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Sample records for phased array transducer

  1. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  2. Ultrasonic phased array transducers for nondestructive evaluation of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Shin, Hyeon Jae; Jang, You Hyun

    2000-05-01

    An ultrasonic phased array transducer has been developed and demonstrated for the nondestructive evaluation of steel structures. The number of array elements is 64 and the center frequency is about 5 MHz. This phased array transducer is designed to use with the phased array system that does steering, transmission focusing and dynamic receive focusing. Each of the array elements is individually excited according to the focal laws and steering angles. Measurements of ultrasonic beam profiles for the array transducer in a reference steel block are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Some of the phased array transducer design concepts for the application in steel structures are discussed. The two-dimensional ultrasonic images of the sample steel block including flat bottom holes and side drilled holes are presented. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate excellent feasibility of the utility of the phased array transducer in imaging and detection of defects in steel structures.

  3. Designing of Phased Array Transducers for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Ph.; Poguet, J.; Fleury, G.

    2004-02-01

    By increasing inspection speed, and deflection capabilities of the transducers, Phased-array technology has proved its interest to face new ∂ NDT challenges, and is becoming more and more popular in the main industrial fields of activities. This paper describes the main effects of specifications on transducer performances, and explains how to defined them. The second part speaks about the manufacturing step, showing the influence of component choice on performances. Several Phased-array applications examples illustrating these considerations will be presented.

  4. Ultrasonic fingerprinting by phased array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, D.; Kataeva, O.; Abramets, V.; Pushenko, P.; Tverdokhlebova, T.

    2016-06-01

    Increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel that must be under national and international control requires a novel approach to safeguard techniques and equipment. One of the proposed approaches is utilize intrinsic features of casks with spent fuel. In this article an application of a phased array ultrasonic method is considered. This study describes an experimental results on ultrasonic fingerprinting of austenitic steel seam weld.

  5. A novel serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Song, Hongwei; Chen, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, wedges are required to generate transverse waves in a solid specimen and mechanical rotation device is needed for interrogation of a specimen with a hollow bore, such as high speed railway locomotive axles, turbine rotors, etc. In order to eliminate the mechanical rotation process, a novel array pattern of phased array ultrasonic transducers named as serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer (SCPAUT) is designed. The elementary transducers are planar rectangular, located on the outside surface of a cylinder. This layout is aimed to generate electrically rotating transverse waveforms so as to inspect the longitudinal cracks on the outside surface of a specimen which has a hollow bore at the center, such as the high speed railway locomotive axles. The general geometry of the SCPAUT and the inspection system are illustrated. A FEM model and mockup experiment has been carried out. The experiment results are in good agreement with the FEM simulation results.

  6. Thermal dispersion method for an ultrasonic phased-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Euna; Lee, Wonseok; Roh, Yongrae

    2016-07-01

    When the driving voltage of an ultrasonic transducer is increased to improve the quality of ultrasound images, heat is generated inside the transducer, which can burn the patient’s skin and degrade transducer performance. In this study, the method to disperse the heat inside an ultrasonic phased-array transducer has been examined. The mechanism of temperature rise due to heat generation inside the transducer was investigated by numerical analysis and the effects of the thermal properties of the components of the transducer such as specific heat and thermal conductivity on the temperature rise were analyzed. On the basis of the results, a heat-dispersive structure was devised to reduce the temperature at the surface of the acoustic lens of the transducer. Prototype transducers were fabricated to check the efficacy of the heat-dispersive structure. By experiments, we have confirmed that the new heat-dispersive structure can reduce the internal temperature by as much as 50% in comparison with the conventional structure, which confirms the validity of the thermal dispersion mechanism developed in this work.

  7. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  8. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  9. Modeling the radiation of ultrasonic phased-array transducers with Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiju; Schmerr, Lester W; Sedov, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    A new transducer beam model, called a multi-Gaussian array beam model, is developed to simulate the wave fields radiated by ultrasonic phased-array transducers. This new model overcomes the restrictions on using ordinary multi-Gaussian beam models developed for large single-element transducers in phased-array applications. It is demonstrated that this new beam model can effectively model the steered and focused beams of a linear phased-array transducer.

  10. Circumferential phased array of shear-horizontal wave magnetostrictive patch transducers for pipe inspection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoe Woong; Lee, Joo Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2013-02-01

    Several investigations report effective uses of magnetostrictive patch transducers to generate and measure longitudinal and torsional guided waves in a pipe. They can be used to form a phased array for the circumferential inspection of pipes. Although there are circumferential phased arrays employing piezoelectric transducers or EMAT's, no magnetostrictive patch transducer based array system has been attempted. In this investigation, we aim to develop a circumferential phased magnetostrictive patch transducer (PMPT) array that can focus shear-horizontal waves at any target point on a cylindrical surface of a pipe. For the development, a specific configuration of a PMPT array employing six magnetostrictive patch transducers is proposed. A wave simulation model is also developed to determine time delays and amplitudes of signals generated by the transducers of the array. This model should be able to predict accurately the angular profiles of shear-horizontal waves generated by the transducers. For wave focusing, the time reversal idea will be utilized. The wave focusing ability of the developed PMPT array is tested with multiple-crack detection experiments. Imaging of localized surface inspection regions is also attempted by using wave signals measured by the developed PMPT array system.

  11. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  12. A parametric study of ultrasonic beam profiles for a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Choi, S W

    2000-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is presented to investigate the influences of design parameters of linear phased array transducers on beam focusing and steering performance. The characteristic of ultrasonic beam profiles has been simulated on the basis of the Huygen's superposition principle. For the simulation, a linear phased array is considered as the composition of finite number of elements separated by equidistance. Individual elements are considered as two-dimensional point sources. The waves generated from piezoelectric elements are considered as simplified transient ultrasonic waves that are constructed with the cosine function enveloped with a Hanning window. The characteristic of ultrasonic wave propagation into a medium from the phased array transducer is described. The effects of the number, the interelement spacing, steering angle, the focal length, and frequency bandwidth of the piezoelectric elements on beam directivity and ultrasonic pressure field in a linear phased array transducer are systematically discussed.

  13. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model.

  14. Two-dimensional refractive index modulation by phased array transducers in acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-01-20

    Acousto-optic deflectors are photonic devices that are used for scanning high-power laser beams in advanced microprocessing applications such as marking and direct writing. The operation of conventional deflectors mostly relies on one-dimensional sinusoidal variation of the refractive index in an acousto-optic medium. Sometimes static phased array transducers, such as step configuration or planar configuration transducer architecture, are used to tilt the index modulation planes for achieving higher performance and higher resolution than a single transducer AO device. However, the index can be modulated in two dimensions, and the modulation plane can be tilted arbitrarily by creating dynamic phase gratings in the medium using phased array transducers. This type of dynamic two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector can provide better performance using, for example, a large deflection angle and high diffraction efficiency. This paper utilizes an ultrasonic beam steering approach to study the two-dimensional strain-induced index modulation due to the photoelastic effect. The modulation is numerically simulated, and the effects of various parameters, such as the operating radiofrequency of the transducers, the ultrasonic beam steering angle, and different combinations of pressure on each element of the transducer array, are demonstrated.

  15. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Aims Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or ‘paperclip’ test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. Methods A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. Results All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling ‘in-the-field’ checks. PMID:27482276

  16. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Dan; Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or 'paperclip' test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling 'in-the-field' checks.

  17. Two-dimensional analytic modeling of acoustic diffraction for ultrasonic beam steering by phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-04-01

    Phased array ultrasonic transducers enable modulating the focal position of the acoustic waves, and this capability is utilized in many applications, such as medical imaging and non-destructive testing. This type of transducers also provides a mechanism to generate tilted wavefronts in acousto-optic deflectors to deflect laser beams for high precision advanced laser material processing. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented for the diffraction of ultrasonic waves emitted by several phased array transducers into an acousto-optic medium such as TeO2 crystal. A simple analytic expression is obtained for the distribution of the ultrasonic displacement field in the crystal. The model prediction is found to be in good agreement with the results of a numerical model that is based on a non-paraxial multi-Gaussian beam (NMGB) model. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The effect of electronically steering a phased array ultrasound transducer on near-field tissue heating

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; Vyas, Urvi; Todd, Nick; Bever, Joshua de; Christensen, Douglas A.; Parker, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents the results obtained from both simulation and experimental techniques that show the effect of mechanically or electronically steering a phased array transducer on proximal tissue heating. Methods: The thermal response of a nine-position raster and a 16-mm diameter circle scanning trajectory executed through both electronic and mechanical scanning was evaluated in computer simulations and experimentally in a homogeneous tissue-mimicking phantom. Simulations were performed using power deposition maps obtained from the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) method and applying a finite-difference approximation of the Pennes’ bioheat transfer equation for the experimentally used transducer and also for a fully sampled transducer to demonstrate the effect of acoustic window, ultrasound beam overlap and grating lobe clutter on near-field heating. Results: Both simulation and experimental results show that electronically steering the ultrasound beam for the two trajectories using the 256-element phased array significantly increases the thermal dose deposited in the near-field tissues when compared with the same treatment executed through mechanical steering only. In addition, the individual contributions of both beam overlap and grating lobe clutter to the near-field thermal effects were determined through comparing the simulated ultrasound beam patterns and resulting temperature fields from mechanically and electronically steered trajectories using the 256-randomized element phased array transducer to an electronically steered trajectory using a fully sampled transducer with 40 401 phase-adjusted sample points. Conclusions: Three distinctly different three distinctly different transducers were simulated to analyze the tradeoffs of selected transducer design parameters on near-field heating. Careful consideration of design tradeoffs and accurate patient treatment planning combined with thorough monitoring of the near-field tissue temperature will

  19. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing of pieces of complex geometry with a flexible phased array transducer

    PubMed

    Chatillon; Cattiaux; Serre; Roy

    2000-03-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive testing of components of complex geometry in the nuclear industry faces several difficulties: sensitivity variations due to unmatched contact, inaccurate localization of defects due to variations of transducer orientation, and uncovered area of the component. To improve the performances of such testing and defect characterization, we propose a new concept of ultrasonic contact phased array transducer. The phased array transducer has a flexible radiating surface able to fit the actual surface of the piece to optimize the contact and thus the sensitivity of the test. To control the transmitted field, and therefore to improve the defect characterization, a delay law optimizing algorithm is developed. To assess the capability of such a transducer, the Champ-Sons model, developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission for predicting field radiated by arbitrary transducers into pieces, has to be extended to sources directly in contact with pieces of complex geometry. The good behavior of this new type of probe predicted by computations is experimentally validated with a jointed transducer positioned on pieces of various profiles.

  20. Investigating a stepped ultrasonic phased array transducer for the evaluation and characterization of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohenick, M.; Blickley, E.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M.

    2007-04-01

    Previous work has led to the design, simulation, and development of a linear phased array transducer. The intention of the array is to be used as a non-destructive ultrasonic device to monitor and evaluate the health of a given specimen. The phased array has been manufactured and tested for the detection and characterization of defects on a target. The array was fabricated with a four-row "stepped" design with four wires to transfer data and one wire for grounding. The "stepped" design allows for the interrogation of a larger region using time delays and beam sweeping without the use of additional electrical channels. The array was designed to be utilized in a water immersion environment with about one inch between the array and the target specimen. An OmniScan MX system was used to operate the phased array and perform real-time linear and sectorial scans on a set of rectangular plates. S-scans allow for beam sweeping over an angle range as well as adjustments for time delays and a true-depth display. The array was operated with sixteen active elements and an angle range of 0 to 30 degrees. The phased array was tested with a variety of targets and was used to investigate and characterize different types of defects such as cracking, warping, and corrosion. The ability of the phased array to distinguish between defect types as well as resolve defect size was evaluated.

  1. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T.; Baque, F.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  2. Modeling and simulation of ultrasound fields generated by 2D phased array transducers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Quaglia, F; Magenes, G

    2010-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging instrumentation for clinical applications allows real-time volumetric scanning of the patients' body. 4D imaging has been made possible thanks to the development of new echographic probes which consist in 2D phased arrays of piezoelectric transducers. In these new devices it is the system electronics which properly drives the matrix elements and focuses the beam in order to obtain a sequence of volumetric images. This paper introduces an ultrasound field simulator based on the Spatial Impulse Response method which is being properly developed to analyze the characteristics of the ultrasound field generated by a 2D phased array of transducers. Thanks to its high configurability by the user, it will represent a very useful tool for electronics designers in developing 4D ultrasound imaging systems components.

  3. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  4. Estimation of scatterer size and acoustic concentration in sound field produced by linear phased array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Takuma; Tamura, Kazuki; Yoshida, Kenji; Mamou, Jonathan; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    Although there have been several quantitative ultrasound studies on the methods of estimation of scatterer size and acoustic concentration based on the analysis of RF signals for tissue characterization, some problems, e.g., narrow frequency bandwidths and complex sound fields, have limited the clinical applications of such methods. In this report, two types of ultrasound transducer are investigated for the estimation of the scatterer size and acoustic concentration in two glass bead phantoms of different weight concentrations of 0.25 and 2.50% and those in an excised pig liver. The diameters of the glass beads ranged from 5 to 63 µm with an average of 50 µm. The first transducer is a single element and the other is a linear phased array. A comparison of the estimations obtained using both transducers gives an insight into how these methods could be applied clinically. Results obtained using the two transducers were significantly different. One of the possible explanations is that beamforming could significantly affect the backscatter coefficient estimation, which was not taken into account.

  5. Simulation of Temperature Field Induced by 8-Element Phased Array HIFU Transducer with Concave Spherical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wujun; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaojing; Jian, Xiqi; Li, Zhihua

    2011-09-01

    Multi-element High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) transducers can change their focal lengths and form multi-foci. In this paper the Westervelt formula and Pennes bio-heat transfer equation have been used along, with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, to study the temperature distribution induced by an 8-element phased array HIFU transducer inside the human body. We evaluated the effects of the gap in the arc between two rings, the frequency of excitation function and pre-focal length on the temperature field. For HIFU therapy, skin burns were caused by high frequency, small pre-focal length, or a big gap between two rings. The focal region may be no longer an ellipsoid due to high frequency. In addition, the actual focal length is slightly different from the pre-focal length.

  6. Development of a 20-MHz wide-bandwidth PMN-PT single crystal phased-array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Man; Chen, Yan; Luo, Haosu; Dai, Jiyan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Chan, Helen Lai-Wa

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a 20-MHz 64-element phased-array ultrasound transducer with a one-wavelength pitch is developed using a PMN-30%PT single crystal and double-matching layer scheme. High piezoelectric (d33>1000pC/N) and electromechanical coupling (k33>0.8) properties of the single crystal with an optimized fabrication process involving the photolithography technique have been demonstrated to be suitable for wide-bandwidth (⩾70%) and high-sensitivity (insertion loss ⩽30dB) phased-array transducer application. A -6dBbandwidth of 91% and an insertion loss of 29dBfor the 20-MHz 64-element phased-array transducer were achieved. This result shows that the bandwidth is improved comparing with the investigated high-frequency (⩾20MHz) ultrasound transducers using piezoelectric ceramic and single crystal materials. It shows that this phased-array transducer has potential to improve the resolution of biomedical imaging, theoretically. Based on the hypothesis of resolution improvement, this phased-array transducer is capable for small animal (i.e. mouse and zebrafish) studies.

  7. A novel, flat, electronically-steered phased array transducer for tissue ablation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellens, Nicholas P. K.; Lucht, Benjamin B. C.; Gunaseelan, Samuel T.; Hudson, John M.; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-03-01

    Flat, λ/2-spaced phased arrays for therapeutic ultrasound were examined in silico and in vitro. All arrays were made by combining modules made of 64 square elements with 1.5 mm inter-element spacing along both major axes. The arrays were designed to accommodate integrated, co-aligned diagnostic transducers for targeting and monitoring. Six arrays of 1024 elements (16 modules) and four arrays of 6144 elements (96 modules) were modelled and compared according to metrics such as peak pressure amplitude, focal size, ability to be electronically-steered far off-axis and grating lobe amplitude. Two 1024 element prototypes were built and measured in vitro, producing over 100 W of acoustic power. In both cases, the simulation model of the pressure amplitude field was in good agreement with values measured by hydrophone. Using one of the arrays, it was shown that the peak pressure amplitude dropped by only 24% and 25% of the on-axis peak pressure amplitude when steered to the edge of the array (40 mm) at depths of 30 mm and 50 mm. For the 6144 element arrays studied in in silico only, similarly high steerability was found: even when steered 100 mm off-axis, the pressure amplitude decrease at the focus was less than 20%, while the maximum pressure grating lobe was only 20%. Thermal simulations indicate that the modules produce more than enough acoustic power to perform rapid ablations at physiologically relevant depths and steering angles. Arrays such as proposed and tested in this study have enormous potential: their high electronic steerability suggests that they will be able to perform ablations of large volumes without the need for any mechanical translation.

  8. Simulation of 3-D radiation beam patterns propagated through a planar interface from ultrasonic phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2002-05-01

    Phased array transducers are quite often mounted on solid wedges with specific angles in many practical ultrasonic inspections of thin plates <10 mm in their thickness or welded joints with convex crowns. For the reliable application of phased array techniques with testing set-up, it is essential to have thorough understanding on the characteristics of radiation beam pattern produced in the interrogated medium. To address such a need, this paper proposes a systematic way to calculate full 3-D radiation beam patterns produced in the interrogated solid medium by phased array transducers mounted on a solid wedge. In order to investigate the characteristics of radiation beam patterns in steel, simulation is carried out for 7.5 MHz array transducers mounted on an acrylic wedge with the angle of 15.45 degrees with various of steering angles and/or focal planes.

  9. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm{sup 3} with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  10. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100×100×80 mm3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  11. Annular phased array transducer for preclinical testing of anti-cancer drug efficacy on small animals.

    PubMed

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Byra, Michał; Postema, Michiel; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    A technique using pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to destroy deep-seated solid tumors is a promising noninvasive therapeutic approach. A main purpose of this study was to design and test a HIFU transducer suitable for preclinical studies of efficacy of tested, anti-cancer drugs, activated by HIFU beams, in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors implanted to various organs of small animals at the depth of the order of 1-2cm under the skin. To allow focusing of the beam, generated by such transducer, within treated tissue at different depths, a spherical, 2-MHz, 29-mm diameter annular phased array transducer was designed and built. To prove its potential for preclinical studies on small animals, multiple thermal lesions were induced in a pork loin ex vivo by heating beams of the same: 6W, or 12W, or 18W acoustic power and 25mm, 30mm, and 35mm focal lengths. Time delay for each annulus was controlled electronically to provide beam focusing within tissue at the depths of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. The exposure time required to induce local necrosis was determined at different depths using thermocouples. Location and extent of thermal lesions determined from numerical simulations were compared with those measured using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and verified by a digital caliper after cutting the tested tissue samples. Quantitative analysis of the results showed that the location and extent of necrotic lesions on the magnetic resonance images are consistent with those predicted numerically and measured by caliper. The edges of lesions were clearly outlined although on ultrasound images they were fuzzy. This allows to conclude that the use of the transducer designed offers an effective noninvasive tool not only to induce local necrotic lesions within treated tissue without damaging the surrounding tissue structures but also to test various chemotherapeutics activated by the HIFU beams in preclinical studies on small animals.

  12. Design and characterization of dual-curvature 1.5-dimensional high-intensity focused ultrasound phased-array transducer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gin-Shin; Lin, Che-Yu; Jeong, Jong Seob; Cannata, Jonathan M; Lin, Win-Li; Chang, Hsu; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A dual-curvature focused ultrasound phased-array transducer with a symmetric control has been developed for noninvasive ablative treatment of tumors. The 1.5-D array was constructed in-house and the electro-acoustic conversion efficiency was measured to be approximately 65%. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the array uses 256 independent elements to achieve 2-D wide-range high-intensity electronic focusing.

  13. A Fast Method to Calculate the Spatial Impulse Response for 1-D Linear Ultrasonic Phased Array Transducers.

    PubMed

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Muhammad, Salman; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-11-08

    A method is developed to accurately determine the spatial impulse response at the specifically discretized observation points in the radiated field of 1-D linear ultrasonic phased array transducers with great efficiency. In contrast, the previously adopted solutions only optimize the calculation procedure for a single rectangular transducer and required approximation considerations or nonlinear calculation. In this research, an algorithm that follows an alternative approach to expedite the calculation of the spatial impulse response of a rectangular linear array is presented. The key assumption for this algorithm is that the transducer apertures are identical and linearly distributed on an infinite rigid plane baffled with the same pitch. Two points in the observation field, which have the same position relative to two transducer apertures, share the same spatial impulse response that contributed from corresponding transducer, respectively. The observation field is discretized specifically to meet the relationship of equality. The analytical expressions of the proposed algorithm, based on the specific selection of the observation points, are derived to remove redundant calculations. In order to measure the proposed methodology, the simulation results obtained from the proposed method and the classical summation method are compared. The outcomes demonstrate that the proposed strategy can speed up the calculation procedure since it accelerates the speed-up ratio which relies upon the number of discrete points and the number of the array transducers. This development will be valuable in the development of advanced and faster linear ultrasonic phased array systems.

  14. A Fast Method to Calculate the Spatial Impulse Response for 1-D Linear Ultrasonic Phased Array Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Muhammad, Salman; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to accurately determine the spatial impulse response at the specifically discretized observation points in the radiated field of 1-D linear ultrasonic phased array transducers with great efficiency. In contrast, the previously adopted solutions only optimize the calculation procedure for a single rectangular transducer and required approximation considerations or nonlinear calculation. In this research, an algorithm that follows an alternative approach to expedite the calculation of the spatial impulse response of a rectangular linear array is presented. The key assumption for this algorithm is that the transducer apertures are identical and linearly distributed on an infinite rigid plane baffled with the same pitch. Two points in the observation field, which have the same position relative to two transducer apertures, share the same spatial impulse response that contributed from corresponding transducer, respectively. The observation field is discretized specifically to meet the relationship of equality. The analytical expressions of the proposed algorithm, based on the specific selection of the observation points, are derived to remove redundant calculations. In order to measure the proposed methodology, the simulation results obtained from the proposed method and the classical summation method are compared. The outcomes demonstrate that the proposed strategy can speed up the calculation procedure since it accelerates the speed-up ratio which relies upon the number of discrete points and the number of the array transducers. This development will be valuable in the development of advanced and faster linear ultrasonic phased array systems. PMID:27834799

  15. A new method for anisotropic materials characterization based on phased-array ultrasonic transducers technology

    SciTech Connect

    Frenet, D.; Calmon, P.; Paradis, L.

    1999-12-02

    A method for materials characterization based on the utilization of a ultrasonic array transducer of conical shape has been developed at the CEA. The specific design of this transducer allows the generation and the detection of leaky surface acoustic waves (LSAW) in an efficient way. Additionally, anisotropic materials can be investigated in several azimuthal directions without any mechanical movement. The characterization process relies on the velocity measurement of the LSAW. Experimental results on both isotropic an anisotropic material are reported.

  16. Development of a C-Scan phased array ultrasonic imaging system using a 64-element 35MHz transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Lequan; Snook, Kevin; Liang, Yu; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Liu, Ruibin; Geng, Xuecang; Jiang, Xiaoning; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-04-01

    Phased array imaging systems provide the features of electronic beam steering and dynamic depth focusing that cannot be obtained with conventional linear array systems. This paper presents a system design of a digital ultrasonic imaging system, which is capable of handling a 64-element 35MHz center frequency phased array transducer. The system consists of 5 parts: an analog front-end, a data digitizer, a DSP based beamformer, a computer controlled motorized linear stage, and a computer for post image processing and visualization. Using a motorized linear stage, C-scan images, parallel to the surface of scanned objects may be generated. This digital ultrasonic imaging system in combination a 35 MHz phased array appears to be a promising tool for NDT applications with high spatial resolution. It may also serve as an excellent research platform for high frequency phased array design and testing as well as ultrasonic array signal algorithm developing using system's raw RF data acquisition function.

  17. A LiNbO3 ultrasonic phased array transducer of more than 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. J.; Jib, X. M.; Zhang, J. Y.; Carlier, J.; Nongaillard, B.; Queste, S.; Huang, Y. P.; Piwakowski, B.

    2012-05-01

    High-frequency ultrasonic transducer arrays are essential for high resolution imaging in clinical analysis and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE). However, the structure design and fabrication of the kerfed ultrasonic array is quite challenging when very high frequency (≥ 100 MHz) is required. Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) deep etching process is used to etch 36°/Y-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystals. Furthermore, a finite element tool, COMSOL, is employed to calculate the electrical properties of the arrays, including crosstalk effect and electrical impedance. At last, arrays with a pitch of 40 μm are fabricated and characterized by a network analyzer. The measured results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  18. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  19. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2016-07-21

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer over distances greater than 1 cm in both the axial and lateral directions. In order to achieve the required f number of 0.69, 1-3 piezocomposite modules were mated within the transducer housing. The performance of the prototype array was experimentally evaluated with excellent agreement with numerical simulation. A focal volume (2.70 mm (axial)  ×  0.65 mm (transverse)  ×  0.35 mm (transverse)) defined by the  -6 dB focal intensity was obtained to address the dimensions needed for small animal therapy. An electronic beam steering range defined by the  -3 dB focal peak intensity (17 mm (axial)  ×  14 mm (transverse)  ×  12 mm (transverse)) and  -8 dB lateral grating lobes (24 mm (axial)  ×  18 mm (transverse)  ×  16 mm (transverse)) was achieved. The combined testing of imaging and therapeutic functions confirmed well-controlled local heating generation and imaging in a tissue mimicking phantom. This dual-array implementation offers a practical means to achieve hyperthermia and ablation in small animal models and can be incorporated within protocols for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  20. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N.; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2016-07-01

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer over distances greater than 1 cm in both the axial and lateral directions. In order to achieve the required f number of 0.69, 1-3 piezocomposite modules were mated within the transducer housing. The performance of the prototype array was experimentally evaluated with excellent agreement with numerical simulation. A focal volume (2.70 mm (axial)  ×  0.65 mm (transverse)  ×  0.35 mm (transverse)) defined by the  -6 dB focal intensity was obtained to address the dimensions needed for small animal therapy. An electronic beam steering range defined by the  -3 dB focal peak intensity (17 mm (axial)  ×  14 mm (transverse)  ×  12 mm (transverse)) and  -8 dB lateral grating lobes (24 mm (axial)  ×  18 mm (transverse)  ×  16 mm (transverse)) was achieved. The combined testing of imaging and therapeutic functions confirmed well-controlled local heating generation and imaging in a tissue mimicking phantom. This dual-array implementation offers a practical means to achieve hyperthermia and ablation in small animal models and can be incorporated within protocols for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  1. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N.; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer over distances greater than 1 cm in both the axial and lateral directions. In order to achieve the required f number of 0.69, 1-3 piezocomposite modules were mated within the transducer housing. The performance of the prototype array was experimentally evaluated with excellent agreement with numerical simulation. A focal volume (2.70 mm (axial) × 0.65 mm (transverse) × 0.35 mm (transverse)) defined by the −6 dB focal intensity was obtained to address the dimensions needed for small animal therapy. An electronic beam steering range defined by the −3 dB focal peak intensity (17 mm (axial) × 14 mm (transverse) × 12 mm (transverse)) and −8 dB lateral grating lobes (24 mm (axial) × 18 mm (transverse) × 16 mm (transverse)) was achieved. The combined testing of imaging and therapeutic functions confirmed well-controlled local heating generation and imaging in a tissue mimicking phantom. This dual-array implementation offers a practical means to achieve hyperthermia and ablation in small animal models and can be incorporated within protocols for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. PMID:27353347

  2. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, V. A.

    2005-04-01

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  3. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kramb, V.A.

    2005-04-09

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  4. Endoluminal MR-guided ultrasonic applicator embedding cylindrical phased-array transducers and opposed-solenoid detection coil.

    PubMed

    Rata, Mihaela; Birlea, Vlad; Murillo, Adriana; Paquet, Christian; Cotton, François; Salomir, Rares

    2015-01-01

    MR-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) was suggested as an alternative therapy for esophageal and rectal cancer. To offer high-quality MR guidance, two prototypes of receive-only opposed-solenoid coil were integrated with 64-element cylindrical phased-array ultrasound transducers (rectal/esophageal). The design of integrated coils took into account the transducer geometry (360° acoustic window within endoluminal space). The rectal coil was sealed on a plastic support and placed reversibly on the transducer head. The esophageal coil was fully embedded within the transducer head, resulting in one indivisible device. Comparison of integrated versus external coils was performed on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The integrated coils showed higher sensitivity compared with the standard extracorporeal coil with factors of up to 7.5 (rectal applicator) and 3.3 (esophageal applicator). High-resolution MR images for both anatomy (voxel 0.4 × 0.4 × 5 mm(3)) and thermometry (voxel 0.75 × 0.75 × 8 mm(3), 2 s/image) were acquired in vivo with the rectal endoscopic device. The temperature feedback loop accurately controlled multiple control points over the region of interest. This study showed significant improvement of MR data quality using endoluminal integrated coils versus standard external coil. Inframillimeter spatial resolution and accurate feedback control of MR-guided HICU thermotherapy were achieved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Simulations and measurements of 3-D ultrasonic fields radiated by phased-array transducers using the westervelt equation.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Novell, Anthony; Calmon, Pierre; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to validate, by comparing numerical and experimental results, the ability of the Westervelt equation to predict the behavior of ultrasound beams generated by phased-array transducers. To this end, the full Westervelt equation is solved numerically and the results obtained are compared with experimental measurements. The numerical implementation of the Westervelt equation is performed using the explicit finite-difference time-domain method on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. The validation of the developed numerical code is first carried out by using experimental data obtained for two different focused circular transducers in the regimes of small-amplitude and finite-amplitude excitations. Then, the comparison of simulated and measured ultrasonic fields is extended to the case of a modified 32-element array transducer. It is shown that the developed code is capable of correctly predicting the behavior of the main lobe and the grating lobes in the cases of zero and nonzero steering angles for both the fundamental and the second-harmonic components.

  6. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  7. Improved intercostal HIFU ablation using a phased array transducer based on Fermat's spiral and Voronoi tessellation: A numerical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, Pascal; Ries, Mario; Moonen, Chrit T W; de Greef, Martijn

    2017-03-01

    A major complication for abdominal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) applications is the obstruction of the acoustic beam path by the thoracic cage, which absorbs and reflects the ultrasonic energy leading to undesired overheating of healthy tissues in the pre-focal area. Prior work has investigated the determination of optimized transducer apodization laws, which allow for a reduced rib exposure whilst (partially) restoring focal point intensity through power compensation. Although such methods provide an excellent means of reducing rib exposure, they generally increase the local energy density in the pre-focal area, which similarly can lead to undesired overheating. Therefore, this numerical study aimed at evaluating whether a novel transducer design could provide improvement for intercostal HIFU applications, in particular with respect to the pre-focal area. A combination of acoustic and thermal simulations was used to evaluate 2 mono-element transducers, 2 clinical phased array transducers, and 4 novel transducers based on Fermat's Spiral (FS), two of which were Voronoi-tessellated (VTFS). Binary apodizations were determined for the phased array transducers using a collision detection algorithm. A tissue geometry was modeled to represent an intercostal HIFU sonication in the liver at 30 and 50 mm behind the ribs, including subsequent layers of gel pad, skin, subcutaneous fat, muscle, and liver tissue. Acoustic simulations were then conducted using propagation of the angular spectrum of plane waves (ASPW). The results of these simulations were used to evaluate pre-focal intensity levels. Subsequently, a finite difference scheme based on the Pennes bioheat equation was used for thermal simulations. The results of these simulations were used to calculate both the energy density in the pre-focal skin, fat, and muscle layers, as well as the energy exposure of the ribs. The acoustic simulations showed that for a sonication in a single point without

  8. Phased-ultrasonic receiving-planar array transducer for partial discharge location in transformer.

    PubMed

    Yongfen, Luo; Shengchang, Ji; Yanming, Li

    2006-03-01

    Partial discharge (PD) location in transformers is very important, and many methods that have been brought forward in past decades have a limitation theoretically, namely, they cannot locate multiple PDs in electrical equipment. In this paper, a new PD location method based on UHF and ultrasonic-phased arrays receiving theory has been presented, which has a possibility to locate multiple PDs. According to the method, a phased-ultrasonic receiving-planar array sensor that possesses 16 * 16 elements is designed; and, based on the phased-array theory, the characteristics of the plane sensor are studied. The laboratory experimental tests on the plane sensor element indicates that it has a good performance within the frequency band of the main ultrasonic energy produced by PD in transformer oil. Location tests are conducted on one or two piezoelectric ultrasonic sources in oil, which are both simulated as PD sources and triggered by an electrical pulse whose front is considered as a time benchmark in the locating algorithm. The test results show locations to one and two PDs can be realized in a single measurement, which lays a foundation for locating PDs in a power transformer in service.

  9. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  10. Design and fabrication of a 5 MHz ultrasonic phased array probe with curved transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Julia; Herzog, Thomas; Walter, Susan; Heuer, Henning

    2013-05-01

    A 5 MHz, 16-element phased array concave ultrasonic probe for non-destructive testing has been designed, fabricated and tested. To improve the probes performance its curvature, as opposed to present solutions, was not obtained by adding a corresponding delay wedge, but rather by manufacturing the functional elements (i.e. active material, matching layer) with a curvature. The piezoelectric material used here was a 1-3 composite material made of PZT. The finished probe was tested on a steel half circle with the corresponding radius (100 mm) and on the Olympus PAUT test piece. Good results could be obtained. Three transverse holes with a diameter of 1 mm and a distance of 5 mm to one another could be detected and resolved.

  11. Focused, phased-array plane piston and spherically-shaped concave piston transducers: comparison for the same aperture and focal point.

    PubMed

    Warriner, Renée K; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-04-01

    It has sometimes been assumed that the phased-array plane piston transducer and the spherically-shaped concave piston transducer are equivalent structures when both have the same aperture and focal point. This assumption has not been previously examined, nor has an expression for the on-axis impulse response of the focused, phased-array plane piston transducer been derived. It is shown in this paper how such an expression can be obtained. Comparisons of the impulse response for both structures show similarities, as well as some differences that could be significant as the observation point approaches the focal point. Comparisons are also performed for wide-band pulses close to the focus as well as for sinusoidal excitation. A physical explanation for the cause of the impulse response discrepancy is shown to be due to the nature of the piston focusing delay and its effect on the Rayleigh integral.

  12. Development of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) phased arrays for SFR inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît

    2014-02-18

    A long-standing problem for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) instrumentation is the development of efficient under-sodium visualization systems adapted to the hot and opaque sodium environment. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) are potential candidates for a new generation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT) probes well-suited for SFR inspection that can overcome drawbacks of classical piezoelectric probes in sodium environment. Based on the use of new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized an advanced EMAT probe for under-sodium visualization. This has led to the development of a fully functional L-wave EMAT sensing system composed of 8 elements and a casing withstanding 200° C sodium inspection. Laboratory experiments demonstrated the probe's ability to sweep an ultrasonic beam to an angle of 15 degrees. Testing in a specialized sodium facility has shown that it was possible to obtain pulse-echo signals from a target under several different angles from a fixed position.

  13. Development of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) phased arrays for SFR inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît

    2014-02-01

    A long-standing problem for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) instrumentation is the development of efficient under-sodium visualization systems adapted to the hot and opaque sodium environment. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) are potential candidates for a new generation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT) probes well-suited for SFR inspection that can overcome drawbacks of classical piezoelectric probes in sodium environment. Based on the use of new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized an advanced EMAT probe for under-sodium visualization. This has led to the development of a fully functional L-wave EMAT sensing system composed of 8 elements and a casing withstanding 200° C sodium inspection. Laboratory experiments demonstrated the probe's ability to sweep an ultrasonic beam to an angle of 15 degrees. Testing in a specialized sodium facility has shown that it was possible to obtain pulse-echo signals from a target under several different angles from a fixed position.

  14. Active control of microbubbles stream in multi-bifurcated flow by using 2D phased array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Koda, Ren; Koido, Jun; Hosaka, Naoto; Ito, Takumi; Onogi, Shinya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported our attempt to propel microbbles in flow by a primary Bjerknes force, which is a physical phenomenon where an acoustic wave pushes an obstacle along its direction of propagation. However, when ultrasound was emitted from surface of the body, controlling bubbles in against flow was needed. It is unpractical to use multiple transducers to produce the same number of focal points because single element transducer cannot produce more than two focal points. In this study, we introduced a complex artificial blood vessel according to a capillary model and a 2D array transducer to produce multiple focal points for active control of microbubbles in against flow. Furthermore, we investigated bubble control in viscous fluid. As the results, we confirmed clearly path selection of MBs in viscous fluid as well as in water.

  15. Reflection at a liquid-solid interface of a transient ultrasonic field radiated by a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Maghlaoui, Nadir; Belgroune, Djema; Ourak, Mohamed; Djelouah, Hakim

    2016-09-01

    In order to put in evidence the specular reflection and the non-specular reflection in the transient case, we have used a model for the study of the transient ultrasonic waves radiated by a linear phased array transducer in a liquid and reflected by a solid plane interface. This method is an extension of the angular spectrum method to the transient case where the reflection at the plane interface is taken into account by using the reflection coefficient for harmonic plane waves. The results obtained highlighted the different components of the ultrasonic field: the direct and edge waves as well as the longitudinal head waves or leaky Rayleigh waves. The transient representation of these waves have been carefully analyzed and discussed by the rays model. Instantaneous cartographies allowed a clear description of all the waves which appear at the liquid-solid interface. The obtained results have been compared to those obtained with a finite element method package. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimization of a phased-array transducer for multiple harmonic imaging in medical applications: frequency and topology.

    PubMed

    Matte, Guillaume M; Van Neer, Paul L M J; Danilouchkine, Mike G; Huijssen, Jacob; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second-harmonic imaging is currently one of the standards in commercial echographic systems for diagnosis, because of its high spatial resolution and low sensitivity to clutter and near-field artifacts. The use of nonlinear phenomena mirrors is a great set of solutions to improve echographic image resolution. To further enhance the resolution and image quality, the combination of the 3rd to 5th harmonics--dubbed the superharmonics--could be used. However, this requires a bandwidth exceeding that of conventional transducers. A promising solution features a phased-array design with interleaved low- and high-frequency elements for transmission and reception, respectively. Because the amplitude of the backscattered higher harmonics at the transducer surface is relatively low, it is highly desirable to increase the sensitivity in reception. Therefore, we investigated the optimization of the number of elements in the receiving aperture as well as their arrangement (topology). A variety of configurations was considered, including one transmit element for each receive element (1/2) up to one transmit for 7 receive elements (1/8). The topologies are assessed based on the ratio of the harmonic peak pressures in the main and grating lobes. Further, the higher harmonic level is maximized by optimization of the center frequency of the transmitted pulse. The achievable SNR for a specific application is a compromise between the frequency-dependent attenuation and nonlinearity at a required penetration depth. To calculate the SNR of the complete imaging chain, we use an approach analogous to the sonar equation used in underwater acoustics. The generated harmonic pressure fields caused by nonlinear wave propagation were modeled with the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method, the KZK, or the Burger's equation. The optimal topology for superharmonic imaging was an interleaved design with 1 transmit element per 6 receive elements. It improves the SNR by ~5 dB compared with

  17. Improved Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Pulse-Inversion Harmonic Imaging with a Phased Array Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Pislaru, Cristina; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging is widely used to improve ultrasound B-mode imaging quality thanks to its effectiveness in suppressing imaging artifacts associated with ultrasound reverberation, phase aberration, and clutter noise. In ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE), because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, these noise sources can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and consequently result in noisy and biased shear wave motion detection. This situation is exacerbated in in vivo SWE applications such as heart, liver, and kidney. This paper, therefore, investigated the possibility of implementing harmonic imaging, specifically pulse-inversion harmonic imaging, in shear wave tracking, with the hypothesis that harmonic imaging can improve shear wave motion detection based on the same principles that apply to general harmonic B-mode imaging. We first designed an experiment with a gelatin phantom covered by an excised piece of pork belly and show that harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion detection by producing less underestimated shear wave motion and more consistent shear wave speed measurements than fundamental imaging. Then, a transthoracic heart experiment on a freshly sacrificed pig showed that harmonic imaging could robustly track the shear wave motion and give consistent shear wave speed measurements while fundamental imaging could not. Finally, an in vivo transthoracic study of seven healthy volunteers showed that the proposed harmonic imaging tracking sequence could provide consistent estimates of the left ventricular myocardium stiffness in end-diastole with a general success rate of 80% and a success rate of 93.3% when excluding the subject with Body Mass Index (BMI) higher than 25. These promising results indicate that pulse-inversion harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion tracking and thus potentially facilitate more robust assessment

  18. Improved Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Pulse-Inversion Harmonic Imaging With a Phased Array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Pengfei Song; Heng Zhao; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Pislaru, Sorin V; Kinnick, Randall R; Pislaru, Cristina; Greenleaf, James F; Shigao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging is widely used to improve ultrasound B-mode imaging quality thanks to its effectiveness in suppressing imaging artifacts associated with ultrasound reverberation, phase aberration, and clutter noise. In ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE), because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, these noise sources can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and consequently result in noisy and biased shear wave motion detection. This situation is exacerbated in in vivo SWE applications such as heart, liver, and kidney. This paper, therefore, investigated the possibility of implementing harmonic imaging, specifically pulse-inversion harmonic imaging, in shear wave tracking, with the hypothesis that harmonic imaging can improve shear wave motion detection based on the same principles that apply to general harmonic B-mode imaging. We first designed an experiment with a gelatin phantom covered by an excised piece of pork belly and show that harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion detection by producing less underestimated shear wave motion and more consistent shear wave speed measurements than fundamental imaging. Then, a transthoracic heart experiment on a freshly sacrificed pig showed that harmonic imaging could robustly track the shear wave motion and give consistent shear wave speed measurements of the left ventricular myocardium while fundamental imaging could not. Finally, an in vivo transthoracic study of seven healthy volunteers showed that the proposed harmonic imaging tracking sequence could provide consistent estimates of the left ventricular myocardium stiffness in end-diastole with a general success rate of 80% and a success rate of 93.3% when excluding the subject with Body Mass Index higher than 25. These promising results indicate that pulse-inversion harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion tracking and thus potentially

  19. Crack orientation and depth estimation in a low-pressure turbine disc using a phased array ultrasonic transducer and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-09-13

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks.

  20. Crack Orientation and Depth Estimation in a Low-Pressure Turbine Disc Using a Phased Array Ultrasonic Transducer and an Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks. PMID:24064602

  1. Simulation study of a chaotic cavity transducer based virtual phased array used for focusing in the bulk of a solid material.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2016-04-01

    In acoustic and ultrasonic non-destructive testing techniques, it is sometimes beneficial to concentrate sound energy at a chosen location in space and at a specific instance in time, for example to improve the signal-to-noise ratio or activate the nonlinearity of damage features. Time Reversal (TR) techniques, taking advantage of the reversible character of the wave equation, are particularly suited to focus ultrasonic waves in time and space. The characteristics of the energy focusing in solid media using principles of time reversed acoustics are highly influenced by the nature and dimensions of the medium, the number of transducers and the length of the received signals. Usually, a large number of transducers enclosing the domain of interest is needed to improve the quality of the focusing. However, in the case of highly reverberant media, the number of transducers can be reduced to only one (single-channel TR). For focusing in a non-reverberant medium, which is impossible when using only one source, an adaptation of the single-channel reciprocal TR procedure has been recently suggested by means of a Chaotic Cavity Transducer (CCT), a single element transducer glued on a cavity of chaotic shape. In this paper, a CCT is used to focus elastic energy, at different times, in different points along a predefined line on the upper surface of a thick solid sample. Doing so, all focusing points can act as a virtual phased array transducer, allowing to focus in any point along the depth direction of the sample. This is impossible using conventional reciprocal TR, as you need to have access to all points in the bulk of the material for detecting signals to be used in the TR process. To asses and provide a better understanding of this concept, a numerical study has been developed, allowing to verify the basic concepts of the virtual phased array and to illustrate multi-component time reversal focusing in the bulk of a solid material.

  2. Modal content based damage indicators and phased array transducers for structural health monitoring of aircraft structures using ultrasonic guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang

    Composite materials, especially carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP), have been widely used in the aircraft industry because of their high specific strength and stiffness, resistance to corrosion and good fatigue life. Due to their highly anisotropic material properties and laminated structures, joining methods like bolting and riveting are no longer appropriate for joining CFRP since they initiate defects during the assembly and severely compromise the integrity of the structure; thus new techniques for joining CFRP are highly demanded. Adhesive bonding is a promising method because it relieves stress concentration, reduces weight and provides smooth surfaces. Additionally, it is a low-cost alternative to the co-cured method which is currently used to manufacture components of aircraft fuselage. Adhesive defects, disbonds at the interface between adherend and adhesive layer, are focused on in this thesis because they can be initialized by either poor surface preparation during the manufacturing or fatigue loads during service. Aircraft need structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to increase safety and reduce loss, and adhesive bonds usually represent the hotspots of the assembled structure. There are many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for bond inspection. However, these methods cannot be readily integrated into an SHM system because of the bulk size and weight of the equipment and requirement of accessibility to one side of the bonded joint. The first objective of this work is to develop instruments, actuators, sensors and a data acquisition system for SHM of bond lines using ultrasonic guided waves which are well known to be able to cover large volume of the structure and inaccessible regions. Different from widely used guided wave sensors like PZT disks, the new actuators, piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC) phased array transducers0 (PAT), can control the modal content of the excited waves and the new sensors, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF

  3. Numerical Simulation of Scattered Waves from Flaws for Ultrasonic Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Kono, N.; Nakahata, K.

    2007-03-01

    To enhance the detectability in the phased array UT, it is essential to have well knowledge on the characteristics of ultrasonic waves from array transducers. This paper proposes a mathematical model of the array transducer and a simulation tool to predict the flaw echoes. The modeling of an array transducer is based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral and the scattered waves from flaws are calculated with the fast multipole BEM (FMBEM). By using the FMBEM, we can solve large scale scattering problems with relatively low computational cost. Here we focus on the transient wave analysis, in which a pulse-shaped wave is used for exciting elements of the array transducer.

  4. Micromachined capacitive transducer arrays for intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degertekin, F. Levent; Guldiken, R. Oytun; Karaman, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging has become an essential imaging modality for the effective diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases during the past decade enabled by innovative applications of piezoelectric transducer technology. The limitations in the manufacture and performance of the same piezoelectric transducers have also impeded the improvement of IVUS for emerging clinically important applications such as forward viewing arrays for guiding interventions and high resolution imaging of arterial structure such as vulnerable plaque and fibrous cap, and also implementation of techniques such as harmonic imaging of the tissue and of the contrast agents. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology shows great potential for transforming IVUS not only to satisfy these clinical needs but also to open up possibilities for low-cost imaging devices integrated to therapeutic tools. We have developed manufacturing processes with a maximum process temperature of 250°C to build CMUTs on the same silicon chip with integrated electronics. Using these processes we fabricated CMUT arrays suitable for forward viewing IVUS in the 10-20MHz range. We characterized these array elements in terms of pulse-echo response, radiation pattern measurements and demonstrated its volumetric imaging capabilities on various imaging targets.

  5. Partially coherent transducers: the random phase transducer approach.

    PubMed

    Mallart, R; Fink, M; Laugier, P; Abouelkaram, S

    1990-07-01

    Ultrasound speckle is a consequence of the stochastic nature of the reflectivity of scattering media (e.g., biological tissue) and of the coherent nature of piezoelectric transducers. This speckle noise can be reduced by the use of incoherent processing techniques (e.g., spatial compounding, incoherent summation, random phase and phase insensitive transducers). We present a unified framework that explains the limitations of incoherent processing in terms of the information grain theory. This theory predicts the gains in SNR as well as the losses in directivity. We also present the random phase transducer approach to incoherence to total coherence. We present applications to speckle reduction, detection of specular reflectors, attenuation estimation and ultrasound imaging. We show that totally incoherent transducers completely remove diffraction effects. They might be used in attenuation estimation, in which case, correction for diffraction is no longer required, in order to obtain unbiased estimates. Partially coherent transducers might also be useful in imaging to reduce speckle noise.

  6. Inter-costal Liver Ablation Under Real Time MR-Thermometry With Partial Activation Of A HIFU Phased Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesson, Bruno; Merle, Mathilde; Köhler, Max; Mougenot, Charles; Roujol, Sebastien; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Moonen, Chrit

    2010-03-01

    HIFU ablation of tumours located inside the liver is hampered by the rib cage, which partially obstructs the beam path and may create adverse effects such as skin burns. This study presents a method for selectively deactivating the transducer elements causing undesired temperature increases near the bones. A manual segmentation of the bones visualized on 3D anatomical MR images acquired prior to sonication was performed to identify the beam obstruction. The resulting mask was projected (ray tracing starting from the focal point) on the transducer and elements with more than 50% obstruction of their active surface were deactivated. The effectiveness of the method for HIFU ablations is demonstrated ex vivo and in vivo in the liver of pigs with real-time MR thermometry, using the proton resonant frequency (PRF) method. For both ex vivo and in vivo experiments, the temperature increase near the bones was significantly reduced when the elements located in front of the ribs were deactivated. The temperature evolution at the focal point were similar, indicative of the absence of loss of heating efficacy when the elements were deactivated. This method is simple, rapid and reliable and allows to perform intercostal MRgHIFU ablation of the liver while sparing the ribs.

  7. MRI-guided Therapeutic Ultrasound : In vitro Validation of a New MR Compatible, Phased Array, Contact Endorectal Ultrasound Transducer with Active Feedback Control of Temperature Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomir, Rares; Rata, Mihaela; Lafon, Cyril; Melodelima, David; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Mathias, Adrien; Cotton, François; Bonmartin, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Contact application of high intensity ultrasound was demonstrated to be suitable for thermal ablation of sectorial tumours of the digestive duct. Experimental validation of a new MR compatible ultrasonic device is described here, dedicated to the minimal invasive therapy of localized colorectal cancer. This is a cylindrical 1D 64-element phased array transducer of 14 mm diameter and 25 mm height (Imasonic, France) allowing electronic rotation of the acoustic beam. Operating frequency ranges from 3.5 to 4.0 MHz and up to 5 effective electrical watts per element are available. A plane wave is reconstructed by simultaneous excitation of eigth adjacent elements with an appropriate phase law. Driving electronics operates outside the Faraday cage of the scanner and provides fast switching capabilities. Excellent passive and active compatibility with the MRI data acquisition has been demonstrated. In addition, feasibility of active temperature control has been demonstrated based on real-time data export out of the MR scanner and a PID feedback algorithm. Further studies will address the in-vivo validation and the integration of a miniature NMR coil for increased SNR in the near field.

  8. Linear-array ultrasonic waveguide transducer for under sodium viewing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Lawrence, W. P.; Engel, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-01

    In this report, we first present the basic design of a low-noise waveguide and its performance followed by a review of the array transducer technology. The report then presents the concept and basic designs of arrayed waveguide transducers that can apply to under-sodium viewing for in-service inspection of fast reactors. Depending on applications, the basic waveguide arrays consist of designs for sideway and downward viewing. For each viewing application, two array geometries, linear and circular, are included in design analysis. Methods to scan a 2-D target using a linear array waveguide transducer are discussed. Future plan to develop a laboratory array waveguide prototype is also presented.

  9. Development of high frequency annular array ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Emanuel John

    The advantage of ultrasonic annular arrays over conventional single element transducers has been in the ability to transmit focus at multiple points throughout the depth of field, as well as receive dynamic focus. Today, annular, linear and multidimensional array imaging systems are not commercially available at frequencies greater than 20 MHz. The fabrication technology used to develop a high frequency (>50 MHz) annular array transducer is presented. A 9 mum P(VDF-TrFE) film was bonded to gold annuli electrodes on the top layer of a two sided polyimide flexible circuit. Each annulus was separated by a 30 mum kerf and had several electroplated micro vias that connected to electrode traces on the bottom side of the polyimide flexible circuit. The array's performance was evaluated by measuring the electrical impedance, pulse echo response and crosstalk measurement for each element in the array. In order to improve device sensitivity each element was electrically matched to an impedance magnitude of 50 O and 0° phase at resonance. The average round trip insertion loss measured for the array and compensated for diffraction effects was -33.5 dB. The measured average center frequency and bandwidth of an element was 55 MHz and 47 respectively. The measured crosstalk between adjacent elements remained below -29 dB at the center frequency in water. A vertical wire phantom was imaged using a single focus transmit beamformer and dynamic focusing receive beamformer. This image showed a significant improvement in lateral resolution over a range of 9 mm after the dynamic focusing receive algorithm was applied. These results correlated well with predictions from a Field II simulation. After beamforming the minimum lateral resolution (-6 dB) was 108 mum at the focus. Preliminary ultrasound B-mode images of the rabbit eye using this transducer were shown in conjunction with a multi-channel digital beamformer. A feasibility study of designing and fabricating tunable copolymer

  10. Highly reliable multisensor array (MSA) smart transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, José; Lucena, Angel; Mackey, Paul; Mata, Carlos; Immer, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Many developments in the field of multisensor array (MSA) transducers have taken place in the last few years. Advancements in fabrication technology, such as Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, have made implementation of MSA devices a reality. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing this type of technology because of the increases in safety, reliability, and performance and the reduction in operational and maintenance costs that can be achieved with these devices. To demonstrate the MSA technology benefits, KSC quantified the relationship between the number of sensors (N) and the associated improvement in sensor life and reliability. A software algorithm was developed to monitor and assess the health of each element and the overall MSA. Furthermore, the software algorithm implemented criteria on how these elements would contribute to the MSA-calculated output to ensure required performance. The hypothesis was that a greater number of statistically independent sensor elements would provide a measurable increase in measurement reliability. A computer simulation was created to answer this question. An array of N sensors underwent random failures in the simulation and a life extension factor (LEF equals the percentage of the life of a single sensor) was calculated by the program. When LEF was plotted as a function of N, a quasiexponential behavior was detected with marginal improvement above N = 30. The hypothesis and follow-on simulation results were then corroborated experimentally. An array composed of eight independent pressure sensors was fabricated. To accelerate sensor life cycle and failure and to simulate degradation over time, the MSA was exposed to an environmental tem-perature of 125°C. Every 24 hours, the experiment's environmental temperature was returned to ambient temperature (27°C), and the outputs of all the MSA sensor elements were measured. Once per week, the MSA calibration was verified at five different

  11. Signal processing for damage detection using two different array transducers.

    PubMed

    El Youbi, F; Grondel, S; Assaad, J

    2004-04-01

    This work describes an investigation into the development of a new health monitoring system for aeronautical applications. The health monitoring system is based on the emission and reception of Lamb waves by multi-element piezoelectric transducers (i.e., arrays) bonded to the structure. The emitter array consists of three different elementary bar transducers. These transducers have the same thickness and length but different widths. The receiver array has 32 same elements. This system offers the possibility to understand the nature of the generated waves and to determine the sensitivity of each mode to possible damage. It presents two principal advantages: Firstly, by exciting all elements in phase, it is possible to generate several Lamb modes in the same time. Secondly, the two-dimensional fourier transform (2D-FT) of the received signal can be easily computed. Experimental results concerning an aluminum plate with different hole sizes will be shown. The A0-, S0-, A1-, S1- and S2-modes are generated at the same time. This study shows that the A0 mode seems particularly interesting to detect flaws of this geometrical type.

  12. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  13. Multilayer Array Transducer for Nonlinear Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Neil R.; Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Li, Tong; Gross, Dan; Postlewait, Steven M.; Curra, Francesco P.

    2011-09-01

    The properties of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation are known to be able to improve the resolution of ultrasound imaging, and could be used to dynamically estimate the physical properties of tissue. However, transducers capable of launching a wave that becomes nonlinear through propagation do not typically have the necessary bandwidth to detect the higher harmonics. Here we present the design and characterization of a novel multilayer transducer for high intensity transmit and broadband receive. The transmit layer was made from a narrow-band, high-power piezoceramic (PZT), with nominal frequency of 2.0 MHz, that was diced into an array of 32 elements. Each element was 0.300 mm wide and 6.3 mm in elevation, and with a pitch of 0.400 mm the overall aperture width was 12.7 mm. A quarter-wave matching layer was attached to the PZT substrate to improve transmit efficiency and bandwidth. The overlaid receive layer was made from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) that had gold metalization on one side. A custom two-sided flex circuit routed electrical connections to the PZT elements and patterned the PVDF elements; the PZT and PVDF elements had identical apertures. A low viscosity and electrically nonconductive epoxy was used for all adhesion layers. Characterization of electrical parameters and acoustic output were performed per standard methods, where transmit and receive events were driven by a software-controlled ultrasound engine. Echo data, collected from ex vivo tissue and digitized at 45 MS/s, exhibited frequency content up to the 4th harmonic of the 2 MHz transmit frequency.

  14. Multiple matching scheme for broadband 0.72Pb(Mg(13)Nb(23))O(3)-0.28PbTiO(3) single crystal phased-array transducer.

    PubMed

    Lau, S T; Li, H; Wong, K S; Zhou, Q F; Zhou, D; Li, Y C; Luo, H S; Shung, K K; Dai, J Y

    2009-05-01

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal 0.72Pb(Mg(13)Nb(23))O(3)-0.28PbTiO(3) (abbreviated as PMN-PT) was used to fabricate high performance ultrasonic phased-array transducer as it exhibited excellent piezoelectric properties. In this paper, we focus on the design and fabrication of a low-loss and wide-band transducer for medical imaging applications. A KLM model based simulation software PiezoCAD was used for acoustic design of the transducer including the front-face matching and backing. The calculated results show that the -6 dB transducer bandwidth can be improved significantly by using double lambda8 matching layers and hard backing. A 4.0 MHz PMN-PT transducer array (with 16 elements) was fabricated and tested in a pulse-echo arrangement. A -6 dB bandwidth of 110% and two-way insertion loss of -46.5 dB were achieved.

  15. Modeling and underwater characterization of cymbal transducers and arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Hladky-Hennion, A C; Hughes, W J; Newnham, R E

    2001-03-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for potential use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single element and transducer arrays by coupling finite element analysis (ATILA) and the integral equation formulation (EQI). The pressure and velocity distributions on the surface elements were calculated by ATILA and later used with EQI to calculate the far field properties of the transducer element and arrays. It eliminates the mesh of the fluid domain and makes the 3-D model of a transducer possible. Three-dimensional models of a cymbal transducer and a 3 x 3 cymbal array were developed in the modeling. Very good agreement was obtained between modeling and measurement for single element transducers. By coupling finite element analysis with the integral equation method using boundary elements, acoustic interaction effects were taken into account. Reasonable agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement for a 3 x 3 array.

  16. An Algorithm for Selecting Transducer Element Array Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    response. A lumped-parameter equivalent circuit of a tonpilz transducer is used to predict element amplitude and phase tolerances for different radiation...lumped-parameter equivalent circuit of a tonpilz transducer is used to predict element amplitude and phase tolerances for different radiation loadings...FIGURES p Figure Page : 2.1 A Tonpilz Type Transducer . . .............. . 6 % 2.2 The Equivalent Circuit .......... .................... 7 2.3 The

  17. TRANSDUCER GENERATED ARRAYS OF ROBOTIC NANO-ARMS.

    PubMed

    Dolzhenko, Egor; Jonoska, Nataša; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2010-06-01

    We consider sets of two-dimensional arrays, called here transducer generated languages, obtained by iterative applications of transducers (finite state automata with output). Each transducer generates a set of blocks of symbols such that the bottom row of a block is an input string accepted by the transducer and, by iterative application of the transducer, each row of the block is an output of the transducer on the preceding row. We show how these arrays can be implemented through molecular assembly of triple crossover DNA molecules. Such assembly could serve as a scaffold for arranging molecular robotic arms capable for simultaneous movements. We observe that transducer generated languages define a class of languages which is a proper subclass of recognizable picture languages, but it containing the class of all factorial local two-dimensional languages. By taking the average growth rate of the number of blocks in the language as a measure of its complexity, we further observe that arrays with high complexity patterns can be generated in this way.

  18. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  19. Prediction of surface temperature rise of ultrasonic diagnostic array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Won-Suk; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Eun Chul

    2008-01-01

    Temperature rise at the surface of an ultrasound transducer used for diagnostic imaging is an important factor in patient safety and regulatory compliance. This paper presents a semianalytical model that is derived from first principles of heat transfer and is simple enough to be implemented in a commercial ultrasound scanner for real-time forecasting of transducer surface temperature. For modeling purposes, one-dimensional array transducers radiating into still air are considered. Promising experimental verification data are shown and practical implementation benefits of the model for thermal design and management of ultrasonic array transducers are discussed. In particular, the reduction in the amount of thermal characterization data required, compared to empirical models, shows promise.

  20. Aircraft components structural health monitoring using flexible ultrasonic transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.-L.; Jen, C.-K.; Kobayashi, M.; Mrad, N.

    2011-04-01

    A damage detection capability based on a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array bonded onto a planar and a curved surface is presented. The FUT array was fabricated on a 75 μm titanium substrate using sol-gel spray technique. Room temperature curable adhesive is used as the bonding agent and ultrasonic couplant between the transducer and the test article. The bonding agent was successfully tested for aircraft environmental temperatures between -80 °C and 100 °C. For a planar test article, selected FUT arrays were able to detect fasteners damage within a planar distance of 176 mm, when used in the pulse-echo mode. Such results illustrate the effectiveness of the developed FUT transducer as compared to commercial 10MHz ultrasonic transducer (UT). These FUT arrays were further demonstrated on a curved test article. Pulse-echo measurements confirmed the reflected echoes from the specimen. Such measurement was not possible with commercial UTs due to the curved nature of the test article and its accessibility, thus demonstrating the suitability and superiority of the developed flexible ultrasonic transducer capability.

  1. Transducer Arrays Suitable for Acoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    OF THIS PGOt (When Deta Entter*0 UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Dae Bntered) Design techniques based on the the transmission...mono- lithic array radiating into metal is demonstrated. UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE’Whou Dato Entered) TRPSSDUCER ARRAYS SUITABLE...attention is placed on achieving high transduction efficiency and angular beam- widths of at least ±15°• T. Design techniques based on the transmission line

  2. Design and fabrication of a 40-MHz annular array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Lizzi, Frederic L.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of fabricating a 5-ring, focused annular array transducer operating at 40 MHz. The active piezoelectric material of the transducer was a 9-μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. One side of the PVDF was metallized with gold and forms the ground plane of the transducer. The array pattern of the transducer and electrical traces to each annulus were formed on a copper-clad polyimide film. The PVDF and polyimide were bonded with a thin layer of epoxy, pressed into a spherically curved shape, and then back filled with epoxy. A 5-ring transducer with equal area elements and 100 μm kerfs between annuli was fabricated and tested. The transducer had a total aperture of 6 mm and a geometric focus of 12 mm. The pulse/echo response from a quartz plate located at the geometric focus, two-way insertion loss (IL), complex impedance, electrical cross-talk, and lateral beamwidth were all measured for each annulus. The complex impedance data from each element were used to perform electrical matching and the measurements were repeated. After impedance matching, fc ≈ 36 MHz and BWs ranged from 31 to 39%. The ILs for the matched annuli ranged from −28 to −38 dB. PMID:16060516

  3. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays as tunable acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lani, Shane W; Wasequr Rashid, M; Hasler, Jennifer; Sabra, Karim G; Levent Degertekin, F

    2014-02-03

    Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) operating in immersion support dispersive evanescent waves due to the subwavelength periodic structure of electrostatically actuated membranes in the array. Evanescent wave characteristics also depend on the membrane resonance which is modified by the externally applied bias voltage, offering a mechanism to tune the CMUT array as an acoustic metamaterial. The dispersion and tunability characteristics are examined using a computationally efficient, mutual radiation impedance based approach to model a finite-size array and realistic parameters of variation. The simulations are verified, and tunability is demonstrated by experiments on a linear CMUT array operating in 2-12 MHz range.

  4. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays as tunable acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Lani, Shane W. E-mail: karim.sabra@me.gatech.edu Sabra, Karim G.; Wasequr Rashid, M.; Hasler, Jennifer; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2014-02-03

    Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) operating in immersion support dispersive evanescent waves due to the subwavelength periodic structure of electrostatically actuated membranes in the array. Evanescent wave characteristics also depend on the membrane resonance which is modified by the externally applied bias voltage, offering a mechanism to tune the CMUT array as an acoustic metamaterial. The dispersion and tunability characteristics are examined using a computationally efficient, mutual radiation impedance based approach to model a finite-size array and realistic parameters of variation. The simulations are verified, and tunability is demonstrated by experiments on a linear CMUT array operating in 2-12 MHz range.

  5. Linear array transducer for high-power airborne ultrasound using flextensional structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Jun; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    To change the direction of ultrasonic irradiation without moving a transducer, a high-power airborne ultrasonic transducer for a one-dimensional phased array system was designed and tested. A flextensional element transducer with higher-mode bending vibration was fabricated to obtain a high vibration amplitude over a wide aperture, where a phase-compensating stepped structure was employed. The width of the main lobe at half maximum and the sidelobe level were measured to be 14.3 deg and 0.78, respectively. The maximal sound pressure of 132 dB (0 dB re. 0.02 mPa) was obtained under the applied voltage of 4.0 V. The beam steering characteristics of a phased array using eight elements were compared with the simple theory.

  6. Studies of the Characteristics of a Densely-Coupled Array of Underwater Acoustic Transmitting Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengyao; Ma, Yuanliang

    2010-09-01

    The characteristics of a densely-coupled array of underwater acoustic transmitting transducers are studied. At first, the electro-acoustic characteristics such as the admittance, the resonant frequency and the transmitting voltage response, of a low frequency barrel-stave flextensional transducer and a densely-coupled compact array composed of three identical transducers uniformly distributed on a circle with spacing much less than half wavelength, are measured by experiments. Then, the radiation impedances of a single transducer and of transducers in the compact array are calculated by the boundary element model together with the finite element model. Based on the above results, the transducer's equivalent circuit model parameters are calculated in different cases, which include a single transducer in air and in water, and a densely-coupled array of three transducers parallel connected in water. The characteristics of the transducers and array are analyzed by the equivalent circuit model that was obtained. The research results show that when the transducers make up a densely-coupled compact array, the resonant frequency decreases and the transmitting bandwidth broadens. It is also shown that the mutual interactions among elements are significant for the compact array. The mutual radiation resistance between two transducers is close to the self-radiation resistance of the transducers. The vibration velocities of the transducers in the compact array are nearly 1/3 as those of a single transducer, and the radiation acoustic power and transmitting voltage response of the array are nearly the same as those of a single transducer, when the driving voltages of the array and single transducer are unchanged. Furthermore, the transmitting source level of the 3-element compact array is 8.9dB higher than that of the single transducer if the vibration velocities of the transducers in the array are the same as those of the single transducer. The proposed technique can be used

  7. Singulation for imaging ring arrays of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chienliu; Moini, Azadeh; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Apte, Nikhil; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2014-10-01

    Singulation of MEMS is a critical step in the transition from wafer-level to die-level devices. As is the case for capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) ring arrays, an ideal singulation must protect the fragile membranes from the processing environment while maintaining a ring array geometry. The singulation process presented in this paper involves bonding a trench-patterned CMUT wafer onto a support wafer, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of the trenches, separating the CMUT wafer from the support wafer and de-tethering the CMUT device from the CMUT wafer. The CMUT arrays fabricated and singulated in this process were ring-shaped arrays, with inner and outer diameters of 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The fabricated CMUT ring arrays demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully and safely singulate the ring arrays and is applicable to any arbitrary 2D shaped MEMS device with uspended microstructures, taking advantage of the inherent planar attributes of DRIE.

  8. A conformal ultrasound transducer array featuring microfabricated polyimide joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David B.; Culjat, Martin O.; Cox, Brian P.; Dann, Aaron E.; Williams, Kimani; Lee, Hua; Brown, Elliott R.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Singh, Rahul S.

    2009-03-01

    Due to their increased angular coverage around body surfaces, conformal ultrasound transducers may potentially provide increased signal acquisition relative to rigid medical ultrasound probes and eliminate the need for mechanical scanning. This paper describes a novel, high efficiency, and robust conformal ultrasound transducer array based on a flexible substrate of silicon islands joined together using polyimide joints. The array incorporated diced bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT) mounted atop the silicon islands as its piezoelectric material for its desirable electromechanical coupling factor and high piezoelectric coefficients. Parylene thin films deposited over the array reinforced the bendable joints, encapsulated the metal film interconnects, and formed, in conjunction with the silicon, an acoustical match between the PZT and soft tissue. Eight element linear arrays were fabricated with a pitch of 3.5 mm, operating at a center frequency of 12 MHz with a 6dB bandwidth of 27%. The robustness of the transducer was demonstrated by iterative bending around a 1 cm diameter cylinder, and the durability of the electrical traces and the frequency performance was measured using a vector network analyzer. This paper presents a robust, durable conformal ultrasound array with the versatility to scale to enable new applications in diagnostic ultrasound imaging.

  9. Optimization of acoustic emitted field of transducer array for ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengyao

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed to calculate the weight vector of a transducer array for ultrasound imaging to obtain a low-sidelobe transmitting beam pattern based on the near-field response vector. An optimization problem is established, and the second-order cone (SOC) algorithm is used to solve the problem to obtain the weight vector. The optimized acoustic emitted field of the transducer array is then calculated using the Field II program by applying the obtained weight vector to the array. The simulation results with a 64-element 26 MHz linear phased array show that the proposed method can be used to control the sidelobe of the near-field transmitting beam pattern of the transducer array and achieve a low-sidelobe level. The near-field sound pressure distribution of the transducer array using the proposed method focuses much better than that using the standard delay and sum (DAS) beamforming method. The sound energy is more concentrated using the proposed method.

  10. Breast ultrasound tomography with two parallel transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Shin, Junseob; Chen, Ting; Lin, Youzuo; Gao, Kai; Intrator, Miranda; Hanson, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is an emerging imaging modality to reconstruct the sound speed, density, and ultrasound attenuation of the breast in addition to ultrasound reflection/beamforming images for breast cancer detection and characterization. We recently designed and manufactured a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography prototype with two parallel transducer arrays consisting of a total of 768 transducer elements. The transducer arrays are translated vertically to scan the breast in a warm water tank from the chest wall/axillary region to the nipple region to acquire ultrasound transmission and reflection data for whole-breast ultrasound tomography imaging. The distance of these two ultrasound transducer arrays is adjustable for scanning breasts with different sizes. We use our breast ultrasound tomography prototype to acquire phantom and in vivo patient ultrasound data to study its feasibility for breast imaging. We apply our recently developed ultrasound imaging and tomography algorithms to ultrasound data acquired using our breast ultrasound tomography system. Our in vivo patient imaging results demonstrate that our breast ultrasound tomography can detect breast lesions shown on clinical ultrasound and mammographic images.

  11. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  12. A low-frequency directional flextensional transducer and line array

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, S.C.; Butler, J.L.; Butler, A.L.; Cavanagh, G.H.

    1997-07-01

    A unique low-frequency (900 Hz) class IV flextensional transducer that produces an enhanced far-field pressure on one side and canceled far-field pressure on the other side has been developed. The transducer radiating surface consists of a thick-walled elliptical aluminum shell and a U.S. Navy type III piezoelectric stack along its major axis with two active sections and one inactive section. The directionality is achieved by simultaneously exciting the shell into an omnidirectional and dipole operation by driving stack into both extensional and bending modes. Both measurements and modeling on this device show a front to back pressure ratio of more than 30 dB, producing cardioid-type radiation patterns over an octave band, for a single transducer element. The transducers measured mechanical Q is 8, coupling coefficient is 0.25, and electroacoustic efficiency is 80{percent} and produced a source level of 215 dB {ital re:} 1 {mu}Pa at 1 m when driven at a field limit of 394 kV/m (10 kV/in.) at resonance. The uniqueness of this transducer is its directional beam patterns (directivity index=3.4 dB) and high acoustic output power from a small (less than a third of a wavelength) single element. Six of these transducers were placed in a closely packed line array two-wavelengths long. The array successfully produced narrow directional sound beams (directivity index=8.7 dB) with a front to back ratio greater than 30 dB and a source level of 225 dB {ital re:} 1 {mu}Pa at 1 m. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  13. A Low Frequency Broadband Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer Array.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Mauti, Barbara; Caliano, Giosuè

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the design and the fabrication of a multicell, piezoelectrically actuated, flextensional transducer array structure, characterized by a low mechanical impedance, thus allowing wideband and high-sensitivity immersion operation in the low ultrasonic frequency range. The transducer structure, consisting of a plurality of circular elementary cells orderly arranged according to a periodic hexagonal tiling, features a high flexibility in the definition of the active area shape and size. We investigate, by finite element modeling (FEM), the influence of different piezoelectric and elastic materials for the flexural plate, for the plate support and for the backing, on the transducer electroacoustic behavior. We carry out the dimensioning of the transducer components and cell layout, in terms of materials and geometry, respectively, by aiming at a circular active area of 80-mm diameter and broadband operation in the 30-100-kHz frequency range in immersion. PZT-5H ceramic disks and a calibrated thickness stainless steel plate are chosen for the vibrating structure, and FR-4 laminates and a brass plate, respectively, for the plate support and the backing. The diameter of the individual cells is set to 6 mm resulting in 121 cells describing a quasi-circular area, and the total thickness of the transducer is less than 10 mm. We report on the fabrication process flow for the accurate assembly of the transducer, based, respectively, on epoxy resin and wire bonding for the mechanical and electrical interconnection of the individual parts. The results of the electrical impedance and transmit pressure field characterization are finally reported and discussed.

  14. Optoacoustic tomography of breast cancer with arc-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeri G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Solomatin, Sergey V.; Savateeva, Elena V.; Aleinikov, Vadim; Zhulina, Yulia V.; Fleming, R. Declan; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2000-05-01

    The second generation of the laser optoacoustic imaging system for breast cancer detection, localization and characterization using a 32-element arc-shaped transducer array was developed and tested. Each acoustic transducer was made of 110-micrometers thick SOLEF PVDF film with dimensions of 1mm X 12.5mm. The frequency band of transducer array provided 0.4-mm axial in-depth resolution. Cylindrical shape of this 10-cm long transducer array provided an improved lateral resolution of 1.0 mm. Original and compact design of low noise preamplifiers and wide band amplifiers was employed. The system sensitivity was optimized by choosing limited bandwidth of ultrasonic detection 20-kHz to 2-MHz. Signal processing was significantly improved and optimized resulting in reduced data collection time of 13 sec. The computer code for digital signal processing employed auto- gain control, high-pass filtering and denoising. An automatic recognition of the opto-acoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the breast surface and improve the accuracy of tumor locations. Radial back-projection algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Optimal filtering of image was employed to reduce low and high frequency noise. The advantages and limitations of various contrast-enhancing filters applied to the entire image matrix were studied and discussed. Time necessary for image reconstruction was reduced to 32 sec. The system performance was evaluated initially via acquisition of 2D opto-acoustic images of small absorbing spheres in breast-tissue-like phantoms. Clinical ex-vivo studies of mastectomy specimen were also performed and compared with x-ray radiography and ultrasound.

  15. A new omnidirectional shear horizontal wave transducer using face-shear (d24) piezoelectric ring array.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Huan, Qiang; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2017-02-01

    The non-dispersive fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is of practical importance in non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Theoretically, an omnidirectional SH0 transducer phased array system can be used to inspect defects in a large plate in the similar manner to the phased array transducers used in medical B-scan ultrasonics. However, very few omnidirectional SH0 transducers have been proposed so far. In this work, an omnidirectional SH0 wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) was proposed, which consists of a ring array of twelve face-shear (d24) trapezoidal PZT elements. Each PZT element can produce face-shear deformation under applied voltage, resulting in circumferential shear deformation in the OSH-PT and omnidirectional SH0 waves in the hosting plate. Both finite element simulations and experiments were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Experimental testing shows that the OSH-PT exhibits good omnidirectional properties, no matter it is used as a SH0 wave transmitter or a SH0 wave receiver. This work may greatly promote the applications of SH0 waves in NDT and SHM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Field computation for two-dimensional array transducers with limited diffraction array beams.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Jiqi

    2005-10-01

    A method is developed for calculating fields produced with a two-dimensional (2D) array transducer. This method decomposes an arbitrary 2D aperture weighting function into a set of limited diffraction array beams. Using the analytical expressions of limited diffraction beams, arbitrary continuous wave (cw) or pulse wave (pw) fields of 2D arrays can be obtained with a simple superposition of these beams. In addition, this method can be simplified and applied to a 1D array transducer of a finite or infinite elevation height. For beams produced with axially symmetric aperture weighting functions, this method can be reduced to the Fourier-Bessel method studied previously where an annular array transducer can be used. The advantage of the method is that it is accurate and computationally efficient, especially in regions that are not far from the surface of the transducer (near field), where it is important for medical imaging. Both computer simulations and a synthetic array experiment are carried out to verify the method. Results (Bessel beam, focused Gaussian beam, X wave and asymmetric array beams) show that the method is accurate as compared to that using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula and agrees well with the experiment.

  17. Phased Array Inspection of Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to research and develop new conformable phased arrays that allow reliable ultrasonic inspection of components with an irregular surface. Two alternative approaches have been considered: flexible contact arrays in which the array itself conforms to the surface and a membrane device in which a standard array is coupled to the surface via a fluid-filled membrane. A linear flexible contact phased array was purchased from CEA France and a conformable membrane device was designed and manufactured at Imperial College. Initial investigations were conducted to evaluate both approaches when coupling to test pieces with machined surfaces representative of typical welded pipes without removal of the weld caps. The research incorporated beam modelling using the CEA CIVA software and comparisons with experimental measurements. It is shown that the conformable membrane approach using a standard array transducer is competitive with the bespoke flexible array.

  18. Singulation for imaging ring arrays of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chienliu; Moini, Azadeh; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Apte, Nikhil; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2015-01-01

    Singulation of MEMS is a critical step in the transition from wafer-level to die-level devices. As is the case for capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) ring arrays, an ideal singulation must protect the fragile membranes from the processing environment while maintaining a ring array geometry. The singulation process presented in this paper involves bonding a trench-patterned CMUT wafer onto a support wafer, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of the trenches, separating the CMUT wafer from the support wafer and de-tethering the CMUT device from the CMUT wafer. The CMUT arrays fabricated and singulated in this process were ring-shaped arrays, with inner and outer diameters of 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The fabricated CMUT ring arrays demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully and safely singulate the ring arrays and is applicable to any arbitrary 2D shaped MEMS device with uspended microstructures, taking advantage of the inherent planar attributes of DRIE. PMID:27076702

  19. DNA-programmed protein-nanoelectronic transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Gary; Kim, Jin Ho; Xu, Jimmy

    2008-08-01

    By incorporating DNA as addressable linkers, we can direct and coordinate the simultaneous, parallel self-assembling and binding of multiple different redox proteins to designated nanoelectrodes. As a result, we have formed a nanoelectronic-protein transducer array which is capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of several analytes in parallel. The sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization provides the means of encoding spatial address instruction to the otherwise random self-assembling process and enables the desired programmability, scalability, and renewability. Results of this study, under an AFOSR MURI program, demonstrate the feasibility of a new paradigm of biosensing: detection of not only the presence of target substances but also the real-time activities of multiple biomolecules. In this system, the conjugated biomolecules and nanoelectronic components provide the active monitoring and mediating functions in real time, and can be integrated en masse into large arrays in a silicon-based integrated circuit.

  20. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  1. Optical vibration measurements of cross coupling effects in capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leirset, Erlend; Aksnes, Astrid

    2011-05-01

    Optical vibration measurement systems are excellent tools for characterizing ultrasonic transducers. This paper presents measurements on immersed arrays of capacitive ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) using a heterodyne interferometer. The interferometer allows measurements of vibrations from DC up to 1 GHz with a noise floor of ~1pm/√Hz. Previously CMUTs have been characterized in air. The transducer is intended for intravascular use. Therefore the CMUTs were characterized in the transparent fluids kerosene and rapeseed oil that have acoustic properties closer to blood. The optical measurements on immersed CMUTs were validated by assessing the measurement errors caused by the acousto optic effects in the fluid. When immersed there is significant cross coupling between individual CMUTs within an array. Simulations presented here indicate that this causes an acoustic wave mode that is bound to the interface between the CMUTs and the fluid. This is confirmed by measurements of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient of this wave. The measurement results indicate that the wave exists up to a maximum frequency and that the attenuation constant increases with increasing frequency. Rapeseed oil causes a significantly larger attenuation coefficient than kerosene, which most probably is due to a considerable difference in fluid viscosities. There was a mismatch between the simulated and measured phase velocity for low frequencies. It is likely that the cause of this is coupling between the fluid CMUT interface waves and Lamb waves in the substrate of the CMUT array. Measurements performed with the heterodyne interferometer have confirmed the presence of dispersive waves bound to the surface of the transducer by directly showing their propagation along the array. The setup has also characterized the bound waves by measuring dispersion relations.

  2. Octave Bandwidth Orthomode Transducers for the Expanded Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutts, Gordon M.

    2011-06-01

    Quadruple-ridge orthomode transducers (OMTs) have been designed to operate over a full octave bandwidth for the expanded very large array (EVLA) project. The OMT separates linearly polarized signal components by matching a circular waveguide input to two orthogonal coaxial outputs. The OMT is used in conjunction with a quadrature hybrid to detect circularly polarized signal components. This paper focuses on the 1 GHz-2 GHz L-Band OMT design, which has better than 18.8 dB measured return loss across the band, with no evidence of trapped-mode resonances. The OMT is designed with an emphasis on performance, ease of tuning and manufacturability since a large number of units are needed for the array application. Extensive parametric analyses were carried out, and nominal dimensions have been set to ensure the devices exceed RF specifications provided the parts are machined to within specified tolerances. With excellent wideband performance and a simplified manufacturing process, the proposed OMT would be amenable to much larger future array projects.

  3. Volumetric Security Alarm Based on a Spherical Ultrasonic Transducer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, Umut; Scaini, Davide; Arteaga, Daniel

    Most of the existent alarm systems depend on physical or visual contact. The detection area is often limited depending on the type of the transducer, creating blind spots. Our proposition is a truly volumetric alarm system that can detect any movement in the intrusion area, based on monitoring the change over time of the impulse response of the room, which acts as an acoustic footprint. The device depends on an omnidirectional ultrasonic transducer array emitting sweep signals to calculate the impulse response in short intervals. Any change in the room conditions is monitored through a correlation function. The sensitivity of the alarm to different objects and different environments depends on the sweep duration, sweep bandwidth, and sweep interval. Successful detection of intrusions also depends on the size of the monitoring area and requires an adjustment of emitted ultrasound power. Strong air flow affects the performance of the alarm. A method for separating moving objects from strong air flow is devised using an adaptive thresholding on the correlation function involving a series of impulse response measurements. The alarm system can be also used for fire detection since air flow sourced from heating objects differ from random nature of the present air flow. Several measurements are made to test the integrity of the alarm in rooms sizing from 834-2080m3 with irregular geometries and various objects. The proposed system can efficiently detect intrusion whilst adequate emitting power is provided.

  4. Breathing-Mode Ceramic Element for Therapeutic Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsu, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2011-07-01

    A new concept of piezoceramic array transducer element using breathing mode has been proposed for therapeutic application. Finite element numerical simulation showed that a concave hemispherical piezoceramic shell with a diameter slightly larger than the wavelength in water is effective for obtaining good acoustic matching with water. A hemispherical piezoceramic element with an inner diameter of 4.0 mm and a thickness of 0.2-0.4 mm produced more than several times higher acoustic power output than a conventional thickness-mode element at the same drive voltage in the simulation. Its good acoustic matching with water is considered to be accomplished by the combined resonance with the spherical bulk of water half covered by the shell, because the resonance was very sensitive to the change in sound speed of the virtual material replacing water with the same acoustic impedance in simulation.

  5. Visualization and simulation of a linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave using Q-switched laser and phased array transducers in a space launcher composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Choi, Mijin; Kong, Cheol-Won

    2015-04-01

    During space flights, pyrotechnic devices are used for various purposes such as separation of boosters, satellites, fairings, and stages. In particular, the prediction of high shock structural response induced by linear explosives is important for safe operation of pyrotechnic devices. In general, repetitive explosive testing using distributed accelerometers is widely used, but multiple test structures are usually necessary because they are easily damaged and not reusable. This paper pertains to a nondestructive technology to replace the damage-causing, time-consuming, expensive, dangerous, and low-repeatability explosive test with a laser-induced shock test. The method proposed in this paper predicts nondestructively the linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave, visualizes its propagation, and allows the simulation of some detonation conditions. A ballistic test based on a linear explosive and noncontact laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) as well as a nondestructive pyroshock test using laser-induced shock and PZT array sensors is performed in a 12.68-mm thick composite sandwich panel. The optimal laser-induced shock experimental conditions to predict real pyroshock response spectra (SRSs) are investigated by controlling the optical characteristics of the laser beam and adjusting the frequency bands in signal acquisition. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser-induced shock to that of the real explosive pyroshock is evaluated with the mean acceleration difference. Next, the experimentally-determined optimal conditions are applied to arbitrary points in the laser-induced shock scanning area. Finally, it is shown that the proposed method will allow nondestructive and quantitative pyroshock testing, pyroshock wave propagation visualization showing the direction and magnitude of principal wave propagation, and detonation speed simulation depending on explosive type and detonation initiation point and direction.

  6. COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR DEFECT ANALYSIS USING PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-30

    background variation. Such an approximation applied to the FFT results of Conclusion Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been...SNR values above 2.55) were statistically defective either. CONCLUSION Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been successfully applied to...4 G.P. Singh and J. W. Davies, “Multiple Transducer Ultrasonic Techniques: Phased Arrays ” In Nondestructive Testing Handbook, 2nd Ed., 7, pp. 284

  7. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  8. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array. PMID:23258939

  9. Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-03

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 11,781 3 January 2007 Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array Andrew J...Code 1516) for their discussions on Tonpilz transducer behavior Reviewed and Approved: 3 January 2007 s S. Griffin Head, Autonomous Systems and...FUNDING NUMBERS Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Hull 7. PERFORMING

  10. Phased array ghost elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  11. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  12. A comparison of methods for focusing the field of a HIFU array transducer through human ribs.

    PubMed

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2014-06-21

    A forward model, which predicts the scattering by human ribs of a multi-element high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer, was used to investigate the efficacy of a range of focusing approaches described in the literature. This forward model is based on the boundary element method and was described by Gélat et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81; 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 8471-97). The model has since been improved and features a complex surface impedance condition at the surface of the ribs. The inverse problem of focusing through the ribs was implemented on six transducer array-rib topologies and five methods of focusing were investigated, including spherical focusing, binarized apodization based on geometric ray tracing, phase conjugation and the decomposition of the time-reversal operator method. The excitation frequency was 1 MHz and the array was of spherical-section type. Both human and idealized rib topologies were considered. The merit of each method of focusing was examined. It was concluded that the constrained optimization approach offers greater potential than the other focusing methods in terms of maximizing the ratio of acoustic pressure magnitudes at the focus to those on the surface of the ribs whilst taking full advantage of the dynamic range of the phased array.

  13. Phased array performance evaluation with photoelastic visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzel, Robert; Dao, Gavin

    2014-02-18

    New instrumentation and a widening range of phased array transducer options are affording the industry a greater potential. Visualization of the complex wave components using the photoelastic system can greatly enhance understanding of the generated signals. Diffraction, mode conversion and wave front interaction, together with beam forming for linear, sectorial and matrix arrays, will be viewed using the photoelastic system. Beam focus and steering performance will be shown with a range of embedded and surface targets within glass samples. This paper will present principles and sound field images using this visualization system.

  14. A custom-made linear array transducer for photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Van Hespen, Johan; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-02-01

    A custom-made first prototype of a linear array ultrasound transducer for breast imaging is presented. Large active area transducer elements (5 mm × 5 mm) with 1 MHz resonance frequency are chosen to obtain a relatively high sensitivity. Acoustic lenses are used to enlarge the narrow acceptance angle of such transducer elements. The minimum detectable pressure, frequency bandwidth and electrical impedance of the transducer elements are characterized. The results show the transducer has a minimum detectable pressure of 0.8 Pa, which is superior than the transducers used in the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope system previously developed in our group. The bandwidth of the transducer is relative small, however it can be improved when using optimized matching layer thickness in future. We also observed a strong lateral resonance at 330 kHz, which may cause problems in various aspects for a photoacoustic imaging system. We discuss the future improvement and plans for the transducer optimizations.

  15. Phased-array radar for airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James J.; Chang, Kai

    2003-09-01

    Phased array antenna systems, which support high pulse rates and high transmit power, are well suited for radar and large-scale surveillance. Sensors and communication systems can function as the eyes and ears for ballistic missile defense applications, providing early warning of attack, target detection and identification, target tracking, and countermeasure decision. In such applications, active array radar systems that contain solid-state transmitter sources and low-noise preamplifiers for transmission and reception are preferred over the conventional radar antennas, because the phased array radar offers the advantages of power management and efficiency, reliability, signal reception, beam steering target detection. The current phased array radar designs are very large, complex and expensive and less efficient because of high RF losses in the phase control circuits used for beam scan. Several thousands of phase shifters and drivers may be required for a single system thus making the system very complex and expensive. This paper describes the phased array radar system based on high power T/R modules, wide-band radiating planar antenna elements and very low loss wide-band phase control circuits (requiring reduced power levels) for beam scan. The phase shifter design is based on micro-strip feed lines perturbed by the proximity of voltage controlled piezoelectric transducer (PET). Measured results have shown an added insertion loss of less than 1 dB for a phase shift of 450 degrees from 2 to 20 GHz. The new wideband phased array radar design provides significant reduction in size cost and weight. Compared to the conventional phased array systems, the cost saving is more than 15 to 1.

  16. An ultrasonic transducer array for velocity measurement in underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Boltryk, P; Hill, M; Keary, A; Phillips, B; Robinson, H; White, P

    2004-04-01

    A correlation velocity log (CVL) is an ultrasonic navigation aid for marine applications, in which velocity is estimated using an acoustic transmitter and a receiver array. CVLs offer advantages over Doppler velocity logs (DVLs) in many autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) applications, since they can achieve high accuracy at low velocities even during hover manoeuvres. DVLs require narrow beam widths, whilst ideal CVL transmitters have wide beam widths. This gives CVLs the potential to use lower frequencies thus permitting operation in deeper water, reducing power requirements for the same depth, or allowing the use of smaller transducers. Moving patterns in the wavefronts across a 2D receiver array are detected by calculating correlation coefficients between bottom reflections from consecutive transmitted pulses, across all combinations of receiver pairings. The position of the peak correlation value, on a surface representing receiver-pairing separations, is proportional to the vessel's displacement between pulses. A CVL aimed primarily for AUVs has been developed. Its acoustical and signal processing design has been optimised through sea trials and computer modelling of the sound field. This computer model is also used to predict how the distribution of the correlation coefficients varies with distance from the peak position. Current work seeks to increase the resolution of the peak estimate using surface fitting methods. Numerical simulations suggest that peak estimation methods significantly improve system precision when compared with simply identifying the position of the maximum correlation coefficient in the dataset. The peak position may be estimated by fitting a quadratic model to the measured data using least squares or maximum likelihood estimation. Alternatively, radial basis functions and Gaussian processes successfully predict the peak position despite variation between individual correlation datasets. This paper summarises the CVL's main acoustical

  17. Applications of Flexible Ultrasonic Transducer Array for Defect Detection at 150 °C

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Jeanne-Louise; Wu, Kuo-Ting; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Chiu, Chun-Hsiung; Tzeng, Jing-Chi; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using a one dimensional 16-element flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array for nondestructive testing at 150 °C is demonstrated. The FUT arrays were made by a sol-gel sprayed piezoelectric film technology; a PZT composite film was sprayed on a titanium foil of 75 μm thickness. Since the FUT array is flexible, it was attached to a steel pipe with an outer diameter of 89 mm and a wall thickness of 6.5 mm at 150 °C. Using the ultrasonic pulse-echo mode, pipe thickness measurements could be performed. Moreover, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes of each element of FUT array, the defect detection was performed on an Al alloy block of 30 mm thickness with a side-drilled hole (SDH) of ϕ3 mm at 150 °C. In addition, a post-processing algorithm based on the total focusing method was used to process the full matrix of these A-scan signals of each single transmitter and multi-receivers, and then the phase-array image was obtained to indicate this defect- SDH. Both results show the capability of FUT array being operated at 150 °C for the corrosion and defect detections. PMID:23322101

  18. Applications of flexible ultrasonic transducer array for defect detection at 150 °C.

    PubMed

    Shih, Jeanne-Louise; Wu, Kuo-Ting; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Chiu, Chun-Hsiung; Tzeng, Jing-Chi; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei

    2013-01-15

    In this study, the feasibility of using a one dimensional 16-element flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array for nondestructive testing at 150 °C is demonstrated. The FUT arrays were made by a sol-gel sprayed piezoelectric film technology; a PZT composite film was sprayed on a titanium foil of 75 µm thickness. Since the FUT array is flexible, it was attached to a steel pipe with an outer diameter of 89 mm and a wall thickness of 6.5 mm at 150 °C. Using the ultrasonic pulse-echo mode, pipe thickness measurements could be performed. Moreover, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes of each element of FUT array, the defect detection was performed on an Al alloy block of 30 mm thickness with a side-drilled hole (SDH) of f3 mm at 150 °C. In addition, a post-processing algorithm based on the total focusing method was used to process the full matrix of these A-scan signals of each single transmitter and multi-receivers, and then the phase-array image was obtained to indicate this defect- SDH. Both results show the capability of FUT array being operated at 150 °C for the corrosion and defect detections.

  19. Theory and operation of 2-D array piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Chou, Derrick R; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (pMUTs) are a new approach for the construction of 2-D arrays for forward-looking 3-D intravascular (IVUS) and intracardiac (ICE) imaging. Two-dimensional pMUT test arrays containing 25 elements (5 x 5 arrays) were bulk micromachined in silicon substrates. The devices consisted of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film membranes formed by deep reactive ion etching of the silicon substrate. Element widths ranged from 50 to 200 microm with pitch from 100 to 300 mum. Acoustic transmit properties were measured in de-ionized water with a calibrated hydrophone placed at a range of 20 mm. Measured transmit frequencies for the pMUT elements ranged from 4 to 13 MHz, and mode of vibration differed for the various element sizes. Element capacitance varied from 30 to over 400 pF depending on element size and PZT thickness. Smaller element sizes generally produced higher acoustic transmit output as well as higher frequency than larger elements. Thicker PZT layers also produced higher transmit output per unit electric field applied. Due to flexure mode operation above the PZT coercive voltage, transmit output increased nonlinearly with increased drive voltage. The pMUT arrays were attached directly to the Duke University T5 Phased Array Scanner to produce real-time pulse-echo B-mode images with the 2-D pMUT arrays.

  20. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  1. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  2. UAVSAR Phased Array Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Zawadzki, Mark; Sadowy, Greg; Oakes, Eric; Brown, Kyle; Hodges, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a patch antenna array for an L-band repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) instrument that is to be flown on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The antenna operates at a center frequency of 1.2575 GHz and with a bandwidth of 80 MHz, consistent with a number of radar instruments that JPL has previously flown. The antenna is designed to radiate orthogonal linear polarizations in order to facilitate fully-polarimetric measurements. Beam-pointing requirements for repeat-pass SAR interferometry necessitate electronic scanning in azimuth over a range of -20degrees in order to compensate for aircraft yaw. Beam-steering is accomplished by transmit/receive (T/R) modules and a beamforming network implemented in a stripline circuit board. This paper, while providing an overview of phased array architecture, focuses on the electromagnetic design of the antenna tiles and associated interconnects. An important aspect of the design of this antenna is that it has an amplitude taper of 10dB in the elevation direction. This is to reduce multipath reflections from the wing that would otherwise be detrimental to interferometric radar measurements. This taper is provided by coupling networks in the interconnect circuits as opposed to attenuating the output of the T/R modules. Details are given of material choices and fabrication techniques that meet the demanding environmental conditions that the antenna must operate in. Predicted array performance is reported in terms of co-polarized and crosspolarized far-field antenna patterns, and also in terms of active reflection coefficient.

  3. Thin catheter bending in the direction perpendicular to ultrasound propagation using two-dimensional array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Ushimizu, Hidetaka; Miyazawa, Shinya; Tsurui, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Kohji

    2017-07-01

    Although we have already experimented on the bending of a thin catheter with acoustic radiation force using a single transducer, it is necessary to develop a method of bending a catheter in an arbitrary direction because the installation position of ultrasound transducers on a body surface is limited for application to various shapes of in vivo blood vessels. Therefore, we examined the bending of a thin catheter in the direction perpendicular to ultrasound propagation using a two-dimensional array transducer (1 MHz), which realizes not only the temporospatial design but also the dynamic variation of acoustic fields. Forming two focal points with opposite phases, where the amplitudes of the two points instantaneously have the positive and negative relationship, we confirmed the bending of a thin catheter in the direction perpendicular to ultrasound propagation. We used a thin catheter (diameter, 200 µm length, 50 mm) to obtain the maximum displacement of 220 µm, where the displacement was proportional to the square of the maximum sound pressure and the duty ratio. From these results, the acoustic energy densities observed in front of and behind the catheter are dominant for the bending of the thin catheter independent of ultrasound propagation. We also found that the distance between two focal points may improve the bending performance without requiring a precise position setting.

  4. Analysis of the crosstalk in an underwater planar array transducer by the equivalent circuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Seonghun; Roh, Yongrae

    2017-07-01

    A planar array transducer consists of several transducers arranged on an acoustic window, which causes crosstalk. The crosstalk is a phenomenon in which the acoustic pressure generated by a projector is transferred to adjacent hydrophones through the acoustic window and the transferred pressure generates noise signals in the hydrophones. The performance of the planar array transducer is deteriorated due to this acoustic interaction, which should be minimized for maximum array performance. Analysis of the crosstalk has been carried out with sophisticated numerical methods, which motivated the need to develop a simpler and accurate analysis method. In this work, an equivalent circuit has been developed to analyze the crosstalk level of the planar array transducer, and the validity of the developed method has been verified by comparing the result from the equivalent circuit analysis with that from finite element analysis.

  5. Breast ultrasound tomography with two parallel transducer arrays: preliminary clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Shin, Junseob; Chen, Ting; Lin, Youzuo; Intrator, Miranda; Hanson, Kenneth; Epstein, Katherine; Sandoval, Daniel; Williamson, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography has great potential to provide quantitative estimations of physical properties of breast tumors for accurate characterization of breast cancer. We design and manufacture a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays. The distance of these two transducer arrays is adjustable for scanning breasts with different sizes. The ultrasound transducer arrays are translated vertically to scan the entire breast slice by slice and acquires ultrasound transmission and reflection data for whole-breast ultrasound imaging and tomographic reconstructions. We use the system to acquire patient data at the University of New Mexico Hospital for clinical studies. We present some preliminary imaging results of in vivo patient ultrasound data. Our preliminary clinical imaging results show promising of our breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays for breast cancer imaging and characterization.

  6. Structural model of standard ultrasonic transducer array developed for FEM analysis of mechanical crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Celmer, M; Opieliński, K J; Dopierała, M

    2017-06-03

    One of the reasons of distortions in ultrasonic imaging are crosstalk effects. They can be divided into groups according to the way of their formation. One of them is constituted by mechanical crosstalk, which is propagated by a construction of a multi-element array of piezoelectric transducers. When an individual transducer is excited, mechanical vibrations are transferred to adjacent construction components, thereby stimulating neighboring transducers to an undesired operation. In order to explore ways of the propagation of such vibrations, the authors developed the FEM model of the array of piezoelectric transducers designed for calculations in COMSOL Multiphysics software. Simulations of activating individual transducers and calculated electrical voltages appearing on transducers unstimulated intentionally, were performed in the time domain in order to assess the propagation velocity of different vibration modes through the construction elements. On this basis, conclusions were drawn in terms of the participation of various construction parts of the array of piezoelectric transducers in the process of creating the mechanical crosstalk. The elaborated FEM model allowed also to examine the ways aimed at reducing the transmission of mechanical crosstalk vibrations through the components of the array. Studies showed that correct cuts in the fasteners and the front layer improve the reduction of the mechanical crosstalk effect. The model can become a helpful tool in the process of design and modifications of manufactured ultrasonic arrays particularly in terms of mechanical crosstalk reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase array calibration orthogonal phase sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorace, Ronald E. (Inventor); Reinhardt, Victor S. (Inventor); Chan, Clinton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems for calibrating an array antenna are described. The array antenna has a plurality of antenna elements each having a signal with a phase and an amplitude forming an array antenna signal. For calibration, the phase of each element signal is sequentially switched one at a time through four orthogonal phase states. At each orthogonal phase state, the power of the array antenna signal is measured. A phase and an amplitude error for each of the element signals is determined based on the power of the array antenna signal at each of the four orthogonal phase states. The phase and amplitude of each of the element signals is then adjusted by the corresponding phase and amplitude errors.

  8. Consistency check of diagnostic ultrasound transducer arrays using tissue-equivalent phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Steffen; Kopp, Andreas; Liebscher, Eckhard; Rosenfeld, Eike

    2012-05-01

    Measurements at two different types of Phantoms - a classic thread phantom and a 3D cyst phantom - were carried out to assess the technical quality of ultrasound B-scan systems. Using statistical methods we examined whether the phantoms are suitable for a consistency test of the transducer arrays. Based on simulated transducer failures it was found that in particular the detection of local of element failures in arrays turned out to be problematic.

  9. Micromachining techniques in developing high-frequency piezoelectric composite ultrasonic array transducers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Djuth, Frank T; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-12-01

    Several micromachining techniques for the fabrication of high-frequency piezoelectric composite ultrasonic array transducers are described in this paper. A variety of different techniques are used in patterning the active piezoelectric material, attaching backing material to the transducer, and assembling an electronic interconnection board for transmission and reception from the array. To establish the feasibility of the process flow, a hybrid test ultrasound array transducer consisting of a 2-D array having an 8 × 8 element pattern and a 5-element annular array was designed, fabricated, and assessed. The arrays are designed for a center frequency of ~60 MHz. The 2-D array elements are 105 × 105 μm in size with 5-μm kerfs between elements. The annular array surrounds the square 2-D array and provides the option of transmitting from the annular array and receiving with the 2-D array. Each annular array element has an area of 0.71 mm(2) with a 16-μm kerf between elements. The active piezoelectric material is (1 - x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-PT)/epoxy 1-3 composite with a PMN-PT pillar lateral dimension of 8 μm and an average gap width of ~4 μm, which was produced by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) dry etching techniques. A novel electric interconnection strategy for high-density, small-size array elements was proposed. After assembly, the array transducer was tested and characterized. The capacitance, pulse-echo responses, and crosstalk were measured for each array element. The desired center frequency of ~60 MHz was achieved and the -6-dB bandwidth of the received signal was ~50%. At the center frequency, the crosstalk between adjacent 2-D array elements was about -33 dB. The techniques described herein can be used to build larger arrays containing smaller elements.

  10. Reflector-based phase calibration of ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    van Neer, Paul L M J; Vos, Hendrik J; de Jong, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the measurement of phase transfer functions (PTFs) of piezoelectric transducers has received more attention. These PTFs are useful for e.g. coding and interference based imaging methods, and ultrasound contrast microbubble research. Several optical and acoustic methods to measure a transducer's PTF have been reported in literature. The optical methods require a setup to which not all ultrasound laboratories have access to. The acoustic methods require accurate distance and acoustic wave speed measurements. A small error in these leads to a large error in phase, e.g. an accuracy of 0.1% on an axial distance of 10cm leads to an uncertainty in the PTF measurement of ±97° at 4MHz. In this paper we present an acoustic pulse-echo method to measure the PTF of a transducer, which is based on linear wave propagation and only requires an estimate of the wave travel distance and the acoustic wave speed. In our method the transducer is excited by a monofrequency sine burst with a rectangular envelope. The transducer initially vibrates at resonance (transient regime) prior to the forcing frequency response (steady state regime). The PTF value of the system is the difference between the phases deduced from the transient and the steady state regimes. Good agreement, to within 7°, was obtained between KLM simulations and measurements on two transducers in a 1-8MHz frequency range. The reproducibility of the method was ±10°, with a systematic error of 2° at 1MHz increasing to 16° at 8MHz. This work demonstrates that the PTF of a transducer can be measured in a simple laboratory setting.

  11. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Pajek, Daniel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1–1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum −3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke. PMID:22800986

  12. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation of Double Bevel T-Joint by Tandem Array Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahata, H.; Miki, C.; Yamaguchi, R.

    2003-03-01

    The double bevel T-joint is one of the most fundamental joints of steel bridges. Double bevel T-joint can be seen at beam-column connection of bridge pier. In the Japanese specifications, the welding should be full penetration. However, weld defect of incomplete penetration could be left in the joint due to the lack of quality control in welding. Fatigue cracks can be propagated from the weld defects. The authors developed a tandem array transducer. The tandem array transducer consists of 10 elements aligned in the same direction. Tandem scanning can be simulated by the transducer. Image reconstruction of incomplete penetration by synthetic aperture focusing technique was carried out. The test results showed sufficient detectability of incomplete penetration by the tandem array transducer. Height of incomplete of penetration could be estimated.

  14. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  15. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  16. Equivalent Circuit Models for Large Arrays of Curved and Flat Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Akhbari, Sina; Sammoura, Firas; Lin, Liwei

    2016-03-01

    Equivalent circuit models of large arrays of curved (spherical shape) and flat piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUTs) have been developed for complex pMUT arrays design and analysis. The exact solutions for circuit parameters in the electromechanical domain, such as mechanical admittance, input electrical impedance, and electromechanical transformer ratio, were analytically derived. By utilizing the array solution methods previously established for the thickness-mode piezoelectric devices and capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs), the single pMUT circuit model can be extended to models for array structures. The array model includes both the self- and mutual-acoustic radiation impedances of individual transducers in the acoustic medium. Volumetric displacement, induced piezoelectric current, and pressure field can be derived with respect to the input voltage matrix, material, and geometrical properties of each individual transducer and the array structure. As such, the analytical models presented here can be used as a guideline for analyses and design evaluations of large arrays of curved and flat pMUTs efficiently and can be further generalized to evaluate other pMUT architectures in the form of single devices or arrays.

  17. 2D Transducer Array for High-Speed 3D Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    low voltage differential signaling ( LVDS ) interface and a peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus. The maximum numbers of transmission and...32-channel analog to digital converter (ADC) was attached to the developed transducer array. LVDS 2D Array Front End D a t a A c q u i s i t i o

  18. Cracks measurement using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2013-04-01

    A phased array laser ultrasound generation system by using fiber optic delivery and a custom-designed focusing objective lens has been developed for crack inspection. The enhancement of crack tip diffraction by using phased array laser ultrasound is simulated with finite element method and validated by experiment. A non-contact and non-destructive measurement of inner-surface cracks by time-of-flight diffraction method using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation and electromagnetic acoustic transducer detection has been studied.

  19. Measurement of two-phase flow momentum with force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two strain-gage-based drag transducers were developed to measure two-phase flow in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) test facilities. One transducer, a drag body (DB), was designed to measure the bidirectional average momentum flux passing through an end box. The second drag sensor, a break through detector (BTD), was designed to sense liquid downflow from the upper plenum to the core region. After prototype sensors passed numerous acceptance tests, transducers were fabricated and installed in two experimental test facilities, one in Japan and one in West Germany. High-quality data were extracted from both the DBs and BTDs for a variety of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. The information collected from these sensors has added to the understanding of the thermohydraulic phenomena that occur during the refill/reflood stage of a LOCA in a PWR. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Electro-optical processing of phased-array antenna data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Casasayas, F.

    1975-01-01

    An on-line two-dimensional optical processor has been used to process simulated linear and planar phased-array radar data off-line but at real-time data rates. The input transducer is an electron-beam-addressed KD2PO4 light valve.

  1. Investigating an alternative ring design of transducer arrays for tumor treating fields (TTFields).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Mario; Wenger, Cornelia; Salvador, Ricardo; Fernandes, Sofia R; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) is a therapy that inhibits cell proliferation and has been approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme. This anti-mitotic technique works non-invasively and regionally, and is associated with less toxicity and a better quality of life. Currently a device called Optune™ is clinically used which works with two perpendicular and alternating array pairs each consisting of 3×3 transducers. The aim of this study is to investigate a theoretical alternative array design which consists of two rings of 16 transducers and thus permits various field directions. A realistic human head model with isotropic tissues was used to simulate the electric field distribution induced by the two types of array layouts. One virtual tumour was modelled as a sphere in the white matter close to one lateral ventricle. Four alternative ring design directions were evaluated by activating arrays of 2×2 transducers on opposite sides of the head. The same amount of current was passed through active transducer arrays of the Optune system and the ring design. The electric field distribution in the brain differs for the various array configurations, with higher fields between activated transducer pairs and lower values in distant areas. Nonetheless, the average electric field strength values in the tumour are comparable for the various configurations. Values between 1.00 and 1.91 V/cm were recorded, which are above the threshold for effective treatment. Increasing the amount of field directions could possibly also increase treatment efficacy, because TTFields' effect on cancer cells is highest when the randomly distributed cell division axis is aligned with the field. The results further predict that slightly changing transducer positions only has a minor effect on the electric field. Thus patients might have some freedom to adjust array positions without major concern for treatment efficacy.

  2. Phase multiplying electronic scanning array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning array was designed with properties of low RF loss and phase control. The array consists of a series of special waveguides, hybrids made up of two variable reactance branch arms for input signals, an edge slot for the difference port, and a sum arm for the unradiated signal.

  3. Phased array observations with infield phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudale, Sanjay; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-07-01

    We present results from pulsar observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as a phased array with infield phasing. The antennas were kept in phase throughout the observation by applying antenna based phase corrections derived from visibilities that were obtained in parallel with the phased array beam data, and which were flagged and calibrated in real time using a model for the continuum emission in the target field. We find that, as expected, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) does not degrade with time. In contrast observations in which the phasing is done only at the start of the observation show a clear degradation of the SNR with time. We find that this degradation is well fit by a function of the form SNR (τ ) = α + β e^{-(τ /τ 0)^{5/3}}, which corresponds to the case where the phase drifts are caused by Kolmogorov type turbulence in the ionosphere. We also present general formulae (i.e. including the effects of correlated sky noise, imperfect phasing and self noise) for the SNR and synthesized beam size for phased arrays (as well as corresponding formulae for incoherent arrays). These would be useful in planning observations with large array telescopes.

  4. Phased array observations with infield phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudale, Sanjay; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-10-01

    We present results from pulsar observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as a phased array with infield phasing. The antennas were kept in phase throughout the observation by applying antenna based phase corrections derived from visibilities that were obtained in parallel with the phased array beam data, and which were flagged and calibrated in real time using a model for the continuum emission in the target field. We find that, as expected, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) does not degrade with time. In contrast observations in which the phasing is done only at the start of the observation show a clear degradation of the SNR with time. We find that this degradation is well fit by a function of the form SNR(τ ) = α + β e^{-(τ /τ 0)^{5/3}}, which corresponds to the case where the phase drifts are caused by Kolmogorov type turbulence in the ionosphere. We also present general formulae (i.e. including the effects of correlated sky noise, imperfect phasing and self noise) for the SNR and synthesized beam size for phased arrays (as well as corresponding formulae for incoherent arrays). These would be useful in planning observations with large array telescopes.

  5. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  6. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas J.; Sliteris, Reimondas; Sestoke, Justina

    2017-01-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz) wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer −11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space. PMID:28067807

  7. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas J; Sliteris, Reimondas; Sestoke, Justina

    2017-01-06

    Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz) wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer -11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space.

  8. High-frequency transducer arrays for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Tutwiler, Richard L.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2000-04-01

    This paper discusses the design, fabrication, testing, and simulated imaging performance of high frequency linear arrays. Both a 2 - 2 PZT composite array with a fine spatial scale and a PbTiO3 array have been investigated at 30 MHz. The composite array demonstrated a seven-fold increase in sensitivity over the PbTiO3 array, as well as increased bandwidth and reduced crosstalk. The electrical impedance magnitude of the composite array was 56 ohms at 30 MHz, and the measured insertion loss was -14 dB. Simulated results demonstrate excellent lateral and axial resolution when imaging a phantom using a synthetic aperture approach. A 35 MHz device is also under development. An interconnect method using a flex circuit and sputtered metal films is used to electrically connect to each element. A curve fitting technique was then used to characterize elements of the array. Electromechanical coupling coefficients from 0.55 to 0.62 and clamped relative permittivities ((epsilon) 33S,/(epsilon) 0) from 1200 to 2000 were observed.

  9. Micromachining Techniques in Developing High-Frequency Piezoelectric Composite Ultrasonic Array Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Djuth, Frank T.; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Several micromachining techniques for the fabrication of high-frequency piezoelectric composite ultrasonic array transducers are described in this paper. A variety of different techniques are used in patterning the active piezoelectric material, attaching backing material to the transducer, and assembling an electronic interconnection board for transmission and reception from the array. To establish the feasibility of the process flow, a hybrid test ultrasound array transducer consisting of a 2-D array having an 8 × 8 element pattern and a 5-element annular array was designed, fabricated, and assessed. The arrays are designed for a center frequency of ~60 MHz. The 2-D array elements are 105 × 105 μm in size with 5-μm kerfs between elements. The annular array surrounds the square 2-D array and provides the option of transmitting from the annular array and receiving with the 2-D array. Each annular array element has an area of 0.71 mm2 with a 16-μm kerf between elements. The active piezoelectric material is (1 − x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3−xPbTiO3 (PMN-PT)/epoxy 1–3 composite with a PMN-PT pillar lateral dimension of 8 μm and an average gap width of ~4 μm, which was produced by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) dry etching techniques. A novel electric interconnection strategy for high-density, small-size array elements was proposed. After assembly, the array transducer was tested and characterized. The capacitance, pulse–echo responses, and crosstalk were measured for each array element. The desired center frequency of ~60 MHz was achieved and the −6-dB bandwidth of the received signal was ~50%. At the center frequency, the crosstalk between adjacent 2-D array elements was about −33 dB. The techniques described herein can be used to build larger arrays containing smaller elements. PMID:24297027

  10. Design and Fabrication of a Wide-Aperture HIFU Annular Array Transducer for the Treatment of Deep-Seated Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gin-Shin; Chang, Hsu; Kuo, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Winli; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Tseng, Wen-Yih

    2011-09-01

    In HIFU treatment applications, the annular array transducer is a feasible solution for the clinical/engineering requirements which are as follows: ablation of tumors deep inside body, electronic dynamic focusing in the depth direction, simple configuration/operation, and lower cost due to fewer elements/channels of amplifier. A 12 cm-diameter, 12 cm-radius-of-curvature annular array transducer has been developed in this study. The pseudo-inverse method was adopted to calculate the desired phase of each element for focusing, and the Rayleigh-Summerfield integral was used to obtain the ultrasonic pressure field. In the simulation, the operating frequency was 0.9 MHz, and the acoustic medium was water. A piece of 1-3 piezocomposite was fabricated using the dice and fill technique for the pilot test. The dimension of the sample was 4×2 cm, and it was thermally shaped using a spherical mold of 12 cm in radius. The results of the simulation showed that the focus could not be moved electronically in the depth direction until the number of elements (annuli) was equal to or higher than 5, and the dynamic focusing range increased as the number of elements increased. The intensity at the acoustic window or skin was also estimated from the simulated results and was only 0.03% of the intensity at focus. The curved composite sample was tested using an impedance analyser and a radiation force balance. The resonant frequency and electro-acoustic efficiency were measured to be 0.914 MHz and 65%, respectively. The results of the simulation can provide a design guideline for the development of different-size HIFU annular array transducers. A prototype of the HIFU annular array transducer designed is being fabricated in-house.

  11. Composite ultrasound transducer arrays for operation above 20 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Geng, Xuecang; Lopath, Patrick D.; Tutwiler, Richard L.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-06-01

    Methods for fabricating and modeling high frequency 2-2 composites and arrays are presented. The composites are suitable for arrays and small aperture single element devices operating above 20 MHz. Coupling coefficients above 0.65 and lateral mode frequencies near 60 MHz were achieved with this composite. Backing and matching materials were prepared to provide up to 70% bandwidth and coaxial cable was used to impedance match the elements to a 50 ohm source. A TPX lens was fabricated and bonded to the face to provide focusing in the elevation direction. Three prototype 4 element 30 MHz linear arrays were designed and built. The designs were analyzed in a time domain finite element analysis program and excellent agreement between theory and experiment was achieved.

  12. Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer (PMUT) Arrays for Integrated Sensing, Actuation and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Gigliotti, James V.; Wallace, Margeaux; Griggio, Flavio; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Many applications of ultrasound for sensing, actuation and imaging require miniaturized and low power transducers and transducer arrays integrated with electronic systems. Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (PMUTs), diaphragm-like thin film flexural transducers typically formed on silicon substrates, are a potential solution for integrated transducer arrays. This paper presents an overview of the current development status of PMUTs and a discussion of their suitability for miniaturized and integrated devices. The thin film piezoelectric materials required to functionalize these devices are discussed, followed by the microfabrication techniques used to create PMUT elements and the constraints the fabrication imposes on device design. Approaches for electrical interconnection and integration with on-chip electronics are discussed. Electrical and acoustic measurements from fabricated PMUT arrays with up to 320 diaphragm elements are presented. The PMUTs are shown to be broadband devices with an operating frequency which is tunable by tailoring the lateral dimensions of the flexural membrane or the thicknesses of the constituent layers. Finally, the outlook for future development of PMUT technology and the potential applications made feasible by integrated PMUT devices are discussed. PMID:25855038

  13. MRI-compatible ultrasound heating system with ring-shaped phased arrays for breast tumor thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Nien; Chen, Guan-Ming; Lin, Bo-Sian; Lien, Pi-Hsien; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Chen, Gin-Shin; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound transducers can carry out precise and efficient power deposition for tumor thermal therapy under the guidance of magnetic resonance imaging. For a better heating, organ-specific ultrasound transducers with precision location control system should be developed for tumors located at various organs. It is feasible to perform a better heating for breast tumor thermal therapy with a ring-shaped ultrasound phased-array transducer. In this study, we developed ring-shaped phased-array ultrasound transducers with 1.0 and 2.5 MHz and a precision location control system to drive the transducers to the desired location to sonicate the designated region. Both thermo-sensitive hydrogel phantom and ex vivo fresh pork were used to evaluate the heating performance of the transducers. The results showed that the ring-shaped phased array ultrasound transducers were very promising for breast tumor heating with the variation of heating patterns and without overheating the ribs.

  14. Phase-locked laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, Dan (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A phase-locked laser array comprises a body of semiconductor material having means for defining a plurality of substantially parallel lasing zones which are spaced an effective distance apart so that the modes of the adjacent lasing zones are phase-locked to one another. One of the array electrodes comprises a plurality of electrical contacts to the body between the lasing zones. These contacts provide an enhanced current density profile and thus an increase in the gain in the regions between the lasing zones so that zero degree phase-shift operation between adjacent lasing zones is achievable.

  15. 7.5 MHz dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T

    2011-07-01

    The difficulties associated with fabrication and interconnection have limited the development of 2-D ultrasound transducer arrays with a large number ofelements (>5000). In previous work, we described a 5 MHz center frequency PZT-P[VDF-TrFE] dual-layer transducer that used two perpendicular 1-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging. This design substantially reduces the channel count as well as fabrication complexity, which makes 3-D imaging more realizable. Higher frequencies (>5 MHz) are more commonly used in clinical applications or imaging targets near transducers, such as the breast, carotid and musculoskeletal tissue. In this paper, we present a 7.5 MHz dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging. A modified acoustic stack model was designed and fabricated. PZT elements were sub-diced to eliminate lateral coupling. This sub-dicing process made the PZT into a 2-2 composite material, which could help improve transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. Full synthetic-aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics data-acquisition system (VDAS). Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of a multiwire phantom and a cyst phantom. The generalized coherence factor (GCF) was applied to improve the contrast of cyst images. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 71% with a center frequency of 7.5 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 0.521 mm and 0.482 mm in azimuth and elevation, respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.43 mm.

  16. A 7.5 MHz Dual-Layer Transducer Array for 3-D Rectilinear Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T.

    2011-01-01

    The difficulties associated with fabrication and interconnection have limited the development of 2-D ultrasound transducer arrays with a large number of elements (>5000). In previous work, we described a 5 MHz center frequency PZT-P[VDF-TrFE] dual-layer transducer, which used 2 perpendicular 1-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging. This design substantially reduces the channel count as well as fabrication complexity, which makes 3-D imaging more realizable. Higher frequencies (>5MHz) are more commonly used in clinical for imaging targets near transducers such as the breast, carotid, and musculoskeletal. In this paper, we present a 7.5 MHz dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging. A modified acoustic stack model was designed and fabricated. PZT elements were sub-diced to eliminate lateral coupling. This sub-dicing process made the PZT into a 2–2 composite material, which could help improve transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. Full synthetic aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics data acquisition system (VDAS). Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of a multi-wire phantom and a cyst phantom. The generalized coherence factor (GCF) was applied to improve the contrast of cyst images. The measured −6 dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 71% with a center frequency of 7.5 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 0.521 mm and 0.482 mm in azimuth and elevation respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.43 mm. PMID:21842584

  17. Dependence of local sound vibration on time frequency in a monolithic array transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Saiga, N.; Suzuki, T.

    1982-02-01

    An approach of increasing spatial resolution in a monolithic array transducer was carried out which utilized the thickness vibration at frequencies slightly lower than the resonance band. At those frequencies, the optical probing manifested that an usual spatial impulse response shifted into a more sharp and monotonously damping one with a peak amplitude comparable to those in resonance. An actual imaging as a receiving array demonstrated the improvement of spatial resolution and the high uniformity of image contrast.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of the human forearm using 40 MHz linear-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán.; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2014-02-01

    In this work photoacoustic imaging (PAI) based on multi element linear-array transducer, combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo imaging of microcirculation of the human forearm. The Vevo® 2100 LAZR PAT system (VISUALSONICS) was used for imaging which simultaneously collects high-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. 3D PA and high frequency ultrasound scans, measured 30.5 mm (length) x 14.1 mm (width) x 10 mm (depth) were acquired from the area of forearm skin using 40 MHz frequency transducer at 860 nm wavelength. 3D structural and functional (microcirculation) maps of the forearm skin were obtained. The multi element linear-array transducer based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin.

  19. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  20. Ultrasound therapy transducers with space-filling non-periodic arrays.

    PubMed

    Raju, Balasundar I; Hall, Christopher S; Seip, Ralf

    2011-05-01

    Ultrasound transducers designed for therapeutic purposes such as tissue ablation, histotripsy, or drug delivery require large apertures for adequate spatial localization while providing sufficient power and steerability without the presence of secondary grating lobes. In addition, it is highly preferred to minimize the total number of channels and to maintain simplicity in electrical matching network design. To this end, we propose array designs that are both space-filling and non-periodic in the placement of the elements. Such array designs can be generated using the mathematical concept of non-periodic or aperiodic tiling (tessellation) and can lead to reduced grating lobes while maintaining full surface area coverage to deliver maximum power. For illustration, we designed two 2-D space-filling therapeutic arrays with 128 elements arranged on a spherical shell. One was based on the two-shape Penrose rhombus tiling, and the other was based on a single rectangular shape arranged non-periodically. The steerability performance of these arrays was studied using acoustic field simulations. For comparison, we also studied two other arrays, one with circular elements distributed randomly, and the other a periodic array with square elements. Results showed that the two space-filling non-periodic arrays were able to steer to treat a volume of 16 x 16 x 20 mm while ensuring that the grating lobes were under -10 dB compared with the main lobe. The rectangular non-periodic array was able to generate two and half times higher power than the random circles array. The rectangular array was then fabricated by patterning the array using laser scribing methods and its steerability performance was validated using hydrophone measurements. This work demonstrates that the concept of space-filling aperiodic/non-periodic tiling can be used to generate therapy arrays that are able to provide higher power for the same total transducer area compared with random arrays while maintaining

  1. A Dual-Layer Transducer Array for 3-D Rectilinear Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jesse T.; Seo, Chi Hyung; Awad, Samer I.; Jeong, Jong S.

    2010-01-01

    2-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging require very large element counts (16,000–65,000). The difficulties in fabricating and interconnecting 2-D arrays with a large number of elements (>5,000) have limited the development of suitable transducers for 3-D rectilinear imaging. In this paper, we propose an alternative solution to this problem by using a dual-layer transducer array design. This design consists of two perpendicular 1-D arrays for clinical 3-D imaging of targets near the transducer. These targets include the breast, carotid artery, and musculoskeletal system. This transducer design reduces the fabrication complexity and the channel count making 3-D rectilinear imaging more realizable. With this design, an effective N × N 2-D array can be developed using only N transmitters and N receivers. This benefit becomes very significant when N becomes greater than 128, for example. To demonstrate feasibility, we constructed a 4 × 4 cm prototype dual-layer array. The transmit array uses diced PZT-5H elements, and the receive array is a single sheet of undiced P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer. The receive elements are defined by the copper traces on the flexible interconnect circuit. The measured −6 dB fractional bandwidth was 80% with a center frequency of 4.8 MHz. At 5 MHz, the nearest neighbor crosstalk of the PZT array and PVDF array was −30.4 ± 3.1 dB and −28.8 ± 3.7 dB respectively. This dual-layer transducer was interfaced with an Ultrasonix Sonix RP system, and a synthetic aperture 3-D data set was acquired. We then performed off-line 3-D beamforming to obtain volumes of nylon wire targets. The theoretical lateral beamwidth was 0.52 mm compared to measured beamwidths of 0.65 mm and 0.67 mm in azimuth and elevation respectively. 3-D images of an 8 mm diameter anechoic cyst phantom were also acquired. PMID:19213647

  2. A dual-layer transducer array for 3-D rectilinear imaging.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jesse T; Seo, Chi Hyung; Awad, Samer I; Jeong, Jong S

    2009-01-01

    Very large element counts (16,000-65,000) are required for 2-D arrays for 3-D rectilinear imaging. The difficulties in fabricating and interconnecting 2-D arrays with a large number of elements (>5,000) have limited the development of suitable transducers for 3-D rectilinear imaging. In this paper, we propose an alternative solution to this problem by using a dual-layer transducer array design. This design consists of 2 perpendicular 1-D arrays for clinical 3-D imaging of targets near the transducer. These targets include the breast, carotid artery, and musculoskeletal system. This transducer design reduces the fabrication complexity and the channel count, making 3-D rectilinear imaging more realizable. With this design, an effective N x N 2-D array can be developed using only N transmitters and N receivers. This benefit becomes very significant when N becomes greater than 128, for example. To demonstrate feasibility, we constructed a 4 x 4 cm prototype dual-layer array. The transmit array uses diced PZT-5H elements, and the receive array is a single sheet of undiced P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer. The receive elements are defined by the copper traces on the flexible interconnect circuit. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth was 80% with a center frequency of 4.8 MHz. At 5 MHz, the nearest neighbor crosstalk of the PZT array and PVDF array was -30.4 +/- 3.1 dB and -28.8 +/- 3.7 dB, respectively. This dual-layer transducer was interfaced with an Ultrasonix Sonix RP system, and a synthetic aperture 3-D data set was acquired. We then performed offline 3-D beamforming to obtain volumes of nylon wire targets. The theoretical lateral beamwidth was 0.52 mm compared with measured beamwidths of 0.65 mm and 0.67 mm in azimuth and elevation, respectively. Then, 3-D images of an 8 mm diameter anechoic cyst phantom were also acquired.

  3. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  4. Airborne ultrasonic phased arrays using ferroelectrets: a new fabrication approach.

    PubMed

    Ealo, Joao L; Camacho, Jorge J; Fritsch, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    In this work, a novel procedure that considerably simplifies the fabrication process of ferroelectret-based multielement array transducers is proposed and evaluated. Also, the potential of ferroelectrets being used as active material for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer design is demonstrated. The new construction method of multi-element transducers introduces 2 distinctive improvements. First, active ferroelectret material is not discretized into elements, and second, the need of structuring upper and/or lower electrodes in advance of the permanent polarization of the film is removed. The aperture discretization and the mechanical connection are achieved in one step using a through-thickness conductive tape. To validate the procedure, 2 linear array prototypes of 32 elements, with a pitch of 3.43 mm and a wide usable frequency range from 30 to 300 kHz, were built and evaluated using a commercial phased-array system. A low crosstalk among elements, below -30 dB, was measured by interferometry. Likewise, a homogeneous response of the array elements, with a maximum deviation of +/-1.8 dB, was obtained. Acoustic beam steering measurements were accomplished at different deflection angles using a calibrated microphone. The ultrasonic beam parameters, namely, lateral resolution, side lobe level, grating lobes, and focus depth, were congruent with theory. Acoustic images of a single reflector were obtained using one of the array elements as the receiver. Resulting images are also in accordance with numerical simulation, demonstrating the feasibility of using these arrays in pulse-echo mode. The proposed procedure simplifies the manufacturing of multidimensional arrays with arbitrary shape elements and not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, this concept can be extended to nonflat arrays as long as the transducer substrate conforms to a developable surface.

  5. Preliminary work of real-time ultrasound imaging system for 2-D array transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has emerged as a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide anatomical structure information in real time. To enable the experimental analysis of new 2-D array ultrasound beamforming methods, a pre-beamformed parallel raw data acquisition system was developed for 3-D data capture of 2D array transducer. The transducer interconnection adopted the row-column addressing (RCA) scheme, where the columns and rows were active in sequential for transmit and receive events, respectively. The DAQ system captured the raw data in parallel and the digitized data were fed through the field programmable gate array (FPGA) to implement the pre-beamforming. Finally, 3-D images were reconstructed through the devised platform in real-time.

  6. Multi-particle trapping and manipulation by a high-frequency array transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Changyang; Kim, Hyung Ham Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-11-24

    We report the multiple micro-particle trapping and manipulation by a single-beam acoustic tweezer using a high-frequency array transducer. A single acoustic beam generated by a 30 MHz ultrasonic linear array transducer can entrap and transport multiple micro-particles located at the main lobe and the grating lobes. The distance between trapped particles can be adjusted by changing the transmit arrangement of array-based acoustic tweezers and subsequently the location of grating lobes. The experiment results showed that the proposed method can trap and manipulate multiple particles within a range of hundreds of micrometers. Due to its simplicity and low acoustic power, which is critical to protect cells from any thermal and mechanical damages, the technique may be used for transportation of cells in cell biology, biosensors, and tissue engineering.

  7. Multi-particle trapping and manipulation by a high-frequency array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Kim, Hyung Ham; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    We report the multiple micro-particle trapping and manipulation by a single-beam acoustic tweezer using a high-frequency array transducer. A single acoustic beam generated by a 30 MHz ultrasonic linear array transducer can entrap and transport multiple micro-particles located at the main lobe and the grating lobes. The distance between trapped particles can be adjusted by changing the transmit arrangement of array-based acoustic tweezers and subsequently the location of grating lobes. The experiment results showed that the proposed method can trap and manipulate multiple particles within a range of hundreds of micrometers. Due to its simplicity and low acoustic power, which is critical to protect cells from any thermal and mechanical damages, the technique may be used for transportation of cells in cell biology, biosensors, and tissue engineering. PMID:25489120

  8. Diffraction aperture non-ideal behaviour of air coupled transducers array elements designed for NDT.

    PubMed

    Prego Borges, J L; Montero de Espinosa, F; Salazar, J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Chávez, J A; Turó, A; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    Air coupled piezoelectric ultrasonic array transducers are a novel tool that could lead to interesting advances in the area of non-contact laminar material testing using Lamb wave's propagation techniques. A key issue on the development of such transducers is their efficient coupling to air media (impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and air is 90 dB or more). Adaptation layers are used in order to attain good matching and avoid possible serious signal degradation. However, the introduction of these matching layers modify the transducer surface behaviour and, consequently, radiation characteristics are altered, making the usual idealization criteria (of uniform surface movement) adopted for field simulation purposes inaccurate. In our system, we have a concave linear-array transducer of 64 elements (electrically coupled by pairs) working at 0.8 MHz made of PZ27 rectangular piezoceramics (15 mm x 0.3 mm) with two matching layers made of polyurethane and porous cellulose bonded on them. Experimental measurements of the acoustic aperture of single excited array elements have shown an increment on the geometrical dimensions of its active surface. A sub-millimeter vibrometer laser scan has revealed an extension of the aperture beyond the supposed physical single array element dimensions. Non-uniform symmetric apodized velocity surface vibration amplitude profile with a concave delay contour indicates the presumed existence of travelling wave phenomena over the surface of the outer array matching layer. Also, asymptotic propagation velocities around 2500 m/s and attenuation coefficient between 15 and 20 dB/mm has been determined for the travelling waves showing clear tendencies. Further comparisons between the experimental measurements of single array element field radiation diagram and simulated equivalent aperture counterpart reveal good agreement versus the ideal (uniform displaced) rectangular aperture. For this purpose an Impulse Response Method

  9. Phased Array Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Bradley, Richard F.; Brisken, Walter F.; Cotton, William D.; Emerson, Darrel T.; Kerr, Anthony R.; Lacasse, Richard J.; Morgan, Matthew A.; Napier, Peter J.; Norrod, Roger D.; Payne, John M.; Pospieszalski, Marian W.; Symmes, Arthur; Thompson, A. Richard; Webber, John C.

    2009-03-01

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  10. A single-input, single-output electromagnetically-transduced microresonator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, A. B.; Hunkler, A. G.; Rhoads, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    Resonant microsystems have found broad applicability in environmental and inertial sensing, signal filtering and timing applications. Despite this breadth in utility, a common constraint on these devices is throughput, or the total amount of information that they can process. In recent years, elastically-coupled arrays of microresonators have been used to increase the throughput in sensing contexts, but these arrays are often more complicated to design than their isolated counterparts, due to the potential for collective behaviors (such as vibration localization) to arise. An alternative solution to the throughput constraint is to use arrays of electromagnetically-transduced microresonators. These arrays can be designed such that the mechanical resonances are spaced far apart and the mechanical coupling between the microresonators is insignificant. Thus, when the entire array is actuated and sensed, a resonance in the electrical response can be directly correlated to a specific microresonator vibrating, as collective behaviors have been avoided. This work details the design, analysis and experimental characterization of an electromagnetically-transduced microresonator array in both low- and atmospheric-pressure environments, and demonstrates that the system could be used as a sensor in ambient conditions. While this device has direct application as a resonant-based sensor that requires only a single source and measurement system to track multiple resonances, with simple modification, this array could find uses in tunable oscillator and frequency multiplexing contexts.

  11. A 35 MHz PCMUT phased array for NDE ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Hu, Changhong; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Ruibin; Welter, John; Shung, Kirk; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the development of a 35 MHz 64-channel Piezoelectric Composite based Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer (PCMUT) phased array for NDE ultrasound application is presented. A 35 MHz PMN-PT single crystal 1-3 composite based PC-MUT phased array was designed with extensive acoustic field and 1D modeling. The initial modeling results demonstrated that the focused detection resolution (10% of -3 dB beam width) could be as small as 30 μm in the azimuth direction. The maximum imaging depth for ceramic samples is around 20 mm. The PC-MUT array being developed will extend the state-of-art NDE phased array technology from approximately 20 MHz to 35 MHz, which will greatly enhance the imaging resolution for a broad range of NDE ultrasound applications.

  12. Non-Metallic Transducer Mounting Brackets (AN/BQQ-5/6 Spherical Array Transducers)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-15

    susceptible to moisture permeation into the bulk polymer phase, while moisture penetration into the glass-resin interface may be the predominant mechanism...material. These surface cracks appear to be present only in the hard liquid crystal polymer skin that forms during the molding of the Vectra material...Portsmouth Connector," NRL-USRD Letter Report No. 9464 to NAVSEA, 25 Apr 1988. 7. J.S. Thornton, R.E. Montgomery, and J.F. Cartier , "Failure Rate Model for

  13. Thermal-independent properties of PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal linear-array ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruimin; Wu, Jinchuan; Ho Lam, Kwok; Yao, Liheng; Zhou, Qifa; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, low-frequency 32-element linear-array ultrasonic transducers were designed and fabricated using both ternary Pb(In(1/2)Nb(1/2))-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) and binary Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))-PbTiO(3) (PMNPT) single crystals. Performance of the array transducers was characterized as a function of temperature ranging from room temperature to 160°C. It was found that the array transducers fabricated using the PIN-PMN-PT single crystal were capable of satisfactory performance at 160°C, having a -6-dB bandwidth of 66% and an insertion loss of 37 dB. The results suggest that the potential of PIN-PMN-PT linear-array ultrasonic transducers for high-temperature ultrasonic transducer applications is promising.

  14. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  15. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project is a process development task. The contract provides for the fabrication of modules from large area tandem junction cells (TJC). During this quarter, effort was focused on the design of a large area, approximately 36 sq cm, TJC and process verification runs. The large area TJC design was optimized for minimum I squared R power losses. In the TJM activity, the cell-module interfaces were defined, module substrates were formed and heat treated and clad metal interconnect strips were fabricated.

  16. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  17. A 5-MHz cylindrical dual-layer transducer array for 3-D transrectal ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T

    2012-07-01

    Two-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is being used in guiding prostate biopsies and treatments. In many cases, the TRUS probes are moved manually or mechanically to acquire volumetric information, making the imaging slow, user dependent, and unreliable. A real-time three-dimensional (3-D) TRUS system could improve reliability and volume rates of imaging during these procedures. In this article, the authors present a 5-MHz cylindrical dual-layer transducer array capable of real-time 3-D transrectal ultrasound without any mechanically moving parts. Compared with fully sampled 2-D arrays, this design substantially reduces the channel count and fabrication complexity. This dual-layer transducer uses PZT elements for transmit and P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer elements for receive, respectively. The mechanical flexibility of both diced PZT and copolymer makes it practical for transrectal applications. Full synthetic aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics Data Acquisition System. Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of two wire phantoms and a cyst phantom. Generalized coherence factor was applied to improve the contrast of images. The measured -6-dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 62% with a center frequency of 5.66 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 1.28 mm and 0.91 mm in transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.92 mm and 0.74 mm.

  18. Optical phased-array ladar.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  19. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  20. Guided wave structural health monitoring with an array of novel piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesky, A.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2014-02-01

    Multi-element, conformable piezoelectric strip transducers have been designed and fabricated for structural health monitoring using ultrasonic guided waves. The piezoelectric fiber composite elements function as a strip transducer to activate a planar wave. A mockup of a storage tank or pressure vessel has been constructed from a steel shell and a hexagonal array of strip transducers. A hot spot to which artificial damage has been induced is monitored with the strip transducers. In addition, conventional piezoelectric disks have also been affixed to the shell in a circular pattern for the purpose of comparison. Different operating conditions are represented by the presence of water inside the shell and temperature variations between 20 and 35°C. The strip transducers have been designed to excite the S1 Lamb wave mode at the dilatational wave speed, which is oblivious to the presence of liquid loaded boundary conditions. An artificial defect simulated a surface breaking fatigue crack. Preliminary results are presented for baseline and damaged conditions using transmission and reflection coefficients as a damage-sensitive feature. At the request of the Proceedings Editor, and all authors of the paper, an updated version of this article was published on 8 April 2014. The Corrigendum attached to the corrected article PDF file explains the changes made to the original paper.

  1. Effects of Non-Elevation-Focalized Linear Array Transducer on Ultrasound Plane-Wave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Xia, Jingjing; Qiu, Weibao; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    Plane-wave ultrasound imaging (PWUS) has become an important method of ultrasound imaging in recent years as its frame rate has exceeded 10,000 frames per second, allowing ultrasound to be used for two-dimensional shear wave detection and functional brain imaging. However, compared to the traditional focusing and scanning method, PWUS images always suffer from a degradation of lateral resolution and contrast. To improve the image quality of PWUS, many different beamforming algorithms have been proposed and verified. Yet the influence of transducer structure is rarely studied. For this paper, the influence of using an acoustic lens for PWUS was evaluated. Two linear array transducers were fabricated. One was not self-focalized in the elevation direction (non-elevation-focalized transducer, NEFT); the other one was a traditional elevation-focalized transducer (EFT). An initial simulation was conducted to show the influence of elevation focusing. Then the images obtained with NEFT on a standard ultrasound imaging phantom were compared with those obtained with EFT. It was demonstrated that, in a relatively deep region, the contrast of an NEFT image is better than that of an EFT image. These results indicate that a more sophisticated design of ultrasound transducer would further improve the image quality of PWUS. PMID:27845751

  2. EMAT phased array: A feasibility study of surface crack detection.

    PubMed

    Isla, J; Cegla, F

    2017-02-14

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) consist of a magnet and a coil. They are advantageous in some non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications because no direct contact with the specimen is needed to send and receive ultrasonic waves. However, EMATs commonly require excitation peak powers greater than 1kW and therefore the driving electronics and the EMAT coils have to be bulky. This has hindered the development of EMAT phased arrays with characteristics similar to those of conventional piezoelectric phased arrays. Phased arrays are widely used in NDE because they offer superior defect characterization in comparison to single-element transducers. In this paper, we report a series of novel techniques and design elements that make it possible to construct an EMAT phased array that performs similarly to conventional piezoelectric arrays used in NDE. One of the key enabling features is the use of coded excitation to reduce the excitation peak power to less than 4.8W (24 Vpp and 200mA) so that racetrack coils with dimensions 3.2×18mm(2) can be employed. Moreover, these racetrack coils are laid out along their shortest dimension so that 1/3 of their area is overlapped. This helps to reduce the crosstalk between the coils, i.e., the array elements, to less than -15dB. We show that an 8-element EMAT phased array operating at a central frequency of 1MHz can be used to detect defects which have a width and a depth of 0.2 and 0.8mm respectively and are located on the surface opposite to the array.

  3. Realistic photoacoustic image simulations of collections of solid spheres using linear array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhajit; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.; Saha, Ratan K.

    2015-03-01

    A methodology for simulating photoacoustic (PA) images of samples with solid spherical absorbers acquired using linear array transducer is described. Two types of numerical phantoms (i.e., polystyrene beads suspended in agar medium) of two different size regimes were imaged with a 40 MHz linear array transducer utilizing this approach. The frequency domain features and statistics of the simulated signals were quantified for tissue characterization. The midband fit at 40 MHz was found to be about 35 dB higher for the sample with larger beads (radius ~7.36 μm) than that of the sample with smaller particles (radius ~ 1.77 μm). The scale parameter of the generalized gamma distribution function was found to be nearly 51 times greater for the former sample compared to the latter sample. The method developed here shows potential to be used a s a fast simulation tool for the PA imaging of collection of absorbers mimicking biological tissue.

  4. Control of complex components with Smart Flexible Phased Arrays.

    PubMed

    Casula, O; Poidevin, C; Cattiaux, G; Dumas, Ph

    2006-12-22

    The inspection is mainly performed in contact with ultrasonic wedge transducers; However, the shape cannot fit the changing geometries of components (butt weld, nozzle, elbow). The variable thickness of the coupling layer, between the wedge and the local surface, leads to beam distortions and losses of sensitivity. Previous studies have shown that these two phenomena contribute to reduce the inspection performances leading to shadow area, split beam.... Flexible phased arrays have been developed to fit the complex profile and improve such controls. The radiating surface is composed with independent piezoelectric elements mechanically assembled and a profilometer, embedded in the transducer, measures the local distortion. The computed shape is used by an algorithm to compute in real-time the adapted delay laws compensating the distortions of 2D or 3D profiles. Those delay laws are transferred to the real-time UT acquisition system, which applies them to the piezoelectric elements. This self-adaptive process preserves, during the scanning, the features of the focused beam (orientation and focal depth) in the specimen. To validate the concept of the Smart Flexible Phased Array Transducer, prototypes have been integrated to detect flaws machined in mock-ups with realistic irregular 2D and 3D shapes. Inspections have been carried out on samples showing the enhancement performances of the "Smart Flexible Phased Array" and validating the mechanical and acoustical behaviors of these probes.

  5. A spacing compensation factor for the optimization of guided wave annular array transducers.

    PubMed

    Borigo, Cody; Rose, Joseph L; Yan, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Transducer arrays can be utilized in ultrasonic guided wave applications to achieve preferential excitation of particular points on a dispersion curve. These arrays are designed according to the principles of wave interference and the influence of the wavelength excitation spectrum. This paper develops the relationships between the peak wavelength in the excitation spectra and the element spacing of linear comb and annular arrays. The excitation spectra are developed by applying Fourier and Hankel transforms to the spatial loading distribution functions of the comb and annular arrays, respectively. Although the peak wavelength of excitation of a comb array is typically assumed to be equal to the element spacing, it is shown that this can be an inaccurate assumption for annular arrays. The ratio of element spacing to the peak wavelength in the excitation spectrum is termed the spacing compensation factor, and is dependent on the number of array elements and the inner radius. It is determined that the compensation factor is negligible for comb arrays but is crucial for annular arrays in order to achieve optimal mode selection. Finite element analyses and experimental data are used to verify the calculations and demonstrate the significance of the compensation factor.

  6. New Design of the Kerfs of an Ultrasonic Two-Dimensional Array Transducer to Minimize Cross-Talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonseok; Roh, Yongrae

    2010-07-01

    The transducer under consideration is a planar two-dimensional (2D) array transducer working at 3.5 MHz. The transducer is composed of 17×17 piezoelectric elements separated by major and minor kerfs. Through finite element analyses (FEA), the performance of the 2D array transducer was investigated in relation to the acoustic impedance and structure of the kerfs. Based on the analysis results, three new types of kerfs were proposed to reduce the cross-talk. Detailed material properties and structures of the new kerfs were determined to provide the lowest cross-talk level and highest pulse-echo sensitivity while preserving a desired acceptance angle at the center frequency of 3.5 MHz. The results in this work can contribute to developing a 2D array transducer which would result in having a higher signal-to-noise level, which in turn will lead to better ultrasonic imaging.

  7. New Design of the Kerfs of an Ultrasonic Two-Dimensional Array Transducer to Minimize Cross-Talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonseok Lee,; Yongrae Roh,

    2010-07-01

    The transducer under consideration is a planar two-dimensional (2D) array transducer working at 3.5 MHz. The transducer is composed of 17× 17 piezoelectric elements separated by major and minor kerfs. Through finite element analyses (FEA), the performance of the 2D array transducer was investigated in relation to the acoustic impedance and structure of the kerfs. Based on the analysis results, three new types of kerfs were proposed to reduce the cross-talk. Detailed material properties and structures of the new kerfs were determined to provide the lowest cross-talk level and highest pulse-echo sensitivity while preserving a desired acceptance angle at the center frequency of 3.5 MHz. The results in this work can contribute to developing a 2D array transducer which would result in having a higher signal-to-noise level, which in turn will lead to better ultrasonic imaging.

  8. Preparation of arc broadband piezoelectric composite vibrator and its transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Miaojie; Wang, Likun; Zhong, Chao; Qin, Lei

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an arc broadband piezoelectric composite vibrator and its transducer array. The arc broadband piezoelectric composite vibrator was fabricated by 1-3 piezoelectric composite with matching layer and was prepared by the curved forming process. The vibration characteristics of a new vibrator were simulated via finite element analysis (FEA) and investigated by experiment. First, the acoustic impedance and thickness of the optimized matching layer were determined by theoretical analysis. Second, the arc piezoelectric vibrator was modeled and simulated in air conditions by the FEA method, and the variation law of resonant frequency was analyzed. Finally, the fabrication process of the arc broadband piezoelectric composite vibrator and its transducer array was studied, and the experimental sample was fabricated and measured. The bandwidth of the arc broadband transducer array was found to be up to 56.5 kHz. Results show that the experimental results were in accordance with the simulation results and have good directivity to realize the purpose of bandwidth and beam expansion.

  9. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  10. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  11. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  12. Full-matrix capture with a customizable phased array instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Gavin; Braconnier, Dominique; Gruber, Matt

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a technique known as Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) has gained some headway in the NDE community for phased array applications. It's important to understand that FMC is the method that the instrumentation acquires the ultrasonic signals, but further post-processing is required in software to create a meaningful image for a particular application. Having a flexible software interface, small form factor, excellent signal-to-noise ratio per acquisition channel on a 64/64 or 128/128 phased array module with FMC capability proves beneficial in both industrial implementation and in further investigation of post-processing techniques. This paper will provide an example of imaging with a 5MHz linear phased array transducer with 128 elements using FMC and a popular post-processing algorithm known as Total-Focus Method (TFM).

  13. A novel method for fabrication of high-frequency (>100 MHz) ZnO ultrasonic array transducers on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. J.; Ji, X. M.; Gao, J. M.; Carlier, J.; Zhang, J. Y.; Nongaillard, B.; Huang, Y. P.; Piwakowski, B.

    2012-05-01

    High-frequency ultrasonic transducer arrays are essential for efficient imaging in clinical analysis and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). However, the fabrication of piezoelectric transducers is really a great challenge due to the small features in an array. A novel technique is presented to fabricate thick-film ZnO ultrasonic array transducers. Piezoelectric elements are formed by sputtering thick-film ZnO onto etched features of a silicon substrate so that the difficult etching process for ZnO films is avoided by etching silicon. This process is simple and efficient. A 13-μm-pitch ZnO sandwich array is achieved with a thickness of 8 μm for 300 MHz. Finite element method is employed to simulate the wave propagation in water based on this new transducer configuration. The acoustic field results indicate this configuration has an acceptable performance. A potential application is proposed based on integration with microfluidics.

  14. A simple device to couple linear array transducers to neonate heads for ultrasonic scanning of the brain.

    PubMed

    Smith, W L; Franklin, T D; Katakura, K; Patrick, J T; Fry, F J; Eggleton, R C

    1980-12-01

    A plastisol coupler has been designed that improves acoustical coupling for linear array ultrasound transducers. This device improves both ease in scanning and image quality in real-time scanning of the infant brain.

  15. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  16. A top-crossover-to-bottom addressed segmented annular array using piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joontaek; Lee, Wonjun; Kang, Woojin; Hong, Hyeryung; Yuen Song, Hi; Oh, Inn-yeal; Park, Chul Soon; Choi, Hongsoo

    2015-11-01

    We design and fabricate segmented annular arrays (SAAs) using piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUTs) to demonstrate the feasibility of acoustic focusing of ultrasound. The fabricated SAAs have 25 concentric top-electrode signal lines and eight bottom-electrodes for grounding to enable electronic steering of selectively grouped ultrasonic transducers from 2393 pMUT elements. Each element in the array is connected by top-crossover-to-bottom metal bridges, which reduce the parasitic capacitance. Circular-shaped pMUT elements, 120 μm in diameter, are fabricated using 1 μm-thick sol-gel lead zirconate titanate on a silicon wafer. To utilize the high-density pMUT array, a deep reactive ion etching process is used for anisotropic silicon etching to realize the transducer membranes. The resonant frequency and effective coupling coefficient of the elements, measured with an impedance analyzer, yields 1.517 MHz and 1.29%, respectively, in air. The SAAs using pMUTs are packaged on a printed circuit board and coated with parylene C for acoustic intensity measurements in water. The ultrasound generated by each segmented array is focused on a selected point in space. When a 5 Vpp, 1.5 MHz square wave is applied, the maximum spatial peak temporal average intensity ({{I}\\text{spta}} ) is found to be 79 mW cm-2 5 mm from the SAAs’ surface without beamforming. The beam widths (-3 dB) of ultrasonic radiation patterns in the elevation and azimuth directions are recorded as 3 and 3.4 mm, respectively. The results successfully show the feasibility of focusing ultrasound on a small area with SAAs using pMUTs.

  17. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  18. Phased-array vector velocity estimation using transverse oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Michael J; Marcher, Jonne; Jensen, Jorgen A

    2012-12-01

    A method for estimating the 2-D vector velocity of blood using a phased-array transducer is presented. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The purposes of this work are to expand the TO method to a phased-array geometry and to broaden the potential clinical applicability of the method. A phased-array transducer has a smaller footprint and a larger field of view than a linear array, and is therefore more suited for, e.g., cardiac imaging. The method relies on suitable TO fields, and a beamforming strategy employing diverging TO beams is proposed. The implementation of the TO method using a phased-array transducer for vector velocity estimation is evaluated through simulation and flow-rig measurements are acquired using an experimental scanner. The vast number of calculations needed to perform flow simulations makes the optimization of the TO fields a cumbersome process. Therefore, three performance metrics are proposed. They are calculated based on the complex TO spectrum of the combined TO fields. It is hypothesized that the performance metrics are related to the performance of the velocity estimates. The simulations show that the squared correlation values range from 0.79 to 0.92, indicating a correlation between the performance metrics of the TO spectrum and the velocity estimates. Because these performance metrics are much more readily computed, the TO fields can be optimized faster for improved velocity estimation of both simulations and measurements. For simulations of a parabolic flow at a depth of 10 cm, a relative (to the peak velocity) bias and standard deviation of 4% and 8%, respectively, are obtained. Overall, the simulations show that the TO method implemented on a phased-array transducer is robust with relative standard deviations around 10% in most cases. The flow-rig measurements show similar results. At a depth of 9.5 cm using 32 emissions per estimate, the relative standard deviation is 9% and the relative bias is -9

  19. High Power Low Impedance Therapeutic Intracavitary Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukic, Aleksandra; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasound phased arrays can be used for noninvasive surgical applications, and are ideal for intracavitary applications, where their properties of dynamic focusing and beam steering compensate for the spatial constraints. Phase shifting without grating lobes requires small elements, which results in low width-thickness ratios and thus high electrical impedance. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a method of lateral coupling for the purposes of reduction of electrical impedance of linear phased arrays. Fabrication procedure for a lateral coupled array for therapeutic purposes is demonstrated. Impedance analysis of a thickness mode driven phased array is compared to a lateral coupling mode array. For a 1.5 MHz resonant frequency, impedance drop of 33 times is seen at antiresonance, and 6 times at resonance. Thickness mode phase peak is never higher than -41.3°, whereas it reaches to 42.3° in the lateral coupling mode. This allows for a phase crossing of 0° for lateral mode transducer, where the impedance is 111Ω, eliminating the need for matching circuits. Scanning laser vibrometer measurements of surface displacements show that a lateral mode element can achieve intensity levels greater than 20 W/cm2, when an unmatched element is tested.

  20. VHF-induced thermoacoustic imaging of fresh human prostates using a clinical ultrasound transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; See, W. A.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that a clinical ultrasound transducer array can practically detect thermoacoustic pulses induced by irradiation by very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic energy. This is an important step because thermoacoustic signal strength is directly proportional to the specific absorption rate (SAR), which is lower in the VHF regime than in microwave or optical regimes. A 96-channel transducer array (P4-1) providing 3 cm coverage was incorporated into a benchtop thermoacoustic imaging system for imaging fresh surgical specimens. Thermoacoustic signal was generated by 700 ns irradiation pulses with 11 kV/m electric field strength and 108 MHz carrier frequency. To improve SNR 1024 pulses were averaged at a 250 Hz repetition rate. Two sets of sinograms were acquired, separated by a 2 cm translation along the tomographic axis and reconstructed over a 6 x 6 x 5 cm3 volume. Contrast and in-plane resolution were measured by imaging a homogeneous cylindrical phantom and an 80- micron wire designed to highlight E-field polarization effects. FWHM of the in-plane point spread function varied from 250 microns to 1.1 mm, depending upon transducer used and phantom orientation relative to the electric field. Several fresh human prostates were imaged immediately after surgery. Rudimentary comparison to histology was performed and volumetric reconstruction of the multi-channel P4-1 data visualizes anatomic features that are rarely seen in ultrasound, CT, or MRI. The single element transducer provided superior image contrast, but with inferior resolution.

  1. Real-time 3-d intracranial ultrasound with an endoscopic matrix array transducer.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    A transducer originally designed for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was adapted for real-time volumetric endoscopic imaging of the brain. The transducer consists of a 36 x 36 array with an interelement spacing of 0.18 mm. There are 504 transmitting and 252 receive channels placed in a regular pattern in the array. The operating frequency is 4.5 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 30%. The transducer is fabricated on a 10-layer flexible circuit from Microconnex (Snoqualmie, WA, USA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of real-time 3-D intracranial ultrasound with this device. The Volumetrics Medical Imaging (Durham, NC, USA) 3-D scanner was used to obtain images in a canine model. A transcalvarial acoustic window was created under general anesthesia in the animal laboratory by placing a 10-mm burr hole in the high parietal calvarium of a 50-kg canine subject. The burr-hole was placed in a left parasagittal location to avoid the sagittal sinus, and the transducer was placed against the intact dura mater for ultrasound imaging. Images of the lateral ventricles were produced, including real-time 3-D guidance of a needle puncture of one ventricle. In a second canine subject, contrast-enhanced 3-D Doppler color flow images were made of the cerebral vessels including the complete Circle of Willis. Clinical applications may include real-time 3-D guidance of cerebrospinal fluid extraction from the lateral ventricles and bedside evaluation of critically ill patients where computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are unavailable.

  2. Phased Array Probe Optimization for the Inspection of Titanium Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasselkorde, E.; Cooper, I.; Wallace, P.; Lupien, V.

    2010-02-01

    The manufacturing process of titanium billets can produce multiple sub-surface defects that are particularly difficult to detect during the early stages of production. Failure to detect these defects can lead to subsequent in-service failure. A new and novel automated quality control system is being developed for the inspection of titanium billets destined for use in aerospace applications. The sensors will be deployed by an automated system to minimise the use of manual inspections, which should improve the quality and reliability of these critical inspections early on in the manufacturing process. This paper presents the first part of the work, which is the design and the simulation of the phased array ultrasonic inspection of the billets. A series of phased array transducers were designed to optimise the ultrasonic inspection of a ten inch diameter billet made from Titanium 6Al-4V. A comparison was performed between different probes including a 2D annular sectorial array.

  3. Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

  4. Ring array transducers for real-time 3-D imaging of an atrial septal occluder.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lindsey, Brooks D; Upchurch, Joseph A; Smith, Stephen W

    2012-08-01

    We developed new miniature ring array transducers integrated into interventional device catheters such as used to deploy atrial septal occluders. Each ring array consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz with interelement spacing of 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French O.D. catheter. We used a braided cabling technology from Tyco Electronics Corporation to connect the elements to the Volumetric Medical Imaging (VMI) real-time 3-D ultrasound scanner. Transducer performance yielded a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 20% centered at 4.7 MHz without a matching layer vs. average bandwidth of 60% centered at 4.4 MHz with a matching layer. Real-time 3-D rendered images of an en face view of a Gore Helex septal occluder in a water tank showed a finer texture of the device surface from the ring array with the matching layer.

  5. Dynamic response of an insonified sonar window interacting with a Tonpilz transducer array.

    PubMed

    Hull, Andrew J

    2007-08-01

    This paper derives and evaluates an analytical model of an insonified sonar window in contact with an array of Tonpilz transducers operating in receive mode. The window is fully elastic so that all wave components are present in the analysis. The output of the model is a transfer function of a transducer element output voltage divided by input pressure versus arrival angle and frequency. This model is intended for analysis of sonar systems that are to be built or modified for broadband processing. The model is validated at low frequency with a comparison to a previously derived thin plate model. Once this is done, an example problem is studied so that the effects of higher order wave interaction with acoustic reception can be understood. It was found that these higher order waves cause multiple nulls in the region where the array detects acoustic energy and that their locations in the arrival angle-frequency plane can be determined. The effects of these nulls in the beam patterns of the array are demonstrated.

  6. Two-dimensional optoacoustic tomography: transducer array and image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Andreev, Valeri A.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    1999-06-01

    Opto-acoustic tomography (OAT) utilizes laser pulses to create acoustic sources in tissue and wide-band detection of pressure profiles for the image reconstruction. A new laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS) for breast cancer detection and two-dimensional visualization is described. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used for generation of opto-acoustic profiles in phantoms and tissues in vitro. Acoustic pulses were detected by a 12 element linear array of piezoelectric transducers. Each transducer was made of 0.5-mm thick PVDF slabs with dimensions of 4.3 mm X 12.5 mm. Signal-to-noise ratio was calculated and the sensitivity of optoacoustic system was evaluated. The axial (in-depth) resolution and the lateral resolution of the system were determined. The axial resolution of the receiving array was limited by its frequency band and was estimated to be approximately 1 mm. The lateral resolution was about 2.5 times the lateral dimension of the 'tumor' and defined by the finite aperture of the array and relatively large size of the single transducer. The time of full data acquisition was limited by the time allowed in clinical procedure of about 5 - 10 minutes. The procedure of signal processing is described. It includes high-pass signal filtering, compensation for acoustic diffraction, detection of the irradiated surface position and rejection of the reverberating signal. Radial back-projection algorithm for image reconstruction was developed and included in the computer code. Two-dimensional opto-acoustic images of simulated spheres and objects inside tissue phantoms are presented. The contrast of these images and limits of detection and localization of deeply embedded tumors are discussed.

  7. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array

    SciTech Connect

    Nie Liming; Xing Da; Yang Diwu; Zeng Lvming; Zhou Quan

    2007-04-23

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

  8. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Liming; Xing, Da; Yang, Diwu; Zeng, Lvming; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects. PMID:23983276

  9. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liming; Xing, Da; Yang, Diwu; Zeng, Lvming; Zhou, Quan

    2007-04-23

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

  10. In-flight measurement of ice growth on an airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Mcknight, Robert C.; Humes, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests to measure ice growth on an airfoil during flight icing conditions are presented. Ultrasonic pulse echo measurements of ice thickness are obtained from an array of eight ultrasonic transducers mounted flush with the leading edge of the airfoil. These thickness measurements are used to document the evolution of the ice shape during the encounter in the form of successive ice profiles. Results from 3 research flights are presented and discussed. The accuracy of the ultrasonic measurements is found to be within 0.5 mm of mechanical and stereo photograph measurements of the ice accretion.

  11. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  12. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  13. A Method for Accurate in silico modeling of Ultrasound Transducer Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Drake A.; Walker, William F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to improve the in silico modeling of ultrasound transducer arrays. While current simulation tools accurately predict the theoretical element spatio-temporal pressure response, transducers do not always behave as theorized. In practice, using the probe's physical dimensions and published specifications in silico, often results in unsatisfactory agreement between simulation and experiment. We describe a general optimization procedure used to maximize the correlation between the observed and simulated spatio-temporal response of a pulsed single element in a commercial ultrasound probe. A linear systems approach is employed to model element angular sensitivity, lens effects, and diffraction phenomena. A numerical deconvolution method is described to characterize the intrinsic electro-mechanical impulse response of the element. Once the response of the element and optimal element characteristics are known, prediction of the pressure response for arbitrary apertures and excitation signals is performed through direct convolution using available tools. We achieve a correlation of 0.846 between the experimental emitted waveform and simulated waveform when using the probe's physical specifications in silico. A far superior correlation of 0.988 is achieved when using the optimized in silico model. Electronic noise appears to be the main effect preventing the realization of higher correlation coefficients. More accurate in silico modeling will improve the evaluation and design of ultrasound transducers as well as aid in the development of sophisticated beamforming strategies. PMID:19041997

  14. Waveguide piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array for short-range pulse-echo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, H.; Wang, Q.; Fung, S.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.; Boser, B. E.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an 8 × 24 element, 100 μm-pitch, 20 MHz ultrasound imager based on a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (PMUT) array having integrated acoustic waveguides. The 70 μm diameter, 220 μm long waveguides function both to direct acoustic waves and to confine acoustic energy, and also to provide mechanical protection for the PMUT array used for surface-imaging applications such as an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor. The imager consists of a PMUT array bonded with a CMOS ASIC using wafer-level conductive eutectic bonding. This construction allows each PMUT in the array to have a dedicated front-end receive amplifier, which together with on-chip analog multiplexing enables individual pixel read-out with high signal-to-noise ratio through minimized parasitic capacitance between the PMUT and the front-end amplifier. Finite element method simulations demonstrate that the waveguides preserve the pressure amplitude of acoustic pulses over distances of 600 μm. Moreover, the waveguide design demonstrated here enables pixel-by-pixel readout of the ultrasound image due to improved directivity of the PMUT by directing acoustic waves and creating a pressure field with greater spatial uniformity at the end of the waveguide. Pulse-echo imaging experiments conducted using a one-dimensional steel grating demonstrate the array's ability to form a two-dimensional image of a target.

  15. Optical metrology of AlN piezomachined ultrasonic transducer arrays and piezopumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mązik, Mateusz; Taha, Inas; Flores, Raquel; Janeiro, Ricardo; Viegas, Jaime

    2015-02-01

    Piezomachined ultrasonic transducer (PMUT) arrays are commonly found in applications in the field of ultrasonography and gesture recognition systems. Their application for bio and chemical sample preparation is another possibility, based on their beam steering and acoustic field manipulation capabilities. Post-fabrication non-destructive measurement of key device temporal and spatial parameters is required in order to adjust either simulation models or tune fabrication steps. In this work we report an optical testing setup for measuring the acoustic spectrum of PMUT devices and arrays, characterize maximum deflection of PMUTs and piezopumps and investigate the load effect of electrical contacts on the spatial and temporal oscillation behavior of these piezoelectric structures. Spatial parameters are evaluated with digital holography and temporal parameters with single point Doppler shift and frequency-shifted. We employ this testing setup to measure our own designed PMUT structures which were fabricated at IME-Singapore, evaluating the relative merits of the PMUT design parameters.

  16. Investigation of a Phase-Locked Loop Receiver for a Parametric Acoustic Receiving Array.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-05

    KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necesary and Identify by block number, PARRAY Nonlinear Acoustics Parametric Reception Phase-Locked Loop...loop (PLL) demodulator considered for use with the parametric acoustic receiving array ( PARRAY ). The PARRAY as an acoustic sensor is explained and the...effects of longitudinal transducer motion on the PARRAY are described. This transducer vibration produces intermodulation products between the desired

  17. Generation of the Ultrasonic Guided Waves in a Seamless Stainless Steel Pipe Using an Array Transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young H.; Song, Sung-Jin; Park, Joon-Soo; Jeon, Jin Hong; Kim, Jae-Hee; Eom, Heung-Sup; Im, Kwang Hee

    2005-04-09

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been widely employed for the long range inspection of structures such as plates, rods and pipes. In ultrasonic guided waves, however, there are numerous modes with different wave velocities, so that the generation and detection of the appropriate wave mode of the guided wave is one of key techniques in the application of guided waves. In the present work, mode tuning using an array transducer was investigated with the hardware implements to generate ultrasonic guided waves in a seamless stainless steel pipe. For this purpose, 8-channel ultrasonic pulser/receiver and their controller which enables sequential activation of each channels with given time delay were developed. A series of experiments was carried out in order to demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic tuning of modes by hardware: tuning the mode of the generated guided wave, group velocity measurement, tuned receiving and mode identification. As a result, the selective tuning of wave mode can be achieved by changing the time interval between adjacent elements of an array transducer.

  18. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Arrays for Integrated Diagnostic/Therapeutic Catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Serena H.; Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Bayram, Baris; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, A. Sanli; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2006-05-01

    In recent years, medical procedures have become increasingly non-invasive. These include endoscopic procedures and intracardiac interventions (e.g., pulmonary vein isolation for treatment of atrial fibrillation and plaque ablation for treatment of arteriosclerosis). However, current tools suffer from poor visualization and difficult coordination of multiple therapeutic and imaging devices. Dual-mode (imaging and therapeutic) ultrasound arrays provide a solution to these challenges. A dual-mode transducer can provide focused, noncontact ultrasound suitable for therapy and can be used to provide high quality real-time images for navigation and monitoring of the procedure. In the last decade, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), have become an attractive option for ultrasonic imaging systems due to their fabrication flexibility, improved bandwidth, and integration with electronics. The CMUT's potential in therapeutic applications has also been demonstrated by surface output pressures as high as 1MPa peak to peak and continuous wave (CW) operation. This paper reviews existing interventional CMUT arrays, demonstrates the feasibility of CMUTs for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and presents a design for the next-generation CMUTs for integrated imaging and HIFU endoscopic catheters.

  19. Visualization of phased-array sound fields and flaw interaction using the photoelastic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitte, T.; Orth, T.; Kersting, T.

    2012-05-01

    In order to visualize ultrasound in steel the photoelastic imager is a complementary technique to simulations, with the advantage that real transducers are used. In this contribution we show the linear behavior of the derived photoelastic signal and compare the results to FEM calculations. We use the result for quantitative analysis of sound-fields of immersion and phased array transducers. Interesting results are derived by analysis of the influence of missing elements on the shape and intensity of phased array (PA) ultrasonic pulses. Furthermore the formation of grating lobes from PA excitation is demonstrated and the plurality of waves generated from a small notch is displayed exemplarily.

  20. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm(-2). By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  1. The application of high permittivity piezoelectric ceramics to 2D array transducers for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Felix, N; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Walker, L; Millar, C; Lethiecq, M

    2000-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) array transducers have become of great interest in the last few years, in view of real-time volumetric ultrasonic imaging. The electrical matching between the high electrical impedance of elements and the standard cables and electronics is one of the key issues in 2D array design. The use of high-permittivity ceramics such as PNNZT either in bulk configuration or in 1-3 piezocomposites decreases the electrical impedance. In this paper, bulk samples of PNNZT and PZT ceramics are characterised, and results are compared. 2D array elements are then manufactured and their electrical impedances measured. Theoretical predictions of homogenisation models for 1-3 piezocomposites allow the simulation of the electroacoustic behaviour of 2D array elements. Results for both piezocomposite and bulk materials can be obtained. Calculations of the input impedance, the sensitivity and the bandwidth of the different configurations are compared and discussed. These results demonstrate the advantages of the PNNZT compositions over standard PZT.

  2. A High-Frequency Annular-Array Transducer Using an Interdigital Bonded 1-3 Composite

    PubMed Central

    Chabok, Hamid Reza; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Kim, Hyung Ham; Williams, Jay A.; Park, Jinhyoung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a 1–3 composite annular-array transducer. An interdigital bonded (IB) 1–3 composite was prepared using two IB operations on a fine-grain piezoelectric ceramic. The final composite had 19-μm-wide posts separated by 6-μm-wide polymer kerfs. A novel method to remove metal electrodes from polymer portions of the 1–3 composite was established to eliminate the need for patterning and aligning the electrode on the composite to the electrodes on a flexible circuit. Unloaded epoxy was used for both the matching and backing layers and a flexible circuit was used for interconnect. A prototype array was successfully fabricated and tested. The results were in reasonable agreement with those predicted by a circuit-analogous model. The average center frequency estimated from the measured pulse-echo responses of array elements was 33.5 MHz and the −6-dB fractional bandwidth was 57%. The average insertion loss recorded was 14.3 dB, and the maximum crosstalk between the nearest-neighbor elements was less than −37 dB. Images of a wire phantom and excised porcine eye were obtained to show the capabilities of the array for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. PMID:21244988

  3. Multilevel phase gratings for array illuminators.

    PubMed

    Arrizón, V; Ojeda-Castañeda, J

    1994-09-01

    We describe a variety of multilevel phase structures that can be used to generate Lohmann's array illuminators. We report several experimental verifications of the synthesis of such multilevel phase structures by using simple binary curves in a conventional optical processor.

  4. Thermal-Independent Properties of PIN-PMN-PT Single-Crystal Linear-Array Ultrasonic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruimin; Wu, Jinchuan; Lam, Kwok Ho; Yao, Liheng; Zhou, Qifa; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, low-frequency 32-element linear-array ultrasonic transducers were designed and fabricated using both ternary Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)–Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)–PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) and binary Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)–PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) single crystals. Performance of the array transducers was characterized as a function of temperature ranging from room temperature to 160°C. It was found that the array transducers fabricated using the PIN-PMN-PT single crystal were capable of satisfactory performance at 160°C, having a −6-dB bandwidth of 66% and an insertion loss of 37 dB. The results suggest that the potential of PIN-PMN-PT linear-array ultrasonic transducers for high-temperature ultrasonic transducer applications is promising. PMID:23221227

  5. An experimental X band phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. P. R.; Limaye, K. U.; Ramalingam, R. P.; Gangadharan, T. S.; Bhandopadhyay, G.; Deshpande, P. A.

    1983-10-01

    The details of an X band experimental 11 x 11 element Phased Array Antenna of phased lens configuration with a monopulse space feed developed at LRDE are presented. The studies carried and the results obtained on collimation, beam steering, pattern variation with scan, array operation in two-dimensional search, dedicated track and track while scan (TWS) are also given.

  6. Nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Su, Xiaodi; Lu, Yi

    2015-05-07

    Biosensors incorporating nanomaterials have demonstrated superior performance compared to their conventional counterparts. Most reported sensors use nanomaterials as a single transducer of signals, while biosensor designs using dual transducing elements have emerged as new approaches to further improve overall sensing performance. This review focuses on recent developments in nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection. The review begins with a brief introduction of the commonly used nanomaterial transducers suitable for designing dual element sensors, including quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles, graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanodots. This is followed by the presentation of the four basic design principles, namely Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Amplified Fluorescence Polarization (AFP), Bio-barcode Assay (BCA) and Chemiluminescence (CL), involving either two kinds of nanomaterials, or one nanomaterial and an organic luminescent agent (e.g. organic dyes, luminescent polymers) as dual transducers. Biomolecular and chemical analytes or biological interactions are detected by their control of the assembly and disassembly of the two transducing elements that change the distance between them, the size of the fluorophore-containing composite, or the catalytic properties of the nanomaterial transducers, among other property changes. Comparative discussions on their respective design rules and overall performances are presented afterwards. Compared with the single transducer biosensor design, such a dual-transducer configuration exhibits much enhanced flexibility and design versatility, allowing biosensors to be more specifically devised for various purposes. The review ends by highlighting some of the further development opportunities in this field.

  7. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  8. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  9. Large phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, Eli, Dr.

    1988-12-01

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  10. Phase velocity spectrum analysis for a time delay comb transducer for guided wave mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Rose, J L

    2000-09-26

    A theoretical model for the analysis of ultrasonic guided wave mode excitation of a comb transducer with time delay features was developed. Time delay characteristics are included via a Fourier transform into the frequency domain. The phase velocity spectrum can be used to determine the mode excitation on the phase velocity dispersion curves for a given structure. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the tuning of guided wave modes using a time delay comb transducer.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Inter-Element Isolation in a Medical Array Transducer at Various Manufacturing Stages.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, Franco; Bini, Fabiano; Grandoni, Andrea

    2015-07-09

    This work presents the experimental investigation of vibration maps of a linear array transducer with 192 piezoelements by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer at various manufacturing finishing steps in air and in water. Over the years, many researchers have investigated cross-coupling in fabricated prototypes but not in arrays at various manufacturing stages. Only the central element of the array was driven at its working frequency of 5 MHz. The experimental results showed that the contributions of cross-coupling depend on the elements of the acoustic stack: Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT), kerf, filler, matching layer, and lens. The oscillation amplitudes spanned from (6 ± 38%) nm to (110 ± 40%) nm when the energized element was tested in air and from (6 ± 57%) nm to (80 ± 67%) nm when measurements were obtained under water. The best inter-element isolation of -22 dB was measured in air after cutting the kerfs, whereas the poorest isolation was -2 dB under water with an acoustic lens (complete acoustic stack). The vibration pattern in water showed a higher standard deviation on the displacement measurements than the one obtained in air, due to the influence of acousto-optic interactions. The amount increased to 30% in water, as estimated by a comparison with the measurements in air. This work describes a valuable method for manufacturers to investigate the correspondence between the manufacturing process and the quantitative evaluations of the resulting effects.

  12. Estimation of guided wave scattering matrices from spatially distributed transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their ability to travel relatively long distances with low attenuation, guided waves are being considered as a tool for the detection of defects in plate-like structures for aerospace, civil, and petrochemical applications. When a guided wave encounters a defect, a scattered field related to the characteristics of the defect is generated. The far field scattering behavior can be described by a scattering matrix that quantifies the amplitude of the scattered signal as a function of incident and scattered angles. Because of the mode and frequency dependence of guided waves interacting with defects, the scattering matrix is typically defined for specific guided wave modes (incident and scattered) at a designated frequency. Prior work has utilized finite element modeling and full wavefield scanning to estimate scattering matrices, but these approaches may be impractical because of either computational requirements or experimental issues. Here, we propose a methodology for estimating a scattering matrix based upon limited experimental data recorded from a spatially distributed transducer array. After applying baseline subtraction to extract changes in received signals resulting from the introduction of a scatterer, we further process differenced signals to obtain a limited number of scattering matrix data points corresponding to the incident and scattered angles for each transducer pair. We perform radial basis function interpolation of these initial points to estimate the complete scattering matrix and evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method via experiments with a glued-on linear scatterer.

  13. Development of Real-Time 3-D Photoacoustic Imaging System Employing Spherically Curved Array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Tabata, Takuya; Takagi, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2017-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a promising imaging modality to visualize specific living tissues based on the light absorption coefficients without dyeing. In this paper, a real-time PA imaging system with a tunable laser was newly developed with an originally designed spherically curved array transducer. Five different series of experiments were conducted to validate the PA measurement system. The peak frequency of the transducer response was 17.7 MHz, and a volume-imaging rate of 3-D volume imaging was 10-20 volumes per second. The spatial resolution of imaging was 90- [Formula: see text] along both the axial and lateral directions. The developed imaging system could measure a difference on an absorption coefficient of gold nanorods. Additionally, the PA imaging could visualize the in vivo microvasculatures of a human hand. This PA imaging system with higher spatial-temporal resolution and the tunable laser further should enhance our understanding of not only basic properties of the photo acoustics but also clinical applications.

  14. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Roger J; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-05-26

    We present a novel high-frequency photoacoustic microscopy system capable of imaging the microvasculature of living subjects in realtime to depths of a few mm. The system consists of a high-repetition-rate Q-switched pump laser, a tunable dye laser, a 30-MHz linear ultrasound array transducer, a multichannel high-frequency data acquisition system, and a shared-RAM multi-core-processor computer. Data acquisition, beamforming, scan conversion, and display are implemented in realtime at 50 frames per second. Clearly resolvable images of 6-microm-diameter carbon fibers are experimentally demonstrated at 80 microm separation distances. Realtime imaging performance is demonstrated on phantoms and in vivo with absorbing structures identified to depths of 2.5-3 mm. This work represents the first high-frequency realtime photoacoustic imaging system to our knowledge.

  15. In-flight measurement of ice growth on an airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Mcknight, Robert C.; Humes, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from three research flights to obtain in-flight ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements of airfoil ice thickness as a function of time using an array of eight ultrasonic transducers mounted flush with the leading edge of the airfoil are presented. The accuracy of the thickness measurements is found to be within 0.5 mm of mechanical and stereophotograph measurements of the ice accretion. The ultrasonic measurements demonstrate that the ice growth rate typically varies during the flight, with variations in the ice growth rate for dry ice growth being primarily due to fluctuations in the cloud liquid water content. Discrepancies between experimental results and results predicted by an analytic icing code underline the need for a better understanding of the physics of wet ice growth.

  16. In-flight measurement of ice growth on an airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Mcknight, Robert C.; Humes, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from three research flights to obtain in-flight ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements of airfoil ice thickness as a function of time using an array of eight ultrasonic transducers mounted flush with the leading edge of the airfoil are presented. The accuracy of the thickness measurements is found to be within 0.5 mm of mechanical and stereophotograph measurements of the ice accretion. The ultrasonic measurements demonstrate that the ice growth rate typically varies during the flight, with variations in the ice growth rate for dry ice growth being primarily due to fluctuations in the cloud liquid water content. Discrepancies between experimental results and results predicted by an analytic icing code underline the need for a better understanding of the physics of wet ice growth.

  17. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  18. Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The basic concept and design of a flatplate-fed transmission array are described and system performance requirements are summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the aperture, the radiating element, the phase shifter, the flatplate feed, and the mechanical support structure. Fabrication and testing techniques are considered. Of the three major parameters of interest in demonstrating the performance capabilities of the transmissive array, beamwidth was shown to be the least sensitive to system amplitude and phase errors. Beam pointing angle was also shown to be relatively insensitive to errors. Close agreement between measured and calculated values was found for array gain. The greatest difference was found for array sidelone level.

  19. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Seeded Titanium Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, J. H.; Gray, T. A.; Khandelwal, P.; Dunhill, T.

    2004-02-01

    As part of efforts by Rolls-Royce to evaluate the use of ultrasonic phased arrays for inspection of titanium billets, a series of ultrasonic phased array inspections were performed at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE). The inspections were performed using a sectorial-annular array designed especially for titanium billets by R/D Tech and supplied to Rolls-Royce. The billet test piece is seeded with thirteen yttria disks, each located at successive depths below the outer diameter surface to just past the billet centerline. The phased array inspections employed both fixed-focus and dynamic-depth-focus (DDF) focal laws in conjunction with several depth gating schemes. Aperture and focal parameters were changed as a function of depth when using fixed-focus focal laws. Results include characterization of transducer performance and delay-time correction of imperfections, signal-to-noise measurements for the yttria disks in the billet test piece, and effects of probe misalignment on flaw sensitivity.

  20. Integration of Trench-Isolated Through-Wafer Interconnects with 2D Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xuefeng; Ergun, Arif S.; Huang, Yongli; Wygant, Ira O.; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method to provide electrical connection to a 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The interconnects are processed after the CMUTs are fabricated on the front side of a silicon wafer. Connections to array elements are made from the back side of the substrate via highly conductive silicon pillars that result from a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. Flip-chip bonding is used to integrate the CMUT array with an integrated circuit (IC) that comprises the front-end circuits for the transducer and provides mechanical support for the trench-isolated array elements. Design, fabrication process and characterization results are presented. The advantages when compared to other through-wafer interconnect techniques are discussed. PMID:18037982

  1. Phased-Antenna-Array Conical Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Antenna pointing faster than mechanical scanning. Three antenna phased array connected to receiving signal-processing system through two phase-shifting networks. Two networks simultaneously steer phased array in two slightly-different beam directions; one for scanning, one for tracking. Technique has many uses in military and civilian radar, principally in tracking aircraft, balloonborne weather instruments, and other moving signal sources or reflectors.

  2. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  3. Length mode piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer for inspection of solid objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The transducer is constructed from individual transducer elements arranged in an array and configured to exhibit a predominant, longitudinal mode transversely to the array. The elements are interconnected through thin flexible sheets. Each element is individually damped, and the transducer as a whole is electrically damped through resonance with the clamped capacitance and dissipation. Electrical control permits inphase operation of all transducer elements or control with preselected phase differences.

  4. Determination of displacement with a piezoelectric transducer using phase-shift algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaing, Cheng-Chung; Shie, Yi-Lin; Tang, Chien-Jen; Liou, Yeuh-Yeong; Chang, Chun-Ming; Yang, Chii-Rong

    2009-03-01

    This investigation accurately measures the relationship between applied voltage and the displacement of a piezoelectric transducer device both by analyzing phase shifting interferometry algorithms and using a Twyman-Green interferometer. Simulations are performed to calculate unknown phase shifts, especially around π/2 and 3 π/2. It is indicated that the Hariharan algorithm is indeed an effective phase shifting interferometry algorithm.

  5. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Magnetostrictive helical array transducer for inspecting spiral welded pipes using flexural guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Tang, Zhifeng; Lv, Fuzai

    2017-02-01

    A wavefront analysis indicates that a flexural wave propagates at a helix angle with respect to the pipe axis. The expression for calculation of the helix angle for each flexural mode is given, and the helix angle dispersion curves for flexural modes are calculated. According to the new understanding of flexural guided waves, a magnetostrictive helical array transducer (MHAT) is proposed for selectively exciting a single predominant flexural torsional guided wave in a pipe and inspecting spiral welded pipes using flexural waves. A MHAT contains a pre-magnetized magnetostrictive patch that is helically coupled with the outer surface of a pipe, and an array of novel compound comb coils that are wrapped around the helical magnetostrictive patch. The proposed wideband MHAT possesses the direction control ability. A verification experiment indicates that flexural torsional mode T(3,1) at center frequency f=64kHz is effectively actuated by a MHAT with 13-degree helix angle. A 20-degree MHAT is adopted to inspect a spiral welded pipe, an artificial notch with cross section loss CSL=2.7% is effectively detected by using flexural waves.

  7. Ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging with transducer arrays and adaptive processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Hayward, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenging problem of ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) imaging with adaptive transducer arrays. In NDE applications, most materials like concrete, stainless steel and carbon-reinforced composites used extensively in industries and civil engineering exhibit heterogeneous internal structure. When inspected using ultrasound, the signals from defects are significantly corrupted by the echoes form randomly distributed scatterers, even defects that are much larger than these random reflectors are difficult to detect with the conventional delay-and-sum operation. We propose to apply adaptive beamforming to the received data samples to reduce the interference and clutter noise. Beamforming is to manipulate the array beam pattern by appropriately weighting the per-element delayed data samples prior to summing them. The adaptive weights are computed from the statistical analysis of the data samples. This delay-weight-and-sum process can be explained as applying a lateral spatial filter to the signals across the probe aperture. Simulations show that the clutter noise is reduced by more than 30 dB and the lateral resolution is enhanced simultaneously when adaptive beamforming is applied. In experiments inspecting a steel block with side-drilled holes, good quantitative agreement with simulation results is demonstrated.

  8. Ultrasound Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Imaging with Transducer Arrays and Adaptive Processing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Hayward, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenging problem of ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) imaging with adaptive transducer arrays. In NDE applications, most materials like concrete, stainless steel and carbon-reinforced composites used extensively in industries and civil engineering exhibit heterogeneous internal structure. When inspected using ultrasound, the signals from defects are significantly corrupted by the echoes form randomly distributed scatterers, even defects that are much larger than these random reflectors are difficult to detect with the conventional delay-and-sum operation. We propose to apply adaptive beamforming to the received data samples to reduce the interference and clutter noise. Beamforming is to manipulate the array beam pattern by appropriately weighting the per-element delayed data samples prior to summing them. The adaptive weights are computed from the statistical analysis of the data samples. This delay-weight-and-sum process can be explained as applying a lateral spatial filter to the signals across the probe aperture. Simulations show that the clutter noise is reduced by more than 30 dB and the lateral resolution is enhanced simultaneously when adaptive beamforming is applied. In experiments inspecting a steel block with side-drilled holes, good quantitative agreement with simulation results is demonstrated. PMID:22368457

  9. Cardiac imaging using a phased array ultrasound system. I. System design.

    PubMed

    vonRamm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1976-02-01

    A new two-dimensional, real-time, high resolution ultrasound imaging system is described. This system uses a linear array of ultrasound transducers to generate tomographic images of the heart in a circular sector format. Phased array techniques allow rapid steering of the ultrasound beam so that images are produced at the rate of 20 per second, or more, while maintaining a resolution of 2-4 mm throughout the field of view.

  10. Coplanar waveguide fed phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Lee, R. Q.; Fernandez, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    A K-band four element linear phased array was designed and tested. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used for the microwave distribution system. A CPW to twin strip transition is used to interface with the printed dipole antennas. MMIC phased shifters are used for phase control.

  11. CDS solid state phase insensitive ultrasonic transducer. [annealing dadmium sulfide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A phase insensitive ultrasonic transducer which includes a CdS crystal that is annealed for a selected period of time and at a selected temperature to provide substantially maximum acoustic attenuation at the operating frequency of the transducer is described. Two electrodes are attached to the crystal with amplifier means and a signal processing system connected to one of the electrodes to provide an ultrasonic receiver.

  12. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  13. Segmented-mirror phased-array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O.

    1987-11-30

    A scheme for phase-locked laser arrays in both one- and two-dimensional configurations is discussed. The scheme can be applied to any laser and its validity has been proved for the case of a pulsed neodimium laser.

  14. Fundamental Limitations of Phased Array Antenna Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    Radiation Q of InfinitePlanar Dipole Phased Arrays, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, (01 2014): 153. doi: Yong Heui Cho, Do-Hoon Kwon...element bandwidth bounds were found in terms of the strengths of the induced electric and magnetic dipole moments, taking into account of the coupling...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 15-12-2015 1-Oct-2012 30-Sep-2015 Final Report: Fundamental Limitations of Phased Array Antenna Elements The views

  15. Phase interpolation circuits using frequency multiplication for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, P. R.; Mailloux, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Antenna phasing circuit is described with the following advantages - 1/ increased number of phased elements, 2/ current repetition for each array element, 3/ circuit simplicity, and 4/ accurate phase interpolation. This circuit functions with Huggins Scan or with nearly any other phasing system.

  16. New piezocrystal material in the development of a 96-element array transducer for MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhen; Habeshaw, Roderick; Fortine, Julien; Huang, Zhihong; Démoré, Christine; Cochran, Sandy

    2012-11-01

    Piezocrystal materials have been recognized as having better performance than piezoelectric ceramics, and have thus been widely adopted in ultrasound imaging arrays. Although their behaviour is susceptible to temperature and pressure, their large electromechanical coupling coefficients and other excellent piezoelectric properties also offer the potential for further improvements in the efficiency of therapeutic ultrasound transducers. Furthermore, new piezocrystals with modified compositions have been developed recently to increase their tolerance to temperature and pressure. In this work, a prototype of faceted bowl transducer was designed and manufactured as a proof of concept to explore practical issues associated with adoption of piezocrystals for magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound surgery.

  17. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-03

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  18. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Phased Array Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, J. N.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  19. Monitoring techniques for phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, J.; Clarke, R. H.

    1985-12-01

    The problem of monitoring phased-array antennas in general and microwave landing system (MLS) in particular is considered. Various methods of monitoring phased-array antennas are suggested. One is based on changes in the far field radiation pattern arising from defects in the array. Another method uses the near-field to far-field transformation, based on the concept of the plane-wave spectrum, for the detection of defects in the antenna. A third method is based on near-field measurements and uses the properties of the Fresnel integral. The methods were simulated on the computer and, where possible, were tested by experiment. A comparative assessment of the methods is given, and an operational monitoring system is suggested for the MLS phased array.

  20. 20-GHz phased-array-fed antennas utilizing distributed MMIC modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Lee, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of phased-array-fed dual-reflector systems with distributed power and phase control, and utilizing monolithic microwave integrated circuit modules, is demonstrated. Secondary radiation patterns for various antenna configurations, calculated using a method in which the phased array for each scanning direction is simulated by a fictitious point source, are computed to determine the achievable EIRP levels, sidelobe isolation, and cross-polarization isolation. The focal-region-fed Cassegrain reflector was found to be best suited for fixed multiple beam applications, while the phased-array-fed dual-reflector configuration was selected for multiple scanning beams. Key elements of the phased-array design including a radiating square horn and a square orthomode transducer were fabricated and tested.

  1. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  2. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the overall program is to establish technological readiness and provide verification for the elements of a manufacturing sequence which would ultimately be suitable for the large-scale production of silicon solar-array modules at a selling price of less than $500/kW. A program and process plan for accomplishing this objective was developed and put into operation. Three junction-formation processes are shown; since cost analysis shows that they do not differ greatly in cost, each should be considered for technical merits and possible future cost reduction. The progress made in the various process steps of the plan is described, and conclusions are presented.

  3. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    NORSAR Phase 3 N-2007 Kieller- Norway ii CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE AFTAC/HQ/TGX h1no 1ORA Patrick AFB 13. NUMBER OF PAGES FL...Project Manager Frode Ringdal (02) 71 69 15 Title of Work The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 Amount of Contract $4.762.383 Contract Period Covered...one in the center. This gives an array of aperture about 4.45 km. For high-frequency phases ( 3 Hz and above) the outer ring does not contribute to

  4. Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-23

    PAGE 1 REPORT NUMBER F08606-76-C-0001 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) rsir Report" Norwegian Seismic Array (N<$SSAR) Phase 3 # 7...34 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERf») Ftf86^6-76-C-##l, 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA • JORK UNIT NUMBERS NORSAR Phase 3 23 Ju IS...0001 Nils Mar&s (02) 71 69 15 Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 $800 000 1 January 1976 - 30 June 1976 The views and conclusions

  5. RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF A GENERALIZED PHASED ARRAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. This computer program was developed to examine the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array antenna. Using a very efficient numerical technique, this program calculates the array's radiated power and its directivity. The results can be used to determine the radiation pattern of a generalized phased array at near- or far-field observation points. This program is a key research tool at the NASA Lewis Research Center for analyzing advanced space communication antenna systems. Results from this program compare favorably with experimental Lewis results for arrays of 2x2 and 3x3 elements. Given the array geometry and element characteristics, generalized phased array attributes can be broken into two areas: 1) the power radiated and its directivity at any given point, and 2) the co- and cross-polarization field components. This program allows arbitrarily located source elements with an analytically described cosine pattern. The formulation is based on a Romberg integration scheme and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E and H plane element patterns, and mutual coupling. The input consists of the array geometry; phase, amplitude, linear and circular polarization of each source element; and the cosine functions of the element pattern. The output is a series of observation angles with their associated field magnitude and polarizations. Total radiated power and peak directivity are also calculated. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 computer operating under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 22K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM Scientific Subroutine Package (SSP) is required to run the program. This program was developed in 1986.

  6. Optical signal processing of phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.

    This thesis develops optical processors that scale to very high processing speed. Optical signal processing is often promoted on the basis of smaller size, lower weight and lower power consumption as well as higher signal processing speed. While each of these requirements has applications, it is the ones that require processing speed beyond that available in electronics that are most compelling. Thirty years ago, optical processing was the only method fast enough to process Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), one of the more demanding signal processing tasks at this time. Since that time electronic processing speed has improved sufficiently to tackle that problem. We have sought out the problems that require significantly higher processing speed and developed optical processors that tackle these more difficult problems. The components that contribute to high signal processing speed are high input signal bandwidth, a large number of parallel input channels each with this high bandwidth, and a large number of parallel operations required on each input channel. Adaptive signal processing for phased array radar has all of these factors. The processors developed for this task scale well in three dimensions, which allows them to maximize parallelism for high speed. This thesis explores an example of a negative feedback adaptive phased array processor and an example of a positive feedback phased array processor. The negative feedback processor uses and array of inputs in up to two dimensions together with the time history of the signal in the third dimension to adapt the array pattern to null out incoming jammer signals. The positive feedback processor uses the incoming signals and assumptions about the radar scene to correct for position errors in a phased array. Discovery and analysis of these new processors are facilitated by an original volume holographic analysis technique developed in the thesis. The thesis includes a new acoustooptic Bragg cell geometry developed with

  7. Characterization of the system functions of ultrasonic linear phased array inspection systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiju; Schmerr, Lester W

    2009-02-01

    This work characterizes the electrical and electromechanical aspects of an ultrasonic linear phased array inspection system, using a matrix of system functions that are obtained from the measured response of individual array elements in a simple reference experiment. It is shown that for the arrays tested all these system functions are essentially identical, allowing one to use a single system function to characterize the entire array, as done for an ordinary single element transducer. The variation of this single system function with the number of elements firing in the array or with changes of the delay law used is examined. It is also demonstrated that once such a single system function is obtained for an array, it can be used in a complete ultrasonic measurement model to accurately predict the array response measured from a reference reflector in an immersion setup.

  8. Array Phase Shifters: Theory and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    While there are a myriad of applications for microwave phase shifters in instrumentation and metrology, power combining, amplifier linearization, and so on, the most prevalent use is in scanning phased-array antennas. And while this market continues to be dominated by military radar and tracking platforms, many commercial applications have emerged in the past decade or so. These new and potential applications span low-Earth-orbit (LEO) communications satellite constellations and collision warning radar, an aspect of the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System or Automated Highway System. In any case, the phase shifters represent a considerable portion of the overall antenna cost, with some estimates approaching 40 percent for receive arrays. Ferrite phase shifters continue to be the workhorse in military-phased arrays, and while there have been advances in thin film ferrite devices, the review of this device technology in the previous edition of this book is still highly relevant. This chapter will focus on three types of phase shifters that have matured in the past decade: GaAs MESFET monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and thin film ferroelectric-based devices. A brief review of some novel devices including thin film ferrite phase shifters and superconducting switches for phase shifter applications will be provided. Finally, the effects of modulo 2 phase shift limitations, phase errors, and transient response on bit error rate degradation will be considered.

  9. Two-dimensional ultrasound phased array design for tissue ablation for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, K Y; Smith, N B

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and evaluation of a two-dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. With two-dimensional phased arrays, the focal point position can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for focusing and electronically steering in a three-dimensional volume. The array was designed with a steering angle of +/-14 degrees in both transverse and longitudinal directions. A piezoelectric ceramic (PZT-8) was used as the material of the transducer, since it can handle the high power needed for tissue ablation and a matching layer was used for maximum acoustic power transmission to tissue. Analysis of the transducer ceramic and cable impedance has been designed for high power transfer with minimal capacitance and diameter. For this initial prototype, the final construction used magnet compatible housing and cabling for future application in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for temperature mapping of the focused ultrasound. To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments were performed and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. For sonications with exposure time of 10, 15 and 20 s, the lesion size was roughly 1.8, 3.0 and 4.3 mm in diameter, respectively, which indicates the feasibility of this device.

  10. Quantum Phase Transition in Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    1997-03-01

    One-dimensional Josephson junction arrays of SQUIDS exhibit a novel superconductor-insulator phase transition. The critical regime can be accessed by tuning the effective Josephson coupling energy using a weak magnetic field applied to the SQUIDS. The role of instantons induced by quantum fluctuations will be discussed. One novel feature of these systems which can be explained in terms of quantum phase slips is that in some regimes, the array resistance decreases with increasing length of the array. We calculate the finite temperature crossover function for the array resistance and compare our theoretical results with the recent experiments by D. Haviland and P. Delsing at Chalmers. This work is supported by DOE grant #DE-FG02-90ER45427 and by NSF DMR-9502555.

  11. The design and characterization of an ultrasound phased array suitable for deep tissue hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Adam H; Mills, John A; Wilson, Adrian J

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of a planar phased-array ultrasound transducer suitable for producing localized hyperthermia in solid tumors deep within the body. Simulation using a customized version of Ultrasim has been used to determine the relationship between the size and position of the focus and parameters of the array. These parameters include the overall size of the array and the size, shape and distribution of the individual elements. A 15-element prototype array has been constructed using the results of the simulation. Beam profile measurements on this transducer made in an acoustic tank were compared with the beam profile predicted by simulation. The results showed good agreement in the shape of the focal region, but with the focus closer to the surface of the physical transducer when compared with the simulation and with small high-intensity areas between the surface of the transducer and the focus in the measured profile. A sensitivity analysis using a simulated factorial experiment indicated that the presence of a secondary vibrational mode within the elements of the array was the principal cause for both the shift in the position of the focus and for the unwanted maxima close to the surface of the array. The results also showed that the array was tolerant of a large variation in output intensity of the individual elements in the array in producing a focal region. Extrapolation of the results obtained in this study indicate that an array of 60 elements, based on the design described, driven by 550 V peak-to-peak pulses would be capable of producing a peak focal intensity of 50 Wcm(-2) at a depth of 60 mm in tissue, which would be appropriate for hyperthermia used as an adjunct to radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  12. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-31

    Seismic Array (NOFSAR). Phase 3 . •■I11 111 s . ,„-,, , ■ , s m^ib^^ ^Ciiv .TlW VJ 7 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE. DISTRIBUTION UNUMfflEO...N-2007 Kjeller, Norway 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Norsar Phase 3 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...NORSAR) Phase 3 $520,000 ^: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as

  13. Phase Noise in Photonic Phased-Array Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Maleki, Lute

    1998-01-01

    The total noise of a phased-array antenna system employing a photonic feed network is analyzed using a model for the individual component noise including both additive and multiplicative equivalent noise generators.

  14. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  15. Optically addressed ultra-wideband phased antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jian

    Demands for high data rate and multifunctional apertures from both civilian and military users have motivated development of ultra-wideband (UWB) electrically steered phased arrays. Meanwhile, the need for large contiguous frequency is pushing operation of radio systems into the millimeter-wave (mm-wave) range. Therefore, modern radio systems require UWB performance from VHF to mm-wave. However, traditional electronic systems suffer many challenges that make achieving these requirements difficult. Several examples includes: voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) cannot provide a tunable range of several octaves, distribution of wideband local oscillator signals undergo high loss and dispersion through RF transmission lines, and antennas have very limited bandwidth or bulky sizes. Recently, RF photonics technology has drawn considerable attention because of its advantages over traditional systems, with the capability of offering extreme power efficiency, information capacity, frequency agility, and spatial beam diversity. A hybrid RF photonic communication system utilizing optical links and an RF transducer at the antenna potentially provides ultra-wideband data transmission, i.e., over 100 GHz. A successful implementation of such an optically addressed phased array requires addressing several key challenges. Photonic generation of an RF source with over a seven-octave bandwidth has been demonstrated in the last few years. However, one challenge which still remains is how to convey phased optical signals to downconversion modules and antennas. Therefore, a feed network with phase sweeping capability and low excessive phase noise needs to be developed. Another key challenge is to develop an ultra-wideband array antenna. Modern frontends require antennas to be compact, planar, and low-profile in addition to possessing broad bandwidth, conforming to stringent space, weight, cost, and power constraints. To address these issues, I will study broadband and miniaturization

  16. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The solar cell module process development activities in the areas of surface preparation are presented. The process step development was carried out on texture etching including the evolution of a conceptual process model for the texturing process; plasma etching; and diffusion studies that focused on doped polymer diffusion sources. Cell processing was carried out to test process steps and a simplified diode solar cell process was developed. Cell processing was also run to fabricate square cells to populate sample minimodules. Module fabrication featured the demonstration of a porcelainized steel glass structure that should exceed the 20 year life goal of the low cost silicon array program. High efficiency cell development was carried out in the development of the tandem junction cell and a modification of the TJC called the front surface field cell. Cell efficiencies in excess of 16 percent at AM1 have been attained with only modest fill factors. The transistor-like model was proposed that fits the cell performance and provides a guideline for future improvements in cell performance.

  17. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO2 estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO2 maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  18. Seismic vertical array analysis for phase decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kunikazu; Sasatani, Tsutomu

    2008-08-01

    We propose a vertical array analysis method that decomposes complex seismograms into body and surface wave time histories by using a velocity structure at the vertical array site. We assume that the vertical array records are the sum of vertically incident plane P and S waves, and laterally incident Love and Rayleigh waves. Each phase at the surface is related to that at a certain depth by the transfer function in the frequency domain; the transfer function is obtained by Haskell's matrix method, assuming a 1-D velocity structure. Decomposed P, S and surface waves at the surface are estimated from the vertical array records and the transfer functions by using a least-squares method in the frequency domain; their time histories are obtained by the inverse Fourier transform. We carried out numerical tests of this method based on synthetic vertical array records consisting of vertically incident plane P and S waves and laterally incident plane Love and Rayleigh waves. Perfect results of the decomposed P, S, Love and Rayleigh waves were obtained for synthetic records without noise. A test of the synthetic records in which a small amount of white noise was added yielded a reasonable result for the decomposed P, S and surface waves. We applied this method to real vertical array records from the Ashigara valley, a moderate-sized sedimentary valley. The array records from two earthquakes occurring at depths of 123 and 148 km near the array (epicentral distance of about 31 km) exhibited long-duration later phases. The analysis showed that duration of the decomposed S waves was a few seconds and that the decomposed surface waves appeared a few seconds after the direct S-wave arrival and had very long duration. This result indicated that the long-duration later phases were generated not by multireflected S waves, but by basin-induced surface waves.

  19. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  20. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  3. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  4. Design and analysis of an ultrasonic transducer micro-array for near-field imaging of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Clyde C.

    Obtaining quantitative data about tissue has been a goal of ultrasonography since its inception, such data provides invaluable information for diagnosing disease. Traditional ultrasound imaging techniques (B-Mode, C-Mode and M-Mode) have been used to diagnose diseases from images of organs. However, images obtained via these techniques, in some cases, provide limited information about the pathology of the tissues being examined. This is because much of the information that is used for diagnosis depends upon qualitative cues emerging from the echoic profiles of bulk tissue properties. In order to obtain quantitative information about tissue properties, an understanding of the interaction of the ultrasound system proper and tissue is necessary. This requires the creation of detailed models of both the ultrasound imaging system and tissue. These models enable us to obtain quantitative information about tissue, by examining features of backscattered data, generated by the interaction of the ultrasonic imaging system with the tissue under examination. Imaging systems are typically designed with little consideration of the constraints of the imaging environment or the acoustic features of the tissue which include impedance, scatterer size, shape and density. We propose to take into account the physical properties of tissue in designing ultrasonic imaging arrays. We develop a framework for designing ultrasonic imaging systems (primarily the transducer and transducer array) with physical parameters that are tuned to detect specific features of tissue. The design methodology obtains the parameters of an NxN transducer array constrained to a size of e.g. 2mm x 2mm (the size required for medical imaging). The physical parameters of the transducer elements are also obtained for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology. In addition to the overall size constraints (2 mm x 2 mm), several other constraints put limitation upon the possible system

  5. Simulation of Transrib HIFU Propagation and the Strategy of Phased-array Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Mingjun

    Liver ablation is challenging in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) because of the presence of ribs and great inhomogeneity in multi-layer tissue. In this study, angular spectrum approach (ASA) has been used in the wave propagation from phased-array HIFU transducer, and diffraction, attenuation and the nonlinearity are accounted for by means of second order operator splitting method. Bioheat equation is used to simulate the subsequent temperature elevation and lesion formation with the formation of shifted focus and multiple foci. In summary, our approach could simulate the performance of phased-array HIFU in the clinics and then develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  6. Phase estimation for a phased array therapeutic interstitial ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenya; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals about high intensity ultrasound interstitial therapy simulation. The simulated phased array ultrasound probe allows a dynamic electronic focusing of the therapeutic beam. In order to maximize the power deposit at the focal point we propose a method which allows to optimally defining the phase shift of the electrical control signal for each individual element.

  7. Proposed Functional Description for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1996-01-01

    Generally speaking, many photonic engineers, while working in a systems development mode, still focus on presenting the unique physical details of the optical elements, instead of using functional representation to describe the system. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce symbols that can be used to represent the functional intent of most of the phased array architecture.

  8. The phase-scanned commutated array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R.

    An array feed network has been developed to demonstrate the P-Scan principle incorporating separate elevation and azimuth antennas. The microwave lens, switches, phase shifters, and amplitude control are discussed, and beam formation is described. The increased scan of the system is addressed, and the results of tests on the system are discussed.

  9. Phase calibration scheme for a ``T'' array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, R.; Subramanian, K. R.; Sastry, Ch. V.

    1999-10-01

    A calibration scheme based on closure and redundancy techniques is described for correcting the phase errors in the complex visibilities observed with a T-shaped radio interferometer array. Practical details of the scheme are illustrated with reference to the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH).

  10. Microelectromechanical Switches for Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Scardelletti, Maximillian; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the fabrication and testing of a MicroElectro-Mechanical (MEM) microstrip series switch. This switch is being developed for use in a K-band phased array antenna that NASA will use for communication links in its Earth orbiting satellites. Preliminary insertion loss and isolation measurements are presented.

  11. Fast-pressure field calculations applied to large spherical ultrasound phased arrays designed for thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J.

    2005-04-01

    Large spherical ultrasound phased arrays are ideal for simulation studies of thermal therapy devices designed for noninvasive breast cancer treatments. In a spherical array, circular sources packed in a dense hexagonal arrangement facilitate the most efficient use of the available aperture. Circular sources are also preferred for simulations of large phased arrays because pressure fields are computed more rapidly for circular pistons than for any other transducer geometry. The computation time is further reduced for circular transducers with grid sectoring. With this approach, the grid of computed pressures is divided into several regions, and then grid sectoring applies more abscissas in regions where the pressure integral converges slowly and fewer abscissas where the integral converges rapidly. As a result, the peak value of the numerical error is roughly the same in each sector, so the maximum numerical error in the computed field is maintained while the computation time is significantly reduced. The grid sectoring approach is extended to three dimensions (3D) for pressure field calculations with spherical arrays. In 3D calculations, the sectors are represented by cones, and the intersections between the computational grid and these cones define the boundaries required for grid sectoring. When these cone structures are applied to spherical phased arrays, 3D grid sectoring calculations rapidly compute the pressure fields so that the time required for array design and evaluation is substantially reduced.

  12. Development of phased array techniques to improve characterization of defect located in a component of complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Mahaut, Steve; Roy, Olivier; Beroni, Claude; Rotter, Bernhard

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of complex geometry components has to cope with different problems: limited access of the area assumed to be insonified, beam misorientation and distortions, loss of sensitivity. Those harmful effects can lead to inspection performance degradations, especially in terms of defect detection and characterization. Phased array techniques may be used to overcome such difficulties, as they can provide an optimal mastering of the ultrasonic beam radiated through the inspected component. This paper presents some applications of phased array inspections carried out by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French Company of Electricity (EDF) in the framework of R&D studies. Inspections of components with varying profile (of planar and cylindrical parts, misalignment and local depression), and containing artificial reflectors have been carried out with pulse echo immersion techniques, using standard and phased arrays transducers. Optimal delay laws have been applied to preserve the beam characteristics in spite of the varying profile geometry encountered as the phased array transducer was moved over the component. Those delay laws allow to efficiently compensate the beam distortions generated by the profile geometry. They were computed using a specific model and compared to experimental delays obtained using through transmission tests. Experimental and simulation results showed that the defect detection and characterization performances were greatly enhanced using phased array techniques. In the presented examples, with standard transducers, defects located below the irregular parts of the specimen were partially detected, in accurately located or even missed, whereas phased array inspections enabled to detect and locate all of these defects.

  13. On the steering of sound energy through a supercritical plate by a near-field transducer array.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Hughes, W Jack; Hambric, Stephen A

    2008-05-01

    The ability to direct sound energy through the flexural vibrations of a submerged plate at various angles of incidence using a near-field transducer array is investigated. An alumina bar is placed in front of a one-dimensional, eight-element transducer array, between the array and the water. Operating in a receive mode, data were taken as a function of angle of incidence and compared to data taken without the presence of the alumina bar. The array was also operated in transmit mode and results were compared to corresponding receive mode data, showing that reciprocity holds. Results show that in fact sound energy can be steered through a plate, and that the measurement method used provides a convenient method of measuring the angular dependence of transmission through a plate, including measurements at frequencies above the plate's critical frequency. Experimental results of sound transmission versus angle of incidence of finite sized plates agree qualitatively with theoretical results from an analysis of the transmission through an unbounded flexible partition.

  14. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  15. A Flexible Ultrasound Transducer Array with Micro-Machined Bulk PZT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Xue, Qing-Tang; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Shu, Yi; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Xie, Dan; Luo, Jian-Wen; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel flexible piezoelectric micro-machined ultrasound transducer, which is based on PZT and a polyimide substrate. The transducer is made on the polyimide substrate and packaged with medical polydimethylsiloxane. Instead of etching the PZT ceramic, this paper proposes a method of putting diced PZT blocks into holes on the polyimide which are pre-etched. The device works in d31 mode and the electromechanical coupling factor is 22.25%. Its flexibility, good conformal contacting with skin surfaces and proper resonant frequency make the device suitable for heart imaging. The flexible packaging ultrasound transducer also has a good waterproof performance after hundreds of ultrasonic electric tests in water. It is a promising ultrasound transducer and will be an effective supplementary ultrasound imaging method in the practical applications. PMID:25625905

  16. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  17. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  18. A photoacoustic imaging system employing a curved-phased ultrasonic array and parallel electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurudis, Anastasios; Huang, Fei; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Castillo, Diego; Wang, Lihong V.; Zhu, Quing

    2006-02-01

    Real-time photoacoustic imaging requires ultrasonic array receivers and parallel data acquisition systems for the simultaneous detection of weak photoacoustic signals. In this paper, we introduce a newly completed ultrasonic receiving array system and report preliminary results of our measured point spread function. The system employs a curved ultrasonic phased array consisting of 128-elements, which span a quarter of a complete circle. The center frequency of the array is 5 MHz and the bandwidth is greater than 60%. In order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio for photoacoustic signal detection, we utilized special designs for the analog front-end electronics. First, the 128 transducer-element signals were routed out using a 50-Ohm impedance matching PCB board to sustain signal integrity. We also utilize 128 low-noise pre-amplifiers, connected directly to the ultrasonic transducer, to amplify the weak photoacoustic signals before they were multiplexed to a variable-gain multi-stage amplifier chain. All front-end circuits were placed close to the transducer array to minimize signal lose due to cables and therefore improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Sixteen analog-to-digital converters were used to sample signals at a rate of 40 mega-samples per second with a resolution of 10-bits per sample. This allows us to perform a complete electronic scan of all 128 elements using just eight laser pulses.

  19. Two-dimensional ultrasound receive array using an angle-tuned Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor for transducer field characterization and transmission ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul Christopher

    2005-06-01

    A 2-D optical ultrasound receive array has been investigated. The transduction mechanism is based upon the detection of acoustically induced changes in the optical thickness of a thin polymer film acting as a Fabry-Perot sensing interferometer (FPI). By illuminating the sensor with a large-area laser beam and mechanically scanning a photodiode across the reflected output beam, while using a novel angle-tuned phase bias control system to optimally set the FPI working point, a notional 2-D ultrasound array was synthesized. To demonstrate the concept, 1-D and 2-D ultrasound field distributions produced by planar 3.5-MHz and focused 5-MHz PZT ultrasound transducers were mapped. The system was also evaluated by performing transmission ultrasound imaging of a spatially calibrated target. The "array" aperture, defined by the dimensions of the incident optical field, was elliptical, of dimensions 16 x 12 mm and spatially sampled in steps of 0.1 mm or 0.2 mm. Element sizes, defined by the photodiode aperture, of 0.8, 0.4, and 0.2 mm were variously used for these experiments. Two types of sensor were evaluated. One was a discrete 75-microm-thick polyethylene terephthalate FPI bonded to a polymer backing stub which had a wideband peak noise-equivalent pressure of 6.5 kPa and an acoustic bandwidth 12 MHz. The other was a 40-microm Parylene film FPI which was directly vacuum-deposited onto a glass backing stub and had an NEP of 8 kPa and an acoustic bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. It is considered that this approach offers an alternative to piezoelectric ultrasound arrays for transducer field characterization, transmission medical and industrial ultrasound imaging, biomedical photoacoustic imaging, and ultrasonic nondestructive testing.

  20. Photorefractive processing for large adaptive phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.; Wagner, Kelvin; Sarto, Anthony

    1996-03-01

    An adaptive null-steering phased-array optical processor that utilizes a photorefractive crystal to time integrate the adaptive weights and null out correlated jammers is described. This is a beam-steering processor in which the temporal waveform of the desired signal is known but the look direction is not. The processor computes the angle(s) of arrival of the desired signal and steers the array to look in that direction while rotating the nulls of the antenna pattern toward any narrow-band jammers that may be present. We have experimentally demonstrated a simplified version of this adaptive phased-array-radar processor that nulls out the narrow-band jammers by using feedback-correlation detection. In this processor it is assumed that we know a priori only that the signal is broadband and the jammers are narrow band. These are examples of a class of optical processors that use the angular selectivity of volume holograms to form the nulls and look directions in an adaptive phased-array-radar pattern and thereby to harness the computational abilities of three-dimensional parallelism in the volume of photorefractive crystals. The development of this processing in volume holographic system has led to a new algorithm for phased-array-radar processing that uses fewer tapped-delay lines than does the classic time-domain beam former. The optical implementation of the new algorithm has the further advantage of utilization of a single photorefractive crystal to implement as many as a million adaptive weights, allowing the radar system to scale to large size with no increase in processing hardware.

  1. Oil-water two-phase flow measurement with combined ultrasonic transducer and electrical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chao; Yuan, Ye; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Dong, Feng

    2016-12-01

    A combination of ultrasonic transducers operated in continuous mode and a conductance/capacitance sensor (UTCC) is proposed to estimate the individual flow velocities in oil-water two-phase flows. Based on the Doppler effect, the transducers measure the flow velocity and the conductance/capacitance sensor estimates the phase fraction. A set of theoretical correlations based on the boundary layer models of the oil-water two-phase flow was proposed to describe the velocity profile. The models were separately established for the dispersion flow and the separate flow. The superficial flow velocity of each phase is calculated with the velocity measured in the sampling volume of the ultrasonic transducer with the phase fraction through the velocity profile models. The measuring system of the UTCC was designed and experimentally verified on a multiphase flow loop. The results indicate that the proposed system and correlations estimate the overall flow velocity at an uncertainty of U J   =  0.038 m s-1, and the water superficial velocity at U Jw   =  0.026 m s-1, and oil superficial velocity at U Jo   =  0.034 m s-1. The influencing factors of uncertainty were analyzed.

  2. Equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction sizing with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic phased array transducers can be used to extend traditional time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) crack sizing, resulting in more quantitative information about the crack being obtained. Traditional TOFD yields a single length parameter, while the equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction crack sizing method (EFTOFD) described here uses data from multiple look-angles to fit an equivalent degenerate ellipsoid to the crack. The size and orientation of the equivalent flaw can be used to estimate the actual crack size.

  3. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  4. Brazilian Decimetric Array (Phase-I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Ramesh, R.; Cecatto, J. R.; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Rosa, R. R.; Andrade, M. C.; Stephany, S.; Cividanes, L. B. T.; Miranda, C. A. I.; Botti, L. C. L.; Boas, J. W. S. V.; Saito, J. H.; Moron, C. E.; Mascarenhas, N. D.; Subramanian, K. R.; Sundararajan, M. S.; Ebenezer, E.; Sankararaman, M. R.

    2007-05-01

    An East West, one-dimensional radio interferometer array consisting of five parabolic dish antennas has been set up at Cachoeira Paulista (longitude 45°0‧20″ W, latitude 22°41‧19″ S) for observations of the Sun and some of the strong sidereal sources by the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Brazil. This is Phase-I of the proposed Brazilian Decimetric Array and can be operated at any frequency in the range 1.2 1.7 GHz. The instrument has been in operation since November 2004 onwards at 1.6 GHz. The angular and temporal resolutions at this frequency are ˜3‧ and 100 ms, respectively. Details of the array, analog/digital receiver system, and a preliminary East West one-dimensional solar image at the 1.6 GHz are presented in this paper.

  5. Integrated transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrzycki, Marek; Parameswaran, M.; Chapman, Glenn H.

    1995-06-01

    In the paper we discuss possible solutions to problems pertaining the implementation of integrated transducer systems, based on examples of WSI image transducers, magnetic field sensors and tactile sensors arrays, as well as arrays of chemical sensors. We also present the issues common to large area transducer arrays, such as building-in redundancy into WSI transducer arrays, and frequency domain circuits for the future communication pathway in integrated transducer systems. Advantages of standard CMOS technology, enhanced with various post-fabrication processes such as silicon micromachining and laser linking, are also stressed.

  6. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  7. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array integrated with complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Fung, S.; Wang, Q.; Horsley, D. A.; Tang, H.; Boser, B. E.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.

    2015-06-29

    This paper presents an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor based on a 24 × 8 array of 22 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs) with 100 μm pitch, fully integrated with 180 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry through eutectic wafer bonding. Each PMUT is directly bonded to a dedicated CMOS receive amplifier, minimizing electrical parasitics and eliminating the need for through-silicon vias. The array frequency response and vibration mode-shape were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometry and verified via finite element method simulation. The array's acoustic output was measured using a hydrophone to be ∼14 kPa with a 28 V input, in reasonable agreement with predication from analytical calculation. Pulse-echo imaging of a 1D steel grating is demonstrated using electronic scanning of a 20 × 8 sub-array, resulting in 300 mV maximum received amplitude and 5:1 contrast ratio. Because the small size of this array limits the maximum image size, mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom (10 mm × 8 mm) at a 1.2 mm distance from the array.

  8. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array integrated with complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, H.; Fung, S.; Wang, Q.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.; Boser, B. E.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor based on a 24 × 8 array of 22 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs) with 100 μm pitch, fully integrated with 180 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry through eutectic wafer bonding. Each PMUT is directly bonded to a dedicated CMOS receive amplifier, minimizing electrical parasitics and eliminating the need for through-silicon vias. The array frequency response and vibration mode-shape were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometry and verified via finite element method simulation. The array's acoustic output was measured using a hydrophone to be ˜14 kPa with a 28 V input, in reasonable agreement with predication from analytical calculation. Pulse-echo imaging of a 1D steel grating is demonstrated using electronic scanning of a 20 × 8 sub-array, resulting in 300 mV maximum received amplitude and 5:1 contrast ratio. Because the small size of this array limits the maximum image size, mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom (10 mm × 8 mm) at a 1.2 mm distance from the array.

  9. Two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for a miniature integrated volumetric ultrasonic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xuefeng; Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, Arif S.; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Huang, Yongli; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2005-04-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and characterized two-dimensional 16x16-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays. The CMUT array elements have a 250-μm pitch, and when tested in immersion, have a 5 MHz center frequency and 99% fractional bandwidth. The fabrication process is based on standard silicon micromachining techniques and therefore has the advantages of high yield, low cost, and ease of integration. The transducers have a Si3N4 membrane and are fabricated on a 400-μm thick silicon substrate. A low parasitic capacitance through-wafer via connects each CMUT element to a flip-chip bond pad on the back side of the wafer. Each through wafer via is 20 μm in diameter and 400 μm deep. The interconnects form metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junctions with the surrounding high-resistivity silicon substrate to establish isolation and to reduce parasitic capacitance. Each through-wafer via has less than 0.06 pF of parasitic capacitance. We have investigated a Au-In flip-chip bonding process to connect the 2D CMUT array to a custom integrated circuit (IC) with transmit and receive electronics. To develop this process, we fabricated fanout structures on silicon, and flip-chip bonded these test dies to a flat surface coated with gold. The average series resistance per bump is about 3 Ohms, and 100% yield is obtained for a total of 30 bumps.

  10. A Phased Array Magnetometer for Sensing IED

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-04

    of information is estimated to average 1 tiour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering...Device Organization (JIEDDO) (Contract No: FA9550-07- 1 -0107) Program Dr. Byung-Lip "Les" Lee Manager Project Title A Phased Array...Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 Voice: 310-825-6030 Fax:310-206-2302 1 . OVERALL OBJECTIVE The objective of this project was to develop the fundamental

  11. Optical Matrix Inverter for Phased Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    cancelling was presented. -, 14 SUBJECTTERMS 15 NUMBER OF PAGES Phased Arrays, Optical Algebraic Processors, Optical Matrix 64 Inverter, Optical...optical algebraic processors to such problems. The advantages gained by using optical systems over their electronic counterparts are investigated...are both time consuming algebra problems. B. No a priori Information is Known This is the most general case where we assume no information about jammers

  12. Technology Development for Millimeter Wave Phased Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    design would use the technology of integration-the same technology that has brought us computing power at such a low cost. The integrated phased array ...circuitry and/or the feed network, which can degrade sidelobe levels or polarization. A Two Layer Substrate Figure 2.8 shows a possible two-layer design ...feed substrates. Coupling is again through aper- tures in the ground plane of the antenna substrate. This design also allows the use of a low dielectric

  13. Phased array antenna for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing a distributed phased array antenna at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center as a possible upgrade for the Space Shuttle Orbiter S-band phase modulation communications system. The antenna consists of an eight-element transmit section, eight-element receive section, and a single L-band receive element. The antenna design is constrained by the existing Orbiter system and space environment. The solution to the interface design problems led to an antenna system which provides improved link margins and yet supports previous operational configurations. This paper describes the system development, antenna hardware, and the interface consideration which led to the final design.

  14. Dynamic cardiac imaging using a focused, phased-array ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Kisslo, J A; vonRamm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1977-07-01

    A two-dimensional ultrasound imaging system capable of producing high resolution, cross-sectional images of the heart in real-time has been developed. This system relies upon phased-array principles to rapidly steer and focus the ultrasound beam through the cardiac structures under investigation. A hand-held, linear array of 24 transducers is manipulated on the anterior chest wall to image various cardiac structures. Images of high line density are presented in selectable sector arcs to a maximum of 90 degrees. This imaging system has proved particularly useful for the detection of a variety of left ventricular and cardiac valvular disease.

  15. Experimental characterization of ultrasonic phased arrays for the nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, L.; Wooh, S.C.

    1999-02-01

    Novel ultrasonic phased arrays were developed and their feasibility was tested for assessing the condition of concrete structures. These sensors are based on low frequency ultrasound technology, which, to date, has been the preferred method for concrete testing. By combining multiple transducer elements in a linear configuration, dynamic phase focusing and steering of the ultrasound beam is possible. An automated testing assembly was used to assess the steering and focusing performance of the array in a cementitious medium. Experimental results demonstrate excellent steerability and accuracy when compared to the numerical simulation presented. The effective steering and focusing behavior in concrete signifies that phased arrays can be used as the primary imaging and scanning device for large scale concrete structures.

  16. A 256×2562-D array transducer with Row-column addressing for 3-D Rectilinear Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Yen, Jesse T.

    2010-01-01

    We present simulation and experimental results from a 5 MHz, 256 × 256 2-D (65,536 elements, 38.4 mm × 38.4 mm) 2-D array transducer with row-column addressing. The main benefits of this design are a reduced number of interconnects, a modified transmit/receive switching scheme with a simple diode circuit, and an ability to perform volumetric imaging of targets near the transducer with transmit beamforming in azimuth and receive beamforming in elevation. The final dimensions of a transducer were 38.4 mm × 38.4 mm × 300 μm. After prototyping a row-column transducer, the series resonance impedance was 104 Ω at 5.4 MHz. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth was 53% with a center frequency of 5.3 MHz. The SNR at the transmit focus was measured to be 30 dB. At 5 MHz, the average nearest neighbor crosstalk was -25 dB. In this paper, we present 3-D images of 5 pairs of nylon wires embedded in a clear gelatin phantom and of an 8 mm diameter cylindrical anechoic cyst phantom acquired from a 256 × 256 2-D array transducer made from a 1–3 composite. We display the azimuth and elevation B-scans as well as the C-scan. The cross-section of the wires is visible in the azimuth B-scan while the long axes can be seen in the elevation B-scan and C-scans. The pair of wires with 1 mm axial separation is discernible in the elevational B-scan while all the pairs of wires were distinguishable in the short-axis B-scan. Using a single wire from the wire target phantom, the measured lateral beamwidth was 0.68 mm and 0.70 mm at 30 mm depth in transmit beamforming and receive beamforming respectively compared to the simulated beamwidth of 0.55 mm. The cross-section of the cyst is visible in the azimuth B-scan while the long axes can be seen in the elevation B-scan and C-scans as a rectangle. PMID:19406713

  17. A 256 x 256 2-D array transducer with row-column addressing for 3-D rectilinear imaging.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Yen, Jesse T

    2009-04-01

    We present simulation and experimental results from a 5-MHz, 256 x 256 2-D (65,536 elements, 38.4 x 38.4 mm) 2-D array transducer with row-column addressing. The main benefits of this design are a reduced number of interconnects, a modified transmit/receive switching scheme with a simple diode circuit, and an ability to perform volumetric imaging of targets near the transducer with transmit beamforming in azimuth and receive beamforming in elevation. The final dimensions of the transducer were 38.4 mm x 38.4 mm x 300 microm. After a row-column transducer was prototyped, the series resonance impedance was 104 Omega at 5.4 MHz. The measured -6 dB fractional bandwidth was 53% with a center frequency of 5.3 MHz. The SNR at the transmit focus was measured to be 30 dB. At 5 MHz, the average nearest neighbor crosstalk was -25 dB. In this paper, we present 3-D images of both 5 pairs of nylon wires embedded in a clear gelatin phantom and an 8 mm diameter cylindrical anechoic cyst phantom acquired from a 256 x 256 2-D array transducer made from a 1-3 composite. We display the azimuth and elevation B-scans as well as the C-scan for each image. The cross-section of the wires is visible in the azimuth B-scan, and the long axes can be seen in the elevation B-scan and C-scans. The pair of wires with 1-mm axial separation is discernible in the elevational B-scan. When a single wire from the wire target phantom was used, the measured lateral beamwidth was 0.68 mm and 0.70 mm at 30 mm depth in transmit beamforming and receive beamforming, respectively, compared with the simulated beamwidth of 0.55 mm. The cross-section of the cyst is visible in the azimuth B-scan whereas the long axes can be seen as a rectangle in the elevation B-scan and C-scans.

  18. Proceedings of the Third EPRI Phased Array Ultrasound Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-01

    Phased array technology for ultrasonic examination is providing innovative solutions for nuclear in-service examination applications. EPRI has been a prime mover in the development and deployment of phased array ultrasound applications in the domestic nuclear market over the past decade. As part of this strategic effort, EPRI has hosted a series of seminars on phased array technology and its applications.

  19. Chemometric Classification of Unknown Vapors by Conversion of Sensor Array Pattern Vectors to Vapor Descriptors: Extension from Mass-Transducing Sensors To Volume-Transducing Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2001-06-28

    A new chemometric method was recently described for classifying unknowns by transforming the vector containing the responses from a multivariate detector to a vector containing descriptors of the detected analyte (Grate et al. 1999). This approach was derived for sensor arrays where each sensor's signal is proportional to the amount of vapor sorbed by a polymer on the sensor surface. In this case, the response is proportional to the partition coefficient, K, and the concentration of the vapor in the gas phase, Cv, where K is the ratio of the concentration of vapor in the sorbent polymer phase, Cs, to Cv.

  20. First IDA Submittal for Transducer Element Design for Loosely Packed Planar Array Common Problem 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-05-11

    FIRST IDA SUBMITTAL FOR TRANSDUCER ELEMENT DESIGN FOR LOOSELY PACKED PLANAR ARRAY CID COMMON PROBLEM 1. 1 Submitted to Conformal/Planar Array Project...R4JEN2’ TRACOR, INC. MID BAND 6..I ~JUUliL-UnLU i C.P. 1 5 INCH CIRCULRR HERD MIO BRINO LPz.3777 QP=E +iD L1oooo -i00 F -WFC 4q(TI’ ERT R-EC c-AE O ALPPE...8217 LcO [a x I. Cr l Z2) D zS x) q." L)I I Iu T~ xj Co4 C3= 1-L Z (nw x V O vV 5% C3 CD .* * -3x U l 1C .) uw wU -A CID .4 i I--I- U- 49 (1’)W uri J m LAJ 0

  1. An Optical Phased Array for LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the development of an Optical Phased Array (OPA) micromechanical system (MEMS) used for beam steering, which shows great advantages over previous mechanisms such as opto-mechanical, acousto-optical (AO) or electro-optical (EO). We aim to integrate the OPA MEMS system into the application of automobile navigation, which is currently primarily dominated by opto-mechanical scanning based systems. Opto-mechanical scanning devices are usually bulky and relatively slow, while competing technologies (AO, EO) utilize devices that while small in size, cannot provide the steering speeds and versatility necessary for many applications. In drawing from phased array concepts that revolutionized RADAR technology by providing a compact, agile alternative to mechanically steered technology, the OPA based LIDAR program seeks to integrate thousands of closely packed optical emitting facets, precise relative electronic phase control of these facets, and all within a very small form factor. Comparing with other competing LIDAR system, the OPA based LIDAR system will have multiple degrees of freedom for phase control which enables not only agile beam steering but also beam forming and multiple beam generation, greatly expanding the diversity of applications.

  2. Extension of the crosstalk cancellation method in ultrasonic transducer arrays from the harmonic regime to the transient one.

    PubMed

    Bybi, A; Grondel, S; Assaad, J; Hladky-Hennion, A-C

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a procedure to extend the crosstalk correction method presented in a previous paper [A. Bybi, S. Grondel, J. Assaad, A.-C. Hladky-Hennion, M. Rguiti, Reducing crosstalk in array structures by controlling the excitation voltage of individual elements: a feasibility study, Ultrasonics, 53 (6) (2013) 1135-1140] from the harmonic regime to the transient one. For this purpose a part of an ultrasonic transducer array radiating in water is modeled around the frequency 0.5 MHz using the finite element method. The study is carried out at low frequency in order to respect the same operating conditions than the previous paper. This choice facilitated the fabrication of the transducer arrays and the comparison of the numerical results with the experimental ones. The modeled array is composed of seventeen elements with the central element excited, while the others are grounded. The matching layers and the backing are not taken into account which limits the crosstalk only to the piezoelectric elements and fluid. This consideration reduces the structure density mesh and results in faster computation time (about 25 min for each configuration using a computer with a processor Intel Core i5-3210M, frequency 2.5 GHz and having 4 Go memory (RAM)). The novelty of this research work is to prove the efficiency of the crosstalk correction method in large frequency band as it is the case in medical imaging. The numerical results show the validity of the approach and demonstrate that crosstalk can be reduced by at least 13 dB in terms of displacement. Consequently, the directivity pattern of the individual element can be improved.

  3. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  4. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  5. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  6. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-04-28

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  7. Photonic Multitasking Interleaved Si Nanoantenna Phased Array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dianmin; Holsteen, Aaron L; Maguid, Elhanan; Wetzstein, Gordon; Kik, Pieter G; Hasman, Erez; Brongersma, Mark L

    2016-12-14

    Metasurfaces provide unprecedented control over light propagation by imparting local, space-variant phase changes on an incident electromagnetic wave. They can improve the performance of conventional optical elements and facilitate the creation of optical components with new functionalities and form factors. Here, we build on knowledge from shared aperture phased array antennas and Si-based gradient metasurfaces to realize various multifunctional metasurfaces capable of achieving multiple distinct functions within a single surface region. As a key point, we demonstrate that interleaving multiple optical elements can be accomplished without reducing the aperture of each subelement. Multifunctional optical elements constructed from Si-based gradient metasurface are realized, including axial and lateral multifocus geometric phase metasurface lenses. We further demonstrate multiwavelength color imaging with a high spatial resolution. Finally, optical imaging functionality with simultaneous color separation has been obtained by using multifunctional metasurfaces, which opens up new opportunities for the field of advanced imaging and display.

  8. Phase discriminating capacitive array sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor); Rahim, Wadi (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A phase discriminating capacitive sensor array system which provides multiple sensor elements which are maintained at a phase and amplitude based on a frequency reference provided by a single frequency stabilized oscillator. Sensor signals provided by the multiple sensor elements are controlled by multiple phase control units, which correspond to the multiple sensor elements, to adjust the sensor signals from the multiple sensor elements based on the frequency reference. The adjustment made to the sensor signals is indicated by output signals which indicate the proximity of the object. The output signals may also indicate the closing speed of the object based on the rate of change of the adjustment made, and the edges of the object based on a sudden decrease in the adjustment made.

  9. Development of a Twin Crystal Membrane Coupled Conformable Phased Array for the Inspection of Austenitic Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-01

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  10. Development of a twin crystal membrane coupled conformable phased array for the inspection of austenitic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-23

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  11. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  12. Phased Antenna Array for Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbiner, Dmitry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for phased array antennas are described. Supports for phased array antennas can be constructed by 3D printing. The array elements and combiner network can be constructed by conducting wire. Different parameters of the antenna, like the gain and directivity, can be controlled by selection of the appropriate design, and by electrical steering. Phased array antennas may be used for radio occultation measurements.

  13. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  14. A digital sidelobe canceller for a linear phased-array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardrop, B.; Gould, D. M.

    The design and performance of a three auxiliary sidelobe canceller for use with a 25 element S-band phased-array is described. The phased-array incorporates a resistive-matrix multiple-beam former, and so the auxiliaries can be either elements of the array, or other beams. Experimental results showing its performance against multiple noise jammers are presented.

  15. Frequency division multiple transmission method to utilize the wide bandwidth property of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Bae-Hyung; Jeon, Taeho; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Song, Jongkeun

    2013-03-01

    CMUT-on-ASIC integration techniques are promising for the development of lower cost smaller volume scanners with higher performance in terms of features and image qualities because it minimizes parasitic capacitances and ultimately improves signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Moreover, a frequency bandwidth of CMUT array is known as relatively broader than that of other ultrasonic transducer arrays. To utilize the wide bandwidth characteristic of the CMUT arrays, in this paper, we introduce a FDMA (frequency division multiple access) based ultrasound imaging technique using orthogonally band-divided coded signals to provide dynamic transmit focused imaging without sacrificing the frame rate. In the presented method, the orthogonal sub-band coded signals are simultaneously fired on multiple ranges, in which each signal is focused at a different range, in one transmission event. This paper also presents an ultrasound imageformation method and a modulation and demodulation process of orthogonal sub-band coded signals designed within the frequency bandwidth of the CMUT arrays. The presented method is verified by computer simulations using Field II and experiments. The simulation results using a computer generated tissue mimicking phantom show that the presented method can be achieved with both increased image quality and frame rate. The experimental results to verify the feasibility of the presented method using orthogonal sub-band coded signals show that the reflected signals from targets are successfully separated into two compressed signals. Currently, we are extending the presented approach to ultrasound imaging technique for volumetric ultrasound scanners using 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays.

  16. Noninvasive Ultrasonic Glucose Sensing with Large Pigs (∼200 Pounds) Using a Lightweight Cymbal Transducer Array and Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Joo; Werner, Jacob; Beebe, Joshua; Chan, Samantha; Barrie Smith, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    Background To prevent complications in diabetes, the proper management of blood glucose levels is essential. Since conventional glucose meters require pricking fingers or other areas of the skin, a noninvasive method for monitoring blood glucose levels is desired. Using a lightweight cymbal transducer array, this study was conducted to noninvasively determine the glucose levels of pigs having a similar size to humans. Method In vivo experiments using eight pigs (∼200 pounds) were performed in five groups. A cymbal array with four biosensors was attached to the axillary area of the pig. The array was operated at 20 kHz at special peak–temporal peak intensity (Isptp) equal to 50 or 100 mW/cm2 for 5, 10, or 20 minutes. After the ultrasound exposure, glucose concentrations of the interstitial fluid were determined using biosensors. For comparison, glucose levels of blood samples collected from the ear vein were measured by a commercial glucose meter. Result In comparison, glucose levels determined by a cymbal array and biosensor system were close to those measured by a glucose meter. After a 20-minute ultrasound exposure at Isptp = 100 mW/cm2, the average glucose level determined by the ultrasound system was 175 ± 7 mg/dl, which is close to 166 ± 5 mg/dl measured by the glucose meter. Conclusion Results indicate the feasibility of using a cymbal array for noninvasive glucose sensing on pigs having a similar size to humans. Further studies on the ultrasound conditions, such as frequency, intensity, and exposure time, will be continued for effective glucose sensing. PMID:20144290

  17. A high-speed photoacoustic tomography system based on a commercial ultrasound and a custom transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Cannata, Jonathan; DeBusschere, Derek; Hu, Changhong; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Building photoacoustic imaging systems by using stand-alone ultrasound (US) units makes it convenient to take advantage of the state-of-the-art ultrasonic technologies. However, the sometimes limited receiving sensitivity and the comparatively narrow bandwidth of commercial US probes with elements driving long cables may not be sufficient for high quality photoacoustic imaging. In this work, a high-speed photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system has been developed using a commercial US unit and a custom built 128-element PVDF transducer array. Since the US unit supports simultaneous signal acquisition from 64 parallel receive channels, PAT data for synthetic image formation from a 64 or 128 element array aperture can be acquired after a single or dual laser firing, respectively. The PVDF array provides satisfactory receiving sensitivity and uniquely broad detection bandwidth, which enables good image quality for tomographic photoacoustic imaging. A specially designed 128-channel preamplifier board that connects the preamps directly to the PVDF elements not only enables impedance matching but also further elevates the signal-to-noise ratio in detecting weak photoacoustic signals. To examine the performance of this imaging system, experiments on phantoms were conducted and the results were compared with those acquired with commercial US probes.

  18. Highly precise acoustic calibration method of ring-shaped ultrasound transducer array for plane-wave-based ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Takahide; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Atsuro; Tsubota, Yushi; Wu, Wenjing; Kawabata, Ken-ichi

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) is promising for a non-invasive, painless, operator-independent and quantitative system for breast-cancer screening. Assembly error, production tolerance, and aging-degradation variations of the hardwire components, particularly of plane-wave-based USCT systems, may hamper cost effectiveness, precise imaging, and robust operation. The plane wave is transmitted from a ring-shaped transducer array for receiving the signal at a high signal-to-noise-ratio and fast aperture synthesis. There are four signal-delay components: response delays in the transmitters and receivers and propagation delays depending on the positions of the transducer elements and their directivity. We developed a highly precise calibration method for calibrating these delay components and evaluated it with our prototype plane-wave-based USCT system. Our calibration method was found to be effective in reducing delay errors. Gaps and curves were eliminated from the plane wave, and echo images of wires were sharpened in the entire imaging area.

  19. Phased array ultrasonic approach to turbine blade attachment inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Nottingham, L.D.; Solomon, K.R.; Presson, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    In situations where particular combinations of material susceptibility, stress, steam conditions and steam chemistry come together, certain steam turbine rotors have exhibited stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the disk side of the blade attachments, where the blades are held to the disk. Cracking has been most prevalent in multiple-hook, fir-tree attachment designs and normally occurs in the corners of the fir-tree hooks. While attempts have been made to perform ultrasonic inspection of the complex fir-tree attachment geometries, results have been mixed. False calls, poor repeatability, a general lack of resolution and lack of a meaningful sizing capability are standing issues. A unique approach to this inspection features a phased array ultrasonic test system that can both focus the ultrasonic beam and steer it to different points within the complex geometry. The focused beam leads directly to significant improvements in detection performance and resolution, as well as the ability to estimate the size of an indication. The ability to steer the beam to different points within the attachment enables comprehensive examination of all critical locations without repeatedly changing and calibrating numerous transducers. Together these features provide more rapid inspections and improved reliability.

  20. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  1. Microfabrication of electrode patterns for high-frequency ultrasound transducer arrays.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, Anne L; García-Gancedo, Luis; Hutson, David; Démoré, Christine E M; McAneny, Jim J; Button, Tim W; Cochran, Sandy

    2012-08-01

    High-frequency ultrasound is needed for medical imaging with high spatial resolution. A key issue in the development of ultrasound imaging arrays to operate at high frequencies (≥30 MHz) is the need for photolithographic patterning of array electrodes. To achieve this directly on 1-3 piezocomposite, the material requires not only planar, parallel, and smooth surfaces, but also an epoxy composite filler that is resistant to chemicals, heat, and vacuum. This paper reports, first, on the surface finishing of 1-3 piezocomposite materials by lapping and polishing. Excellent surface flatness has been obtained, with an average surface roughness of materials as low as 3 nm and step heights between ceramic/polymer of ∼80 nm. Subsequently, high-frequency array elements were patterned directly on top of these surfaces using a photolithography process. A 30-MHz linear array electrode pattern with 50-μm element pitch has been patterned on the lapped and polished surface of a high-frequency 1-3 piezocomposite. Excellent electrode edge definition and electrical contact to the composite were obtained. The composite has been lapped to a final thickness of ∼55 μm. Good adhesion of electrodes on the piezocomposite has been achieved and electrical impedance measurements have demonstrated their basic functionality. The array was then packaged, and acoustic pulse-echo measurements were performed. These results demonstrate that direct patterning of electrodes by photolithography on 1-3 piezocomposite is feasible for fabrication of high-frequency ultrasound arrays. Furthermore, this method is more conducive to mass production than other reported array fabrication techniques.

  2. Stability of Programmable Shunt Valve Settings with Simultaneous Use of the Optune Transducer Array: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Viner, Jennifer A; Taylor, Jennie W; McDermott, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The Optune® transducer array (Novocure Ltd., Haifa, Israel) is an FDA-approved noninvasive regional therapy that aims to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via utilization of alternating electric fields. Some patients with GBM may develop hydrocephalus and benefit from subsequent shunt placement, but special attention must be paid to patients in whom programmable valves are utilized, given the potential effect of the magnetic fields on valve settings. We present the first case report illustrating the stability of programmable shunt valve settings in a neurosurgical patient undergoing therapy with the Optune device. In this study, shunt valve settings were stable over a period of five days despite Optune therapy. This is reassuring for patients with GBM who require simultaneous treatment with both the Optune device and a programmable shunt system. PMID:27551653

  3. Stability of Programmable Shunt Valve Settings with Simultaneous Use of the Optune Transducer Array: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Birk, Harjus S; Winkler, Ethan A; Viner, Jennifer A; Taylor, Jennie W; McDermott, Michael W

    2016-07-07

    The Optune® transducer array (Novocure Ltd., Haifa, Israel) is an FDA-approved noninvasive regional therapy that aims to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via utilization of alternating electric fields. Some patients with GBM may develop hydrocephalus and benefit from subsequent shunt placement, but special attention must be paid to patients in whom programmable valves are utilized, given the potential effect of the magnetic fields on valve settings. We present the first case report illustrating the stability of programmable shunt valve settings in a neurosurgical patient undergoing therapy with the Optune device. In this study, shunt valve settings were stable over a period of five days despite Optune therapy. This is reassuring for patients with GBM who require simultaneous treatment with both the Optune device and a programmable shunt system.

  4. Large Volume Coagulation Utilizing Multiple Cavitation Clouds Generated by Array Transducer Driven by 32 Channel Drive Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Asai, Ayumu; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment is a noninvasive treatment, in which focused ultrasound is generated outside the body and coagulates a diseased tissue. The advantage of this method is minimal physical and mental stress to the patient, and the disadvantage is the long treatment time caused by the smallness of the therapeutic volume by a single exposure. To improve the efficiency and shorten the treatment time, we are focusing attention on utilizing cavitation bubbles. The generated microbubbles can convert the acoustic energy into heat with a high efficiency. In this study, using the class D amplifiers, which we have developed, to drive the array transducer, we demonstrate a new method to coagulate a large volume by a single HIFU exposure through generating cavitation bubbles distributing in a large volume and vibrating all of them. As a result, the coagulated volume by the proposed method was 1.71 times as large as that of the conventional method.

  5. Phased-Array Method for the Ut-Inspection of French Rail Repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédif, P.; Plu, J.; Pouligny, P.; Poidevin, C.

    2008-02-01

    The SNCF (French National Railways) is repairing rails that have suffered surface damage. Gas inclusions present in repairs may induce cracking, which could affect the rail integrity. This paper presents a NDT phased-array method developed to detect and characterize small gas inclusions in the bulk of the repair. The method is based on the implementation of a contact phased-array transducer associated with a specific processing. The transducer is articulated to conform as much as possible to the nominal rail section. The use of a phased-array probe allows limitation of mechanical displacements to only one axis (along the longitudinal plane of the rail). Inspection in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the rail is performed through electronic commutation and beam steering. The data analysis is done using CIVA-Software. A processing based on ultrasonic field computation was developed. The method was experimentally assessed on real repairs in laboratory conditions. Experiments proved the capability of the method to detect, locate and categorize gas inclusions according to several ranges of size.

  6. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  7. S-band antenna phased array communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzer, D. R.; Chapman, J. E.; Griffin, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an S-band antenna phased array for spacecraft to spacecraft communication is discussed. The system requirements, antenna array subsystem design, and hardware implementation are examined. It is stated that the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost. The objectives of the development contract are defined as: (1) design of a medium gain active phased array S-band communications antenna, (2) development and test of a model of a seven element planar array of radiating elements mounted in the appropriate cavity matrix, and (3) development and test of a breadboard transmit/receive microelectronics module.

  8. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  9. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  10. PHASED ARRAY FEED CALIBRATION, BEAMFORMING, AND IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Jonathan; Elmer, Michael; Waldron, Jacob; Jones, David; Stemmons, Alan; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F.; Richard Fisher, J.; Norrod, Roger D.

    2010-03-15

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) for reflector antennas offer the potential for increased reflector field of view and faster survey speeds. To address some of the development challenges that remain for scientifically useful PAFs, including calibration and beamforming algorithms, sensitivity optimization, and demonstration of wide field of view imaging, we report experimental results from a 19 element room temperature L-band PAF mounted on the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope. Formed beams achieved an aperture efficiency of 69% and a system noise temperature of 66 K. Radio camera images of several sky regions are presented. We investigate the noise performance and sensitivity of the system as a function of elevation angle with statistically optimal beamforming and demonstrate cancelation of radio frequency interference sources with adaptive spatial filtering.

  11. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  12. Joint stars phased array radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnitkin, Harold

    1994-10-01

    The Joint STARS phased array radar system is capable of performing long range airborne surveillance and was used during the Persian Gulf war on two E8-A aircraft to fly many around-the-clock missions to monitor the Kuwait and Iraq battlefield from a safe distance behind the front lines. This paper is a follow-on to previous publications on the subject of the Joint STARS antenna and deals mainly with mission performance and technical aspects not previously covered. Radar data of troop movements and armament installations will be presented, a brief review of the antenna design is given, followed by technical discussions concerning the three-port interferometry, gain and sidelobe design approach, cost control, range test implementation and future improvements.

  13. Therapeutic Array Transducer Element Using Coresonance between Hemispherical Piezoceramic Shell and Water Sphere: Effect of Load Masses of Support and Electric Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsu, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    For therapeutic ultrasound array transducers, it is necessary to reduce the electrical impedance of their elements so that the transducer can produce high ultrasonic power at a relatively low drive voltage. For this purpose, a new concept of a breathing-mode piezoceramic transducer element has been proposed. Numerical simulation showed its low electric impedance as well as good acoustical coupling between the concave hemispherical piezoceramic shell, with a diameter on the order of a wavelength in water, and the volume of a water sphere half enclosed by the shell. In the preparation of a prototype transducer, the effect of additional load masses of the flange supporting the shell and the electric contact for driving the element was numerically analyzed in this paper.

  14. Modeling and optimization of non-phased two-dimensional ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Alexey A.

    Ultrasonic image acquisition with non-phased 2D arrays is a relatively new method in NDE inspection. Historically, ultrasonic array development progressed mostly in the medical imaging where phased arrays found a great application. However, in the field of NDE inspection of metals, heavy plastics and composites, and many other materials the applicability of phased arrays is often restricted due to physical limitations. On the other hand, using versatile systems with mechanical scanning is not always convenient. Therefore, non-phased arrays of independent elements have a strong potential for becoming a valuable tool for rapid ultrasonic image acquisition in the industrial environment as well as in many other areas where conventional methods may not be applicable. The main motivation of this work is to build the necessary mathematical apparatus for estimating the process of signal and image formation in such systems. A model of signal penetration through a complex multilayered structure with non-parallel interfaces is discussed in the plane-wave approximation. This model is then refined to finite-size transducers and finite-size defects inside the sample. A new method of obtaining the beam structure in such multi-layered media is presented. The advantage of this method is that it allows for a very fast calculation while the precision is still comparable to more precise and more computationally expensive methods. A new method of calculating the response of the transducer to defects inside the sample is presented and discussed. The results of numerical calculations using these two methods are discussed and compared with experimental data. Using these models, image formation algorithms together with new image refining techniques are discussed.

  15. First in vivo use of a capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array-based imaging and ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Douglas N; Truong, Uyen T; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Seo, Chi Hyung; Cannata, Jonathan; Dentinger, Aaron; Thomenius, Kai; de la Rama, Alan; Nguyen, Tho; Lin, Feng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; O'Donnell, Matt; Sahn, David J

    2012-02-01

    The primary objective was to test in vivo for the first time the general operation of a new multifunctional intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter constructed with a microlinear capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (ML-CMUT) imaging array. Secondarily, we examined the compatibility of this catheter with electroanatomic mapping (EAM) guidance and also as a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter. Preliminary thermal strain imaging (TSI)-derived temperature data were obtained from within the endocardium simultaneously during RFA to show the feasibility of direct ablation guidance procedures. The new 9F forward-looking ICE catheter was constructed with 3 complementary technologies: a CMUT imaging array with a custom electronic array buffer, catheter surface electrodes for EAM guidance, and a special ablation tip, that permits simultaneous TSI and RFA. In vivo imaging studies of 5 anesthetized porcine models with 5 CMUT catheters were performed. The ML-CMUT ICE catheter provided high-resolution real-time wideband 2-dimensional (2D) images at greater than 8 MHz and is capable of both RFA and EAM guidance. Although the 24-element array aperture dimension is only 1.5 mm, the imaging depth of penetration is greater than 30 mm. The specially designed ultrasound-compatible metalized plastic tip allowed simultaneous imaging during ablation and direct acquisition of TSI data for tissue ablation temperatures. Postprocessing analysis showed a first-order correlation between TSI and temperature, permitting early development temperature-time relationships at specific myocardial ablation sites. Multifunctional forward-looking ML-CMUT ICE catheters, with simultaneous intracardiac guidance, ultrasound imaging, and RFA, may offer a new means to improve interventional ablation procedures.

  16. Receiver Would Control Phasing of a Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Charles E.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    In a proposed digital signal-processing technique, a radio receiver would control the phasing of a phased-array antenna to aim the peaks of the antenna radiation pattern toward desired signal sources while aiming the nulls of the pattern toward interfering signal sources. The technique was conceived for use in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, for which the desired signal sources would be GPS satellites and typical interference sources would be terrestrial objects that cause multipath propagation. The technique could also be used to optimize reception in spread-spectrum cellular-telephone and military communication systems. During reception of radio signals in a conventional phased-array antenna system, received signals at their original carrier frequencies are phase-shifted, then combined by analog circuitry. The combination signal is then subjected to down-conversion and demodulation. In a system according to the proposed technique (see figure), the signal received by each antenna would be subjected to down-conversion, spread-spectrum demodulation, and correlation; this processing would be performed separately from, and simultaneously with, similar processing of signals received by the other antenna elements. Following analog down-conversion to baseband, the signals would be digitized, and all subsequent processing would be digital. In the digital process, residual carriers would be removed and each signal would be correlated with a locally generated model pseudorandum-noise code, all following normal GPS procedure. As part of this procedure, accumulated values would be added in software and the resulting signals would be phase-shifted in software by the amounts necessary to synthesize the desired antenna directional gain pattern of peaks and nulls. The principal advantage of this technique over the conventional radio-frequency-combining technique is that the parallel digital baseband processing of the signals from the various antenna elements would be

  17. Excitation of ultrasonic Lamb waves using a phased array system with two array probes: phantom and in vitro bone studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Le, Lawrence H; Tran, Tho N H T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Lou, Edmond H M

    2014-07-01

    Long bones are good waveguides to support the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves. The low-order guided waves have been consistently observed in quantitative ultrasound bone studies. Selective excitation of these low-order guided modes requires oblique incidence of the ultrasound beam using a transducer-wedge system. It is generally assumed that an angle of incidence, θi, generates a specific phase velocity of interest, co, via Snell's law, θi=sin(-1)(vw/co) where vw is the velocity of the coupling medium. In this study, we investigated the excitation of guided waves within a 6.3-mm thick brass plate and a 6.5-mm thick bovine bone plate using an ultrasound phased array system with two 0.75-mm-pitch array probes. Arranging five elements as a group, the first group of a 16-element probe was used as a transmitter and a 64-element probe was a receiver array. The beam was steered for six angles (0°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°) with a 1.6-MHz source signal. An adjoint Radon transform algorithm mapped the time-offset matrix into the frequency-phase velocity dispersion panels. The imaged Lamb plate modes were identified by the theoretical dispersion curves. The results show that the 0° excitation generated many modes with no modal discrimination and the oblique beam excited a spectrum of phase velocities spread asymmetrically about co. The width of the excitation region decreased as the steering angle increased, rendering modal selectivity at large angles. The phenomena were well predicted by the excitation function of the source influence theory. The low-order modes were better imaged at steering angle ⩾30° for both plates. The study has also demonstrated the feasibility of using the two-probe phased array system for future in vivo study.

  18. Feasibility of using lateral mode coupling method for a large scale ultrasound phased array for noninvasive transcranial therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    A hemispherical-focused, ultrasound phased array was designed and fabricated using 1372 cylindrical piezoelectric transducers that utilize lateral coupling for noninvasive transcranial therapy. The cylindrical transducers allowed the electrical impedance to be reduced by at least an order of magnitude, such that effective operation could be achieved without electronic matching circuits. In addition, the transducer elements generated the maximum acoustic average surface intensity of 27 W/cm(2). The array, driven at the low (306-kHz) or high frequency (840-kHz), achieved excellent focusing through an ex vivo human skull and an adequate beam steering range for clinical brain treatments. It could electronically steer the ultrasound beam over cylindrical volumes of 100-mm in diameter and 60-mm in height at 306 kHz, and 30-mm in diameter and 30-mm in height at 840 kHz. A scanning laser vibrometer was used to investigate the radial and length mode vibrations of the element. The maximum pressure amplitudes through the skull at the geometric focus were predicted to be 5.5 MPa at 306 kHz and 3.7 MPa at 840 kHz for RF power of 1 W on each element. This is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using cylindrical transducer elements and lateral coupling in construction of ultrasound phased arrays.

  19. Feasibility of Using Lateral Mode Coupling Method for a Large Scale Ultrasound Phased Array for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    A hemispherical-focused, ultrasound phased array was designed and fabricated using 1372 cylindrical piezoelectric transducers that utilize lateral coupling for noninvasive transcranial therapy. The cylindrical transducers allowed the electrical impedance to be reduced by at least an order of magnitude, such that effective operation could be achieved without electronic matching circuits. In addition, the transducer elements generated the maximum acoustic average surface intensity of 27 W/cm2. The array, driven at the low (306 kHz) or high frequency (840 kHz), achieved excellent focusing through an ex vivo human skull and an adequate beam steering range for clinical brain treatments. It could electronically steer the ultrasound beam over cylindrical volumes of 100 mm in diameter and 60 mm in height at 306 kHz, and 30-mm in diameter and 30-mm in height at 840 kHz. A scanning laser vibrometer was used to investigate the radial and length mode vibrations of the element. The maximum pressure amplitudes through the skull at the geometric focus were predicted to be 5.5 MPa at 306 kHz and 3.7 MPa at 840 kHz for RF power of 1 W on each element. This is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using cylindrical transducer elements and lateral coupling in construction of ultrasound phased arrays. PMID:19695987

  20. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  1. 3D Ultrasonic Needle Tracking with a 1.5D Transducer Array for Guidance of Fetal Interventions

    PubMed Central

    West, Simeon J.; Mari, Jean-Martial; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound image guidance is widely used in minimally invasive procedures, including fetal surgery. In this context, maintaining visibility of medical devices is a significant challenge. Needles and catheters can readily deviate from the ultrasound imaging plane as they are inserted. When the medical device tips are not visible, they can damage critical structures, with potentially profound consequences including loss of pregnancy. In this study, we performed 3D ultrasonic tracking of a needle using a novel probe with a 1.5D array of transducer elements that was driven by a commercial ultrasound system. A fiber-optic hydrophone integrated into the needle received transmissions from the probe, and data from this sensor was processed to estimate the position of the hydrophone tip in the coordinate space of the probe. Golay coding was used to increase the signal-to-noise (SNR). The relative tracking accuracy was better than 0.4 mm in all dimensions, as evaluated using a water phantom. To obtain a preliminary indication of the clinical potential of 3D ultrasonic needle tracking, an intravascular needle insertion was performed in an in vivo pregnant sheep model. The SNR values ranged from 12 to 16 at depths of 20 to 31 mm and at an insertion angle of 49° relative to the probe surface normal. The results of this study demonstrate that 3D ultrasonic needle tracking with a fiber-optic hydrophone sensor and a 1.5D array is feasible in clinically realistic environments. PMID:28111644

  2. The Design and Analysis of Split Row-Column Addressing Array for 2-D Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Jia, Yanping; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-01-01

    For 3-D ultrasound imaging, the row-column addressing (RCA) with 2N connections for an N × N 2-D array makes the fabrication and interconnection simpler than the fully addressing with N2 connections. However, RCA degrades the image quality because of defocusing in signal channel direction in the transmit event. To solve this problem, a split row-column addressing scheme (SRCA) is proposed in this paper. Rather than connecting all the elements in the signal channel direction together, this scheme divides the elements in the signal channel direction into several disconnected blocks, thus enables focusing beam access in both signal channel and switch channel directions. Selecting an appropriate split scheme is the key for SRCA to maintaining a reasonable tradeoff between the image quality and the number of connections. Various split schemes for a 32 × 32 array are fully investigated with point spread function (PSF) analysis and imaging simulation. The result shows the split scheme with five blocks (4, 6, 12, 6, and 4 elements of each block) can provide similar image quality to fully addressing. The splitting schemes for different array sizes from 16 × 16 to 96 × 96 are also discussed. PMID:27690029

  3. The Design and Analysis of Split Row-Column Addressing Array for 2-D Transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Jia, Yanping; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-09-27

    For 3-D ultrasound imaging, the row-column addressing (RCA) with 2N connections for an N × N 2-D array makes the fabrication and interconnection simpler than the fully addressing with N² connections. However, RCA degrades the image quality because of defocusing in signal channel direction in the transmit event. To solve this problem, a split row-column addressing scheme (SRCA) is proposed in this paper. Rather than connecting all the elements in the signal channel direction together, this scheme divides the elements in the signal channel direction into several disconnected blocks, thus enables focusing beam access in both signal channel and switch channel directions. Selecting an appropriate split scheme is the key for SRCA to maintaining a reasonable tradeoff between the image quality and the number of connections. Various split schemes for a 32 × 32 array are fully investigated with point spread function (PSF) analysis and imaging simulation. The result shows the split scheme with five blocks (4, 6, 12, 6, and 4 elements of each block) can provide similar image quality to fully addressing. The splitting schemes for different array sizes from 16 × 16 to 96 × 96 are also discussed.

  4. Phased-array ultrasound technology enhances accuracy of dual frequency ultrasound measurements - towards improved ultrasound bone diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Hans; Malo, Markus K H; Liukkonen, Jukka; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Overlying soft tissues attenuate ultrasound backscattered from bone, complicating diagnostics of osteoporosis at the most important fracture sites. Dual-frequency ultrasound technique (DFUS) has been proposed to solve this problem through determination of thickness and composition of overlying soft tissue. This study applies DFUS technique for the first time with a phased-array transducer to investigate if the thickness of two interfering layers (oil and water) can be accurately determined in a variety of configurations. Results indicate that DFUS may be used with phased-array ultrasound systems, making them a suitable combination to consider in future development of clinical in vivo ultrasound methodologies.

  5. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas Keith; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discussed a novel phased array with an emphasis to simplify the array feed. Specifically, we will demonstrate a simple, low cost feeding approach by mechanically controlling the substrate thickness. The array feed lines are constructed from parallel plate transmission lines whose thickness are adjusted to control their effective dielectric constant (Epsilon_eff). As a result the phase delay/excitation at each array element will be adjusted per desired beam direction. The proposed antenna elements will be overlapping dipoles operating over a 2:1 bandwidth in the Ku-Band spectrum. Preliminary simulation and experimental demonstration of such an array will be presented.

  6. An ultrasound cylindrical phased array for deep heating in the breast: theoretical design using heterogeneous models.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Obdeijn, I M; van Rhoon, G C; van Dongen, K W A

    2009-05-21

    The objective of this theoretical study is to design an ultrasound (US) cylindrical phased array that can be used for hyperthermia (40-44 degrees C) treatment of tumours in the intact breast. Simultaneously, we characterize the influence of acoustic and thermal heterogeneities on the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature patterns to determine the necessity of using heterogeneous models for a US applicator design and treatment planning. Cylindrical configurations of monopole transducers are studied on their ability to generate interference patterns that can be steered electronically to the location of the target region. Hereto, design parameters such as frequency, number of transducers per ring, ring distance and number of rings are optimized to obtain a small primary focus, while suppressing secondary foci. The models account for local heterogeneities in both acoustic (wave velocity and absorption) and thermal (blood perfusion rate, heat capacity and conductivity) tissue properties. We used breast models with a central tumour (30x20x38 mm3) and an artificial thorax tumour (sphere with a radius of 25 mm) to test the design. Simulations predict that a US cylindrical phased array, consisting of six rings with 32 transducers per ring, a radius of 75 mm and 66 mm distance between the first and sixth transducer ring, operating at a frequency of 100 kHz, can be used to obtain 44 degrees C in the centre of tumours located anywhere in the intact breast. The dimensions of the volumes enclosed by the 41 degrees C iso-temperature are 19x19x21 mm3 and 21x21x32 mm3 for the central and the thorax tumours, respectively. It is demonstrated that acoustic and thermal heterogeneities do not disturb the SAR and temperature patterns.

  7. Decomposition of Composite Electric Field in a Three-Phase D-Dot Voltage Transducer Measuring System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueqi; Wang, Jingang; Wei, Gang; Deng, Xudong

    2016-10-12

    In line with the wider application of non-contact voltage transducers in the engineering field, transducers are required to have better performance for different measuring environments. In the present study, the D-dot voltage transducer is further improved based on previous research in order to meet the requirements for long-distance measurement of electric transmission lines. When measuring three-phase electric transmission lines, problems such as synchronous data collection and composite electric field need to be resolved. A decomposition method is proposed with respect to the superimposed electric field generated between neighboring phases. The charge simulation method is utilized to deduce the decomposition equation of the composite electric field and the validity of the proposed method is verified by simulation calculation software. With the deduced equation as the algorithm foundation, this paper improves hardware circuits, establishes a measuring system and constructs an experimental platform for examination. Under experimental conditions, a 10 kV electric transmission line was tested for steady-state errors, and the measuring results of the transducer and the high-voltage detection head were compared. Ansoft Maxwell Stimulation Software was adopted to obtain the electric field intensity in different positions under transmission lines; its values and the measuring values of the transducer were also compared. Experimental results show that the three-phase transducer is characterized by a relatively good synchronization for data measurement, measuring results with high precision, and an error ratio within a prescribed limit. Therefore, the proposed three-phase transducer can be broadly applied and popularized in the engineering field.

  8. Decomposition of Composite Electric Field in a Three-Phase D-Dot Voltage Transducer Measuring System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xueqi; Wang, Jingang; Wei, Gang; Deng, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    In line with the wider application of non-contact voltage transducers in the engineering field, transducers are required to have better performance for different measuring environments. In the present study, the D-dot voltage transducer is further improved based on previous research in order to meet the requirements for long-distance measurement of electric transmission lines. When measuring three-phase electric transmission lines, problems such as synchronous data collection and composite electric field need to be resolved. A decomposition method is proposed with respect to the superimposed electric field generated between neighboring phases. The charge simulation method is utilized to deduce the decomposition equation of the composite electric field and the validity of the proposed method is verified by simulation calculation software. With the deduced equation as the algorithm foundation, this paper improves hardware circuits, establishes a measuring system and constructs an experimental platform for examination. Under experimental conditions, a 10 kV electric transmission line was tested for steady-state errors, and the measuring results of the transducer and the high-voltage detection head were compared. Ansoft Maxwell Stimulation Software was adopted to obtain the electric field intensity in different positions under transmission lines; its values and the measuring values of the transducer were also compared. Experimental results show that the three-phase transducer is characterized by a relatively good synchronization for data measurement, measuring results with high precision, and an error ratio within a prescribed limit. Therefore, the proposed three-phase transducer can be broadly applied and popularized in the engineering field. PMID:27754340

  9. Microstrip technology and its application to phased array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.; Daniels, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic analysis of mutual coupling compensation using microstrip techniques is presented. A method for behind-the-array coupling of a phased antenna array is investigated as to its feasibility. The matching scheme is tried on a rectangular array of one half lambda 2 dipoles, but it is not limited to this array element or geometry. In the example cited the values of discrete components necessary were so small an L-C network is needed for realization. Such L-C tanks might limit an otherwise broadband array match, however, this is not significant for this dipole array. Other areas investigated were balun feeding and power limits of spiral antenna elements.

  10. SAFT-assisted sound beam focusing using phased arrays (PA-SAFT) for non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanekar, Paritosh; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-04-01

    Focusing of sound has always been a subject of interest in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation. An integrated approach to sound beam focusing using phased array and synthetic aperture focusing technique (PA-SAFT) has been developed in the authors' laboratory. The approach involves SAFT processing on ultrasonic B-scan image collected by a linear array transducer using a divergent sound beam. The objective is to achieve sound beam focusing using fewer elements than the ones required using conventional phased array. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated on aluminium blocks with artificial flaws and steel plate samples with embedded volumetric weld flaws, such as slag and clustered porosities. The results obtained by the PA-SAFT approach are found to be comparable to those obtained by conventional phased array and full matrix capture - total focusing method approaches.

  11. Optimizing Satellite Communications With Adaptive and Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Popovic, Zoya; Langley, John; Barott, William C.; Ahmed, M. Usman; Mandl, Dan

    2004-01-01

    A new adaptive antenna array architecture for low-earth-orbiting satellite ground stations is being investigated. These ground stations are intended to have no moving parts and could potentially be operated in populated areas, where terrestrial interference is likely. The architecture includes multiple, moderately directive phased arrays. The phased arrays, each steered in the approximate direction of the satellite, are adaptively combined to enhance the Signal-to-Noise and Interference-Ratio (SNIR) of the desired satellite. The size of each phased array is to be traded-off with the number of phased arrays, to optimize cost, while meeting a bit-error-rate threshold. Also, two phased array architectures are being prototyped: a spacefed lens array and a reflect-array. If two co-channel satellites are in the field of view of the phased arrays, then multi-user detection techniques may enable simultaneous demodulation of the satellite signals, also known as Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA). We report on Phase I of the project, in which fixed directional elements are adaptively combined in a prototype to demodulate the S-band downlink of the EO-1 satellite, which is part of the New Millennium Program at NASA.

  12. Three-dimensional ultrasound molecular imaging of angiogenesis in colon cancer using a clinical matrix array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaijun; Kaneko, Osamu F; Tian, Lu; Hristov, Dimitre; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-05-01

    We sought to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of 3-dimensional ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) expression in tumor angiogenesis using a clinical matrix array transducer and a clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted contrast agent in a murine model of human colon cancer. Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice with human colon cancer xenografts (n = 33) were imaged with a clinical ultrasound system and transducer (Philips iU22; X6-1) after intravenous injection of either clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles or nontargeted control microbubbles. Nineteen mice were scanned twice to assess imaging reproducibility. Fourteen mice were scanned both before and 24 hours after treatment with either bevacizumab (n = 7) or saline only (n = 7). Three-dimensional USMI data sets were retrospectively reconstructed into multiple consecutive 1-mm-thick USMI data sets to simulate 2-dimensional imaging. Vascular VEGFR2 expression was assessed ex vivo using immunofluorescence. Three-dimensional USMI was highly reproducible using both VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles and nontargeted control microbubbles (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.83). The VEGFR2-targeted USMI signal significantly (P = 0.02) decreased by 57% after antiangiogenic treatment compared with the control group, which correlated well with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression on immunofluorescence (ρ = 0.93, P = 0.003). If only central 1-mm tumor planes were analyzed to assess antiangiogenic treatment response, the USMI signal change was significantly (P = 0.006) overestimated by an average of 27% (range, 2%-73%) compared with 3-dimensional USMI. Three-dimensional USMI is feasible and highly reproducible and allows accurate assessment and monitoring of VEGFR2 expression in tumor angiogenesis in a murine model of human colon cancer.

  13. Three-dimensional Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis in Colon Cancer using a Clinical Matrix Array Ultrasound Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaijun; Kaneko, Osamu F.; Tian, Lu; Hristov, Dimitre; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) expression in tumor angiogenesis using a clinical matrix array transducer and a clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted contrast agent in a murine model of human colon cancer. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice with human colon cancer xenografts (n=33) were imaged with a clinical ultrasound system and transducer (Philips iU22; X6-1) following intravenous injection of either clinical grade VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles (MBVEGFR2) or non-targeted control microbubbles (MBControl). Nineteen mice were scanned twice to assess imaging reproducibility. Fourteen mice were scanned both before and 24h after treatment with either bevacizumab (n=7) or saline only (n=7). 3D USMI datasets were retrospectively reconstructed into multiple consecutive 1-mm thick USMI data sets to simulate 2D imaging. Vascular VEGFR2 expression was assessed ex vivo using immunofluorescence. Results 3D USMI was highly reproducible using both MBVEGFR2 and MBControl (ICC=0.83). VEGFR2-targeted USMI signal significantly (P=0.02) decreased by 57% following anti-angiogenic treatment compared to the control group, which correlated well with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression on immunofluorescence (rho=0.93, P=0.003). If only central 1-mm tumor planes were analyzed to assess anti-angiogenic treatment response, the USMI signal change was significantly (P=0.006) overestimated by an average of 27% (range, 2–73%) compared to 3D USMI. Conclusions 3D USMI is feasible and highly reproducible and allows accurate assessment and monitoring of VEGFR2 expression in tumor angiogenesis in a murine model of human colon cancer. PMID:25575176

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of small animal brain with a curved array transducer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Maurudis, Anastasios; Gamelin, John; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We present the application of a curved array photoacoustic tomographic imaging system that can provide rapid, high-resolution photoacoustic imaging of small animal brains. The system is optimized to produce a B-mode, 90-deg field-of-view image at sub-200-microm resolution at a frame rate of approximately 1 frame/second when a 10-Hz pulse repetition rate laser is employed. By rotating samples, a complete 360-deg scan can be achieved within 15 s. In previous work, two-dimensional (2-D) ex vivo mouse brain cortex imaging has been reported. We report three-dimensional (3-D) small animal brain imaging obtained with the curved array system. The results are presented as a series of 2-D cross-sectional images. Besides structural imaging, the blood oxygen saturation of the animal brain cortex is also measured in vivo. In addition, the system can measure the time-resolved relative changes in blood oxygen saturation level in the small animal brain cortex. Last, ultrasonic gel coupling, instead of the previously adopted water coupling, is conveniently used in near-real-time 2-D imaging.

  15. Phased Array Transmit Antenna for a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, R. W.; Heisen, P. T.; Miller, G. E.; McMeen, D. J.; Perko, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Active phased array antennas with electronically scanned beams offer advantages over high gain parabolic dish antennas currently used on spacecraft. Benefits include the elimination of deployable structures, no moving parts, and no torque disturbances that moving antennas impart to the spacecraft. The latter results in the conservation of spacecraft power, and the ability to take precision optical data while transmitting data. Such an antenna has been built under a contract from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the New Millennium Program EO- 1 satellite where it will act as the primary highspeed scientific data communication link. The antenna operates at X-band, has an integral controller and power conditioner, communicates with the spacecraft over a 1773 optical data bus, and is space qualified for low earth orbit (705 Km altitude). The nominal mission length is one year, and the operational requirement is for one 10 minute transmission a day over Spitsbergen, Norway. Details of the antenna and its performance will be described in the following paper.

  16. Phased Array Transmit Antenna for a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, R. W.; Heisen, P. T.; Miller, G. E.; McMeen, D. J.; Perko, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Active phased array antennas with electronically scanned beams offer advantages over high gain parabolic dish antennas currently used on spacecraft. Benefits include the elimination of deployable structures, no moving parts, and no torque disturbances that moving antennas impart to the spacecraft. The latter results in the conservation of spacecraft power, and the ability to take precision optical data while transmitting data. Such an antenna has been built under a contract from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the New Millennium Program EO- 1 satellite where it will act as the primary highspeed scientific data communication link. The antenna operates at X-band, has an integral controller and power conditioner, communicates with the spacecraft over a 1773 optical data bus, and is space qualified for low earth orbit (705 Km altitude). The nominal mission length is one year, and the operational requirement is for one 10 minute transmission a day over Spitsbergen, Norway. Details of the antenna and its performance will be described in the following paper.

  17. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  18. Improved Titanium Billet Inspection Sensitivity through Optimized Phased Array Design, Part I: Design Technique, Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lupien, Vincent; Hassan, Waled

    2006-03-06

    Reductions in the beam diameter and pulse duration of focused ultrasound for titanium inspections are believed to result in a signal-to-noise ratio improvement for embedded defect detection. It has been inferred from this result that detection limits could be extended to smaller defects through a larger diameter, higher frequency transducer resulting in a reduced beamwidth and pulse duration. Using Continuum Probe Designer{sup TM} (Pat. Pending), a transducer array was developed for full coverage inspection of 8 inch titanium billets. The main challenge in realizing a large aperture phased array transducer for billet inspection is ensuring that the number of elements remains within the budget allotted by the driving electronics. The optimization technique implemented by Continuum Probe Designer{sup TM} yields an array with twice the aperture but the same number of elements as existing phased arrays for the same application. The unequal area element design was successfully manufactured and validated both numerically and experimentally. Part I of this two-part series presents the design, simulation and modeling steps, while Part II presents the experimental validation and comparative study to multizone.

  19. Automated co-alignment of coherent fiber laser arrays via active phase-locking.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Weiss, S Benjamin

    2012-07-02

    We demonstrate a novel closed-loop approach for high-precision co-alignment of laser beams in an actively phase-locked, coherently combined fiber laser array. The approach ensures interferometric precision by optically transducing beam-to-beam pointing errors into phase errors on a single detector, which are subsequently nulled by duplication of closed-loop phasing controls. Using this approach, beams from five coherent fiber tips were simultaneously phase-locked and position-locked with sub-micron accuracy. Spatial filtering of the sensed light is shown to extend the control range over multiple beam diameters by recovering spatial coherence despite the lack of far-field beam overlap.

  20. Crosstalk Reduction for High-Frequency Linear-Array Ultrasound Transducers Using 1–3 Piezocomposites With Pseudo-Random Pillars

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao-Chung; Cannata, Jonathan; Williams, Jay; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a novel diced 1–3 piezocomposite geometry to reduce pulse–echo ring down and acoustic crosstalk between high-frequency ultrasonic array elements. Two PZT-5H-based 1–3 composites (10 and 15 MHz) of different pillar geometries [square (SQ), 45° triangle (TR), and pseudo-random (PR)] were fabricated and then made into single-element ultrasound transducers. The measured pulse–echo waveforms and their envelopes indicate that the PR composites had the shortest −20-dB pulse length and highest sensitivity among the composites evaluated. Using these composites, 15-MHz array subapertures with a 0.95λ pitch were fabricated to assess the acoustic crosstalk between array elements. The combined electrical and acoustical crosstalk between the nearest array elements of the PR array sub-apertures (−31.8 dB at 15 MHz) was 6.5 and 2.2 dB lower than those of the SQ and the TR array subapertures, respectively. These results demonstrate that the 1–3 piezocomposite with the pseudo-random pillars may be a better choice for fabricating enhanced high-frequency linear-array ultrasound transducers; especially when mechanical dicing is used. PMID:23143580

  1. A Phased Array Coil for Human Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Chris D.; Westgate, Charles R.; O'Dell, Walter G.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype cardiac phased array receiver coil was constructed that comprised a cylindrical array and a separate planar array. Both arrays had two coil loops with the same coil dimensions. Data acquisition with the cylindrical array placed on the human chest, and the planar array placed under the back, yielded an overall enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the entire heart by a factor of 1.1–2.85 over a commercially available flexible coil and a commercially available four-loop planar phased array coil. This improvement in SNR can be exploited in cardiac imaging to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the image acquisition time. PMID:7674903

  2. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  3. Phased array feed testing for astronomy with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, Aaron P.; O'Sullivan, John; Reynolds, John; Gough, Russell; Hayman, Douglas; Hay, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Phased array feeds enable radio telescopes to make faster surveys with fewer antennas. This paper presents testing of a phased array feed prototype to verify design methods for array feeds of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). We have tested a 5 × 4 port × 2 polarisation connected-chequerboard array at the prime focus of a 12 m diameter parabolic reflector. This prototype system currently achieves a system-temperature-on-efficiency ratio Tsys/η of 134 K at 1260 MHz and operates from 700 MHz to 1,800 MHz. The larger 94 port × 2 polarisation phased array feed being developed for ASKAP has a target Tsys/η of 50 K. The time taken by a radio telescope to survey a fixed area of sky to a fixed sensitivity is proportional to (Tsys/η)2.

  4. Comparison of two methods of treatment for intraluminal thermal ablation using an ultrasound cylindrical phased array.

    PubMed

    Melodelima, David; Prat, Frédéric; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2004-04-01

    Intraluminal (within the alimentary tract) thermal surgery has been shown to be a useful therapeutic option when extracorporeal focused ultrasound applicators cannot be used since their beam may not reach the target site. If plane transducers are used for the treatment of alimentary tract tumours, the applicator must be rotated in order to generate a cylindrical volume of necrosis. However, rotating these applicators and controlling their shooting direction presents technical difficulties. If tubular transducers are used it is difficult to treat arbitrary angles with a large therapeutic length. To solve these difficulties, the feasibility of an ultrasound phased array applicator has been evaluated using a cylindrical prototype (outer diameter 10.6 mm), which is composed of 16 elementary transducers working at 4.55 MHz and arranged on a quarter of the cylinder. Using this applicator it is possible to generate plane or cylindrical waves. Plane waves were generated by exciting eight successive elements of the array with appropriate delay times. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. In this way, the ultrasound beam was electronically rotated through the tissues. Cylindrical waves were generated by exciting several transducers without delay times. Imaging was provided using a miniature echographic probe. Ex vivo experiments were carried out in pig liver to compare two approaches of treatment. The first consisted of generating successive plane waves separated from each other by a 6 degrees angle. The second one consisted of exciting all the 16 elements without delay times. In the two cases, the lesions were well-defined and occupied a quarter of cylinder. In both sets of experiments, the sonication time and the intensity were 20 s and 17 W/cm(2), respectively. In the first case, the depth was up to 17 mm compared to 6 mm in the second case.

  5. Full matrix capture and the total focusing imaging algorithm using laser induced ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Clark, Matt; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonics is a technique where lasers are used for the generation and detection of ultrasound instead of conventional piezoelectric transducers. The technique is broadband, non-contact, and couplant free, suitable for large stand-off distances, inspection of components of complex geometries and hazardous environments. In this paper, array imaging is presented by obtaining the full matrix of all possible laser generation, laser detection combinations in the array (Full Matrix Capture), at the nondestructive, thermoelastic regime. An advanced imaging technique developed for conventional ultrasonic transducers, the Total Focusing Method (TFM), is adapted for laser ultrasonics and then applied to the captured data, focusing at each point of the reconstruction area. In this way, the beamforming and steering of the ultrasound is done during the post processing. A 1-D laser induced ultrasonic phased array is synthesized with significantly improved spatial resolution and defect detectability. In this study, shear waves are used for the imaging, since they are more efficiently produced than longitudinal waves in the nondestructive, thermoelastic regime. Experimental results are presented from nondestructive, laser ultrasonic inspection of aluminum samples with side drilled holes and slots at depths varying between 5 and 20mm from the surface.

  6. Rigorous investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Wyman, Jason E; Tyler, Glenn A

    2014-04-10

    An investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays is presented. The investigation begins with theoretical derivations of the far-zone radiated field, the array factor, and the far-field radiated power for the seven-element hexagonal array with array tilt present. Physical insights gained from this analysis are discussed. An analytical treatment of correlation-based array-tilt estimators is also undertaken. Two novel array-tilt estimation techniques are developed from the analysis. The new techniques are shown to be significantly more efficient computationally than the traditional estimation approach. Simulation and experimental results are presented to validate the new array-tilt estimation methods.

  7. Microwave power transmitting phased array antenna research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An initial design study and the development results of an S band RF power transmitting phased array antenna experiment system are presented. The array was to be designed, constructed and instrumented to permit wireless power transmission technology evaluation measurements. The planned measurements were to provide data relative to the achievable performance in the state of the art of flexible surface, retrodirective arrays, as a step in technically evaluating the satellite power system concept for importing to earth, via microwave beams, the nearly continuous solar power available in geosynchronous orbit. Details of the microwave power transmitting phased array design, instrumentation approaches, system block diagrams, and measured component and breadboard characteristics achieved are presented.

  8. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-07

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  9. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  10. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  11. Ultrasound array transmitter architecture with high timing resolution using embedded phase-locked loops.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter R; Cowell, David M J; Raiton, Benjamin; Ky, Chau Vo; Freear, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Coarse time quantization of delay profiles within ultrasound array systems can produce undesirable side lobes in the radiated beam profile. The severity of these side lobes is dependent upon the magnitude of phase quantization error--the deviation from ideal delay profiles to the achievable quantized case. This paper describes a method to improve interchannel delay accuracy without increasing system clock frequency by utilizing embedded phase-locked loop (PLL) components within commercial field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Precise delays are achieved by shifting the relative phases of embedded PLL output clocks in 208-ps steps. The described architecture can achieve the necessary interelement timing resolution required for driving ultrasound arrays up to 50 MHz. The applicability of the proposed method at higher frequencies is demonstrated by extrapolating experimental results obtained using a 5-MHz array transducer. Results indicate an increase in transmit dynamic range (TDR) when using accurate delay profiles generated by the embedded-PLL method described, as opposed to using delay profiles quantized to the system clock.

  12. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  13. Signal detectability in diffusive media using phased arrays in conjunction with detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongyel; Kupinski, Matthew A

    2011-06-20

    We investigate Hotelling observer performance (i.e., signal detectability) of a phased array system for tasks of detecting small inhomogeneities and distinguishing adjacent abnormalities in uniform diffusive media. Unlike conventional phased array systems where a single detector is located on the interface between two sources, we consider a detector array, such as a CCD, on a phantom exit surface for calculating the Hotelling observer detectability. The signal detectability for adjacent small abnormalities (2 mm displacement) for the CCD-based phased array is related to the resolution of reconstructed images. Simulations show that acquiring high-dimensional data from a detector array in a phased array system dramatically improves the detectability for both tasks when compared to conventional single detector measurements, especially at low modulation frequencies. It is also observed in all studied cases that there exists the modulation frequency optimizing CCD-based phased array systems, where detectability for both tasks is consistently high. These results imply that the CCD-based phased array has the potential to achieve high resolution and signal detectability in tomographic diffusive imaging while operating at a very low modulation frequency. The effect of other configuration parameters, such as a detector pixel size, on the observer performance is also discussed.

  14. A 63 element 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Khaldon Y; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2005-06-17

    Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are very common diseases in older American men, thus having a reliable treatment modality for both diseases is of great importance. The currently used treating options, mainly surgical ones, have numerous complications, which include the many side effects that accompany such procedures, besides the invasive nature of such techniques. Focused ultrasound is a relatively new treating modality that is showing promising results in treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Thus this technique is gaining more attention in the past decade as a non-invasive method to treat both diseases. In this paper, the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used for treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is presented. With this array, the position of the focus can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for electronically focusing and steering in a three dimensional volume. The array was designed with a maximum steering angle of +/- 13.5 degrees in the transverse direction and a maximum depth of penetration of 11 cm, which allows the treatment of large prostates. The transducer piezoelectric ceramic, matching layers and cable impedance have been designed for maximum power transfer to tissue. To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments using bovine tissue were performed with various lesion sizes and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. A 1.75 dimensional array, that overcame the drawbacks associated with one-dimensional arrays, has been designed, built and successfully tested. Design issues, such as cable and ceramic capacitances, were taken into account when designing this array. The final prototype overcame also the problem of

  15. A 63 element 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Khaldon Y; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2005-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are very common diseases in older American men, thus having a reliable treatment modality for both diseases is of great importance. The currently used treating options, mainly surgical ones, have numerous complications, which include the many side effects that accompany such procedures, besides the invasive nature of such techniques. Focused ultrasound is a relatively new treating modality that is showing promising results in treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Thus this technique is gaining more attention in the past decade as a non-invasive method to treat both diseases. Methods In this paper, the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used for treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is presented. With this array, the position of the focus can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for electronically focusing and steering in a three dimensional volume. The array was designed with a maximum steering angle of ± 13.5° in the transverse direction and a maximum depth of penetration of 11 cm, which allows the treatment of large prostates. The transducer piezoelectric ceramic, matching layers and cable impedance have been designed for maximum power transfer to tissue. Results To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments using bovine tissue were performed with various lesion sizes and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. Conclusion A 1.75 dimensional array, that overcame the drawbacks associated with one-dimensional arrays, has been designed, built and successfully tested. Design issues, such as cable and ceramic capacitances, were taken into account when designing this array. The final prototype

  16. Large improvement of the electrical impedance of imaging and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) phased arrays using multilayer piezoelectric ceramics coupled in lateral mode.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Lucht, Benjamin; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-07-01

    With a change in phased-array configuration from one dimension to two, the electrical impedance of the array elements is substantially increased because of their decreased width (w)-to-thickness (t) ratio. The most common way to compensate for this impedance increase is to employ electrical matching circuits at a high cost of fabrication complexity and effort. In this paper, we introduce a multilayer lateral-mode coupling method for phased-array construction. The direct comparison showed that the electrical impedance of a single-layer transducer driven in thickness mode is 1/(n²(1/(w/t))²) times that of an n-layer lateral mode transducer. A large reduction of the electrical impedance showed the impact and benefit of the lateral-mode coupling method. A one-dimensional linear 32-element 770-kHz imaging array and a 42-element 1.45-MHz high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) phased array were fabricated. The averaged electrical impedances of each element were measured to be 58 Ω at the maximum phase angle of -1.2° for the imaging array and 105 Ω at 0° for the HIFU array. The imaging array had a center frequency of 770 kHz with an averaged -6-dB bandwidth of approximately 52%. For the HIFU array, the averaged maximum surface acoustic intensity was measured to be 32.8 W/cm² before failure.

  17. Clinical results of real-time ultrasonic scanning of the heart using a phased array system.

    PubMed

    Kisslo, J A; vonRamm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the operating characteristics and initial clinical results of a new echocardiographic system that produces real-time, high resolution, cross-sectional images of the heart. This system relies upon phased-array principles to rapidly steer and focus the ultrasound beam through the cardiac structures under investigation. A hand-held, linear array of 24 transducers is manipulated on the patient's chest to direct the interrogating plane at various cardiac structures. Images of high line density are presented in selectable sector arcs to a maximum of 90 degrees. This imaging system has been used clinically in over 2,000 patients in the past two and one-half years. Its use in the detection of altered states of ventricular and valvular pathology has been described.

  18. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  19. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Kadlec, Emil A; Shaner, Eric A; Klem, John F; Sinclair, Michael B; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  20. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  1. Diffraction-Coupled, Phase-Locked Semiconductor Laser Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yariv, Amnon; Margalit, Shlomo

    1988-01-01

    Stable, narrow far field produced. Array of lasers fabricated on single chip. Individual laser waveguides isolated from each other except in end portions, where diffraction coupling takes place. Radiation pattern far from laser array has single, sharp central lobe when all lasers operate in phase with each other. Shape of lobe does not vary appreciably with array current. Applications include recording, printing, and range finding.

  2. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-11-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  3. Design and evaluation of a 63 element 1.75-dimensional ultrasound phased array for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Khaldon Y.; Smith, Nadine B.

    2003-10-01

    Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a clinical method for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in which tissue is noninvasively necrosed by elevating the temperature at the focal point above 60°C using short sonications. With 1.75-dimensional (1.75-D) arrays, the power and phase to the individual elements can be controlled electronically for focusing and steering. This research describes the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75-D ultrasound phased array to be used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The array was designed with a steering angle of +/-13.5 deg in the transverse direction, and can move the focus in three parallel planes in the longitudinal direction with a relatively large focus size. A piezoelectric ceramic (PZT-8) was used as the material of the transducer and two matching layers were built for maximum acoustic power transmission to tissue. To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated fields. In vivo experiments were performed to verify the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Prostate Cancer Research Program.

  4. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  5. Testing the Atacama Compact Array Phase-Correction Scheme Using the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2010-08-01

    We conducted observational tests of a phase-correction scheme for the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) of the Atacama Large Millimeter and submillimeter Array (ALMA) using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Interferometers at millimeter and submillimeter waves are highly affected by refraction induced by water vapor in the troposphere, which results in phase fluctuations. The ACA is planning to compensate for the atmospheric phase fluctuation using phase information of the outermost antennas with interpolating into the inner antennas by creating a phase screen. The interpolation and extrapolation phase-correction schemes using phase screens have been tested by the SMA to study how effective they are. We produce a plane of wavefront (phase screen) from the phase information of three antennas for each integration, and this phase screen is used for interpolating the phase of the inner antenna and extrapolating that of the outer one. The interpolation scheme apparently obtains improved results, suggesting that the ACA phase-correction scheme works well. On the other hand, the extrapolation one often does not improve the results. After extrapolation, unexpectedly large phase fluctuations occur in the phases of the antennas at a distance of ˜140 m away from the center of the three reference antennas. The directions of these antennas are almost perpendicular to that of the wind, suggesting that the phase fluctuations can be well explained by the frozen phase screen in the atmosphere.

  6. Transmit beamforming techniques for suppressing grating lobes in large pitch ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Zahra; Adamson, Rob; Bance, Manohar; Brown, Jeremy A.

    2011-03-01

    To date, clinical implementation of high-frequency ultrasound has been limited due to the difficulties in fabricating sufficiently small micro-array transducers. Specifically, if an array is desired with the ability to beam-steer to large angles, an inter-element pitch of approximately .5λ is required to avoid grating lobe artifacts. At high-frequencies (30-70MHz), this introduces major fabrication challenges since the required element pitch is between 10 and 25 microns. A new technique called Phase Coherence Imaging has been introduced in the literature for suppressing grating lobes in large-pitch arrays by calculating a weighting factor proportional to the instantaneous phase coherence of the received element echoes. If the reflected echoes in the grating lobe region are relatively broadband, only some of the echoes will overlap and the resulting weighting factor will be less. Unfortunately, most beamforming techniques result in relatively narrowband echoes in the grating lobe region, making this technique less effective. We have developed a technique that splits the N-element transmit aperture into N/K transmit elements and N receive elements in order to better suppress grating lobes by increasing the bandwidth of the grating lobe echoes. We have also developed a technique that uses a probing pulse from a virtual point source behind the array in order to pre-calculate weighting factors from broadband echoes before conventional transmit beamforming is used. Radiation patterns have been simulated and the amount of grating lobe suppression has been quantified using the proposed techniques. It has been shown that these techniques are very effective in suppressing grating lobes in large-pitch phased-arrays, potentially simplifying high-frequency array fabrication.

  7. Feasibility of in vivo transesophageal cardiac ablation using a phased ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Lee, Hotaik; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-05-01

    Over 2.2 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation making it one of the most common arrhythmias. Cardiac ablation has shown a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Prevailing modalities for this treatment are catheter based radio-frequency ablation or surgery. However, there is measurable morbidity and significant costs and time associated with these invasive procedures. Due to these issues, developing a method that is less invasive to treat atrial fibrillation is needed. In the development of such a device, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for cardiac ablation was designed, constructed and evaluated. A goal of this research was to create lesions in myocardial tissue using a phased array. Based on multiple factors from array simulations, transesophageal imaging devices and throat anatomy, a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus was designed and tested. In this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with the aperture size of 20.7 mm x 10.2 mm with flat tapered elements as a transesophageal ultrasound applicator was fabricated and evaluated with in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed through the esophagus and positioned over the heart. The array was operated for 8-15 min at 1.6 MHz with the acoustic intensity of 150-300 W/cm(2) resulting in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1 +/- 2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8 +/- 2.5 mm in length. Based on the experimental results, the array delivered sufficient power to the focal point to produce ablation while not grossly damaging nearby tissue outside the target area. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator to transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  8. Evaluation of adhesive-free crossed-electrode poly(vinylidene fluoride) copolymer array transducers for high frequency imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Sanat; Decharat, Adit; Habib, Anowarul; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.; Melandsø, Frank

    2016-07-01

    High frequency crossed-electrode transducers have been investigated, both as single and dual layer transducers. Prototypes of these transducers were developed for 4 crossed lines (yielding 16 square elements) on a polymer substrate, using a layer-by-layer deposition method for poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] with intermediate sputtered electrodes. The transducer was characterized using various methods [LCR analyzer, a pulse-echo experimental setup, and a numerical Finite element method (FEM) model] and evaluated in terms of uniformity of bandwidth and acoustical energy output. All 16 transducer elements produced broad-banded ultrasonic spectra with small variation in central frequency and -6 dB bandwidth. The frequency responses obtained experimentally were verified using a numerical model.

  9. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  10. Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GENETIC ALGORITHMS AS A...REPORT DATE June 2002 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar...creative ways to design multi-function phased array radars. This thesis proposes that Genetic Algorithms, computer programs that mimic natural selection

  11. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  12. Coherent Optical Processing of Phased Array Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Interfacing a coherent optical processor, which utilizes an electron-beam addressed, potassium dideuterium phosphate (KDP) crystal modulator, with a linear phased array is studied. An abbreviated development of typical radar signals from a linear array is included. A plan for formating the spatial modulator with linear array signals is presented. The theoretical expectations which include target angle and Doppler are derived. A simulated set of M signals which are typical of a linear array of M elements was devised. This set of signals was used to modulate the wave front of collimated laser light via the KDP crystal according to the format presented.

  13. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  14. Behavior of Drag Disc Turbine Transducers in Steady-State Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbrig, C. W.; Reimann, J.

    1980-08-01

    Many experiments being conducted to investigate the hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in nuclear power plants involve the measurement of two-phase flow. This paper describes an experiment conducted to determine the behavior of a drag-disc turbine transducer (DTT) in a high pressure, high temperature, steam-water steady state environment. DTTs have been used extensively to measure mass flow rates in the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) experiments. Drag discs and turbines have been used in many other safety related facilities. However, the performance of these instruments is highly dependent on flow regime and void fraction and this dependence makes data analysis difficult. Experiments conducted in separated flow are described in this paper. The results show the measured mass flow rates can be corrected if a three-beam gamma densitometer is available, if the calculated density ratio correction is less than three, and if the velocity measured by the turbine is greater than 2 m/ s. The results also suggest that the turbine and drag disc measure local mass average quantities averaged over the area of the DTT.

  15. The effect of variation in phased array element performance for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE).

    PubMed

    Duxbury, David; Russell, Jonathan; Lowe, Michael

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effects of phased array element performance on ultrasonic beam integrity. This investigation has been performed using an array beam model based on Huygens' principle to independently investigate the effects of element sensitivity and phase, and non-functioning elements via Monte Carlo simulation. The purpose of this work is to allow a new method of array calibration for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) to be adopted that focuses on probe integrity rather than beam integrity. This approach is better suited to component inspections that utilise Full Matrix Capture (FMC) to record data as the calibration routine is uncoupled from the beams that the array is required to produce. For this approach to be adopted specifications must be placed on element performance that guarantee beam quality without carrying out any beam forming. The principal result of this investigation is that the dominant outcome following variations in array element performance is the introduction of beam artefacts such as main beam broadening, raising of the noise floor of the ultrasonic field, and the enlargement or creation of side lobes. Specifications for practical allowable limits of element sensitivity, element phase, and the number of non-functioning elements have been suggested based on a minimum amplitude difference between beam artefacts and the main beam peak of 8 dB. Simulation at a number of centre frequencies has led to a recommendation that the product of transducer bandwidth and maximum phase error should be kept below 0.051 and 0.035 for focused and plane beams respectively. Element sensitivity should be within 50% of mean value of the aperture, and no more than 9% of the elements should be non-functioning.

  16. A silicon electrostatic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro; Higuchi, Kohei; Tanigawa, Hiroshi

    1989-11-01

    An electric ultrasonic transducer is developed by using a silicon IC process. Design considerations are first presented to obtain high sensitivity and the desired frequency responses in air. The measured transmitter sensitivity is 19.1 dB (0 dB = 1 microbar/V) at a point 50 cm away from the devices, when the devices are operated at 150 kHz. The receiving sensitivity is 0.47 mV/Pa in the 10-130-kHz range, with bias voltages as low as 30 V. An electronic sector scanning operation is also achieved by time-sequentially driving seven elements arranged in a linear array on the same chip. The results should be helpful in the design of phased-array transducers integrated with electronic scanning circuits.

  17. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  18. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  19. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-08-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  20. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-01-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  1. A vertically integrated Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, R. Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, A. N.; Simons, R.

    1992-01-01

    The design, development, and experimental demonstration of a small phased array antenna suitable for applications on communications satellites are discussed. Each of the vertical layers was optimized for performance, and MMICs on custom carriers were characterized prior to insertion. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 Ghz, 4-bit MMIC phase shifters on customized alumina carriers. Performance data are presented for all components, and far-field antenna radiation patterns are given.

  2. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are 1) the fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, 2) spatial beam forming, and 3) optical beam splitting techniques. Two novel optical beam forming approaches, i.e., the spatial beam forming with a 'smart pixel' spatial light modulator (SLM) and the optical beam splitting approaches are conceived with integrated quasi-optical components. Also presented are the transmit and receive array architectures with the new SLM.

  3. An analysis of the origin of differences between measured and simulated fields produced by a 15-element ultrasound phased array.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Adam H; Mills, John A; Wilson, Adrian J

    2010-03-01

    Modeling provides an attractive approach for the design of phased array ultrasound transducers for hyperthermia. However, measurements on physical transducers reveal differences from the idealized field profiles predicted by simulation. In this paper we report a method of analyzing the origins of these differences. The measured performance of a 15-element sparse phased array is described and compared with simulated fields calculated using the point source method. It highlighted two notable differences: First, that the focal region was located closer to the surface of the physical transducer than in the simulated fields; and second, that numerous intensity maxima were present between the surface of the transducer and the focal zone in the experimental data, but not in the simulated fields. We identified six factors that could potentially affect the field but were not taken into account by the default simulations, and we performed a sensitivity analysis on these: (i) Variation in the amplitude of the output from each element, (ii) the presence of square-wave harmonics in the drive signals, (iii) nonpistonlike vibration of elements, (iv) quantization of the applied phases, (v) errors in the spatial positioning of each element; and (vi) interelement cross-coupling. Both the independent impact of each factor and the interactions between multiple factors were analyzed by using a full-factorial experimental design composed of 64 (2(6)) simulations. The results indicated that nonpistonlike motion of elements is likely to be the primary cause of differences between the measured and modelled fields. Determination of the precise vibrational modes of elements in an array is complex and would require full finite element analysis. However, the simple vibrational mode considered within the present work, corresponding to the addition of a surface Rayleigh wave originating at the element center and propagating radially, produced simulation results that were in good agreement with

  4. Comparison of piezoresistive and capacitive ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, John J.; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2004-07-01

    MEMS ultrasonic transducers for flaw detection have heretofore been built as capacitive diaphragm-type devices. A diaphragm forms a moveable electrode, placed at a short gap from a stationary electrode, and diaphragm movement has been detected by capacitance change. Although several research teams have successfully demonstrated that technology, the detection of capacitance change is adversely affected by stray and parasitic capacitances, limiting the sensitivity of such transducers and typically requiring relatively large diaphragm areas. We describe the design and fabrication of what to our knowledge is the first CMOS-MEMS ultrasonic phased array transducer using piezoresistive strain sensing. Piezoresistors have been patterned within the diaphragms, and diaphragm movement creates bending strain which is detected by a bridge circuit, for which conductor losses will be less significant. The prospective advantage of such piezoresistive transducers is that sufficient sensitivity may be achieved with very small diaphragms. We compare transducer response under fluid-coupled ultrasonic excitation and report the experimental gauge factor for the piezoresistors. We also discuss the phased array performance of the transducer in sensing the direction of an incoming wave.

  5. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  6. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  7. Fiber optic signal distribution for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecherle, G. S.

    1992-03-01

    The use of a 32-GHz phased-array transmitting antenna with fiberoptic signal distribution is considered in the context of a Mars relay satellite for NASA's Space Exploration Initiative. The specifications of the proposed application are assessed with specific attention given to the EIRP requirement of 86 dBW and its ramifications on the phased array, antenna, and photonic architecture. A photonic performance analysis is conducted to study phase-noise and SNR degradations to determine whether phase-locked loop (PLL) complexity is required. SNR and phase noise are examined as a function of the number of optical splits, and the number is shown to be limited to 350. Use of the PLL allows one laser to support 650 elements - as opposed to 250 - showing that only a single laser diode is needed to support the array for the Mars transmitter.

  8. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  9. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following Coplanar Waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/Microstrip Line feed; (2) CPW/Balanced Stripline feed; (3) CPW/Slotline feed; (4) Grounded CPW/Balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/Slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  10. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following coplanar waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  11. Optical Phase Lock Loop Based Phased Array Transmitter for Optical Commmunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenchik, Y.; Erkmen, B. I.; Satyan, N.; Yariv, A.; Farr, W. H.; Choi, J. M.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a novel deep space optical communication scheme, in which an integrated optical phased array (OPA) is used for both phase modulation and fine beam steering. In particular, an optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) based phased array with full electronic control over the phase is introduced and analyzed. The performance of such an array as a beam steering mechanism is evaluated and compared to realistic steering requirements for deep space applications. It is shown that an array with a high fill factor (>0.7) with about 300 elements per dimension is needed to meet these requirements. The effect of residual phase noise due to limited loop bandwidth is analyzed. Finally, the theory is validated by experimental results demonstrating successful beam steering using a two-element phased array.

  12. Two transducer formula for more precise determination of ultrasonic phase velocity from standing wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringermacher, H. I.; Moerner, W. E.; Miller, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two transducer correction formula valid for both solid and liquid specimens is presented. Using computer simulations of velocity measurements, the accuracy and range of validity of the results are discussed and are compared with previous approximations.

  13. Interferometric study on Gouy phase anomaly of microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Noell, Wilfried; Herzig, Hans Peter; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the Gouy phase anomaly of light in the focus of refractive plano-convex microlens arrays by using longitudinal-differential (LD) interferometry and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. We put emphasis on determining the amount of the Gouy phase shift for the line focus of the cylindrical lens and the point focus of the spherical lens. We discuss additional phase structures caused by diffraction, which lead to the discrepancy from the conventional Gouy phase shift.

  14. Design and control of phased ICRF antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    Phased antenna arrays operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are used to produce highly directional wave spectra, primarily for use in current drive experiments. RF current drive using phased antennas has been demonstrated in both the JET and DIII-D tokamaks, and both devices are planning to operate new four-element arrays beginning early next year. Features of antenna design that are relevant to phased operation and production of directional spectra are reviewed. Recent advances in the design of the feed circuits and the related control systems for these arrays should substantially improve their performance, by reducing the coupling seen by the matching networks and rf power supplies caused by the mutual impedance of the array elements. The feed circuit designs for the DIII-D and JET phased antenna arrays are compared. The two configurations differ significantly due to the fact that one power amplifier is used for the entire array in the former case, and one per element in the latter. The JET system uses automatic feedback control of matching, phase and amplitude of antenna currents, and the transmitter power balance. The design of this system is discussed, and a time dependent model used to predict its behavior is described.

  15. 4D ICE: A 2D Array Transducer with Integrated ASIC in a 10 Fr Catheter for Real-Time 3D Intracardiac Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wildes, Douglas; Lee, Warren; Haider, Bruno; Cogan, Scott; Sundaresan, Krishnakumar; Mills, David; Yetter, Christopher; Hart, Patrick; Haun, Christopher; Concepcion, Mikael; Kirkhorn, Johan; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-10-12

    We developed a 2.5 x 6.6 mm 2D array transducer with integrated transmit/receive ASIC for 4D ICE (real-time 3D IntraCardiac Echocardiography) applications. The ASIC and transducer design were optimized so that the high voltage transmit, low-voltage TGC (time-gain control) and preamp, subaperture beamformer, and digital control circuits for each transducer element all fit within the 0.019 mm2 area of the element. The transducer assembly was deployed in a 10 Fr (3.3 mm diameter) catheter, integrated with a GE Vivid1 E9 ultrasound imaging system, and evaluated in three pre-clinical studies. 2D image quality and imaging modes were comparable to commercial 2D ICE catheters. The 4D field of view was at least 90° x 60° x 8 cm and could be imaged at 30 volumes/sec, sufficient to visualize cardiac anatomy and other diagnostic and therapy catheters. 4D ICE should significantly reduce X-ray fluoroscopy use and dose during electrophysiology (EP) ablation procedures. 4D ICE may be able to replace trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and the associated risks and costs of general anesthesia, for guidance of some structural heart procedures.

  16. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  17. High-Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging of Dento-Periodontal Tissues Using a Multi-Element Phased Array System.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Le, Lawrence H; Kaipatur, Neelambar R; Zheng, Rui; Lou, Edmond H; Major, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Intraoral ultrasonography uses high-frequency mechanical waves to study dento-periodontium. Besides the advantages of portability and cost-effectiveness, ultrasound technique has no ionizing radiation. Previous studies employed a single transducer or an array of transducer elements, and focused on enamel thickness and distance measurement. This study used a phased array system with a 128-element array transducer to image dento-periodontal tissues. We studied two porcine lower incisors from a 6-month-old piglet using 20-MHz ultrasound. The high-resolution ultrasonographs clearly showed the cross-sectional morphological images of the hard and soft tissues. The investigation used an integration of waveform analysis, travel-time calculation, and wavefield simulation to reveal the nature of the ultrasound data, which makes the study novel. With the assistance of time-distance radio-frequency records, we robustly justified the enamel-dentin interface, dentin-pulp interface, and the cemento-enamel junction. The alveolar crest level, the location of cemento-enamel junction, and the thickness of alveolar crest were measured from the images and compared favorably with those from the cone beam computed tomography with less than 10% difference. This preliminary and fundamental study has reinforced the conclusions from previous studies, that ultrasonography has great potential to become a non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool for quantitative assessment of periodontal structures and better delivery of oral care.

  18. Transducers in medical ultrasound: Part Three. Transducer applications in echocardiology.

    PubMed

    Lancée, C T; Daigle, R; Sahn, D J; Thijssen, J M

    1985-09-01

    A comparison is made between phased arrays and mechanical sector scanners in transcutaneous echocardiographic applications. Aspects such as contact area, beam control, side lobes, grating lobes and image quality are discussed in the context of transducer frequency. The incorporation of simultaneous acquisition of Doppler velocity information and display of M-mode signals is considered. Transoesophageal and intraoperative scanning systems for cardiology are also compared, in particular linear arrays, phased arrays and mechanical scanners, and their advantages and disadvantages in relation to the above mentioned aspects are discussed. The general conclusion is that electronic sector scanners may have a considerably improved cost/benefit ratio in the near future and thereby will become the leading systems for echocardiography.

  19. Phased array antenna beamforming using optical processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. P.; Boldissar, F.; Chang, D. C. D.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of optical processor based beamforming for microwave array antennas is investigated. The primary focus is on systems utilizing the 20/30 GHz communications band and a transmit configuration exclusively to serve this band. A mathematical model is developed for computation of candidate design configurations. The model is capable of determination of the necessary design parameters required for spatial aspects of the microwave 'footprint' (beam) formation. Computed example beams transmitted from geosynchronous orbit are presented to demonstrate network capabilities. The effect of the processor on the output microwave signal to noise quality at the antenna interface is also considered.

  20. Simple Array Beam-Shaping Using Phase-Only Adjustments.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional beam-shaping for array antennas is accomplished via an amplitude-taper on the elemental radiators. It is well known that proper manipulation of the elemental phases can also shape the antenna far-field pattern. A fairly simple transformation from a desired amplitude-taper to a phase-taper can yield nearly equivalent results.

  1. Ultrasonic Phased-Array Characterization for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, John J.; Tennis, Richard F.; Pickens, Keith S.

    1995-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) recently fabricated and delivered the 100-channel Ultrasonic Phased-Array Testbed System (UPATS) for NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA prepared the specifications and provided the funding to develop UPATS in order to provide a tool for the improvement of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and characterization of materials. UPATS incorporates state-of-the-art phased-array concepts such as beam steering, focusing, apodization, and phase-sensitive detection which make it possible to develop more sophisticated testing methodologies. It also can be used to investigate fundamental ultrasonic propagation and detection phenomena such as refraction, diffraction, scattering, and beam broadening.

  2. Diffraction-limited circular single spot from phased array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuno, K.; Drenten, R.; Poel, C.v.d.; Opschoor, J.; Acket, G. )

    1989-11-01

    Anamorphic prism optics makes it possible to obtain a diffraction-limited ({Sigma}/8) circular single spot from index guided phased array lasers. It served not only for beam shaping but also for astigmatism correction and spatial filtering. The optical path analysis based on the interferometric fringe scanning phase measurements both in the near and far fields indicates that the phased array lasers can be applied to such diffraction-limited precise optical systems as optical disk recording, laser beam printing, or second harmonics generation.

  3. Optical phased array radiating optical vortex with manipulated topological charges.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Cui, Jianhua; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-02-23

    Optical antennas are key elements in quantum optics emitting and sensing, and behave wide range applications in optical domain. However, integration of optical antenna radiating orbital angular momentum is still a challenge in nano-scale. We theoretically demonstrate a sub-wavelength phased optical antenna array, which manipulates the distribution of the orbital angular momentum in the near field. Orbital angular momentum with topological charge of 4 can be obtained by controlling the phase distribution of the fundamental mode orbital angular momentum in each antenna element. Our results indicate this phased array may be utilized in high integrated optical communication systems.

  4. A conformal SHF phased array for aircraft satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, R.; Kudrna, K.

    1984-03-01

    A receive-only 7.5 GHz microstrip phased array has been developed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division (BASD). This 256 radiating element array provides a gain of 20 dBic over a conical scan region of 120 deg. Two arrays with one on either side of an aircraft would provide near hemispherical coverage. The array consists of four subarrays and can be expanded to achieve higher gain when required. The array is left-hand circularly polarized and has three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters for steering the beam. A microprocessor-based beam steering controller is used for calculating the phase shifter settings for each beam position. Each subarray includes radiating elements, quadrature hybrids, phase shifters, corporate feed, R.F. chokes in microstrip medium and hybrid PIN diode drivers. The array is approximately 1.5 inches thick and is conformal to the aircraft skin. It is a bolt on assembly only requiring aircraft skin entries for the R.F. output and for control lines. Transmit capability can be provided by merely changing the artwork to go to 8.5 GHz.

  5. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  6. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  7. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  8. Fabrication and performance of a miniaturized 64-element high-frequency endoscopic phased array.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, Andre; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a 40-MHz, 64-element phased-array transducer packaged in a 2.5 x 3.1 mm endoscopic form factor. The array is a forward-looking semi-kerfed design based on a 0.68Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3) - 0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-32%PT) single-crystal wafer with an element-to-element pitch of 38 µm. To achieve a miniaturized form factor, a novel technique of wire bonding the array elements to a polyimide flexible circuit board oriented parallel to the forward looking ultrasound beam and perpendicular to the array was developed. A technique of partially dicing into the back of the array was also implemented to improve the directivity of the array elements. The array was fabricated with a single-layer P(VDF-TrFE)-copolymer matching layer and a polymethylpentene (TPX) lens for passive elevation focusing to a depth of 7 mm. The two-way -6-dB pulse bandwidth was measured to be 55% and the average electromechanical coupling (k(eff)) for the individual elements was measured to be 0.62. The one-way -6-dB directivities from several array elements were measured to be ±20°, which was shown to be an improvement over an identical kerfless array. The -3-dB elevation focus resulting from the TPX lens was measured to be 152 µm at the focal depth, and the focused lateral resolution was measured to be 80 µm at a steering angle of 0°. To generate beam profiles and images, the probe was connected to a commercial ultrasound imaging platform which was reprogrammed to allow for phased array transmit beamforming and receive data collection. The collected RF data were then processed offline using a numerical computing script to generate sector images. The radiation pattern for the beamformed transmit pulse was collected along with images of wire phantoms in water and tissue-equivalent medium with a dynamic range of 60 dB. Finally, ex vivo tissue images were generated of porcine brain tissue.

  9. All-in-one low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation system using piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) arrays for targeted cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjun; Yoo, Seungjun; Jung, Joontaek; Kang, Woojin; Wang, Wei; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-09-19

    A novel cell-stimulation system was fabricated using 10 × 29 piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) arrays for targeted ultrasonic cell stimulation. Both the diameter of a single pMUT element and the edge-to-edge gap were 120 μm, and the size of a pMUT array was 2.27 × 6.84 mm, to be placed at the bottom of a Transwell. The measured resonance frequency of a single pMUT element was 1.48 ± 0.13 MHz and the measured acoustic intensity of the pMUT array was 0.15 ± 0.03 MPa at 1 mm away from the transducer. A pMUT array was mounted on a print circuit board (PCB), which was designed in accordance with the size of a 12-well Transwell. The Transwell was placed on the PCB and wire bonding was performed to electrically connect the PCB and pMUT arrays. After wiring, the PCB and pMUT arrays were coated with 2.6-μm thick parylene-C to ensure biocompatibility and waterproofing. PC12 cells were used for ultrasonic cell stimulation tests to examine the proposed all-in-one low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation system. Various stimulation times and duty cycles were used simultaneously for cell proliferation in a confined cell culture environment. All stimulation groups showed increased cell proliferation rates, in the range 138-166%, versus the proliferation rate of the control group.

  10. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  11. Model of a Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenow, Debra

    2004-01-01

    It's difficult to control liquid and gas in propellant tanks in zero gravity. A possible a design would utilize acoustic liquid manipulation (ALM) technology which uses ultrasonic beams conducted through a liquid and solid media, to push gas bubbles in the liquid to desirable locations. We can propel and control the bubble with acoustic radiation pressure by aiming the acoustic waves on the bubble s surface. This allows us to design a so called smart tank in which the ALM devices transfer the gas to the outer wall of the tank and isolating the liquid in the center. Because the heat transfer rate of a gas is lower of that of the liquid it would substantially decrease boil off and provide of for a longer storage life. The ALM beam is composed of little wavelets which are individual waves that constructively interfere with each other to produce a single, combined acoustic wave front. This is accomplished by using a set of synchronized ultrasound transducers arranged in an array. A slight phase offset of these elements allows us to focus and steer the beam. The device that we are using to produce the acoustic beam is called the piezoelectric transducer. This device converts electrical energy to mechanical energy, which appears in the form of acoustic energy. Therefore the behavior of the device is dependent on both the mechanical characteristics, such as its density, cross-sectional area, and its electrical characteristics, such as, electric flux permittivity and coupling factor. These devices can also be set up in a number of modes which are determined by the way the piezoelectric device is arranged, and the shape of the transducer. For this application we are using the longitudinal or thickness mode for our operation. The transducer also vibrates in the lateral mode, and one of the goals of my project is to decrease the amount of energy lost to the lateral mode. To model the behavior of the transducers I will be using Pspice, electric circuit modeling tool, to

  12. Model of a Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenow, Debra

    2004-01-01

    It's difficult to control liquid and gas in propellant tanks in zero gravity. A possible a design would utilize acoustic liquid manipulation (ALM) technology which uses ultrasonic beams conducted through a liquid and solid media, to push gas bubbles in the liquid to desirable locations. We can propel and control the bubble with acoustic radiation pressure by aiming the acoustic waves on the bubble s surface. This allows us to design a so called smart tank in which the ALM devices transfer the gas to the outer wall of the tank and isolating the liquid in the center. Because the heat transfer rate of a gas is lower of that of the liquid it would substantially decrease boil off and provide of for a longer storage life. The ALM beam is composed of little wavelets which are individual waves that constructively interfere with each other to produce a single, combined acoustic wave front. This is accomplished by using a set of synchronized ultrasound transducers arranged in an array. A slight phase offset of these elements allows us to focus and steer the beam. The device that we are using to produce the acoustic beam is called the piezoelectric transducer. This device converts electrical energy to mechanical energy, which appears in the form of acoustic energy. Therefore the behavior of the device is dependent on both the mechanical characteristics, such as its density, cross-sectional area, and its electrical characteristics, such as, electric flux permittivity and coupling factor. These devices can also be set up in a number of modes which are determined by the way the piezoelectric device is arranged, and the shape of the transducer. For this application we are using the longitudinal or thickness mode for our operation. The transducer also vibrates in the lateral mode, and one of the goals of my project is to decrease the amount of energy lost to the lateral mode. To model the behavior of the transducers I will be using Pspice, electric circuit modeling tool, to

  13. Optical RF distribution links for MMIC phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Raquet, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional methods to distribute RF signals to GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits Phased Array Antennas are inadequate for arrays having large numbers of elements. Optical RF distribution links have been proposed as a lightweight, mechanically flexible, and low volume solution. Three candidate techniques for providing optical RF distribution are discussed along with the electro-optic devices required to configure them. A discussion of the present status of applicable electro-optics devices is also included.

  14. An analytical filter design method for guided wave phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for designing a spatial filter that processes the data from an array of two-dimensional guided wave transducers. An inverse problem is defined where the spatial filter coefficients are determined in such a way that a prescribed beam shape, i.e., a desired array output is best approximated in the least-squares sense. Taking advantage of the 2π-periodicity of the generated wave field, Fourier-series representation is used to derive closed-form expressions for the constituting matrix elements. Special cases in which the desired array output is an ideal delta function and a gate function are considered in a more explicit way. Numerical simulations are performed to examine the performance of the filters designed by the proposed method. It is shown that the proposed filters can significantly improve the beam quality in general. Most notable is that the proposed method does not compromise between the main lobe width and the sidelobe levels; i.e. a narrow main lobe and low sidelobes are simultaneously achieved. It is also shown that the proposed filter can compensate the effects of nonuniform directivity and sensitivity of array elements by explicitly taking these into account in the formulation. From an example of detecting two separate targets, how much the angular resolution can be improved as compared to the conventional delay-and-sum filter is quantitatively illustrated. Lamb wave based imaging of localized defects in an elastic plate using a circular array is also presented as an example of practical applications.

  15. Phased-Array Antenna With Optoelectronic Control Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos; Lee, Richard Q.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1995-01-01

    Prototype phased-array antenna features control of amplitude and phase at each radiating element. Amplitude- and phase-control signals transmitted on optical fiber to optoelectronic interface circuit (OEIC), then to monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) at each element. Offers advantages of flexible, rapid electronic steering and shaping of beams. Furthermore, greater number of elements, less overall performance of antenna degraded by malfunction in single element.

  16. Reconfigurable Infrared Phased-Array Semiconductor Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Jon

    The ability to engineer the scattering phase of metamaterial constituents offers tremendous potential for constructing new classes of beam steering, shaping, and focusing technologies. Current methods for engineering phase rely on static geometry-based effects. In this talk we describe methods to dynamically tune the scattering phase of infrared semiconductor nanoantennas. We fabricate spherical silicon and germanium nanoparticles via femtosecond laser ablation and demonstrate size-dependent multipolar resonances throughout the infrared frequency range. We experimentally demonstrate that the resonance frequencies shift with doping, according to simple Drude models of free-carrier refraction. Using a combination of theoretical and analytical calculations we show that dynamically tuning free-carrier concentration can enable reconfigurable optical antennas and metasurfaces. Such dynamic tuning will enable reconfigurable photonic devices based on optical antenna and metamaterial concepts.

  17. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for Radio Frequency and Optical Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hardened solutions for satellite systems in addition to improved size, weight, power, and bandwidth characteristics. ODIS, Inc., has developed optoelectronic integrated circuit technology for sensing and data transfer in phased arrays. The technology applies integrated components (lasers, amplifiers, modulators, detectors, and optical waveguide switches) to a radio frequency (RF) array with true time delay for beamsteering. Optical beamsteering is achieved by controlling the current in a two-dimensional (2D) array. In this project, ODIS integrated key components to produce common RF-optical aperture operation.

  18. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  19. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  20. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  1. The Potential of Phased Arrays for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    Phased array antennas provide a set of operational capabilities which are very attractive for certain mission applications and not very attractive for others. Such antennas are by no means a panacea for telecommunications. In this paper the features of phased arrays are reviewed and their implications for space missions are considered in terms of benefits and costs. The primary capability provided by a phased array is electronic beam agility. The beam direction may be controlled at electronic speeds (vs. mechanical actuation) permitting time division multiplexing of multiple "users." Moreover, the beam direction can be varied over a full hemisphere (for a planar array). On the other hand, such antennas are typically much more complicated than the more commonly used reflectors and horns and this implies higher cost. In some applications, this increased cost must be accepted if the mission is to be carried out at all. The SIR-C radar is an example of such a case albeit not for deep space. Assuming for the sake of argument that the complexity and cost of a phased array can be significantly reduced, where can such antennas be of value in the future of planetary exploration? Potential applications to be discussed are planetary rovers, landers, and orbiters including both the areosynchronous and low orbit varieties. In addition, consideration is given to links from deep space to earth. As may be fairly obvious, the deep space link to earth would not benefit from the wide angle steering capability provided by a phase array whereas a rover could gain advantage from the capability to steer a beam anywhere in the sky. In the rover case, however, physical size of the aperture becomes a significant factor which, of course, has implications regarding the choice of frequency band. Recent research work concerning phased arrays has suggested that future phased arrays might be made less complex and, therefore, less costly. Successful realization of such phased arrays would enable

  2. A Parameterized Pattern-Error Objective for Large-Scale Phase-Only Array Pattern Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-21

    array pattern Array synthesis Transmit array pattern Array pattern optimization Phase-only optimization Modern phased-array radar systems increasingly...the most trivial phase-only optimizations are nonconvex and thus may have large numbers of local optima. In most fielded radar systems only the...existing approaches to phase-only array design can be roughly divided into heuristic, nonlocal optimization , and local optimization methods. The first two

  3. Phased arrays for satellites and the TDRSS antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    The design and performance of satellite phased-array systems are examined by considering several specific antennas built for spacecraft use. Particular consideration is given to: (1) the JARED (Jammer Reduction Antenna System) antenna, and adaptive phased array which can be used to null jammer signals while providing coverage to specific user areas; (2) the algorithm used in the JARED antenna; and (3) a technique that can be used to detect and locate jammers. The antennas used by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) are then described. A significant aspect of the TDRSS is the multiple access antenna which is a 30-element phased array, providing a single steered beam on transmit and the ability to receive data from 20 simultaneous users. Also included on the TDRSS is a mesh deployable reflector and a C-band and K-band communications system.

  4. Phased arrays for satellites and the TDRSS antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and performance of satellite phased-array systems are examined by considering several specific antennas built for spacecraft use. Particular consideration is given to: (1) the JARED (Jammer Reduction Antenna System) antenna, and adaptive phased array which can be used to null jammer signals while providing coverage to specific user areas; (2) the algorithm used in the JARED antenna; and (3) a technique that can be used to detect and locate jammers. The antennas used by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) are then described. A significant aspect of the TDRSS is the multiple access antenna which is a 30-element phased array, providing a single steered beam on transmit and the ability to receive data from 20 simultaneous users. Also included on the TDRSS is a mesh deployable reflector and a C-band and K-band communications system.

  5. System response in passively phased fiber amplifier arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Sami A.; Culver, Bill; Nelson, Burke; Starcher, Yuji; Bates, George M.; Hedrick, Jerry W., Jr.

    2008-08-01

    System temporal response in passively phased fiber amplifier arrays dictates how fast a passively phased system can correct for phase fluctuations due to thermal and mechanical effects. The system response time was measured by employing a variable-speed mechanical chopper in the feedback loop of a passively phased system then measuring the on-axis output intensity of the system as a function of time. Observed relaxation oscillations are compared to theory. The system response time was measured to be about 20 μsec. We also find that passive phasing improved the system's beam stability and extraction efficiency.

  6. Research on calibration error of carrier phase against antenna arraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Hou, Xiaomin

    2016-11-01

    It is the technical difficulty of uplink antenna arraying that signals from various quarters can not be automatically aligned at the target in deep space. The size of the far-field power combining gain is directly determined by the accuracy of carrier phase calibration. It is necessary to analyze the entire arraying system in order to improve the accuracy of the phase calibration. This paper analyzes the factors affecting the calibration error of carrier phase of uplink antenna arraying system including the error of phase measurement and equipment, the error of the uplink channel phase shift, the position error of ground antenna, calibration receiver and target spacecraft, the error of the atmospheric turbulence disturbance. Discuss the spatial and temporal autocorrelation model of atmospheric disturbances. Each antenna of the uplink antenna arraying is no common reference signal for continuous calibration. So it must be a system of the periodic calibration. Calibration is refered to communication of one or more spacecrafts in a certain period. Because the deep space targets are not automatically aligned to multiplexing received signal. Therefore the aligned signal should be done in advance on the ground. Data is shown that the error can be controlled within the range of demand by the use of existing technology to meet the accuracy of carrier phase calibration. The total error can be controlled within a reasonable range.

  7. Focusing of high-intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    A method for focusing high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU) through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs while maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) was proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, were investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator, the diffraction approach provides a 23% gain in peak intensity and results in significantly less power losses on the ribs (1% vs. 7.5% of the irradiated power) compared with the geometric one. A 2-D 1-MHz phased array with 254 randomly distributed elements, tissue-mimicking phantoms and samples of porcine rib cages are used in experiments; the geometric approach is used to configure how the array is driven. Intensity distributions are measured in the plane of the ribs and in the focal plane using an infrared camera. Theoretical and experimental results show that it is possible to provide adequate focusing through the ribs without overheating them for a single focus and several foci, including steering at +/- 10-15 mm off and +/- 20 mm along the array axis. Focus splitting caused by the periodic spatial structure of ribs is demonstrated both in simulations and experiments; the parameters of splitting are quantified. The ability to produce thermal lesions with a split focal pattern in ex vivo porcine tissue placed beyond the rib phantom is also demonstrated. The results suggest that the method is potentially useful for clinical applications of HIFU, for which the rib cage lies between the transducer(s) and the targeted tissue.

  8. Focusing of high intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array

    PubMed Central

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey; #, ||

    2010-01-01

    A method for focusing high intensity ultrasound through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs whilst maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) is proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, are investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator the diffraction approach provides a 23% gain in peak intensity and results in significantly less power losses on the ribs (1% versus 7.5% of the irradiated power) compared with the geometric one. A 2D 1-MHz phased array with 254 randomly distributed elements, tissue mimicking phantoms, and samples of porcine rib cages are used in experiments; the geometric approach is used to configure how the array is driven. Intensity distributions are measured in the plane of the ribs and in the focal plane using an infra-red camera. Theoretical and experimental results show that it is possible to provide adequate focusing through the ribs without overheating them for a single focus and several foci, including steering at ± 10–15 mm off and ± 20 mm along the array axis. Focus splitting due to the periodic spatial structure of ribs is demonstrated both in simulations and experiments; the parameters of splitting are quantified. The ability to produce thermal lesions with a split focal pattern in ex vivo porcine tissue placed beyond the rib phantom is also demonstrated. The results suggest that the method is potentially useful for clinical applications of HIFU for which the rib cage lies between the transducer(s) and the targeted tissue. PMID:20510186

  9. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  10. Optically controlled phased-array technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  11. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method.

  12. Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation by Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  13. High performance relaxor-based ferroelectric single crystals for ultrasonic transducer applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Zhou, Dan; Yue, Qingwen; Yu, Yanxiong; Wu, Jinchuan; Qiu, Weibao; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Luo, Haosu; Chan, Helen L W; Dai, Jiyan

    2014-07-29

    Relaxor-based ferroelectric single crystals Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) have drawn much attention in the ferroelectric field because of their excellent piezoelectric properties and high electromechanical coupling coefficients (d33~2000 pC/N, kt~60%) near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). Ternary Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystals also possess outstanding performance comparable with PMN-PT single crystals, but have higher phase transition temperatures (rhombohedral to tetragonal Trt, and tetragonal to cubic Tc) and larger coercive field Ec. Therefore, these relaxor-based single crystals have been extensively employed for ultrasonic transducer applications. In this paper, an overview of our work and perspectives on using PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT single crystals for ultrasonic transducer applications is presented. Various types of single-element ultrasonic transducers, including endoscopic transducers, intravascular transducers, high-frequency and high-temperature transducers fabricated using the PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT crystals and their 2-2 and 1-3 composites are reported. Besides, the fabrication and characterization of the array transducers, such as phased array, cylindrical shaped linear array, high-temperature linear array, radial endoscopic array, and annular array, are also addressed.

  14. High Performance Relaxor-Based Ferroelectric Single Crystals for Ultrasonic Transducer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Zhou, Dan; Yue, Qingwen; Yu, Yanxiong; Wu, Jinchuan; Qiu, Weibao; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Luo, Haosu; Chan, Helen L. W.; Dai, Jiyan

    2014-01-01

    Relaxor-based ferroelectric single crystals Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) have drawn much attention in the ferroelectric field because of their excellent piezoelectric properties and high electromechanical coupling coefficients (d33∼2000 pC/N, kt∼60%) near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). Ternary Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystals also possess outstanding performance comparable with PMN-PT single crystals, but have higher phase transition temperatures (rhombohedral to tetragonal Trt, and tetragonal to cubic Tc) and larger coercive field Ec. Therefore, these relaxor-based single crystals have been extensively employed for ultrasonic transducer applications. In this paper, an overview of our work and perspectives on using PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT single crystals for ultrasonic transducer applications is presented. Various types of single-element ultrasonic transducers, including endoscopic transducers, intravascular transducers, high-frequency and high-temperature transducers fabricated using the PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT crystals and their 2-2 and 1-3 composites are reported. Besides, the fabrication and characterization of the array transducers, such as phased array, cylindrical shaped linear array, high-temperature linear array, radial endoscopic array, and annular array, are also addressed. PMID:25076222

  15. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  16. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, Florian Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-31

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  17. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentally demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.

  18. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentallymore » demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.« less

  19. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; ...

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization.more » As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.« less

  20. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum. PMID:26126879

  1. Single- and double-difference algorithms for position and time-delay calibration of transducer-elements in a sparse array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Sharp, Ian; Hedley, Mark; Ho, Phil; Guo, Y Jay

    2007-06-01

    A method for the calibration of the position and time delay of transducer elements in a large, sparse array used for underwater, high-resolution, ultrasound imaging has been described in a previous work. This algorithm is based on the direct algorithm used in the global positioning system (GPS), but the wave propagation speed is treated as one of the to-be-calibrated parameters. In this article, the performance of two other commonly used GPS algorithms, namely the single-difference algorithm and the double-difference algorithm, is evaluated. The calibration of the propagation speed also is integrated into these two algorithms. Furthermore, a novel, least-squares method is proposed to calibrate the time delay associated with each transducer element for these two algorithms. The performances of these algorithms are theoretically analyzed and evaluated using numerical analysis and simulation study. The performance of the direct algorithm, the single-difference algorithm, and the double-difference algorithm is compared. It was found that the single-difference algorithm has the best performance among the three algorithms for the current application, and it is capable of calibrating the position and time delay of transducer elements to an accuracy of one-tenth of a wavelength.

  2. Phased array receiver development using high performance HEMT MMICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Jones, W.; Carandang, R.; Lam, W.; Yonaki, J.; Streit, D.; Kasody, R.

    1991-07-01

    A set of HEMT MMICs including LNAs and phase shifters has been developed for an all-HEMT 20 GHz phased array receiver applications. These MMICs use state-of-the-art HEMT devices for low noise figure, innovative design techniques for compactness, and proven wafer processing for high yield. The LNA achieved a noise figure of 2.5 dB with an associated gain of 22 dB. The 3-bit phase shifter achieved 6 to 7.8 dB insertion loss for all states. With their performance and high process yield, these MMIC chips can be inserted into a system to demonstrate the next generation phased array performance.

  3. Detection Performance of a Diffusive Wave Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Stephen P.

    2004-04-01

    Diffusive wave phased arrays have been demonstrated to be a sensitive method of detecting inhomogeneities embedded in heavily scattering media. However, the increase in sensitivity is coupled with an increase in noise, so that the optimum performance may not be obtained when the sources are modulated in antiphase. The performance of a range of configurations in the presence of Gaussian noise is investigated by using probabilistic detection theory. A model of diffusive wave propagation through scattering media is used to demonstrate that the phase performance can be improved by controlling the relative phase difference between the two sources. However, the best performance is obtained by using the amplitude response of a single source system. The major benefit of a phased array system is therefore the rejection of common systematic noise.

  4. Simulations of lesion detection using a combined phased array LHMI-technique.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound based elasticity imaging techniques have been developed during the past decades. Some of these techniques are based on an internal radiation force stimulation in which a transient or dynamic radiation force is produced by using a single or dual-frequency sonication. In addition, sonication and data acquisition can be implemented using combined or separate transducers. In this simulation study of lesion detection using localized harmonic motion imaging (LHMI), we used a combined phased array designed for simultaneous thermal ablation and lesion detection. In the sonication mode, a focused single-frequency amplitude-modulated sonication is used to induce harmonic motion and in the tracking mode, some of the array elements are used for pulse-echo tracking of the induced displacements. The results showed that the size of the lesion affected the induced displacement around the sonication point. The displacement tracking simulations demonstrated that these changes in the displacement distributions can be detected using only a few of the array elements in the tracking mode but the exact size of the lesion can not be detected accurately. The simulations also showed that two lesions having the radius of 2.5mm can be distinguished if distance between these lesions is at least 2.5mm.

  5. Scattering of the field of a multi-element phased array by human ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-03-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of invasiveness and risk of harmful side effects. Despite its advantages, however, there are a number of significant challenges currently hindering its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes. Multielement random arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successfully treating a patient for liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the ribcage. A mesh of quadratic pressure patches was generated using CT scan data for ribs nine to twelve on the right side. A boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used, in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array past the ribs at both intercostal and transcostal treatment locations. This method has the advantage of accounting for full effects of scattering and diffraction in three dimensions under continuous wave excitation.

  6. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  7. Computation of the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology, the phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. Array-fed antennas are used extensively in today's multiple beam satellite antennas. A computer program based on a very efficient numerical technique for calculating the radiated power (Romberg integration), directivity, and radiation pattern of a phased array is described. The formulation developed is very general, and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E- and H-plane element pattern, element location, and complex element excitation. For comparison purposes sample cases have been presented. Excellent agreement has been obtained for all cases. Also included are a user guide and a copy of the computer program.

  8. Ku band phased array in a large angular sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubost, G.; Gueho, S.; Beguin, D.

    The feasibility of a microstrip, flat, phased, square array performing at high frequency and exhibiting proper technological behavior is demonstrated. A total of 64 three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters are used to steer the beam. Sum and difference patterns can be formed for every deflected directivity. Data are presented on the efficiency evaluation for different deflection angles, the highest sidelobe levels, the maximum directivity, and the measured average efficiency.

  9. Inflatable TORUS Solar Array Technology Program. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Phase II Accomplishments ............................ 199, 5.5.2 Lessons Learned from the ITSAT Program ................ 192 5.5.3 Phase III Program...flexible solar array blanket consists of thin crystalline silicon solar cells, a foldable Kapton® substrate, associated wiring and assembly fittings. This...film is used to hold the pressure when inflating by increasing the tear resistance; otherwise the soft foldable aluminum would tear very easily

  10. Infinite Phased Array of Microstrip Dipoles in Two Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Green’s function appropriate to the two-layer substrate- superstrate structure was used in the formulation of the method of moMents - (continued on back) 20...analysis is presented for an infinite phased array of microstrip dipoles embedded within a two layer substrate structure (sub- strate- superstrate ...characterization of input impedance as a function of phase scan angle. Results for several sub- strate- superstrate structures illustrate the utility of the single

  11. Phased arrays. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-04-01

    The design, performance, radiation patterns, and applications of phased arrays are presented in these Federally-sponsored research reports. Applications include communications, radar, optical, spacecraft, and navigational aids. This updated bibliography contains 244 abstracts, 44 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  12. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development Canada Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 Email: Peter.Moo@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Abstract A phased array radar has the ability to rapidly and...search and Development Canada (DRDC) Ottawa to analyse the performance of radar resource management techniques for naval radars operating in a littoral

  13. From Vision to Reality: 50 Years of Phased Array Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-30

    an exciting year on 4 October when the engineers and scientists of the Soviet Union launched the first artificial earth satellite. The “Space Age...reliably and in complete amplitude and phase coherence an “impossible dream .” The cost, complexity, and reliability of such arrays were substantial

  14. Weak-signal Phase Calibration Strategies for Large DSN Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is studying arrays of large numbers of small, mass-produced radio antennas as a cost-effective way to increase downlink sensitivity and data rates for future missions. An important issue for the operation of large arrays is the accuracy with which signals from hundreds of small antennas can be combined. This is particularly true at Ka band (32 GHz) where atmospheric phase variations can be large and rapidly changing. A number of algorithms exist to correct the phases of signals from individual antennas in the case where a spacecraft signal provides a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on time scales shorter than the atmospheric coherence time. However, for very weak spacecraft signals it will be necessary to rely on background natural radio sources to maintain array phasing. Very weak signals could result from a spacecraft emergency or by design, such as direct-to-Earth data transmissions from distant planetary atmospheric or surface probes using only low gain antennas. This paper considers the parameter space where external real-time phase calibration will be necessary, and what this requires in terms of array configuration and signal processing. The inherent limitations of this technique are also discussed.

  15. Noise correlations and SNR in phased-array MRS.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Santarelli, M F; Giovannetti, G; Milanesi, M; De Marchi, D; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals by multiple receiver coils can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or alternatively can reduce the scan time maintaining a reliable SNR. However, using phased array coils in MRS studies requires efficient data processing and data combination techniques in order to exploit the sensitivity improvement of the phased array coil acquisition method. This paper describes a novel method for the combination of MRS signals acquired by phased array coils, even in presence of correlated noise between the acquisition channels. In fact, although it has been shown that electric and magnetic coupling mechanisms produce correlated noise in the coils, previous algorithms developed for MRS data combination have ignored this effect. The proposed approach takes advantage of a noise decorrelation stage to maximize the SNR of the combined spectra. In particular Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was exploited to project the acquired spectra in a subspace where the noise vectors are orthogonal. In this subspace the SNR weighting method will provide the optimal overall SNR. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is carried out on simulated (1)H-MRS signals and experimental results are obtained on phantom (1)H-MR spectra using a commercially available 8-element phased array coil. Noise correlations between elements were generally low due to the optimal coil design, leading to a fair SNR gain (about 0.5%) in the center of the field of view (FOV). A greater SNR improvement was found in the peripheral FOV regions.

  16. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  17. Looking Below the Surface with Ultrasonic Phased Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2010-10-01

    This article is a brief tutorial on the benefits of volumetric ultrasonic phased array line scanning. The article describes the need, the approach, and the methods/practices used to analyze the data for flaw detection and characterization in the nuclear power plant component arena.

  18. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study of printed circuit discontinuities is necessary in order to design, for example, transitions between rectangular waveguides and printed circuits. New developments with respect to the analytical approaches to this problem are discussed. A summary of the progress in the experimental approach is presented. The accurate solution for the modes in various millimeter-wave waveguides is essential in the analysis of many integrated circuit components, such as filters and impedance transformers. Problems associated with the numerical computation of these modes in two frequently used waveguide forms, namely, the finline and microstrip, are presented. The spectral domain method of formulation, with a moment method solution, is considered. This approach can be readily extended to analyze an arbitrary configuration of dielectric and metallized regions in a shielded enclosure. Galerkin's method is used, where the testing and basic functions are the same. It is shown that the mode functions, or eigenfunctions, are more sensitive to errors than the phase constants, or eigenvalues. The approximate mode functions do not satisfy the orthogonality relationship well, resulting in difficulties when these modal solutions are used to form an approximate Green's function or are used in a mode matching analysis.

  19. Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-Channel Digital Phased Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-16

    Simultaneous transmit and receive with digital phased arrays,” in IEEE International Symposium on Phased Array Systems and Technology , Oct. 2016, pp. 1–6. ...Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-channel Digital Phased Array Jonathan P. Doane, Kenneth E. Kolodziej, Bradley T. Perry MIT...high isolation between adjacent transmitting and receiving sub-arrays in a digital phased array without analog cancellers or other complex front-end

  20. Adaptive phase calibration of a microphone array for acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Teal, Paul D; Poletti, Mark A

    2010-04-01

    Previous work has indicated that a limitation on the performance of a circular microphone array for holographic sound field recording at low frequencies is phase mismatch between the microphones in the array. At low frequencies these variations become more significant than at mid-range and high frequencies because the high order phase mode responses at low frequencies are lower in amplitude. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a "self-calibration" method. The basis of the calibration is to estimate the location of one or more wide-band sources using mid-range frequencies and to use this source location information to perform correction to the array at low frequencies. In its simplest form the calibration must be performed in an anechoic environment, since multipath effects at widely differing frequencies are uncorrelated. The approach is first demonstrated in such an environment using recordings from an array of high quality microphones. The technique is then extended to an adaptive calibration that can be used in an environment that is somewhat reverberant. The validity of the adaptive approach is demonstrated using recordings from an array of inexpensive microphones.