sectional categorical time series collected from multiple subjects where the effect of static continuous-valued covariates is of interest. Toward this goal, we extend the spectral envelope methodology for the frequency domain analysis of a single categorical process to cross-sectional categorical processes that are possibly covariate dependent. The analysis introduces an enveloping spectral surface for describing the association between the frequency domain properties of qualitative time series and covariates. The resulting surface offers an intuitively interpretable measure of association between covariates and a qualitative time series by finding the maximum possible conditional power at a given frequency from scalings of the qualitative time series conditional on the covariates. The optimal scalings that maximize the power provide scientific insight by identifying the aspects of the qualitative series which have the most pronounced periodic features at a given frequency conditional on the value of the covariates. To facilitate the assessment of the dependence of the enveloping spectral surface on the covariates, we include a theory for analyzing the partial derivatives of the surface. Our approach is entirely nonparametric, and we present estimation and asymptotics in the setting of local polynomial smoothing. PMID:24790257

  18. Spectral analysis of lunar analogue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    source. Together with taking an average over ±600 measurements per sample this leads to the best spectral signals that can be acquired with this set-up. Obtained spectra can be tested for accuracy by comparing them with stationary laboratory spectrometers such as the FTIR spectrometer. Future campaigns involving the employment of the spectrometers on the ExoGeoLab lander would prove the applicability of the equipment in the field.

  19. Spectral Analysis of B Stars: An Application of Bayesian Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnes, J.-M.; Robert, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the processes involved in stellar physics, it is necessary to obtain accurate stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, abundances…). Spectral analysis is a powerful tool for investigating stars, but it is also vital to reduce uncertainties at a decent computational cost. Here we present a spectral analysis method based on a combination of Bayesian statistics and grids of synthetic spectra obtained with TLUSTY. This method simultaneously constrains the stellar parameters by using all the lines accessible in observed spectra and thus greatly reduces uncertainties and improves the overall spectrum fitting. Preliminary results are shown using spectra from the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic.

  20. Mass Defect from Nuclear Physics to Mass Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourshahian, Soheil

    2017-09-01

    Mass defect is associated with the binding energy of the nucleus. It is a fundamental property of the nucleus and the principle behind nuclear energy. Mass defect has also entered into the mass spectrometry terminology with the availability of high resolution mass spectrometry and has found application in mass spectral analysis. In this application, isobaric masses are differentiated and identified by their mass defect. What is the relationship between nuclear mass defect and mass defect used in mass spectral analysis, and are they the same? [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Spectral mixture analysis of EELS spectrum-images.

    PubMed

    Dobigeon, Nicolas; Brun, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in detectors and computer science have enabled the acquisition and the processing of multidimensional datasets, in particular in the field of spectral imaging. Benefiting from these new developments, Earth scientists try to recover the reflectance spectra of macroscopic materials (e.g., water, grass, mineral types…) present in an observed scene and to estimate their respective proportions in each mixed pixel of the acquired image. This task is usually referred to as spectral mixture analysis or spectral unmixing (SU). SU aims at decomposing the measured pixel spectrum into a collection of constituent spectra, called endmembers, and a set of corresponding fractions (abundances) that indicate the proportion of each endmember present in the pixel. Similarly, when processing spectrum-images, microscopists usually try to map elemental, physical and chemical state information of a given material. This paper reports how a SU algorithm dedicated to remote sensing hyperspectral images can be successfully applied to analyze spectrum-image resulting from electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). SU generally overcomes standard limitations inherent to other multivariate statistical analysis methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA), that have been previously used to analyze EELS maps. Indeed, ICA and PCA may perform poorly for linear spectral mixture analysis due to the strong dependence between the abundances of the different materials. One example is presented here to demonstrate the potential of this technique for EELS analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  3. Progress in Advanced Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Flory, Adam E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Suckow, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    Improvements to a Java based software package developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for display and analysis of radioxenon spectra acquired by the International Monitoring System (IMS) are described here. The current version of the Radioxenon JavaViewer implements the region of interest (ROI) method for analysis of beta-gamma coincidence data. Upgrades to the Radioxenon JavaViewer will include routines to analyze high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) data, Standard Spectrum Method to analyze beta-gamma coincidence data and calibration routines to characterize beta-gamma coincidence detectors. These upgrades are currently under development; the status and initial results will be presented. Implementation of these routines into the JavaViewer and subsequent release is planned for FY 2011-2012.

  4. Verification of DSMC Simulations Using Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    Analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) S. J. Araki and R. S. Martin 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...propulsion relevant plasma at different spatial scales (1μm-100m) • Single fluid Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver • Unstructured multi -fluid solver... Objectives Motivation • Multiple developers of TURF - Changes to core class objects required by one model can break the others. - Merging different heads

  5. On the Application of Hilbert Spectral Analysis for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Hilbert spectral analysis (Huang et al, 1998, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, A 454, pp 903-995) consisted of two steps: First, the data has to be reduced into a finite number of Intrinsic Mode Function by the Empirical Mode Decomposition method, then the resulting Intrinsic Mode Functions are converted to time-frequency-energy distribution through Hilbert transform. In this approach, the Empirical Mode Functions served as the basis functions with which the data is expanded. This basis function is adaptive, and the decomposition is nonlinear. Furthermore, as the Hilbert transform is a singular transform, it retains a high degree of local information. The instantaneous frequency is determined by differentiation of the phase function; therefore, there is no restriction of the 'uncertainty principle' for all the time-frequency analysis resulting from a priori basis approach. With the adaptive basis and the instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert Spectral analysis can represent data from nonlinear and nonstationary processes without resorting to the harmonics. Another advantage of using instantaneous frequency is the ability to find out frequency from limited length of data, which is a critical problem in climate studies. As the processes driving the climate changes could be both nonlinear and nonstationary, the Hilbert Spectral Analysis could be of great use in examining the underlying mechanisms. A preliminary study based on the length of day data will be presented as example for the application of the Hilbert Spectral Analysis for climate study.

  6. Spectral and polarization analysis of micropulsations observed at ATS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W.; Cummings, W. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported for an analysis of low frequency oscillations in the earth's magnetic field as observed at the synchronous orbit by the magnetometer experiment on board ATS 1. Oscillations in the range .002 f .02 H3 for the period Dec. 1966 through Dec. 1967 were studied. The analysis combines a detailed, computer-processed, spectral analysis of selected events with a less detailed manual analysis of all events in the two year time interval from Dec. 1966 to Dec. 1968. The computer analysis revealed that a given event is often characterized by a dominat, narrow, spectral peak whose associated oscillations are almost entirely limited to a plane, together with several minor peaks. Dynamic spectral analyses revealed that minor spectral peaks appear as short isolated bursts. The sense of rotation of the perturbation vector tends to change from right-handed elliptical at the beginning of a burst to left-handed elliptical at the end. The major axis of the polarization ellipse is inclined by typically 30 deg east of radial.

  7. Spectral Synthesis via Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning; Su, Shan-Shan; Kong, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We apply a new statistical analysis technique, the Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis (MF-ICA) in a Bayseian framework, to galaxy spectral analysis. This algorithm can compress a stellar spectral library into a few Independent Components (ICs), and the galaxy spectrum can be reconstructed by these ICs. Compared to other algorithms which decompose a galaxy spectrum into a combination of several simple stellar populations, the MF-ICA approach offers a large improvement in efficiency. To check the reliability of this spectral analysis method, three different methods are used: (1) parameter recovery for simulated galaxies, (2) comparison with parameters estimated by other methods, and (3) consistency test of parameters derived with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that our MF-ICA method can not only fit the observed galaxy spectra efficiently, but can also accurately recover the physical parameters of galaxies. We also apply our spectral analysis method to the DEEP2 spectroscopic data, and find it can provide excellent fitting results for low signal-to-noise spectra.

  8. Generalized neural networks for spectral analysis: dynamics and Liapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Vegas, José M; Zufiria, Pedro J

    2004-03-01

    This paper analyzes local and global behavior of several dynamical systems which generalize some artificial neural network (ANN) semilinear models originally designed for principal component analysis (PCA) in the characterization of random vectors. These systems implicitly performed the spectral analysis of correlation (i.e. symmetric positive definite) matrices. Here, the proposed generalizations cover both nonsymmetric matrices as well as fully nonlinear models. Local stability analysis is performed via linearization and global behavior is analyzed by constructing several Liapunov functions.

  9. Spectral analysis of the Elatina varve series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    1988-01-01

    The Elatina formation in South America, which provides a rich fossil record of presumptive solar activity in the late Precambrian, is of great potential significance for the physics of the sun because it contains luminae grouped in cycles of about 12, an appearance suggestive of the solar cycle. Here, the laminae are treated as varves laid down yearly and modulated in thickness in accordance with the late Precambrian sunspot activity for the year of deposition. The purpose is to present a simple structure, or intrinsic spectrum, that will be uncovered by appropriate data analysis.

  10. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax.

  11. Spectral Analysis of a Protein Conformational Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovsky, S.

    2011-06-01

    The existence of conformational switching in proteins, induced by single amino acid mutations, presents an important challenge to our understanding of the physics of protein folding. Sequence-local methods, commonly used to detect structural homology, are incapable of accounting for this phenomenon. We examine a set of proteins, derived from the GA and GB domains of Streptococcus protein G, which are known to show a dramatic conformational change as a result of single-residue replacement. It is shown that these sequences, which are almost identical locally, can have very different global patterns of physical properties. These differences are consistent with the observed complete change in conformation. These results suggest that sequence-local methods for identifying structural homology can be misleading. They point to the importance of global sequence analysis in understanding sequence-structure relationships.

  12. Spectangular - Spectral Disentangling For Detailed Chemical Analysis Of Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablowski, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Disentangling of spectra helps to improve the orbit parameters and allows detailed chemical analysis. Spectangular is a GUI program written in C++ for spectral disentangling of spectra of SB1 and SB2 systems. It is based on singular value decomposition in the wavelength space and is coupled to an orbital solution.The results are the component spectra and the orbital parameters.

  13. PIXE-quantified AXSIA : elemental mapping by multivariate spectral analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Campbell, J. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Barrett, Keith E.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2005-07-01

    Automated, nonbiased, multivariate statistical analysis techniques are useful for converting very large amounts of data into a smaller, more manageable number of chemical components (spectra and images) that are needed to describe the measurement. We report the first use of the multivariate spectral analysis program AXSIA (Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis) developed at Sandia National Laboratories to quantitatively analyze micro-PIXE data maps. AXSIA implements a multivariate curve resolution technique that reduces the spectral image data sets into a limited number of physically realizable and easily interpretable components (including both spectra and images). We show that the principal component spectra can be further analyzed using conventional PIXE programs to convert the weighting images into quantitative concentration maps. A common elemental data set has been analyzed using three different PIXE analysis codes and the results compared to the cases when each of these codes is used to separately analyze the associated AXSIA principal component spectral data. We find that these comparisons are in good quantitative agreement with each other.

  14. Spectral Analysis of Polysomnography in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seok Ho; Choi, Ho Dong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to identify differences between people with narcolepsy and the normal control of delta and theta activity using electroencephalogram (EEG) spectrum analysis of nocturnal polysomnography (PSG). Methods Seven narcolepsy patients and seven age-sex matched normal controls underwent PSG and multiple sleep latency tests. Participants' non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep EEGs in PSG was analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform technique. Results While NREM delta activity of people with narcolepsy declined during the first three periods of NREM, there was no change during the 4th period of NREM. The increase in NREM theta activity also lasted until the 3rd period of NREM but did not occur during the 4th period of NREM. In comparing sleep parameters, REM sleep latency in the narcolepsy group was significantly shorter than in controls. Conclusion These results suggest that people with narcolepsy are likely to have a delta and theta activity-related sleep disturbance mechanism in NREM sleep. PMID:28326118

  15. Monitoring sedation levels by EEG spectral analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, M. J.; Preece, A. W.; Green, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time electroencephalographic power spectra were obtained for a group of 37 volunteers undergoing sedation with enflurane at different concentrations in air. In part one, 17 subjects were given 0.5%, 0.75%, and 1.0% for 4 min at each level, and recovery after 5 min was assessed by the Trieger method. There was considerable variation in subject response to the different doses, but adequate sedation was indicated by the presence of a strong alpha rhythm (9-11 Hz) and suppression of frequencies below 5 Hz. Overdose was indicated by an initial shift in the alpha frequency to a lower value (6-7 Hz) followed by the appearance of delta waves (0.5-4 Hz) and loss of alpha waves. In part two, 20 volunteers inhaled enflurane at 0.5% for 10 min to allow adequate absorption, followed by a 10-min recovery period. Equal numbers showed sedation or a failure to respond to enflurane at this concentration. In the responders, sedation was accompanied by a marked shift in the ratio of the power in two frequency bands: 1-4 Hz and 8-12 Hz. Progress of the frequency band power ratio followed closely the state of the subject into sedation, overdose, and recovery. This measure was further improved by the use of multivariate analysis, which showed good discrimination of the alert, sedated, and overdosed states of the subject. PMID:1842161

  16. [Study on the quality of spectral line of laser microprobe emission spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-lin; Zhang, Qiu-lin; Liang, Bao-lai; Wei, Yan-hong; Huai, Su-fang

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, the quality improvement of Laser Microprobe Emission Spectral Analysis (LMESA) lines in argon atmosphere at reduced pressure was experimentally investigated. The experimental setup consists of a YGJ-II laser micro-spectral analyzer and a photo-electro detection system. The temporal behavior and the intensity distribution of Cu I 324.7 nm and Cu I 327.4 nm lines of the copper alloy standard samples were studied. The results show that LMESA spectrum strongly depends on the environment gas, its pressure and the auxiliary excitation parameters. When the diameter at the end of graphite auxiliary electrodes is 1.5 mm, the distance between the electrodes is 4 mm, the center of the electrodes is 3 mm above the sample surface, the voltage of the auxiliary excitation is 1,300 V and the argon pressure is 33.2 Kpa, the emission time of Cu I 324.7 nm and Cu I 327.4 nm is about 500 microseconds longer than that in the air. The emission intensity of Cu I 324.7 nm and Cu I 327.4 nm is about 4 times higher than that in the air at the same pressure and is about 2 times higher than that in the air at normal pressure. The full width at half maximum of the spectral lines is obviously narrowed.

  17. Spectral derivative analysis of solar spectroradiometric measurements: Theoretical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansell, R. A.; Tsay, S.-C.; Pantina, P.; Lewis, J. R.; Ji, Q.; Herman, J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral derivative analysis, a commonly used tool in analytical spectroscopy, is described for studying cirrus clouds and aerosols using hyperspectral, remote sensing data. The methodology employs spectral measurements from the 2006 Biomass-burning Aerosols in Southeast Asia field study to demonstrate the approach. Spectral peaks associated with the first two derivatives of measured/modeled transmitted spectral fluxes are examined in terms of their shapes, magnitudes, and positions from 350 to 750 nm, where variability is largest. Differences in spectral features between media are mainly associated with particle size and imaginary term of the complex refractive index. Differences in derivative spectra permit cirrus to be conservatively detected at optical depths near the optical thin limit of ~0.03 and yield valuable insight into the composition and hygroscopic nature of aerosols. Biomass-burning smoke aerosols/cirrus generally exhibit positive/negative slopes, respectively, across the 500-700 nm spectral band. The effect of cirrus in combined media is to increase/decrease the slope as cloud optical thickness decreases/increases. For thick cirrus, the slope tends to 0. An algorithm is also presented which employs a two model fit of derivative spectra for determining relative contributions of aerosols/clouds to measured data, thus enabling the optical thickness of the media to be partitioned. For the cases examined, aerosols/clouds explain ~83%/17% of the spectral signatures, respectively, yielding a mean cirrus cloud optical thickness of 0.08 ± 0.03, which compared reasonably well with those retrieved from a collocated Micropulse Lidar Network Instrument (0.09 ± 0.04). This method permits extracting the maximum informational content from hyperspectral data for atmospheric remote sensing applications.

  18. Spectral characteristics analysis of red tide water in mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tingwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hongliang; Ma, Yi; Gao, Xuemin

    2003-05-01

    Mesocosm ecosystem experiment with seawater enclosed of the red tide was carried out from July to September 2001. We got four species of biology whose quantities of bion are dominant in the red tide. During the whole process from the beginning to their dying out for every specie, in situ spectral measurements were carried out. After data processing, characteristic spectra of red tide of different dominant species are got. Via comparison and analysis of characteristics of different spectra, we find that in the band region between 685 and 735 nanometers, spectral characteristics of red tide is apparently different from that of normal water. Compared to spectra of normal water, spectra of red tide have a strong reflectance peak in the above band region. As to spectra of red tide dominated by different species, the situations of reflectance peaks are also different: the second peak of Mesodinium rubrum spectrum lies between 726~732 nm, which is more than 21nm away from the other dominant species spectra"s Leptocylindrus danicus"s second spectral peak covers 686~694nm; that of Skeletonema costatum lies between 691~693 nm. Chattonella marina"s second spectral peak lies about 703~705 nm. Thus we can try to determine whether red tide has occurred according to its spectral data. In order to monitor the event of red tide and identify the dominant species by the application of the technology of hyperspectral remote sensing, acquiring spectral data of different dominant species of red tide as much as possible becomes a basic work to be achieved for spectral matching, information extraction and so on based on hyperspectral data.

  19. Superconducting integrated terahertz receiver for spectral analysis of gas compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Filippenko, L. V.; Kalashnikov, K. V.; Kiselev, O. S.; Vaks, V. L.; Domracheva, E. G.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    A new highly sensitive device for analysis of gas compounds in terahertz frequency range based on the superconducting integrated receiver is being developed. Such receiver for spectral research of Earth atmosphere from balloon-borne instrument was developed earlier in Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and successfully operated during several flight missions. In this work, the laboratory setup for gas spectroscopy in the range of 450-700 GHz with the noise temperature below 150 K and spectral resolution better than 0.5 MHz is presented. First results of measurements of NH3 and H2O absorption spectra are obtained.

  20. Phase-resolved emission spectroscopy of a neutraliser-free gridded ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Gibson, Andrew; Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    Power-efficient electric propulsion systems that operate without an external neutraliser have the potential to increase the longevity of traditional concepts. The Neptune gridded-ion thruster prototype, which uses a single radio-requency (rf) power source for plasma generation, ion acceleration and beam neutralisation, is under development. Previous research has suggested that the time-resolved electron dynamics in the plume are important for maintaining charge neutrality and overall performance. In this study, the electron dynamics in the exhaust beam are investigated within the rf cycle using phase-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results are compared with time-resolved and time-integrated electrical diagnostics to investigate the mechanisms behind beam neutralisation. This work received financial support from the York-Paris CIRC and state aid managed by the laboratory of excellence Plas@Par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).

  1. Time frequency analysis of Jovian and Saturnian radio spectral patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Al-Haddad, Emad; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Prominent radio spectral patterns were observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment (RPWS) principally at Jupiter and Saturn. The spectral shapes are displayed in the usual dynamic spectra showing the flux density versus the time and the frequency. Those patterns exhibit well-organized shapes in the time-frequency plane connected with the rotation of the planet. We consider in this analysis the auroral emissions which occurred in the frequency range between 10 kHz and approximately 3 MHz. It concerns the Jovian hectometric emission (HOM) and the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). We show in the case of Jupiter's HOM that the spectral patterns are well-arranged arc structures with curvatures depending on the Jovian rotation. Regarding the SKR emission, the spectral shapes exhibit generally complex patterns, and only sometimes arc structures are observed. We emphasize the curve alterations from vertex-early to vertex-late arcs (and vice versa) and we study their dependences, or not, on the planetary rotations. We also discuss the common physical process at the origin of the HOM and SKR emissions, specifically the spectral patterns created by the interaction between planetary satellites (e.g. Io or Dione) and the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres.

  2. Semantic Lexicon Construction: Learning from Unlabeled Data via Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    SVD). In this paper, we generally call such SVD- based subspace construction spectral analysis. Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) (Deerwester et al...Richard Harshman. 1990. Indexing by Latent Semantic Analysis. Journal of the Society for Information Science, 41:391–407. A. Dempster, N. Laird, and D...and Knowledge Management. Christos H. Papadimitriou, Prabhakar Raghavan, Hisao Tamaki, and Santosh Vempala. 2000. Latent Semantic Indexing: A

  3. CHANDRA PHASE-RESOLVED X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Becker, Werner

    2011-12-20

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 {+-} 0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} (4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find {tau}{sub scat} = 0.147 {+-} 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum-albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat

  4. Application of multivariate statistical analysis to STEM X-ray spectral images: interfacial analysis in microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

    2006-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis methods have been applied to scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectral images. The particular application of the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) technique provides a high spectral contrast view of the raw spectral image. The power of this approach is demonstrated with a microelectronics failure analysis. Specifically, an unexpected component describing a chemical contaminant was found, as well as a component consistent with a foil thickness change associated with the focused ion beam specimen preparation process. The MCR solution is compared with a conventional analysis of the same spectral image data set.

  5. Species Discrimination of Mangroves using Derivative Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Arun; Gnanappazham, L.

    2014-11-01

    Mangroves are salt tolerant trees or shrubs commonly seen in mudflats of intertidal regions of tropical and subtropical coastlines. Recent advances in field spectroscopic techniques enabled the species level discrimination among closely related vegetation types. In this study we have analysed the laboratory spectroscopy data collected from eight species of Rhizophoraceaea family of mangroves. The spectral data ranges between the wavelength of 350 nm and 2500 nm at a very narrow bandwidth of 1 nm. Preprocessing techniques including smoothing were done on the spectra to remove the noise before compiling it to a spectral library. Derivative analysis of the spectra was done and its corresponding first and second derivatives were obtained. Statistical analysis such as parametric and non-parametric tests were implemented on the original processed spectra as well as their respective first and second order derivatives for the identification of significant bands for species discrimination. Results have shown that red edge region (680 nm - 720 nm) and water vapour absorption region around 1150 nm and 1400 nm are optimal as they were consistent in discriminating species in reflectance spectra as well as in its first and second derivative spectra. C. decandra species is found to be discriminable from other species while reflectance and its derivative spectra were used. Non-parametric statistical analysis gave better results than that of parametric statistical analysis especially in SWIR 2 spectral region (1831 nm - 2500 nm).

  6. Spectral analysis of underwater explosions in the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Ginzburg, A.

    1998-08-01

    The present study utilizes the Israel Seismic Network (ISN) as a spatially distributed multichannel system for the discrimination of low-magnitude events (ML < 2.5), namely earthquakes and underwater explosions in the Dead Sea. In order to achieve this, we began with the application of conventional single-station methods, such as spectral short-period ratios. We then applied a newly developed, network-oriented algorithm based on different spectral features of the seismic radiation from underwater explosions and earthquakes, i.e. spectral semblance statistics. Twenty-eight single-shot underwater explosions (UWEs) and 16 earthquakes in the magnitude range ML = 1.6-2.8, within distances of 10-150 km, recorded by the ISN, were selected for the analysis. The analysis is based on a smoothed (0.5 Hz window) Fourier spectrum of the whole signal (defined by the signal-to-noise criterion), without picking separate wave phases. It was found that the classical discriminant of the seismic energy ratio between the relatively low-frequency (1-6 Hz) and high-frequency (6-11 Hz) bands, averaged over an ISN subnetwork, showed an overlap between UWEs and earthquakes and cannot itself provide reliable identification. We developed and tested a new multistation discriminant based on the low- frequency spectral modulation (LFSM) method. In our case the LFSM is associated with the bubbling effect in underwater explosions. The method demonstrates a distinct azimuth-invariant coherency of spectral shapes in the low-frequency range (1-12 Hz) of short-period seismometer systems. The coherency of the modulated spectra for different ISN stations was measured by semblance statistics commonly used in seismic prospecting for phase correlation in the time domain. The modified statistics provided an almost complete separation between earthquakes and underwater explosions.

  7. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  8. Spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia - A measure of mental effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Craig Thornton, D.; Moray, Neville

    1987-01-01

    The validity of the spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia as a measure of mental effort was investigated using a computer simulation of a hovercraft piloted along a river as the experimental task. Strong correlation was observed between the subjective effort-ratings and the heart-rate variability (HRV) power spectrum between 0.06 and 0.14 Hz. Significant correlations were observed not only between subjects but, more importantly, within subjects as well, indicating that the spectral analysis of HRV is an accurate measure of the amount of effort being invested by a subject. Results also indicate that the intensity of effort invested by subjects cannot be inferred from the objective ratings of task difficulty or from performance.

  9. Shortgrass prairie spectral measurements. [for terrain analysis and photomapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Miller, L. D.; Pearson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral methods of vegetation analysis not only measure herbage biomass on a nondestructive basis but also can be adapted to aircraft and satellite devices to map the spatial distribution over an area in an efficient and economical fashion. This study reviews the ground-based in situ field spectrometry in the 0.350-0.800 micron region of the spectrum. A statistical analysis of in situ spectroreflectance data from sample plots of the shortgrass prairie shows that green biomass, chlorophyll concentration, and leaf water content are directly interrelated to that composite property of the plot which is called functioning green biomass. Spectrocorrelation data indicate the spectral regions of optimum sensitivity for a remote estimation of the green biomass, chlorophyll, and leaf water content. The near-infrared region of the spectrum shows a high positive spectrocorrelation to these three sample parameters, regardless of the amount of standing dead vegetation.

  10. Shortgrass prairie spectral measurements. [for terrain analysis and photomapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Miller, L. D.; Pearson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral methods of vegetation analysis not only measure herbage biomass on a nondestructive basis but also can be adapted to aircraft and satellite devices to map the spatial distribution over an area in an efficient and economical fashion. This study reviews the ground-based in situ field spectrometry in the 0.350-0.800 micron region of the spectrum. A statistical analysis of in situ spectroreflectance data from sample plots of the shortgrass prairie shows that green biomass, chlorophyll concentration, and leaf water content are directly interrelated to that composite property of the plot which is called functioning green biomass. Spectrocorrelation data indicate the spectral regions of optimum sensitivity for a remote estimation of the green biomass, chlorophyll, and leaf water content. The near-infrared region of the spectrum shows a high positive spectrocorrelation to these three sample parameters, regardless of the amount of standing dead vegetation.

  11. Spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia - A measure of mental effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Craig Thornton, D.; Moray, Neville

    1987-01-01

    The validity of the spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia as a measure of mental effort was investigated using a computer simulation of a hovercraft piloted along a river as the experimental task. Strong correlation was observed between the subjective effort-ratings and the heart-rate variability (HRV) power spectrum between 0.06 and 0.14 Hz. Significant correlations were observed not only between subjects but, more importantly, within subjects as well, indicating that the spectral analysis of HRV is an accurate measure of the amount of effort being invested by a subject. Results also indicate that the intensity of effort invested by subjects cannot be inferred from the objective ratings of task difficulty or from performance.

  12. Investigation of Periodic Nuclear Decay Data with Spectral Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P.; Buncher, J.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, T.; Hoft, A.; Horan, T.; Jenkins, J.; Kerford, J.; Lee, R.; Mattes, J.; Morris, D.; Mudry, R.; Newport, J.; Petrelli, M.; Silver, M.; Stewart, C.; Terry, B.; Willenberg, H.

    2009-12-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay experiments displaying unexplained periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data was from 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston, 32Si decay reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt in Germany. All three data sets possess the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additionally a spectral comparison of the local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and the plasma speed and latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was performed. Following analysis of these six possible causal factors, their reciprocals, and their linear combinations, a possible link between nuclear decay rate fluctuations and the linear combination of the HCS latitude and 1/R motivates searching for a possible mechanism with such properties.

  13. Temporary spectral analysis of a laser plasma of mineral coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, P.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present results of the temporal spectral study of a plasma laser of mineral coal using the Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The plasma was generated by focusing a laser beam of Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm with energy per pulse of 35 mJ on coal target pellets. The plasma radiation was conducted by an optical fiber to the entrance slit of a spectrograph of 0.5 m, equipped with a 1200 and 2400 grooves/mm diffraction grating and an ICCD camera for registration with different delay times of the spectra in the spectral range from 250 nm to 900 nm. The temporal spectral analysis allowed the identification of the elements Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, and Si, and CN and C2 molecules present in natural coals. The characteristics of the spectral lines and bands were studied at different delay times obtaining the calculation of the evolution of electron temperature, electron density, and vibrational temperature of plasmas in the time. The delay times used were between 0.5 μs and 5 μs, calculating the electron temperature ranged between 5 000 K and 1 000 K.

  14. Spectral Image Processing and Analysis of the Archimedes Palimpsest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    SPECTRAL IMAGE PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS OF THE ARCHIMEDES PALIMPSEST Roger L. Easton, Jr., William A. Christens-Barry, Keith T. Knox Chester F...5988 (fax), e-mail: easton@cis.rit.edu web: www.cis.rit.edu/people/faculty/easton ABSTRACT The Archimedes Palimpsest is a 10th-century parchment...rendering. 1. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CODEX Almost everything known about the work of Archimedes has been gleaned from three codex manuscripts. The first

  15. Spectral Envelopes and Additive + Residual Analysis/Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodet, Xavier; Schwarz, Diemo

    The subject of this chapter is the estimation, representation, modification, and use of spectral envelopes in the context of sinusoidal-additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis. A spectral envelope is an amplitude-vs-frequency function, which may be obtained from the envelope of a short-time spectrum (Rodet et al., 1987; Schwarz, 1998). [Precise definitions of such an envelope and short-time spectrum (STS) are given in Section 2.] The additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis method is based on a representation of signals in terms of a sum of time-varying sinusoids and of a non-sinusoidal residual signal [e.g., see Serra (1989), Laroche et al. (1993), McAulay and Quatieri (1995), and Ding and Qian (1997)]. Many musical sound signals may be described as a combination of a nearly periodic waveform and colored noise. The nearly periodic part of the signal can be viewed as a sum of sinusoidal components, called partials, with time-varying frequency and amplitude. Such sinusoidal components are easily observed on a spectral analysis display (Fig. 5.1) as obtained, for instance, from a discrete Fourier transform.

  16. A Digital Spectral Library for Planetary and Terrestrial Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Wise, R.; Livo, K. E.; Hoefen, T. M.; Kokaly, R. F.; Sutley, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library of over 800 spectra that covers the ultraviolet to near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, vegetation, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from the laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopic identification of minerals and related materials important to a variety of research programs being conducted on the Earth and other planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), or the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on its way to orbit Saturn in 2004, have narrow band widths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features from a variety of materials. Identification of materials requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. This new database includes minerals found in hydrothermal alteration zones and weathering products that may be important in the exploration of Mars. This library includes all spectra used in the Clark et al, (JGR in Press 2003) Tetracorder imaging spectroscopy mapping system. Chapters of the library are: Chapter 1: M = Minerals, Chapter 2: S = Soils, Rocks, Mixtures, Chapter 3: C = Coatings, Chapter 4: L = Liquids, Liquid Mixtures, Water and Other Volatiles Including Frozen Volatiles, Chapter 5: A = Artificial (Man-Made) Including Manufactured Chemicals, Chapter 6: V = Vegetation, Mixtures with Vegetation, and Micro-Organisms.

  17. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  18. Exploration of Integrated Visible to Near-, Shortwave-, and Longwave-Infrared (Full-Range) Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    wavelengths before using MNF analysis to isolate linear band combinations containing high signal to noise. Spectral endmembers isolated from data were...80 Figure 50. Spectral comparison of sagebrush library spectrum and vegetation image endmember spectra...specific spectral features due to chemical composition. Only subtle spectral features exist for vegetation in the LWIR (van der Meer & de Jong, 2011

  19. Investigation of spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that velocimetry (LV) generates individual realization velocity data that are randomly or unevenly sampled in time. Spectral analysis of such data to obtain the turbulence spectra, and hence turbulence scales information, requires special techniques. The 'slotting' technique of Mayo et al, also described by Roberts and Ajmani, and the 'Direct Transform' method of Gaster and Roberts are well known in the LV community. The slotting technique is faster than the direct transform method in computation. There are practical limitations, however, as to how a high frequency and accurate estimate can be made for a given mean sampling rate. These high frequency estimates are important in obtaining the microscale information of turbulence structure. It was found from previous studies that reliable spectral estimates can be made up to about the mean sampling frequency (mean data rate) or less. If the data were evenly samples, the frequency range would be half the sampling frequency (i.e. up to Nyquist frequency); otherwise, aliasing problem would occur. The mean data rate and the sample size (total number of points) basically limit the frequency range. Also, there are large variabilities or errors associated with the high frequency estimates from randomly sampled signals. Roberts and Ajmani proposed certain pre-filtering techniques to reduce these variabilities, but at the cost of low frequency estimates. The prefiltering acts as a high-pass filter. Further, Shapiro and Silverman showed theoretically that, for Poisson sampled signals, it is possible to obtain alias-free spectral estimates far beyond the mean sampling frequency. But the question is, how far? During his tenure under 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, the author investigated from his studies on the spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled signals that the spectral estimates can be enhanced or improved up to about 4-5 times the mean sampling frequency by using a suitable

  20. Analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparrini, D.; Cutini, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Giommi, P.; Raino, S.

    2010-03-26

    Blazars are a small fraction of all extragalactic sources but, unlike other objects, they are strong emitters across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In this study we have conducted a detailed investigation of the broad-band spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining the accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, NIR-Optical and hard-X/gamma-ray data, collected within three months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. Here we show the procedure for the multi wavelength analysis.

  1. Harmonic component detection: Optimized Spectral Kurtosis for operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, J.-L.; Tawfiq, I.; Chevallier, G.

    2012-01-01

    This work is a contribution in the field of Operational Modal Analysis to identify the modal parameters of mechanical structures using only measured responses. The study deals with structural responses coupled with harmonic components amplitude and frequency modulated in a short range, a common combination for mechanical systems with engines and other rotating machines in operation. These harmonic components generate misleading data interpreted erroneously by the classical methods used in OMA. The present work attempts to differentiate maxima in spectra stemming from harmonic components and structural modes. The detection method proposed is based on the so-called Optimized Spectral Kurtosis and compared with others definitions of Spectral Kurtosis described in the literature. After a parametric study of the method, a critical study is performed on numerical simulations and then on an experimental structure in operation in order to assess the method's performance.

  2. [Applications of spectral analysis technique to monitoring grasshoppers].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Han, Jian-guo; Zhang, Lu-da

    2008-12-01

    Grasshopper monitoring is of great significance in protecting environment and reducing economic loss. However, how to predict grasshoppers accurately and effectively is a difficult problem for a long time. In the present paper, the importance of forecasting grasshoppers and its habitat is expounded, and the development in monitoring grasshopper populations and the common arithmetic of spectral analysis technique are illustrated. Meanwhile, the traditional methods are compared with the spectral technology. Remote sensing has been applied in monitoring the living, growing and breeding habitats of grasshopper population, and can be used to develop a forecast model combined with GIS. The NDVI values can be analyzed throughout the remote sensing data and be used in grasshopper forecasting. Hyper-spectra remote sensing technique which can be used to monitor grasshoppers more exactly has advantages in measuring the damage degree and classifying damage areas of grasshoppers, so it can be adopted to monitor the spatial distribution dynamic of rangeland grasshopper population. Differentialsmoothing can be used to reflect the relations between the characteristic parameters of hyper-spectra and leaf area index (LAI), and indicate the intensity of grasshopper damage. The technology of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been employed in judging grasshopper species, examining species occurrences and monitoring hatching places by measuring humidity and nutrient of soil, and can be used to investigate and observe grasshoppers in sample research. According to this paper, it is concluded that the spectral analysis technique could be used as a quick and exact tool in monitoring and forecasting the infestation of grasshoppers, and will become an important means in such kind of research for their advantages in determining spatial orientation, information extracting and processing. With the rapid development of spectral analysis methodology, the goal of sustainable monitoring

  3. Effective dielectric constants and spectral density analysis of plasmonic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jin You; Raza, Aikifa; Fang, Nicholas X.; Chen, Gang; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-10-01

    Cermet or ceramic-metal composite coatings promise great potentials in light harvesting, but the complicated composite structure at the nanoscale induces a design challenge to predict their optical properties. We find that the effective dielectric constants of nanocomposites predicted by finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulation results match those of different classical effective medium theories in their respective validity range. However, a precise prediction of the fabricated nanocomposite properties for different filling factors is very challenging. In this work, we extract the spectral density functions in the Bergman representation from the analytical models, numerical simulations, and experimental data of plasmonic nanocomposites. The spectral density functions, which only depend on geometry of the nanocomposite material, provide a unique measure on the contribution of individual and percolated particles inside the nanocomposite. According to the spectral density analysis of measured dielectric constants, the material properties of nanocomposites fabricated by the co-sputtering approach are dominated by electromagnetic interaction among individual metallic particles. While in the case of the nanocomposites fabricated by the multilayer thin film approach, the material properties are dominated by percolated metallic particles inside the dielectric host, as indicated by our FDTD simulation results. This understanding provides new physical insight into the interaction between light and plasmonic nanocomposites.

  4. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevin, G.O.

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  5. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF FERMI -LAT BLAZARS ABOVE 50 GEV

    DOE PAGES

    Domínguez, Alberto; Ajello, Marco

    2015-11-04

    We present an analysis of the intrinsic (unattenuated by the extragalactic background light, EBL) power-law spectral indices of 128 extragalactic sources detected up to z ~ 2 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) at very high energies (VHEs, E ≥50 GeV). The median of the intrinsic index distribution is 2.20 (versus 2.54 for the observed distribution). We also analyze the observed spectral breaks (i.e., the difference between the VHE and high energy, HE, 100 MeV ≤ E ≤ 300 GeV, spectral indices). The Fermi-LAT has now provided a large sample of sources detected both at VHE and HE with comparablemore » exposure that allows us to test models of extragalactic γ-ray photon propagation. We find that our data are compatible with simulations that include intrinsic blazar curvature and EBL attenuation. There is also no evidence of evolution with redshift of the physics that drives the photon emission in high-frequency synchrotron peak (HSP) blazars. This makes HSP blazars excellent probes of the EBL.« less

  6. Monitoring Urban Greenness Dynamics Using Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Muye; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Xinyu; Hong, Yang; Wang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Urban greenness is increasingly recognized as an essential constituent of the urban environment and can provide a range of services and enhance residents’ quality of life. Understanding the pattern of urban greenness and exploring its spatiotemporal dynamics would contribute valuable information for urban planning. In this paper, we investigated the pattern of urban greenness in Hangzhou, China, over the past two decades using time series Landsat-5 TM data obtained in 1990, 2002, and 2010. Multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was used to derive vegetation cover fractions at the subpixel level. An RGB-vegetation fraction model, change intensity analysis and the concentric technique were integrated to reveal the detailed, spatial characteristics and the overall pattern of change in the vegetation cover fraction. Our results demonstrated the ability of multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis to accurately model the vegetation cover fraction in pixels despite the complex spectral confusion of different land cover types. The integration of multiple techniques revealed various changing patterns in urban greenness in this region. The overall vegetation cover has exhibited a drastic decrease over the past two decades, while no significant change occurred in the scenic spots that were studied. Meanwhile, a remarkable recovery of greenness was observed in the existing urban area. The increasing coverage of small green patches has played a vital role in the recovery of urban greenness. These changing patterns were more obvious during the period from 2002 to 2010 than from 1990 to 2002, and they revealed the combined effects of rapid urbanization and greening policies. This work demonstrates the usefulness of time series of vegetation cover fractions for conducting accurate and in-depth studies of the long-term trajectories of urban greenness to obtain meaningful information for sustainable urban development. PMID:25375176

  7. Monitoring urban greenness dynamics using multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Muye; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Xinyu; Hong, Yang; Wang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Urban greenness is increasingly recognized as an essential constituent of the urban environment and can provide a range of services and enhance residents' quality of life. Understanding the pattern of urban greenness and exploring its spatiotemporal dynamics would contribute valuable information for urban planning. In this paper, we investigated the pattern of urban greenness in Hangzhou, China, over the past two decades using time series Landsat-5 TM data obtained in 1990, 2002, and 2010. Multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was used to derive vegetation cover fractions at the subpixel level. An RGB-vegetation fraction model, change intensity analysis and the concentric technique were integrated to reveal the detailed, spatial characteristics and the overall pattern of change in the vegetation cover fraction. Our results demonstrated the ability of multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis to accurately model the vegetation cover fraction in pixels despite the complex spectral confusion of different land cover types. The integration of multiple techniques revealed various changing patterns in urban greenness in this region. The overall vegetation cover has exhibited a drastic decrease over the past two decades, while no significant change occurred in the scenic spots that were studied. Meanwhile, a remarkable recovery of greenness was observed in the existing urban area. The increasing coverage of small green patches has played a vital role in the recovery of urban greenness. These changing patterns were more obvious during the period from 2002 to 2010 than from 1990 to 2002, and they revealed the combined effects of rapid urbanization and greening policies. This work demonstrates the usefulness of time series of vegetation cover fractions for conducting accurate and in-depth studies of the long-term trajectories of urban greenness to obtain meaningful information for sustainable urban development.

  8. Spectral analysis of snoring events from an Emfit mattress.

    PubMed

    Perez-Macias, Jose Maria; Viik, Jari; Varri, Alpo; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Tenhunen, Mirja

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the capability of an Emfit (electromechanical film transducer) mattress to detect snoring (SN) by analyzing the spectral differences between normal breathing (NB) and SN. Episodes of representative NB and SN of a maximum of 10 min were visually selected for analysis from 33 subjects. To define the bands of interest, we studied the statistical differences in the power spectral density (PSD) between both breathing types. Three bands were selected for further analysis: 6-16 Hz (BW1), 16-30 Hz (BW2) and 60-100 Hz (BW3). We characterized the differences between NB and SN periods in these bands using a set of spectral features estimated from the PSD. We found that 15 out of the 29 features reached statistical significance with the Mann-Whitney U-test. Diagnostic properties for each feature were assessed using receiver operating characteristic analysis. According to our results, the highest diagnostic performance was achieved using the power ratio between BW2 and BW3 (0.85 area under the receiver operating curve, 80% sensitivity, 80% specificity and 80% accuracy). We found that there are significant differences in the defined bands between the NB and SN periods. A peak was found in BW3 for SN epochs, which was best detected using power ratios. Our work suggests that it is possible to detect snoring with an Emfit mattress. The mattress-type movement sensors are inexpensive and unobtrusive, and thus provide an interesting tool for sleep research.

  9. Dictionary-driven Ischemia Detection from Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP–BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP–BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson’s r = 0.84) w.r.t. infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP–BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique. PMID:26292338

  10. Incorporating Endmember Variability into Spectral Mixture Analysis Through Endmember Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.; Wessman, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in canopy structure and biochemistry induces a concomitant variation in the top-of-canopy spectral reflectance of a vegetation type. Hence, the use of a single endmember spectrum to track the fractional abundance of a given vegetation cover in a hyperspectral image may result in fractions with considerable error. One solution to the problem of endmember variability is to increase the number of endmembers used in a spectral mixture analysis of the image. For example, there could be several tree endmembers in the analysis because of differences in leaf area index (LAI) and multiple scatterings between leaves and stems. However, it is often difficult in terms of computer or human interaction time to select more than six or seven endmembers and any non-removable noise, as well as the number of uncorrelated bands in the image, limits the number of endmembers that can be discriminated. Moreover, as endmembers proliferate, their interpretation becomes increasingly difficult and often applications simply need the aerial fractions of a few land cover components which comprise most of the scene. In order to incorporate endmember variability into spectral mixture analysis, we propose representing a landscape component type not with one endmember spectrum but with a set or bundle of spectra, each of which is feasible as the spectrum of an instance of the component (e.g., in the case of a tree component, each spectrum could reasonably be the spectral reflectance of a tree canopy). These endmember bundles can be used with nonlinear optimization algorithms to find upper and lower bounds on endmember fractions. This approach to endmember variability naturally evolved from previous work in deriving endmembers from the data itself by fitting a triangle, tetrahedron or, more generally, a simplex to the data cloud reduced in dimension by a principal component analysis. Conceptually, endmember variability could make it difficult to find a simplex that both surrounds the data

  11. Incorporating Endmember Variability into Spectral Mixture Analysis Through Endmember Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.; Wessman, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in canopy structure and biochemistry induces a concomitant variation in the top-of-canopy spectral reflectance of a vegetation type. Hence, the use of a single endmember spectrum to track the fractional abundance of a given vegetation cover in a hyperspectral image may result in fractions with considerable error. One solution to the problem of endmember variability is to increase the number of endmembers used in a spectral mixture analysis of the image. For example, there could be several tree endmembers in the analysis because of differences in leaf area index (LAI) and multiple scatterings between leaves and stems. However, it is often difficult in terms of computer or human interaction time to select more than six or seven endmembers and any non-removable noise, as well as the number of uncorrelated bands in the image, limits the number of endmembers that can be discriminated. Moreover, as endmembers proliferate, their interpretation becomes increasingly difficult and often applications simply need the aerial fractions of a few land cover components which comprise most of the scene. In order to incorporate endmember variability into spectral mixture analysis, we propose representing a landscape component type not with one endmember spectrum but with a set or bundle of spectra, each of which is feasible as the spectrum of an instance of the component (e.g., in the case of a tree component, each spectrum could reasonably be the spectral reflectance of a tree canopy). These endmember bundles can be used with nonlinear optimization algorithms to find upper and lower bounds on endmember fractions. This approach to endmember variability naturally evolved from previous work in deriving endmembers from the data itself by fitting a triangle, tetrahedron or, more generally, a simplex to the data cloud reduced in dimension by a principal component analysis. Conceptually, endmember variability could make it difficult to find a simplex that both surrounds the data

  12. Computational balance in real-time cyclic spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.; Loomis, H.H. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Real-time cyclic spectral analysis is useful in many applications, but is difficult to achieve because of its computational complexity. This paper studies the distribution of complex multipliers in multiprocessor cyclic spectrum analyzers, with the objective of obtaining computational balance. Computationally balanced implementations efficiently use hardware so that computational bottlenecks are reduced and a smooth flow of data between computational sections of the analyzer is maintained. Tables are presented that give the number of complex multipliers required in each section of the analyzer to obtain computational balance.

  13. Multiphoton autofluorescence spectral analysis for fungus imaging and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Kuo, Chien-Jui; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Wang, Shiou-Han; Chen, Wei-Liang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We performed multiphoton imaging on fungi of medical significance. Fungal hyphae and spores of Aspergillus flavus, Micosporum gypseum, Micosoprum canis, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans were found to be strongly autofluorescent but generate less prominent second harmonic signal. The cell wall and septum of fungal hyphae can be easily identified by autofluorescence imaging. We found that fungi of various species have distinct autofluorescence characteristics. Our result shows that the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis can be used to visualize and identify fungal species. This approach may be developed into an effective diagnostic tool for fungal identification.

  14. Autoregressive modeling for the spectral analysis of oceanographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Cornillon, Peter; Jackson, Leland B.

    1989-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number and volume of data sets useful for oceanographic studies. Many of these data sets consist of long temporal or spatial series derived from satellites and large-scale oceanographic experiments. These data sets are, however, often 'gappy' in space, irregular in time, and always of finite length. The conventional Fourier transform (FT) approach to the spectral analysis is thus often inapplicable, or where applicable, it provides questionable results. Here, through comparative analysis with the FT for different oceanographic data sets, the possibilities offered by autoregressive (AR) modeling to perform spectral analysis of gappy, finite-length series, are discussed. The applications demonstrate that as the length of the time series becomes shorter, the resolving power of the AR approach as compared with that of the FT improves. For the longest data sets examined here, 98 points, the AR method performed only slightly better than the FT, but for the very short ones, 17 points, the AR method showed a dramatic improvement over the FT. The application of the AR method to a gappy time series, although a secondary concern of this manuscript, further underlines the value of this approach.

  15. Autoregressive modeling for the spectral analysis of oceanographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Cornillon, Peter; Jackson, Leland B.

    1989-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number and volume of data sets useful for oceanographic studies. Many of these data sets consist of long temporal or spatial series derived from satellites and large-scale oceanographic experiments. These data sets are, however, often 'gappy' in space, irregular in time, and always of finite length. The conventional Fourier transform (FT) approach to the spectral analysis is thus often inapplicable, or where applicable, it provides questionable results. Here, through comparative analysis with the FT for different oceanographic data sets, the possibilities offered by autoregressive (AR) modeling to perform spectral analysis of gappy, finite-length series, are discussed. The applications demonstrate that as the length of the time series becomes shorter, the resolving power of the AR approach as compared with that of the FT improves. For the longest data sets examined here, 98 points, the AR method performed only slightly better than the FT, but for the very short ones, 17 points, the AR method showed a dramatic improvement over the FT. The application of the AR method to a gappy time series, although a secondary concern of this manuscript, further underlines the value of this approach.

  16. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  17. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the High-Magnetic-Field Pulsar B1509-58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Ng, Chi-Yung

    2016-04-01

    We report on timing and spectral analysis of the young, high-magnetic-field pulsar B1509-58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The on-pulsed X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 1.16(2), which is flatter than those determined with RXTE/PCA and NuSTAR. This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra, we clearly identified off-pulsed X-ray emission from the pulsar. The spectrum is best fitted by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ~0.14 keV, which is similar to those of other young and high-magnetic-field pulsars, and lies between those of magnetars and typical rotational-powered pulsars. For the non-thermal emission of PSR B1509-58, we found that the power law component of the off-pulsed emission is significantly steeper than that of the on-pulsed one. We further divided the data into 24 phase bins and found that the photon index varies between 1.0 and 2.0 and anti-correlating with the flux. A similar correlation was also found in the Crab Pulsar, and this requires further theoretical interpretations. This work is supported by a GRF grant of Hong Kong Government under 17300215.

  18. Multicomponent Analysis Using Synchronous-Excitation Phase-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-04

    Excitation", APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY , 41, 395-399 (1987). Vitense, K. R. and McGown, L. B., "Simultaneous Two-Component Determination of Metals with 5-Sulfo-8...34, APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY , 41, 1080-1082 (1987). Vitense, K. R. and McGown, L. B., "Simultaneous Determination of A1(I1I) and Ga(III) with Lumogallion by Using

  19. Cytogenetic analysis of interphase cells using spectral imaging [SIm] technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Smida, Jan; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Lersch, Robert A.; Hung, Jamie; Hsieh, H. B.; Salassidis, K.; McNamara, George; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    2000-03-01

    Spectral Imaging (SIm) has dramatically improved our ability to localize and quantitatively analyze multiple nucleic acid targets such as chromosomes, genes and gene transcripts. Studies on metaphase cells such as `Spectral Karyotyping' are less complicated than interphase cell studies because the objects (chromosomes) are spatially separated and ratio- labeled probes can be used to uniquely stain each chromosome type. Our research, however, targets the extensive cytogenetic and phenotypic analysis of interphase cells. The complex organization of interphase chromatin and co- localization of gene transcripts (RNAs) in nuclear or cytoplasmic domains requires unique fluorochrome-labeling for each nucleic acid target. An increasing number of commercially available dyes for probe labeling and software to deconvolute partially overlapping emission spectra has helped to overcome most of these obstacles. This presentation summarizes our experience in analyzing numerical and structural alterations in various human cell types (leukocytes, amniocytes, blastomeres or solid tissue) as well as our approach to multi-gene expression profiling using SIm. Examples illustrate a wide spectrum of groundbreaking techniques for interphase cell analysis. We demonstrate how ten or more chromosomes can be scored in interphase nuclei or the relative level of expression of different transforming RNAs in tumor cells can be measured by SIm.

  20. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  1. Groupwise shape analysis of the hippocampus using spectral matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Lombaert, Hervé; Lippé, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    The hippocampus is a prominent subcortical feature of interest in many neuroscience studies. Its subtle morphological changes often predicate illnesses, including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or epilepsy. The precise location of structural differences requires a reliable correspondence between shapes across a population. In this paper, we propose an automated method for groupwise hippocampal shape analysis based on a spectral decomposition of a group of shapes to solve the correspondence problem between sets of meshes. The framework generates diffeomorphic correspondence maps across a population, which enables us to create a mean shape. Morphological changes are then located between two groups of subjects. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on a dataset of 42 hippocampus shapes and compared with a state-of-the-art structural shape analysis approach, using spherical harmonics. Difference maps between mean shapes of two test groups demonstrates that the two approaches showed results with insignificant differences, while Gaussian curvature measures calculated between matched vertices showed a better fit and reduced variability with spectral matching.

  2. Efficient geometric rectification techniques for spectral analysis algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Pang, S. S.; Curlander, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral analysis algorithm is a viable technique for processing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in near real time throughput rates by trading the image resolution. One major challenge of the spectral analysis algorithm is that the output image, often referred to as the range-Doppler image, is represented in the iso-range and iso-Doppler lines, a curved grid format. This phenomenon is known to be the fanshape effect. Therefore, resampling is required to convert the range-Doppler image into a rectangular grid format before the individual images can be overlaid together to form seamless multi-look strip imagery. An efficient algorithm for geometric rectification of the range-Doppler image is presented. The proposed algorithm, realized in two one-dimensional resampling steps, takes into consideration the fanshape phenomenon of the range-Doppler image as well as the high squint angle and updates of the cross-track and along-track Doppler parameters. No ground reference points are required.

  3. MAC to VAX Connectivity: Heartrate Spectral Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Hasan H.; Faruque, Monazer

    1993-01-01

    The heart rate Spectral Analysis System (SAS) acquires and analyzes, in real-time, the Space Shuttle onboard electrocardiograph (EKG) experiment signals, calculates the heartrate, and applies a Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) to the heart rate. The system also calculates other statistical parameters such as the 'mean heart rate' over specific time period and heart rate histogram. This SAS is used by NASA Principal Investigators as a research tool to determine the effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular system. This is also used to determine if Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) is an effective countermeasure to the orthostatic intolerance experienced by astronauts upon return to normal gravity. In microgravity, astronauts perform the LBNP experiment in the mid deck of the Space Shuttle. The experiment data are downlinked by the orbiter telemetry system, then processed and analyzed in real-time by the integrated Life Sciences Data Acquisition (LSDS) - Spectral Analysis System. The data system is integrated within the framework of two different computer systems, VAX and Macintosh (Mac), using the networking infrastructure to assist the investigators in further understanding the most complex machine on Earth--the human body.

  4. Efficient geometric rectification techniques for spectral analysis algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Pang, S. S.; Curlander, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral analysis algorithm is a viable technique for processing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in near real time throughput rates by trading the image resolution. One major challenge of the spectral analysis algorithm is that the output image, often referred to as the range-Doppler image, is represented in the iso-range and iso-Doppler lines, a curved grid format. This phenomenon is known to be the fanshape effect. Therefore, resampling is required to convert the range-Doppler image into a rectangular grid format before the individual images can be overlaid together to form seamless multi-look strip imagery. An efficient algorithm for geometric rectification of the range-Doppler image is presented. The proposed algorithm, realized in two one-dimensional resampling steps, takes into consideration the fanshape phenomenon of the range-Doppler image as well as the high squint angle and updates of the cross-track and along-track Doppler parameters. No ground reference points are required.

  5. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-05-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  6. Improved spectral analysis for the motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.; Klabacha, J.

    2012-10-15

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from reversed field pinch plasmas in the Madison symmetric torus (MST) have been routinely obtained from fully resolved motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum analyses. Recently, the spectrum fit procedure has been improved by initializing and constraining the fit parameters based on the MSE model in the atomic data and analysis structure. A collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n= 4 and a simple Born approximation for ion-impact cross sections is used for this analysis. Measurement uncertainty is quantified by making MSE measurements with multiple views of a single spatial location, ranging 5%-15% for typical MST operation conditions. A multi-view fit improves the goodness of fit of MSE spectral features and background.

  7. Software for the Spectral Analysis of Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Nickelt, I.; Stampa, U.; Demleitner, M.; Koesterke, L.

    2009-09-01

    In a collaboration of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) and AstroGrid-D, the German Astronomy Community Grid (GACG), we provide a VO service for the access and the calculation of stellar synthetic energy distributions (SEDs) based on static as well as expanding non-LTE model atmospheres. At three levels, a VO user may directly compare observed and theoretical SEDs: The easiest and fastest way is to use pre-calculated SEDs from the GAVO database. For individual objects, grids of model atmospheres and SEDs can be calculated on the compute resources of AstroGrid-D within reasonable wallclock time. Experienced VO users may even create their own atomic data files for a more detailed analysis. This VO service also opens the perspective for a new approach to an automated spectral analysis of a large number of observations, e.g. provided by multi-object spectrographs.

  8. Spectral analysis of mammographic images using a multitaper method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Power spectral analysis in radiographic images is conventionally performed using a windowed overlapping averaging periodogram. This study describes an alternative approach using a multitaper technique and compares its performance with that of the standard method. This tool will be valuable in power spectrum estimation of images, whose content deviates significantly from uniform white noise. The performance of the multitaper approach will be evaluated in terms of spectral stability, variance reduction, bias, and frequency precision. The ultimate goal is the development of a useful tool for image quality assurance. Methods: A multitaper approach uses successive data windows of increasing order. This mitigates spectral leakage allowing one to calculate a reduced-variance power spectrum. The multitaper approach will be compared with the conventional power spectrum method in several typical situations, including the noise power spectra (NPS) measurements of simulated projection images of a uniform phantom, NPS measurement of real detector images of a uniform phantom for two clinical digital mammography systems, and the estimation of the anatomic noise in mammographic images (simulated images and clinical mammograms). Results: Examination of spectrum variance versus frequency resolution and bias indicates that the multitaper approach is superior to the conventional single taper methods in the prevention of spectrum leakage and variance reduction. More than four times finer frequency precision can be achieved with equivalent or less variance and bias. Conclusions: Without any shortening of the image data length, the bias is smaller and the frequency resolution is higher with the multitaper method, and the need to compromise in the choice of regions of interest size to balance between the reduction of variance and the loss of frequency resolution is largely eliminated.

  9. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton observations of the massive WR+O binary WR 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, E.; Nazé, Y.; Sana, H.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. To better understand the phenomenon of colliding winds in massive binary stars, we study the X-ray lightcurve of a WR+O system of the Carina region, a system well known for the high mass of its primary. Methods: Phase-resolved X-ray observations of the massive WR+O binary system WR 22 were performed with the XMM-Newton facility. We observed the object at seven different phases from near apastron to near periastron. Results: The X-ray spectrum can be represented by a two-component, optically thin, thermal plasma model with a first one at a typical temperature of 0.6 keV and a second hotter one in the range 2.0-4.5 keV. The hot component is indicative of a colliding wind phenomenon, but its flux is remarkably constant with time despite the high eccentricity of the orbit. Although surprising at first, this actually does not contradict the results of the hydrodynamical simulations of the wind collision that we performed. When the system goes from apastron to periastron, the soft part of the X-ray flux is progressively lowered by an increasing intervening absorbing column. This behaviour can be interpreted in terms of an X-ray emitting plasma located near the O star, but not fully intrinsic to it, and accompanying the star when it dives into the wind of the WR component. A model is presented that interprets most of the observational constraints. This model suggests that the mass-loss rate of dot{M}WR 1.6 × 10-5 {M}⊙ yr-1 assumed for the WR could still be slightly too high, whereas it is already lower than other published values. From the comparison of the observed and the expected absorptions at phases near periastron, we deduce that the hard X-ray emitting collision zone should at least have a typical size of 50-60 R⊙, but that the size for the soft X-ray emitting region could reach 244 R⊙ if the assumed mass-loss rate is correct. We also present an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity of the WR component that further questions the existence of intrinsic X

  10. Chandra Phase-resolved Spectroscopy of the High Magnetic Field Pulsar B1509-58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Ng, C.-Y.; Takata, J.; Shannon, R. M.; Johnston, S.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a timing and spectral analysis of the young, high magnetic field rotation-powered pulsar (RPP) B1509-58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The pulsar’s X-ray light curve can be fit by the two Gaussian components and the pulsed fraction shows moderate energy dependence over the Chandra band. The pulsed X-ray spectrum is well described by a power law with a photon index 1.16(4), which is harder than the values measured with RXTE/PCA and NuSTAR. This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra, we clearly identified off-pulse X-ray emission from the pulsar, and its spectrum is best fit by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ˜0.14 keV with a bolometric luminosity comparable to the luminosities of other young and high magnetic field RPPs, and it lies between the temperature of magnetars and typical RPPs. In addition, we found that the nonthermal X-ray emission of PSR B1509-58 is significantly softer in the off-pulse phase than in the pulsed phase, with the photon index varying between 1.0 and 1.8 and anticorrelated with the flux. This is similar to the behavior of three other young pulsars. We interpreted it as different contributions of pair-creation processes at different altitudes from the neutron star surface according to the outer-gap model.

  11. Microscopic fluorescence spectral analysis of basal cell carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingli; Lui, Harvey; Zloty, David; Cowan, Bryce; Warshawski, Larry; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2007-05-01

    Background and Objectives. Laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) is a promising tool for cancer diagnosis. This method is based on the differences in autofluorescence spectra between normal and cancerous tissues, but the underlined mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this research is to study the microscopic origins and intrinsic fluorescence properties of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) for better understanding of the mechanism of in vivo fluorescence detection and margin delineation of BCCs on skin patients. A home-made micro- spectrophotometer (MSP) system was used to image the fluorophore distribution and to measure the fluorescence spectra of various microscopic structures and regions on frozen tissue sections. Materials and Methods. BCC tissue samples were obtained from 14 patients undergoing surgical resections. After surgical removal, each tissue sample was immediately embedded in OCT medium and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. The frozen tissue block was then cut into 16-μm thickness sections using a cryostat microtome and placed on microscopic glass slides. The sections for fluorescence study were kept unstained and unfixed, and then analyzed by the MSP system. The adjacent tissue sections were H&E stained for histopathological examination and also served to help identify various microstructures on the adjacent unstained sections. The MSP system has all the functions of a conventional microscope, plus the ability of performing spectral analysis on selected micro-areas of a microscopic sample. For tissue fluorescence analysis, 442nm He-Cd laser light is used to illuminate and excite the unstained tissue sections. A 473-nm long pass filter was inserted behind the microscope objective to block the transmitted laser light while passing longer wavelength fluorescence signal. The fluorescence image of the sample can be viewed through the eyepieces and also recorded by a CCD camera. An optical fiber is mounted onto the image plane of the photograph

  12. Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA): Software for Exploratory Analysis of High-Resolution Spectral Reflectance Data on Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Lobos, Gustavo A.; Poblete-Echeverría, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This article describes public, free software that provides efficient exploratory analysis of high-resolution spectral reflectance data. Spectral reflectance data can suffer from problems such as poor signal to noise ratios in various wavebands or invalid measurements due to changes in incoming solar radiation or operator fatigue leading to poor orientation of sensors. Thus, exploratory data analysis is essential to identify appropriate data for further analyses. This software overcomes the problem that analysis tools such as Excel are cumbersome to use for the high number of wavelengths and samples typically acquired in these studies. The software, Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA), was initially developed for plant breeding, but it is also suitable for other studies such as precision agriculture, crop protection, ecophysiology plant nutrition, and soil fertility. Various spectral reflectance indices (SRIs) are often used to relate crop characteristics to spectral data and the software is loaded with 255 SRIs which can be applied quickly to the data. This article describes the architecture and functions of SK-UTALCA and the features of the data that led to the development of each of its modules. PMID:28119705

  13. Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA): Software for Exploratory Analysis of High-Resolution Spectral Reflectance Data on Plant Breeding.

    PubMed

    Lobos, Gustavo A; Poblete-Echeverría, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes public, free software that provides efficient exploratory analysis of high-resolution spectral reflectance data. Spectral reflectance data can suffer from problems such as poor signal to noise ratios in various wavebands or invalid measurements due to changes in incoming solar radiation or operator fatigue leading to poor orientation of sensors. Thus, exploratory data analysis is essential to identify appropriate data for further analyses. This software overcomes the problem that analysis tools such as Excel are cumbersome to use for the high number of wavelengths and samples typically acquired in these studies. The software, Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA), was initially developed for plant breeding, but it is also suitable for other studies such as precision agriculture, crop protection, ecophysiology plant nutrition, and soil fertility. Various spectral reflectance indices (SRIs) are often used to relate crop characteristics to spectral data and the software is loaded with 255 SRIs which can be applied quickly to the data. This article describes the architecture and functions of SK-UTALCA and the features of the data that led to the development of each of its modules.

  14. Clinical measurements analysis of multi-spectral photoplethysmograph biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, Lasma; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-05-01

    The developed portable multi-spectral photoplethysmograph (MS-PPG) optical biosensor device, intended for analysis of peripheral blood volume pulsations at different vascular depths, has been clinically verified. Multi-spectral monitoring was performed by means of a four - wavelengths (454 nm, 519 nm, 632 nm and 888 nm) light emitted diodes and photodiode with multi-channel signal output processing. Two such sensors can be operated in parallel and imposed on the patient's skin. The clinical measurements confirmed ability to detect PPG signals at four wavelengths simultaneously and to record temporal differences in the signal shapes (corresponding to different penetration depths) in normal and pathological skin. This study analyzed wavelengths relations between systole and diastole peak difference at various tissue depths in normal and pathological skin. The difference between parameters of healthy and pathological skin at various skin depths could be explain by oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin dominance at different wavelengths operated in sensor. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications in dermatology for skin assessment are discussed.

  15. Power spectral analysis of the EEG following protein malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Stisser, P; Forbes, W B; Tracy, C; Resnick, O; Morgane, P J

    1980-01-01

    In these studies, power spectral analysis techniques were utilized to quantify the EEG obtained from rats reared on either an 8% or 25% casein diet during various vigilance states at two stages of development: (1) adulthood-90 to 120 days old; and (2) immediately after weaning-22 to 23 days old. It was found that the cortical EEG contained relatively more power in the low frequencies (ie., 0.5 to 10 Hz) for the 22-23 day old animals than for the 90-120 day old rats, especially during the slow wave sleep states-SWS1 and SWS2. Theta activity (5-8 Hz) in the hippocampus was shown to have greater power for the 22-23 day old group than for the older animals during both REM sleep and waking. Analyses of power spectral data and other indices of the frequency distribution of the hippocampal EEG indicated that those animals subjected to protein malnutrition have significantly more power in the theta band during REM sleep than the normal adult group. Since it was also noted that the hippocampal EEG obtained from the 22-23 day old group contained relatively more power in the theta band than the 90-120 day old group, the dietary treatment effect might be intrepreted as an instance of retarded development associated with protein malnutrition. Thus, a significant effect of the dietary manipulation used in the study may be largely on the system responsible for regulating theta activity.

  16. Accuracy Enhancement of Inertial Sensors Utilizing High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Aboelmagd; Armstrong, Justin; El-Shafie, Ahmed; Karamat, Tashfeen; McGaughey, Don; Korenberg, Michael; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    In both military and civilian applications, the inertial navigation system (INS) and the global positioning system (GPS) are two complementary technologies that can be integrated to provide reliable positioning and navigation information for land vehicles. The accuracy enhancement of INS sensors and the integration of INS with GPS are the subjects of widespread research. Wavelet de-noising of INS sensors has had limited success in removing the long-term (low-frequency) inertial sensor errors. The primary objective of this research is to develop a novel inertial sensor accuracy enhancement technique that can remove both short-term and long-term error components from inertial sensor measurements prior to INS mechanization and INS/GPS integration. A high resolution spectral analysis technique called the fast orthogonal search (FOS) algorithm is used to accurately model the low frequency range of the spectrum, which includes the vehicle motion dynamics and inertial sensor errors. FOS models the spectral components with the most energy first and uses an adaptive threshold to stop adding frequency terms when fitting a term does not reduce the mean squared error more than fitting white noise. The proposed method was developed, tested and validated through road test experiments involving both low-end tactical grade and low cost MEMS-based inertial systems. The results demonstrate that in most cases the position accuracy during GPS outages using FOS de-noised data is superior to the position accuracy using wavelet de-noising.

  17. Advanced spectral analysis of ionospheric waves observed with sparse arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Intema, H. T.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a case study from a single, 6h observing period to illustrate the application of techniques developed for interferometric radio telescopes to the spectral analysis of observations of ionospheric fluctuations with sparse arrays. We have adapted the deconvolution methods used for making high dynamic range images of cosmic sources with radio arrays to making comparably high dynamic range maps of spectral power of wavelike ionospheric phenomena. In the example presented here, we have used observations of the total electron content (TEC) gradient derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of synchrotron emission from two galaxy clusters at 330MHz as well as GPS-based TEC measurements from a sparse array of 33 receivers located within New Mexico near the VLA. We show that these techniques provide a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of detected wavelike structures by correcting for both measurement inaccuracies and wavefront distortions. This is especially true for the GPS data when combining all available satellite/receiver pairs, which probe a larger physical area and likely have a wider variety of measurement errors than in the single-satellite case. In this instance, we found that the peak S/N of the detected waves was improved by more than an order of magnitude. The data products generated by the deconvolution procedure also allow for a reconstruction of the fluctuations as a two-dimensional waveform/phase screen that can be used to correct for their effects.

  18. Effects of ozone exposure on 'Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Savio Figueira; Brito Paiva, Luisa; Mota do Couto, Flavio; Gomes da Silva, Marcelo; Silva Sthel, Marcelo; Vargas, Helion; Mota, Leonardo; Goncalves de Oliveira, Jurandi; Miklos, Andras

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of 'Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  19. Effects of ozone exposure on `Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Savio Figueira; Mota, Leonardo; Paiva, Luisa Brito; Couto, Flávio Mota do; Silva, Marcelo Gomes da; Oliveira, Jurandi Gonçalves de; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Miklós, András

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of `Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  20. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software packagePySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is

  1. Spatially explicit spectral analysis of point clouds and geospatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of spatially explicit analyses of high-resolution spatially distributed data (imagery and point clouds) for the purposes of characterising spatial heterogeneity in geophysical phenomena necessitates the development of custom analytical and computational tools. In recent years, such analyses have become the basis of, for example, automated texture characterisation and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, from a variety of data types. In this work, much use has been made of statistical descriptors of localised spatial variations in amplitude variance (roughness), however the horizontal scale (wavelength) and spacing of roughness elements is rarely considered. This is despite the fact that the ratio of characteristic vertical to horizontal scales is not constant and can yield important information about physical scaling relationships. Spectral analysis is a hitherto under-utilised but powerful means to acquire statistical information about relevant amplitude and wavelength scales, simultaneously and with computational efficiency. Further, quantifying spatially distributed data in the frequency domain lends itself to the development of stochastic models for probing the underlying mechanisms which govern the spatial distribution of geological and geophysical phenomena. The software package PySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) has been developed for generic analyses of spatially distributed data in both the spatial and frequency domains. Developed predominantly in Python, it accesses libraries written in Cython and C++ for efficiency. It is open source and modular, therefore readily incorporated into, and combined with, other data analysis tools and frameworks with particular utility for supporting research in the fields of geomorphology, geophysics, hydrography, photogrammetry and remote sensing. The analytical and computational structure of the toolbox is described

  2. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1994-07-01

    Our ARM goal is to help improve both longwave and shortwave models used in GCM's by providing improved radiometric shortwave data. The inference of cloud cover and optical properties of clouds is another goal of this research effort. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling shortwave, including direct and diffuse irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling longwave, upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave, and aerosol optical depth that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data as a model test data set for ARM researchers. The major objective of our program has been to develop two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR). The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) contains six filtered, narrow-passband detectors, and one unfiltered silicon detector that serves as a surrogate total shortwave sensor. The rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) contains a 256-channel diode array that spans the wavelengths 350-1050 nm with resolution varying between 0.6 nm and 8 nm. With some of the instrument development complete we are devoting more effort to analysis of the MFRSR data. Progress was made on several fronts this year, resulting in conference papers and submissions to refereed journals. Data from the ASRC roof has been used to develop corrections of the MFRSR shortwave sensor. SGP data has been used to develop and validate a retrieval technique for total column water vapor. Total column ozone has been estimated using MFRSR data, but validation at the SGP was not possible for lack of a suitable ozone column standard. Some progress has been made on cloud cover detection, but it is not yet implemented as a routine classification and reporting procedure.

  3. Phase-resolved spectroscopy and Kepler photometry of the ultracompact AM CVn binary SDSS J190817.07+394036.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Groot, P. J.; Bloemen, S.; Levitan, D.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Nelemans, G.; Prince, T. A.; Fürst, F.; Geier, S.

    2015-10-01

    Kepler satellite photometry and phase-resolved spectroscopy of the ultracompact AM CVn type binary SDSS J190817.07+394036.4 are presented. The average spectra reveal a variety of weak metal lines of different species, including silicon, sulphur and magnesium as well as many lines of nitrogen, beside the strong absorption lines of neutral helium. The phase-folded spectra and the Doppler tomograms reveal an S-wave in emission in the core of the He I 4471 Å absorption line at a period of Porb = 1085.7 ± 2.8 s identifying this as the orbital period of the system. The Si II, Mg II and the core of some He I lines show an S-wave in absorption with a phase offset of 170° ± 15° compared to the S-wave in emission. The N II, Si III and some helium lines do not show any phase variability at all. The spectroscopic orbital period is in excellent agreement with a period at Porb = 1085.108(9) s detected in the 3 yr Kepler light curve. A Fourier analysis of the Q6-Q17 short-cadence data obtained by Kepler revealed a large number of frequencies above the noise level where the majority shows a large variability in frequency and amplitude. In an Observed-minus-computed analysis, we measured a \\vert dot{P}\\vert ˜ 1.0 × 10-8 s s-1 for some of the strongest variations and set a limit for the orbital period to be \\vert dot{P}\\vert <10^{-10} s s-1. The shape of the phase-folded light curve on the orbital period indicates the motion of the bright-spot. Models of the system were constructed to see whether the phases of the radial velocity curves and the light-curve variation can be combined to a coherent picture. However, from the measured phases neither the absorption nor the emission can be explained to originate in the bright-spot.

  4. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  5. Structural, spectral and thermal analysis of some metallocephradines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Ghareeb, Doaa A.; Nasr, Nessma M.

    2015-11-01

    A series of cephradine metal complexes were prepared and investigated by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility, ESR spectra, 1HNMR spectral studies and mass spectra. EDX patterns were carried out to emphasis the nature of the particles and the purity of products, while SEM is a sensitive tool used to justify on the microstructure and surface morphology. Thermal behavior of the synthesized complexes was illustrated by different techniques (TGA, DTA and DSC). The thermal decomposition of all the complexes ended with the formation of metal oxides and carbon residue as a final product. Also, the thermodynamic parameters and thermal transitions, such as glass transitions, crystallization and melting temperatures for cephradine and its metal complexes were evaluated and discussed. The entropy change values, ΔS#, showed that the transition states are more ordered than the reacting complexes.

  6. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  7. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  8. Space-adaptive spectral analysis of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Luciano; Argenti, Fabrizio; Dionisio, Michele; Facheris, Luca

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this paper is investigating the use of overcomplete bases for the representation of hyperspectral image data. The idea is building an overcomplete basis starting from several orthogonal or non-orthogonal bases and picking up a set of vectors fitting pixel spectra to the largest extent. A common technique to select the most representative elements of a signal is Matching Pursuit (MP). This technique is analogous to the Mixed-Transform Analysis (MTA) and has been successfully used to represent speech and images. The main problems in using MTA for hyperspectral data analysis are: (1) choice of bases that potentially convey the maximum of spectral information; (2) calculation of projections in the non-orthogonal representation. A large variety of bases has been taken into consideration, including several types of wavelets with compact support. An iterative approach is used to find the coefficients of the linear combination of vectors, so that the residual function has minimum energy. The computational cost is extrmeely high when a large set of data is to be processed. To encompass computational constraints, a reduced data set (RDS) is produced by applying the projection pursuit technique to each of the square blocks in which the input hyperspectral iamge is partitioned based on a spatial homogeneity criterion. Then MTA is applied to the RDS to find out a non-orthogonal frame capable to represent such data through waveforms selected to best match spectral features. Experimental results carried out on the hyperspectral data AVIRIS Moffett Field '97 show the joint use of different bases, including wavelet bases, may be preferable to a unique orthogonal basis in terms of energy compaction, was well as of significance of the outcome components.

  9. A comparative analysis of GPU implementations of spectral unmixing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Sergio; Plaza, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Spectral unmixing is a very important task for remotely sensed hyperspectral data exploitation. It involves the separation of a mixed pixel spectrum into its pure component spectra (called endmembers) and the estimation of the proportion (abundance) of each endmember in the pixel. Over the last years, several algorithms have been proposed for: i) automatic extraction of endmembers, and ii) estimation of the abundance of endmembers in each pixel of the hyperspectral image. The latter step usually imposes two constraints in abundance estimation: the non-negativity constraint (meaning that the estimated abundances cannot be negative) and the sum-toone constraint (meaning that the sum of endmember fractional abundances for a given pixel must be unity). These two steps comprise a hyperspectral unmixing chain, which can be very time-consuming (particularly for high-dimensional hyperspectral images). Parallel computing architectures have offered an attractive solution for fast unmixing of hyperspectral data sets, but these systems are expensive and difficult to adapt to on-board data processing scenarios, in which low-weight and low-power integrated components are essential to reduce mission payload and obtain analysis results in (near) real-time. In this paper, we perform an inter-comparison of parallel algorithms for automatic extraction of pure spectral signatures or endmembers and for estimation of the abundance of endmembers in each pixel of the scene. The compared techniques are implemented in graphics processing units (GPUs). These hardware accelerators can bridge the gap towards on-board processing of this kind of data. The considered algorithms comprise the orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), iterative error analysis (IEA) and N-FINDR algorithms for endmember extraction, as well as unconstrained, partially constrained and fully constrained abundance estimation. The considered implementations are inter-compared using different GPU architectures and hyperspectral

  10. [Detection of citrus greening based on Vis-NIR spectroscopy and spectral feature analysis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hao; Ji, Hai-Yan; Won, Suk Lee

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper we discussed the methods of classification of citrus greening and extraction of spectral features based on the spectral reflectance of four different statuses of citrus leaves (healthy, HLB, iron deficiency and nitrogen deficiency). Between two classes of classification, the values of discriminability of different spectra were calculated to extract spectral features. The greater value of discriminability showed a bigger difference of the two spectra, which means it would be easier to distinguish the two classes. By the Fisher linear discriminant analysis, three classification models (HLB & healthy, HLB & iron deficiency and HLB & nitrogen deficiency) based on the spectral features yielded more than 90% accuracies, which were better than expected. And at last, we discussed the application of the classification tree in multi-class discriminant analysis and spectral features extraction. The models trained based on the original reflectance spectra, first derivative and selected spectral features yielded more than 88% average accuracy, and especially the model based on the spectral features yielded more than 94% average accuracies, which verified the feasibility of detection of citrus greening in multi-class discriminant analysis and the importance of the spectral feature extraction. The results were compared based on classification tree, k-NN and Bayesian classifiers. Adoption of spectral features as input variables was significantly superior to using the original spectrum, which confirmed the validity of spectral feature selection. Spectral features could be used well for developing a multi-spectral imaging system to detect the citrus greening.

  11. Development of spectral analysis math models and software program and spectral analyzer, digital converter interface equipment design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, W. L.; Robinson, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spectral analyses of angle-modulated communication systems is studied by: (1) performing a literature survey of candidate power spectrum computational techniques, determining the computational requirements, and formulating a mathematical model satisfying these requirements; (2) implementing the model on UNIVAC 1230 digital computer as the Spectral Analysis Program (SAP); and (3) developing the hardware specifications for a data acquisition system which will acquire an input modulating signal for SAP. The SAP computational technique uses extended fast Fourier transform and represents a generalized approach for simple and complex modulating signals.

  12. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  13. Tomographic spectral imaging: Data acquisition and analysis via multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotula, Paul G.; Sorensen, N. R.

    2011-07-01

    Tomographic spectral imaging is a powerful technique for the three-dimensional (3-D) analysis of materials. Using a focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer, 3-D microanalysis can be performed on individual regions of a sample, such as defects, with microanalytical spatial resolution of better than 300 nm typically. The focused ion-beam can serially section at comparable thicknesses to sequentially reveal new analytical surfaces within the specimen. After each slice a full 2-spatial dimension spectral image, consisting of a complete spectrum at each point in the 2-D array, is acquired with the scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer on the same platform. The process is repeated multiple times to result in a 3-D or tomographic spectral image. The challenge is to effectively and efficiently analyze the tomographic spectral image to extract chemical phase distributions. Therefore, automated multivariate statistical analysis methods were developed and applied to these images. Sandia's Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis multivariate statistical analysis software requires no a priori information to find even very weak signals hidden in the data sets. The result of the analysis is a small number of chemical components which describe the 3-D phase distribution in the volume of material sampled. These 3-D phases can then be effectively visualized with off-the-shelf 3-D rendering software.

  14. Analysis of cirrus cloud spectral signatures in the far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Tosi, E.; Veglio, P.; Palchetti, L.; Bianchini, G.; Di Girolamo, P.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Summa, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper analyses high spectral resolution downwelling radiance measurements in the far infrared in the presence of cirrus clouds taken by the REFIR-PAD interferometer, deployed at 3500 m above the sea level at the Testa Grigia station (Italy), during the Earth COoling by WAter vapouR emission (ECOWAR) campaign. Atmospheric state and cloud geometry are characterised by the co-located millimeter-wave spectrometer GBMS and by radiosonde profile data, an interferometer (I-BEST) and a Raman lidar system deployed at a nearby location (Cervinia). Cloud optical depth and effective diameter are retrieved from REFIR-PAD data using a limited number of channels in the 820-960 cm-1 interval. The retrieved cloud parameters are the input data for simulations covering the 250-1100 cm-1 band in order to test our ability to reproduce the REFIR-PAD spectra in the presence of ice clouds. Inverse and forward simulations are based on the same radiative transfer code. A priori information concerning cloud ice vertical distribution is used to better constrain the simulation scheme and an analysis of the degree of approximation of the phase function within the radiative transfer codes is performed to define the accuracy of computations. Simulation-data residuals over the REFIR-PAD spectral interval show an excellent agreement in the window region, but values are larger than total measurement uncertainties in the far infrared. Possible causes are investigated. It is shown that the uncertainties related to the water vapour and temperature profiles are of the same order as the sensitivity to the a priori assumption on particle habits for an up-looking configuration. In case of a down-looking configuration, errors due to possible incorrect description of the water vapour profile would be drastically reduced.

  15. Power Spectral Analysis of Simultaneous VLBI and GPS Tropospheric Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Boehm, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations by space geodetic techniques experience refraction and signal delay due to passage through the Earth's atmosphere. For high-accuracy positioning results, data analysts must account for these effects. Since independent path delay values of sufficient accuracy are not usually available, nuisance parameters are commonly added in the geodetic analysis. The general validity of such zenith path delay (ZPD) estimates as true atmospheric measures has been confirmed by comparison of results from independent radiometric and other techniques over many years. Biases and standard deviations in the sub-cm range are normally found, which is expected to be adequate as inputs to improve the forecast performance of numerical weather models. To better understand the noise characteristics of ZPD estimates from VLBI and GPS, we have examined the power spectra of simultaneous observations during a 15-day period in October 2002. The official combined ZPD products from the technique services have been used primarily, but series from individual analysis centers have also been included. For the seven sites studied, the power-law spectral indices over sub-daily intervals are close to -8/3, consistent with fully developed Kolmogorov turbulence, and flatten over longer periods. The VLBI series, sampled hourly, show white noise at levels of 0.7 to 1.5 mm for frequencies above 5 cycles per day. The simultaneous GPS series, sampled every 2 hours, display no indication of white noise except for one receiver with poor data analysis. The spectra of VLBI-GPS differences are generally flat but show possible signs of excess noise in some spectral bands. Based on these results, estimating VLBI ZPD values more often than every few hours should be reconsidered, especially if changes would strengthen other parameters. On the other hand, GPS-based ZPD estimates should be determined more frequently, at least hourly. Considering the greater reliability of the VLBI scale and the corresponding

  16. Phase-resolved pulse propagation through metallic photonic crystal slabs: plasmonic slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhardt, Anja; Nau, Dietmar; Bauer, Christina; Christ, André; Gräbeldinger, Hedi; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-01

    We characterized the electromagnetic field of ultra-short laser pulses after propagation through metallic photonic crystal structures featuring photonic and plasmonic resonances. The complete pulse information, i.e. the envelope and phase of the electromagnetic field, was measured using the technique of cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating. In good agreement, measurements and scattering matrix simulations show a dispersive behaviour of the spectral phase at the position of the resonances. Asymmetric Fano-type resonances go along with asymmetric phase characteristics. Furthermore, the spectral phase is used to calculate the dispersion of the sample and possible applications in dispersion compensation are investigated. Group refractive indices of 700 and 70 and group delay dispersion values of 90 000 fs2 and 5000 fs2 are achieved in transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization, respectively. The behaviour of extinction and spectral phase can be understood from an intuitive model using the complex transmission amplitude. An associated depiction in the complex plane is a useful approach in this context. This method promises to be valuable also in photonic crystal and filter design, for example, with regards to the symmetrization of the resonances. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  17. Phase-resolved pulse propagation through metallic photonic crystal slabs: plasmonic slow light.

    PubMed

    Schönhardt, Anja; Nau, Dietmar; Bauer, Christina; Christ, André; Gräbeldinger, Hedi; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-28

    We characterized the electromagnetic field of ultra-short laser pulses after propagation through metallic photonic crystal structures featuring photonic and plasmonic resonances. The complete pulse information, i.e. the envelope and phase of the electromagnetic field, was measured using the technique of cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating. In good agreement, measurements and scattering matrix simulations show a dispersive behaviour of the spectral phase at the position of the resonances. Asymmetric Fano-type resonances go along with asymmetric phase characteristics. Furthermore, the spectral phase is used to calculate the dispersion of the sample and possible applications in dispersion compensation are investigated. Group refractive indices of 700 and 70 and group delay dispersion values of 90 000 fs(2) and 5000 fs(2) are achieved in transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization, respectively. The behaviour of extinction and spectral phase can be understood from an intuitive model using the complex transmission amplitude. An associated depiction in the complex plane is a useful approach in this context. This method promises to be valuable also in photonic crystal and filter design, for example, with regards to the symmetrization of the resonances.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Spectral analysis of the Stromlo-APM Survey - I. Spectral properties of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresse, L.; Maddox, S.; Loveday, J.; Singleton, C.

    1999-11-01

    We analyse spectral properties of 1671 galaxies from the Stromlo-APM Survey, selected to have 15<=bJ<=17.15 and having a mean redshift z=0.05. This is a representative local sample of field galaxies, so the global properties of the galaxy population provide a comparative point for analysis of more distant surveys. We measure Hα, [Oii] λ3727, [Sii] λλ6716, 6731, [Nii] λ6583 and [Oi] λ6300 equivalent widths and the D4000 break index. The 5-Å-resolution spectra use an 8-arcsec slit, which typically covers 40-50per cent of the galaxy area. We find no evidence for systematic trends depending on the fraction of galaxy covered by the slit, and further analysis suggests that our spectra are representative of integrated galaxy spectra. We classify spectra according to their Hα emission, which is closely related to massive star formation. Overall we find that 61per cent of galaxies are Hα emitters with rest-frame equivalent widths EW(Hα) >~2Å. The emission-line galaxy (ELG) fraction is smaller than seen in the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS) at z=0.2, and is consistent with a rapid evolution of Hα luminosity density. The ELG fraction and EW(Hα) increase at fainter absolute magnitudes, smaller projected area and smaller D4000. In the local Universe, faint, small galaxies are dominated by star formation activity, while bright, large galaxies are more quiescent. This picture of the local Universe is quite different from that of the distant one; bright galaxies appear to show rapidly increasing activity as one moves further back in time. We find that the ratio [Nii] λ6583/Hα is anticorrelated with EW(Hα), and that the value of 0.5 commonly used to remove the [Nii] contribution from blended Hα+[Nii] λλ6548, 6583 applies only for samples with an EW distribution similar to that seen at low redshift. We show that the [Oii], [Nii], [Sii] and Hα EWs are correlated, but with large dispersions (~50per cent) owing to the diversity of galaxy contents sampled. Our

  19. Identification of Random Loads Impinging on the RAH-66 Comanche Helicopter Empennage Using Spectral Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    using DMAP commands, the eigenvalue matrix (representing NASTRAN natural frequencies) was altered to actual frequencies. The resulting accelerations...and accelerometers, the spectral content of the response and excitation was determined Then, using a NASTRAN model modified to replicate the flight...Helicopter, Random Vibrations, Comanche Tail Section, Structural Analysis, Spectral Analysis, NASTRAN Analysis 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 155 16. PRICE

  20. Characteristics of the 5-μm-bright spectral unit from spectral analysis of Tui Regio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.

    2014-11-01

    Tui Regio, Titan's largest outcrop of 5-μm-bright material, exhibits one of the few absorption features identified on Titan's surface McCord et al. (2008). In this work, we seek to constrain the formation mechanism for this spectral unit by characterizing the physical structure and optical properties of the surface. To do so, we explore the occurrence of this absorption feature in all available VIMS coverage of Tui Regio and investigate the depth of the absorption as a function of phase angle. With more thorough understanding of how the 4.92-μm absorption feature works at Tui, we will be better able to compare it to other evaporitic material, especially the north polar deposits where VIMS observations are generally of different viewing geometries, and thus identify common characteristics of the 5-μm-bright spectral unit.

  1. Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 for Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Feiming; Sue, Miles; Peng, Ted; Tan, Harry; Liang, Robert; Kinman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Spectral Analysis Tool 6.2 is the latest version of a computer program that assists in analysis of interference between radio signals of the types most commonly used in Earth/spacecraft radio communications. [An earlier version was reported in Software for Analyzing Earth/Spacecraft Radio Interference (NPO-20422), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 4 (April 2001), page 52.] SAT 6.2 calculates signal spectra, bandwidths, and interference effects for several families of modulation schemes. Several types of filters can be modeled, and the program calculates and displays signal spectra after filtering by any of the modeled filters. The program accommodates two simultaneous signals: a desired signal and an interferer. The interference-to-signal power ratio can be calculated for the filtered desired and interfering signals. Bandwidth-occupancy and link-budget calculators are included for the user s convenience. SAT 6.2 has a new software structure and provides a new user interface that is both intuitive and convenient. SAT 6.2 incorporates multi-tasking, multi-threaded execution, virtual memory management, and a dynamic link library. SAT 6.2 is designed for use on 32- bit computers employing Microsoft Windows operating systems.

  2. Informed spectral analysis: audio signal parameter estimation using side information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourer, Dominique; Marchand, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    Parametric models are of great interest for representing and manipulating sounds. However, the quality of the resulting signals depends on the precision of the parameters. When the signals are available, these parameters can be estimated, but the presence of noise decreases the resulting precision of the estimation. Furthermore, the Cramér-Rao bound shows the minimal error reachable with the best estimator, which can be insufficient for demanding applications. These limitations can be overcome by using the coding approach which consists in directly transmitting the parameters with the best precision using the minimal bitrate. However, this approach does not take advantage of the information provided by the estimation from the signal and may require a larger bitrate and a loss of compatibility with existing file formats. The purpose of this article is to propose a compromised approach, called the 'informed approach,' which combines analysis with (coded) side information in order to increase the precision of parameter estimation using a lower bitrate than pure coding approaches, the audio signal being known. Thus, the analysis problem is presented in a coder/decoder configuration where the side information is computed and inaudibly embedded into the mixture signal at the coder. At the decoder, the extra information is extracted and is used to assist the analysis process. This study proposes applying this approach to audio spectral analysis using sinusoidal modeling which is a well-known model with practical applications and where theoretical bounds have been calculated. This work aims at uncovering new approaches for audio quality-based applications. It provides a solution for challenging problems like active listening of music, source separation, and realistic sound transformations.

  3. Spectral analysis of linear relations and degenerate operator semigroups

    SciTech Connect

    Baskakov, A G; Chernyshov, K I

    2002-12-31

    Several problems of the spectral theory of linear relations in Banach spaces are considered. Linear differential inclusions in a Banach space are studied. The construction of the phase space and solutions is carried out with the help of the spectral theory of linear relations, ergodic theorems, and degenerate operator semigroups.

  4. Effect of method and parameters of spectral analysis on selected indices of simulated Doppler spectra.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K; Palko, T

    1993-05-01

    The sensitivity of Doppler spectral indices (mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral broadening index and turbulence intensity) to the conditions of spectral analysis (estimation method, data window, smoothing window or model order) increases with decreasing signal bandwidth and growing index complexity. The bias of spectral estimate has a more important effect on these indices than its variance. A too low order, in the case of autoregressive modeling and minimum variance methods, and excessive smoothing, in the case of the FFT method, result in increased errors of Doppler spectral indices. There is a trade-off between the errors resulting from a short data window and those due to insufficient temporal resolution.

  5. Study of cross-linking process in grafted polyethylene and ethylene based copolymer using a phase resolved photoacoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, D. T.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Porto, M. F.; Muniz, E. C.; Rubira, A. F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the phase resolved photoacoustic method has been employed to monitor water saturated vapor cross linking in both copolymer and grafted polyethylene. The overtone bands and stretching frequencies combinations of the -Si-OH, =CH2, -CH3, and -CH2-CH3 were monitored and analyzed accordingly to a 32 factorial design with nine samples. The results showed that the cross-linking processes were more efficient when the samples were prepared at 80 °C with the catalyst in the concentration range between 3% and 5% for grafted PE, while 70 °C was the best temperature to obtain copolymer.

  6. Robust strain mapping in optical coherence elastography by combining local phase-resolved measurements and cumulative displacement tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-03-01

    We report a novel hybrid method of robust strain mapping in compressional optical coherence elastography using combined phase measurements on sub-wavelength-scale and cumulative pixel-scale displacement tracking. This hybrid nature significantly extends the range of measurable displacements and strains in comparison with conventional direct phase-resolved measurements. As a result, the proposed strain-mapping method exhibits significantly increased robustness with respect to both additive noise and decorrelation noise produced by displacements and strains. The main advantages of the proposed approach are illustrated by numerical simulations. Experimental examples of obtained strain maps for phantoms and real biological tissues are also presented.

  7. [A New HAC Unsupervised Classifier Based on Spectral Harmonic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-ming; Wei, Hua-feng; Shi, Gang-qiang; Sun, Yang-yang; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Hyperspectral images classification is one of the important methods to identify image information, which has great significance for feature identification, dynamic monitoring and thematic information extraction, etc. Unsupervised classification without prior knowledge is widely used in hyperspectral image classification. This article proposes a new hyperspectral images unsupervised classification algorithm based on harmonic analysis(HA), which is called the harmonic analysis classifer (HAC). First, the HAC algorithm counts the first harmonic component and draws the histogram, so it can determine the initial feature categories and the pixel of cluster centers according to the number and location of the peak. Then, the algorithm is to map the waveform information of pixels to be classified spectrum into the feature space made up of harmonic decomposition times, amplitude and phase, and the similar features can be gotten together in the feature space, these pixels will be classified according to the principle of minimum distance. Finally, the algorithm computes the Euclidean distance of these pixels between cluster center, and merges the initial classification by setting the distance threshold. so the HAC can achieve the purpose of hyperspectral images classification. The paper collects spectral curves of two feature categories, and obtains harmonic decomposition times, amplitude and phase after harmonic analysis, the distribution of HA components in the feature space verified the correctness of the HAC. While the HAC algorithm is applied to EO-1 satellite Hyperion hyperspectral image and obtains the results of classification. Comparing with the hyperspectral image classifying results of K-MEANS, ISODATA and HAC classifiers, the HAC, as a unsupervised classification method, is confirmed to have better application on hyperspectral image classification.

  8. A novel spectral fingerprint analysis to discriminate dry red wines.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Tao, Yong-Sheng; Hou, Xiao-Fan; Dizy, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A novel spectral fingerprint to discriminate different dry red wines was built using data visualization method. Twelve red wines with different vintages, cultivars and ageing methods from Changli and Shacheng were sampled. Nine fractions of each wine were collected with a reversed-phase C18 column, and then they were lyophilized. The residue of each fraction was resolved with synthetic wine of the same volume with the fraction sample. The transmittance spectra of wines and their fractions were recorded from 190 to 1100 nm. And the spectral data were visualized to show their visual differences directly. Mono-phenols in wine and fractions were analyzed by HPLC-DAD at wavelengths in the range where located the obvious differences of the spectral fingerprints. The results showed that the spectral differences of wine samples lied in the range of 190 to 600 nm. There were obvious differences in visual maps among wines with different vintages, mainly around 520 nm. The visualization differences among wines with distinct geographical origins lay in the F8 maps, and the differences from the aging methods almost cover the whole wavelength range visualized. However, wines from different grape cultivars had the similar visual characteristics. HPLC-DAD identified the possible monophenol groups for the spectral differences at 280, 313, 365 and 520 nm. It was concluded that the visualization of spectral data from 190 to 600 nm could be used to build red wine spectral fingerprint to distinguish dry red wines with different vintages, origins, and ageing methods.

  9. Analysis of acoustic reduction using spectral similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Annika; Gubian, Michele; ten Bosch, Louis; Boves, Lou

    2009-12-01

    Articulatory and acoustic reduction can manifest itself in the temporal and spectral domains. This study introduces a measure of spectral reduction, which is based on the speech decoding techniques commonly used in automatic speech recognizers. Using data for four frequent Dutch affixes from a large corpus of spontaneous face-to-face conversations, it builds on an earlier study examining the effects of lexical frequency on durational reduction in spoken Dutch [Pluymaekers, M. et al. (2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 2561-2569], and compares the proposed measure of spectral reduction with duration as a measure of reduction. The results suggest that the spectral reduction scores capture other aspects of reduction than duration. While duration can--albeit to a moderate degree--be predicted by a number of linguistically motivated variables (such as word frequency, segmental context, and speech rate), the spectral reduction scores cannot. This suggests that the spectral reduction scores capture information that is not directly accounted for by the linguistically motivated variables. The results also show that the spectral reduction scores are able to predict a substantial amount of the variation in duration that the linguistically motivated variables do not account for.

  10. Derivative component analysis for mass spectral serum proteomic profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As a promising way to transform medicine, mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have seen a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, there is a lack of effective feature selection methods that are able to capture essential data behaviors to achieve clinical level disease diagnosis. Moreover, it faces a challenge from data reproducibility, which means that no two independent studies have been found to produce same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issue causes the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevents it from real clinical usage. Methods In this work, we propose a novel machine-learning algorithm: derivative component analysis (DCA) for high-dimensional mass spectral proteomic profiles. As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis examines input proteomics data in a multi-resolution approach by seeking its derivatives to capture latent data characteristics and conduct de-noising. We further demonstrate DCA's advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input proteomics data as a profile biomarker via integrating it with support vector machines to tackle the reproducibility issue, besides comparing it with state-of-the-art peers. Results Our results show that high-dimensional proteomics data are actually linearly separable under proposed derivative component analysis (DCA). As a novel multi-resolution feature selection algorithm, DCA not only overcomes the weakness of the traditional methods in subtle data behavior discovery, but also suggests an effective resolution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem and provides new techniques and insights in translational bioinformatics and machine learning. The DCA-based profile biomarker diagnosis makes clinical level diagnostic performances reproducible across different proteomic data, which is more robust and systematic than the existing biomarker discovery based

  11. Nonlinear Laplacian spectral analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenowitz, N. D.; Giannakis, D.; Majda, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of physical datasets using modern methods developed in machine learning presents unique challenges and opportunities. These datasets typically feature many degrees of freedom, which tends to increase the computational cost of statistical methods and complicate interpretation. In addition, physical systems frequently exhibit a high degree of symmetry that should be exploited by any data analysis technique. The classic problem of Rayleigh Benárd convection in a periodic domain is an example of such a physical system with trivial symmetries. This article presents a technique for analyzing the time variability of numerical simulations of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection at large aspect ratio and intermediate Rayleigh number. The simulated dynamics are highly unsteady and consist of several convective rolls that are distributed across the domain and oscillate with a preferred frequency. Intermittent extreme events in the net heat transfer, as quantified by the time-weighted probability distribution function of the Nusselt number, are a hallmark of these simulations. Nonlinear Laplacian Spectral Analysis (NLSA) is a data-driven method which is ideally suited for the study of such highly nonlinear and intermittent dynamics, but the trivial symmetries of the Rayleigh-Bénard problem such as horizontal shift-invariance can mask the interesting dynamics. To overcome this issue, the vertical velocity is averaged over parcels of similar temperature and height, which substantially compresses the size of the dataset and removes trivial horizontal symmetries. This isothermally averaged dataset, which is shown to preserve the net convective heat-flux across horizontal surfaces, is then used as an input to NLSA. The analysis generates a small number of orthogonal modes which describe the spatiotemporal variability of the heat transfer. A regression analysis shows that the extreme events of the net heat transfer are primarily associated with a family of

  12. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  13. On Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis: A Full Informational Spectral Representation for Nonlinear and Non-Stationary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Huang; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time- frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and nonstationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  14. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time–frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  15. Spectral analysis of GPS precise point positioning time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, C.; Desai, S.; Garcia Fernandez, M.; Sibois, A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results from performing spectral analysis on GPS positioning time series obtained from precise point positioning (PPP). The goal of this work was to evaluate the impact of different choices of processing strategies and models on GPS-based PPP. We studied the spectra of station positions, examined overall noise levels and identified the presence of spurious periodic signals. Testing various processing options allowed us to assess their effect on station position estimates. With the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's contribution to the second reprocessing campaign of the International GNSS Service (IGS) as our reference source for input orbits and clocks, we also considered the effects of using different orbit and clock products. This included products from the previous reprocessing campaign, which were fixed in the IGS05 reference frame, while recent products use the IGS08 frame. Of particular importance are our results from assessing the impact on the station position time series from the single-receiver ambiguity resolution capability offered by JPL's reprocessing campaigns. Furthermore, our tests raise the possibility of distinguishing between PPP processing settings, input orbits and clocks, and station data and location-dependent effects as causes of these features.

  16. A New Study of Mountain Snowpack through Graph Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongora, J. A.; Marshall, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to accurately quantify snowpack variability has major impacts on estimations of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Complex physics based models have attempted to constrain the physical mechanisms that most affect snowpack properties and have been successful in producing results that are comparable to the average changes seasonal snowpack undergoes during the accumulation and melt periods. However they fail to accurately model any abrupt changes, especially in mountainous terrain; in part, due to the lack of in-situ measurements that contain the detailed forcing data required by such models. This study approaches the problem using a merger of Graph Theory, Spectral and K-means Cluster Analysis, as well as Radial Basis Function Neural Network to partition a complete data set of SNODAS product in addition to LiDAR datasets at the 1 km scale. These partitions are used to implement machine learning techniques to make predictions about current and future snowpack conditions. This system leverages the ability of Graphs, collections of nodes and edges, to represent nonlinear systems, such as the continuous spatiotemporal changes in seasonal snowpack and has unique properties that allow optimal sampling design for monitoring and studying snowpack patterns.

  17. Statistical shape analysis of subcortical structures using spectral matching.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Lombaert, Herve; Datta, Alexandre N; Oser, Nadine; Létourneau-Guillon, Laurent; Lapointe, Laurence Vincent; Martin, Florence; Malfait, Domitille; Tucholka, Alan; Lippé, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Studying morphological changes of subcortical structures often predicate neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Hence, methods for quantifying morphological variations in the brain anatomy, including groupwise shape analyses, are becoming increasingly important for studying neurological disorders. In this paper, a novel groupwise shape analysis approach is proposed to detect regional morphological alterations in subcortical structures between two study groups, e.g., healthy and pathological subjects. The proposed scheme extracts smoothed triangulated surface meshes from segmented binary maps, and establishes reliable point-to-point correspondences among the population of surfaces using a spectral matching method. Mean curvature features are incorporated in the matching process, in order to increase the accuracy of the established surface correspondence. The mean shapes are created as the geometric mean of all surfaces in each group, and a distance map between these shapes is used to characterize the morphological changes between the two study groups. The resulting distance map is further analyzed to check for statistically significant differences between two populations. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated on two separate subcortical structures (hippocampus and putamen). Furthermore, the proposed methodology is validated in a clinical application for detecting abnormal subcortical shape variations in Alzheimer's disease. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art algorithms, has less computational cost, and is more sensitive to small morphological variations in patients with neuropathologies.

  18. Spectral analysis of storm surge in Hong Kong Victoria Harbour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tou, Stephen K. W.; Arumugam, K.

    Based on a linear model the dynamic characteristics of Victoria Harbour (Hong Kong) is obtained by means of spectral analysis of the storm surge hydrographs. The results show that the harbour is an ideal one which has a small gain factor and a flat response in the frequency range from 0 to 6 × 10 -5 Hz. The results also show that the power spectra possess the narrow band features which indicates that the periodic components associated with tidal motions are predominant over the random components. The power spectrum corresponding to a frequency of 2.3 × 10 -5 Hz is likely to be associated with the astronomical tides. The peaks in the power spectra at zero frequency suggest that the pumping mode of oscillations is dominant in a storm surge. This mode of oscillations represents the temporal variations in mean sea level. To demonstrate the full potential of the present model, more case studies should be conducted when surge as well as non-surge data are available.

  19. Spectral Analysis Flare ribbons by NST and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nengyi; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin; Jing, Ju

    2017-08-01

    As one of the most powerful phenomena of solar activities, flares have long been observed and studied extensively. Taking advantages of observing capabilities of modern solar telescopes and focal-plane instruments such as the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar observatory (BBSO), we are able to obtain high resolution imaging spectroscopic data in UV, visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Here we present the spectral analysis of an M6.5 flare (SOL2015-06-22T18:23) which was well covered by the joint observation of IRIS and NST. In the visible wavelengths H-alpha and TiO, we can separate the flare ribbon into a very narrow leading front and faint trailing component, of which the former is characterized by the intense emission and significant Doppler signals. In the IRIS UV spectra, the ribbon front shows distinct properties, such as the line broadening, Doppler shifts and central reversal pattern, which are consistent with the visible observations. These characteristics suggest that the ribbon front to be the p

  20. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, A.; Chen, J.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Continued advances in solar observations have led to higher-resolution magnetograms and surface (photospheric) images, revealing bipolar magnetic features operating near the resolution limit during emerging flux events and other phenomena used to predict solar eruptions responsible for geomagnetic plasma disturbances. However, line of sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A pixel dynamics model utilizing Stokes I spectral profiles was previously-used to quantify changes in the Doppler shift, width, asymmetry, and tail flatness of Fe I lines at 6301.5 and 6302.5 Å and used pixel-by-pixel line profile fluctuations to characterize quiet and active regions on the Sun. We use this pixel dynamics model with circularly polarized photospheric data (e.g., SOLIS data) to estimate plasma dynamic properties at a sub-pixel level. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties on sub-pixel scales.

  1. Spectral analysis of two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David; Hoffmann, Darius; Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models are well known to obey a transition from regular to quantum-chaotic spectral statistics. We are extending this concept to relatively simple two-dimensional many-body models. Also in two dimensions a transition from regular to chaotic spectral statistics is found and discussed. In particular, we analyze the dependence of the spectral properties on the bond number of the two-dimensional lattices and the applied boundary conditions. For maximal connectivity, the systems behave most regularly in agreement with the applicability of mean-field approaches in the limit of many nearest-neighbor couplings at each site.

  2. Studying soil properties using visible and near infrared spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, S.; Garfagnoli, F.; Innocenti, L.; Chiarantini, L.

    2009-04-01

    This research is carried out inside the DIGISOIL Project, whose purposes are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal measurement technologies, for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going form the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in digital soil mapping. The study area is located in the Virginio river basin, about 30 km south of Firenze, in the Chianti area, where soils with agricultural suitability have a high economic value connected to the production of internationally famous wines and olive oils. The most common soil threats, such as erosion and landslide, may determine huge economic losses, which must be considered in farming management practices. This basin has a length of about 23 km for a basin area of around 60,3 Km2. Geological formations outcropping in the area are Pliocene to Pleistocene marine and lacustrine sediments in beds with almost horizontal bedding. Vineyards, olive groves and annual crops are the main types of land use. A typical Mediterranean climate prevails with a dry summer followed by intense and sometimes prolonged rainfall in autumn, decreasing in winter. In this study, three types of VNIR and SWIR techniques, operating at different scales and in different environments (laboratory spectroscopy, portable field spectroscopy) are integrated to rapidly quantify various soil characteristics, in order to acquire data for assessing the risk of occurrence for typically agricultural practice-related soil threats (swelling, compaction, erosion, landslides, organic matter decline, ect.) and to collect ground data in order to build up a spectral library to be used in image analysis from air-borne and satellite sensors. Difficulties encountered in imaging spectroscopy, such as influence of measurements conditions, atmospheric attenuation, scene dependency and sampling representation are investigated and mathematical pre-treatments, using proper algorithms, are applied and

  3. Bayesian Spectral Analysis of Chorus Sub-Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a Bayesian spectral analysis technique that calculates the probability distribution functions of a superposition of wave-modes each described by a linear growth rate, a frequency and a chirp rate. The Bayesian framework has a number of advantages, including 1) reducing the parameter space by integrating over the amplitude and phase of the wave, 2) incorporating the data from each channel to determine the model parameters such as frequency which leads to high resolution results in frequency and time, 3) the ability to consider the superposition of waves where the wave-parameters are closely spaced, 4) the ability to directly calculate the expectation value of wave parameters without resorting to ensemble averages, 5) the ability to calculate error bars on model parameters. We examine one rising-tone chorus element in detail from a disturbed time on November 14, 2012 using burst mode waveform data of the three components of the electric and magnetic field from the EMFISIS instrument on board NASA's Van Allen Probes. The results of the analysis demonstrate that whistler mode chorus sub-elements are composed of almost linear waves that are nearly parallel propagating with continuously changing wave parameters such as frequency and wave-vector. The change of wave-vector as a function of time is a three-dimensional phenomenon suggesting that 2D simulations may not accurately represent chorus. The initial parts of the sub-elements are in good agreement with the analytical theory of Omura et al. 2008. However, between sub-elements the wave parameters of the dominant mode undergo discrete changes in frequency and wave-vector. Near the boundary of sub-elements multiple waves are observed such that the evolution of the waves is reminiscent of wave-wave processes such as parametric decay or induced scattering by particles. These nonlinear processes are signatures of weak turbulence and may affect the saturation of the whistler-mode chorus instability.

  4. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability during trigger point acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yoji; Kimura, Kenichi; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-06-01

    To clarify changes in the cardiovascular autonomic nervous system function due to trigger point acupuncture, we evaluated differences in responses between acupuncture at trigger points and those at other sites using spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Subjects were 35 healthy men. Before measurements began the subjects were assigned to a trigger point acupuncture or control group based on the presence/absence of referred pain on applying pressure to a taut band within the right tibialis anterior muscle. The measurements were conducted in a room with a temperature of 25°C, with subjects in a long sitting position after 10 min rest. Acupuncture needles were retained for 10 min at two sites on the right tibialis anterior muscle. ECG was performed simultaneously with measurements of blood pressure and the respiratory cycle. Based on the R-R interval on the ECG, frequency analysis was performed, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components were extracted and the ratio of LF to HF components (LF/HF) was evaluated. The trigger point acupuncture group showed a transient decrease in heart rate and an increase in the HF component but no significant changes in LF/HF. In the control group, no significant changes were observed in heart rate, the HF component or LF/HF. There were no consistent changes in systolic or diastolic blood pressure in either group. These data suggest that acupuncture stimulation of trigger points of the tibialis anterior muscle transiently increases parasympathetic nerve activity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Pixel Analysis of Photospheric Spectral Data. I. Plasma Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolution show small dynamic features at or below the current resolving limits. A new pixel dynamics method has been developed to analyze spectral profiles and quantify changes in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness of photospheric absorption lines. The algorithm evaluates variations of line profile properties in each pixel and determines the statistics of such fluctuations averaged over all pixels in a given region. The method has been used to derive statistical characteristics of pixel fluctuations in observed quiet-Sun regions, an active region with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe i 6301.5 Å are shown to have a distinct spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare in NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as stationary and contiguous patches of pixels adjacent to a sunspot exhibiting intense flattening in the line profile and line-center displacement as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity, which is not present in area scans of the non-eruptive active region. The analysis of pixel dynamics allows one to extract quantitative information on differences in plasma dynamics on sub-pixel scales in these photospheric regions. The analysis can be extended to include the Stokes parameters and study signatures of vector components of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  6. Phase-resolved heat-flux measurements on the blade of a full-scale rotating turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Seymour, P. J.; Woodward, S. H.; George, W. K.; Chupp, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents detailed phase-resolved heat-flux data obtained on the blade of a Teledyne 702 HP full-stage rotating turbine. A shock tube is used as a short-duration source of heated air, and platinum thin-film gages are used to obtain the heat-flux measurements. Results are presented along the midspan at several locations on the blade suction and pressure surfaces from the stagnation point to near the trailing edge. For these measurements, the turbine was operating at the design flow function and at 100 percent corrected speed. Results are presented for the design vane/blade spacing (0.19 Cs) and at a wide spacing (0.50 Cs). Data are also presented illustrating the phase-resolved blade heat-flux distribution with upstream cold gas injection from discrete holes on the vane surface. The results illustrate that several successive passages can be superimposed upon each other and that a heat-flux pattern can be determined within the passage.

  7. Orbital phase-resolved spectroscopy of 4U 1538-52 with MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodes-Roca, J. J.; Mihara, T.; Nakahira, S.; Torrejón, J. M.; Giménez-García, Á.; Bernabéu, G.

    2015-08-01

    Context. 4U 1538-52, an absorbed high mass X-ray binary with an orbital period of ~3.73 days, shows moderate orbital intensity modulations with a low level of counts during the eclipse. Several models have been proposed to explain the accretion at different orbital phases by a spherically symmetric stellar wind from the companion. Aims: The aim of this work is to study both the light curve and orbital phase spectroscopy of this source in the long term. In particular, we study the folded light curve and the changes in the spectral parameters with orbital phase to analyse the stellar wind of QV Nor, the mass donor of this binary system. Methods: We used all the observations made from the Gas Slit Camera on board MAXI of 4U 1538-52 covering many orbits continuously. We obtained the good interval times for all orbital phase ranges, which were the input for extracting our data. We estimated the orbital period of the system and then folded the light curves, and we fitted the X-ray spectra with the same model for every orbital phase spectrum. We also extracted the averaged spectrum of all the MAXI data available. Results: The MAXI spectra in the 2-20 keV energy range were fitted with an absorbed Comptonisation of cool photons on hot electrons. We found a strong orbital dependence of the absorption column density but neither the fluorescence iron emission line nor low energy excess were needed to fit the MAXI spectra. The variation in the spectral parameters over the binary orbit were used to examine the mode of accretion onto the neutron star in 4U 1538-52. We deduce a best value of Ṁ/v∞ = 0.65 × 10-9M⊙ yr-1/ (km s-1) for QV Nor.

  8. Hurricane coastal flood analysis using multispectral spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogashawara, I.; Ferreira, C.; Curtarelli, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Flooding is one of the main hazards caused by extreme events such as hurricanes and tropical storms. Therefore, flood maps are a crucial tool to support policy makers, environmental managers and other government agencies for emergency management, disaster recovery and risk reduction planning. However traditional flood mapping methods rely heavily on the interpolation of hydrodynamic models results, and most recently, the extensive collection of field data. These methods are time-consuming, labor intensive, and costly. Efficient and fast response alternative methods should be developed in order to improve flood mapping, and remote sensing has been proved as a valuable tool for this application. Our goal in this paper is to introduce a novel technique based on spectral analysis in order to aggregate knowledge and information to map coastal flood areas. For this purpose we used the Normalized Diference Water Index (NDWI) which was derived from two the medium resolution LANDSAT/TM 5 surface reflectance product from the LANDSAT climate data record (CDR). This product is generated from specialized software called Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS). We used the surface reflectance products acquired before and after the passage of Hurricane Ike for East Texas in September of 2008. We used as end member a classification of estimated flooded area based on the United States Geological Survey (USGS) mobile storm surge network that was deployed for Hurricane Ike. We used a dataset which consisted of 59 water levels recording stations. The estimated flooded area was delineated interpolating the maximum surge in each location using a spline with barriers method with high tension and a 30 meter Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from the National Elevation Dataset (NED). Our results showed that, in the flooded area, the NDWI values decreased after the hurricane landfall on average from 0.38 to 0.18 and the median value decreased from 0.36 to 0.2. However

  9. Analysis of wheezes using wavelet higher order spectral features.

    PubMed

    Taplidou, Styliani A; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2010-07-01

    Wheezes are musical breath sounds, which usually imply an existing pulmonary obstruction, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although many studies have addressed the problem of wheeze detection, a limited number of scientific works has focused in the analysis of wheeze characteristics, and in particular, their time-varying nonlinear characteristics. In this study, an effort is made to reveal and statistically analyze the nonlinear characteristics of wheezes and their evolution over time, as they are reflected in the quadratic phase coupling of their harmonics. To this end, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used in combination with third-order spectra to define the analysis domain, where the nonlinear interactions of the harmonics of wheezes and their time variations are revealed by incorporating instantaneous wavelet bispectrum and bicoherence, which provide with the instantaneous biamplitude and biphase curves. Based on this nonlinear information pool, a set of 23 features is proposed for the nonlinear analysis of wheezes. Two complementary perspectives, i.e., general and detailed, related to average performance and to localities, respectively, were used in the construction of the feature set, in order to embed trends and local behaviors, respectively, seen in the nonlinear interaction of the harmonic elements of wheezes over time. The proposed feature set was evaluated on a dataset of wheezes, acquired from adult patients with diagnosed asthma and COPD from a lung sound database. The statistical evaluation of the feature set revealed discrimination ability between the two pathologies for all data subgroupings. In particular, when the total breathing cycle was examined, all 23 features, but one, showed statistically significant difference between the COPD and asthma pathologies, whereas for the subgroupings of inspiratory and expiratory phases, 18 out of 23 and 22 out of 23 features exhibited discrimination power, respectively

  10. Atmospheric Optical Properties and Spectral Analysis of Desert Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvgeni, D.; Karnieli, A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Maenhaut, W.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific background Aerosols can interact directly with solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering as well as absorption. In addition, they can indirectly alter the planetary albedo by modifying the properties of clouds. Objectives Investigations have been devoted to two main areas: (1) Aerosol climatology situation in the Negev desert, investigations of physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols, and study of the local and long-range transport trajectory of polluted air masses over the Negev desert; and (2) An estimation of the optical properties throughout the atmospheric column by surface measurements via performance of spectral and statistical analysis of the data received from two measurement systems. Results and conclusions Analyzed data from the Sede Boker site, in the Negev Desert of Israel, shows an increase in aerosol optical depth during the summer seasons and a decrease during winter. One of the possible reasons for this characteristic is an increase of the precipitable water (reaches 3.0-3.5 cm) due to a constant wind stream from the Mediterranean Sea in same time. The highest probability distribution of the aerosol optical depth is in the range of 0.15-0.20; and of the Angstrom parameter is in range of 0.83 - 1.07. During dust storm events, the scattering coefficient range at 670 nm and 440 nm wavelengths were inverted. It was discovered that the dust particles in this case had non-spherical character. Comparison between optical depth, measured through all atmospheric column, and scattering coefficient from surface measurements provides correlation coefficient (r) equal to 0.64. The Angstrom parameter, calculated via optical depth and via scattering coefficient, provides a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Thus we can obtain an estimate of the influence of the surface aerosol situation on column optical properties. The combined analysis of dust cloud altitude and optical depth as a function of the time indicates long-term transport and

  11. Pulmonary mechanics by spectral analysis of forced random noise.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, E D; Grassman, E D; Peters, W R

    1975-01-01

    The magnitude (Zrs) and phase angle (thetars) of the total respiratory impedance (Zrs), from 3 to 45 Hz, were rapidly obtained by a modification of the forced oscillation method, in which a random noise pressure wave is imposed on the respiratory system at the mouth and compared to the induced random flow using Fourier and spectral analysis. No significant amplitude or phase errors were introduced by the instrumentation. 10 normals, 5 smokers, and 5 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) were studied. Measurements of Zrs were corrected for the parallel shunt impedance of the mouth, which was independently measured during a Valsalva maneuver, and from which the mechanical properties of the mouth were derived. There were small differences in Zrs between normals and smokers but both behaved approximately like a second-order system with thetars = 0 degree in the range of 5--9 Hz, and thetars in the range of +40 degrees at 20 Hz and +60 degrees at 40 Hz. In COPD, thetars remained more negative (compared to normals and smokers) at all frequencies and crossed 0 between 15 and 29 Hz. Changes in Zrs, similar in those in COPD, were also observed at low lung volumes in normals. These changes, the effects of a bronchodilator in COPD, and deviations of Zrs from second-order behavior in normals, can best be explained by a two-compartment parallel model, in which time-constant discrepancies between the lung parenchyma and compliant airway keep compliant greater than inertial reactance, resulting in a more negative phase angle as frequency is increased. PMID:1184746

  12. Multitaper Spectral Analysis and Wavelet Denoising Applied to Helioseismic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm, R. W.; Gu, Y.; Hill, F.; Stark, P. B.; Fodor, I. K.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of solar normal mode frequencies from helioseismic observations can be improved by using Multitaper Spectral Analysis (MTSA) to estimate spectra from the time series, then using wavelet denoising of the log spectra. MTSA leads to a power spectrum estimate with reduced variance and better leakage properties than the conventional periodogram. Under the assumption of stationarity and mild regularity conditions, the log multitaper spectrum has a statistical distribution that is approximately Gaussian, so wavelet denoising is asymptotically an optimal method to reduce the noise in the estimated spectra. We find that a single m-upsilon spectrum benefits greatly from MTSA followed by wavelet denoising, and that wavelet denoising by itself can be used to improve m-averaged spectra. We compare estimates using two different 5-taper estimates (Stepian and sine tapers) and the periodogram estimate, for GONG time series at selected angular degrees l. We compare those three spectra with and without wavelet-denoising, both visually, and in terms of the mode parameters estimated from the pre-processed spectra using the GONG peak-fitting algorithm. The two multitaper estimates give equivalent results. The number of modes fitted well by the GONG algorithm is 20% to 60% larger (depending on l and the temporal frequency) when applied to the multitaper estimates than when applied to the periodogram. The estimated mode parameters (frequency, amplitude and width) are comparable for the three power spectrum estimates, except for modes with very small mode widths (a few frequency bins), where the multitaper spectra broadened the modest compared with the periodogram. We tested the influence of the number of tapers used and found that narrow modes at low n values are broadened to the extent that they can no longer be fit if the number of tapers is too large. For helioseismic time series of this length and temporal resolution, the optimal number of tapers is less than 10.

  13. Synthesis, spectral, computational and thermal analysis studies of metallocefotaxime antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Ali, Alaa E; Elasala, Gehan S

    2015-01-01

    Cefotaxime metal complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and two mixed metals complexes of (Fe,Cu) and (Fe,Ni) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra. The studies proved that cefotaxime may act as mono, bi, tri and tetra-dentate ligand through oxygen atoms of lactam carbonyl, carboxylic or amide carbonyl groups and nitrogen atom of thiazole ring. From the magnetic measurements and electronic spectral data, octahedral structures were proposed for all complexes. Quantum chemical methods have been performed for cefotaxime to calculate charges, bond lengths, bond angles, dihedral angles, electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), global hardness (η), softness (σ) and the electrophilicity index (ω). The thermal decomposition of the prepared metals complexes was studied by TGA, DTA and DSC techniques. Thermogravimetric studies revealed the presence of lattice or coordinated water molecules in all the prepared complexes. The decomposition mechanisms were suggested. The thermal decomposition of the complexes ended with the formation of metal oxides and carbon residue as a final product except in case of Hg complex, sublimation occur at the temperature range 376.5-575.0 °C so, only carbon residue was produced during thermal decomposition. The orders of chemical reactions (n) were calculated via the peak symmetry method and the activation parameters were computed from the thermal decomposition data. The geometries of complexes may be converted from Oh to Td during the thermal decomposition steps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectral analysis of GRB 080810 detected by Fermi GBM and Swift BAT

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, E.; Page, K.; McBreen, S.; Briggs, M. S.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.

    2009-05-25

    We present the spectral analysis of GRB 080810 which triggered both the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The time-integrated and time-resolved spectral characteristics of this burst are investigated by combining the precise localisation from Swift and its low energy response with the broader spectral coverage provided by the NaI and BGO detectors of GBM.

  15. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  16. Estimation of sub-pixel water area on Tibet plateau using multiple endmembers spectral mixture spectral analysis from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qian; Shi, Jiancheng; Xu, Yuanliu

    2011-12-01

    Water is the basic needs for human society, and the determining factor of stability of ecosystem as well. There are lots of lakes on Tibet Plateau, which will lead to flood and mudslide when the water expands sharply. At present, water area is extracted from TM or SPOT data for their high spatial resolution; however, their temporal resolution is insufficient. MODIS data have high temporal resolution and broad coverage. So it is valuable resource for detecting the change of water area. Because of its low spatial resolution, mixed-pixels are common. In this paper, four spectral libraries are built using MOD09A1 product, based on that, water body is extracted in sub-pixels utilizing Multiple Endmembers Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) using MODIS daily reflectance data MOD09GA. The unmixed result is comparing with contemporaneous TM data and it is proved that this method has high accuracy.

  17. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q.

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  18. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  19. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, Michael James

    1995-01-01

    We describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The Technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  20. Analysis of superconducting patch antennas using the spectral domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Kiyohiko; Fukasawa, Toru; Ishii, Nozomu

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the authors analyze electrical small HTS (High-Tc Superconductors) patch antennas using the modified spectral domain moment method (SDMM). Although it is assumed that a patch and a ground plane are perfect electric conductors (PECs) in the conventional SDMM, they can compute the performance of not only HTS patch antennas but also patch antennas with a conducting loss, by exchanging the boundary conditions on the conductors for {Epsilon}{sub t} = Z{sub s}J{sub s}, where {Epsilon}{sub t} is the tangential {Epsilon} field, Z{sub s} is surface impedance on the conductors, and J{sub s} is surface impedance on the conductors, and J{sub s} is surface current density. Z{sub s} of HTS is determined by using the ``three-fluid model`` in the analysis. This paper presents the numerical results for a 2.8GHz HTS patch antenna with 12mm length and 1.5mm width, on the grounded dielectric substrate with thickness d = 0.5mm, {epsilon}{sub r} = 25 and tan {delta} = 0. As the result, one can see that efficiency of the HTS patch is improved, for example, 3.8 times at T = 0(K) and 2.9 times at T = 77(K) improvement are obtained from the analysis. As regards the input impedance when a patch is proved, the peak at the resonance of the Cu patch is much smaller than the PEC patch, because the resonance is weaker as a conducting loss is larger, Therefore, the peak of the HTS patch is larger than that of the Cu patch, and is smaller than that of the PEC patch. This tendency is dependent on Z{sub s} of HTS, that is, this peak is larger as a real part of Z{sub s} is smaller. The authors also show that the resonance frequency of the HTS patch is shifted as temperature is changing. There are conducting losses, a dielectric loss and surface wave losses as factors degrading radiation efficiency. They examine the loss mechanism of the HTS patch for the various substrate thickness, d.

  1. Wavelet and Multitaper spectral analysis of cosmic ray muon and neutron data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. R.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Echer, E.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Vieira, L. E. A.; de Lucas, A.; Dal Lago, A.; Munakata, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Schuch, N. J.

    Many times series in geophysics may contain dominant periodic signals These signals can vary in both amplitude and frequency over long periods of time The wavelet analysis is a powerful toll to spectral analyses of time series because this analysis decomposes a time series into time frequency space simultaneously One gets information on both the amplitude of the interest periodic signal within the series and how this amplitude varies with time In this work we will make a spectral wavelet and multitaper analysis of muon and neutron cosmic ray and compare these two kinds of spectral analysis and particles with each other and will find the mainly periodicities in these time series

  2. Time spectral analysis of midlatitude disturbances in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Time-spectral and cross-spectral analyses are used to investigate synoptic pressure variations in the Viking-2 pressure, wind, and temperature data for selected portions of the Mars fall, winter, and spring seasons. Estimates of the phase relationships between the highly coherent pressure, wind, and temperature oscillations are obtained, and found to be very similar to those expected for baroclinic waves and to those obtained from terrestrial surface data. Phase speeds and zonal wavenumbers are inferred by interpreting the pressure and meridional wind variations in terms of eastward-traveling quasi-geostrophic waves.

  3. Spectral Analysis of Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarwitz, M.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    Spectra of the optical process emissions of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) processing with a continuous wave (cw) thin disk laser are recorded for a basic characterization of the ablation process. The observed line spectra show a characteristic spectral line at a wavelength of 588.95 nm that is found to be atomic sodium (Na I). No spectral lines of atomic or ionized carbon appear in the recorded spectra leading to the conclusion that only a small fraction of C-atoms is ionized.

  4. Accelerometer and gyroscope based gait analysis using spectral analysis of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study's purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended.

  5. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  6. Picosecond spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging with principal component analysis of meibomian glands

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Nien, Chyong Ly; Miljković, Miloš D.; Diem, Max; Jester, James V.; Potma, Eric. O.

    2011-01-01

    The lipid distribution in the mouse meibomian gland was examined with picosecond spectral anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. Spectral CARS data sets were generated by imaging specific localized regions of the gland within tissue sections at consecutive Raman shifts in the CH2 stretching vibrational range. Spectral differences between the location specific CARS spectra obtained in the lipid-rich regions of the acinus and the central duct were observed, which were confirmed with a Raman microspectroscopic analysis, and attributed to meibum lipid modifications within the gland. A principal component analysis of the spectral data set reveals changes in the CARS spectrum when transitioning from the acini to the central duct. These results demonstrate the utility of picosecond spectral CARS imaging combined with multivariate analysis for assessing differences in the distribution and composition of lipids in tissues. PMID:21361667

  7. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%.

  8. Prostate cancer spectral multifeature analysis using TRUS images.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, S S; Salama, M A

    2008-04-01

    This paper focuses on extracting and analyzing different spectral features from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for prostate cancer recognition. First, the information about the images' frequency domain features and spatial domain features are combined using a Gabor filter and then integrated with the expert radiologist's information to identify the highly suspicious regions of interest (ROIs). The next stage of the proposed algorithm is to scan each identified region in order to generate the corresponding 1-D signal that represents each region. For each ROI, possible spectral feature sets are constructed using different new geometrical features extracted from the power spectrum density (PSD) of each region's signal. Next, a classifier-based algorithm for feature selection using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is adopted and used to select the optimal feature subset from the constructed feature sets. A new spectral feature set for the TRUS images using estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT) is also constructed, and its ability to represent tissue texture is compared to the PSD-based spectral feature sets using the support vector machines (SVMs) classifier. The accuracy obtained ranges from 72.2% to 94.4%, with the best accuracy achieved by the ESPRIT feature set.

  9. Spectral analysis of oscillation instabilities in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippincott, S.

    1970-01-01

    Phase and frequency fluctuations, inherent in oscillators used as frequency standards, are measured over spectral frequency range of 1 Hz to 5 kHz. Basic measurement system consists of electromechanical phase-locked loop that extracts phase and frequency fluctuations and error multiplier that extends threshold sensitivity.

  10. Time-resolved spectral analysis of Radachlorin luminescence in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, V. P.; Gadzhiev, I. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2017-05-01

    We report results of spectral- and time-resolved study of Radachlorin photosensitizer luminescence in water in the spectral range of 950-1350nm and for determination of the photosensitizer triplet state and the singlet oxygen lifetimes responsible for singlet oxygen generation and degradation. At any wavelength within the explored spectral range the luminescence decay contained two major contributions: a fast decay at the ns time scale and a slow evolution at the μs time scale. The fast decay was attributed to electric dipole fluorescence transitions in photosensitizer molecules and the slow evolution to intercombination phosphorescence transitions in singlet oxygen and photosensitizer molecules. Relatively high-amplitude ns peak observed at all wavelengths suggests that singlet oxygen monitoring with spectral isolation methods alone, without additional temporal resolution can be controversial. In the applied experimental conditions the total phosphorescence signal at any wavelength contained a contribution from the photosensitizer triplet state decay, while at 1274nm the singlet oxygen phosphorescence dominated. The results obtained can be used for optimization of the methods of singlet oxygen monitoring and imaging.

  11. Time-resolved spectral analysis of Radachlorin luminescence in water.

    PubMed

    Belik, V P; Gadzhiev, I M; Semenova, I V; Vasyutinskii, O S

    2017-05-05

    We report results of spectral- and time-resolved study of Radachlorin photosensitizer luminescence in water in the spectral range of 950-1350nm and for determination of the photosensitizer triplet state and the singlet oxygen lifetimes responsible for singlet oxygen generation and degradation. At any wavelength within the explored spectral range the luminescence decay contained two major contributions: a fast decay at the ns time scale and a slow evolution at the μs time scale. The fast decay was attributed to electric dipole fluorescence transitions in photosensitizer molecules and the slow evolution to intercombination phosphorescence transitions in singlet oxygen and photosensitizer molecules. Relatively high-amplitude ns peak observed at all wavelengths suggests that singlet oxygen monitoring with spectral isolation methods alone, without additional temporal resolution can be controversial. In the applied experimental conditions the total phosphorescence signal at any wavelength contained a contribution from the photosensitizer triplet state decay, while at 1274nm the singlet oxygen phosphorescence dominated. The results obtained can be used for optimization of the methods of singlet oxygen monitoring and imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Statistical Analysis of Spectral Properties and Prosodic Parameters of Emotional Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Přibil, J.; Přibilová, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper addresses reflection of microintonation and spectral properties in male and female acted emotional speech. Microintonation component of speech melody is analyzed regarding its spectral and statistical parameters. According to psychological research of emotional speech, different emotions are accompanied by different spectral noise. We control its amount by spectral flatness according to which the high frequency noise is mixed in voiced frames during cepstral speech synthesis. Our experiments are aimed at statistical analysis of cepstral coefficient values and ranges of spectral flatness in three emotions (joy, sadness, anger), and a neutral state for comparison. Calculated histograms of spectral flatness distribution are visually compared and modelled by Gamma probability distribution. Histograms of cepstral coefficient distribution are evaluated and compared using skewness and kurtosis. Achieved statistical results show good correlation comparing male and female voices for all emotional states portrayed by several Czech and Slovak professional actors.

  13. Acquisition and analysis of spectral image data by linear un-mixing, cluster computing and a novel spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Paul R.; Edens, Richard J.; Vojnovic, B.

    2005-03-01

    We describe how spectral imaging, linear un-mixing and cluster computing have been combined to aid biomedical researchers and allow the spatial segmentation and quantitative analysis of immunohistochemically stained tissue section images. A novel cost-effective spectral imager, with a bandwidth of 15 nm between 400 and 700 nm, allows us to record both spatial and spectral data from absorptive and fluorescent chemical probes. The linear un-mixing of this data separates the stain distributions revealing areas of co-localisation and extracts quantitative values of optical density. This has been achieved at the single-pixel level of an image by non-negative least squares fitting. This process can be computationally expensive but great processing speed increases have been achieved through the use of cluster computing. We describe how several personal computers, running Microsoft WindowsXP, can be used in parallel, linked by the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard. We describe how the free MPICH libraries have been incorporated into our spectral imaging application under the C language and how this has been extended to support features of MPI2 via the commercial WMPI II libraries. A cluster of 8 processors, in 4 dual-Athlon-2600+ computers, offered a speed up of a factor of 5 compared to a singleton. This includes the time required to transfer the data throughout the cluster and reflects a processing efficiency of 0.62 (a Cluster Efficacy of 3.0). The cluster was based on a 1000Base-T Ethernet network and appears to be scalable efficiently beyond 8 processors.

  14. Phase-resolved Crab pulsar measurements from 25 to 400 GeV with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepser, S.; Giavitto, G.; Lopez, M.; Saito, T. Y.; Schweizer, T.; Šnidarić, I.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    We report on observations of the Crab pulsar with the MAGIC telescopes. Our data were taken in both monoscopic (> 25 GeV) and stereoscopic (> 50 GeV) observation modes. Two peaks were detected with both modes and phase-resolved energy spectra were calculated. By comparing with Fermi-LAT measurements, we find that the energy spectrum of the Crab pulsar does not follow a power law with an exponential cutoff, but has an additional hard component, extending up to at least 400 GeV. This suggests that the emission above 25 GeV is not dominated by curvature radiation, as suggested in the standard scenarios of the OG and SG models.

  15. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  16. Spectral compression algorithms for the analysis of very large multivariate images

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2007-10-16

    A method for spectrally compressing data sets enables the efficient analysis of very large multivariate images. The spectral compression algorithm uses a factored representation of the data that can be obtained from Principal Components Analysis or other factorization technique. Furthermore, a block algorithm can be used for performing common operations more efficiently. An image analysis can be performed on the factored representation of the data, using only the most significant factors. The spectral compression algorithm can be combined with a spatial compression algorithm to provide further computational efficiencies.

  17. [Analysis of spectral intensity of fermi resonance of molecules].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-heng; Gao, Shu-qin; Li, Zhan-long; Cao, Biao; Li, Zuo-wei

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide (CS) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were measured. And the spectral intensity was analyzed using the J. F. Bertran theory and the group theory. The rule about Fermi resonance was obtained from the Raman spectra of carbon disulfide (CS) and carbon tetrachloride (CCL4): (1) The energy can transfer between a fundamental and an overtone frequency about Fermi resonance; the two spectra have the same intensity. The spectral intensity of the two spectra was equal (R=1) about Fermi resonance, when the difference between fundamental of Fermi resonance and overtone of Fermi resonance was very small. (2) The intensity of overtone is stronger than that of fundamental's. (3) The spectrum of Fermi resonance was observed, but the fundamental frequency was not. This article has very good reference value for the assignments in the molecular structure and the research of contents.

  18. Photon propagation function: spectral analysis of its asymptotic form.

    PubMed

    Schwinger, J

    1974-08-01

    The physical attitudes of source theory, displacing those of renormalized, perturbative, operator field theory, are used in a simple discussion of the asymptotic behavior of the photon propagation function. A guiding principle is the elementary consistency requirement that, under circumstances where a physical parameter cannot be accurately measured, no sensitivity to its precise value can enter the description of those circumstances. The mathematical tool is the spectral representation of the propagation function, supplemented by an equivalent phase representation. The Gell-Mann-Low equation is recovered, but with their function now interpreted physically as the spectral weight function. A crude inequality is established for the latter, which helps in interpolating between the initial rising behavior and the ultimate zero at infinite mass. There is a brief discussion of the aggressive source theory viewpoint that denies the existence of a "bare charge".

  19. Multivariate Spectral Analysis to Extract Materials from Multispectral Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    highest omm* &Poin I1w v~ ovaw~ to be agricultural fields. Their spectral behavior and &s mat" V4 jr4wmwg I ewo be understood by referring to Appendi*x A...unoway-U 15 Swamp-A ____ Urbee-D QUMt. Urbain -V Aim__ j Average)et Using the 20 otining classes rim dmsume4 (ClaM. ItWlik- ifwm *&.,m MAeW* all 5

  20. Quantitative analysis of multi-spectral fundus images.

    PubMed

    Styles, I B; Calcagni, A; Claridge, E; Orihuela-Espina, F; Gibson, J M

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a new technique for extracting histological parameters from multi-spectral images of the ocular fundus. The new method uses a Monte Carlo simulation of the reflectance of the fundus to model how the spectral reflectance of the tissue varies with differing tissue histology. The model is parameterised by the concentrations of the five main absorbers found in the fundus: retinal haemoglobins, choroidal haemoglobins, choroidal melanin, RPE melanin and macular pigment. These parameters are shown to give rise to distinct variations in the tissue colouration. We use the results of the Monte Carlo simulations to construct an inverse model which maps tissue colouration onto the model parameters. This allows the concentration and distribution of the five main absorbers to be determined from suitable multi-spectral images. We propose the use of "image quotients" to allow this information to be extracted from uncalibrated image data. The filters used to acquire the images are selected to ensure a one-to-one mapping between model parameters and image quotients. To recover five model parameters uniquely, images must be acquired in six distinct spectral bands. Theoretical investigations suggest that retinal haemoglobins and macular pigment can be recovered with RMS errors of less than 10%. We present parametric maps showing the variation of these parameters across the posterior pole of the fundus. The results are in agreement with known tissue histology for normal healthy subjects. We also present an early result which suggests that, with further development, the technique could be used to successfully detect retinal haemorrhages.

  1. Spectral analysis of dike-induced earthquakes in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Shallow dike intrusions may be accompanied by fault slip above the dikes, a superposition which complicates seismic and geodetic data analyses. The diverse volcano-tectonic and low-frequency local earthquakes accompanying the 2005-2010 large-volume dike intrusions in the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift (Afar), some with fault displacements of up to 3 m at the surface, provide an opportunity to examine the relations among the earthquakes, dike intrusions, and surface ruptures. We apply the frequency index (FI) method to characterize the spectra of swarm earthquakes from six of the dikes. These earthquakes often have broad spectra with multiple peaks, making the usual peak frequency classification method unreliable. Our results show a general bimodal character with high FI earthquakes associated with deeper dikes (top > 3 km subsurface) and low FI earthquakes associated with shallow dikes, indicating that shallow dikes result in earthquakes with more low-frequency content and larger-amplitude surface waves. Low FI earthquakes are more common during dike emplacement, suggesting that interactions between the dike and faults may lead to lower FI. Taken together, likely source processes for low FI earthquakes are shallow hypocenters (<3 km) possibly with surface rupture, slow rupture velocities, and interactions with dike fluids. Strong site effects also heavily influence the earthquake spectral content. Additionally, our results suggest a continuum of spectral responses, implying either that impulsive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and the unusual, emergent earthquakes have similar source processes or that simple spectral analyses, such as FI, cannot distinguish different source processes.

  2. Spectral analysis and connectivity of porous microstructures in bone.

    PubMed

    Golden, Kenneth M; Benjamin Murphy, N; Cherkaev, Elena

    2011-01-11

    Cancellous bone is a porous composite of calcified tissue interspersed with soft marrow. Sea ice is also a porous composite, consisting of pure ice with brine, air, and salt inclusions. Interestingly, the microstructures of bone and sea ice exhibit notable similarities. In recent years, we have developed mathematical and experimental techniques for imaging and characterizing the brine microstructure of sea ice, such as its volume fraction and connectivity, as well as a range of theoretical approaches for studying fluid, thermal, and electromagnetic transport in sea ice. Here we explore the application of our sea ice techniques to investigate trabecular bone. For example, percolation theory that quantifies brine connectivity and its thermal evolution can also help assess the impact of osteoporosis on trabecular structure. Central to our approach is the spectral measure of a composite material, which contains detailed information about the mixture geometry, and can be used in powerful integral representations to compute the effective properties. The spectral measure is obtained from the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a self-adjoint operator determined exclusively by the composite microgeometry. Here we compute the spectral measures for discretizations of images of healthy and osteoporotic bone. The measures are used to compute the effective electromagnetic properties of the bone specimens. These data are then inverted to reconstruct the porosity of the original specimens, with excellent agreement.

  3. Quantitative Spectral Analysis of Evolved Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  4. Detecting Unknown Artificial Urban Surface Materials Based on Spectral Dissimilarity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jilge, Marianne; Heiden, Uta; Habermeyer, Martin; Mende, André; Juergens, Carsten

    2017-08-08

    High resolution imaging spectroscopy data have been recognised as a valuable data resource for augmenting detailed material inventories that serve as input for various urban applications. Image-specific urban spectral libraries are successfully used in urban imaging spectroscopy studies. However, the regional- and sensor-specific transferability of such libraries is limited due to the wide range of different surface materials. With the developed methodology, incomplete urban spectral libraries can be utilised by assuming that unknown surface material spectra are dissimilar to the known spectra in a basic spectral library (BSL). The similarity measure SID-SCA (Spectral Information Divergence-Spectral Correlation Angle) is applied to detect image-specific unknown urban surfaces while avoiding spectral mixtures. These detected unknown materials are categorised into distinct and identifiable material classes based on their spectral and spatial metrics. Experimental results demonstrate a successful redetection of material classes that had been previously erased in order to simulate an incomplete BSL. Additionally, completely new materials e.g., solar panels were identified in the data. It is further shown that the level of incompleteness of the BSL and the defined dissimilarity threshold are decisive for the detection of unknown material classes and the degree of spectral intra-class variability. A detailed accuracy assessment of the pre-classification results, aiming to separate natural and artificial materials, demonstrates spectral confusions between spectrally similar materials utilizing SID-SCA. However, most spectral confusions occur between natural or artificial materials which are not affecting the overall aim. The dissimilarity analysis overcomes the limitations of working with incomplete urban spectral libraries and enables the generation of image-specific training databases.

  5. Spectral and correlation analysis with applications to middle-atmosphere radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, Prabhat K.

    1989-01-01

    The correlation and spectral analysis methods for uniformly sampled stationary random signals, estimation of their spectral moments, and problems arising due to nonstationary are reviewed. Some of these methods are already in routine use in atmospheric radar experiments. Other methods based on the maximum entropy principle and time series models have been used in analyzing data, but are just beginning to receive attention in the analysis of radar signals. These methods are also briefly discussed.

  6. Exploring the accessible frequency range of phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detected with x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnicke, P.; Knut, R.; Wahlström, E.; Karis, O.; Bailey, W. E.; Arena, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present time- and element-resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnetic trilayer structure. A pump-probe scheme was utilized with a microwave magnetic excitation field phase-locked to the photon bunches and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in transmission geometry. Using a relatively large photon bunch length with a full width at half maximum of 650 ps, the precessional motion of the magnetization was resolved up to frequencies of 2.5 GHz, thereby enabling sampling at frequencies significantly above the inverse bunch length. By simulating the experimental data with a numerical model based on a forced harmonic oscillator, we obtain good correlation between the two. The model, which includes timing jitter analysis, is used to predict the accessible frequency range of x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance.

  7. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and Swift Observations of WR 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ~10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ~2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  8. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Siok, C J; Austin, K; Austin-Lafrance, R J; Morgane, P J

    1987-10-01

    Power spectral measures of the EEG obtained from the frontal cortex and hippocampal formation during different vigilance states in the developing rat have been computed and compared. The most significant ontogenetic changes were observed in the hippocampal power spectra obtained during the vigilance state of REM sleep. These spectral analyses have revealed in the hippocampus: (1) a significant increase in the frequency at which the peak power occurs in the theta-frequency (4-11 Hz) band from 14 to 45 days of age; (2) a decrease in the quality factor of the peak from 14 to 45 days of age; (3) a decrease in the relative power co-ordinate for the center of spectral mass associated with the 0-4-Hz frequency band coupled with an increase in the frequency coordinate of the 4-11-Hz frequency band from 14 to 45 days of age, and; (4) a significant decrease in the average percent relative power associated with the 0-4-Hz frequency band from 14 to 22 days of age. For the EEG obtained from the frontal cortex, the major findings of note were: (1) a dominant contribution of relative power in the 0-4-Hz frequency band which was observed at every age and during every vigilance state tested, and; (2) a significant increase in the average percent relative power associated with this band at 18, 22, and 45 days of age. The results of this study provide a quantitative description of the electroencephalographic (EEG) ontogeny of the hippocampal formation and the frontal cortex in the rat. These ontogenetic changes in EEG activity relate closely to development of the internal circuitry and synaptic maturation in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex.

  9. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  10. Effective numerical method of spectral analysis of quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Figueroa, Víctor; Rabinovich, Vladimir S.

    2017-05-01

    We present in the paper an effective numerical method for the determination of the spectra of periodic metric graphs equipped by Schrödinger operators with real-valued periodic electric potentials as Hamiltonians and with Kirchhoff and Neumann conditions at the vertices. Our method is based on the spectral parameter power series method, which leads to a series representation of the dispersion equation, which is suitable for both analytical and numerical calculations. Several important examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our method for some periodic graphs of interest that possess potentials usually found in quantum mechanics.

  11. Application of periodogram and AR spectral analysis to EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Akin, M; Kiymik, M K

    2000-08-01

    In this study, in order to analyze the EEG signal, the conventional and modern spectral methods were investigated. Interpretation and performance of these methods were detected for clinical applications. For this purpose EEG data obtained from different persons were processed by PC computer using periodogram and AR model algorithms. Periodogram and AR modeling approaches were compared for their resolution and interpretation performance. It was determined that the AR approach is better for the use in clinical and research areas, because of the clear spectra that are obtained by it.

  12. Investigation of TC-1 flight failure using power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    During the Titan Centaur 1 test flight a failure involving at least one of the Centaur propellant boost pumps occurred. Also, neither of the boost pump speed instruments indicated pump rotation. Accelerometer data from the Titan Centaur 1 flight failure were analyzed using power spectral density methods to determine boost pump speed during attempted starts of the Centaur. The technique was demonstrated on a reference flight. The hydrogen boost pump speed transient was determined for the TC-1 flight. Other trends are seen in the data. However, these are not believed to be the oxygen boost pump. Discussion of data enhancement techniques is also presented.

  13. Analysis of the spectral response of Tamarix spp vegetation to the soil salinity based on ground spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiapaer, Guli; Chen, Xi; Bao, Anming

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the field-derived hyperspecral reflectance of the Tamarix spp vegetation and background soil parameters (soluble salt content and eight base ions) of associated saline soil at the lower reaches of the Tarim River were measured and studied. The spectral responses of the Tamarix spp canopy with different level saline soil, and the relationship between soil salt variables and vegetation spectral indices were analyzed in order to understand the sensitive bands and the appropriate vegetation spectral indices. The results revealed that:(1) the spectra at band ranges 600-750nm,1350-1550nm change regularly with the increasing salt content of the background soil. (2) The removal continuum reflectance shows that the three absorb troughs with band ranges 460-560nm, 560-760nm,1050-1300nm, 1300-1700nm, can play an important role in indicating increasing changes of soil salt. Theses sensitive bands just reflect the characteristics of the chlorophyll content, moisture content of the vegetation. It presents a negative correction between the absorption valley changing trend and the salt content in the background soil. When the soil salinity content is higher, the corresponding absorption valley value that reflects vegetation growth condition characteristic is not more obvious. (3) Further analysis are conducted on the absorption width at the band range 1300-1700nm, the absorption width at the band range 560-760nm, λred, absorption depth at the band range 1050-1300nm, R1450, MSAVI, trough area of the band range 560-760nm, λred and the absorption depth at the band range 560-760nm, these nine indices can be used to predict salt values of saline soil and evaluate the degree of soil salinity.

  14. Stellar and wind parameters of massive stars from spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.

    2017-07-01

    The only way to deduce information from stars is to decode the radiation it emits in an appropriate way. Spectroscopy can solve this and derive many properties of stars. In this work we seek to derive simultaneously the stellar and wind characteristics of A and B supergiant stars. Our stellar properties encompass the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the stellar radius, the micro-turbulence velocity, the rotational velocity and, finally, the chemical composition. For wind properties we consider the mass-loss rate, the terminal velocity and the line-force parameters (α, k and δ) obtained from the standard line-driven wind theory. To model the data we use the radiative transport code Fastwind considering the newest hydrodynamical solutions derived with Hydwind code, which needs stellar and line-force parameters to obtain a wind solution. A grid of spectral models of massive stars is created and together with the observed spectra their physical properties are determined through spectral line fittings. These fittings provide an estimation about the line-force parameters, whose theoretical calculations are extremely complex. Furthermore, we expect to confirm that the hydrodynamical solutions obtained with a value of δ slightly larger than ˜ 0.25, called δ-slow solutions, describe quite reliable the radiation line-driven winds of A and late B supergiant stars and at the same time explain disagreements between observational data and theoretical models for the Wind-Momentum Luminosity Relationship (WLR).

  15. [Spectral features analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean].

    PubMed

    Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Lei, Rui-bo; Li, Qun; Sun, Bo

    2012-04-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate change, and its quick change and impact are the scientists' focus all over the world. The spectra of different kinds of sea ice were measured with portable ASD FieldSpec 3 spectrometer during the long-term ice station of the 4th Chinese national Arctic Expedition in 2010, and the spectral features were analyzed systematically. The results indicated that the reflectance of sea ice covered by snow is the highest one, naked sea ice the second, and melted sea ice the lowest. Peak and valley characteristics of spectrum curves of sea ice covered by thick snow, thin snow, wet snow and snow crystal are very significant, and the reflectance basically decreases with the wavelength increasing. The rules of reflectance change with wavelength of natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice are basically same, the reflectance of them is medium, and that of grey ice is far lower than natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice. It is very significant for scientific research to analyze the spectral features of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and to implement the quantitative remote sensing of sea ice, and to further analyze its response to the global warming.

  16. Spectral Analysis of Biodiversity Cycles and Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Bruce; Melott, Adrian

    2007-04-01

    We have analyzed the power spectral and phase relationships of fluctuations in biodiversity, species origination, extinction rate, and motion of the solar system normal to the galactic plane over the last ˜500 My. The period of the dominant spectral component is the same 62 My for all these except extinction. It is also the same as the rate of gene duplication events (as determined by Ding et al.), suggesting some sort of causal relationship. The spectra suggest that the biodiversity cycle is more closely related to origination rates than extinction rates. Biodiversity and solar motion are offset by π, with gene duplication and origination lagging and leading biodiversity by ˜2 radians. A picture emerges consistent with a rising rate of mutation and stress on the biosphere as the solar system moves to galactic north, possibly exposed to higher cosmic rays from a galactic bow shock, as proposed elsewhere, and increasing species origination as it returns to the magnetic shielding of the galactic disk.

  17. Spectral Analysis of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Based on Delayed Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jingxiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanli; Fu, Jialei; Zhao, Xiaolei; Yang, Meina; van Wijk, Eduard; Wang, Mei; Nie, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in healthcare; however, it lacks scientific evidence to support the multidimensional therapeutic effects. These effects are based on experience, and, to date, there is no advanced tool to evaluate these experience based effects. In the current study, Chinese herbal materials classified with different cold and heat therapeutic properties, based on Chinese medicine principles, were investigated using spectral distribution, as well as the decay probability distribution based on delayed luminescence (DL). A detection system based on ultraweak biophoton emission was developed to determine the DL decay kinetics of the cold and heat properties of Chinese herbal materials. We constructed a mathematical model to fit the experimental data and characterize the properties of Chinese medicinal herbs with different parameters. The results demonstrated that this method has good reproducibility. Moreover, there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the spectral distribution and the decay probability distribution of Chinese herbal materials with cold and heat properties. This approach takes advantage of the comprehensive nature of DL compared with more reductionist approaches and is more consistent with TCM principles, in which the core comprises holistic views.

  18. Spectral Analysis of Chinese Medicinal Herbs Based on Delayed Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanli; Fu, Jialei; Zhao, Xiaolei; van Wijk, Eduard; Wang, Mei; Nie, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in healthcare; however, it lacks scientific evidence to support the multidimensional therapeutic effects. These effects are based on experience, and, to date, there is no advanced tool to evaluate these experience based effects. In the current study, Chinese herbal materials classified with different cold and heat therapeutic properties, based on Chinese medicine principles, were investigated using spectral distribution, as well as the decay probability distribution based on delayed luminescence (DL). A detection system based on ultraweak biophoton emission was developed to determine the DL decay kinetics of the cold and heat properties of Chinese herbal materials. We constructed a mathematical model to fit the experimental data and characterize the properties of Chinese medicinal herbs with different parameters. The results demonstrated that this method has good reproducibility. Moreover, there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the spectral distribution and the decay probability distribution of Chinese herbal materials with cold and heat properties. This approach takes advantage of the comprehensive nature of DL compared with more reductionist approaches and is more consistent with TCM principles, in which the core comprises holistic views. PMID:27478482

  19. Categorical spectral analysis of periodicity in human and viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Howe, Elizabeth D; Song, Jun S

    2013-02-01

    Periodicity in nucleotide sequences arises from regular repeating patterns which may reflect important structure and function. Although a three-base periodicity in coding regions has been known for some time and has provided the basis for powerful gene prediction algorithms, its origins are still not fully understood. Here, we show that, contrary to common belief, amino acid (AA) bias and codon usage bias are insufficient to create base-3 periodicity. This article applies the rigorous method of spectral envelope to systematically characterize the contributions of codon bias, AA bias and protein structural motifs to the three-base periodicity of coding sequences. The method is also used to classify CpG islands in the human genome. In addition, we show how spectral envelope can be used to trace the evolution of viral genomes and monitor global sequence changes without having to align to previously known genomes. This approach also detects reassortment events, such as those that led to the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

  20. Ultrasound spectral analysis of photoacoustic signals from red blood cell populations at different optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) signals in the ultrasound frequency domain is a method that analyzes the power spectrum of PA signals to quantify tissue microstructures. PA spectral analysis has been correlated to changes in the size, morphology and concentration of absorbers that are smaller than the system spatial resolution. However, the calculated spectral parameters are still not system independent due to difficulty in eliminating variations in the light distribution for different optical wavelengths. Changes in spectral parameters for the same absorber geometry but different optical illumination wavelengths needs to be carefully examined. A gelatin vessel phantom is used. The vessels contain red blood cells comprised of oxy, deoxy and methemoglobin induced using oxygen, sodium hydrosulfite and sodium nitrite, respectively. The samples were imaged using the VevoLAZR system at wavelengths 680 - 905 nm in steps of 15 nm. The radiofrequency (RF) signals were analyzed to calculate the spectral slope. The results were compared to simulated RF signals acquired using the mcxyz Monte Carlo package coupled to the solution of the PA wave equation using the Green's function approach. Changes in the spectral slope as a function of optical wavelength were detected. For longer optical wavelengths, the spectral slope increased for deoxyhemoglobin, but decreased for oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The changes in the spectral slope were correlated to changes in the fluence distribution as optical properties change for different wavelengths. The change in the spectral slope as a function of optical wavelength and chromophore content can potentially be used in spectral unmixing for better estimation of hemoglobin content.

  1. Maturational changes in automated EEG spectral power analysis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Jennekens, Ward; Pasman, Jaco W; Katgert, Titia; Van Pul, Carola; Gavilanes, Antonio W D; Kramer, Boris W; Zimmermann, Luc J; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Andriessen, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Our study aimed at automated power spectral analysis of the EEG in preterm infants to identify changes of spectral measures with maturation. Weekly (10-20 montage) 4-h EEG recordings were performed in 18 preterm infants with GA <32 wk and normal neurological follow-up at 2 y, resulting in 79 recordings studied from 27(+4) to 36(+3) wk of postmenstrual age (PMA, GA + postnatal age). Automated spectral analysis was performed on 4-h EEG recordings. The frequency spectrum was divided in delta 1 (0.5-1 Hz), delta 2 (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), and beta (13-30 Hz) band. Absolute and relative power of each frequency band and spectral edge frequency were calculated. Maturational changes in spectral measures were observed most clearly in the centrotemporal channels. With advancing PMA, absolute powers of delta 1 to 2 and theta decreased. With advancing PMA, relative power of delta 1 decreased and relative powers of alpha and beta increased, respectively. In conclusion, with maturation, spectral analysis of the EEG showed a significant shift from the lower to the higher frequencies. Computer analysis of EEG will allow an objective and reproducible analysis for long-term prognosis and/or stratification of clinical treatment.

  2. Military target detection using spectrally modeled algorithms and independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kailash Chandra; Arora, Manoj K.; Singh, Dharmendra; Yadav, Deepti

    2013-02-01

    Most military targets of strategic importance are very small in size. Though some of them may get spatially resolved, most cannot be detected due to lack of adequate spectral resolution. Hyperspectral data, acquired over hundreds of narrow contiguous wavelength bands, are extremely suitable for most military target detection applications. Target detection, however, still remains complicated due to a host of other issues. These include, first, the heavy volume of hyperspectral data, which leads to computational complexities; second, most materials in nature exhibit spectral variability and remain unpredictable; and third, most target detection algorithms are based on spectral modeling and availability of a priori target spectra is an essential requirement, a condition difficult to meet in practice. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a new evolving technique that aims at finding components that are statistically independent or as independent as possible. It does not have any requirement of a priori availability of target spectra and is an attractive alternative. This paper, presents a study of military target detection using four spectral matching algorithms, namely, orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), constrained energy minimisation, spectral angle mapper and spectral correlation mapper, four anomaly detection algorithms, namely, OSP anomaly detector (OSPAD), Reed-Xiaoli anomaly detector (RXD), uniform target detector (UTD), a combination of RXD-UTD. The performances of these spectrally modeled algorithms are then also compared with ICA using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The superior performance of ICA indicates that it may be considered a viable alternative for military target detection.

  3. Studies on spectral analysis of randomly sampled signals: Application to laser velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David

    1992-01-01

    Spectral analysis is very useful in determining the frequency characteristics of many turbulent flows, for example, vortex flows, tail buffeting, and other pulsating flows. It is also used for obtaining turbulence spectra from which the time and length scales associated with the turbulence structure can be estimated. These estimates, in turn, can be helpful for validation of theoretical/numerical flow turbulence models. Laser velocimetry (LV) is being extensively used in the experimental investigation of different types of flows, because of its inherent advantages; nonintrusive probing, high frequency response, no calibration requirements, etc. Typically, the output of an individual realization laser velocimeter is a set of randomly sampled velocity data. Spectral analysis of such data requires special techniques to obtain reliable estimates of correlation and power spectral density functions that describe the flow characteristics. FORTRAN codes for obtaining the autocorrelation and power spectral density estimates using the correlation-based slotting technique were developed. Extensive studies have been conducted on simulated first-order spectrum and sine signals to improve the spectral estimates. A first-order spectrum was chosen because it represents the characteristics of a typical one-dimensional turbulence spectrum. Digital prefiltering techniques, to improve the spectral estimates from randomly sampled data were applied. Studies show that the spectral estimates can be increased up to about five times the mean sampling rate.

  4. [Estimation of Hunan forest carbon density based on spectral mixture analysis of MODIS data].

    PubMed

    Yan, En-ping; Lin, Hui; Wang, Guang-xing; Chen, Zhen-xiong

    2015-11-01

    With the fast development of remote sensing technology, combining forest inventory sample plot data and remotely sensed images has become a widely used method to map forest carbon density. However, the existence of mixed pixels often impedes the improvement of forest carbon density mapping, especially when low spatial resolution images such as MODIS are used. In this study, MODIS images and national forest inventory sample plot data were used to conduct the study of estimation for forest carbon density. Linear spectral mixture analysis with and without constraint, and nonlinear spectral mixture analysis were compared to derive the fractions of different land use and land cover (LULC) types. Then sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm with and without the fraction images from spectral mixture analyses were employed to estimate forest carbon density of Hunan Province. Results showed that 1) Linear spectral mixture analysis with constraint, leading to a mean RMSE of 0.002, more accurately estimated the fractions of LULC types than linear spectral and nonlinear spectral mixture analyses; 2) Integrating spectral mixture analysis model and sequential Gaussian co-simulation algorithm increased the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density to 81.5% from 74.1%, and decreased the RMSE to 5.18 from 7.26; and 3) The mean value of forest carbon density for the province was 30.06 t · hm(-2), ranging from 0.00 to 67.35 t · hm(-2). This implied that the spectral mixture analysis provided a great potential to increase the estimation accuracy of forest carbon density on regional and global level.

  5. FT-Raman spectral analysis of human urinary stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, R.; Raja, A.; Thiruppathi, G.

    2012-12-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy is the most useful tool for the purpose of bio-medical diagnostics. In the present study, FT-Raman spectral method is used to investigate the chemical composition of urinary calculi. Urinary calculi multi-components such as calcium oxalate, hydroxyl apatite, struvite and uric acid are studied. FT-Raman spectrum has been recorded in the range of 3500-400 cm-1. Chemical compounds are identified by Raman spectroscopic technique. The quantitative estimations of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) 1463 cm-1, calcium oxalate dehydrate (COD) 1478 cm-1, hydroxyl apatite 959 cm-1, struvite 575 cm-1, uric acid 1283 cm-1 and oxammite (ammonium oxalate monohydrate) 2129 cm-1 are calculated using particular peaks of FT-Raman spectrum. The quantitative estimation of human urinary stones suitable for the single calibration curve was performed.

  6. [Decoloring and spectral properties analysis of innoxious ultraviolet absorbents].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Wen; Ni, Wen-Xiu; Huang, Chong; Xue, Liang; Yu, Lin

    2006-07-01

    The ultraviolet absorbent extracted from mango leaves, was discolored by some decoloring agent. Then the spectral properties of the discolored ultraviolet absorbents were analyzed. The discolored method of ultraviolet absorbent was studied by comparing one with the others. The results showed that the discoloring effect was satisfactory by using active carbon, H2O2, citric acid, and oxalic acid as decoloring agent. Specially, when oxalic acid was used as decoloring agent, the color of the production was slight, the rate of production was high, and the absorption effect of ultraviolet ray was well. When the concentration of the ultraviolet absorbent solution is 0.5% (w/w), the ultraviolet ray transmission was smaller than 0.3% in 200-370 nm, and it increased slightly from 370 nm. There was a maximum value at 400 nm, approaching 12%.

  7. Spectral measurements and analysis of beam-gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. P.; Yu, S. S.; Fessenden, T. J.; Masamitsu, J. A.; Frank, A. M.; Prono, D. S.

    1984-02-01

    Spectral emissions of the Experimental Test Accelerator beam in 500-Torr synthetic air have been measured in the wavelength range 250-700 nm for beam currents of 4.5 and 8 kA. Intense emissions are identified as radiation from nitrogen. Relative intensities agree well with Franck-Condon factors. Wet air results in a dramatic decrease (by a factor of 2-3) in intensity over the scanned range. This effect is presently attributed to incresed hose motion. Near 700 nm, emissions that are not observed in dry air are identified as emanating from water vapor, nitric oxide, and oxygen. The pressure dependence of emitted intensities at 337.1 and 391.4 nm were measured. Results obtained for an 8-kA beam are not explained by a time-dependent Boltzmann air chemistry code which predicted very well previous measurements for a 1-kA beam.

  8. Cool DZ white dwarfs I: Identification and spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, M. A.; Koester, D.; Alekseev, V.; Herbert, E. L.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    White dwarfs with metal lines in their spectra act as signposts for post-main sequence planetary systems. Searching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 12, we have identified 231 cool (<9000 K) DZ white dwarfs with strong metal absorption, extending the DZ cooling sequence to both higher metal abundances, lower temperatures, and hence longer cooler ages. Of these 231 systems, 104 are previously unknown white dwarfs. Compared with previous work, our spectral fitting uses improved model atmospheres with updated line profiles and line-lists, which we use to derive effective temperatures and abundances for up to 8 elements. We also determine spectroscopic distances to our sample, identifying two halo-members with tangential space-velocities >300 km s-1. The implications of our results on remnant planetary systems are to be discussed in a separate paper.

  9. [The method of time series modeling and its application in the spectral analysis of lubricating oil].

    PubMed

    Gan, M; Zuo, H; Yang, Z; Jiang, Y

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the applications of time series modeling method in the analysis of lubricating oil of mechanical equipment. We obtained satisfactory results by applying AR model to perform time series modeling and forecasting analysis to the collected spectral analysis data of the air engine. So we have built a practical method for state monitoring and trouble forecasting of mechanical equipment.

  10. MR PRISM: a spectral analysis tool for the PRISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael

    2006-08-01

    We describe a computer application designed to analyze hyperspectral data collected by the Compact Infrared Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). The application links the spectral, imaging and mapping perspectives on the eventual CRISM dataset by presenting the user with three different ways to analyze the data. One of the goals when developing this instrument is to build in the latest algorithms for detection of spectrally compelling targets on the surface of the Red Planet, so they may be available to the Planetary Science community without cost and with a minimal learning barrier to cross. This will allow the Astrobiology community to look for targets of interest such as hydrothermal minerals, sulfate minerals and hydrous minerals and be able to map the extent of these minerals using the most up-to-date and effective algorithms. The application is programmed in Java and will be made available for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms. Users will be able to embed Groovy scripts into the program in order to extend its functionality. The first collection of CRISM data will occur in September of 2006 and this data will be made publicly available six months later via the Planetary Datasystem (PDS). Potential users in the community should therefore look forward to a release date mid-2007. Although exploration of the CRISM data set is the motivating force for developing these software tools, the ease of writing additional Groovy scripts to access other data sets makes the tools useful for mineral exploration, crop management, and characterization of extreme environments here on Earth or other terrestrial planets. The system can be easily implemented for use by high school, college, and graduate level students.

  11. Analysis of solvation and structural contributions in spectral characteristics of dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfin, Yu. S.; Rumyantsev, E. V.

    2014-09-01

    Photophysical characteristics of several alkylated dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes in organic solvents were analyzed. Relations between spectral properties of complexes and physical-chemical parameters of solvents were determined with the use of linear regression analysis method. Each solvent parameter contribution in investigated spectral characteristics was estimated. Spectral properties of complexes under study depend on the specific interactions of zinc with the solvent molecules by specific axial coordination. Increasing of alkyl substitution lead to the bathochromic shifts in spectra due to the positive induction effect of alkyl groups.

  12. Highly sensitive index of sympathetic activity based on time-frequency spectral analysis of electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Álvaro D; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Time-domain indices of electrodermal activity (EDA) have been used as a marker of sympathetic tone. However, they often show high variation between subjects and low consistency, which has precluded their general use as a marker of sympathetic tone. To examine whether power spectral density analysis of EDA can provide more consistent results, we recently performed a variety of sympathetic tone-evoking experiments (43). We found significant increase in the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.045 to 0.25 Hz when sympathetic tone-evoking stimuli were induced. The sympathetic tone assessed by the power spectral density of EDA was found to have lower variation and more sensitivity for certain, but not all, stimuli compared with the time-domain analysis of EDA. We surmise that this lack of sensitivity in certain sympathetic tone-inducing conditions with time-invariant spectral analysis of EDA may lie in its inability to characterize time-varying dynamics of the sympathetic tone. To overcome the disadvantages of time-domain and time-invariant power spectral indices of EDA, we developed a highly sensitive index of sympathetic tone, based on time-frequency analysis of EDA signals. Its efficacy was tested using experiments designed to elicit sympathetic dynamics. Twelve subjects underwent four tests known to elicit sympathetic tone arousal: cold pressor, tilt table, stand test, and the Stroop task. We hypothesize that a more sensitive measure of sympathetic control can be developed using time-varying spectral analysis. Variable frequency complex demodulation, a recently developed technique for time-frequency analysis, was used to obtain spectral amplitudes associated with EDA. We found that the time-varying spectral frequency band 0.08-0.24 Hz was most responsive to stimulation. Spectral power for frequencies higher than 0.24 Hz were determined to be not related to the sympathetic dynamics because they comprised less than 5% of the total power. The mean value of time

  13. Principal Components Analysis of Martian NIR Image Cubes to Retrieve Surface Spectral Endmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2016-07-01

    Presented here is a discussion of the complete principal components analysis (PCA) performed on all photometric NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) NSFCAM spectral image sets from 1995-2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral image sets from 2006-2008, detailing the similarities and differences and overall interpretation of the PC dimensional spaces. The purpose of the analysis is to use the PCA to recover surface spectral endmembers to be used in a full radiative transfer modeling program to recover ice cloud optical depths (and thus water content) over diurnal, seasonal, and interannual timescales. The PCA results show considerable consistency across all seasons, and can be optimized to increase the consistency through both spectral and geographic restrictions on the data.

  14. Depth-encoded dual beam phase-resolved Doppler OCT for Doppler-angle-independent flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jie; Cheng, Wei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xinjian; Mo, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography (PR-D-OCT) is a functional OCT imaging technique that can provide high-speed and high-resolution depth-resolved measurement on flow in biological materials. However, a common problem with conventional PR-D-OCT is that this technique often measures the flow motion projected onto the OCT beam path. In other words, it needs the projection angle to extract the absolute velocity from PR-D-OCT measurement. In this paper, we proposed a novel dual-beam PR-D-OCT method to measure absolute flow velocity without separate measurement on the projection angle. Two parallel light beams are created in sample arm and focused into the sample at two different incident angles. The images produced by these two beams are encoded to different depths in single B-scan. Then the Doppler signals picked up by the two beams together with the incident angle difference can be used to calculate the absolute velocity. We validated our approach in vitro on an artificial flow phantom with our home-built 1060 nm swept source OCT. Experimental results demonstrated that our method can provide an accurate measurement of absolute flow velocity with independency on the projection angle.

  15. Development of a phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography system for use in cutaneous microcirculation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moger, Julian; Matcher, Stephen J.; Shore, Angel C.

    2002-06-01

    Phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography is a recently reported technique for simultaneously imaging tissue structure and blood with high velocity resolution. The optical set-up consists of a fibre-based Michelson interferometer with a 1300nm superluminescent diode in the source arm. The output power is 0.6mW with a bandwidth of 50nm. The reference arm contains a grating-based Fourier domain rapid-scanning delay line with an electro-optic phase modulator to provide a stable reference frequency (800kHz). Ten axial scans sampled, at 400Hz, from the same location are processed to generate structural and velocity data from the reconstructed phase information derived from a Hilbert transform. The sample arm probe focuses light from the fibre into the tissue, producing a beam spot of diameter approximately 20micrometers . The probe is mounted on a linear translation stage, which generates a lateral step of 10micrometers between groups of ten axial scans. The Doppler shift in each pixel is calculated from the average phase shift over the ten sequential scans at each location. The acquisition time for a 100x100 pixel image is approximately 5s. We demonstrate the systems ability to image in-vivo changes in skin perfusion, induced by standard non-invasive physiological techniques.

  16. Phase-resolved detection of the spin Hall angle by optical ferromagnetic resonance in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capua, Amir; Wang, Tianyu; Yang, See-Hun; Rettner, Charles; Phung, Timothy; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-02-01

    The conversion of charge current to spin current by the spin Hall effect is of considerable current interest from both fundamental and technological perspectives. Measurement of the spin Hall angle, especially for atomically thin systems with large magnetic anisotropies, is not straightforward. Here we demonstrate a hybrid phase-resolved optical-electrical ferromagnetic resonance method that we show can robustly determine the spin Hall angle in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayer systems with large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We present an analytical model of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in the presence of the spin Hall effect, in which the spin Hall angle can be directly determined from the changes in the amplitude response as a function of the spin current that is generated from a dc charge current passing through the heavy-metal layer. Increased sensitivity to the spin current is achieved by operation under conditions for which the magnetic potential is shallowest at the "Smit point." Study of the phase response reveals that the spin Hall angle can be reliably extracted from a simplified measurement that does not require scanning over time or magnetic field but rather only on the dc current. The method is applied to the Pt-Co/Ni/Co system whose spin Hall angle was to date characterized only indirectly and that is especially relevant for spin-orbit torque devices.

  17. Phase resolved investigation of the power balance of HID lamp electrodes from low to RF frequency operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinelt, Jens; Westermeier, Michael; Mentel, Juergen; Awakowicz, Peter

    2008-10-01

    For HID lamps the electrode temperature is a very important parameter since it has a strong influence on the whole discharge. Also the power balance of the lamp is strongly depending on the electrode temperature. For the efficiency of the lamp it is very important to minimize the part of the input power Pin which is not transformed into visible light. This part mainly consists of the power input into the electrode plasma sheaths Psheath which is in part dissipated by thermal radiation of the electrodes and in part by heat conduction to the lamp bulb. For dc operation an extensive investigation of these parameters can be found in literature. For ac operation these parameters change since now the heat capacity and the change of the polarity of the electrodes have to be considered. Shown are phase resolved measurements and calculations for various frequencies at the Bochum model lamp of the electrode temperature, the input power, the power loss of the electrodes and the electrode sheath voltage (ESV). Furthermore calculations of the cathode and anode fall voltage Uc and Ua are presented.

  18. PHASE-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND PHOTOMETRY OF V1500 CYGNI, AND A SEARCH FOR SIMILAR OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Randy D.; Lyke, James E. E-mail: jlyke@keck.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    We present phase-resolved near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the classical nova (CN) V1500 Cyg to explore whether cyclotron emission is present in this system. While the spectroscopy do not indicate the presence of discrete cyclotron harmonic emission, the light curves suggest that a sizable fraction of its near-infrared fluxes are due to this component. The light curves of V1500 Cyg appear to remain dominated by emission from the heated face of the secondary star in this system. We have used infrared spectroscopy and photometry to search for other potential magnetic systems among old CNe. We have found that the infrared light curves of V1974 Cyg superficially resemble those of V1500 Cyg, suggesting a highly irradiated companion. The old novae V446 Her and QV Vul have light curves with large amplitude variations like those seen in polars, suggesting they might have magnetic primaries. We extract photometry for 79 old novae from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog and use those data to derive the mean, un-reddened infrared colors of quiescent novae. We also extract WISE data for these objects and find that 45 of them were detected. Surprisingly, a number of these systems were detected in the WISE 22 {mu}m band. While two of those objects produced significant dust shells (V705 Cas and V445 Pup), the others did not. It appears that line emission from their ionized ejected shells is the most likely explanation for those detections.

  19. Technical Training on High-Order Spectral Analysis and Thermal Anemometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, A. A.; Shiplyuk, A. N.; Sidirenko, A. A.; Bountin, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The topics of thermal anemometry and high-order spectral analyses were the subject of the technical training. Specifically, the objective of the technical training was to study: (i) the recently introduced constant voltage anemometer (CVA) for high-speed boundary layer; and (ii) newly developed high-order spectral analysis techniques (HOSA). Both CVA and HOSA are relevant tools for studies of boundary layer transition and stability.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Transition Operators, Automata Groups and Translation in BBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zuk, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    We give the automata that describe time evolution rules of the box-ball system with a carrier. It can be shown by use of tropical geometry that such systems are ultradiscrete analogues of KdV equation. We discuss their relation with the lamplighter group generated by an automaton. We present spectral analysis of the stochastic matrices induced by these automata and verify their spectral coincidence.

  1. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  2. Post-analysis report on Chesapeake Bay data processing. [spectral analysis and recognition computer signature extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    The additional processing performed on data collected over the Rhode River Test Site and Forestry Site in November 1970 is reported. The techniques and procedures used to obtain the processed results are described. Thermal data collected over three approximately parallel lines of the site were contoured, and the results color coded, for the purpose of delineating important scene constituents and to identify trees attacked by pine bark beetles. Contouring work and histogram preparation are reviewed and the important conclusions from the spectral analysis and recognition computer (SPARC) signature extension work are summarized. The SPARC setup and processing records are presented and recommendations are made for future data collection over the site.

  3. Stratified spectral mixture analysis of medium resolution imagery for impervious surface mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Genyun; Chen, Xiaolin; Ren, Jinchang; Zhang, Aizhu; Jia, Xiuping

    2017-08-01

    Linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) is widely employed in impervious surface estimation, especially for estimating impervious surface abundance in medium spatial resolution images. However, it suffers from a difficulty in endmember selection due to within-class spectral variability and the variation in the number and the type of endmember classes contained from pixel to pixel, which may lead to over or under estimation of impervious surface. Stratification is considered as a promising process to address the problem. This paper presents a stratified spectral mixture analysis in spectral domain (Sp_SSMA) for impervious surface mapping. It categorizes the entire data into three groups based on the Combinational Build-up Index (CBI), the intensity component in the color space and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values. A suitable endmember model is developed for each group to accommodate the spectral variation from group to group. The unmixing into the associated subset (or full set) of endmembers in each group can make the unmixing adaptive to the types of endmember classes that each pixel actually contains. Results indicate that the Sp_SSMA method achieves a better performance than full-set-endmember SMA and prior-knowledge-based spectral mixture analysis (PKSMA) in terms of R, RMSE and SE.

  4. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time.

  5. Midinfrared spectral investigations of carbonates: Analysis of remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T.; Pollack, J. B.; Mckay, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent airborne thermal infrared observations of Mars from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) have provided evidence for the presence of carbonates, sulfates, and hydrates. Using the optical properties of calcite and anhydrite, it was estimated that CO3's and SO4's constituted about 1 to 3 and 10 to 15 wt. percent, repectively of the materials composing the atmospheric dust. Using the derived value as an estimate of total CO3 abundance, and making an assumption that the CO3's were uniformly distributed within the Martian regolith, it was estimated that such a CO3 reservoir could contain roughly 2 to 5 bars of CO2. While the results indicate that several volatile-bearing materials are present on Mars, the observations from the KAO are inherently limited in their ability to determine the spatial distributions of these materials. However, previous spacecraft observations of Mars provide both the spectral coverage necessary to identify these materials, as well as the potential for investigating their spatial variability. This has prompted us to pursue a reinvestigation of the Mariner 6 and 7 infrared spectrometer and Mariner 9 infrared interferometer spectrometer observations. The former data have been recently made available in digital format and calibration of wavelengths and intensities are almost complete. Additionally, we are pursuing the derivation of optical constants of more appropriate carbonates and sulfates.

  6. Spectral analysis of pigment photobleaching in photosynthetic antenna complex LHCIIb.

    PubMed

    Olszówka, Dorota; Maksymiec, Waldemar; Krupa, Zbigniew; Krawczyk, Stanislaw

    2003-04-01

    Light-induced photooxidation of chlorophyll (Chl) a, b and xanthophylls was investigated in LHCIIb, the antenna pigment-protein complex of photosystem II. Absorption difference spectra at normal and low temperatures show initially (at less than 25% Chl a decay) a selective bleaching of a red-shifted Chl b with absorption bands at 487 and 655 nm, Chl b (460/650 nm) and Chl a (433/670 nm), which changes to a less selective photooxidation pattern at deeper bleaching stages. Difference absorption spectra and HPLC analyses indicate different photooxidation rates of pigments in the order neoxanthin>Chl a>lutein approximately Chl b. Despite significant pigment loss as monitored with absorption spectra, CD spectra indicate an essentially complete persistence of the protein secondary structure. Fluorescence excitation spectra suggest the conversion of a small fraction of Chl a into pheophytin a which acts as a fluorescence quencher, possibly through temporary charge separation process. The strong features in the electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectra due to chlorophyll b at 655 nm and a xanthophyll at 510 nm, and the spectral changes mentioned above are assigned to Chl molecules located at several binding sites in LHCIIb protein and are discussed in the context of spatial configuration and interactions of pigment molecules.

  7. Koopmans' Analysis of Chemical Hardness with Spectral-Like Resolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three approximation levels of Koopmans' theorem are explored and applied: the first referring to the inner quantum behavior of the orbitalic energies that depart from the genuine ones in Fock space when the wave-functions' Hilbert-Banach basis set is specified to solve the many-electronic spectra of spin-orbitals' eigenstates; it is the most subtle issue regarding Koopmans' theorem as it brings many critics and refutation in the last decades, yet it is shown here as an irrefutable “observational” effect through computation, specific to any in silico spectra of an eigenproblem; the second level assumes the “frozen spin-orbitals” approximation during the extracting or adding of electrons to the frontier of the chemical system through the ionization and affinity processes, respectively; this approximation is nevertheless workable for great deal of chemical compounds, especially organic systems, and is justified for chemical reactivity and aromaticity hierarchies in an homologue series; the third and the most severe approximation regards the extension of the second one to superior orders of ionization and affinities, here studied at the level of chemical hardness compact-finite expressions up to spectral-like resolution for a paradigmatic set of aromatic carbohydrates. PMID:23970834

  8. Spectral analysis of hearing protector impulsive insertion loss.

    PubMed

    Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Murphy, William J; Stergar, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    To characterise the performance of hearing protection devices (HPDs) in impulsive-noise conditions and to compare various protection metrics between impulsive and steady-state noise sources with different characteristics. HPDs were measured per the impulsive test methods of ANSI/ASA S12.42- 2010 . Protectors were measured with impulses generated by both an acoustic shock tube and an AR-15 rifle. The measured data were analysed for impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) and impulsive spectral insertion loss (ISIL). These impulsive measurements were compared to insertion loss measured with steady-state noise and with real-ear attenuation at threshold (REAT). Tested HPDs included a foam earplug, a level-dependent earplug and an electronic sound-restoration earmuff. IPIL for a given protector varied between measurements with the two impulse noise sources, but ISIL agreed between the two sources. The level-dependent earplug demonstrated level-dependent effects both in IPIL and ISIL. Steady-state insertion loss and REAT measurements tended to provide a conservative estimate of the impulsively-measured attenuation. Measurements of IPIL depend strongly on the source used to measure them, especially for HPDs with less attenuation at low frequencies. ISIL provides an alternative measurement of impulse protection and appears to be a more complete description of an HPD's performance.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  10. Spectral analysis and markov switching model of Indonesia business cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Muhammad; Darwis, Sutawanir; Darmawan, Gumgum

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the Indonesia business cycle encompassing the determination of smoothing parameter (λ) on Hodrick-Prescott filter. Subsequently, the components of the filter output cycles were analyzed using a spectral method useful to know its characteristics, and Markov switching regime modeling is made to forecast the probability recession and expansion regimes. The data used in the study is real GDP (1983Q1 - 2016Q2). The results of the study are: a) Hodrick-Prescott filter on real GDP of Indonesia to be optimal when the value of the smoothing parameter is 988.474, b) Indonesia business cycle has amplitude varies between±0.0071 to±0.01024, and the duration is between 4 to 22 quarters, c) the business cycle can be modelled by MSIV-AR (2) but regime periodization is generated this model not perfect exactly with real regime periodzation, and d) Based on the model MSIV-AR (2) obtained long-term probabilities in the expansion regime: 0.4858 and in the recession regime: 0.5142.

  11. Quantitative characterization of surface topography using spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Tevis D. B.; Junge, Till; Pastewka, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Roughness determines many functional properties of surfaces, such as adhesion, friction, and (thermal and electrical) contact conductance. Recent analytical models and simulations enable quantitative prediction of these properties from knowledge of the power spectral density (PSD) of the surface topography. The utility of the PSD is that it contains statistical information that is unbiased by the particular scan size and pixel resolution chosen by the researcher. In this article, we first review the mathematical definition of the PSD, including the one- and two-dimensional cases, and common variations of each. We then discuss strategies for reconstructing an accurate PSD of a surface using topography measurements at different size scales. Finally, we discuss detecting and mitigating artifacts at the smallest scales, and computing upper/lower bounds on functional properties obtained from models. We accompany our discussion with virtual measurements on computer-generated surfaces. This discussion summarizes how to analyze topography measurements to reconstruct a reliable PSD. Analytical models demonstrate the potential for tuning functional properties by rationally tailoring surface topography—however, this potential can only be achieved through the accurate, quantitative reconstruction of the PSDs of real-world surfaces.

  12. Spectral analysis and structure preserving preconditioners for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, Marco; Mazza, Mariarosa; Serra-Capizzano, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Fractional partial order diffusion equations are a generalization of classical partial differential equations, used to model anomalous diffusion phenomena. When using the implicit Euler formula and the shifted Grünwald formula, it has been shown that the related discretizations lead to a linear system whose coefficient matrix has a Toeplitz-like structure. In this paper we focus our attention on the case of variable diffusion coefficients. Under appropriate conditions, we show that the sequence of the coefficient matrices belongs to the Generalized Locally Toeplitz class and we compute the symbol describing its asymptotic eigenvalue/singular value distribution, as the matrix size diverges. We employ the spectral information for analyzing known methods of preconditioned Krylov and multigrid type, with both positive and negative results and with a look forward to the multidimensional setting. We also propose two new tridiagonal structure preserving preconditioners to solve the resulting linear system, with Krylov methods such as CGNR and GMRES. A number of numerical examples show that our proposal is more effective than recently used circulant preconditioners.

  13. Spectral analysis of hearing protector impulsive insertion loss

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Cameron J.; Berger, Elliott H.; Murphy, William J.; Stergar, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To characterize the performance of hearing protection devices in impulsive-noise conditions and to compare various protection metrics between impulsive and steady-state noise sources with different characteristics. Design Hearing protectors were measured per the impulsive test methods of ANSI/ASA S12.42-2010. Protectors were measured with impulses generated by both an acoustic shock tube and an AR-15 rifle. The measured data were analyzed for impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) and impulsive spectral insertion loss (ISIL). These impulsive measurements were compared to insertion loss measured with steady-state noise and with real-ear attenuation at threshold (REAT). Study Sample Tested devices included a foam earplug, a level-dependent earplug, and an electronic sound-restoration earmuff. Results IPIL for a given protector varied between measurements with the two impulse noise sources, but ISIL agreed between the two sources. The level-dependent earplug demonstrated level-dependent effects both in IPIL and ISIL. Steady-state insertion loss and REAT measurements tended to provide a conservative estimate of the impulsively-measured attenuation. Conclusions Measurements of IPIL depend strongly on the source used to measure them, especially for hearing protectors with less attenuation at low frequencies. ISIL provides an alternative measurement of impulse protection and appears to be a more complete description of an HPD’s performance. PMID:27885881

  14. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  15. Spectral characterization as a tool for parchment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radis, Michela; Iacomussi, Paola; Rossi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents an investigation on the correlation between spectral characteristics and conservation conditions of parchment to define a NON invasive methodology able to detect and monitor deterioration process in historical parchment without the need of taking small samples. To verify the feasibility and define the most appropriate measurement method, several samples of contemporary parchments, produced following ancient recipes and coming from different animal species, with different degrees of artificially induced damage, were analyzed. The SRF and STF of each sample were measured in the same point, before and after each step of the artificial ageing treatment. Having at disposal a parchment coming from a whole lamb leather, allowed also the study of the correlations between the variations of SRF - STF and the intrinsic factors of a parchment like the variability of animal skin anatomy and of manufacturing. Analyzing different samples allowed also the definition of the measuring method sensitivity and of reference spectrum for the different animal species parchments with accuracy limits. The definition of a reference spectrum of not damaged parchment with acceptability limits is a necessary step for understanding, through SRF - STF measurements, historical parchments conservation conditions: indeed it is necessary to know if deviations from the reference spectrum are ascribable to damage or only to parchment anatomic/production variability. As a case study, the method has been applied to two historical parchment scrolls stored at the Archivio di Stato di Torino (Italy). The SRF - STF of both scrolls was acquired in several points of the scroll, the average spectrum of each scroll was compared with the reference spectra with the relative tolerance limits, recognizing the animal species and damage alterations and demonstrating the feasibility of the method.

  16. Spectral and Morphological Analysis of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Massironi, M.; Carli, C.; Martellato, E.; Pasquarè, G.; Pompilio, L.; Cremonese, G.

    2008-12-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. According to MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope < 5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes < 0.5° and commonly < 0.1°. MOC and THEMIS images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than 1500, even if determining their absolute length is difficult as subsequent lava flows have buried the source vents. MEX/OMEGA data reveal that Daedalia Planum lavas have a spectral shapes comparable to those observed in laboratory for rock slabs of Earth's basalts. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. The Daedalia Planum flow surfaces show several morphological features that remember the inflation fingerprints. This suggests that also Daedalia Planum could have been interested by inflation. However these features appear dissimilar to inflation forms on Elysium Planitia flows. Different degrees of erosion could explain such dissimilarities. In particular Daedalia Planum flow surfaces appear heavily modelled by wind erosion whereas the Elysium Planitia features seem fresher. The different age between the two areas support this hypothesis. Our crater counting dated the most recent Daedalia Planum flows to about 230 Myr , by contrast the Elysium Planitia lava flows range from 100 to 10 My. In conclusion, the inflation process on Martian flows could be more frequent than previously supposed and, consequently, effusion rates and rheological properties of Martian lavas more variable.

  17. Spectral analysis of the fifth spectrum of indium: In V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swapnil; Tauheed, A.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth spectrum of indium (In V) has been investigated in the grazing and normal incidence wavelength regions. In4+ is a Rh-like ion with the ground configuration 4p64d9 and first excited configurations of the type 4p64d8nℓ (n≥4). The theoretical predications for this ion were made by Cowan's quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock code with superposition of configurations involving 4p64d8(5p+6p+7p+4f+5f+6f), 4p54d10, 4p64d75s(5p+4f) for the odd parity matrix and 4p64d8 (5s+6s+7s+5d+6d), 4p64d7(5s2+5p2) for the even parity system. The spectra used for this work were recorded on 10.7 m grazing and normal incidence spectrographs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (USA) and also on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at Antigonish (Canada). The sources used were a sliding spark and a triggered spark respectively. Two hundred and thirty two energy levels based on the identification of 873 spectral lines have been established, forty six being new. Least squares fitted parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed level structure. The energy levels were optimized using a level optimization computer program (LOPT). Our wavelength accuracy for sharp and unblended lines is estimated to be within ±0.005 Å for λ below 400 Å and ±0.006 Å up to 1200 Å.

  18. 1H-NMR Spectral Analysis: Phenoxanthiin-1-oxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Robert F. X.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a case, a heterocyclic sulfoxide, which is useful for an introduction to first-order four-spin data analysis. Background of this technique for use with undergraduate students is given including a sample analysis, a list of supplementary materials, and experimental procedures. (CW)

  19. Spectral analysis of electroencephalogram and oximetric signals in obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto; Marcos, J; Del Campo, Felix; Lopez, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the hypothesis that blood oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings could provide complementary information in the diagnosis of the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome. We studied 148 patients suspected of suffering from OSA. Classical spectral parameters based on the relative power in specified frequency bands (A(f-band)) or peak amplitudes (PA) were used to characterize the frequency content of SaO(2) and EEG recordings. Additionally, the median frequency (MF) and the spectral entropy (SE) were applied to obtain further spectral information. We applied a forward stepwise logistic regression (LR) procedure with crossvalidation leave-one-out to obtain the optimum spectral feature set. Two features from the oximetric spectral analysis (PA and MFsat) and three features from the EEG spectral analysis (A(delta), A(alpha) and SEeeg) were automatically selected. 91.0% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity and 88.5% accuracy were obtained. These results suggest that MF and SE could provide additional information to classical frequency characteristics commonly used in OSA diagnosis. Additionally, nocturnal SaO(2) and EEG recordings during the whole night could provide complementary information to help in the detection of OSA syndrome.

  20. Radiation flux and spectral analysis of the multi-temperature Z dynamic hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Lockard, T. E.; Idzorek, G. C.; Tierney, T. E. IV; Watt, R. G.

    2008-10-15

    Experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico produce hot ({approx}220 eV) plasmas. X-ray emission from the plasma is used to drive radiation flow experiments. Our standard plasma diagnostic suite consists of x-ray diodes (XRDs), silicon photodiodes, and nickel thin film bolometers. Small diagnostic holes allow us to view the hot plasma from the side, top axial anode side, and bottom axial cathode side. Computer software has been written to process the raw data to calculate data quality, fold in detector spectral response and experiment geometry for emitted flux, calculate a multidetector spectral unfold, and yield an equivalent time-dependent Planckian temperature profile. Spectral unfolds of our XRD data generally yield a Planckian-like spectrum. In our presentation we will compare our diagnostic techniques, analysis, and results to more accurately characterize spectral unfolds in order to establish better drive conditions for our experiments.

  1. Radiation flux and spectral analysis of the multi-temperature Z dynamic hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Lockard, T E; Idzorek, G C; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2008-10-01

    Experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico produce hot (approximately 220 eV) plasmas. X-ray emission from the plasma is used to drive radiation flow experiments. Our standard plasma diagnostic suite consists of x-ray diodes (XRDs), silicon photodiodes, and nickel thin film bolometers. Small diagnostic holes allow us to view the hot plasma from the side, top axial anode side, and bottom axial cathode side. Computer software has been written to process the raw data to calculate data quality, fold in detector spectral response and experiment geometry for emitted flux, calculate a multidetector spectral unfold, and yield an equivalent time-dependent Planckian temperature profile. Spectral unfolds of our XRD data generally yield a Planckian-like spectrum. In our presentation we will compare our diagnostic techniques, analysis, and results to more accurately characterize spectral unfolds in order to establish better drive conditions for our experiments.

  2. Spectral analysis of time series of categorical variables in earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Dorador, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Time series of categorical variables often appear in Earth Science disciplines and there is considerable interest in studying their cyclic behavior. This is true, for example, when the type of facies, petrofabric features, ichnofabrics, fossil assemblages or mineral compositions are measured continuously over a core or throughout a stratigraphic succession. Here we deal with the problem of applying spectral analysis to such sequences. A full indicator approach is proposed to complement the spectral envelope often used in other disciplines. Additionally, a stand-alone computer program is provided for calculating the spectral envelope, in this case implementing the permutation test to assess the statistical significance of the spectral peaks. We studied simulated sequences as well as real data in order to illustrate the methodology.

  3. Unsupervised clustering analysis of normalized spectral reflectance data for the Rudaki/Kuiper area on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, M.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; D'Incecco, P.; Holsclaw, G. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of spectral reflectance data from Mercury focused on an area that encompasses the craters Kuiper-Murasaki, Rudaki, and Waters. The goal is to identify different spectral units and analyze potential relations among them. The study region is geologically and spectrally classified as heavily cratered intermediate terrain (IT) with mixed patches of high-reflectance red plains (HRP) and intermediate plains (IP), on the basis of multispectral images taken by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [1]. Recent analysis of observations by the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft with an unsupervised hierarchical clustering method shows a comparable number of units at global scales [2,3]. Analyses on the local scale reveal a larger number of spectral units with a substantially more complex relationship among units.

  4. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%. PMID:26504638

  5. [Algae identification research based on fluorescence spectral imaging technology combined with cluster analysis and principal component analysis].

    PubMed

    Liang, Man; Huang, Fu-rong; He, Xue-jia; Chen, Xing-dan

    2014-08-01

    In order to explore rapid real-time algae detection methods, in the present study experiments were carried out to use fluorescence spectral imaging technology combined with a pattern recognition method for identification research of different types of algae. The fluorescence effect of algae samples is obvious during the detection. The fluorescence spectral imaging system was adopted to collect spectral images of 40 algal samples. Through image denoising, binarization processing and making sure the effective pixels, the spectral curves of each sample were drawn according to the spectral cube. The spectra in the 400-720 nm wavelength range were obtained. Then, two pattern recognition methods, i.e., hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, were used to process the spectral data. The hierarchical cluster analysis results showed that the Euclidean distance method and average weighted method were used to calculate the cluster distance between samples, and the samples could be correctly classified at a level of the distance L=2.452 or above, with an accuracy of 100%. The principal component analysis results showed that first-order derivative, second-order derivative, multiplicative scatter correction, standard normal variate and other pretreatments were carried out on raw spectral data, then principal component analysis was conducted, among which the identification effect after the second-order derivative pretreatment was shown to be the most effective, and eight types of algae samples were independently distributed in the principal component eigenspace. It was thus shown that it was feasible to use fluorescence spectral imaging technology combined with cluster analysis and principal component analysis for algae identification. The method had the characteristics of being easy to operate, fast and nondestructive.

  6. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of near-infrared spectral intensity variations of ground wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was applied to characterize the NIR spectral intensity fluctuations among many spectra of ground wheat with multi-variable variations. Prior to 2D analysis, the spectra having neighboring protein / SDSS reference values were averaged and then new...

  7. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Spectral analysis as related to C-band radar data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work performed on spectral analysis of data from the C-band radars tracking GEOS-2 and on the development of a data compaction method for the GEOS-2 C-band radar data is described. The purposes of the spectral analysis study were to determine the optimum data recording and sampling rates for C-band radar data and to determine the optimum method of filtering and smoothing the data. The optimum data recording and sampling rate is defined as the rate which includes an optimum compromise between serial correlation and the effects of frequency folding. The goal in development of a data compaction method was to reduce to a minimum the amount of data stored, while maintaining all of the statistical information content of the non-compacted data. A digital computer program for computing estimates of the power spectral density function of sampled data was used to perform the spectral analysis study.

  8. Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

  9. Adaptive multiparameter spectral feature analysis for synthetic aperture radar target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Jiao, Licheng; Zhou, Sisi; Zhou, Nan; Feng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    A feature extraction algorithm based on spectral clustering with adaptive multiparameters is proposed for synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR-ATR). Spectral clustering has been widely applied in computer vision for its good performance. Meanwhile, the spectral mapping step in it has the property of feature space transformation. Spectral clustering based target feature extraction for SAR-ATR is constructed according to the framework of out-of-sample extensions in weighted kernel principal component analysis. To avoid the scaling parameter selection in spectral feature analysis (SFA) and eliminate the influence of scaling parameter on feature extraction performance as well, the multiple scaling parameters are calculated adaptively by local neighborhoods. Because the local statistics of the neighborhood of each point are taken into consideration, its performance is better than using only one fixed parameter. Based on the extracted features, target recognition is performed by the support vector machine for its good generalization capability. The experimental results show that the multiparameter SFA outperforms the principal component analysis, kernel principal component analysis and SFA with the selected scaling parameter for SAR target recognition in terms of recognition accuracy.

  10. Objective determination of image end-members in spectral mixture analysis of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Forsyth, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral mixture analysis has been shown to be a powerful, multifaceted tool for analysis of multi- and hyper-spectral data. Applications of AVIRIS data have ranged from mapping soils and bedrock to ecosystem studies. During the first phase of the approach, a set of end-members are selected from an image cube (image end-members) that best account for its spectral variance within a constrained, linear least squares mixing model. These image end-members are usually selected using a priori knowledge and successive trial and error solutions to refine the total number and physical location of the end-members. However, in many situations a more objective method of determining these essential components is desired. We approach the problem of image end-member determination objectively by using the inherent variance of the data. Unlike purely statistical methods such as factor analysis, this approach derives solutions that conform to a physically realistic model.

  11. Objective determination of image end-members in spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Forsyth, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral mixture analysis was shown to be a powerful, multifaceted tool for analysis of multi- and hyper-spectral data. The essence of the first phase of the approach is to determine a set of image end-members that best account for the spectral variance in an image cube within a constrained, linear least squares mixing model. The selection of the image end-member is usually achieved using a priori knowledge and successive trial and error solutions to refine the total number and physical location of the end-members. However, in many situations a more objective method of determining these essential components is desired. The problem of image end-member determination was approached objectively by using the inherent variance of the data. Unlike purely statistical methods such as factor analysis, this approach derives solutions that conform to a physically realistic model.

  12. Objective determination of image end-members in spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stefanie; Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Forsyth, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral mixture analysis was shown to be a powerful, multifaceted tool for analysis of multi- and hyper-spectral data. The essence of the first phase of the approach is to determine a set of image end-members that best account for the spectral variance in an image cube within a constrained, linear least squares mixing model. The selection of the image end-member is usually achieved using a priori knowledge and successive trial and error solutions to refine the total number and physical location of the end-members. However, in many situations a more objective method of determining these essential components is desired. The problem of image end-member determination was approached objectively by using the inherent variance of the data. Unlike purely statistical methods such as factor analysis, this approach derives solutions that conform to a physically realistic model.

  13. Radio-to-TeV Phase-resolved Emission from the Crab Pulsar: The Annular Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Wang, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Crab pulsar is a quite young, famous pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. The latest detection of GeV and TeV pulsed emission with an unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio, supplied by the powerful telescopes Fermi, MAGIC, and VERITAS, challenges the current popular pulsar models, and can be a valuable discriminator to justify the pulsar high-energy-emission models. Our work is divided into two steps. First, taking reasonable parameters (the magnetic inclination angle α = 45° and the view angle ζ = 63°), we use the latest high-energy data to calculate radio, X-ray, γ-ray, and TeV light curves from a geometric view to obtain crucial information on emission locations. Second, we calculate the phase-averaged spectrum and phase-resolved spectra for the Crab pulsar and take a theoretical justification from a physical view for the emission properties as found in the first step. It is found that a Gaussian emissivity distribution with the peak emission near the null charge surface in the so-called annular gap (AG) region gives the best modeled light curves. The pulsed radio, X-ray, γ-ray, and TeV emission are mainly generated from the emission of primary particles or secondary particles with different emission mechanisms in the nearly similar region of the AG located in the only magnetic pole, which leads to the nearly "phase-aligned" multi-wavelength light curves. The emission of peak 1 and peak 2 originates from the AG region near the null charge surface, while the emission of the bridge primarily originates from the core gap (CG) region. The charged particles cannot co-rotate with the pulsar and escape from the magnetosphere, which determines the original flowing primary particles. The acceleration electric field and potential in the AG and CG are huge enough and are in the several tens of neutron star radii. Thus, the primary particles are accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies and produce numerous secondary particles (pairs) in the inner

  14. IR spectral analysis for the diagnostics of crust earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarkhodgaev, R. M.; Liperovsky, V. A.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Naumov, D. Ju

    2012-04-01

    In regions of future earthquakes, a few days before the seismic shock, the emanation of radon and hydrogen is being observed, which causes clouds of increased ionisation in the atmosphere. In the present work the possible diagnostics of these clouds using infrared (IR) spectroscopy is considered, which may be important and useful for the general geophysical system of earthquake prediction and the observation of industrial emissions of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Some possible physical processes are analysed, which cause, under the condition of additional ionisation in a pre-breakdown electrical field, emissions in the IR interval. In doing so, the transparency region of the IR spectrum at wavelengths of 7-15 μm is taken into account. This transparency region corresponds to spectral lines of small atmospheric constituents like CH4, CO2, N2O, NO2, NO, and O3. The possible intensities of the IR emissions observable in laboratories and in nature are estimated. The acceleration process of the electrons in the pre-breakdown electrical field before its adhesion to the molecules is analysed. The laboratory equipment for the investigation of the IR absorption spectrum is constructed for the cases of normal and decreased atmospheric pressures. The syntheses of ozone and nitrous oxides are performed in the barrier discharge. It is studied if the products of the syntheses may be used to model atmospheric processes where these components take part. Spectra of products of the syntheses in the wavelength region of 2-10 μm are observed and analysed. A device is created for the syntheses and accumulation of nitrous oxides. Experiments to observe the IR-spectra of ozone and nitrous oxides during the syntheses and during the further evolution of these molecules are performed. For the earthquake prediction, practically, the investigation of emission spectra is most important, but during the laboratory experiments, the radiation of the excited molecules is shifted by a

  15. Spectral analysis of the DNA targeting bisalkylaminoanthraquinone DRAQ5 in intact living cells.

    PubMed

    Njoh, Kerenza L; Patterson, Laurence H; Zloh, Mire; Wiltshire, Marie; Fisher, Janet; Chappell, Sally; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Bai, Yanhong; Matthews, Daniel; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J

    2006-08-01

    We report on the potential DNA binding modes and spectral characteristics of the cell-permeant far red fluorescent DNA dye, DRAQ5, in solution and bound within intact cells. Our aim was to determine the constraints for its use in flow cytometry and bioimaging. Solution characteristics and quantum yields were determined by spectroscopy. DRAQ5 binding to nuclear DNA was analyzed using fluorescence quenching of Hoechst 33342 dye, emission profiling by flow cytometry, and spectral confocal laser scanning microscopy of the complex DRAQ5 emission spectrum. Cell cycle profiling utilized an EGFP-cyclin B1 reporter as an independent marker of cell age. Molecular modeling was used to explore the modes of DNA binding. DRAQ5 showed a low quantum yield in solution and a spectral shift upon DNA binding, but no significant fluorescence enhancement. DRAQ5 caused a reduction in the fluorescence intensity of Hoechst 33342 in live cells prelabeled with the UV excitable dye, consistent with molecular modeling that suggests AT preference and an engagement of the minor groove. In vivo spectral analysis of DRAQ5 demonstrated shifts to longer wavelengths upon binding with DNA. Analysis of spectral windows of the dual emission peaks at 681 and 707 nm in cells showed that cell cycle compartment recognition was independent of the far red-near IR emission wavelengths monitored. The study provides new clues to modes of DNA binding of the modified anthraquinone molecule in vivo, and its AT base-pair selectivity. The combination of low quantum yield but high DNA affinity explains the favorable signal-to-noise profile of DRAQ5-nuclear fluorescence. The robust nature of cell cycle reporting using DRAQ5, even when restricted spectral windows are selected, facilitates the analysis of encroaching spectral emissions from other fluorescent reporters, including GFP-tagged proteins. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  16. [Spectral analysis of self-oscillating motility in isolated plasmodial strand of Physarum polycephalum].

    PubMed

    Proskurin, S G; Avsievich, T I

    2014-01-01

    In this study the experimental dependencies of the velocity of shuttle endoplasmic motion in the isolated plasmodial strand of Physarum polycephalum obtained by laser Doppler microscopy are presented. The spectral analysis of the time dependencies of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components. Influence of KCN and SHAM--inhibitors of cellular respiration--leads to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. After removal of the inhibitors the respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillation sources. Based on the spectral analysis the simulated time-dependent velocity of the endoplasmic motion is rather good consistent with experimental data.

  17. Spectral Cytometry Has Unique Properties Allowing Multicolor Analysis of Cell Suspensions Isolated from Solid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Sandrine; Valente, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, initially developed to analyze surface protein expression in hematopoietic cells, has increased in analytical complexity and is now widely used to identify cells from different tissues and organisms. As a consequence, data analysis became increasingly difficult due the need of large multi-parametric compensation matrices and to the eventual auto-fluorescence frequently found in cell suspensions obtained from solid organs. In contrast with conventional flow cytometry that detects the emission peak of fluorochromes, spectral flow cytometry distinguishes the shapes of emission spectra along a large range of continuous wave lengths. The data is analyzed with an algorithm that replaces compensation matrices and treats auto-fluorescence as an independent parameter. Thus, spectral flow cytometry should be capable to discriminate fluorochromes with similar emission peaks and provide multi-parametric analysis without compensation requirements. Here we show that spectral flow cytometry achieves a 21-parametric (19 fluorescent probes) characterization and deals with auto-fluorescent cells, providing high resolution of specifically fluorescence-labeled populations. Our results showed that spectral flow cytometry has advantages in the analysis of cell populations of tissues difficult to characterize in conventional flow cytometry, such as heart and intestine. Spectral flow cytometry thus combines the multi-parametric analytical capacity of the highest performing conventional flow cytometry without the requirement for compensation and enabling auto-fluorescence management. PMID:27500930

  18. EEG Signal Decomposition and Improved Spectral Analysis Using Wavelet Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    research and medical applications. Wavelet transform (WT) is a new multi-resolution time-frequency analysis method. WT possesses localization feature both... wavelet transform , the EEG signals are successfully decomposed and denoised. In this paper we also use a ’quasi-detrending’ method for classification of EEG

  19. Analysis of biomass dynamics derived from spectral trajectories.

    Treesearch

    S.L. Powell; W.B. Cohen; R.E. Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    Quantification of the rates and variability of forest disturbance and regrowth at continental scales remains a critical challenge. We have undertaken an effort to address these issues, through funding from NASA, by coordinating research efforts between the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). We present...

  20. A Molecular Iodine Spectral Data Set for Rovibronic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kafader, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    A data set of 7,381 molecular iodine vapor rovibronic transitions between the X and B electronic states has been prepared for an advanced undergraduate spectroscopic analysis project. Students apply standard theoretical techniques to these data and determine the values of three X-state constants (image omitted) and four B-state constants (image…

  1. Spectral Analysis of the Volume Operator in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnemann, J.; Rideout, D.

    2008-09-01

    We describe preliminary results of a detailed numerical analysis of the volume operator as formulated by Ashtekar and Lewandowski.2 Due to a simplified explicit expression for its matrix elements,3 it is possible for the first time to treat generic vertices of valence greater than four. It is found that the vertex geometry characterizes the volume spectrum.

  2. A Molecular Iodine Spectral Data Set for Rovibronic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kafader, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    A data set of 7,381 molecular iodine vapor rovibronic transitions between the X and B electronic states has been prepared for an advanced undergraduate spectroscopic analysis project. Students apply standard theoretical techniques to these data and determine the values of three X-state constants (image omitted) and four B-state constants (image…

  3. Photoplethysmographic imaging via spectrally demultiplexed erythema fluctuation analysis for remote heart rate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deglint, Jason; Chung, Audrey G.; Chwyl, Brendan; Amelard, Robert; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wang, Xiao Yu; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Traditional photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) systems use the red, green, and blue (RGB) broadband measurements of a consumer digital camera to remotely estimate a patients heart rate; however, these broadband RGB signals are often corrupted by ambient noise, making the extraction of subtle fluctuations indicative of heart rate difficult. Therefore, the use of narrow-band spectral measurements can significantly improve the accuracy. We propose a novel digital spectral demultiplexing (DSD) method to infer narrow-band spectral information from acquired broadband RGB measurements in order to estimate heart rate via the computation of motion- compensated skin erythema fluctuation. Using high-resolution video recordings of human participants, multiple measurement locations are automatically identified on the cheeks of an individual, and motion-compensated broadband reflectance measurements are acquired at each measurement location over time via measurement location tracking. The motion-compensated broadband reflectance measurements are spectrally demultiplexed using a non-linear inverse model based on the spectral sensitivity of the camera's detector. A PPG signal is then computed from the demultiplexed narrow-band spectral information via skin erythema fluctuation analysis, with improved signal-to-noise ratio allowing for reliable remote heart rate measurements. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed system, a set of experiments involving human motion in a front-facing position were performed under ambient lighting conditions. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system achieves robust and accurate heart rate measurements and can provide additional information about the participant beyond the capabilities of traditional PPGI methods.

  4. The Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS): Software for integrated analysis of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.; Boardman, J. W.; Heidebrecht, K. B.; Shapiro, A. T.; Barloon, P. J.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Spectral Image Processing System (SIPS) is a software package developed by the Center for the Study of Earth from Space (CSES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in response to a perceived need to provide integrated tools for analysis of imaging spectrometer data both spectrally and spatially. SIPS was specifically designed to deal with data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), but was tested with other datasets including the Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS), GEOSCAN images, and Landsat TM. SIPS was developed using the 'Interactive Data Language' (IDL). It takes advantage of high speed disk access and fast processors running under the UNIX operating system to provide rapid analysis of entire imaging spectrometer datasets. SIPS allows analysis of single or multiple imaging spectrometer data segments at full spatial and spectral resolution. It also allows visualization and interactive analysis of image cubes derived from quantitative analysis procedures such as absorption band characterization and spectral unmixing. SIPS consists of three modules: SIPS Utilities, SIPS_View, and SIPS Analysis. SIPS version 1.1 is described below.

  5. Mapping tropical dry forest succession using multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Sen; Yu, Qiuyan; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Feng, Jilu; Rivard, Benoit; Gu, Zhujun

    2015-11-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) in the Americas are considered the first frontier of economic development with less than 1% of their total original coverage under protection. Accordingly, accurate estimates of their spatial extent, fragmentation, and degree of regeneration are critical in evaluating the success of current conservation policies. This study focused on a well-protected secondary TDF in Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP) Environmental Monitoring Super Site, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We used spectral signature analysis of TDF ecosystem succession (early, intermediate, and late successional stages), and its intrinsic variability, to propose a new multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis (MCSMA) method on the shortwave infrared (SWIR) of HyMap image. Unlike most existing iterative mixture analysis (IMA) techniques, MCSMA tries to extract and make use of representative endmembers with spectral and spatial information. MCSMA then considers three criteria that influence the comparative importance of different endmember combinations (endmember models): root mean square error (RMSE); spatial distance (SD); and fraction consistency (FC), to create an evaluation framework to select a best-fit model. The spectral analysis demonstrated that TDFs have a high spectral variability as a result of biomass variability. By adopting two search strategies, the unmixing results showed that our new MCSMA approach had a better performance in root mean square error (early: 0.160/0.159; intermediate: 0.322/0.321; and late: 0.239/0.235); mean absolute error (early: 0.132/0.128; intermediate: 0.254/0.251; and late: 0.191/0.188); and systematic error (early: 0.045/0.055; intermediate: -0.211/-0.214; and late: 0.161/0.160), compared to the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA). This study highlights the importance of SWIR in differentiating successional stages in TDFs. The proposed MCSMA provides a more flexible and generalized means for the best-fit model determination

  6. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  7. Spectral Analysis Of Digital Wave Data Computer Program: SPECTRUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    spectrum and time series analysis may be found in Bendat and Piersol (L97L), Borgman (1972), Borgman (1973), Lund (1986), and Welch (1967). The...Including Procedures Based on the Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm", STL #2008, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY. Lund , Robert B. "A Mathematical Model...Engineering Research Center, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Rye, Henrik . 1977. "The Stability of Some Currently Used Wave

  8. Spectral analysis of optical emission of microplasma in sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Morita, Hayato; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an analysis of optical emission spectra from microplasma in three types of liquid, namely artificial sea water composed of 10 typical agents (10ASW), reference solutions each containing a single agent (NaCl, MgCl2 + H2O, Na2SO4, CaCl2, KCl, NaHCO3, KBr, NaHCO3, H3BO3, SrCl2 + H2O, NaF) and naturally sampled deep sea water (DSW). Microplasma was operated using a needle(Pd)-to-plate(Pt) electrode system sunk into each liquid in a quartz cuvette. The radius of the tip of the needle was 50 μm and the gap between the electrodes was set at 20 μm. An inpulse generator circuit, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the liquid between the electrodes, was used as a pulse current source for operation of discharges. In the spectra, the emission peaks for the main components of sea water and contaminants from the electrodes were detected. Spectra for reference solutions were examined to enable the identification of unassigned peaks in the spectra for sea water. Analysis of the Stark broadening of H α peak was carried out to estimate the electron density of the plasma under various conditions. The characteristics of microplasma discharge in sea water and the analysis of the optical emission spectra will be presented. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26600129.

  9. Conditional adaptive Bayesian spectral analysis of nonstationary biomedical time series.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Scott A; Hall, Martica H; Buysse, Daniel J; Krafty, Robert T

    2017-05-08

    Many studies of biomedical time series signals aim to measure the association between frequency-domain properties of time series and clinical and behavioral covariates. However, the time-varying dynamics of these associations are largely ignored due to a lack of methods that can assess the changing nature of the relationship through time. This article introduces a method for the simultaneous and automatic analysis of the association between the time-varying power spectrum and covariates, which we refer to as conditional adaptive Bayesian spectrum analysis (CABS). The procedure adaptively partitions the grid of time and covariate values into an unknown number of approximately stationary blocks and nonparametrically estimates local spectra within blocks through penalized splines. CABS is formulated in a fully Bayesian framework, in which the number and locations of partition points are random, and fit using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Estimation and inference averaged over the distribution of partitions allows for the accurate analysis of spectra with both smooth and abrupt changes. The proposed methodology is used to analyze the association between the time-varying spectrum of heart rate variability and self-reported sleep quality in a study of older adults serving as the primary caregiver for their ill spouse. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Adapting Spectral Co-clustering to Documents and Terms Using Latent Semantic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Laurence A. F.; Leckie, Christopher A.; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri; Bezdek, James C.

    Spectral co-clustering is a generic method of computing co-clusters of relational data, such as sets of documents and their terms. Latent semantic analysis is a method of document and term smoothing that can assist in the information retrieval process. In this article we examine the process behind spectral clustering for documents and terms, and compare it to Latent Semantic Analysis. We show that both spectral co-clustering and LSA follow the same process, using different normalisation schemes and metrics. By combining the properties of the two co-clustering methods, we obtain an improved co-clustering method for document-term relational data that provides an increase in the cluster quality of 33.0%.

  11. Stochastic analysis of spectral broadening by a free turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the time-varying shear layer between a harmonic acoustic source and an observer on the frequency content of the observed sound is considered. Experimental data show that the spectral content of the acoustic signal is considerably broadened upon passing through such a shear layer. Theoretical analysis is presented which shows that such spectral broadening is entirely consistent with amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal by the time-varying shear layer. Thus, no actual frequency shift need be hypothesized to explain the spectral phenomenon. Experimental tests were conducted at 2, 4, and 6 kHz and at free jet flow velocities of 10, 20, and 30 m/s. Analysis of acoustic pressure time histories obtained from these tests confirms the above conclusion, at least for the low Mach numbers considered.

  12. Combined spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging applied for tissue analysis: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontu, S.; Miclos, S.; Savastru, D.; Tautan, M.

    2017-09-01

    In recent years many optoelectronic techniques have been developed for improvement and the development of devices for tissue analysis. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a new medical interferometric imaging modality that provides depth resolved tissue structure information with resolution in the μm range. However, SD-OCT has its own limitations and cannot offer the biochemical information of the tissue. These data can be obtained with hyperspectral imaging, a non-invasive, sensitive and real time technique. In the present study we have combined Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) with Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for tissue analysis. The Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) and Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) are two methods that have demonstrated significant potential in this context. Preliminary results using different tissue have highlighted the capabilities of this technique of combinations.

  13. Enhancing detection sensitivity of metallic nanostructures by resonant coupling mode and spectral integration analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Hung; Tsai, Wan-Shao; Lee, Kuang-Li; Lee, Ming-Chang M; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2014-08-11

    We report a simple method to efficiently improve the detection limit of surface plasmon resonance in periodic metallic nanostructures by using small angle illumination and spectral integration analysis. The large-area gold nanoslit arrays were fabricated by thermal-annealing template-stripping method with a slit width of 60 nm and period of 500 nm. The small angle illumination induced a resonant coupling between surface plasmon mode and substrate mode. It increased ~2.24 times intensity sensitivity at 5.5° incident angle. The small-angle illumination also resulted in multiple resonant peaks. The spectral integration method integrated all changes near the resonant peaks and increased the signal to noise ratio about 5 times as compared to single-wavelength intensity analysis. Combining both small angle and spectral integration, the detection limit was increased to one order of magnitude. The improvement of the detection limit for antigen-antibody interactions was demonstrated.

  14. SearchLight: a freely available web-based quantitative spectral analysis tool (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhat, Prashant; Peet, Michael; Erdogan, Turan

    2016-03-01

    In order to design a fluorescence experiment, typically the spectra of a fluorophore and of a filter set are overlaid on a single graph and the spectral overlap is evaluated intuitively. However, in a typical fluorescence imaging system the fluorophores and optical filters are not the only wavelength dependent variables - even the excitation light sources have been changing. For example, LED Light Engines may have a significantly different spectral response compared to the traditional metal-halide lamps. Therefore, for a more accurate assessment of fluorophore-to-filter-set compatibility, all sources of spectral variation should be taken into account simultaneously. Additionally, intuitive or qualitative evaluation of many spectra does not necessarily provide a realistic assessment of the system performance. "SearchLight" is a freely available web-based spectral plotting and analysis tool that can be used to address the need for accurate, quantitative spectral evaluation of fluorescence measurement systems. This tool is available at: http://searchlight.semrock.com/. Based on a detailed mathematical framework [1], SearchLight calculates signal, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio for multiple combinations of fluorophores, filter sets, light sources and detectors. SearchLight allows for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the compatibility of filter sets with fluorophores, analysis of bleed-through, identification of optimized spectral edge locations for a set of filters under specific experimental conditions, and guidance regarding labeling protocols in multiplexing imaging assays. Entire SearchLight sessions can be shared with colleagues and collaborators and saved for future reference. [1] Anderson, N., Prabhat, P. and Erdogan, T., Spectral Modeling in Fluorescence Microscopy, http://www.semrock.com (2010).

  15. Non Destructive Defect Detection by Spectral Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krejcar, Ondrej; Frischer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The potential nondestructive diagnostics of solid objects is discussed in this article. The whole process is accomplished by consecutive steps involving software analysis of the vibration power spectrum (eventually acoustic emissions) created during the normal operation of the diagnosed device or under unexpected situations. Another option is to create an artificial pulse, which can help us to determine the actual state of the diagnosed device. The main idea of this method is based on the analysis of the current power spectrum density of the received signal and its postprocessing in the Matlab environment with a following sample comparison in the Statistica software environment. The last step, which is comparison of samples, is the most important, because it is possible to determine the status of the examined object at a given time. Nowadays samples are compared only visually, but this method can’t produce good results. Further the presented filter can choose relevant data from a huge group of data, which originate from applying FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). On the other hand, using this approach they can be subjected to analysis with the assistance of a neural network. If correct and high-quality starting data are provided to the initial network, we are able to analyze other samples and state in which condition a certain object is. The success rate of this approximation, based on our testing of the solution, is now 85.7%. With further improvement of the filter, it could be even greater. Finally it is possible to detect defective conditions or upcoming limiting states of examined objects/materials by using only one device which contains HW and SW parts. This kind of detection can provide significant financial savings in certain cases (such as continuous casting of iron where it could save hundreds of thousands of USD). PMID:22163742

  16. Examining Interindividual Differences in Cyclicity of Pleasant and Unpleasant Affects Using Spectral Analysis and Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Nilam; Chow, Sy-Miin; Bowles, Ryan P.; Wang, Lijuan; Grimm, Kevin; Fujita, Frank; Nesselroade, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Weekly cycles in emotion were examined by combining item response modeling and spectral analysis approaches in an analysis of 179 college students' reports of daily emotions experienced over 7 weeks. We addressed the measurement of emotion using an item response model. Spectral analysis and multilevel sinusoidal models were used to identify…

  17. [Spectral characters analysis of ground objects in snowmelt period in the northern slope of Tianshan Mountains].

    PubMed

    Fang, Shi-Feng; Pei, Huan; Liu, Zhi-Hui

    2010-05-01

    Urumqi River Basin and Juntanghu Basin, located in the northern slope of Tianshan Mountains in Xinjiang, were selected as typical study areas. With the portable field spectrometer CI700 produced by CID in the United States and from a large number of field investigations and field measurements in the snowmelt period (usually starts in the end of February or the beginning of March, and goes on for many days) from 2006 to 2009, a variety of spectral curves and their variation of typical ground objects in the snowmelt period in the northern slope of Tianshan Mountains, such as snow, ice, water and soil, were obtained, and spectral characters analysis was carried out based on the collected data. The results showed that the classes of ground objects in snowmelt period are quite monotone, however, a great challenge was brought about to the quantitative remote sensing research on surface parameters in snowmelt period because of the interactive effects of the complex systems of snow-ice-water-soil, the spectral properties of typical ground objects, and their complex changes. Reflectance of soil with different moisture conditions is distinct, as well as reflectance of ice and snow under different environment or dissimilar mixtures have obvious development trends. The series of observations and analysis of the typical and complex spectral features in snowmelt period are of great significance for the fundamental study of objects' spectral characteristics, as well as for the application of quantitative remote sensing studies.

  18. Spectral analysis of the Crab Nebula and GRB 160530A with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleator, Clio; Boggs, Steven E.; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Kierans, Carolyn; Lowell, Alexander; Tomsick, John; Zoglauer, Andreas; Amman, Mark; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying; Lin, Chih H.; Jean, Pierre; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-5 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources including gamma-ray bursts and compact objects. As a compact Compton telescope, COSI has inherent sensitivity to polarization. COSI utilizes 12 germanium detectors to provide excellent spectral resolution. On May 17, 2016, COSI was launched from Wanaka, New Zealand and completed a successful 46-day flight on NASA’s new Superpressure balloon. To perform spectral analysis with COSI, we have developed an accurate instrument model as required for the response matrix. With carefully chosen background regions, we are able to fit the background-subtracted spectra in XSPEC. We have developed a model of the atmosphere above COSI based on the NRLMSISE-00 Atmosphere Model to include in our spectral fits. The Crab and GRB 160530A are among the sources detected during the 2016 flight. We present spectral analysis of these two point sources. Our GRB 160530A results are consistent with those from other instruments, confirming COSI’s spectral abilities. Furthermore, we discuss prospects for measuring the Crab polarization with COSI.

  19. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatikos, Michael; Sakamoto, Takanori; Band, David L.

    2008-05-22

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (E{sub peak}) values, for a conservative annual estimate of {approx}30 GRBs. The addition of BAT/s spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the {approx}20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND and Suzaku-WAM, would enable the study of broad-band spectral and temporal evolution of prompt GRB emission over three energy decades, thus potentially increasing science return without placing additional demands upon mission resources throughout their contemporaneous orbital tenure over the next decade.

  20. Imagination in harmony with science: Spectral analysis as a practical pedagogic tool in the voice studio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundus, Katharin Elaine

    Traditionally, voice teachers have relied on intuition and imagination to impart technical information to their students. Spectral analysis, generated on a personal computer, is now available, affordable and accessible to the twenty-first century voice teacher. These programs provide several acoustical functions using frequency, intensity and time to provide technical information about the human singing voice. This paper advocates the use of this technology as a supplemental and supporting strategy in addition to the traditional pedagogic modes of metaphor and intuition. To begin, the paper examines the acoustical principles that reflect beautiful singing and are necessary to an understanding of spectral analysis. Several figures are used that graphically explain the source-filter theory of vowels and how it is affected by the constant manipulation of a closed-open tube like the human vocal tract. Nine functions of Real Analysis (a spectral analysis program in real time manufactured by Tiger DRS, Inc.) are then examined and explained in relation to the singing voice. The paper goes on to outline a systematic vocal pedagogy in eight parts that can be used in harmony with spectral analysis, portrayed in an octagonal spiral figure. In the fourth chapter, this systematic vocal pedagogy is then integrated with spectral analysis to suggest a holistic and artistic method to use this technology. In a table format, several singing behaviors are identified, both negative and positive; training solutions using Real Analysis functions are outlined for each behavior. The paper concludes by pointing out that this technology is valuable because it teaches teachers about their own voice in a scientific manner and allows them to share this quantifiable information with their students. Furthermore, twenty-first century students are accepting of and eager for new technologies as they learn about their voices. This new technology does not change the traditional goals of voice training

  1. On spectral techniques in analysis of Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Juha; Rämö, Pauli; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2005-06-01

    In this work we present results that can be used for analysis of Boolean networks. The results utilize Fourier spectra of the functions in the network. An accurate formula is given for Derrida plots of networks of finite size N based on a result on Boolean functions presented in another context. Derrida plots are widely used to examine the stability issues of Boolean networks. For the limit N→∞, we give a computationally simple form that can be used as a good approximation for rather small networks as well. A formula for Derrida plots of random Boolean networks (RBNs) presented earlier in the literature is given an alternative derivation. It is shown that the information contained in the Derrida plot is equal to the average Fourier spectrum of the functions in the network. In the case of random networks the mean Derrida plot can be obtained from the mean spectrum of the functions. The method is applied to real data by using the Boolean functions found in genetic regulatory networks of eukaryotic cells in an earlier study. Conventionally, Derrida plots and stability analysis have been computed with statistical sampling resulting in poorer accuracy.

  2. Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2012-10-07

    We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more naturally than previously used summary statistics such as the degree distribution. Furthermore, we include the effects of sampling into the analysis, to properly correct for the incompleteness of existing datasets, and have analysed the performance of our method under various degrees of sampling. We consider a number of models focusing not only on the biologically relevant class of duplication models, but also including models of scale-free network growth that have previously been claimed to describe such data. We find a preference for a duplication-divergence with linear preferential attachment model in the majority of the interaction datasets considered. We also illustrate how our method can be used to perform multi-model inference of network parameters to estimate properties of the full network from sampled data.

  3. Spectral saliency via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Dai, Jialun; Zhu, Yafei; Zheng, Haiyong; Qiao, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    Suppressing nonsalient patterns by smoothing the amplitude spectrum at an appropriate scale has been shown to effectively detect the visual saliency in the frequency domain. Different filter scales are required for different types of salient objects. We observe that the optimal scale for smoothing amplitude spectrum shares a specific relation with the size of the salient region. Based on this observation and the bottom-up saliency detection characterized by spectrum scale-space analysis for natural images, we propose to detect visual saliency, especially with salient objects of different sizes and locations via automatic adaptive amplitude spectrum analysis. We not only provide a new criterion for automatic optimal scale selection but also reserve the saliency maps corresponding to different salient objects with meaningful saliency information by adaptive weighted combination. The performance of quantitative and qualitative comparisons is evaluated by three different kinds of metrics on the four most widely used datasets and one up-to-date large-scale dataset. The experimental results validate that our method outperforms the existing state-of-the-art saliency models for predicting human eye fixations in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  4. Site Characterization in the Urban Area of Tijuana, B. C., Mexico by Means of: H/V Spectral Ratios, Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves, and Random Decrement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia-Herrera, R.; Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Results of site characterization for an experimental site in the metropolitan area of Tijuana, B. C., Mexico are presented as part of the on-going research in which time series of earthquakes, ambient noise, and induced vibrations were processed with three different methods: H/V spectral ratios, Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW), and the Random Decrement Method, (RDM). Forward modeling using the wave propagation stiffness matrix method (Roësset and Kausel, 1981) was used to compute the theoretical SH/P, SV/P spectral ratios, and the experimental H/V spectral ratios were computed following the conventional concepts of Fourier analysis. The modeling/comparison between the theoretical and experimental H/V spectral ratios was carried out. For the SASW method the theoretical dispersion curves were also computed and compared with the experimental one, and finally the theoretical free vibration decay curve was compared with the experimental one obtained with the RDM. All three methods were tested with ambient noise, induced vibrations, and earthquake signals. Both experimental spectral ratios obtained with ambient noise as well as earthquake signals agree quite well with the theoretical spectral ratios, particularly at the fundamental vibration frequency of the recording site. Differences between the fundamental vibration frequencies are evident for sites located at alluvial fill (~0.6 Hz) and at sites located at conglomerate/sandstones fill (0.75 Hz). Shear wave velocities for the soft soil layers of the 4-layer discrete soil model ranges as low as 100 m/s and up to 280 m/s. The results with the SASW provided information that allows to identify low velocity layers, not seen before with the traditional seismic methods. The damping estimations obtained with the RDM are within the expected values, and the dominant frequency of the system also obtained with the RDM correlates within the range of plus-minus 20 % with the one obtained by means of the H/V spectral

  5. Laser dissection sampling modes for direct mass spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, John F; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2016-03-15

    Laser microdissection coupled directly with mass spectrometry provides the capability of on-line analysis of substrates with high spatial resolution, high collection efficiency, and freedom on shape and size of the sampling area. Establishing the merits and capabilities of the different sampling modes that the system provides is necessary in order to select the best sampling mode for characterizing analytically challenging samples. The capabilities of laser ablation spot sampling, laser ablation raster sampling, and laser 'cut and drop' sampling modes of a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system were compared for the analysis of single cells and tissue. Single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were monitored for their monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diacylglyceryltrimethylhomo-Ser (DGTS) lipid content using the laser spot sampling mode, which was capable of ablating individual cells (~4-15 μm) even when agglomerated together. Turbid Allium Cepa cells (~150 μm) having unique shapes difficult to precisely measure using the other sampling modes could be ablated in their entirety using laser raster sampling. Intact microdissections of specific regions of a cocaine-dosed mouse brain tissue were compared using laser 'cut and drop' sampling. Since in laser 'cut and drop' sampling whole and otherwise unmodified sections are captured into the probe, 100% collection efficiencies were achieved. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, while laser ablation raster sampling has the highest sampling area adaptability of the sampling modes. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, useful in this case for the analysis of single cells. Laser ablation raster sampling was best for sampling regions with unique shapes that are difficult to measure using other sampling modes. Laser 'cut and drop' sampling can be used for

  6. Structural, spectral analysis of ambroxol using DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Manikandan, A.

    2017-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of Ambroxol are recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Theoretical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) method using 6-31G(2d,3p) basis set. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The results of the calculations were applied to the simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with the observed spectra. The frontier orbital energy gap and dipole moment, illustrates the high reactivity of the title molecule. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analysed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), the electronic properties were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach, and HOMO-LUMO energy levels are also constructed.

  7. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  8. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  9. Kirchhoff's Laws of Spectral Analysis: A Set of Computer Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillmore, James A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A computer program which simulates an interstellar gas and dust cloud has been used to study Kirchhoff's laws of spectral analysis in introductory astronomy courses. The model parameters can be varied to stimulate various effects observed in actual clouds. Students are given exercises to use the program in a manner similar to a lab experiment.…

  10. Wavelet-transform analysis for group delay extraction of white light spectral interferograms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuqiang; Yang, Weijian; Zhou, Chun; Wang, Xi; Tao, Jun; Kong, Weipeng; Zhang, Zhigang

    2009-04-13

    We proposed a simple and straightforward technique, wavelet-transform analysis, for group delay extraction from the white light spectral interferograms. In this paper, we demonstrated that the extracted group delay dispersion by wavelet-transform was insensitive to the path length balancing of the interferometer. This promises a flexible and robust technique for chirped mirror characterization.

  11. [The use of the spectral analysis techniques for the medico-criminalistic identification of the speaker].

    PubMed

    Kir'yanov, P A; Kaganov, A Sh

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to discuss the theoretical foundations and the methodological basis for the use of the apparatus of spectral analysis for the purpose of medico-criminalistic personality identification from the characteristics of the subject's voice and sounding speech. The article is based on the review of the literature sources and the methodological approaches developed by the author.

  12. Library Optimization in EDXRF Spectral Deconvolution for Multi-element Analysis of Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    In multi-element analysis of atmospheric aerosols, attempts are made to fit overlapping elemental spectral lines for many elements that may be undetectable in samples due to low concentrations. Fitting with many library reference spectra has the unwanted effect of raising the an...

  13. Evaluation of skin melanoma in spectral range 450-950 nm using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, D.; Lihacova, I.; Kuzmina, I.; Spigulis, J.

    2013-06-01

    Diagnostic potential of principal component analysis (PCA) of multi-spectral imaging data in the wavelength range 450- 950 nm for distant skin melanoma recognition is discussed. Processing of the measured clinical data by means of PCA resulted in clear separation between malignant melanomas and pigmented nevi.

  14. Mass spectral analysis of C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acid derivatives.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Chadha, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria are obtained for the distinction of alpha, beta, gamma, and N-methyl isomers of the C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acids, using mass spectral analysis of the derivatives of these acids. The use of deuterium labeling has helped in the understanding of certain fragmentation pathways.

  15. Skylab S-191 spectrometer single spectral scan analysis program. [user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    Documentation and user information for the S-191 single spectral scan analysis program are reported. A breakdown of the computational algorithms is supplied, followed by the program listing and examples of sample output. A copy of the flow chart which describes the driver routine in the body of the main program segment is included.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Spectral Analysis using Linearly Chirped Gaussian Pulse Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huan; Wang, An-Ting; Xu, Li-Xin; Ming, Hai

    2009-07-01

    We analyze the spectrum of a stacked pulse with the technique of linearly chirped Gaussian pulse stacking. Our results show that there are modulation structures in the spectrum of the stacked pulse. The modulation frequencies are discussed in detail. By applying spectral analysis, we find that the intensity fluctuation cannot be smoothed by introducing an optical amplitude filter.

  17. [Spectral Analysis of Trace Fluorine Phase in Phosphogypsum].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-tao; Li, Hui-quan; Bao, Wei-jun; Wang, Chen-ye; Li, Song-geng; Lin, Wei-gang

    2015-08-01

    Phosphogypsum, which contains more than 90% of the calcium sulfate dehydrate (CaSO4 · 2H2O), is a kind of important renewable gypsum resources. Unlike the natural gypsum, however, phosphorus, fluorine, organic matter and other harmful impurities in phosphogypsum limit its practical use. To ascertain the existence form, content and phase distribution of trace fluoride in phosphogypsum has important theoretical values in removing trace fluoride effectively. In this present paper, the main existence form and phase distribution of trace fluoride in phosphogypsum was investigated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). The results show that trace fluoride phase mainly includes NaF, KF, CaF2, K2SiF6, Na2SiF6, Na3AlF6, K3AlF6, AlF3 · 3H2O, AlF2.3(OH)0.7 · H2O, Ca5(PO4)3F, Ca10(PO4)6F2. Among them, 4.83% of fluorine exists in the form of fluoride (NaF, KF, CaF2); Accordingly, 8.43% in the form of fluoride phosphate (Ca5(PO4)3F, Ca10(PO4)6F2); 12.21% in the form of fluorine aluminate (Na3AlF6, K3AlF6); 41.52% in the form of fluorosilicate (K2SiF6, Na2SiF6); 33.02% in the form of aluminum fluoride with crystal water (AlF3 · 3H2O, AlF2.3(OH)0.7 · H2O). In the analysis of phase constitution for trace elements in solid samples, the method of combining XPS and EMPA has more advantages. This study also provides theoretical basis for the removal of trace fluorine impurity and the effective recovery of fluorine resources.

  18. A comprehensive multiphonon spectral analysis in MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livneh, Tsachi; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2015-09-01

    We present a comprehensive multiphonon Raman and complementary infrared analysis for bulk and monolayer MoS2. For the bulk the analysis consists of symmetry assignment from which we obtain a broad set of allowed second-order transitions at the high symmetry M, K and Γ Brillouin zone (BZ) points. The attribution of about 80 transitions of up to fifth order processes are proposed in the low temperature (95 K) resonant Raman spectrum measured with excitation energy of 1.96 eV, which is slightly shifted in energy from the A exciton. We propose that the main contributions come from four phonons: A1g (M), E12g (M1), E22g (M1) (TA‧ (M)) and E22g (M2) (LA‧ (M)). The last three are single degenerate phonons at M with an origin of the E12g (Γ) and E22g (Γ) phonons. Among the four phonons, we identify in the resonant Raman spectra all (but one) of the second-order overtones, combination and difference-bands and many of the third order bands. Consistent with the expectation that at the M point only combinations with the same inversion symmetry (g or u) are Raman-allowed, the contribution of combinations with the longitudinal acoustic (LA(M)) mode can not be considered with the above four phonons. Although minor, contributions from K point and possibly Γ-point phonons are also evident. The ‘2LA band’, measured at ˜460 cm-1 is reassigned. Supported by the striking similarity between this band, measured under off-resonant conditions, and recently published two phonon density of states, we explain the lower part of the band, previously attributed to 2LA(M), as being due to a van Hove singularity between K and M. The higher part, previously attributed exclusively to the A2u (Γ) phonon, is mostly due to the LA and LA‧ phonons at M. For the monolayer MoS2 the second-order phonon processes from the M and Γ BZ points are also analyzed and are discussed within similar framework to that of the bulk.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Spatial Series Data of Pathologic Tissue: A Study on Small Intestine in ICR Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mise, Keiji; Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Ohtomo, Norio

    2009-01-01

    We examined the usefulness of spectral analysis for investigating quantitatively the spatial pattern of pathologic tissue. To interpret the results obtained from real tissue, we constructed a two-dimensional spatial model of the tissue. Spectral analysis was applied to the spatial series data, which were obtained from the real tissue and model. From the results of spectral analysis, spatial patterns of the tissue and model were characterized quantitatively in reference to the frequencies and powers of the spectral peaks in power spectral densities (PSDs). The results for the model were essentially consistent with those for the tissue. It was concluded that the model was capable of adequately explaining the spatial pattern of the tissue. It is anticipated that spectral analysis will become a useful tool for characterizing the spatial pattern of the tissue quantitatively, resulting in an automated first screening of pathological specimens.

  20. Electron spin resonance spectral analysis of irradiated royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2014-01-15

    The analysis of unpaired electron components in royal jelly was carried out using electron spin resonance (ESR) with the aim to develop a detection method for irradiated royal jelly. The ESR spectrum of royal jelly had natural signals derived from transition metals, including Fe(3+) and Cu(2+), and a signal line near g=2.00. After irradiation, a new splitting asymmetric spectrum with overall spectrum width ca. 10mT at g=2.004 was observed. The intensities of the signals at g=2.004 increased in proportion to the absorbed dose in samples under different storage conditions: fresh frozen royal jelly and dried royal jelly powder at room temperature. The signal intensity of the fresh frozen sample was stable after irradiation. One year after 10kGy irradiation of dried powder, the signal intensity was sevenfold greater than before irradiation, although the intensity continued to steadily decrease with time. This stable radiation-induced radical component was derived from the poorly soluble constituent of royal jelly.

  1. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re = 100 . Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the mid-plane perpendicular to the axis of cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space were the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable is scrutinized using this experimental data. A novel method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. The present work was supported by the Franco-Argentinian Associated Laboratory in the Physics and Mechanics of Fluids (LIA PMF-FMF).

  2. Synthesis, spectral, computational and thermal analysis studies of metalloceftriaxone antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Elasala, Gehan S.

    2015-03-01

    Binary ceftriaxone metal complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and six mixed metals complexes of (Fe, Cu), (Fe, Co), (Co, Ni), (Co, Cu), (Ni, Cu) and (Fe, Ni) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra. The studies proved that the ligand has different combination modes and all complexes were of octahedral geometry. Molecular modeling techniques and quantum chemical methods have been performed for ceftriaxone to calculate charges, bond lengths, bond angles, dihedral angles, electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), global hardness (η), softness (σ) and the electrophilicity index (ω). The thermal decomposition of the prepared metals complexes was studied by TGA, DTA and DSC techniques. The kinetic parameters and the reaction orders were estimated. The thermal decomposition of all the complexes ended with the formation of metal oxides and carbon residue as a final product except in case of Hg complex, sublimation occurs at the temperature range 297.7-413.7 °C so, only carbon residue was produced during thermal decomposition. The geometries of complexes may be altered from Oh to Td during the thermal decomposition steps. Decomposition mechanisms were suggested.

  3. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  4. Effectiveness of Spectral Similarity Measures to Develop Precise Crop Spectra for Hyperspectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H.; Krishna Mohan, B.

    2014-11-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective to check effectiveness of spectral similarity measures to develop precise crop spectra from the collected hyperspectral field spectra. In Multispectral and Hyperspectral remote sensing, classification of pixels is obtained by statistical comparison (by means of spectral similarity) of known field or library spectra to unknown image spectra. Though these algorithms are readily used, little emphasis has been placed on use of various spectral similarity measures to select precise crop spectra from the set of field spectra. Conventionally crop spectra are developed after rejecting outliers based only on broad-spectrum analysis. Here a successful attempt has been made to develop precise crop spectra based on spectral similarity. As unevaluated data usage leads to uncertainty in the image classification, it is very crucial to evaluate the data. Hence, notwithstanding the conventional method, the data precision has been performed effectively to serve the purpose of the present research work. The effectiveness of developed precise field spectra was evaluated by spectral discrimination measures and found higher discrimination values compared to spectra developed conventionally. Overall classification accuracy for the image classified by field spectra selected conventionally is 51.89% and 75.47% for the image classified by field spectra selected precisely based on spectral similarity. KHAT values are 0.37, 0.62 and Z values are 2.77, 9.59 for image classified using conventional and precise field spectra respectively. Reasonable higher classification accuracy, KHAT and Z values shows the possibility of a new approach for field spectra selection based on spectral similarity measure.

  5. The analysis of toxic connections content in water by spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, I. V.; Chaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Artyushin, V. R.

    2017-08-01

    The current state of ecology means the strict observance of measures for the utilization of household and industrial wastes that is connected with very essential expenses of means and time. Thanks to spectroscopic devices usage the spectral methods allow to carry out the express quantitative and qualitative analysis in a workplace and field conditions. In a work the application of spectral methods by studying the degradation of toxic organic compounds after preliminary radiation of various sources is shown. Experimental data of optical density of water at various influences are given.

  6. Semi-automatic detection of skin malformations by analysis of spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-06-01

    The multi-spectral imaging technique to reveal skin malformations has been described in this work. Four spectral images taken at polarized monochromatic LED illumination (450nm, 545nm, 660nm and 940 nm) and polarized white LED light imaged by CMOS sensor via cross-oriented polarizing filter were analyzed to calculate chromophore maps. The algorithm based on skin color analysis and user-defined threshold selection allows highlighting of skin areas with predefined chromophore concentration semi-automatically. Preliminary results of clinical tests are presented.

  7. The spectral analysis of syllables in patients using dentures.

    PubMed

    Jindra, Petr; Eber, Miroslav; Pesák, Josef

    2002-12-01

    Changes in the oral cavity resulting from the loss of teeth and the ensuing reconstruction of a set of teeth by dentures (partial or complete) may cause changes in the speech and voice of the patient. The aim of the present investigation was to study the changes in speech and voice in patients suffering from teeth loss and the degree of speech improvement using dentures. Voice and speech parameters of a set of tested syllables were analysed in 10 patients at the 2nd Clinic of Stomatology. The analysis was carried out by means of an FFT, SoundForge 5.0 programme. Differently expressed acoustic changes in both consonants and vowels were ascertained in a percentage of the patients under examination. These concerned especially the sibilant ("s", "(see text)"), labiodental ("f", "v") and vibrating ("r", "(see text)") consonants. Changes in the FFT spectrum and air leakage in constrictive consonants were also found. In some patients the vowels, especially the closed ones ("i", "u"), may change their fundamental frequency and show noise admixture manifested as a blurred delimitation of the formants. A denture should, inter alia, render it possible for the patient to produce the same articulation to which he/she had been accustomed before the loss of teeth. For the construction of dentures the most important factors from a phonetic point of view appear to be the following: overbite, overjet, the height of the plate, the thickness of the palatal material, the incisor position, and the modelling of the ruga palatina on the hard palate. In case of wrong denture construction the acoustic changes may continue, resulting in the patient's stress load dependent upon sex, age, psychic condition and seriousness of the problem.

  8. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1 Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, J. B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, M. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Although the spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law (photon index Gamma = 1.45+0.01 -0.02 , e-folding energy e(sub f) = 162+9 -8 keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody, with temperature kT(sub BB) = 1.2 +0.0 -0.1 keV), the inclusion of a reflection component does not improve the fit. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona (ADC) models. A slab-geometry ADC model is unable to describe the data. However, a spherical corona, with a total optical depth tau- = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kTc = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X red (exp 2) = 1.55). These models deviate from the data bv up to 7% in the 5-10 keV range. However, considering how successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10-200 keV data, such "photon-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  9. Multi-Spectral Image Analysis for Improved Space Object Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M.; Riker, J.; Glass, W.; Bush, K.; Briscoe, D.; Klein, M.; Pugh, M.; Engberg, B.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is studying the application and utility of various ground based and space-based optical sensors for improving surveillance of space objects in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). At present, ground-based optical and radar sensors provide the bulk of remotely sensed information on satellites and space debris, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future. However, in recent years, the Space Based Visible (SBV) sensor was used to demonstrate that a synthesis of space-based visible data with ground-based sensor data could provide enhancements to information obtained from any one source in isolation. The incentives for space-based sensing include improved spatial resolution due to the absence of atmospheric effects and cloud cover and increased flexibility for observations. Though ground-based optical sensors can use adaptive optics to somewhat compensate for atmospheric turbulence, cloud cover and absorption are unavoidable. With recent advances in technology, we are in a far better position to consider what might constitute an ideal system to monitor our surroundings in space. This work has begun at the AFRL using detailed optical sensor simulations and analysis techniques to explore the trade space involved in acquiring and processing data from a variety of hypothetical space-based and ground-based sensor systems. In this paper, we briefly review the phenomenology and trade space aspects of what might be required in order to use multiple band-passes, sensor characteristics, and observation and illumination geometries to increase our awareness of objects in space.

  10. Multi-spectral image analysis for improved space object characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, William; Duggin, Michael J.; Motes, Raymond A.; Bush, Keith A.; Klein, Meiling

    2009-08-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is studying the application and utility of various ground-based and space-based optical sensors for improving surveillance of space objects in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). This information can be used to improve our catalog of space objects and will be helpful in the resolution of satellite anomalies. At present, ground-based optical and radar sensors provide the bulk of remotely sensed information on satellites and space debris, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future. However, in recent years, the Space-Based Visible (SBV) sensor was used to demonstrate that a synthesis of space-based visible data with ground-based sensor data could provide enhancements to information obtained from any one source in isolation. The incentives for space-based sensing include improved spatial resolution due to the absence of atmospheric effects and cloud cover and increased flexibility for observations. Though ground-based optical sensors can use adaptive optics to somewhat compensate for atmospheric turbulence, cloud cover and absorption are unavoidable. With recent advances in technology, we are in a far better position to consider what might constitute an ideal system to monitor our surroundings in space. This work has begun at the AFRL using detailed optical sensor simulations and analysis techniques to explore the trade space involved in acquiring and processing data from a variety of hypothetical space-based and ground-based sensor systems. In this paper, we briefly review the phenomenology and trade space aspects of what might be required in order to use multiple band-passes, sensor characteristics, and observation and illumination geometries to increase our awareness of objects in space.

  11. Nonlinear complex diffusion approaches based on a novel noise estimation for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear diffusion processes have been widely used for image denoising. In the traditional nonlinear anisotropic diffusion denoising techniques, behavior of the diffusion depends highly on the gradient of image. However, it is difficult to get a good effect if we use these methods to reduce noise in optical coherence tomography images. Because background has the gradient that is very similar to regions of interest, so background noise will be mistaken for edge information and cannot be reduced. Therefore, nonlinear complex diffusion approaches using texture feature(NCDTF) for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography is proposed here, which uses texture feature in OCT images and structural OCT images to remove noise in phase-resolved OCT. Taking into account the fact that texture between background and signal region is different, which can be linked with diffusion coefficient of nonlinear complex diffusion model, we use NCDTF method to reduce noises of structure and phase images first. Then, we utilize OCT structure images to filter phase image in OCT. Finally, to validate our method, parameters such as image SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL), and edge preservation were compared between our approach and median filter, Gaussian filter, wavelet filter, nonlinear complex diffusion filter (NCDF). Preliminary results demonstrate that NCDTF method is more effective than others in keeping edges and denoising for phase-resolved OCT.

  12. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1. 1; Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, Brian A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law with a photon index Gamma = 1.45(+0.01 -0.02) (a value considerably harder 0.02 than typically found), e-folding energy E(sub f) = 162(+9 -8) keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody with temperature kT(sub bb) = 1.2(+0.0 -0.1) keV. Although the 3-30 keV portion of the spectrum can be fit with a reflected power law with Gamma = 1.81 + or - 0.01 and covering fraction f = 0.35 + or - 0.02, the quality of the fit is significantly reduced when the HEXTE data in the 30-100 keV range is included, as there is no observed hardening in the power law within this energy range. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona models of Dove, Wilms & Begelman (1997a) - where the temperature of the corona is determined self-consistently. A spherical corona with a total optical depth pi = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kT(sub c) = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X(exp 2 sub red) = 1.55). These models deviate from red the data by up to 7% in the 5 - 10 keV range, and we discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies. However, considering bow successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10 - 200 keV data, such "pboton-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  13. Time-Resolved Spectral Analysis of Blazar 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosamaria; Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    As electromagnetic (EM) waves from sources such as blazars travel through the intergalactic medium (IGM), they are slowed by electrons; a phenomenon called dispersion delay [2]. We study the propagation effects in emissions of EM waves from blazar source BL 0716+714 by estimating the average electron density, or dispersion measure (DM), of the IGM on a line of sight to the blazar. Measuring the variations in these effects with time allow us to understand the properties of the intervening material. Toward this goal we analyzed months of archived observations of BL 0716+714 taken by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The ATA's correlator produces cross-power vs. frequency spectra for every baseline (distance between a pair of antennas) in ten-second intervals. To reduce this immense load of data we used a technique based on interferometry called bispectrum, which does not depend on complicated array calibration and simplifies our work. The bispectrum multiplies baselines, three at a time, so that they form a closed loop, then the cube root of spectra are averaged [1]. This technique is independent of phase errors associated with any individual antenna and has a better SNR ratio than simply taking the average of all the baselines. We developed a numerical analysis program that takes in archived blazar files containing correlation data, computes the bispectrum, and outputs FITS images for each day of observations. The results show that our observations do not have sufficient sensitivity to reveal blazar variations in the frequency ranges that were studied. It is suggested that future observations at higher frequencies and/or with another telescope having greater sensitivity would reveal the time/frequency dependence of emission structure that would allow measurements of electron content. This work shows that but bispectrum is a useful tool for rapid characterization of interferometer data that does not require interferometer caclibration which could introduce artifacts

  14. Spectral Variability among Rocks in Visible and Near Infrared Multispectral Pancam Data Collected at Gusev Crater: Examinations using Spectral Mixture Analysis and Related Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F., III; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit s Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analysed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three endmember mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover s Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional endmembers. In the Columbia Hills there were a number of scenes in which additional rock endmembers were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces, as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are: Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes, but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts.

  15. Data processing method applying principal component analysis and spectral angle mapper for imaging spectroscopic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Allende, P. B.; Conde, O. M.; Mirapeix, J.; Cubillas, A. M.; López-Higuera, J. M.

    2007-07-01

    A data processing method for hyperspectral images is presented. Each image contains the whole diffuse reflectance spectra of the analyzed material for all the spatial positions along a specific line of vision. This data processing method is composed of two blocks: data compression and classification unit. Data compression is performed by means of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the spectral interpretation algorithm for classification is the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM). This strategy of classification applying PCA and SAM has been successfully tested on the raw material on-line characterization in the tobacco industry. In this application case the desired raw material (tobacco leaves) should be discriminated from other unwanted spurious materials, such as plastic, cardboard, leather, candy paper, etc. Hyperspectral images are recorded by a spectroscopic sensor consisting of a monochromatic camera and a passive Prism- Grating-Prism device. Performance results are compared with a spectral interpretation algorithm based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN).

  16. Isomer Specific Microwave Spectrum of - and - Phenylvinylnitrile. Implementing a New Multi-Resonant Spectral Analysis Tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Hays, Brian M.; Abeysekera, Chamara; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    There are many circumstances in modern microwave spectroscopy where the observed spectra contain contributions from many distinct sub-populations, creating a complicated spectrum with interleaved transitions due to its components making spectral assignment challenging. A new method, exploiting multi resonance effects with broadband CP-FTMW was developed and implemented to differentiate the structural isomers: (E)- and (Z)-phenylvinylnitrile. This method will output an exclusive set of isomer-specific transitions reducing the spectral assignment time. Details of the method implementation and structural analysis of the two-isomer mixture will be discussed. The application of the method to other circumstances where selective modulation of the transitions due to a single set of connected transitions is vital for complex spectral assignment, will also be considered.

  17. Spectral and brain mapping analysis of EEG based on Pwelch in schizophrenic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate and analyze the differences of power spectral distribution in various frequency bands between healthy subjects and schizophrenic patients. Subjects in this study were 8 people consisting of 4 schizophrenic patients and 4 healthy subjects. Subjects were recorded from 12 electrodes with Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG signals were recorded during a resting eye-closed state for 4-6 minutes. Data were extracted and analyzed by centering and filtering, then performed using Welch Periodogram technique for the spectral estimation with a Hamming window. The results of this study showed that delta power spectral in schizophrenic patients increased ten times from healthy subjects; theta power spectral in schizophrenic patients increased three times from healthy subjects; alpha power spectral in schizophrenic patients decreased with an increase of one third of healthy subjects. These results were confirmed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showing there were significant differences between schizophrenic and healthy subjects on delta, theta and alpha brain wave. Based on the results of Brain Mapping analysis showed that there was significant increasing in the activity of delta waves and theta waves in frontal lobe of schizophrenics, whereas the alpha waves indicated a decrease in the occipital lobe in all schizophrenic patients.

  18. A Legendre spectral element model for sloshing and acoustic analysis in nearly incompressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Kishor, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    A new spectral finite element formulation is presented for modeling the sloshing and the acoustic waves in nearly incompressible fluids. The formulation makes use of the Legendre polynomials in deriving the finite element interpolation shape functions in the Lagrangian frame of reference. The formulated element uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre quadrature scheme for integrating the volumetric stiffness and the mass matrices while the conventional Gauss-Legendre quadrature scheme is used on the rotational stiffness matrix to completely eliminate the zero energy modes, which are normally associated with the Lagrangian FE formulation. The numerical performance of the spectral element formulated here is examined by doing the inf-sup test on a standard rectangular rigid tank partially filled with liquid. The eigenvalues obtained from the formulated spectral element are compared with the conventional equally spaced node locations of the h-type Lagrangian finite element and the predicted results show that these spectral elements are more accurate and give superior convergence. The efficiency and robustness of the formulated elements are demonstrated by solving few standard problems involving free vibration and dynamic response analysis with undistorted and distorted spectral elements, and the obtained results are compared with available results in the published literature.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Acceleration Data for Detection of Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyo Sung; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Jongshill; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kang, Joong Koo; Woo, Jihwan

    2017-01-01

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) can be underestimated and can also increase mortality rates. The monitoring devices used to detect GTCS events in daily life are very helpful for early intervention and precise estimation of seizure events. Several studies have introduced methods for GTCS detection using an accelerometer (ACM), electromyography, or electroencephalography. However, these studies need to be improved with respect to accuracy and user convenience. This study proposes the use of an ACM banded to the wrist and spectral analysis of ACM data to detect GTCS in daily life. The spectral weight function dependent on GTCS was used to compute a GTCS-correlated score that can effectively discriminate between GTCS and normal movement. Compared to the performance of the previous temporal method, which used a standard deviation method, the spectral analysis method resulted in better sensitivity and fewer false positive alerts. Finally, the spectral analysis method can be implemented in a GTCS monitoring device using an ACM and can provide early alerts to caregivers to prevent risks associated with GTCS. PMID:28264522

  20. Real-time system for robust spectral parameter estimation in Doppler signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Giuliomaria, C; Capponi, M; D'Alessio, T; Sacco, R; Zanette, E

    1990-01-01

    In assessing the level of stenosis in extracranial Doppler analysis, spectral analysis has until now been used qualitatively, for the most part. Owing to the many variables affecting the measurements (mainly noise level and instrument setting made subjectively by the operator), the reliability of the inferences on the degree of stenosis is not clearly definable. Under such conditions the need arises for algorithms and systems that can estimate spectral parameters with a higher degree of accuracy, to verify whether reliable inferences can indeed by made or if this technique is only a qualitative one. In the paper a real-time spectral analysis system is described. The system relies on a new spectral estimation algorithm which gives estimates with good robustness with respect to noise. Moreover, a clear measurement procedure which eliminates the many subjective factors affecting the estimates has also been proposed and used. The system has been evaluated with simulated signals and in clinical trials and has shown better performance than the commonly used commercial analysers.

  1. Method for Removing Spectral Contaminants to Improve Analysis of Raman Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xun; Chen, Sheng; Ling, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Ding, Da-Yong; Kim, Yoon Soo; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The spectral contaminants are inevitable during micro-Raman measurements. A key challenge is how to remove them from the original imaging data, since they can distort further results of data analysis. Here, we propose a method named “automatic pre-processing method for Raman imaging data set (APRI)”, which includes the adaptive iteratively reweighted penalized least-squares (airPLS) algorithm and the principal component analysis (PCA). It eliminates the baseline drifts and cosmic spikes by using the spectral features themselves. The utility of APRI is illustrated by removing the spectral contaminants from a Raman imaging data set of a wood sample. In addition, APRI is computationally efficient, conceptually simple and potential to be extended to other methods of spectroscopy, such as infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). With the help of our approach, a typical spectral analysis can be performed by a non-specialist user to obtain useful information from a spectroscopic imaging data set. PMID:28054587

  2. Investigation and development of a high spectral resolution coherent optical spectrum analysis system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kunpeng; Cui, Jiwen; Dang, Hong; Zhao, Shiyuan; Wu, Weidong; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-10-31

    Focusing on high resolution optical spectroscopy, a coherent optical spectrum analysis (COSA) system is investigated in this paper. Principle is built to demonstrate the operation of COSA and its signal processing in both time and frequency domain. According to COSA principle, resolution bandwidth (RBW) filters are found to have significant influence on power accuracy and spectral resolution of the optical spectrum analysis (OSA). Much effort is paid to design RBW filters, including center frequency, bandwidth and type of filters. Two RBW filters are optimized to reduce the power uncertainty of different spectral resolution and satisfy different signal under test. Then, simulations and experiments are conducted to verify COSA principle and results show that the power uncertainty is less than 0.5% and 1.2% for high and medium spectral resolution application, respectively. Finally, experiments on the OSA of actual spectra indicate that COSA system can achieve a 6 MHz spectral resolution and has an excellent capacity in analysis of fine spectrum structures.

  3. A Perturbative Analysis of Synchrotron Spectral Index Variation over the Microwave Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajib; Aluri, Pavan K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we implement a perturbative approach, first proposed by Bouchet & Gispert, to estimate the variation of the spectral index of galactic polarized synchrotron emission, using a linear combination of simulated Stokes Q polarization maps of selected frequency bands from WMAP and Planck observations on a region of sky dominated by the synchrotron Stokes Q signal. We find that a first order perturbative analysis recovers the input spectral index map well. Along with the spectral index variation map, our method provides a fixed reference index, {\\hat{β }}0s, over the sky portion being analyzed. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we find that < {\\hat{β }}0s> =-2.84+/- 0.01, which matches very closely with the position of a peak at {β }s(p)=-2.85 of the empirical probability density function of input synchrotron indices obtained from the same sky region. For thermal dust, the mean recovered spectral index < {\\hat{β }}d> =2.00+/- 0.004 from simulations, matches very well with the spatially fixed input thermal dust spectral index {β }d=2.00. As accompanying results of the method, we reconstruct cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and a synchrotron template components with fixed spectral indices over the entire sky region. We use, in our analysis, full pixel-pixel noise covariance matrices of all frequency bands, estimated from the sky region being analyzed. The perturbative technique of this work (1) can build a model with an arbitrary but sufficient degree of accuracy (and precession) as allowed by the data and (2) can produce maximum likelihood estimators for reference indices and templates asymptotically.

  4. Analysis of multimode fiber bundles for endoscopic spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Risi, Matthew D.; Makhlouf, Houssine; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the use of a fiber bundle in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems is presented. The fiber bundle enables a flexible endoscopic design and provides fast, parallelized acquisition of the OCT data. However, the multimode characteristic of the fibers in the fiber bundle affects the depth sensitivity of the imaging system. A description of light interference in a multimode fiber is presented along with numerical simulations and experimental studies to illustrate the theoretical analysis. PMID:25967012

  5. Determining Sleep Quality in Children with Sleep Disordered Breathing: EEG Spectral Analysis Compared with Conventional Polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joel S.C.; Nicholas, Christian L.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Davey, Margot J.; Anderson, Vicki; Walker, Adrian M.; Trinder, John A.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify the extent of sleep disruption in children with various severities of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) using both conventional visually scored assessment of sleep stages and arousal indices together with EEG power spectral analysis. Design: Sleep stages and power spectral analysis of the sleep EEG in children with varying severities of SDB with matched control subjects with no history of snoring were compared across the whole night, across sequential hours from sleep onset, and across sleep stages. Measurements: Overnight polysomnography was performed on 90 children (49M/41F) aged 7-12 y with SDB and 30 age-matched healthy controls (13M/17F). Sleep stages were visually scored and the EEG spectra were analyzed in 5-s epochs. Results: Conventional visual scoring indicated that, although sleep duration was reduced in severely affected children, sleep quality during the essential stages of SWS and REM was preserved, as evidenced by the lack of any significant decrease in their duration in SDB severity groups. This finding was supported by the lack of substantial differences in EEG spectral power between the groups over the whole night, within specific hours, and in individual sleep stages. Conclusions: Both conventional scoring and EEG spectral analysis indicated only minor disruptions to sleep quality in children with SDB when assessed across the night, in any specific hour of the night, or in any specific sleep stage. These results suggest that reduced daytime functioning previously reported in children with SDB may not be due to sleep disruption. We speculate that in children, in contrast to adults, a stronger sleep drive may preserve sleep quality even in severe SDB. Citation: Yang JSC; Nicholas CL; Nixon GM; Davey MJ; Anderson V; Walker AM; Trinder JA; Horne RSC. Determining sleep quality in children with sleep disordered breathing: EEG spectral analysis compared with conventional polysomnography. SLEEP 2010;33(9):1165-1172. PMID

  6. Trend analysis of in-situ spectral reflectance data from the Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Lemaster, P. S.; Mell, Richard J.; Miller, Edgar R.; Zwiener, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) on the LDEF was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive pre- and post-flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The TCSE is the first space experiment to directly measure in-situ total hemispherical reflectance of thermal control surfaces in the same way they are routinely measured in the laboratory. In-space optical measurements performed by the TCSE provide the unique opportunity for trend analysis of the performance of materials in the space environment. Such trend analysis of flight data offers the potential to develop an empirical life time prediction model for several thermal control surfaces. For material research, trend analysis of the TCSE flight data, particularly the spectral data, can provide insight into the damage mechanisms of space exposure. Trend analysis for the TCSE samples has been limited to those materials that were not significantly eroded by the atomic oxygen (AO) environment. The performance of several materials on the LDEF mission was dominated by AO effects. Trend analysis was performed on both the detailed spectral reflectance measurements (in-space, pre-flight, and post-flight) and on the integrated solar absorptance. Results of this analysis for the five selected TCSE materials are presented along with the spectral flight data. Possible degradation and effects mechanisms will be discussed to better understand and predict the behavior of these materials in the LEO space environment.

  7. Jupiter Systems Data Analysis Program Galileo Multi-Spectral Analysis of the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda; Carlson, Robert; Smythe, William

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made on this project at the University of Colorado, particularly concerning analysis of data of the galilean moons Io and Europa. The goal of the Io portion of this study is to incorporate Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) measured sulfur dioxide (SO2) frost amounts into models used with Ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) spectra, in order to better constrain SO2 gas amounts determined by the UVS. The overall goal of this portion of the study is to better understand the thickness and distribution of Io's SO2 atmosphere. The goal of the analysis of the Europa data is to better understand the source of the UV absorption feature centered near 280 rim which has been noted in disk-integrated spectra primarily on the trailing hemisphere. The NIMS data indicate asymmetric water ice bands on Europa, particularly over the trailing hemisphere, and especially concentrated in the visibly dark regions associated with chaotic terrain and lines. The UPS data, the first-ever disk-resolved UV spectra of Europa, shown that the UV absorber is likely concentrated in regions where the NIMS data show asymmetric water ice bands. The material that produces both spectral features is likely the same, and we use data from both wavelength regions to better understand this material, and whether it is endogenically or exogenically produced. This work is still in progress at JPL.

  8. A statistical evaluation of spectral fingerprinting methods using analysis of variance and principal component analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Six methods were compared with respect to spectral fingerprinting of a well-characterized series of broccoli samples. Spectral fingerprints were acquired for finely-powdered solid samples using Fourier transform-infrared (IR) and Fourier transform-near infrared (NIR) spectrometry and for aqueous met...

  9. Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, Ann

    2001-11-01

    SPEX enables the user to interactively create, display, compare, and analyze spectra (in particular gamma-ray spectra). It includes features from the INEEL GAUSS software series and the ORNL DAMM program. Input data is spectrum histograms, energy calibration, peakwidth calibrationb, and peak energy listgs. Output data includes new spectra created from projections, postscript for printing current view, summary log, gaussian fit log, exported energy calibratgion, exported peak lists and banana gates.

  10. A comparison of spectral mixture analysis an NDVI for ascertaining ecological variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Carol A.; Bateson, C. Ann; Curtiss, Brian; Benning, Tracy L.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we compare the performance of spectral mixture analysis to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in detecting change in a grassland across topographically-induced nutrient gradients and different management schemes. The Konza Prairie Research Natural Area, Kansas, is a relatively homogeneous tallgrass prairie in which change in vegetation productivity occurs with respect to topographic positions in each watershed. The area is the site of long-term studies of the influence of fire and grazing on tallgrass production and was the site of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) from 1987 to 1989. Vegetation indices such as NDVI are commonly used with imagery collected in few (less than 10) spectral bands. However, the use of only two bands (e.g. NDVI) does not adequately account for the complex of signals making up most surface reflectance. Influences from background spectral variation and spatial heterogeneity may confound the direct relationship with biological or biophysical variables. High dimensional multispectral data allows for the application position of techniques such as derivative analysis and spectral curve fitting, thereby increasing the probability of successfully modeling the reflectance from mixed surfaces. The higher number of bands permits unmixing of a greater number of surface components, separating the vegetation signal for further analyses relevant to biological variables.

  11. Chemometric analysis for near-infrared spectral detection of beef in fish meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Garrido-Novell, Cristóbal; Pérez-Marín, Dolores; Guerrero-Ginel, José E.; Garrido-Varo, Ana; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the chemometric analysis of near-infrared spectra drawn from hyperspectral images to develop, evaluate, and compare statistical models for the detection of beef in fish meal. There were 40 pure-fish meal samples, 15 pure-beef meal samples, and 127 fish/beef mixture meal samples prepared for hyperspectral line-scan imaging by a machine vision system. Spectral data for 3600 pixels per sample, in which individual spectra was obtain, were retrieved from the region of interest (ROI) in every sample image. The spectral data spanning 969 nm to 1551 nm (across 176 spectral bands) were analyzed. Statistical models were built using the principal component analysis (PCA) and the partial least squares regression (PLSR) methods. The models were created and developed using the spectral data from the purefish meal and pure-beef meal samples, and were tested and evaluated using the data from the ROI in the mixture meal samples. The results showed that, with a ROI as large as 3600 pixels to cover sufficient area of a mixture meal sample, the success detection rate of beef in fish meal could be satisfactory 99.2% by PCA and 98.4% by PLSR.

  12. Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Zaharov, Viktor; Tetard, Laurene; Thundat, Thomas George; Passian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

  13. Adaptive Filter-bank Approach to Restoration and Spectral Analysis of Gapped Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Petre; Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jian

    2000-10-01

    The main topic of this paper is the nonparametric estimation of complex (both amplitude and phase) spectra from gapped data, as well as the restoration of such data. The focus is on the extension of the APES (amplitude and phase estimation) approach to data sequences with gaps. APES, which is one of the most successful existing nonparametric approaches to the spectral analysis of full data sequences, uses a bank of narrowband adaptive (both frequency and data dependent) filters to estimate the spectrum. A recent interpretation of this approach showed that the filterbank used by APES and the resulting spectrum minimize a least-squares (LS) fitting criterion between the filtered sequence and its spectral decomposition. The extended approach, which is called GAPES for somewhat obvious reasons, capitalizes on the aforementioned interpretation: it minimizes the APES-LS fitting criterion with respect to the missing data as well. This should be a sensible thing to do whenever the full data sequence is stationary, and hence the missing data have the same spectral content as the available data. We use both simulated and real data examples to show that GAPES estimated spectra and interpolated data sequences have excellent accuracy. We also show the performance gain achieved by GAPES over two of the most commonly used approaches for gapped-data spectral analysis, viz., the periodogram and the parametric CLEAN method. This work was partly supported by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research.

  14. Baroreflex sensitivity and power spectral analysis during autonomic testing in different extrapyramidal syndromes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Constanze; Rüdiger, Heinz; Schmidt, Claudia; Herting, Birgit; Prieur, Silke; Junghanns, Susann; Schweitzer, Katherine; Globas, Christoph; Schöls, Ludger; Berg, Daniela; Reichmann, Heinz; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2010-02-15

    Autonomic dysfunction has been frequently demonstrated in patients with extrapyramidal diseases by cardiovascular autonomic testing. In addition to classical testing, we applied the more detailed baroreflex and spectral analysis on three traditional cardiovascular tests in this study to get additional information on autonomic outflow. We recorded continuously blood pressure, electrocardiogram, and respiration in 35 patients with multiple system atrophy, 32 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, 46 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and in 27 corresponding healthy subjects during cardiovascular autonomic testing (metronomic breathing, Valsalva manoeuvre, head-up tilt). Baroreflex and spectral analyses were performed by using trigonometric regressive spectral analysis between and during the manoeuvres. Consistent with previous interpretations, our data showed an increase of sympathetic activity in head-up tilt and Valsalva test in healthy controls. This sympathetic activity was significantly decreased in patients with typical and atypical Parkinson syndromes. Significant modulation of baroreflex activity could be observed especially during metronomic breathing; again it was significantly lower in all patient groups. Baroreflex and spectral parameters could not only differentiate between patients and healthy controls, but also differentiate between clinically symptomatic (with autonomic dysfunction as eg. orthostatic hypotension) and asymptomatic patients. In conclusion, our approach allows the evaluation of autonomic variability during short and nonstationary periods of time and may constitute a useful advance in the assessment of autonomic function in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Extracting spectral contrast in Landsat Thematic Mapper image data using selective principal component analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.; Kwarteng, A.Y.

    1989-01-01

    A challenge encountered with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data, which includes data from size reflective spectral bands, is displaying as much information as possible in a three-image set for color compositing or digital analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the six TM bands simultaneously is often used to address this problem. However, two problems that can be encountered using the PCA method are that information of interest might be mathematically mapped to one of the unused components and that a color composite can be difficult to interpret. "Selective' PCA can be used to minimize both of these problems. The spectral contrast among several spectral regions was mapped for a northern Arizona site using Landsat TM data. Field investigations determined that most of the spectral contrast seen in this area was due to one of the following: the amount of iron and hematite in the soils and rocks, vegetation differences, standing and running water, or the presence of gypsum, which has a higher moisture retention capability than do the surrounding soils and rocks. -from Authors

  16. Multi-component spectral analysis of extended sources with a likelihood method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Christopher Lindsay; Jacholkowska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    The spectral and morphological analysis for gamma-ray sources with multiple emission components remains a major challenge for Cherenkov telescopes due to background emission from diffuse gamma rays. Current methods of background suppression, based on the bin-by-bin subtraction of OFF-source data do not allow an analysis of the various background components. As an alternative, we present an approach based on an event-by-event likelihood fit of ON-source data, using a combined spectral model for the source emission as well as the gamma-like background obtained from fits of the OFF-source data. Multiple emission components are separated by successive fits in different energy regimes and spectral variation inside the extended source is derived. The performance of this approach is evaluated by toy Monte-Carlo studies. For the application to real data, two well-studied H.E.S.S. sources are re-examined: the extragalactic point-source PKS 2155-304 and the extended pulsar wind nebula HESS J1825-137. For the latter, radial variation of the emission spectral index was evaluated with the likelihood method, confirming earlier findings by the H.E.S.S. collaboration [1].

  17. Linear spectral mixture analysis with the Open Leontief Input-Output Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lijiang, Zhu

    2014-03-01

    Commonly, it requires two constraints imposed on the linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA). One constraint is the abundance of sum-to-one, which requires the abundance fractions of materials presented in an image pixel to be one and is easy to deal with. The other constraint is that any abundance fractions are always nonnegative and difficult to solve with analytical solution. Most of approaches that provide the solution for the latter problem of LSMA use an optimization or maximization procedure. The results of solution resort to optimization strategies. The Leontief input-output model, of which parameters are very similar to LSMA, is represented by a linear system of equations and the system has a unique nonnegative solution. In this paper, we considered how to determine the parameters of LSMA model, and based on the open Leontief input-output model, we presented a fully constrained linear spectral (FCLS) mixture analysis method for estimating material abundance in spectral mixture pixel. The new FCLS method can not only make the abundance fractions of materials be nonnegative, but also keep them less than one, that always obtained by normalizing procedure in other methods. We also examine a number of approaches, previous FCLS and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) spectral un-mixing, closely related. A series of computer simulations are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method in material quantification.

  18. [Life table and spectral analysis of endangered plant Taxus chinensis var. mairei population].

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Xingong; Wu, Chengzhen; He, Dongjin; Liao, Chengzhang; Cheng, Yu; Feng, Lei

    2004-06-01

    Based on the investigation in Longxi Mountain National Nature Reserve and the theory of survival analysis, a static life table of Taxus chinensis var. mairei population was worked out, the curves of its survival rate, mortality rate and killing power were drawn, and the population dynamics was analyzed by spectral analysis. The results showed that the survival curve of the population appeared to be a type of Deevey-III, and the high mortality of seeding was one of the important reasons which caused Taxus chinensis var. mairei to be endangered. The spectral analysis of the population showed that there was a marked periodic regularity in the process of natural regeneration of Taxus chinensis var. mairei.

  19. Duplex-Doppler spectral analysis in the physiopathology of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Marini, M; Odoardi, G L; Bolle, G; Tartaglia, P

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a new method of analysis of the normal and abnormal behavior of the TMJ, using a duplex-doppler spectral analysis. The method consists in monitoring the joint movement by means of a study of the Fourier transformed signals, which give information on the velocity distribution of the condylo-meniscal complex during the opening and closing phases of the jaw. Using repeated sampling over short time intervals we get a detailed description of the motion which allows to discriminate the normal and abnormal action of the condylomeniscal complex. We are able to identify various physiopathological conditions, among which opening and/or closing clicks, complex locking conditions and anomalies related to an asymmetrical behavior during the operation cycle. Duplex-doppler spectral analysis is correlated to a clinical examination in order to define various classes of anomalies.

  20. Clues to Coral Reef Ecosystem Health: Spectral Analysis Coupled with Radiative Transfer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L.; Ganapol, B.; Kramer, P.; Armstrong, R.; Gleason, A.; Torres, J.; Johnson, L.; Garfield, N.

    2003-12-01

    Coral reefs are among the world's most productive and biologically rich ecosystems and are some of the oldest ecosystems on Earth. Coralline structures protect coastlines from storms, maintain high diversity of marine life, and provide nurseries for marine species. Coral reefs play a role in carbon cycling through high rates of organic carbon metabolism and calcification. Coral reefs provide fisheries habitat that are the sole protein source for humans on remote islands. Reefs respond immediately to environmental change and therefore are considered "canaries" of the oceans. However, the world's reefs are in peril: they have shrunk 10-50% from their historical extent due to climate change and anthropogenic activity. An important contribution to coral reef research is improved spectral distinction of reef species' health where anthropogenic activity and climate change impacts are high. Relatively little is known concerning the spectral properties of coral or how coral structures reflect and transmit light. New insights into optical processes of corals under stressed conditions can lead to improved interpretation of airborne and satellite data and forecasting of immediate or long-term impacts of events such as bleaching and disease in coral. We are investigating the spatial and spectral resolution required to detect remotely changes in reef health by coupling spectral analysis of in situ spectra and airborne spectral data with a new radiative transfer model called CorMOD2. Challenges include light attenuation by the water column, atmospheric scattering, and scattering caused by the coral themselves that confound the spectral signal. In CorMOD2, input coral reflectance measurements produce modeled absorption through an inversion at each visible wavelength. The first model development phase of CorMOD2 imposes a scattering baseline that is constant regardless of coral condition, and further specifies that coral is optically thick. Evolution of CorMOD2 is towards a coral

  1. EEG resolutions in detecting and decoding finger movements from spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ran; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Mu/beta rhythms are well-studied brain activities that originate from sensorimotor cortices. These rhythms reveal spectral changes in alpha and beta bands induced by movements of different body parts, e.g., hands and limbs, in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. However, less can be revealed in them about movements of different fine body parts that activate adjacent brain regions, such as individual fingers from one hand. Several studies have reported spatial and temporal couplings of rhythmic activities at different frequency bands, suggesting the existence of well-defined spectral structures across multiple frequency bands. In the present study, spectral principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on EEG data, obtained from a finger movement task, to identify cross-frequency spectral structures. Features from identified spectral structures were examined in their spatial patterns, cross-condition pattern changes, detection capability of finger movements from resting, and decoding performance of individual finger movements in comparison to classic mu/beta rhythms. These new features reveal some similar, but more different spatial and spectral patterns as compared with classic mu/beta rhythms. Decoding results further indicate that these new features (91%) can detect finger movements much better than classic mu/beta rhythms (75.6%). More importantly, these new features reveal discriminative information about movements of different fingers (fine body-part movements), which is not available in classic mu/beta rhythms. The capability in decoding fingers (and hand gestures in the future) from EEG will contribute significantly to the development of non-invasive BCI and neuroprosthesis with intuitive and flexible controls.

  2. EEG resolutions in detecting and decoding finger movements from spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ran; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Mu/beta rhythms are well-studied brain activities that originate from sensorimotor cortices. These rhythms reveal spectral changes in alpha and beta bands induced by movements of different body parts, e.g., hands and limbs, in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. However, less can be revealed in them about movements of different fine body parts that activate adjacent brain regions, such as individual fingers from one hand. Several studies have reported spatial and temporal couplings of rhythmic activities at different frequency bands, suggesting the existence of well-defined spectral structures across multiple frequency bands. In the present study, spectral principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on EEG data, obtained from a finger movement task, to identify cross-frequency spectral structures. Features from identified spectral structures were examined in their spatial patterns, cross-condition pattern changes, detection capability of finger movements from resting, and decoding performance of individual finger movements in comparison to classic mu/beta rhythms. These new features reveal some similar, but more different spatial and spectral patterns as compared with classic mu/beta rhythms. Decoding results further indicate that these new features (91%) can detect finger movements much better than classic mu/beta rhythms (75.6%). More importantly, these new features reveal discriminative information about movements of different fingers (fine body-part movements), which is not available in classic mu/beta rhythms. The capability in decoding fingers (and hand gestures in the future) from EEG will contribute significantly to the development of non-invasive BCI and neuroprosthesis with intuitive and flexible controls. PMID:26388720

  3. Parallel implementation of the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis algorithm for hyperspectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabe, Sergio; Igual, Francisco D.; Botella, Guillermo; Prieto-Matias, Manuel; Plaza, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade, the issue of endmember variability has received considerable attention, particularly when each pixel is modeled as a linear combination of endmembers or pure materials. As a result, several models and algorithms have been developed for considering the effect of endmember variability in spectral unmixing and possibly include multiple endmembers in the spectral unmixing stage. One of the most popular approach for this purpose is the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) algorithm. The procedure executed by MESMA can be summarized as follows: (i) First, a standard linear spectral unmixing (LSU) or fully constrained linear spectral unmixing (FCLSU) algorithm is run in an iterative fashion; (ii) Then, we use different endmember combinations, randomly selected from a spectral library, to decompose each mixed pixel; (iii) Finally, the model with the best fit, i.e., with the lowest root mean square error (RMSE) in the reconstruction of the original pixel, is adopted. However, this procedure can be computationally very expensive due to the fact that several endmember combinations need to be tested and several abundance estimation steps need to be conducted, a fact that compromises the use of MESMA in applications under real-time constraints. In this paper we develop (for the first time in the literature) an efficient implementation of MESMA on different platforms using OpenCL, an open standard for parallel programing on heterogeneous systems. Our experiments have been conducted using a simulated data set and the clMAGMA mathematical library. This kind of implementations with the same descriptive language on different architectures are very important in order to actually calibrate the possibility of using heterogeneous platforms for efficient hyperspectral imaging processing in real remote sensing missions.

  4. Optimization of the spectral data processing in a LIBS simultaneous elemental analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Body, D.; Chadwick, B. L.

    2001-06-01

    An instrumentation variation on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is described that allows simultaneous determination of all detectable elements using a multiple spectrograph and synchronized, multiple CCD spectral acquisition system. The system is particularly suited to the rapid analysis of heterogeneous materials such as coal and mineral ores. For the analysis of a heterogeneous material the acquisition cycle typically stores 1000 spectra for subsequent filtering and analysis. The incorporation of an effective data analysis methodology has been critical in achieving both accurate and reproducible results in the analysis of powders with the technology. Using naturally occurring gypsum as the optimization matrix, various data analysis techniques have been investigated including: using pulse-to-pulse internal standardisation; data filtering; and spectral deconvolution. The incorporation of normalization of the elemental emission to the total plasma emission intensity has been found to yield the single biggest improvement in accuracy and precision. Spectral deconvolution has been found to yield further improvement and is particularly relevant to the analysis of complex materials such as black coal. The use of pulse-to-pulse intensity normalization has the further benefit of extending the period between instrument recalibration, thus enhancing the ease of use of the device. The benefit of the optimized data analysis methodology is revealed in the determination of eight elemental components of gypsum (Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, Si, Ti and K) where a typical absolute analysis accuracy of ±10% is obtained. These results compare favourably to analysis by conventional techniques for these materials. The analysis accuracy and repeatability is further demonstrated by the determination of the concentrations of these elements in a black coal sample.

  5. Spectral analysis of the Chandler wobble: comparison of the discrete Fourier analysis and the maximum entropy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    The methods of spectral analysis are applied to solve the following two problems concerning the free Chandler wobble (CW): 1) to estimate the CW resonance parameters, the period T and the quality factor Q, and 2) to perform the excitation balance of the observed free wobble. It appears, however, that the results depend on the algorithm of spectral analysis applied. Here we compare the following two algorithms which are frequently applied for analysis of the polar motion data, the classical discrete Fourier analysis and the maximum entropy method corresponding to the autoregressive modeling of the input time series. We start from general description of both methods and of their application to the analysis of the Earth orientation observations. Then we compare results of the analysis of the polar motion and the related excitation data.

  6. Spatial-Spectral EOF analysis of AIRS data: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Yung, Y. L.; Lambrigtsen, B. H.

    2003-12-01

    We apply spatial-spectral EOF analysis to 14 days of AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) calibrated radiance data collected over the tropics and subtropics (32S to 32N) from July 1 to July 14, 2003. We limit our analysis to the nadir-view (scan angle less than 5o) spectra only. After the quality control procedure, we have an average of 1400 spectra over this period for each 4o by 5o grid box. We obtain a 14-day averaged spectrum for each grid box and apply EOF analysis to these averaged spectra to obtain principal components in spectrally resolved radiance and associated spatial patterns. The first principal component (PC1) can explain more than 90% of the total variance. With the second principal component (PC2), these two leading principal components can explain more than 99% of the total variance. The PC1 spectral features are consistent with spectral features due to the change of surface (or cloud deck) emission temperature. A couple of features can be clearly seen in the PC1 spatial map: ITCZ due to the low emission temperature of optically-thick high cloud, Sahara due to the high surface emission temperature and the clear sky. The spatial map of PC1 closely resembles that of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis of outgoing longwave radiation over the same period. It is also highly correlated with the map of high cloud amount. Both the spectral features and spatial map indicate that the PC1 is mainly due to the spatial variation of cloud emission temperature (for grid boxes with the optically thick clouds) and surface temperature. The PC2 shows spectral features similar to those due to the change of the optical depth of low clouds. Moreover, the PC2 spatial map shows maxima near the coasts of Peru, Namibia and California, as well as over the southern ocean west of Australia. All these regions are known for high frequency of marine stratus. Unlike the traditional approach of observing low clouds from the visible reflectance, these results indicate that we can actually see

  7. Exploring the potential of hyper-spectral imaging for the biogeochemical analysis of varved lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Christoph; Grosjean, Martin; Enters, Dirk; Tylmann, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Varved lake sediments have successfully been used to make inferences about past environmental and climate conditions from annual to multi-millennial scales. Among other proxies, concentrations of sedimentary photopigments have been used for temperature reconstructions. However, obtaining well calibrated annually resolved records from sediments still remains challenging. Most laboratory methods used to analyse lake sediments require physical subsampling and are destructive in the process. Hence, temporal resolution and number of data are limited by the amount of material available in the core. Furthermore, for very low sediment accumulation rates annual subsampling is often very difficult or even impossible. To address these problems we explore hyper-spectral imaging as a new method to analyse lake sediments based on their reflectance spectra in the visible and near infrared spectrum. In contrast to other fast and non-destructive methods like X-ray fluorescence, VIS/NIR reflectance spectrometry distinguishes between biogeochemical substances rather than single elements. Rein (2003) has shown that VIS-RS can be used to detect relative concentrations of sedimentary photopigments (e.g. chlorins, carotenoids) and clay minerals. This study presents an advanced approach using a hyper-spectral camera and remote sensing techniques to infer climate proxy data from reflectance spectra of varved lake sediments. Hyper-spectral imaging allows analysing an entire sediment core in a single measurement, producing a spectral dataset with very high spatial (30x30µm/pixel) and spectral resolutions (~1nm) and a higher spectral range (400-1000nm) compared to previously used spectrophotometers. This allows the analysis of data time series at sub-varve scales or spatial mapping of sedimentary substances (e.g. chlorophyll-a and diagenetic products) at very high resolution. The method is demonstrated on varved lake sediments from northern Poland showing the change of the relative

  8. Discriminant Analysis of Time Series in the Presence of Within-Group Spectral Variability.

    PubMed

    Krafty, Robert T

    2016-07-01

    Many studies record replicated time series epochs from different groups with the goal of using frequency domain properties to discriminate between the groups. In many applications, there exists variation in cyclical patterns from time series in the same group. Although a number of frequency domain methods for the discriminant analysis of time series have been explored, there is a dearth of models and methods that account for within-group spectral variability. This article proposes a model for groups of time series in which transfer functions are modeled as stochastic variables that can account for both between-group and within-group differences in spectra that are identified from individual replicates. An ensuing discriminant analysis of stochastic cepstra under this model is developed to obtain parsimonious measures of relative power that optimally separate groups in the presence of within-group spectral variability. The approach possess favorable properties in classifying new observations and can be consistently estimated through a simple discriminant analysis of a finite number of estimated cepstral coefficients. Benefits in accounting for within-group spectral variability are empirically illustrated in a simulation study and through an analysis of gait variability.

  9. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-03

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data.

  10. Paleoclimatic variability inferred from the spectral analysis of Greenland and Antarctic ice-core data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, P.; Fuhrer, K.; Meeker, L. D.; Jouzel, J.; Johnsen, S.; Mayewski, P. A.

    1997-11-01

    Paleoclimate variations occur at various time scales, between a few centuries for the Heinrich events and several hundreds of millenia for the glacial to interglacial variations. The recent ice cores from Greenland (Greenland Ice Core Project and Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2) and Antarctica (Vostok) span at least one glacial oscillation and provide many opportunities to investigate climate variations with a very fine resolution. The joint study of cores from both hemispheres allows us to distinguish between the sources of variability and helps to propose mechanisms of variations for the different time scales involved. The climate proxies we analyze are inferred from δ18O and δD for temperature and chemical species (such as calcium) for the joint behavior of the major ions in the atmosphere, which yield an estimate of the polar circulation index. Those data provide time series of climatic variables from which we extract the information on the dynamics of the underlying system. We used several independent spectral analysis techniques, to reduce the possibility of spurious results. Those methods encompass the multitaper spectral analysis, singular-spectrum analysis, maximum entropy method, principal component analysis, minimum bias spectral estimates, and digital filter reconstructions. Our results show some differences between the two hemispheres in the slow variability associated with the astronomical forcing. Common features found in the three ice-core records occur on shorter periods, between 1 and 7 kyr. The Holocene also shows recurrent common patterns between Greenland and Antarctica. We propose and discuss mechanisms to explain such behavior.

  11. Discriminant Analysis of Time Series in the Presence of Within-Group Spectral Variability

    PubMed Central

    Krafty, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies record replicated time series epochs from different groups with the goal of using frequency domain properties to discriminate between the groups. In many applications, there exists variation in cyclical patterns from time series in the same group. Although a number of frequency domain methods for the discriminant analysis of time series have been explored, there is a dearth of models and methods that account for within-group spectral variability. This article proposes a model for groups of time series in which transfer functions are modeled as stochastic variables that can account for both between-group and within-group differences in spectra that are identified from individual replicates. An ensuing discriminant analysis of stochastic cepstra under this model is developed to obtain parsimonious measures of relative power that optimally separate groups in the presence of within-group spectral variability. The approach possess favorable properties in classifying new observations and can be consistently estimated through a simple discriminant analysis of a finite number of estimated cepstral coefficients. Benefits in accounting for within-group spectral variability are empirically illustrated in a simulation study and through an analysis of gait variability. PMID:27695143

  12. Polychromatic spectral pattern analysis of ultra-weak photon emissions from a human body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Iwasa, Torai; Tada, Mika

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-weak photon emission (UPE), often designated as biophoton emission, is generally observed in a wide range of living organisms, including human beings. This phenomenon is closely associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal metabolic processes and pathological states induced by oxidative stress. Application of UPE extracting the pathophysiological information has long been anticipated because of its potential non-invasiveness, facilitating its diagnostic use. Nevertheless, its weak intensity and UPE mechanism complexity hinder its use for practical applications. Spectroscopy is crucially important for UPE analysis. However, filter-type spectroscopy technique, used as a conventional method for UPE analysis, intrinsically limits its performance because of its monochromatic scheme. To overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, the authors developed a polychromatic spectroscopy system for UPE spectral pattern analysis. It is based on a highly efficient lens systems and a transmission-type diffraction grating with a highly sensitive, cooled, charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. Spectral pattern analysis of the human body was done for a fingertip using the developed system. The UPE spectrum covers the spectral range of 450-750nm, with a dominant emission region of 570-670nm. The primary peak is located in the 600-650nm region. Furthermore, application of UPE source exploration was demonstrated with the chemiluminescence spectrum of melanin and coexistence with oxidized linoleic acid.

  13. Spectral analysis of bacanora (agave-derived liquor) by using FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Clavero, Valentin; Weber, Andreas; Schröder, Werner; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The industry of the agave-derived bacanora, in the northern Mexican state of Sonora, has been growing substantially in recent years. However, this higher demand still lies under the influences of a variety of social, legal, cultural, ecological and economic elements. The governmental institutions of the state have tried to encourage a sustainable development and certain levels of standardization in the production of bacanora by applying different economical and legal strategies. However, a large portion of this alcoholic beverage is still produced in a traditional and rudimentary fashion. Beyond the quality of the beverage, the lack of proper control, by using adequate instrumental methods, might represent a health risk, as in several cases traditional-distilled beverages can contain elevated levels of harmful materials. The present article describes the qualitative spectral analysis of samples of the traditional-produced distilled beverage bacanora in the range from 0 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1 by using a Fourier Transform Raman spectrometer. This particular technique has not been previously explored for the analysis of bacanora, as in the case of other beverages, including tequila. The proposed instrumental arrangement for the spectral analysis has been built by combining conventional hardware parts (Michelson interferometer, photo-diodes, visible laser, etc.) and a set of self-developed evaluation algorithms. The resulting spectral information has been compared to those of pure samples of ethanol and to the spectra from different samples of the alcoholic beverage tequila. The proposed instrumental arrangement can be used the analysis of bacanora.

  14. [Analysis of software for identifying spectral line of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy based on LabVIEW].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-yu; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Yan, Xiao-juan; Li, Zhi-xin; Zhang, Yong-zhi; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Yin, Wang-bao; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-03-01

    Self-designed identifying software for LIBS spectral line was introduced. Being integrated with LabVIEW, the soft ware can smooth spectral lines and pick peaks. The second difference and threshold methods were employed. Characteristic spectrum of several elements matches the NIST database, and realizes automatic spectral line identification and qualitative analysis of the basic composition of sample. This software can analyze spectrum handily and rapidly. It will be a useful tool for LIBS.

  15. Novel Spectral Representations and Sparsity-Driven Algorithms for Shape Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ming

    In this dissertation, we focus on extending classical spectral shape analysis by incorporating spectral graph wavelets and sparsity-seeking algorithms. Defined with the graph Laplacian eigenbasis, the spectral graph wavelets are localized both in the vertex domain and graph spectral domain, and thus are very effective in describing local geometry. With a rich dictionary of elementary vectors and forcing certain sparsity constraints, a real life signal can often be well approximated by a very sparse coefficient representation. The many successful applications of sparse signal representation in computer vision and image processing inspire us to explore the idea of employing sparse modeling techniques with dictionary of spectral basis to solve various shape modeling problems. Conventional spectral mesh compression uses the eigenfunctions of mesh Laplacian as shape bases, which are highly inefficient in representing local geometry. To ameliorate, we advocate an innovative approach to 3D mesh compression using spectral graph wavelets as dictionary to encode mesh geometry. The spectral graph wavelets are locally defined at individual vertices and can better capture local shape information than Laplacian eigenbasis. The multi-scale SGWs form a redundant dictionary as shape basis, so we formulate the compression of 3D shape as a sparse approximation problem that can be readily handled by greedy pursuit algorithms. Surface inpainting refers to the completion or recovery of missing shape geometry based on the shape information that is currently available. We devise a new surface inpainting algorithm founded upon the theory and techniques of sparse signal recovery. Instead of estimating the missing geometry directly, our novel method is to find this low-dimensional representation which describes the entire original shape. More specifically, we find that, for many shapes, the vertex coordinate function can be well approximated by a very sparse coefficient representation with

  16. Detector level ABI spectral response function: FM4 analysis and comparison for different ABI modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Frank; Wu, Xiangqian

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of imaging instruments Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is to be launched aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - R Series (GOES-R). Four ABI flight modules (FM) are planned to be launched on GOES-R,S,T,U, the first one in the fall of 2016. Pre-launch testing is on-going for FM3 and FM4. ABI has 16 spectral channels, six in the visible/near infrared (VNIR 0.47 - 2.25 μm), and ten in the thermal infrared (TIR 3.9 - 13.3 μm) spectral regions, to be calibrated on-orbit by observing respectively a solar diffuser and a blackbody. Each channel has hundreds of detectors arranged in columns. Operationally one Analytic Generation of Spectral Response (ANGEN) function will be used to represent the spectral response function (SRF) of all detectors in a band. The Vendor conducted prelaunch end-to-end SRF testing to compare to ANGEN; detector specific SRF data was taken for: i) best detector selected (BDS) mode - for FM 2,3, and 4; and ii) all detectors (column mode) - for four spectral bands in FM3 and FM4. The GOES-R calibration working group (CWG) has independently used the SRF test data for FM2 and FM3 to study the potential impact of detector-to-detector SRF differences on the ABI detected Earth view radiances. In this paper we expand the CWG analysis to include the FM4 SRF test data - the results are in agreement with the Vendor analysis, and show excellent instrument performance and compare the detector-to-detector SRF differences and their potential impact on the detected Earth view radiances for all of the tested ABI modules.

  17. [Optimizing spectral region in using near-infrared spectroscopy for donkey milk analysis].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Min; Zhang, Lu-Da; Guo, Hui-Yuan; Pang, Kun; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Ren, Fa-Zheng

    2007-11-01

    Donkey milk has aroused more attention in recent years since its nutrition composition shows a higher similarity to human milk than others. Due to the composition difference between cow milk and donkey milk, the present models available for cow milk analysis could not be applied to donkey milk without modifications. A rapid and reliable analysis method is required to measure the nutrition composition of donkey milk. Near infrared spectroscopy is a newly developed method in food industry, but no literature report was found regarding to its application in the analysis of donkey milk. Protein, fat, ash contents and energy value are the major nutrition factors of milk. In the present paper, these factors of donkey milk were investigated by Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. The ranges of protein, fat and ash contents, and energy value in donkey milk samples were 1.15%-2.54%, 0.34%-2.67%, 0.28%-0.57% and 355.87-565.17 cal x kg(-1), respectively. The IR spectra ranged f from 3 899.6 to 12 493.4 cm(-1), with a 1 cm(-1) scanning interval. When the principal least square (PLS) regression algorithm is used for spectral regions information extraction, the additional constraint makes the principal components of matrix X to be related with the components of Y which is to be analyzed. Various spectral regions and data pretreatment methods were selected for principal least square (PLS) regression model development. A comparison of the whole and optimized spectral region NIR indicated that the models of selecting optimum spectral region were better than those of the whole spectral region. It was shown that the protein, fat and ash contents, and energy value in donkey milk obtained by chemical methods were well correlated to the respective values predicted by the NIR spectroscopy quantitative analysis model (alpha = 0.05). The RMSEP values were 0.18, 0.117, 0.040 6 and 23.5 respectively, indicating that these predicted values were reliable. These results

  18. A distributed microcomputer-controlled system for data acquisition and power spectral analysis of EEG.

    PubMed

    Vo, T D; Dwyer, G; Szeto, H H

    1986-04-01

    A relatively powerful and inexpensive microcomputer-based system for the spectral analysis of the EEG is presented. High resolution and speed is achieved with the use of recently available large-scale integrated circuit technology with enhanced functionality (INTEL Math co-processors 8087) which can perform transcendental functions rapidly. The versatility of the system is achieved with a hardware organization that has distributed data acquisition capability performed by the use of a microprocessor-based analog to digital converter with large resident memory (Cyborg ISAAC-2000). Compiled BASIC programs and assembly language subroutines perform on-line or off-line the fast Fourier transform and spectral analysis of the EEG which is stored as soft as well as hard copy. Some results obtained from test application of the entire system in animal studies are presented.

  19. [Forensic applications of human skin spectral remission analysis employing a movable integrated sphere (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blazek, V

    1977-01-21

    Spectral remission analysis has been known for long in the medical sciences [1,2,3] but has gained practical importance only in the last years due to the existence of modern techniques and components [4,5]. In this paper a method is presented which enlarges the range of applications of spectral remission and transmission analysis for wavelengths between 380 and 1100 nm considerably. This is achieved by a novel conception of the measuring instrumentation, the advantages of which are discussed and compared with the conventional technique. In detail these advantages are a) employment of a movable instead of a fixed detector (integrated sphere) b) illumination of standard and probe with radiation from a common source c) considerable increase of sensibility due to the use of selective lock-in amplifiers. As a demonstration of the proposed method results are given for 5 different probes of human skin.

  20. Preliminary spectral and geologic analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data, Wind River Basin area, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Lang, H. R.; Paylor, E. D.; Alley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) image of the Wind River Basin area in Wyoming is currently under analysis for stratigraphic and structural mapping and for assessment of spectral and spatial characteristics using visible, near infrared, and short wavelength infrared bands. To estimate the equivalent Lambertian surface reflectance, TM radiance data were calibrated to remove atmospheric and instrumental effects. Reflectance measurements for homogeneous natural and cultural targets were acquired about one year after data acquisition. Calibration data obtained during the analysis were used to calculate new gains and offsets to improve scanner response for earth science applications. It is shown that the principal component images calculated from the TM data were the result of linear transformations of ground reflectance. In images prepared from this transform, the separation of spectral classes was independent of systematic atmospheric and instrumental factors. Several examples of the processed images are provided.

  1. Preliminary spectral and geologic analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data, Wind River Basin area, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Lang, H. R.; Paylor, E. D.; Alley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) image of the Wind River Basin area in Wyoming is currently under analysis for stratigraphic and structural mapping and for assessment of spectral and spatial characteristics using visible, near infrared, and short wavelength infrared bands. To estimate the equivalent Lambertian surface reflectance, TM radiance data were calibrated to remove atmospheric and instrumental effects. Reflectance measurements for homogeneous natural and cultural targets were acquired about one year after data acquisition. Calibration data obtained during the analysis were used to calculate new gains and offsets to improve scanner response for earth science applications. It is shown that the principal component images calculated from the TM data were the result of linear transformations of ground reflectance. In images prepared from this transform, the separation of spectral classes was independent of systematic atmospheric and instrumental factors. Several examples of the processed images are provided.

  2. Spectral Analysis of the Daily Maximum Precipitation Time Series over Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, F.

    2009-04-01

    A method of estimating the spectral density of random components of precipitation time series is presented. Precipitation time series consist of periodic components (such as normal annual variation) and random or nondeterministic components which are the deviations from the normal. In this paper, Fourier analysis technique is used to study the daily maximum precipitation data to identify the 24- hour extreme precipitation frequency and to evaluate the risk of flooding over Iran. Time series data form 40 stations are used in the period 1960-2007. As in most analyses, in time series analysis, it is assumed that the data consist of a systematic pattern and random noise which usually makes the pattern difficult to identify.This paper discuses the problem of estimating the spectral density of random components in order to obtain an estimate of predicting future values of the precipitation time series.

  3. Unsupervised spectral classification of astronomical x-ray sources based on independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bo

    By virtue of the sensitivity of the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray telescopes, astronomers are capable of probing increasingly faint X-ray sources in the universe. On the other hand, we have to face a tremendous amount of X-ray imaging data collected by these observatories. We developed an efficient framework to classify astronomical X-ray sources through natural grouping of their reduced dimensionality profiles, which can faithfully represent the high dimensional spectral information. X-ray imaging spectral extraction techniques, which use standard astronomical software (e.g., SAS, FTOOLS and CIAO), provide an efficient means to investigate multiple X-ray sources in one or more observations at the same time. After applying independent component analysis (ICA), the high-dimensional spectra can be expressed by reduced dimensionality profiles in an independent space. An infrared spectral data set obtained for the stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud,observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph, has been used to test the unsupervised classification algorithms. The least classification error is achieved by the hierarchical clustering algorithm with the average linkage of the data, in which each spectrum is scaled by its maximum amplitude. Then we applied a similar hierarchical clustering algorithm based on ICA to a deep XMM-Newton X-ray observation of the field of the eruptive young star V1647 Ori. Our classification method establishes that V1647 Ori is a spectrally distinct X-ray source in this field. Finally, we classified the Xray sources in the central field of a large survey, the Subaru/XMM-Newton deep survey, which contains a large population of high-redshift extragalactic sources. A small group of sources with maximum spectral peak above 1 keV are easily picked out from the spectral data set, and these sources appear to be associated with active galaxies. In general, these experiments confirm that our classification framework is an efficient X

  4. The spectral relationships between NEA and the meteorites: An overview using principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Tholen, D. J.; Bell, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary reservoirs for meteorites is probably the planet-crossing Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Comparing the spectral characteristics of these two populations with each other and with the spectra of the main belt asteroids would provide insight into the dynamical processes that deliver meteorites to Earth. One method for obtaining an overview of general relationships in a large spectral data set is the statistical technique of principal components analysis. This technique quantifies general spectral similarities and reprojects the data in a plot of major axes of variation where distance is a measure of relative similarity. A major caveat should be kept in mind, however, spectra are sensitive to particle size and viewing geometry effects, and near Earth asteroids (NEA's) are probably significantly different from main belt asteroids in both these factors. The analysis was restricted to the spectral range of ECAS filters and included 116 meteorite spectra from the Gaffey (1976) survey and 417 asteroids from the Zellner et. al. (1985) survey of which 13 are planet-crossers. Although thirteen asteroids are not much of a sample on which to base conclusions, a few inferences can be drawn from this exercise. First, the NEA spectral characteristics are, on average, more consistent with the spectra of meteorites than are the main belt asteroids. Second, the S-type NEA's tend to be spectrally more similar to the ordinary chondrite meteorites than the main belt S-types. This suggests that the planet-crossing S-types do not represent the spectral range of the main belt S-type population and that the planet-crossing S-types are on average more like the ordinary chondrites than the main belt S-types. Third, the only direct asteroidal ordinary chondrite analog, the Q-type asteroid, 1862 Apollo, plots well within the field of the ordinary chondrite meteorites and represents the most common meteorite fall type. Finally, it is interesting that the planet

  5. Application of Spectral Mixture Analysis to Urban Land use/Land cover Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argany, M.; Sarajian, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    Remote sensing satellite imagery represent important source of information for urban analysis. But because of large spatial pixel sizes for multispectral and hyperspectral sensors that numerous disparate substances can contribute to the spectrum measured from a single pixel, spectral unmixing algorithms can be used to determine the land use/land cover and sub pixel data. In this paper, in order to determine the individual constituent materials present in pixels, the linear spectral unmixing method has been used. By using the linear spectral unmixing method, the components in mixed pixels are identified, and by performing inverse operation, the proportions of the materials are determined and the measured spectrum of a mixed pixel is decomposed into a collection of constituent spectra, or endmembers. Accordingly, a set of corresponding fractions, or abundances, that indicate the proportion of each endmember present in the pixel are specified. Endmembers normally correspond to familiar objects in the scene, and here they are green vegetation, impervious surface, soil and shade, etc. So, in the next stage endmembers have been selected using Pixel Purity Index (PPI) to find the most spectrally pure pixels. The PPI was computed by repeatedly projecting n-dimensional scatter plots on to a random unit vector. In the final stage, abundances have been extracted by an inversion algorithm and fraction images have been made. Study area in this paper is Karaj city and ETM+ image taken by Landsat satellite has been used.

  6. Spectral and Image Integrated Analysis of Hyperspectral Data for Waxy Corn Seed Variety Classification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoling; Hong, Hanmei; You, Zhaohong; Cheng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purity of waxy corn seed is a very important index of seed quality. A novel procedure for the classification of corn seed varieties was developed based on the combined spectral, morphological, and texture features extracted from visible and near-infrared (VIS/NIR) hyperspectral images. For the purpose of exploration and comparison, images of both sides of corn kernels (150 kernels of each variety) were captured and analyzed. The raw spectra were preprocessed with Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and derivation. To reduce the dimension of spectral data, the spectral feature vectors were constructed using the successive projections algorithm (SPA). Five morphological features (area, circularity, aspect ratio, roundness, and solidity) and eight texture features (energy, contrast, correlation, entropy, and their standard deviations) were extracted as appearance character from every corn kernel. Support vector machines (SVM) and a partial least squares–discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model were employed to build the classification models for seed varieties classification based on different groups of features. The results demonstrate that combining spectral and appearance characteristic could obtain better classification results. The recognition accuracy achieved in the SVM model (98.2% and 96.3% for germ side and endosperm side, respectively) was more satisfactory than in the PLS-DA model. This procedure has the potential for use as a new method for seed purity testing. PMID:26140347

  7. Performance evaluation of spectral analysis and Werner deconvolution interpretation techniques in magnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.; Gebissa, Fekadu Tamiru

    2017-03-01

    Determining the depth of anomalous geological subsurface structure is an important parameter in any of geophysical methods. Though, numerous magnetic interpretation techniques are available in literature for locating depth to the causative source, no specific information is found on the performance of any of the techniques. Werner deconvolution and Spectral methods are widely used to determine the approximate depth to the causative sources, which are then used in modeling methods. An attempt has been made in this study to evaluate the performance of Werner and spectral methods. Synthetic magnetic anomalies are generated over sheet, dyke and fault models for different combinations of geometric dimensions of the bodies and magnetization angles. These anomalies were interpreted with the two methods: Werner deconvolution and Spectral analysis. The error percentages are calculated as the difference between the theoretical and interpreted values. In addition, the results are discussed for their performance. It is observed that Werner method yields more reasonable values for depth compared to spectral methods particularly when body widths are more and deep seated or faulting is deep. In case of dyke model, the Werner method determines width also reliably.

  8. Analysis Of Spectrally Selective Liquid Absorption Filters For Hybrid Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chendo, M. A. C.; Osborn, D. E.; Swenson, Rick

    1985-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed to convert solar energy to both electric power and heat in hybrid systems. Many of these approaches are designed to utilize spectral selectivity to improve the overall conversion efficiency. Examples include spectrally selective beamsplitters and arrangements of long-wave or short-wave-pass glass filters that divide the spectrum so that photon energies are roughly matched to the energies corresponding to the solar-cell bandgaps or to efficient photothermal convertors. This paper describes the analysis of liquid optical filters that have high transmittance in the visible spectrum and high absorptance in the infrared. These qualities make it possible to capture that portion of the spectrum useful to a quantum convertor, such as a photovoltaic cell, while channeling the "excess heat" of the photons with energies below the bandgap to a thermal convertor, thereby enhancing the overall conversion efficiency of the system. The preliminary studies show that spectral responses of the tested solutions (salts in water) are primarily influenced by the cation component of the salt solution. By changing the solutions and concentrations, a variety of spectrally selective filters can be tailored to match system requirements.

  9. Time-lens Based Hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging and Quantitative Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Delong; Charan, Kriti; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Xu, Chris; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope through spectral-transformed excitation. The 1064-nm Stokes pulse was from a synchronized time-lens source, generated through time-domain phase modulation of a continuous wave (CW) laser. The tunable pump pulse was from linear spectral filtering of a femtosecond laser output with an intra-pulse spectral scanning pulse shaper. By electronically modulating the time-lens source at 2.29 MHz, hyperspectral stimulated Raman loss (SRL) images were obtained on a laser-scanning microscope. Using this microscope, DMSO in aqueous solution with a concentration down to 28 mM could be detected at 2 μs time constant. Hyper-spectral SRL images of prostate cancer cells were obtained. Multivariate curve resolution analysis was further applied to decompose the SRL images into concentration maps of CH2 and CH3 bonds. This method offers exciting potential in label-free imaging of live cells using fingerprint Raman bands. Hyperspectral SRS microscopy using a synchronized time-lens source allows mapping of different cellular contents. PMID:23840041

  10. Introducing Spectral Structure Activity Relationship (S-SAR) Analysis. Application to Ecotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Lacrămă, Ana-Maria

    2007-01-01

    A novel quantitative structure-activity (property) relationship model, namely Spectral-SAR, is presented in an exclusive algebraic way replacing the old-fashioned multi-regression one. The actual S-SAR method interprets structural descriptors as vectors in a generic data space that is further mapped into a full orthogonal space by means of the Gram-Schmidt algorithm. Then, by coordinated transformation between the data and orthogonal spaces, the S-SAR equation is given under simple determinant form for any chemical-biological interactions under study. While proving to give the same analytical equation and correlation results with standard multivariate statistics, the actual S-SAR frame allows the introduction of the spectral norm as a valid substitute for the correlation factor, while also having the advantage to design the various related SAR models through the introduced “minimal spectral path” rule. An application is given performing a complete S-SAR analysis upon the Tetrahymena pyriformis ciliate species employing its reported eco-toxicity activities among relevant classes of xenobiotics. By representing the spectral norm of the endpoint models against the concerned structural coordinates, the obtained S-SAR endpoints hierarchy scheme opens the perspective to further design the ecotoxicological test batteries with organisms from different species.

  11. A New View of Earthquake Ground Motion Data: The Hilbert Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A brief description of the newly developed Empirical Mode Decomposition (ENID) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) method will be given. The decomposition is adaptive and can be applied to both nonlinear and nonstationary data. Example of the method applied to a sample earthquake record will be given. The results indicate those low frequency components, totally missed by the Fourier analysis, are clearly identified by the new method. Comparisons with Wavelet and window Fourier analysis show the new method offers much better temporal and frequency resolutions.

  12. Spectral-domain moment-method analysis of coplanar microstrip parasitic subarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei; Lee, Kai-Fong; Lee, R. Q.

    1993-01-01

    Basic characteristics of several configurations of coplanar microstrip parasitic subarrays consisting of one fed patch and two or more parasitic patches were investigated by means of a spectral-domain full-wave analysis and the moment method analysis. Results are presented for radiating- and nonradiating edge-coupled three-element linear subarrays and for a five-patch cross. A comparison of the theoretical input impedance results obtained by the analysis of a three-element linear array showed a reasonable agreement between computed and measured R and X values.

  13. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  14. Multi-site recording and spectral analysis of spontaneous photon emission from human body.

    PubMed

    Wijk, Eduard P A Van; Wijk, Roeland Van

    2005-04-01

    In the past years, research on ultraweak photon emission (UPE) from human body has increased for isolated cells and tissues. However, there are only limited data on UPE from the whole body, in particular from the hands. To describe a protocol for the management of subjects that (1) avoids interference with light-induced longterm delayed luminescence, and (2) includes the time slots for recording photon emission. The protocol was utilised for multi-site recording of 4 subjects at different times of the day and different seasons, and for one subject to complete spectral analysis of emission from different body locations. An especially selected low-noise end-window photomultiplier was utilised for the detection of ultraviolet / visible light (200-650 nm) photon emission. For multi-site recording it was manipulated in three directions in a darkroom with a very low count rate. A series of cut-off filters was used for spectral analysis of UPE. 29 body sites were selected such that the distribution in UPE could be studied as right-left symmetry, dorsal-ventral symmetry, and the ratio between the central body part and extremities. Generally, the fluctuation in photon counts over the body was lower in the morning than in the afternoon. The thorax-abdomen region emitted lowest and most constantly. The upper extremities and the head region emitted most and increasingly over the day. Spectral analysis of low, intermediate and high emission from the superior frontal part of the right leg, the forehead and the palms in the sensitivity range of the photomultiplier showed the major spontaneous emission at 470-570 nm. The central palm area of hand emission showed a larger contribution of the 420-470 nm range in the spectrum of spontaneous emission from the hand in autumn/winter. The spectrum of delayed luminescence from the hand showed major emission in the same range as spontaneous emission. Examples of multi-site UPE recordings and spectral analysis revealed individual patterns

  15. Spectral stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  16. Power spectral analysis of cardiovascular variability in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Malliani, A; Lombardi, F; Pagani, M; Cerutti, S

    1994-03-01

    The time series of successive heart periods present important variations around its mean value, determining the phenomenon of heart rate variability (HRV), assessed with both time and frequency domain approaches. A low standard deviation of the heart period (a time domain index of HRV) is a powerful prognostic indicator of sudden coronary death in patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction. Spectral analysis of HRV usually demonstrates two major components: indicated as LF (low frequency, approximately 0.1 Hz) and HF (high frequency, approximately 0.25 Hz). They are defined by center frequency and associated power, which is expressed in msec2 or normalized units. When assessed in normalized units, LF and HF provide quantitative indicators of neural control of the sinoatrial node. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have consistently indicated that the LF component is a marker of sympathetic modulation and HF a marker of vagal modulation; the LF/HF ratio is a synthetic index of sympathovagal balance. In the analysis of 24-hour Holter recordings of normal subjects, a circadian rhythmicity of spectral markers of sympathetic and vagal modulation is clearly present, with a sympathetic predominance during the day and a vagal predominance during the night. In patients recovering from an acute myocardial infarction, spectral analysis of HRV revealed an increased sympathetic and decreased vagal activity during early convalescence, and a return to their normal balance by 6 to 12 months. A clear increase of LF was also evident in patients studied within a few hours of the onset of symptoms related to an acute myocardial infarction, independent of its location. Similarly, LF increased during transient myocardial ischemia. An increase in markers of sympathetic activity has also been observed prior to episodes of malignant arrhythmias. Spectral analysis of HRV could help in the understanding of the role of abnormal neural mechanisms in sudden coronary death

  17. Metabolism, Mass Spectral Analysis and Mode of Action of Trichothecene Mycotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-12

    AD --------------- METABOLISM, MASS SPECTRAL ANALYSIS AND MODE OF ACTION OF TRICHOTHECENE MYCOTOXINS W ANNUAL REPORT 12 OCTOBER 1988 CHESTER J...Trichothecene Mycotoxins 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) . Chester J. Mirocha, Robert J. Pawlosky, and Roland Gunther 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP RA 1, Mycotoxins , T-2 toxin, Mass spectra, metabolism 06

  18. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  19. A Review of Maximum Entropy Spectral Analysis and Applications to Fourier Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-03

    Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier to the French Academy. (There are constraints on the function, but analyticity is not one of them.) The distinguished...Spectral Analysis and Applications to Fourier Spectroscopy EDMOND MA. DEWAN DTIC 3 April 1985 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...1jop11Litions to Fourier , Soert!rosrom.___________ 12 PERSONAL AIUTITORISI D)ea in, Fdyond Ml. 13. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVE RED 114 DATE OF

  20. Optimal error analysis of spectral methods with emphasis on non-constant coefficients and deformed geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maday, Yvon; Ronquist, Einar M.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical analysis of spectral methods when non-constant coefficients appear in the equation, either due to the original statement of the equations or to take into account the deformed geometry, is presented. Particular attention is devoted to the optimality of the discretization even for low values of the discretization parameter. The effect of some overintegration is also addressed, in order to possibly improve the accuracy of the discretization.

  1. Spectral analysis of Jupiter kilometric radio emissions during the Ulysses flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echer, M. P. D. S.; Echer, E.; Gonzalez, W.; Magalães, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we analyze Ulysses URAP kilometric radio data during Ulysses Jupiter flyby. The interval selected for analysis was from October 1991 to February 1992. URAP 10-min averages of auroral (bkom) and torus (nkom) radio data are used. The wavelet and iterative regression spectral analyses techniques are employed on both data set. The results obtained will enable us to determine the major frequencies present in the auroral and torus data and study their similar and different periodicities.

  2. Spectral and dynamic analysis of plastic instabilities during serrated creep of the aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Zheltov, M. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Gasanov, M. F.

    2014-05-01

    The force response to the development of a macroscopic plastic deformation jump under the conditions of serrated creep of the aluminummagnesium alloy 5456 has been studied using spectral and dynamic analysis methods. The flicker-noise structure of the force response indicating the self-organized criticality state has been revealed. It has been found that a short-term state of plastic instability flatter spontaneously appears during the development of the macroscopic deformation step.

  3. Titan's Surface Composition Investigated by Spectral Mixture Analysis of VIMS/Cassini Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, T. B.; Hayne, P.; Hansen, G. B.

    2007-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini and ground-based telescopic observations revealed the diversity of Titan's surface composition. The atmosphere is transparent only in seven narrow ranges of wavelength between 1 and 5 µm, and mixtures of materials certainly occur and distort their absorption bands, even in high spectral resolution measurements. As a consequence, some investigations for specific materials are not fully certain or even failed. In addition, aerosol scattering dominates the signal, especially towards short wavelengths. H2O ice has been reported first by Griffith et al. (2003). Other components are only suggested: CH4 (Coustenis et al. (2005), bitumens and tholins (Lellouch et al., 2004) and CO2 ice (Barnes et al., 2006; Rodriguez et al., 2006) but detection attempt failed for CO2 ice (Hartung et al., 2006). The global spectral shape also contains useful information to derive the surface composition. Thus, we focused on the analysis of VIMS spectra after averaging the signal within each atmospheric window. Data are selected between 70 degrees emergence angle and incidence angles less than 45 degrees for more homogeneity. We apply a linear spectral unmixing model to fit VIMS data with similarly windowed laboratory spectra of known materials and a model of aerosol scattering. Image fraction maps suggest a major role of CO2 in bright regions like the 5-µm bright spot at Tui Regio (Barnes et al., 2005). Results are consistent with the 5-µm window analysis reported in the companion abstracts (Hayne et al., 2007 and in McCord et al., 2007, this meeting). This analysis is also in agreement with H2O ice at locations previously reported by Soderblom et al. (2007) . Atmospheric scattering is ubiquitous and quite homogenous. This analysis revealed a spectral component bright at 2 µm that may be used to identify other surface components.

  4. Spectral analysis on the group of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, V. V.; Volchkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    For the group G of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc the problem of spectral analysis is considered for subspaces \\mathscr{U}\\subset C(G) which are invariant under right shifts by elements of G and conjugations by elements of the rotation subgroup. It turns out that, in contrast to subspaces of C(G) which are merely invariant under right shifts, \\mathscr{U} contains a minimal subspace with the above properties. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  5. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  6. Design and analysis of conical diffraction imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution and wide spectral dispersion range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qiao; Jin, Yangming; Zhao, Zhicheng; Liu, Qinghan; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    Astigmatism and distortion aberrations of conventional Offner-type imaging spectrometer with an in-plane diffraction grating will increase dramatically as its spectral dispersion width so that such spectroscopic mounting is usually suitable for such situation that both slit length and spectrum width are medium and that the spectrum width is less than the slit length. To short slit and high dispersion, novel conical diffraction Offner mounting is more appropriate. Based on the operation principle of this kind mounting, a set of optimized designs, which the focal ratio is 4, the spectral region from 400nm to 900nm, the slit length from 0.5mm to 1mm, and the dispersion width from 9.8mm to 28mm are obtained under the same optical size. To evaluate the imaging quality of the designed and to get the relation between slit length and dispersion width, the merit function and spectral response function are considered. The results show that conical diffraction Offner imaging spectrometers can image well while the spectrum width is less than the slit length, but no more than its 20 times.

  7. Energy distribution in shallow water ship wakes from a spectral analysis of the wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplier, Clément; Rousseaux, Germain; Calluaud, Damien; David, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the effects of finite water depth on the waves generated by a ship in a towing tank. The wakes of two hull forms representative of maritime and river ships are measured for both deep water and shallow water configurations and for several Froude numbers. The free surface deformations are measured with an optical stereo-correlation measurement method to access a full and detailed reconstruction of the wave fields. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed wakes allows us to perform a spectral analysis of the waves generated by the ships and to decompose them into a near-field hydrodynamic response and a far-field undulatory component. First, the spectral analysis method is presented and the effects of finite water depth on a theoretical point of view are studied. The analysis of subcritical, trans-critical, and supercritical ship wakes in both real space and spectral space highlights the effects of the finite water depth, of the ship speed, and of the hull shape on the energy distribution in the ship wakes through these different regimes.

  8. Mapping asphalt pavement aging and condition using multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yifan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tian, Jie; Jin, Xu; Luo, Lun; Yang, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Asphalt road reflectance spectra change as pavement ages. This provides the possibility for remote sensing to be used to monitor a change in asphalt pavement conditions. However, the relatively narrow geometry of roads and the relatively coarse spatial resolution of remotely sensed imagery result in mixtures between pavement and adjacent landcovers (e.g., vegetation, buildings, and soil), increasing uncertainties in spectral analysis. To overcome this problem, multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) was used to map the asphalt pavement condition using Worldview-2 satellite imagery in this study. Based on extensive field investigation and in situ measurements, aged asphalt pavements were categorized into four stages-preliminarily aged, moderately aged, heavily aged, and distressed. The spectral characteristics in the first three stages were further analyzed, and a MESMA unmixing analysis was conducted to map these three kinds of pavement conditions from the Worldview-2 image. The results showed that the road pavement conditions could be detected well and mapped with an overall accuracy of 81.71% and Kappa coefficient of 0.77. Finally, a quantitative assessment of the pavement conditions for each road segment in this study area was conducted to inform road maintenance management.

  9. The measurement and analysis of leaf spectral reflectance of two stands of loblolly pine populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Anthony D.

    1993-01-01

    My research was conducted under the mentorship of Dr. Jeff Luvall. I worked at Marshall from June 1 through August 6, 1993. My proposal is titled 'The Measurement and Analysis of Leaf Spectral Reflectance of Two Stands of Loblolly Pine Populations.' The populations for this study were chosen from a larger population of 31 families managed by the International Forest Seed Company, Odenville, Alabama. The technology for mobile ground base spectral detecting is new and therefore the majority of time, June 2 through July 9, was spent on learning the techniques of the Spectrometer 2 spectroradiometer used in the gathering of spectra information. The activities included in the learning process were as follows: calibration of the equipment, programming the associated computer for data management, operation of the spectral devices, and input and output of data. From July 12 through August 3 the time was spent on learning the 'STATGRAP' computer software. This software will be used in the analysis of the data retrieved by the Spectrometer 2 spectroradiometer. Dr. Greg Carter, at Stennis, a colleague of Dr. Luvall, has been conducting similar work with different instruments and procedures and has agreed to host us for a training session on data gathering and analysis. This visit, which has previously planned for July 9, 1993, but had to be postponed because of schedule conflicts, is now confirmed for August 18-22, 1993. This trip to Stennis will provide the knowledge for conducting the field operations in my study, i.e., gathering of data and file conversions.

  10. Structural, vibrational, electronic and NMR spectral analysis of 3-chloro-6-methoxypyridazine by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Chamundeeswari, S P; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E; Sundaraganesan, N

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the FT-Raman and FT-Infrared spectra of 3-chloro-6-methoxypyridazine sample were measured to elucidate the spectroscopic properties of title molecule in the spectral range of 3500-50 cm(-1) and 4000-400 cm(-1), respectively. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of 3-chloro-6-methoxypyridazine in the ground state were calculated using the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d),6-311G(d,p) level. The recorded FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral measurements favor the calculated structural parameters which are further supported by spectral simulation. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. The UV-Visible absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in methanol was recorded in the range of 800-200 nm. The formation of hydrogen bond and the most possible interaction are explained using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The isotropic chemical shift computed by (13)C and (1)H NMR analysis also shows good agreement with experimental observations. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) analysis of the title compound were investigated using theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of neuronal network properties from the spectral analysis of calcium imaging signals in neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Tibau, Elisenda; Valencia, Miguel; Soriano, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks.

  12. Identification of neuronal network properties from the spectral analysis of calcium imaging signals in neuronal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tibau, Elisenda; Valencia, Miguel; Soriano, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks. PMID:24385953

  13. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  14. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2003-12-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  15. A Spectral Analysis of Mars as a Grade 9-12 Outreach Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Eaton, S.; Vaillancourt, M.; Rock, B.; Smith, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    The Martian landscape was studied by two high-school students as part of the University of New Hampshire's Project SMART (Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training) outreach effort. They used infrared data provided by the OMEGA sensor on Mars Express for a portion of Terra Meridiani (orbit 485). The OMEGA infrared (IR) spectral properties of surface mineral composition were compared to lab IR spectral data of rocks and minerals believed to be found on Mars. Spectral plots (Selection Graphs), cluster analysis, and false-color images were analyzed using NASA's freeware software MultiSpec to process the OMEGA data. By examining and comparing the two sets of IR spectral data from OMEGA (MultiSpec) and the lab samples using VIRIS (Visible Infrared Intelligent Spectroradiometer) data, and by reviewing the literature, conclusions were drawn regarding the types of minerals present on this part of Mars. Some minerals (e.g. calcites and sulfates) found on Mars are known to exhibit IR spectral properties indicative of water (absorptions at 1.43 and 1.90μm). Our analysis of the OMEGA data identified such water-absorption features, a strong indication of the presence of hydrated minerals and possibly clays. Some mineral spectral properties identified by the VIRIS are inconclusive when compared with the OMEGA data and their presence on Mars is not verified. After performing a 10-class clustering/unsupervised classification, different areas of Terra Meridiani were identified, such as cratered terrain covered with Basalt (and some associated minerals) and low-lying plains bearing hydrated or poly-hydrated minerals. This research supports the view that liquid water was once present on Mars. We present these results as an example of what can be done with this data set and publicly available analysis tool. While we recognize that the above results do not constitute new information, they were obtained using only a single interval of OMEGA data. We present this as

  16. Spectral analysis for the mineralogical characterization of planosols in NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Diego; Souza, Deorgia; Rocha, Washington

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to conduct a spectral characterization in two soil profiles located in the northeast of Brazil proposing relations between the pedogenetic evolution and the environmental settings generated from the characteristics of Planosols analyzed and the presence of minerals identified by spectral pattern obtained in a laboratory. The methodological procedures were divided into the characterization of the study area, theoretical framework, field work with sampling, sample preparation, measurement in the laboratory, processing of spectral data, analysis and interpretation of results and a vegetation index calculation for aid in the environmental characterization. It is possible to see that: i) both profiles have similar spectral characterized patterns; ii) the horizons A and E show higher reflectance compared with B and C; iii) Minerals 2: 1 and 1: 1, such as montmorillonite and kaolinite can be identified; iv) Planosols are fragile to erosion. In both profiles, the C horizon less weathered and B horizon iluvial show intense absorption bands at 1400nm, 1900nm and 2200nm. These absorption bands indicate the existence of mineralogy 2: 1 on the horizons of the soils analyzed. In both profiles were found small peaks absorption in 2265nm, corresponding to gibbsite. The occurrence of this type of mineral is more common in highly weathered soils or old surfaces of erosion, which is reflected in small intensities of absorption observed in this analysis since these are of little-weathered soils of the Brazilian semiarid region. Spectral analysis and morphology described in the two profiles show difficulties for the growth of vegetation, which is consistent with NDVI values found, ranging from -0.32 to 0.61with a predominance of 0.19. These factors lead to the intensification of erosion. Erosion is characterized as one of the main indicators of environmental degradation, causing loss of important elements of the soil, which creates consequently a reduction in fertility

  17. An Excel-based implementation of the spectral method of action potential alternans analysis.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Action potential (AP) alternans has been well established as a mechanism of arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. Proper interpretation of AP alternans requires a robust method of alternans quantification. Traditional methods of alternans analysis neglect higher order periodicities that may have greater pro-arrhythmic potential than classical 2:1 alternans. The spectral method of alternans analysis, already widely used in the related study of microvolt T-wave alternans, has also been used to study AP alternans. Software to meet the specific needs of AP alternans analysis is not currently available in the public domain. An AP analysis tool is implemented here, written in Visual Basic for Applications and using Microsoft Excel as a shell. This performs a sophisticated analysis of alternans behavior allowing reliable distinction of alternans from random fluctuations, quantification of alternans magnitude, and identification of which phases of the AP are most affected. In addition, the spectral method has been adapted to allow detection and quantification of higher order regular oscillations. Analysis of action potential morphology is also performed. A simple user interface enables easy import, analysis, and export of collated results.

  18. Spectral analysis of the primary flight focal plane arrays for the thermal infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-06-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on board the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a two-channel, push-broom imager that will continue Landsat thermal band measurements of the Earth. The core of the instrument consists of three Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays whose data are combined to effectively produce a linear array of 1850 pixels for each band with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 meters and a swath width of 185 kilometers. In this push-broom configuration, each pixel may have a slightly different band shape. An on-board blackbody calibrator is used to correct each pixel. However, depending on the scene being observed, striping and other artifacts may still be present in the final data product. The science-focused mission of LDCM requires that these residual effects be understood. The analysis presented here assisted in the selection of the three flight QWIP arrays. Each pixel was scrutinized in terms of its compliance with TIRS spectral requirements. This investigation utilized laboratory spectral measurements of the arrays and filters along with radiometric modeling of the TIRS instrument and environment. These models included standard radiometry equations along with complex physics-based models such as the MODerate spectral resolution TRANsmittance (MODTRAN) and Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tools. The laboratory measurements and physics models were used to determine the extent of striping and other spectral artifacts that might be present in the final TIRS data product. The results demonstrate that artifacts caused by the residual pixel-to-pixel spectral non-uniformity are small enough that the data can be expected to meet the TIRS radiometric and image quality requirements.

  19. Comparative spectral analysis between the functionality of the human eye and of the optical part of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2015-02-01

    A software that comparatively analysis the spectral functionality of the optical part of the human eye and of the optical image acquisition system of the digital camera, is presented. Comparisons are done using demonstrative images which present the spectral color transformations of an image that is considered the test object. To perform the simulations are presented the spectral models and are computed their effects on the colors of the spectral image, during the propagation of the D48 sun light through the eye and the optics of the digital camera. The simulations are made using a spectral image processing algorithm which converts the spectral image into XYZ color space, CIE CAM02 color appearance model and then into RGB color space.

  20. Spectral variability among rocks in visible and near-infrared mustispectral Pancam data collected at Gusev crater: Examinations using spectral mixture analysis<