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Sample records for phaseolus vulgaris ii

  1. Phaseolus vulgaris - recalcitrant potential.

    PubMed

    Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2014-11-15

    Since the ability to genetically engineer plants was established, researchers have modified a great number of plant species to satisfy agricultural, horticultural, industrial, medicinal or veterinary requirements. Almost thirty years after the first approaches to the genetic modification of pulse crops, it is possible to transform many grain legumes. However, one of the most important species for human nutrition, Phaseolus vulgaris, still lacks some practical tools for genomic research, such as routine genetic transformation. Its recalcitrance towards in vitro regeneration and rooting significantly hampers the possibilities of improvement of the common bean that suffers from many biotic and abiotic constraints. Thus, an efficient and reproducible system for regeneration of a whole plant is desired. Although noticeable progress has been made, the rate of recovery of transgenic lines is still low. Here, the current status of tissue culture and recent progress in transformation methodology are presented. Some major challenges and obstacles are discussed and some examples of their solutions are presented.

  2. Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 infecting common bean Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes show differential infection patterns between gene pools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2), in breeding-lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as other Phaseolus species collected from two...

  3. The Class II Trehalose 6-phosphate Synthase Gene PvTPS9 Modulates Trehalose Metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Aarón; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Reyes, José L.; Juárez-Verdayes, Marco A.; Avonce, Nelson; Quinto, Carmen; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1%) of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant. PMID:27847509

  4. The Class II Trehalose 6-phosphate Synthase Gene PvTPS9 Modulates Trehalose Metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris Nodules.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Aarón; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Reyes, José L; Juárez-Verdayes, Marco A; Avonce, Nelson; Quinto, Carmen; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1%) of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant.

  5. Inhibition of photosystem II precedes thylakoid membrane lipid peroxidation in bisulfite-treated leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Covello, P.S.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Thompson, J.E. Univ. of Guelph, Ontario ); Chang, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Exposure of leaves to SO{sub 2} bisulfite is known to induce peroxidation of thylakoid lipids and to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport. In the present study, we have examined the temporal relationship between bisulfite-induced thylakoid lipid peroxidation and inhibition of electron transport in an attempt to clarify the primary mechanism of SO{sub 2} phytotoxicity. Primary leaves of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Kinghorn) were floated on a solution of NaHSO{sub 3}, and the effects of this treatment on photosynthetic electron transport were determined in vivo by measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction and in vitro by biochemical measurements of the light reactions using isolated thylakoids. Lipid peroxidation in treated leaves was followed by monitoring ethane emission from leaf segments and by measuring changes in fatty acid composition and lipid fluidity in isolated thylakoids. A 1 hour treatment with bisulfite inhibited photosystem II (PSII) activity by 70% without modifying Photosystem I, and this inhibitory effect was not light-dependent. By contrast, lipid peroxidation was not detectable until after the inhibition of PSII and was strongly light dependent. This temporal separation of events together with the differential effect of light suggests that bisulfite-induced inhibition of PSII is not a secondary effect of lipid peroxidation, and that bisulfite acts directly on one or more components of PSII.

  6. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  7. Light-stimulated cell expansion in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves. II. Quantity and quality of light required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Volkenburgh, E.; Cleland, R. E.; Watanabe, M.

    1990-01-01

    The quantity and quality of light required for light-stimulated cell expansion in leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been determined. Seedlings were grown in dim red light (RL; 4 micromoles photons m-2 s-1) until cell division in the primary leaves was completed, then excised discs were incubated in 10 mM sucrose plus 10 mM KCl in a variety of light treatments. The growth response of discs exposed to continuous white light (WL) for 16 h was saturated at 100 micromoles m-2 s-1, and did not show reciprocity. Extensive, but not continuous, illumination was needed for maximal growth. The wavelength dependence of disc expansion was determined from fluence-response curves obtained from 380 to 730 nm provided by the Okazaki Large Spectrograph. Blue (BL; 460 nm) and red light (RL; 660 nm) were most effective in promoting leaf cell growth, both in photosynthetically active and inhibited leaf discs. Far-red light (FR; 730 nm) reduced the effectiveness of RL, but not BL, indicating that phytochrome and a separate blue-light receptor mediate expansion of leaf cells.

  8. [Microstructural changes in hardened beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)].

    PubMed

    Mujica, Maria Virginia; Granito, Marisela; Soto, Naudy

    2015-06-01

    (Phaseolus vulgaris). The hardening of Phaseolus vulgaris beans stored at high temperature and high relative humidity is one of the main constraints for consumption. The objective of this research was to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy, structural changes in cotyledons and testa of the hardened beans. The freshly harvested grains were stored for twelve months under two conditions: 5 ° C-34% RH and 37 ° C-75% RH, in order to promote hardening. The stored raw and cooked grains were lyophilized and fractured. The sections of testa and cotyledons were observed in an electron microscope JSM-6390. After twelve months, grains stored at 37 ° C-75% RH increased their hardness by 503%, whereas there were no significant changes in grains stored at 5 ° C-34% RH. At the microstructural level, the cotyledons of the raw grains show clear differences in appearance of the cell wall, into the intercellular space size and texture matrix protein. There were also differences in compaction of palisade and sub-epidermal layer in the testa of raw grains. After cooking, cotyledon cells of the soft grains were well separated while these ofhard grains were seldom separated. In conclusion, the found differences in hard and soft grains showed a significant participation of both structures, cotyledons and testa, in the grains hardening.

  9. A Phaseolus vulgaris diversity panel for Andean bean improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) of the Andean gene pool, including red mottled, kidney, cranberry, and yellow seed types are important in Africa and in the Americas. Andean dry bean breeding gains have lagged behind those of Mesoamerican beans. These differences may be due to a narrower genetic b...

  10. POD DEVELOPMENT INCREASES THE OZONE SENSITIVITY OF PHASEOLUS VULGARIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine if the O3 sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris L. changed with plant development. Plants exposed to charcoal-filtered air or elevated O3 throughout the study were compared to those exposed only during the vegetative or reproductive s...

  11. Reducing effect of a combination of Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus extracts on operant self-administration of a chocolate-flavoured beverage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaru, Alessandro; Maccioni, Paola; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Carai, Mauro A M; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2013-06-01

    Treatment with a rational combination of standardized extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus reduced food intake and glycemia in rats. The present study was designed to assess the effect of this extract combination and of each single extract in an experimental model of food craving, made up of rats displaying exaggerated seeking and taking behaviors for a chocolate-flavoured beverage. After training to lever-respond for the chocolate-flavoured beverage, rats were treated with vehicle, Phaseolus vulgaris extract alone (200 mg/kg), Cynara scolymus extract alone (400 mg/kg), or combination of Phaseolus vulgaris (200 mg/kg) and Cynara scolymus (400 mg/kg) extracts. The Phaseolus vulgaris extract and the extract combination exerted similar and substantial decrements in the number of lever-responses and amount of self-administered chocolate-flavoured beverage; conversely, the Cynara scolymus extract was totally ineffective. These results suggest that (i) the capacity of the extract combination to reduce the self-administration of the chocolate-flavoured beverage entirely relied on the Phaseolus vulgaris extract, (ii) Phaseolus vulgaris extract may interfere with the mechanisms regulating food-related addictive-like behaviors, and (iii) combinations of Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus extracts may possess a broad spectrum of activities, from treatment of metabolic syndrome to overweight, obesity, and possibly food-related addictive disorders.

  12. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (<1 kDa) with IC50 of 30.3 and 51.8 μg/mL values for the P. lunatus with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension.

  13. Clinical complications of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) consumption.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Alok Kumar; Das, Mukul; Jain, S K; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2013-06-01

    Kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), are common legumes, consumed worldwide. The delicacy of kidney beans is highly appreciable but, at the same time, their toxicity has raised an alarming concern. Kidney bean toxicity may be divided into two subcategories: toxicity caused by its lectins, saponins, phytates, and protease inhibitors or allergenicity induced by its allergenic proteins. The purpose of this review is to unravel the facts behind the different aspects of toxicity and allergenicity induced by kidney beans and try to fill the gaps that exist currently.

  14. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris.

  15. Two endornaviruses show differential infection patterns between gene pools of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Khankhum, Surasak; Valverde, Rodrigo A; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A; Osorno, Juan M; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2, in breeding lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) collected from the two centers of common bean domestication: Mesoamerica and the Andes. The two endornaviruses were detected in many genotypes of Mesoamerican origin but rarely in genotypes of Andean origin. The results suggest that these two endornaviruses were introduced into the Mesoamerican modern genotypes during common bean domestication and provide more evidence for the existence of two divergent gene pools of common bean.

  16. INDUCED CYTOMICTIC VARIATIONS AND SYNCYTE FORMATION DURING MICROSPOROGENESIS IN PHASEOLUS VULGARIS L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Chaudhary, N

    2016-01-01

    The intercellular translocation of chromatin material along with other cytoplasmic contents among the proximate meiocytes lying in close contact with each other commonly referred as cytomixis was reported during microsporogenesis in Phaseolus vulgaris L., a member of the family Fabaceae. The phenomenon of cytomixis was observed at three administered doses of gamma rays viz. 100, 200, 300 Gy respectively in the diploid plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. The gamma rays irradiated plants showed the characteristic feature of inter-meiocyte chromatin/chromosomes transmigration through various means.such as channel formation, beak formation or by direct adhesion between the PMC's (Pollen mother cells). The present study also reports the first instance of syncyte formation induced via cytomictic transmigration in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Though the frequency of syncyteformation was rather low yet these could play a significant role in plant evolution. It is speculated that syncyte enhances the ploidy level of plants by forming 2n gametes and may lead to the production ofpolyploid plants. The phenomenon of cytomixis shows a gradual inclination along with the increasing treatment doses of gamma rays. The preponderance of cytomixis was more frequent during meiosis I as compared to meiosis II. An interesting feature noticed during the present study was the channel formation among the microspores and fusion among the tetrads due to cell wall dissolution. The impact of this phenomenon is also visible on the development of post-meiotic products. The formation of heterosized pollen grains; a deviation from the normal pollen grains has also been reported. The production of gametes with unbalanced chromosomes is of utmost importance and should be given more attention in future studies as they possess the capability of inducing variations at the genomic level and can be further utilized in the improvement of germplasm.

  17. Volatile compounds of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Oomah, B Dave; Liang, Lisa S Y; Balasubramanian, Parthiba

    2007-12-01

    Volatile compounds of uncooked dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars representing three market classes (black, dark red kidney and pinto) grown in 2005 were isolated with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 62 volatiles consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alkanes, alcohols and ketones represented on average 62, 38, 21, 12, and 9 x 10(6) total area counts, respectively. Bean cultivars differed in abundance and profile of volatiles. The combination of 18 compounds comprising a common profile explained 79% of the variance among cultivars based on principal component analysis (PCA). The SPME technique proved to be a rapid and effective method for routine evaluation of dry bean volatile profile.

  18. Heterogeneity of Glutamine Synthetase Polypeptides in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Miguel; Porta, Helena; Padilla, Jaime; Folch, Jorge; Sánchez, Federico

    1984-01-01

    Glutamine synthetases from roots, nodules, and leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been purified to homogeneity and their polypeptide composition determined. The leaf enzyme is composed of six polypeptides. The cytosolic fraction contains two 43,000 dalton polypeptides and the chloroplastic enzyme is formed by four 45,000 dalton polypeptides. Root glutamine synthetase consists only of the same two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton that are present in the leaf enzyme. The nodule enzyme is formed by two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton, one is common to the leaf and root enzyme but the other is specific for N2-fixing nodule tissue. The two glutamine synthetase forms of the nodule contain a different proportion of the 43,000 dalton polypeptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16663942

  19. Leaf conductance response of phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.

    The effect of ozone flux density on leaf conductance to ozone in Phaseolus vulgaris was examined. The change in conductance was measured within the first two hours of fumigation for mature, fruiting 6-week-old plants of an ozone sensitive cultivar (Seafarer); for young, 14-day-old plants of the same cultivar; and for an ozone resistant cultivar (Gold Crop). Young Seafarer plants showed no change in conductance to ozone over a wide range of ozone flux densities. Gold Crop showed a decrease in conductance of -3.1 % /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1) whereas mature Seafarer plants exhibited a stronger decrease of -7.7% /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1). Diffusion porometer measurements taken on fruiting Seafarer plants in the field illustrated that a decrease in leaf diffusive conductance to water is related to visual ozone injury.

  20. Injury response of Phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Thurtell, G. W.

    This study describes a quantitative relationship between mean O 3 flux density and the length of exposure needed for the occurrence of visual injury to Phaseolus vulgaris L. Similar relationships were found for 14 day old and 6 week old plants using a whole leaf gas exchange cuvette system. Cultivars Seafarer (O 3 sensitive) and Gold Crop (O 3 resistant) exhibited similar responses at flux densities > 3 mg m -2 h -1 but only Seafarer was injured below this flux density. O 3 concentration and length of exposure period alone did not contain sufficient information to describe the onset of visual foliar injury. The use of O 3 concentrations in excess of normal ambient conditions compensated for low leaf conductances so that flux densities in the cuvette were similar to those found in the field.

  1. Burkholderia phymatum strains capable of nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris are present in Moroccan soils.

    PubMed

    Talbi, C; Delgado, M J; Girard, L; Ramírez-Trujillo, A; Caballero-Mellado, J; Bedmar, E J

    2010-07-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, nodC, and nifH genes of four bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Morocco soils were identified as Burkholderia phymatum. All four strains formed N(2)-fixing nodules on P. vulgaris and Mimosa, Acacia, and Prosopis species and reduced acetylene to ethylene when cultured ex planta.

  2. Burkholderia phymatum Strains Capable of Nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris Are Present in Moroccan Soils ▿

    PubMed Central

    Talbi, C.; Delgado, M. J.; Girard, L.; Ramírez-Trujillo, A.; Caballero-Mellado, J.; Bedmar, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, nodC, and nifH genes of four bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Morocco soils were identified as Burkholderia phymatum. All four strains formed N2-fixing nodules on P. vulgaris and Mimosa, Acacia, and Prosopis species and reduced acetylene to ethylene when cultured ex planta. PMID:20472732

  3. Rhizobium lusitanum sp. nov. a bacterium that nodulates Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Angel; Igual, José M; Peix, Alvaro; Cervantes, Emilio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2006-11-01

    The species Phaseolus vulgaris is a promiscuous legume nodulated by several species of the family Rhizobiaceae. During a study of rhizobia nodulating this legume in Portugal, we isolated several strains that nodulate P. vulgaris effectively and also Macroptilium atropurpureum and Leucaena leucocephala, but they form ineffective nodules in Medicago sativa. According to phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strains from this study belong to the genus Rhizobium, with Rhizobium rhizogenes and Rhizobium tropici as the closest related species, with 99.9 and 99.2% similarity, respectively, between the type strains of these species and strain P1-7T. The nodD and nifH genes carried by strain P1-7T are phylogenetically related to those of other species nodulating Phaseolus. This strain does not carry virulence genes present in the type strain of R. rhizogenes, ATCC 11325T. Analysis of the recA and atpD genes confirms this phylogenetic arrangement, showing low similarity with respect to those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11325T (91.9 and 94.1% similarity, respectively) and R. tropici IIB CIAT 899T (90.6% and 91.8% similarity, respectively). The intergenic spacer (ITS) of the strains from this study is phylogenetically divergent from those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T, with 85.9 and 82.8% similarity, respectively, with respect to strain P1-7T. The tRNA profile and two-primer random amplified polymorphic DNA pattern of strain P1-7T are also different from those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T. The strains isolated in this study can be also differentiated from R. rhizogenes and R. tropici by several phenotypic characteristics. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization showed means of 28 and 25% similarity between strain P1-7T and R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T, respectively. All these data showed that the strains isolated in this study belong to a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which we propose

  4. Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Petolino, J.F.; Leone, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine some of the chemical and physiological changes accompanying exposure of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Topcrop') to saline aerosol. Plants were exposed to various dosages of salt (0-150 ..mu..g Cl/sup -//cm/sup 2/) when the primary leaves were approximately one-quarter expanded (7-8 days old). Respiration, photosynthesis, and transpiration rates were determined after salt exposure. There was an increase in the respiration rate of salted plants as compared to the unsalted controls. Photosynthesis rate increased when expressed on a unit chlorophyll basis. Transpiration rate decreased with exposure to saline aerosol. When the primary leaves were fully expanded (15-17 days old) they were analyzed for contents of chloride, water, total nitrogen, total chlorophyll, total free amino acids, soluble sugar, and starch. The chloride content increased linearly with increased exposure. As the chloride content increased, the total nitrogen content decreased. Chlorophyll and amino acid contents increased until symptoms appeared, then they decreased. With increased exposure to salt total soluble sugar content increased.

  5. Ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase from developing French bean fruits (Phaseolus vulgaris [L.].).

    PubMed

    Wells, X E; Lees, E M

    1991-05-15

    Ureidoglycolate is an intermediate of allantoin catabolism in ureide-transporting legumes. This report describes the first purification of ureidoglycolate degrading activity (UGDA) from plant tissue in which the enzyme has been separated from urease. The enzyme from developing fruits of Phaseolus vulgaris has been purified 48-fold to give a preparation free of allantoinase and urease activity. UGDA was inhibited by EDTA while the Vmax was increased in the presence of Mn2+. The Km values for ureidoglycolate in the presence and the absence of Mn2+ were 2.0 and 5.4 mM, respectively. In the absence of Mn2+ UGDA was heat labile at 40 degrees C, but in the presence of Mn2+ the activity was stable up to temperatures of 60 degrees C. The Mr of UGDA was determined to be 300,000 by gel filtration chromatography and the pH optimum ranged from pH 7.0 to 8.5. Ammonia was determined to be the nitrogen-containing product of UGDA by a microdiffusion assay. This enzyme should therefore be described as ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase. The activity was shown to be associated with peroxisomes by fractionation of a crude extract on a sucrose density gradient. The products of ureidoglycolate degradation are glyoxylate, ammonia, and presumably carbon dioxide, which can be readily utilized by pathways of metabolism that are known to be present in this organelle.

  6. Ureide metabolism during seedling development in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Raso, María José; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is a legume that transports most of the atmospheric nitrogen fixed in its nodules to the aerial parts of the plant as ureides. Changes in ureide content and in enzymatic activities involved in their metabolism were identified in the cotyledons and embryonic axes during germination and early seedling development. Accumulation of ureides (ca. 1300 nmol per pair of cotyledons) was observed in the cotyledons of dry seeds. Throughout germination, the total amount of ureides slightly decreased to about 1200 nmol, but increased both in cotyledons and in embryonic axes after radicle emergence. In the axes, the ureides were almost equally distributed in roots, hypocotyls and epicotyls. The pattern of ureide distribution was not affected by the presence of nitrate or sucrose in the media up to 6 days after imbibition. Ureides are synthesized from purines because allopurinol (a xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor) blocks the increase of ureides. Allantoin and allantoate-degrading activities were detected in French bean dried seeds, whereas no ureidoglycolate-degrading activity was detected. During germination, the levels of the three activities remain unchanged in cotyledons. After radicle emergence, the levels of activities in cotyledons changed. Allantoin-degrading activity increased, allantoate-degrading activity decreased and ureidoglycolate-degrading activity remained undetectable in cotyledons. In developing embryonic axes, the three activities were detected throughout germination and early seedling development. The embryonic axes are able to synthesize ureides, because those compounds accumulated in axes without cotyledons.

  7. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris growth and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, Derek; Durham, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  8. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources.

  9. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Stephanie; Boylan, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  10. An antifungal peptide from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. brown kidney bean.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wen Liang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-04-01

    A 5.4-kDa antifungal peptide, with an N-terminal sequence highly homologous to defensins and inhibitory activity against Mycosphaerella arachidicola (IC(50)= 3 μM), Setospaeria turcica and Bipolaris maydis, was isolated from the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. brown kidney bean. The peptide was purified by employing a protocol that entailed adsorption on Affi-gel blue gel and Mono S and finally gel filtration on Superdex 75. The antifungal activity of the peptide against M. arachidicola was stable in the pH range 3-12 and in the temperature range 0°C to 80°C. There was a slight reduction of the antifungal activity at pH 2 and 13, and the activity was indiscernible at pH 0, 1, and 14. The activity at 90°C and 100°C was slightly diminished. Deposition of Congo red at the hyphal tips of M. arachidicola was induced by the peptide indicating inhibition of hyphal growth. The lack of antiproliferative activity of brown kidney bean antifungal peptide toward tumor cells, in contrast to the presence of such activity of other antifungal peptides, indicates that different domains are responsible for the antifungal and antiproliferative activities.

  11. An antifungal defensin from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Cloud Bean'.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangli; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-15

    An antifungal peptide with a defensin-like sequence and exhibiting a molecular mass of 7.3kDa was purified from dried seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Cloud Bean'. The isolation procedure entailed anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography an Affi-gel blue gel, cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. Although the antifungal peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, it was adsorbed on both Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. The antifungal peptide exerted antifungal activity against Mycosphaerella arachidicola with an IC(50) value of 1.8 μM. It was also active against Fusarium oxysporum with an IC(50) value of 2.2 μM. It had no inhibitory effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase when tested up to 100 μM. Proliferation of L1210 mouse leukemia cells and MBL2 lymphoma cells was inhibited by the antifungal peptide with an IC(50) of 10 μM and 40 μM, respectively.

  12. Inhibition of the catalase activity from Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa by sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tejera García, Noel A; Iribarne, Carmen; Palma, Francisco; Lluch, Carmen

    2007-08-01

    Changes in catalase activity during the development of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis as well as its response in salinized plants of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa, was studied. Besides, it was examined the behavior of the enzyme, isolated from leaves and root nodules, during in vitro incubation with NaCl doses. Nodule catalase activities of both legumes were assayed with several enzyme inhibitors and also purified. Leaf catalase activity of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa decreased and increased respectively throughout the ontogeny, but root nodule catalase kept a high and stable value. This last result suggests that both legumes require the maintenance of high nodule catalase in nitrogen-fixing nodules. Under salt stress conditions leaf and nodule catalase activity decreased in both, grain and pasture legumes. Because catalase from leaf of Medicago sativa and nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris were relatively sensitive to NaCl during in vitro experiments, the detoxifying role of this enzyme for H(2)O(2) should be limited in such conditions. Both catalases, from determinate and indeterminate nodules, were affected neither by oxygen nor superoxide radicals but showed a strong (Phaseolus vulgaris) or partial (Medicago sativa) inhibition with dithiothreitol, dithionite and beta-mercaptoethanol. Besides, cyanide was the most potent inhibitor of nodule catalases. Finally, catalases partially purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography migrated at 42 (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 46kDa (Medicago sativa) on SDS-PAGE, whereas native forms on sephacryl S-300 columns exhibited a molecular mass of 59 and 48kDa (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 88 and 53kDa (Medicago sativa).

  13. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans.

  14. Cytokinin Oxidase from Phaseolus vulgaris Callus Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield, J. Mark; Armstrong, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of metal ions on cytokinin oxidase activity extracted from callus tissues of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Great Northern have been examined using an assay based on the oxidation of N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)-adenine-2,8-3H (i6 Ade) to adenine (Ade). The addition of cupric ions to reaction mixtures containing imidazole buffer markedly enhanced cytokinin oxidase activity. In the presence of optimal concentrations of copper and imidazole, cytokinin oxidase activity was stimulated more than 20-fold. The effect was enzyme dependent, specific for copper, and observed only in the presence of imidazole. The substrate specificity of the copper-imidazole enhanced reaction, as judged by substrate competition tests, was the same as that observed in the absence of copper and imidazole. Similarly, in tests involving DEAE-cellulose chromatography, elution profiles of cytokinin oxidase activity determined using a copper-imidazole enhanced assay were identical to those obtained using an assay without copper and imidazole. On the basis of these results, the addition of copper and imidazole to reaction mixtures used to assay for cytokinin oxidase activity is judged to provide a reliable and specific assay of greatly enhanced sensitivity for the enzyme. The mechanism by which copper and imidazole enhance cytokinin oxidase activity is not certain, but the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme was not inhibited by anaerobic conditions when these reagents were present. This observation suggests that copper-imidazole complexes are substituting for oxygen in the reaction mechanism by which cytokinin oxidase effects cleavage of the N6-side chain of i6Ade. PMID:16665511

  15. Diversification and Population Structure in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew W.; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J.

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of the Phaseolus vulgaris - Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Padder, Bilal A.; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Awale, Halima E.; Kelly, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) anthracnose caused by the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a major factor limiting production worldwide. Although sources of resistance have been identified and characterized, the early molecular events in the host-pathogen interface have not been investigated. In the current study, we conducted a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using Illumina sequencing of two near isogenic lines (NILs) differing for the presence of the Co-1 gene on chromosome Pv01 during a time course following infection with race 73 of C. lindemuthianum. From this, we identified 3,250 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) within and between the NILs over the time course of infection. During the biotrophic phase the majority of DEGs were up regulated in the susceptible NIL, whereas more DEGs were up-regulated in the resistant NIL during the necrotrophic phase. Various defense related genes, such as those encoding PR proteins, peroxidases, lipoxygenases were up regulated in the resistant NIL. Conversely, genes encoding sugar transporters were up-regulated in the susceptible NIL during the later stages of infection. Additionally, numerous transcription factors (TFs) and candidate genes within the vicinity of the Co-1 locus were differentially expressed, suggesting a global reprogramming of gene expression in and around the Co-1 locus. Through this analysis, we reduced the previous number of candidate genes reported at the Co-1 locus from eight to three. These results suggest the dynamic nature of P. vulgaris–C. lindemuthianum interaction at the transcriptomic level and reflect the role of both pathogen and effector triggered immunity on changes in plant gene expression. PMID:27829044

  17. Virulence of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, is an important disease in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the dry and warmer areas of Puerto Rico and in much of the tropics and subtropics worldwide. The virulence of three isolates from Isabela (Mph-ISA-TARS), Juana Diaz (Mph-JD) a...

  18. Identifying genes involved in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in Phaseolus vulgaris using RNAseq technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. Legumes form a unique symbiotic relationship with rhizob...

  19. Transcriptome of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) through RNA-seq: nodulation, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, transcription factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. We have performed next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) o...

  20. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  1. Fungal endophytes in germinated seeds of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world, but its production is severely limited by several biotic and abiotic stressors. In search of a sustainable solution to this problem, we conducted a survey of fungal endophytes in 582 germinated seeds belonging to 11...

  2. Genetic Diversity and Genome Wide Association Analysis of Cooking Time in Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a nutrient dense food and a dietary staple in parts of Africa and Latin America. One of the major factors that limits greater utilization of beans is their long cooking times compared to other foods. Cooking time is an important trait with implications for gende...

  3. Influence of atmospheric vapour pressure deficit on ozone responses of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genotypes of snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one known to be sensitive to ozone and the other resistant, were examined to determine their response to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the presence and absence of ozone. Plants were grown in Outdoor Plant Environment Chambers in combin...

  4. Identification of Nutritional Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators for Arabidopsis development and stress responses. A hybridization approach using miRNAs-macroarrays was used to identify miRNAs that respond to nutritional stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. miRNAs-macroarrays were prepared by printing nylon filters with DNA syntheti...

  5. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on common beans Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  6. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  7. Host Suitability of Diverse Lines of Phaseolus vulgaris to Multiple Populations of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James R.; Young, Lawrence D.

    2003-01-01

    The host suitability of diverse races and gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) for multiple isolates of Heterodera glycines was studied. Twenty P. vulgaris genotypes, representing three of the six races within the two major germplasm pools, were tested in greenhouse experiments to determine their host suitability to five H. glycines isolates. Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes differed in their host suitability to different H. glycines isolates. While some common bean lines were excellent hosts for some H. glycines isolates, no common bean line was a good host for all isolates. Some bean lines from races Durango and Mesoamerica, representing the Middle America gene pool, were resistant to all five nematode isolates. Other lines, from both the Andean and Middle America gene pools, had differential responses for host suitability to the different isolates of H. glycines. PMID:19265970

  8. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Badari Nath, A R S; Sivaramakrishna, A; Marimuthu, K M; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-05

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco. This PHA (Gibco) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  9. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badari Nath, A. R. S.; Sivaramakrishna, A.; Marimuthu, K. M.; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco®. This PHA (Gibco®) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco®) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  10. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Giraldo, M C; Buendía, H F; Tovar, E; Duque, M C; Beebe, S E

    2006-06-01

    A diversity survey was used to estimate allelic diversity and heterozygosity of 129 microsatellite markers in a panel of 44 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations. Two types of microsatellites were evaluated, based respectively on gene coding and genomic sequences. Genetic diversity was evaluated by estimating the polymorphism information content (PIC), as well as the distribution and range of alleles sizes. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic than genomic microsatellites in terms of both number of alleles (6.0 vs. 9.2) and PIC values (0.446 vs. 0.594) while greater size differences between the largest and the smallest allele were observed for the genomic microsatellites than for the gene-based microsatellites (31.4 vs. 19.1 bp). Markers that showed a high number of alleles were identified with a maximum of 28 alleles for the marker BMd1. The microsatellites were useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes, for uncovering the races within each genepool and for separating wild accessions from cultivars. Greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool and polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Comparisons between Andean genotypes had higher polymorphism (53.0%) on average than comparisons among Mesoamerican genotypes (33.4%). Within the Mesoamerican parental combinations, the intra-racial combinations between Mesoamerica and Durango or Jalisco race genotypes showed higher average rates of polymorphism (37.5%) than the within-race combinations between Mesoamerica race genotypes (31.7%). In multiple correspondance analysis we found two principal clusters of genotypes corresponding to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools and subgroups representing specific races especially for the Nueva Granada and Peru races of the Andean gene pool. Intra population diversity

  11. Two Isoenzymes of NADH-dependent Glutamate Synthase in Root Nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-Ling; Cullimore, Julie V.

    1988-01-01

    The specific activity of plant NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT) in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L. is over threefold higher than the specific activity of ferredoxin-dependent GOGAT. The NADH-GOGAT is composed of two distinct isoenzymes (NADH-GOGAT I and NADH-GOGAT II) which can be separated from crude nodule extracts by ion-exchange chromatography. Both NADH-GOGAT isoenzymes have been purified to apparent homogeneity and shown to be monomeric proteins with similar Mrs of about 200,000. They are both specific for NADH as reductant. An investigation of their kinetic characteristics show slight differences in their Kms for l-glutamine, 2-oxoglutarate, and NADH, and they have different pH optima, with NADH-GOGAT I exhibiting a broad pH optimum centering at pH 8.0 whereas NADH-GOGAT II has a much narrower pH optimum of 8.5. The specific activity of NADH-GOGAT in roots is about 27-fold lower than in nodules and consists almost entirely of NADH-GOGAT I. During nodulation both isoenzymes increase in activity but the major increase is due to NADH-GOGAT II which increases over a time course similar to the increase in nitrogenase activity. This isoenzyme is twice as active as NADH-GOGAT I in mature nodules. The roles and regulation of these two isoenzymes in the root nodule are discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:16666475

  12. Narrow- and Broad-Host-Range Symbiotic Plasmids of Rhizobium spp. Strains That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Martinez, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1988-01-01

    Agrobacterium transconjugants containing symbiotic plasmids from different Rhizobium spp. strains that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris were obtained. All transconjugants conserved the parental nodulation host range. Symbiotic (Sym) plasmids of Rhizobium strains isolated originally from P. vulgaris nodules, which had a broad nodulation host range, and single-copy nitrogenase genes conferred a Fix+ phenotype to the Agrobacterium transconjugants. A Fix− phenotype was obtained with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from P. vulgaris nodules that had a narrow host range and reiterated nif genes, as well as with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from other legumes that presented single nif genes and a broad nodulation host range. This indicates that different types of Sym plasmids can confer the ability to establish an effective symbiosis with P. vulgaris. Images PMID:16347637

  13. Transcriptome characterization of developing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) pods from two genotypes with contrasting seed zinc concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds are a rich source of dietary zinc, especially for people consuming plant-based diets. Within P. vulgaris there is at least two-fold variation in seed Zn concentration. Genetic studies have revealed seed Zn differences to be controlled by a single gene in two c...

  14. Effects of copper on reserve mobilization in embryo of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Karmous, Inès; Bellani, Lorenza M; Chaoui, Abdelilah; El Ferjani, Ezzedine; Muccifora, Simonetta

    2015-07-01

    The present research reports a biochemical and micro-submicroscopic analysis of copper effect on reserve mobilization during germination of Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. soisson nain hatif seeds. Dry embryonic cells are rich in protein bodies and little starch grains. In Cu-treated embryos copper inhibited 50% of albumin and globulin mobilization after 72 h imbibition. The severe alterations in treated embryo cells, observed by electron microscope, were probably the cause of the inability to utilize the amino acids freed by protein mobilization and so possibly the cause of the inhibition of P. vulgaris embryonic axis elongation.

  15. Suspected white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) toxicity in horses and cattle.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, J; Rosel, K; Burns, T; Janzen, E

    2003-11-01

    Thirty-four mixed breed horses from two separate farms showed signs of abdominal discomfort, pyrexia and dehydration after being exposed to a new batch of 14% complete horse feed. A new batch of cattle feed from the same manufacturer resulted in dairy cows showing depression, a drop in milk production and diarrhoea. Examination of both diets revealed the presence of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Inclusion of raw beans of this genus in animal feeds is to be avoided.

  16. A Dietary Supplement Containing Standardized Phaseolus vulgaris Extract Influences Body Composition of Overweight Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Celleno, Leonardo; Tolaini, Maria Vittoria; D'Amore, Alessandra; Perricone, Nicholas V.; Preuss, Harry G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: More than one billion human adults worldwide are overweight and, therefore, are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and a variety of other chronic perturbations. Many believe that use of natural dietary supplements could aid in the struggle against obesity. So-called "starch blockers" are listed among natural weight loss supplements. Theoretically, they may promote weight loss by interfering with the breakdown of complex carbohydrates thereby reducing, or at least slowing, the digestive availability of carbohydrate-derived calories and/or by providing resistant starches to the lower gastrointestinal tract. Aims: The present research study examines a dietary supplement containing 445 mg of Phaseolus vulgaris extract derived from the white kidney bean, previously shown to inhibit the activity of the digestive enzyme alpha amylase, on body composition of overweight human subjects. Methods: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 60 pre-selected, slightly overweight volunteers, whose weight had been essentially stable for at least six months. The volunteers were divided into two groups, homogeneous for age, gender, and body weight. The test product containing Phaseolus vulgaris extract and the placebo were taken one tablet per day for 30 consecutive days before a main meal rich in carbohydrates. Each subject's body weight, fat and non-fat mass, skin fold thickness, and waist/hip/thigh circumferences were measured. Results: After 30 days, subjects receiving Phaseolus vulgaris extract with a carbohydrate-rich, 2000- to 2200-calorie diet had significantly (p<0.001) greater reduction of body weight, BMI, fat mass, adipose tissue thickness, and waist,/hip/ thigh circumferences while maintaining lean body mass compared to subjects receiving placebo. Conclusion: The results indicate that Phaseolus vulgaris extract produces significant decrements in body weight and suggest decrements in fat mass in the

  17. 1H NMR quantitative determination of photosynthetic pigments from green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Valverde, Juan; This, Hervé

    2008-01-23

    Using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1D and 2D), the two types of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls, their derivatives, and carotenoids) of "green beans" (immature pods of Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were analyzed. Compared to other analytical methods (light spectroscopy or chromatography), 1H NMR spectroscopy is a fast analytical way that provides more information on chlorophyll derivatives (allomers and epimers) than ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Moreover, it gives a large amount of data without prior chromatographic separation.

  18. Molecular characterization of two evolutionarily distinct endornaviruses co-infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Yong, Chee Keat; Valverde, Rodrigo A; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Aoki, Nanako; Hotate, Shunsuke; Kiyota, Eri; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Two high-molecular-mass dsRNAs of approximately 14 and 15 kbp were isolated from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivar Black Turtle Soup. These dsRNAs did not appear to cause obvious disease symptoms, and were transmitted through seeds at nearly 100% efficiency. Sequence information indicates that they are the genomes of distinct endornavirus species, for which the names Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2) are proposed. The PvEV-1 genome consists of 13,908 bp and potentially encodes a single polyprotein of 4496 aa, while that of PvEV-2 consists of 14 820 bp and potentially encodes a single ORF of 4851 aa. PvEV-1 is more similar to Oryza sativa endornavirus, while PvEV-2 is more similar to bell pepper endornavirus. Both viruses have a site-specific nick near the 5' region of the coding strand, which is a common property of the endornaviruses. Their polyproteins contain domains of RNA helicase, UDP-glycosyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which are conserved in other endornaviruses. However, a viral methyltransferase domain was found in the N-terminal region of PvEV-2, but was absent in PvEV-1. Results of cell-fractionation studies suggested that their subcellular localizations were different. Most endornavirus-infected bean cultivars tested were co-infected with both viruses.

  19. Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., a nodule endophytic bacterium of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yan, Hui; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng

    2017-01-01

    One Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as FH14(T), was isolated from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Hidalgo State of Mexico. Results based upon 16S rRNA gene (≥99.8 % similarities to known species), concatenated sequence (recA, atpD and glnII) analysis of three housekeeping genes (≤93.4 % similarities to known species) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of genome sequence (ranged from 87.6 to 90.0 % to related species) indicated the distinct position of strain FH14(T) within the genus Rhizobium. In analyses of symbiotic genes, only nitrogen fixation gene nifH was amplified that had nucleotide sequence identical to those of the bean-nodulating strains in R. phaseoli and R. vallis, while nodulation gene nodC gene was not amplified. The failure of nodulation to its original host P. vulgaris and other legumes evidenced the loss of its nodulation capability. Strain FH14(T) contained summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω6c/C18:1 ω7c, 59.96 %), C16:0 (10.6 %) and summed feature 2 (C12:0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928, 10.24 %) as the major components of cellular fatty acids. Failure to utilize alaninamide, and utilizing L-alanine, L-asparagine and γ-amino butyric acid as carbon source, distinguished the strain FH14(T) from the type strains for the related species. The genome size and DNA G+C content of FH14(T) were 6.94 Mbp and 60.8 mol %, respectively. Based on those results, a novel specie in Rhizobium, named Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., was proposed, with FH14(T) (=HAMBI 3636(T) = LMG 29288(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Leaf conductance in relation to rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation. II. Effects of short-term exposures to different photon flux densities. [Zea mays; Phaseolus vulgaris; Eucalyptus pauciflora

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.C.; Cowan, I.R.; Farquhar, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    When photon flux density incident on attached leaves of Zea mays L. was varied from the equivalent of 0.12 of full sunlight to full sunlight, leaf conductance to CO/sub 2/ transfer, g, changed in proportion to the change in rate of CO/sub 2/, assimilation, A, with the result that intercellular partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ remained almost constant. The proportionality was the same as the previously found in g and A measured at one photon flux density in plants of Zea mays L. grown at different levels of mineral nutrition, light intensities, and ambient partial pressures of CO/sub 2/. In shade-grown Phaseolus vulgaris L., plants, A as photon flux density was increased from about 0.12 up to about 0.5 full sunlight, the proportionality being almost the same in plants grown at low and at high light intensity. When photon flux density incident on the adaxial an abaxial surfaces of the isolateral leaves of Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng was varied, g and A also varied proportionally. The leaf conductance in a particular surface was affected by the photon flux density at the opposite surface to a greater extent than was expected on the basis of transmittance. The results indicated that stomata may, in some way, be sensitive to the photon flux absorbed within the leaf as a whole. 5 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Mangifera indica and Phaseolus vulgaris in the bioindication of air pollution in Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, J S; Fernandes, E B; Fawcett, W N

    2000-07-01

    In this article are reported the results of a study on the concentration of ascorbic acid (AA) in Mangifera indica as passive monitor and in Phaseolus vulgaris as active monitor with the intention to study the effects of industrial emissions from the Petrochemical Complex of Camaçari (PCC), Bahia, Brazil, on the vegetation. Leaves from M. indica were collected in two sites in the region under direct influence of industrial emissions and in one presumed nonpolluted reference (background) site. Pots with P. vulgaris were exposed in the same sites. The AA increase in the leaves of M. indica from PCC sites indicates a stress situation. The small AA increase in the P. vulgaris exposed in the more polluted site indicates that the active monitor is a sensitive one. The decrease of its leaf area indicates the inability of this species to activate physiological protection mechanisms like an increase in AA production.

  2. Computational identification of miRNAs and their targets in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Xie, H; Kong, M L; Sun, Q P; Li, R Z; Pan, J B

    2014-01-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Although thousands of miRNAs have been identified in plants, limited information is available about miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris, despite it being an important food legume worldwide. The high conservation of plant miRNAs enables the identification of new miRNAs in P. vulgaris by homology analysis. Here, 1804 known and unique plant miRNAs from 37 plant species were blast-searched against expressed sequence tag and genomic survey sequence databases to identify novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris. All candidate sequences were screened by a series of miRNA filtering criteria. Finally, we identified 27 conserved miRNAs, belonging to 24 miRNA families. When compared against known miRNAs in P. vulgaris, we found that 24 of the 27 miRNAs were newly discovered. Further, we identified 92 potential target genes with known functions for these novel miRNAs. Most of these target genes were predicted to be involved in plant development, signal transduction, metabolic pathways, disease resistance, and environmental stress response. The identification of the novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris is anticipated to provide baseline information for further research about the biological functions and evolution of miRNAs in P. vulgaris.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial species and symbiovars nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rouhrazi, Kiomars; Khodakaramian, Gholam; Velázquez, Encarna

    2016-03-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of 29 rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran was analysed on the basis of their core and symbiotic genes. These strains displayed five 16S rRNA-RFLP patterns and belong to eight ERIC-PCR clusters. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA and atpD core genes allowed the identification of several strains as Rhizobium sophoriradicis, R. leguminosarum, R. tropici and Pararhizobium giardinii, whereas other strains represented a new phylogenetic lineage related to R. vallis. These strains and those identified as R. sophoriradicis and R. leguminosarum belong to the symbiovar phaseoli carrying the γ nodC allele distributed in P. vulgaris endosymbionts in America, Europe, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as R. tropici belongs to the symbiovar tropici carried by strains of R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum and R. freirei nodulating P. vulgaris in America, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as P. giardinii belongs to the symbiovar giardinii together with the type strain of this species nodulating P. vulgaris in France. It is remarkable that the recently described species R. sophoriradicis is worldwide distributed in P. vulgaris nodules carrying the γ nodC allele of symbiovar phaseoli harboured by rhizobia isolated in the American distribution centers of this legume.

  4. Analysis of the uptake of atmospheric ammonia by leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hove, L. W. A.; Koops, A. J.; Adema, E. H.; Vredenberg, W. J.; Pieters, G. A.

    Individual leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were exposed for 9 h in a leaf chamber to different NH 3 concentrations at different light intensities. The rates of NH 3-uptake, transpiration and photosynthesis were measured simultaneously. The flux density of NH 3 increased linearly with concentration in the range of 4-400μg m -3. Flux densities also increased with light intensity. Resistance analysis indicated that NH 3 transport into the leaf is via the stomata: transport via the cuticle is negligible under the experimental conditions. There is no internal resistance against NH 3 transport. The NH 3 flux was found not to influence the photosynthesis.

  5. Free cyclitol, soluble carbohydrate and protein contents in Vigna unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Elane da Silva; Centeno, Danilo da Cruz; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Xavier-Filho, José; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amancio

    2011-04-27

    Seeds sprouts have been used as a good source of basic nutrients and nutraceutical compounds. The high nutritional value of seeds derives from the deposition of compounds during development. However some of these molecules are used in metabolic processes like germination, which leads to a considerable variation in their concentrations once these events are completed. In this work, we investigate the levels of inositols (myo-inositol, D-pinitol and ononitol), soluble carbohydrates and proteins in cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata sprouts. Sprouting increased myo-inositol and glucose content and reduction of raffinose and ononitol was observed. The protein levels increased in P. vulgaris and decreased in V. unguiculata sprouting. The level of sucrose was maintained in both sprouts. D-Pinitol was detected only in quiescent seeds. Our results suggested that bean sprout is an important source of proteins, sucrose, glucose and myo-inositol. Additionally, bean sprouts have low levels of raffinose, an antinutritional compound.

  6. PvRbohB negatively regulates Rhizophagus irregularis colonization in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Montiel, Jesús; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases (RBOHs) regulate the early stages of rhizobial infection in Phaseolus vulgaris and affect nodule function in Medicago truncatula. In contrast, the role of RBOHs in the plant-arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis and in the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during the establishment of the AM interaction is largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of P. vulgaris Rboh (PvRbohB) during the symbiosis with the AM fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis. Our results indicate that the PvRbohB transcript is significantly up-regulated in the mycorrhized roots of P. vulgaris. Further, the PvRbohB promoter was found to be active during the invasion of R. irregularis. Down-regulation of PvRbohB transcription by RNAi (RNA interference) silencing resulted in diminished ROS levels in the transgenic mycorrhized roots and induced early hyphal root colonization. Interestingly, the size of appressoria increased in PvRbohB-RNAi roots (760 ± 70.1 µm) relative to controls (251 ± 73.2 µm). Finally, the overall level of mycorrhizal colonization significantly increased in PvRbohB-RNAi roots [48.1 ± 3.3% root length colonization (RLC)] compared with controls (29.4 ± 1.9% RLC). We propose that PvRbohB negatively regulates AM colonization in P. vulgaris.

  7. Polyphenolic compounds appear to limit the nutritional benefit of biofortified higher iron black bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Our objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard black beans to deliver Fe for Hb synthesis. Two isolines of black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a standard (DOR500, "Low Fe") and biofortified (MIB465, "High Fe") in Fe (59 and 88 ug Fe/g, respectively) were used. ...

  8. Bioaccessibility of phenols in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and iron (Fe) availability to Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of common and biofortified beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), both raw and cooked (autoclaved 120 deg C, 20 min) were analyzed for their polyphenol composition. Polyphenols were identified via HPLC-UV/diode array detection. Cooking favored the extraction of polyphenols without the need of a hydroly...

  9. Genome Sequence of Paraburkholderia nodosa Strain CNPSo 1341, a N2-Fixing Symbiont of the Promiscuous Legume Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Costa, Maira Rejane; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Chueire, Ligia Maria Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Paraburkholderia nodosa CNPSo 1341 is a N2-fixing symbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris isolated from an undisturbed soil of the Brazilian Cerrado. Its draft genome contains 8,614,032 bp and 8,068 coding sequences (CDSs). Nodulation and N2-fixation genes were clustered in the genome that also contains several genes of secretion systems and quorum sensing. PMID:27811087

  10. Mapping Fusarium solani and Aphanomyces euteiches root rot resistance and root architecture quantitative trait loci in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot diseases of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a constraint to dry and snap bean production. We developed the RR138 RIL mapping population from the cross of OSU5446, a susceptible line that meets current snap bean processing industry standards, and RR6950, a root rot resistant dry bean in th...

  11. Isolates of Rhizoctonia solani can produce both web blight and root rot symptoms in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (Rs) is an important pathogen in the tropics, causing web blight (WB), and a widespread soil-borne root rot (RR) pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. This pathogen is a species complex classified into 14 anastomosis groups (AG). Some AGs have been report...

  12. Mapping snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) pod and color traits, in a dry bean x snap bean recombinant inbred population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) breeding programs are tasked with developing varieties that meet the standards of the vegetable processing industry and ultimately that of the consumer; all the while matching or exceeding the field performance of existing varieties. While traditional breeding methods ...

  13. MicroRNAs Expression Profile in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under Nutrient Deficiency Stresses and Manganese Toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a pivotal role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in plants. The information on miRNAs in legumes is scarce. This work analyzes miRNAs in the agronomically important legume common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. A hybridization approach of miRNAs-macroarrays prin...

  14. Rhizobium freirei sp. nov., a symbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris that is very effective at fixing nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Andrade, Diva Souza; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-11-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can establish symbiotic associations with several Rhizobium species; however, the effectiveness of most strains at fixing nitrogen under field conditions is very low. PRF 81(T) is a very effective strain, usually referred to as Rhizobium tropici and used successfully in thousands of doses of commercial inoculants for the common bean crop in Brazil; it has shown high rates of nitrogen fixation in all areas representative of the crop in the country. Here, we present results that indicate that PRF 81(T), although it belongs to the 'R. tropici group', which includes 10 Rhizobium species, R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum, R. multihospitium, R. miluonense, R. hainanense, R. calliandrae, R. mayense, R. jaguaris and R. rhizogenes, represents a novel species. Several morpho-physiological traits differentiated PRF 81(T) from related species. Differences were also confirmed in the analysis of rep-PCR (sharing less than 45 % similarity with the other species), MLSA with recA, atpD and rpoB genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. The novel species, for which we propose the name Rhizobium freirei sp. nov., is able to establish effective root nodule symbioses with Phaseolus vulgaris, Leucaena leucocephala, Leucaena esculenta, Crotalaria juncea and Macroptilium atropurpureum. The type strain is PRF 81(T) ( = CNPSo 122(T) = SEMIA 4080(T) = IPR-Pv81(T) = WDCM 440(T)).

  15. Rhizofiltration using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) to remediate uranium contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee; Yang, Minjune

    2010-01-15

    The uranium removal efficiencies of rhizofiltration in the remediation of groundwater were investigated in lab-scale experiments. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) were cultivated and an artificially uranium contaminated solution and three genuine groundwater samples were used in the experiments. More than 80% of the initial uranium in solution and genuine groundwater, respectively, was removed within 24h by using sunflower and the residual uranium concentration of the treated water was lower than 30 microg/L (USEPA drinking water limit). For bean, the uranium removal efficiency of the rhizofiltration was roughly 60-80%. The maximum uranium removal via rhizofiltration for the two plant cultivars occurred at pH 3-5 of solution and their uranium removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. The lab-scale continuous rhizofiltration clean-up system delivered over 99% uranium removal efficiency, and the results of SEM and EDS analyses indicated that most uranium accumulated in the roots of plants. The present results suggested that the uranium removal capacity of two plants evaluated in the clean-up system was about 25mg/kg of wet plant mass. Notably, the removal capacity of the root parts only was more than 500 mg/kg.

  16. Photosynthesis, Carbohydrate Metabolism, and Export in Beta vulgaris L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. during Square and Sinusoidal Light Regimes.

    PubMed

    Fondy, B R; Geiger, D R; Servaites, J C

    1989-02-01

    Rates of photosynthesis, sucrose synthesis, starch accumulation and degradation were measured in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants under a square-wave light regime and under a sinusoidal regime that simulated the natural daylight period. Photosynthesis rate increased in a measured manner in direct proportion to the increasing light level. In contrast to this close correspondence between photosynthesis and light, a lag in photosynthesis rate was seen during the initial hour under square-wave illumination. The leaf appeared to be responding to limits set by carbon metabolism rather than by gas exchange or light reactions. Under the sinusoidal regime starch degradation occurred during the first and last 2 hours of the photoperiod, likely in response to photosynthesis rate rather than directly to light level. Starch broke down when photosynthesis was below a threshold rate and accumulated above this rate. Under square-wave illumination, accumulation of starch did not begin until irradiance was at full level for an hour or more and photosynthesis was at or near its maximum. Under a sinusoidal light regime, sucrose synthesis rate comprised carbon that was newly fixed throughout the day plus that from starch degradation at the beginning and end of the day. Synthesis of sucrose from recently fixed carbon increased with increasing net carbon fixation rate while its formation from degradation of starch decreased correspondingly. The complementary sources of carbon maintained a relatively steady rate of sucrose synthesis under the changing daytime irradiance.

  17. Metabolic responses in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa exposed to the imazamox herbicide.

    PubMed

    García-Garijo, A; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C; Palma, F

    2014-05-01

    Alterations on growth, amino acids metabolism and some antioxidant enzyme activities as result of imazamox treatment were examined in determinate and indeterminate nodules, formed by Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa, respectively. Young seedlings of both legumes were inoculated with their respective microsymbionts and grown under controlled conditions. At vegetative growth, plants were treated with imazamox (250μM) in the nutrient solution and harvested 7days after. Imazamox was mainly accumulated in V. sativa where concentrations were more than six fold higher than those detected in P. vulgaris. Nodule dry weight and total nitrogen content were reduced by the herbicide treatment: the highest decrease of nodule biomass (50%) and nitrogen content (40%) were registered in V. sativa and P. vulgaris, respectively. The concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) did not change in neither determinate nor indeterminate nodules even though the acetohydroxyacid synthase activity decreased in root and nodules of both symbioses with the herbicide application. Based on this last result and taking into account that total free amino acids increased in roots but not in nodules of common vetch, a possible BCAA translocation from root to nodule could occur. Our results suggest that the maintenance of BCAA balance in nodule become a priority for the plant in such conditions. The involvement of activities glutathione-S-transferase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the response of the symbioses to imazamox are also discussed.

  18. 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, M; Borrajo, A; Bermúdez, J; Lores, M; Alonso, J; López, M; Santalla, M; De Ron, A M; Zapata, C; Alvarez, G

    2011-02-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for direct human consumption. Proteomic studies in legumes have increased significantly in the last years but few studies have been performed to date in P. vulgaris. We report here a proteomic analysis of bean seeds by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Three different protein extraction methods (TCA-acetone, phenol and the commercial clean-up kit) were used taking into account that the extractome can have a determinant impact on the level of quality of downstream protein separation and identification. To demonstrate the quality of the 2-DE analysis, a selection of 50 gel spots was used in protein identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF). The results showed that a considerable proportion of spots (70%) were identified in spite of incomplete genome/protein databases for bean and other legume species. Most identified proteins corresponded to storage protein, carbohydrate metabolism, defense and stress response, including proteins highly abundant in the seed of P. vulgaris such as the phaseolin, the phytohemagglutinin and the lectin-related α-amylase inhibitor.

  19. Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Román-Ponce, Brenda; Jing Zhang, Yu; Soledad Vásquez-Murrieta, María; Hua Sui, Xin; Feng Chen, Wen; Carlos Alberto Padilla, Juan; Wu Guo, Xian; Lian Gao, Jun; Yan, Jun; Hong Wei, Ge; Tao Wang, En

    2016-01-01

    Two Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains, FH13T and FH23, representing a novel group of Rhizobium isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Mexico, were studied by a polyphasic analysis. Phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed them to be members of the genus Rhizobium related most closely to 'Rhizobium anhuiense' CCBAU 23252 (99.7 % similarity), Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370T (98.6 %), and Rhizobium sophorae CCBAU 03386T and others ( ≤ 98.3 %). In sequence analyses of the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD, both strains formed a subclade distinct from all defined species of the genus Rhizobium at sequence similarities of 82.3-94.0 %, demonstrating that they represented a novel genomic species in the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between the reference strain FH13T and the type strains of related species varied between 13.0 ± 2.0 and 52.1 ± 1.2 %. The DNA G+C content of strain FH13T was 63.5 mol% (Tm). The major cellular fatty acids were 16 : 0, 17 : 0 anteiso, 18 : 0, summed feature 2 (12 : 0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928) and summed feature 8 (18 : 1ω7c). The fatty acid 17 : 1ω5c was unique for this strain. Some phenotypic features, such as failure to utilize adonitol, l-arabinose, d-fructose and d-fucose, and ability to utilize d-galacturonic acid and itaconic acid as carbon source, could also be used to distinguish strain FH13T from the type strains of related species. Based upon these results, a novel species, Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., is proposed, with FH13T ( = CCBAU 101094T = HAMBI 3626T = LMG 28672T) as the type strain.

  20. Comparative assessment of the polypeptide profiles from lateral and primary roots of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, J.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris, primary roots show gravitational sensitivity soon after emerging from the seed. In contrast, lateral roots are agravitropic during early development, and become gravitropic after several cm growth. Primary and lateral root tissues were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, coupled with western blotting techniques, to compare proteins which may contribute to the acquisition of gravitational sensitivity. Root tips and zones of cell elongation were compared for each root type, using immunological probes for calmodulin, alpha-actin, alpha-tubulin, and proteins of the plastid envelope. Lateral roots contained qualitatively less calmodulin, and showed a slightly different pattern of actin-related epitope proteins, than did primary root tissues, suggesting that polypeptide differences may contribute to the gravitational sensitivity which these root types express.

  1. Selective inhibition of histidine-modified pancreatic alpha-amylase by proteinaceous inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, H

    1988-06-01

    Chemical modification of two histidine residues of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) by diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence of a high concentration of maltotriose caused a decrease of amylase activity and an increase of maltosidase activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-alpha-maltoside). By binding a proteinaceous inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris (white kidney bean) with the modified enzyme, the amylase activity was further decreased but the maltosidase activity was retained to about 100% that of the native enzyme. Both amylase and maltosidase activities of the native enzyme were almost completely inhibited by the proteinaceous inhibitor. The increase of maltosidase activity by histidine modification was due to an increase of kcat, whereas the Km value was not changed; but binding of the proteinous inhibitor affected mainly the Km value of the modified enzyme.

  2. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M A; Mancini Filho, J; Lajolo, F M

    1984-02-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed.

  3. Fungal endophytes in germinated seeds of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Soroush; García-Lemos, Adriana M.; Castillo, Katherine; Ortiz, Viviana; López-Lavalle, Luis Augusto Becerra; Braun, Jerome; Vega, Fernando E.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a survey of fungal endophytes in 582 germinated seeds belonging to 11 Colombian cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The survey yielded 394 endophytic isolates belonging to 42 taxa, as identified by sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Aureobasidium pullulans was the dominant endophyte, isolated from 46.7 % of the samples. Also common were Fusarium oxysporum, Xylaria sp., and Cladosporium cladosporioides, but found in only 13.4 %, 11.7 %, and 7.6 % of seedlings, respectively. Endophytic colonization differed significantly among common bean cultivars and seedling parts, with the highest colonization occurring in the first true leaves of the seedlings. PMID:27109374

  4. Effect of different nitrogen sources on plant characteristics and yield of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luqueño, F; Reyes-Varela, V; Martínez-Suárez, C; Salomón-Hernández, G; Yáñez-Meneses, J; Ceballos-Ramírez, J M; Dendooven, L

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater sludge can be used to fertilize crops, especially after vermicomposting (composting with earthworms to reduce pathogens). How wastewater sludge or vermicompost affects bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) growth is still largely unknown. In this study the effect of different forms of N fertilizer on common bean plant characteristics and yield were investigated in a Typic Fragiudepts (sandy loam) soil under greenhouse conditions. Beans were fertilized with wastewater sludge, or wastewater sludge vermicompost, or urea, or grown in unamended soil, while plant characteristics and yield were monitored (the unamended soil had no fertilization). Yields of common bean plants cultivated in unamended soil or soil amended with urea were lower than those cultivated in wastewater sludge-amended soil. Application of vermicompost further improved plant development and increased yield compared with beans cultivated in wastewater amended soil. It was found that application of organic waste products improved growth and yield of bean plants compared to those amended with inorganic fertilizer.

  5. Isoflavonoid Formation as an Indicator of UV Stress in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Christopher J.; Stolzer-Jehle, Andrea; Wellmann, Eckard

    1985-01-01

    Induction of the isoflavonoid pigment, coumestrol (3,9-dihydroxy-6H-benzofuro-[3,2-c][1] benzopyran-6-one), in primary leaves of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used as a quantifiable marker for UV damage to a plant system. Coumestrol was induced only by wavelengths below 300 nanometers and its formation could be reversed by treatment with white, but not red light after the UV irradiation period. Formation of coumestrol by UV could also be prevented over a period of 14 hours by simultaneous irradiation with blue light provided that the blue fluence rate was high enough. The results suggest that coumestrol formation is mediated via UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plant DNA and the photorepair properties of blue light are discussed with respect to possible increases in solar UV due to stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:16664463

  6. Jejunal ultrastructural changes induced by kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Mancini Filho, J.; Lajolo, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats maintained for a period of 5 days on a diet containing purified lectins extracted from a Brazilian variety (called 'Jalo') of white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed marked ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the proximal jejunum, while both pair-fed and ad-libitum-fed controls did not. The jejunal absorptive cells of rats fed a diet containing lectins exhibited conspicuous abnormalities of the microvilli. They were shorter, slightly thicker, irregular and more sparse; some were bi- or tri-furcated, sharing a common base of implantation. A slightly disorganized terminal web was present below the brush border. The supranuclear cytoplasm of a great number of cells exhibited large cytolysosomes. Comparison with the results of pair-feeding suggests that purified bean lectins have a direct causative role in the pathogenesis of absorptive cell changes in the jejunal villi of rats. The possible pathogenic mechanism of these lesions is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6696828

  7. Integration of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) linkage and chromosomal maps.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, A; Vallejos, C E; Bachmair, A; Schweizer, D

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation of pooled, closely linked RFLP markers was used to integrate the genetic linkage map and the mitotic chromosome map of the common bean. Pooled RFLP probes showed clear and reproducible signals and allowed the assignment of all linkage groups to the chromosomes of two Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars, Saxa and Calima. Low extension values for signals originating from clustered RFLPs suggest that these clones are physically close to each other and that clusters in the genetic map are not a result of suppression of recombination due to the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements. For linkage group K, clustering of markers could be associated with proximity to centromeres. High variation in the number of 45S rDNA loci was observed among cultivars, suggesting that these terminal sites are highly recombinogenic in common bean.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships and host range of Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Lucas, I; Segovia, L; Martinez-Romero, E; Pueppke, S G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene segments from five Rhizobium strains that have been isolated from tropical legume species. All share the capacity to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L., the common bean. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains are of two different chromosomal lineages. We defined the host ranges of two strains of Rhizobium etli and three strains of R. tropici, comparing them with those of the two most divergently related new strains. Twenty-two of the 43 tested legume species were nodulated by three or more of these strains. All seven strains have broad host ranges that include woody species such as Albizia lebbeck, Gliricidia maculata, and Leucaena leucocephala. PMID:7618891

  9. Remediation effect of compost on soluble mercury transfer in a crop of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Sánchez, Nora E; Acevedo-Betancourth, Liliana; Henao-Murillo, Beatriz; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    We studied the dynamics of mercury (Hg) transfer in Phaseolus vulgaris plants grown in soil with Hg-doped compost at the maximum levels permitted by Colombian law on organic amendments. Quantitative evaluation of transfer was made in different plant organs: roots, stem, leaves, pods and seeds. Matrix effect was determined in doped soil assays, using soil with and without addition of compost. Results showed that the use of organic matter reduced Hg transfer to the plant and the amount transferred was differentially distributed to the organs. We observed an inverse relationship between concentration and distance from the body to the root. It was evident that transfer was mediated by quantitative factors; the greater the presence of mercury in soil, the larger the amount that will be transferred. Results also indicate the remedial effect of compost and the presence of a barrier, at the root level, against mercury translocation to the plant aerial parts.

  10. Occurrence of isoflavonoids in Brazilian common bean germplasm (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    de Lima, Paula Feliciano; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais

    2014-10-08

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is present in the daily diet of various countries and, as for other legumes, has been investigated for its nutraceutical potential. Thus, 16 genotypes from different gene pools, representing seven types of seed coats and different responses to pathogens and pests, were selected to verify their isoflavone contents. The isoflavonoids daidzein and genistein and the flavonols kaempferol, myricetin, and quercetin were found. Grains of the black type showed the highest concentrations of isoflavonoids and were the only ones to exhibit daidzein. IAC Formoso, with high protein content and source of resistance to anthracnose, showed the greatest concentration of genistein, representing around 11% of the content present in soybean, as well as high levels of kaempferol. Arc 1, Raz 55, and IAC Una genotypes showed high content of coumestrol. The results suggest the use of IAC Formoso to increase the nutraceutical characteristics in common bean.

  11. High and low toxicity of cadmium on polyamine metabolism of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelo, J.; Creus, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 ppm) of Cadmium were supplied to the nutrient solution of liquid hidroponic culture of Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Contender. After 21 days of plant growth the levels of Putrescine (Put), Spermidine (Spd) and Spermine (Spm) were determined in roots, stem, primary leaves and trifoliate leaves. Stem and trifoliate leaves of Cadmium treated plants show a senescence state indicated by a lower values of Put and Spd than nontreated plants. A stress situation is present in roots of all treated plants indicated by a higher values of Put and Spd than nontreated plants, with a good inverse correlation between polyamine levels and Cadmium concentrations. In primary leaves 0.1 ppm and 0.2 ppm of Cadmium produce a stress situation, but 0.5 ppm of Cadmium produces a senescence state.

  12. Isoflavonoid formation as an indicator of UV stress in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. ) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, C.J.; Stolzer-Jehle, A.; Wellmann, E.

    1985-11-01

    Induction of the isoflavonoid pigment, coumestrol (3,9-dihydroxy-6H-benzofuro-(3,2-c)(1) benzopyran-6-one), in primary leaves of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) by ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used as a quantifiable marker for UV damage to a plant system. Coumestrol was induced only by wavelengths below 300 nanometers and its formation could be reversed by treatment with white, but not red light after the UV irradiation period. Formation of coumestrol by UV could also be prevented over a period of 14 hours by simultaneous irradiation with blue light provided that the blue fluence rate was high enough. The results suggest that coumestrol formation is mediated via UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plant DNA and the photorepair properties of blue light are discussed with respect to possible increases in solar UV due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

  13. Leaf gas exchange and ABA accumulation in Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes of contrasting drought tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, A.; Castonguay, Y.; Nadeau, P. )

    1991-05-01

    Drought tolerance mechanisms in Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv) are still largely unknown. Gas exchange responses and ABA accumulation were monitored in Pv genotypes differing in their drought adaptation. Higher rates of photosynthesis were observed under well-watered conditions in drought sensitive genotypes. Water stress caused a significant reduction in leaf water potential and photosynthetic rates regardless of drought adaptation. Higher photosynthetic rates were maintained under stress conditions in one drought tolerant genotype. Interestingly water stress caused significant ABA accumulation only in this genotype. Root ABA levels were similar among genotypes and were not modified by water stress. Endogenous levels of free ABA in leaves and roots did not correlated with gas exchange response to water stress. These results differ from previous reports on genotypic variation in ABA accumulation under water stress.

  14. Co-inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 improves nodulation in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Camacho, M; Santamaría, C; Temprano, F; Rodriguez-Navarro, D N; Daza, A

    2001-11-01

    The strain Bacillus sp. CECT 450 increased nodulation on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) when co-inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899. This positive effect occured under controlled conditions on perlite-vermiculite, sand, or in a mixture of soil and sand. This increase was also observed in a field assay. Nodulation kinetic studies suggested that the synergistic effect is pronounced during the latter stages of cultivation. In contrast, the same bacteria co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 reduced nodulation on soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 alone had no effect on bean plants, but reduced root growth in soybean. The survival of Bacillus sp. CECT 450 on inoculated seeds was high, even when inoculated seeds were maintained for several months at room temperature.

  15. Sulphadimethoxine inhibits Phaseolus vulgaris root growth and development of N-fixing nodules.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Marilena; Riccio, Anna; Cermola, Michele; Casoria, Paolo; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Taté, Rosarita

    2009-07-01

    Sulphonamides contamination of cultivated lands occurs through the recurrent spreading of animal wastes from intensive farming. The aim of this study was to test the effect(s) of sulphadimethoxine on the beneficial N-fixing Rhizobium etli-Phaseolus vulgaris symbiosis under laboratory conditions. The consequence of increasing concentrations of sulphadimethoxine on the growth ability of free-living R. etli bacteria, as well as on seed germination, seedling development and growth of common bean plants was examined. We have established that sulphadimethoxine inhibited the growth of both symbiotic partners in a dose-dependent manner. Bacterial invasion occurring in developing root nodules was visualized by fluorescence microscopy generating EGFP-marked R. etli bacteria. Our results proved that the development of symbiotic N-fixing root nodules is hampered by sulphadimethoxine thus identifying sulphonamides as toxic compounds for the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: a low-input sustainable agricultural practice.

  16. Dynamics of a Novel Highly Repetitive CACTA Family in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dongying; Zhao, Dongyan; Abernathy, Brian; Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Jiang, Ning; Jackson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Transposons are ubiquitous genomic components that play pivotal roles in plant gene and genome evolution. We analyzed two genome sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and identified a new CACTA transposon family named pvCACTA1. The family is extremely abundant, as more than 12,000 pvCACTA1 elements were found. To our knowledge, this is the most abundant CACTA family reported thus far. The computational and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses indicated that the pvCACTA1 elements were concentrated in terminal regions of chromosomes and frequently generated AT-rich 3 bp target site duplications (TSD, WWW, W is A or T). Comparative analysis of the common bean genomes from two domesticated genetic pools revealed that new insertions or excisions of pvCACTA1 elements occurred after the divergence of the two common beans, and some of the polymorphic elements likely resulted in variation in gene sequences. pvCACTA1 elements were detected in related species but not outside the Phaseolus genus. We calculated the molecular evolutionary rate of pvCACTA1 transposons using orthologous elements that indicated that most transposition events likely occurred before the divergence of the two gene pools. These results reveal unique features and evolution of this new transposon family in the common bean genome. PMID:27185400

  17. Dynamics of a Novel Highly Repetitive CACTA Family in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongying; Zhao, Dongyan; Abernathy, Brian; Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Jiang, Ning; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-07-07

    Transposons are ubiquitous genomic components that play pivotal roles in plant gene and genome evolution. We analyzed two genome sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and identified a new CACTA transposon family named pvCACTA1. The family is extremely abundant, as more than 12,000 pvCACTA1 elements were found. To our knowledge, this is the most abundant CACTA family reported thus far. The computational and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses indicated that the pvCACTA1 elements were concentrated in terminal regions of chromosomes and frequently generated AT-rich 3 bp target site duplications (TSD, WWW, W is A or T). Comparative analysis of the common bean genomes from two domesticated genetic pools revealed that new insertions or excisions of pvCACTA1 elements occurred after the divergence of the two common beans, and some of the polymorphic elements likely resulted in variation in gene sequences. pvCACTA1 elements were detected in related species but not outside the Phaseolus genus. We calculated the molecular evolutionary rate of pvCACTA1 transposons using orthologous elements that indicated that most transposition events likely occurred before the divergence of the two gene pools. These results reveal unique features and evolution of this new transposon family in the common bean genome.

  18. A Phaseolus vulgaris Extract Reduces Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Chocolate Seeking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lorrai, Irene; Piga, Valentina; Carai, Mauro A. M.; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo; Maccioni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that treatment with a standardized dry extract of Phaseolus vulgaris reduced intake and operant self-administration of highly palatable foods and fluids in rats and mice. The present study was designed to assess whether such extract was also effective in reducing seeking behavior for a highly hedonic chocolate-flavored beverage, using a “reinstatement” procedure adopted from the drug addiction research field and modeling relapse behavior. Rats were initially trained to lever-respond for the chocolate-flavored beverage under the Fixed Ratio (FR) 10 schedule of reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were exposed to an extinction responding phase, during which lever-responding – being unreinforced – diminished progressively up to extinction. Lever-responding was then powerfully reinstated by the non-contingent presentation of a complex of gustatory, olfactory, auditory, and visual stimuli previously associated to the availability of the chocolate-flavored beverage. Acute, intragastric administration of P. vulgaris dry extract (100 and 500 mg/kg) reduced lever-responding by 40–45%, in comparison to vehicle condition. These results indicate the ability of P. vulgaris dry extract to reduce seeking behavior for a highly palatable nourishment in an experimental model of relapse into disordered eating of palatable foods. The unavailability of the chocolate-flavored beverage in the reinstatement session tends to exclude that the observed effect of the P. vulgaris dry extract was secondary to any inhibition of carbohydrate metabolism; conversely, it is the likely consequence on a central action on the rewarding and hedonic properties of food. PMID:27199752

  19. A Phaseolus vulgaris Extract Reduces Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Chocolate Seeking in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lorrai, Irene; Piga, Valentina; Carai, Mauro A M; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo; Maccioni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that treatment with a standardized dry extract of Phaseolus vulgaris reduced intake and operant self-administration of highly palatable foods and fluids in rats and mice. The present study was designed to assess whether such extract was also effective in reducing seeking behavior for a highly hedonic chocolate-flavored beverage, using a "reinstatement" procedure adopted from the drug addiction research field and modeling relapse behavior. Rats were initially trained to lever-respond for the chocolate-flavored beverage under the Fixed Ratio (FR) 10 schedule of reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were exposed to an extinction responding phase, during which lever-responding - being unreinforced - diminished progressively up to extinction. Lever-responding was then powerfully reinstated by the non-contingent presentation of a complex of gustatory, olfactory, auditory, and visual stimuli previously associated to the availability of the chocolate-flavored beverage. Acute, intragastric administration of P. vulgaris dry extract (100 and 500 mg/kg) reduced lever-responding by 40-45%, in comparison to vehicle condition. These results indicate the ability of P. vulgaris dry extract to reduce seeking behavior for a highly palatable nourishment in an experimental model of relapse into disordered eating of palatable foods. The unavailability of the chocolate-flavored beverage in the reinstatement session tends to exclude that the observed effect of the P. vulgaris dry extract was secondary to any inhibition of carbohydrate metabolism; conversely, it is the likely consequence on a central action on the rewarding and hedonic properties of food.

  20. Beans in Europe: origin and structure of the European landraces of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Angioi, S A; Rau, D; Attene, G; Nanni, L; Bellucci, E; Logozzo, G; Negri, V; Spagnoletti Zeuli, P L; Papa, R

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the expansion of Phaseolus vulgaris in Europe. The pathways of distribution of beans into and across Europe were very complex, with several introductions from the New World that were combined with direct exchanges between European and other Mediterranean countries. We have analyzed here six chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) loci and two unlinked nuclear loci (for phaseolin types and Pv-shatterproof1). We have assessed the genetic structure and level of diversity of a large collection of European landraces of P. vulgaris (307) in comparison to 94 genotypes from the Americas that are representative of the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. First, we show that most of the European common bean landraces (67%) are of Andean origin, and that there are no strong differences across European regions for the proportions of the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. Moreover, cytoplasmic diversity is evenly distributed across European regions. Secondly, the cytoplasmic bottleneck that was due to the introduction of P. vulgaris into the Old World was very weak or nearly absent. This is in contrast to evidence from nuclear analyses that have suggested a bottleneck of greater intensity. Finally, we estimate that a relatively high proportion of the European bean germplasm (about 44%) was derived from hybridization between the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. Moreover, although hybrids are present everywhere in Europe, they show an uneven distribution, with high frequencies in central Europe, and low frequencies in Spain and Italy. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the entire European continent and not only some of the countries therein can be regarded as a secondary diversification center for P. vulgaris. Finally, we outline the relevance of these inter-gene pool hybrids for plant breeding.

  1. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [alpha]-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, J.J.; Hunt, D.C.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the [alpha]-amylases of mammals and insects. This [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]Al) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M[sub r]) 15,000 to 18,000. The authors report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, they found that antibodies to [alpha]Al recognize large (M[sub r] 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical [alpha]Al processing products (M[sub r] 15,000-18,000). [alpha]Al activity was found in all extracts that had the typical [alpha]Al processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, they made a mutant [alpha]Al in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-[alpha]Al when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-[alpha]Al was separated from mature [alpha]Al by gel filtration, pro-[alpha]Al was found not to have [alpha]-amylase inhibitory activity. The authors interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. They suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformation constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Zolfino landrace (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Pratomagno: general and specific features of a functional food

    PubMed Central

    Balestri, Francesco; Rotondo, Rossella; Moschini, Roberta; Pellegrino, Mario; Cappiello, Mario; Barracco, Vito; Misuri, Livia; Sorce, Carlo; Andreucci, Andrea; Del-Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Background The Zolfino bean is a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, which is cultivated in a limited area of Tuscany, Italy, and is widely appreciated for its flavor and culinary uses. Objectives A yellow Zolfino landrace cultivated in the Leccio-Reggello area was characterized and compared with three other varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris (i.e. the Borlotto, Cannellino, and Corona beans) in terms of its general features and potential as an antioxidant/anti-inflammatory agent. Design The length, width, thickness, equatorial section surface, weight, volume, and seed coat section were measured in all the beans. The seed surface area was also estimated by an original empirical method. The ability of the different beans to interfere with the enzymes of the polyol pathway (that is, aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase) was tested using the supernatant after soaking the beans at room temperature and after thermal treatment, which simulated the bean-cooking process in a controlled fashion. Results Concerning the general features, Zolfino was comparable with other beans, except Corona, in terms of surface–volume ratio, which possesses the lowest tegument thickness. Moreover, Zolfino appears the most effective in inhibiting AR activity. The inhibitory ability is unaffected by thermal treatment and appears to be associated with compound(s) present in the coat of the bean. Conclusions The ability of Zolfino to inhibit AR, thus reducing the flux of glucose through the polyol pathway, highlights the features of Zolfino as a functional food, potentially useful in treating the dysfunctions linked to the hyperactivity of AR, such as diabetic complications or inflammatory responses. PMID:27415159

  3. Exceptionally high heterologous protein levels in transgenic dicotyledonous seeds using Phaseolus vulgaris regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Geert; Angenon, Geert; Depicker, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Seeds are concentrated sources of protein and thus may be ideal 'bioreactors' for the production of heterologous proteins. For this application, strong seed-specific expression signals are required. A set of expression cassettes were designed using 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of the seed storage protein gene arcelin 5-I (arc5-I) from Phaseolus vulgaris, and evaluated for the production of heterologous proteins in dicotyledonous plant species. A murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was chosen as model protein because of the current industrial interest to produce antibodies and derived fragments in crops. Because the highest scFv accumulation in seed had previously been achieved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the scFv-encoding sequence was provided with signal sequences for accumulation in the ER. Transgenic Arabidopsis seed stocks, expressing the scFv under control of the 35S promoter, contained scFv accumulation levels in the range of 1% of total soluble protein (TSP). However, the seed storage promoter constructs boosted the scFv to exceptionally high levels. Maximum scFv levels were obtained in homozygous seed stocks, being 12.5% of TSP under control of the arc5-I regulatory sequences and even up to 36.5% of TSP upon replacing the arc5-I promoter by the beta-phaseolin promoter of Phaseolus vulgaris. Even at such very high levels, the scFv proteins retain their full antigen-binding activity. Moreover, the presence of very high scFv levels has only minory effects on seed germination and no effect on seed production. These results demonstrate that the expression levels of arcelin 5-I and beta-phaseolin seed storage protein genes can be transferred to heterologous proteins, giving exceptionally high levels of heterologous proteins, which can be of great value for the molecular farming industry by raising production yield and lowering bio-mass production and purification costs. Finally, the feasibility of heterologous protein production using the

  4. The seed coat of Phaseolus vulgaris interferes with the development of the cowpea weevil [Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)].

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana B; Sales, Maurício P; Oliveira, Antônia E A; Machado, Olga L T; Fernandes, Kátia V S; Xavier-Filho, José

    2004-03-01

    We have confirmed here that the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.) do not support development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), a pest of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] seeds. Analysis of the testa (seed coat) of the bean suggested that neither thickness nor the levels of compounds such as tannic acid, tannins, or HCN are important for the resistance. On the other hand, we have found that phaseolin (vicilin-like 7S storage globulin), detected in the testa by Western blotting and N-terminal amino acid sequencing, is detrimental to the development of C. maculatus. As for the case of other previously studied legume seeds (Canavalia ensiformis and Phaseolus lunatus) we suggest that the presence of vicilin-like proteins in the testa of P. vulgaris may have had a significant role in the evolutionary adaptation of bruchids to the seeds of leguminous plants.

  5. Reducing effect of a combination of Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus extracts on food intake and glycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Loi, Barbara; Fantini, Noemi; Colombo, Giancarlo; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Riva, Antonella; Bombardelli, Ezio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Carai, Mauro A M

    2013-02-01

    Extracts from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus may reduce food intake and/or postprandial glycemia. This study investigated the effect of standardized extracts of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus and their combination on food intake and glycemia in rats. P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts, and their 1:2 combination, were administered acutely to rats (a) given access to regular food and water, (b) given access to regular food, water, and a chocolate-flavored beverage, or (c) infused with a starch bolus. P. vulgaris extract and the combination produced comparable reductions in intake of regular food and chocolate-flavored beverage; conversely, C. scolymus extract was ineffective on both parameters. P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts additively contributed to the reducing effect of the combination on glycemic rise. These results suggest that a mixture of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts is preferable over each single extract, as it combines the anorectic effect of the P. vulgaris extract with the hypoglycemic effect of both extracts. These data support the recent clinical use of the combination of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts in the control of appetite, food intake, and postprandial glycemia and represent a successful example of translational research in the nutraceutical field.

  6. Analysis of genes that are differentially expressed during the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum–Phaseolus vulgaris interaction

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marília B.; de Andrade, Rosângela V.; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F.; Petrofeza, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, one of the most important plant pathogens, causes white mold on a wide range of crops. Crop yield can be dramatically decreased due to this disease, depending on the plant cultivar and environmental conditions. In this study, a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library approach was used for the identification of pathogen and plant genes that were differentially expressed during infection of the susceptible cultivar BRS Pérola of Phaseolus vulgaris L. A total of 979 unigenes (430 contigs and 549 singletons) were obtained and classified according to their functional categories. The transcriptional profile of 11 fungal genes related to pathogenicity and virulence were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Additionally, the temporal expression profile obtained by RT-qPCR was evaluated for the following categories of plant defense-related genes: pathogenesis-related genes (PvPR1, PvPR2, and PvPR3), phenylpropanoid pathway genes (PvIsof, PvFPS1, and 4CL), and genes involved in defense and stress-related categories (PvLox, PvHiprp, PvGST, PvPod, and PvDox). Data obtained in this study provide a starting point for achieving a better understanding of the pathosystem S. sclerotiorum–P. vulgaris. PMID:26579080

  7. Secondary metabolite perturbations in Phaseolus vulgaris leaves due to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ramabulana, T; Mavunda, R D; Steenkamp, P A; Piater, L A; Dubery, I A; Madala, N E

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition in which the balance between the production and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is disturbed. However, plants have developed a very sophisticated mechanism to mitigate the effect of ROS by constantly adjusting the concentration thereof to acceptable levels. Electromagnetic radiation is one of the factors which results in oxidative stress. In the current study, ionizing gamma radiation generated from a Cobalt-60 source was used to induce oxidative stress in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings. Plants were irradiated with several radiation doses, with 2 kGy found to be the optimal, non-lethal dose. Metabolite distribution patterns from irradiated and non-irradiated plants were analyzed using UHPLC-qTOF-MS and multivariate data models such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA). Metabolites such as hydroxycinnamic phenolic acids, flavonoids, terpenes, and a novel chalcone were found to be perturbed in P. vulgaris seedlings treated with the aforementioned conditions. The results suggest that there is a compensatory link between constitutive protectants and inducible responses to injury as well as defense against oxidative stress induced by ionizing radiation. The current study is also the first to illustrate the power of a metabolomics approach to decipher the effect of gamma radiation on crop plants.

  8. Molecular analysis of ureide accumulation under drought stress in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Alamillo, Josefa M; Díaz-Leal, Juan Luís; Sánchez-Moran, Ma Victoria; Pineda, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Under water deficit, ureidic legumes accumulate ureides in plant tissues, and this accumulation has been correlated with the inhibition of nitrogen fixation. In this work we used a molecular approach to characterize ureide accumulation under drought stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. Accumulation of ureides, mainly allantoate, was found in roots, shoots and leaves, but only a limited transient increase was observed in nodules from drought-stressed plants. We show that ureide accumulation is regulated at the transcriptional level mainly through induction of allantoinase (ALN), whereas allantoate amidohydrolase (AAH), involved in allantoate degradation, was slightly reduced, indicating that inhibition of this enzyme, key in ureide breakdown in aerial tissues, is not the main cause of allantoate accumulation. Expression of the ureide metabolism genes analysed in this study was induced by abscisic acid (ABA), suggesting the involvement of this plant hormone in ureide accumulation. Moreover, we observed that increases of ureide levels in P. vulgaris drought-stressed tissues were similar in non-nodulated, nitrate-fed plants, and in plants cultured under nitrogen-fixation conditions. Our results indicate that ureide accumulation in response to water deficit is independent from de novo synthesis of ureides in nodules, and therefore uncoupled from nitrogen fixation.

  9. Uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for uranium rhizofiltration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Jawitz, James W; Lee, Minhee

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory scale rhizofiltration experiments were performed to investigate uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. During 72 h of rhizofiltration, the roots of the bean accumulated uranium and cesium to concentrations 317-1019 times above the initial concentrations, which ranged from 100 to 700 μg l(-1) in artificially contaminated solutions. When the pH of the solution was adjusted to 3, the ability to accumulate uranium was 1.6 times higher than it was for solutions of pH 7 and pH 9. With an initial uranium concentration of 240 μg l(-1) in genuine groundwater at pH 5, the bean reduced the uranium concentration by 90.2% (to 23.6 μg l(-1)) within 12 h and by 98.9% (to 2.8 μg l(-1)) within 72 h. A laboratory scale continuous clean-up system reduced uranium concentrations from 240 μg l(-1) to below 10 μg l(-1) in 56 h; the whole uranium concentration in the bean roots during system operation was more than 2600 μg g(-1) on a dry weight basis. Using SEM and EDS analyses, the uranium removal in solution at pH 7 was determined based on adsorption and precipitation on the root surface in the form of insoluble uranium compounds. The present results demonstrate that the rhizofiltration technique using beans efficiently removes uranium and cesium from groundwater as an eco-friendly and cost-effective method.

  10. Effect of regurgitant from Leptinotarsa decemlineata on wound responses in Solanum tuberosum and Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kruzmane, Dace; Jankevica, Liga; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2002-08-01

    The effect of regurgitant from Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say larvae on wound-induced responses was studied using two plant species, Solanum tuberosum L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Wounding of one leaf of intact S. tuberosum plants differentially affected ethylene production and activities of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase. Only polyphenol oxidase activity was stimulated by wounding in both wounded and systemic leaves. Peroxidase activity was not affected by wounding. Wounding caused only a transient increase of ethylene production from wounded leaves. The application of regurgitant to wound surfaces stimulated ethylene production as well as activities of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase in both wounded and systemic leaves. Wounding significantly enhanced ethylene production and polyphenol oxidase activity in wounded and systemic leaves of P. vulgaris. The application of regurgitant caused an amplification of ethylene production, peroxidase activity, and polyphenol oxidase activity, in both wounded and systemic leaves of bean plants. Several substances were tested for their role as possible endogenous signals in P. vulgaris. Hydrogen peroxide and methyl jasmonate appeared as potential local and systemic signals of ethylene formation in wounded bean plants. Local ethylene production in leaf discs was differentially affected by the regurgitant application in potato versus bean plants. While all tested concentrations of regurgitant caused stimulation of ethylene formation from potato leaf discs, ethylene production was completely inhibited by increasing concentrations of the regurgitant in bean leaf discs. Our data present evidence that ethylene may play an important role in the interaction between plants and herbivores at the level of recognition of a particular herbivore leading to specific induction of signalling cascades.

  11. Interaction of Methanol Spray and Water-Deficit Stress on Photosynthesis and Biochemical Characteristics of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Sadry.

    PubMed

    Armand, Nezam; Amiri, Hamzeh; Ismaili, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This study was a factorial experiment with a completely randomized design and three replications. The four levels of methanol spraying were used. Spraying was carried out three times during the growing season at 10-day intervals beginning at 4 weeks after sowing. The spraying of solution continued until saturation of droplets on the leaves was achieved. The levels of water-deficit stress applied were nonstress, moderate water stress and severe water stress. The results showed that there was a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) between the methanol and water-deficit stress treatments for chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, carotenoid, total chlorophyll, net photosynthesis (PN ), intercellular CO2 (Ci ), maximal quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry (Fv /Fm ), leaf moisture, water use efficiency and relative water content. The application of foliar methanol at all levels of water-deficit stress significantly decreased the catalase activity of the roots. Under all levels of water-deficit stress, the 30% (v/v) methanol treatment significantly decreased peroxidase activity in the roots over that for the control. The results suggest that foliar application of methanol can decrease the negative effects of water-deficit stress on Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Sadry.

  12. The arcelin-5 Gene of Phaseolus vulgaris Directs High Seed-Specific Expression in Transgenic Phaseolus acutifolius and Arabidopsis Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Alain; Dillen, Willy; De Clercq, Janniek; Van Montagu, Marc; Angenon, Geert

    1999-01-01

    The regulatory sequences of many genes encoding seed storage proteins have been used to drive seed-specific expression of a variety of proteins in transgenic plants. Because the levels at which these transgene-derived proteins accumulate are generally quite low, we investigated the utility of the arcelin-5 regulatory sequences in obtaining high seed-specific expression in transgenic plants. Arcelin-5 is an abundant seed protein found in some wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes. Seeds of Arabidopsis and Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) plants transformed with arcelin-5 gene constructs synthesized arcelin-5 to levels of 15% and 25% of the total protein content, respectively. To our knowledge, such high expression levels directed by a transgene have not been reported before. The transgenic plants also showed low plant-to-plant variation in arcelin expression. Complex transgene integration patterns, which often result in gene silencing effects, were not associated with reduced arcelin-5 expression. High transgene expression was the result of high mRNA steady-state levels and was restricted to seeds. This indicates that all requirements for high seed-specific expression are cis elements present in the cloned genomic arcelin-5 sequence and trans-acting factors that are available in Arabidopsis and Phaseolus spp., and thus probably in most dicotyledonous plants. PMID:10444093

  13. Seedborne Pathogenic Fungi in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. INTA Rojo) in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Marcenaro, Delfia; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume with high nutritional value. In Nicaragua, certified healthy seeds of local bean varieties are not available, and seedborne fungi have gained little attention. Here, were surveyed seedborne pathogenic fungi in an important local bean cultivar, ‘INTA Rojo’. Beans grown in the four main production areas in Nicaragua (Boaco, Carazo, Estelí, Matagalpa) for future use as seed stock were sampled from four seed storehouses and six seed lots. A total of 133 fungal strains were isolated from surface-sterilized beans and inoculated to healthy lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) under controlled conditions. Eighty-seven isolates caused symptoms of varying severity in the seedlings, including discoloration, necrotic lesions, cankers, rot, and lethal necrosis. Pathogenic isolates were divided into eight phenotypically distinguishable groups based on morphology and growth characteristics on artificial growth medium, and further identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal RNA genes. The pathogenic isolates belonged to eight genera. Fusarium spp. (F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. incarnatum), Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Penicillium citrinum were the most damaging and common fungi found in the seed lots. Furthermore, Corynespora cassiicola, Colletotrichum capsisi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Aspergillus flavus, and Diaporthe sp. (Phomopsis) were seedborne in cultivar ‘INTA Rojo’ and found to be pathogenic to bean seedlings. This study reveals, for the first time, many seedborne pathogenic fungi in beans in Nicaragua; furthermore, prior to this study, little information was available concerning F. equiseti, F. incarnatum, L. theobromae, C. cassiicola, and Diaporthe spp. as seedborne pathogens of common bean. Our results lay the basis for developing diagnostic tools for seed health inspection and for further study of the epidemiology

  14. Seedborne Pathogenic Fungi in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. INTA Rojo) in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Delfia; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume with high nutritional value. In Nicaragua, certified healthy seeds of local bean varieties are not available, and seedborne fungi have gained little attention. Here, were surveyed seedborne pathogenic fungi in an important local bean cultivar, 'INTA Rojo'. Beans grown in the four main production areas in Nicaragua (Boaco, Carazo, Estelí, Matagalpa) for future use as seed stock were sampled from four seed storehouses and six seed lots. A total of 133 fungal strains were isolated from surface-sterilized beans and inoculated to healthy lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) under controlled conditions. Eighty-seven isolates caused symptoms of varying severity in the seedlings, including discoloration, necrotic lesions, cankers, rot, and lethal necrosis. Pathogenic isolates were divided into eight phenotypically distinguishable groups based on morphology and growth characteristics on artificial growth medium, and further identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal RNA genes. The pathogenic isolates belonged to eight genera. Fusarium spp. (F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. incarnatum), Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Penicillium citrinum were the most damaging and common fungi found in the seed lots. Furthermore, Corynespora cassiicola, Colletotrichum capsisi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Aspergillus flavus, and Diaporthe sp. (Phomopsis) were seedborne in cultivar 'INTA Rojo' and found to be pathogenic to bean seedlings. This study reveals, for the first time, many seedborne pathogenic fungi in beans in Nicaragua; furthermore, prior to this study, little information was available concerning F. equiseti, F. incarnatum, L. theobromae, C. cassiicola, and Diaporthe spp. as seedborne pathogens of common bean. Our results lay the basis for developing diagnostic tools for seed health inspection and for further study of the epidemiology

  15. Multiple origins of the determinate growth habit in domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Myounghai; Toro, Orlando; Debouck, Daniel G.; Gepts, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The actual number of domestications of a crop is one of the key questions in domestication studies. Answers to this question have generally been based on relationships between wild progenitors and domesticated descendants determined with anonymous molecular markers. In this study, this question was investigated by determining the number of instances a domestication phenotype had been selected in a crop species. One of the traits that appeared during domestication of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is determinacy, in which stems end with a terminal inflorescence. It has been shown earlier that a homologue of the arabidopsis TFL1 gene – PvTFL1y – controls determinacy in a naturally occurring variation of common bean. Methods Sequence variation was analysed for PvTFL1y in a sample of 46 wild and domesticated accessions that included determinate and indeterminate accessions. Key Results Indeterminate types – wild and domesticated – showed only synonymous nucleotide substitutions. Determinate types – observed only among domesticated accessions – showed, in addition to synonymous substitutions, non-synonymous substitutions, indels, a putative intron-splicing failure, a retrotransposon insertion and a deletion of the entire locus. The retrotransposon insertion was observed in 70 % of determinate cultivars, in the Americas and elsewhere. Other determinate mutants had a more restricted distribution in the Americas only, either in the Andean or in the Mesoamerican gene pool of common bean. Conclusions Although each of the determinacy haplotypes probably does not represent distinct domestication events, they are consistent with the multiple (seven) domestication pattern in the genus Phaseolus. The predominance of determinacy in the Andean gene pool may reflect domestication of common bean prior to maize introduction in the Andes. PMID:23019270

  16. Genetic Structure of Rhizobium etli biovar phaseoli Associated with Wild and Cultivated Bean Plants (Phaseolus vulgaris and Phaseolus coccineus) in Morelos, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Valeria; Eguiarte, Luis; Avila, German; Cappello, Renato; Gallardo, Claudia; Montoya, Javier; Piñero, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    The genetic structure of Rhizobium etli biovar phaseoli was determined for five populations in three different locations in the state of Morelos, Mexico, by using starch gel electrophoresis for five to nine polymorphic loci. Two populations were sampled during two different years from nodules of cultivated and wild common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris). The three other populations were associated with wild runner beans (P. coccineus) and sampled during 1988. The Rhizobium populations differ genetically both among sites and among populations within the same site in different years, as shown by differences in allelic frequencies, genetic differentiation analysis, and differences in electrotypes. The total genetic diversity for the five populations during 1988 was H = 0.487; there were also high levels of genetic variation within each population. We found the highest linkage disequilibrium in a global analysis for all the populations. At a local scale, we also found significant linkage disequilibrium in two populations, although the distribution of the D′ suggest some recombination at a local scale. The other three rhizobium populations exhibit low linkage disequilibrium. A cluster analysis (UPGMA) of pairwise genetic distances showed that bacteria isolated from most wild Phaseolus spp. are grouped by population, whereas those obtained from cultivated P. vulgaris are very heterogeneous. The analysis of the genetic structure of Rhizobium strains may allow the identification of strains that are naturally well adapted to a wide range of different environments, which may be useful for agricultural purposes or as a starting point for developing improved Rhizobium strains. PMID:16349234

  17. Evaluation of foliar phenols of 25 Mexican varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as antioxidants and varietal markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Martínez, Alfonso; Almaraz-Abarca, Norma; Gallardo-Velázquez, Tzayhri; González-Elizondo, María Del Socorro; Herrera-Arrieta, Yolanda; Pajarito-Ravelero, Arnulfo; Alanís-Bañuelos, Ruth Elizabeth; Torres-Morán, Martha Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant properties and the foliar phenol composition of 25 Mexican varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) were evaluated. Phaseolus coccineus was analysed with comparative aims. The high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection analysis revealed 27 phenolics in the leaves of P. vulgaris (13 quercetin-3-O-glycosides, 8 kaempferol-3-O-glycosides, 2 myricetin glycosides and 4 phenolic acids) and 5 in P. coccineus (2 kaempferol-3-O-glycoside, 2 apigenin-7-O-glycoside and 1 luteolin-7-O-glycoside). All extracts showed high levels of phenols and flavonoids (0.964-5.601 mg g⁻¹ dry tissue, and 0.287-1.418 mg g⁻¹ dry tissue, respectively) and relevant antioxidant properties, suggesting that the leaves of the varieties of P. vulgaris are a significant source of natural antioxidants. The foliar phenol profiles were species-specific and, besides, the qualitative variation allowed discriminating among varieties of P. vulgaris. These profiles can represent an important varietal authenticity proof.

  18. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. Results We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt). These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724) including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and transcription factors were also identified in this study. Conclusions This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and will aid in the

  19. Cloning and characterization of a biotic-stress-inducible glutathione transferase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous proteins in plants that play important roles in stress tolerance and in the detoxification of toxic chemicals and metabolites. In this study, we systematically examined the catalytic diversification of a GST isoenzyme from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvGST) which is induced under biotic stress treatment (Uromyces appendiculatus infection). The full-length cDNA of this GST isoenzyme (termed PvGSTU3-3) with complete open reading frame, was isolated using RACE-RT and showed that the deduced amino acid sequence shares high homology with the tau class plant GSTs. PvGSTU3-3 catalyzes several different reactions and exhibits wide substrate specificity. Of particular importance is the finding that the enzyme shows high antioxidant catalytic function and acts as hydroperoxidase, thioltransferase, and dehydroascorbate reductase. In addition, its K m for GSH is about five to ten times lower compared to other plant GSTs, suggesting that PvGSTU3-3 is able to perform efficient catalysis under conditions where the concentration of reduced glutathione is low (e.g., oxidative stress). Its ability to conjugate GSH with isothiocyanates may provide an additional role for this enzyme to act as a regulator of the released isothiocyanates from glucosinolates as a response of biotic stress. Molecular modeling showed that PvGSTU3-3 shares the same overall fold and structural organization with other plant cytosolic GSTs, with major differences at their hydrophobic binding sites (H-sites) and some differences at the level of C-terminal domain and the linker between the C- and N-terminal domains. PvGSTU3-3, in general, exhibits restricted ability to bind xenobiotics in a nonsubstrate manner, suggesting that the biological role of PvGSTU3-3, is restricted mainly to the catalytic function. Our findings highlight the functional and catalytic diversity of plant GSTs and demonstrate their pivotal role for addressing biotic stresses in Phaseolus

  20. Effect of Rhizobium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on electrolyte leakage in Phaseolus vulgaris roots overexpressing RbohB.

    PubMed

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Nava, Noreide; Quinto, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory oxidative burst homolog (RBOH)-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate a wide range of biological functions in plants. They play a critical role in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. For instance, overexpression of PvRbohB enhances nodule numbers, but reduces mycorrhizal colonization in Phaseolus vulgaris hairy roots and downregulation has the opposite effect. In the present study, we assessed the effect of both rhizobia and AM fungi on electrolyte leakage in transgenic P. vulgaris roots overexpressing (OE) PvRbohB. We demonstrate that elevated levels of electrolyte leakage in uninoculated PvRbohB-OE transgenic roots were alleviated by either Rhizobium or AM fungi symbiosis, with the latter interaction having the greater effect. These results suggest that symbiont colonization reduces ROS elevated electrolyte leakage in P. vulgaris root cells.

  1. Effect of Rhizobium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on electrolyte leakage in Phaseolus vulgaris roots overexpressing RbohB

    PubMed Central

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Nava, Noreide; Quinto, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory oxidative burst homolog (RBOH)-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate a wide range of biological functions in plants. They play a critical role in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. For instance, overexpression of PvRbohB enhances nodule numbers, but reduces mycorrhizal colonization in Phaseolus vulgaris hairy roots and downregulation has the opposite effect. In the present study, we assessed the effect of both rhizobia and AM fungi on electrolyte leakage in transgenic P. vulgaris roots overexpressing (OE) PvRbohB. We demonstrate that elevated levels of electrolyte leakage in uninoculated PvRbohB-OE transgenic roots were alleviated by either Rhizobium or AM fungi symbiosis, with the latter interaction having the greater effect. These results suggest that symbiont colonization reduces ROS elevated electrolyte leakage in P. vulgaris root cells. PMID:25946118

  2. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V.S.; Gajula, MNV Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely. Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/ PMID:27465131

  3. Constraints to hydraulic acclimation under reduced light in two contrasting Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Steven L; Rettedal, David D; Harmon, Derek A; Beukelman, MacKenzie R

    2014-08-01

    Two cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were grown under three light levels to determine if hydraulic acclimation to light occurs in herbaceous annuals and whether intraspecific trade-offs constrain hydraulic traits. Acclimation occurred in response to reduced light and included decreased stomatal density (SD) and increased specific leaf area (SLA). Reduced light resulted in lower wood density (WD); decreased cavitation resistance, measured as the xylem pressure causing a 50 % reduction in stem conductivity (P50); and increased hydraulic capacity, measured as average leaf mass specific transpiration (E(LM)). Significant or marginally significant trade-offs between P50 and WD, WD and E(LM), and E(LM) and P50 reflected variation due to both genotype and environmental effects. A trade-off between WD and P50 within one cultivar indicated that morphological adjustment was constrained. Coordinated changes in WD, P50, and E(LM) within each cultivar in response to light were consistent with trade-offs constraining plasticity. A water-use efficiency (WUE, measured as δ(13)C) versus hydraulic capacity (E(LM)) trade-off was observed within each cultivar, further indicating that hydraulic trade-offs can constrain acclimation. Larger plants had lower hydraulic capacity (E(LM)) but greater cavitation resistance, WD, and WUE. Distinct hydraulic strategies were observed with the cultivar adapted to irrigated conditions having higher stomatal conductance and stem flow rates. The cultivar adapted to rain-fed conditions had higher leaf area and greater cavitation resistance. Hydraulic trade-offs were observed within the herbaceous P. vulgaris resulting from both genotype and environmental effects. Trade-offs within a cultivar reflected constraints to hydraulic acclimation in response to changing light.

  4. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes.

    PubMed

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V S; Gajula, Mnv Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely.Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/.

  5. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants to low-let ionizing radiation: Growth and oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Aronne, G.; Pugliese, M.; Virzo De Santo, A.; De Maio, A.

    2013-10-01

    The scenarios for the long-term habitation of space platforms and planetary stations involve plants as fundamental part of Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) to support the crew needs. Several constraints may limit plant growth in space: among them ionizing radiation is recognized to severely affect plant cell at morphological, physiological and biochemical level. In this work, plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were subjected to four different doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50 and 100 Gy) in order to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on this species and to analyze possible mechanisms carried out to overcome the radiation injuries. The effects of X-rays on plant growth were assessed by measuring stem elongation, number of internodes and leaf dry weight. The integrity of photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by photosynthetic pigment composition and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, whereas changes in total antioxidant pool and glutathione S transferase activity (GST) were utilized as markers of oxidative stress. The distribution of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues as natural shielding against radiation was also determined. Irradiation of plants at 0.3 and 10 Gy did not determine differences in all considered parameters as compared to control. On the contrary, at 50 and 100 Gy a reduction of plant growth and a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, as well as an increase in phenolic compounds and a decrease in total antioxidant content and GST activity were found. Only a slight reduction of Rubisco activity in leaves irradiated at 50 and 100 Gy was found. The overall results indicate P. vulgaris as a species with a good potential to face ionizing radiation and suggest its suitability for utilization in BLSSs.

  6. Comparative analysis of genome-wide Mlo gene family in Cajanus cajan and Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Reena; Singh, V K; Singh, B D

    2016-04-01

    The Mlo gene was discovered in barley because the mutant 'mlo' allele conferred broad-spectrum, non-race-specific resistance to powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The Mlo genes also play important roles in growth and development of plants, and in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The Mlo gene family has been characterized in several crop species, but only a single legume species, soybean (Glycine max L.), has been investigated so far. The present report describes in silico identification of 18 CcMlo and 20 PvMlo genes in the important legume crops Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. and Phaseolus vulgaris L., respectively. In silico analysis of gene organization, protein properties and conserved domains revealed that the C. cajan and P. vulgaris Mlo gene paralogs are more divergent from each other than from their orthologous pairs. The comparative phylogenetic analysis classified CcMlo and PvMlo genes into three major clades. A comparative analysis of CcMlo and PvMlo proteins with the G. max Mlo proteins indicated close association of one CcMlo, one PvMlo with two GmMlo genes, indicating that there was no further expansion of the Mlo gene family after the separation of these species. Thus, most of the diploid species of eudicots might be expected to contain 15-20 Mlo genes. The genes CcMlo12 and 14, and PvMlo11 and 12 are predicted to participate in powdery mildew resistance. If this prediction were verified, these genes could be targeted by TILLING or CRISPR to isolate powdery mildew resistant mutants.

  7. Generation of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs and investigation of their regulation upon Uromyces appendiculatus infection

    PubMed Central

    Thibivilliers, Sandra; Joshi, Trupti; Campbell, Kimberly B; Scheffler, Brian; Xu, Dong; Cooper, Bret; Nguyen, Henry T; Stacey, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Background Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is the second most important legume crop in the world after soybean. Consequently, yield losses due to fungal infection, like Uromyces appendiculatus (bean rust), have strong consequences. Several resistant genes were identified that confer resistance to bean rust infection. However, the downstream genes and mechanisms involved in bean resistance to infection are poorly characterized. Results A subtractive bean cDNA library composed of 10,581 unisequences was constructed and enriched in sequences regulated by either bean rust race 41, a virulent strain, or race 49, an avirulent strain on cultivar Early Gallatin carrying the resistance gene Ur-4. The construction of this library allowed the identification of 6,202 new bean ESTs, significantly adding to the available sequences for this plant. Regulation of selected bean genes in response to bean rust infection was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Plant gene expression was similar for both race 41 and 49 during the first 48 hours of the infection process but varied significantly at the later time points (72–96 hours after inoculation) mainly due to the presence of the Avr4 gene in the race 49 leading to a hypersensitive response in the bean plants. A biphasic pattern of gene expression was observed for several genes regulated in response to fungal infection. Conclusion The enrichment of the public database with over 6,000 bean ESTs significantly adds to the genomic resources available for this important crop plant. The analysis of these genes in response to bean rust infection provides a foundation for further studies of the mechanism of fungal disease resistance. The expression pattern of 90 bean genes upon rust infection shares several features with other legumes infected by biotrophic fungi. This finding suggests that the P. vulgaris-U. appendiculatus pathosystem could serve as a model to explore legume-rust interaction. PMID:19397807

  8. Reducing effect of an extract of Phaseolus vulgaris on food intake in mice--focus on highly palatable foods.

    PubMed

    Loi, Barbara; Fantini, Noemi; Colombo, Giancarlo; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Riva, Antonella; Bombardelli, Ezio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Carai, Mauro A M

    2013-03-01

    Different lines of experimental evidence indicate that treatment with extracts from and derivatives of Phaseolus vulgaris reduces intake of food, including highly palatable foods and beverages, in rats. The present study was designed to extend to mice these lines of evidence. To this end, CD1 mice were treated acutely with a standardized extract of P. vulgaris and then exposed to unlimited access to regular food pellets (Experiment 1) or 1-hour limited access to three different palatable foods/beverages, such as butter cookies (Experiment 2), a condensed-milk beverage (Experiment 3), and a chocolate-flavored beverage (Experiment 4). Treatment with P. vulgaris extract resulted in a significant reduction in the intake of regular food pellets, that was still evident 24h later, as well as of the three palatable nourishments. Together, these results (a) extend to mice several previous findings on the capacity of P. vulgaris extracts to suppress food intake in rats, (b) suggest that P. vulgaris extracts may interfere with the central mechanisms regulating appetite, food intake, palatability, and/or the rewarding and hedonic properties of food, and (c) P. vulgaris extracts may represent a potentially effective therapy for overeating, obesity, and food craving.

  9. Thermal stability of Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin: a differential scanning calorimetry study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2002-09-30

    Phaseolus vulgaris phytohemagglutinin L is a homotetrameric-leucoagglutinating seed lectin. Its three-dimensional structure shows similarity with other members of the legume lectin family. The tetrameric form of this lectin is pH dependent. Gel filtration results showed that the protein exists in its dimeric state at pH 2.5 and as a tetramer at pH 7.2. Contrary to earlier reports on legume lectins that possess canonical dimers, thermal denaturation studies show that the refolding of phytohemagglutinin L at neutral pH is irreversible. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the denaturation of this lectin as a function of pH that ranged from 2.0 to 3.0. The lectin was found to be extremely thermostable with a transition temperature around 82 degrees C and above 100 degrees C at pH 2.5 and 7.2, respectively. The ratio of calorimetric to vant Hoff enthalpy could not be calculated because of its irreversible-folding behavior. However, from the DSC data, it was discovered that the protein remains in its compact-folded state, even at pH 2.3, with the onset of denaturation occurring at 60 degrees C.

  10. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Affantrange, Xochitl Alvarado; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50 mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and enhanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean.

  11. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  12. Protein and Metalloprotein Distribution in Different Varieties of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Effects of Cooking.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline P; Andrade, Geyssa Ferreira; Mateó, Bianca S O; Naozuka, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are among the main sources of protein and minerals. The cooking of the grains is imperative, due to reduction of the effect of some toxic and antinutritional substances, as well as increase of protein digestibility. In this study, the effects of cooking on albumins, globulins, prolamins, and glutelins concentration and determination of Fe associated with proteins for different beans varieties and on phaseolin concentration in common and black beans were evaluated. Different extractant solutions (water, NaCl, ethanol, and NaOH) were used for extracting albumins, globulins, prolamins, and glutelins, respectively. For the phaseolin separation NaOH, HCl, and NaCl were used. The total concentration of proteins was determined by Bradford method; Cu and Fe associated with phaseolin and other proteins were obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, respectively. Cooking promoted a negative effect on (1) the proteins concentrations (17 (glutelin) to 95 (albumin) %) of common beans and (2) phaseolin concentration (90%) for common and black beans. Fe associated with albumin, prolamin, and glutelin was not altered. In Fe and Cu associated with phaseolin there was an increase of 20 and 37% for the common and black varieties, respectively.

  13. Cell-Wall Proteins Induced by Water Deficit in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, A. A.; Ayala, J. W.; Reyes, J. L.; Hernandez, M.; Garciarrubio, A.

    1995-01-01

    In the last few years, much attention has been given to the role of proteins that accumulate during water deficit. In this work, we analyzed the electrophoretic patterns of basic protein extracts, enriched for a number of cell-wall proteins, from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings and 21-d-old plants subjected to water deficit. Three major basic proteins accumulated in bean seedlings exposed to low water potentials, with apparent molecular masses of 36, 33, and 22 kD, which we refer to as p36, p33, and p22, respectively. Leaves and roots of 21-d-old plants grown under low-water-availability conditions accumulated only p36 and p33 proteins. In 21-d-old plants subjected to a fast rate of water loss, both p33 and p36 accumulated to approximately the same levels, whereas if the plants were subjected to a gradual loss of water, p33 accumulated to higher levels. Both p36 and p33 were glycosylated and were found in the cell-wall fraction. In contrast, p22 was not glycosylated and was found in the soluble fraction. The accumulation of these proteins was also induced by abscisic acid (0.1-1.0 mM) treatment but not by wounding or by jasmonate treatment. PMID:12228420

  14. Environmental Effects of Nanoceria on Seed Production of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Almeida, Igor C; Arigi, Emma A; Choi, Hyungwon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Flores-Margez, Juan P; White, Jason C; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-11-17

    The rapidly growing literature on the response of edible plants to nanoceria has provided evidence of its uptake and bioaccumulation, which delineates a possible route of entry into the food chain. However, little is known about how the residing organic matter in soil may affect the bioavailability and resulting impacts of nanoceria on plants. Here, we examined the effect of nanoceria exposure (62.5-500 mg/kg) on kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity and seed quality as a function of soil organic matter content. Cerium accumulation in the seeds produced from plants in organic matter enriched soil showed a dose-dependent increase, unlike in low organic matter soil treatments. Seeds obtained upon nanoceria exposure in soils with higher organic matter were more susceptible to changes in nutrient quality. A quantitative proteomic analysis of the seeds produced upon nanoceria exposure provided evidence for upregulation of stress-related proteins at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg nanoceria treatments. Although the plants did not exhibit overt toxicity, the major seed proteins primarily associated with nutrient storage (phaseolin) and carbohydrate metabolism (lectins) were significantly down-regulated in a dose dependent manner upon nanoceria exposure. This study thus suggests that nanoceria exposures may negatively affect the nutritional quality of kidney beans at the cellular and molecular level. More confirmatory studies with nanoceria along different species using alternative and orthogonal "omic" tools are currently under active investigation, which will enable the identification of biomarkers of exposure and susceptibility.

  15. Isolation and characterization of the subunits of Phaseolus vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H

    1991-11-01

    An alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) of the white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was found to be composed of two kinds of subunits and they were isolated on a size-exclusion column by HPLC under denaturing conditions. The alpha-subunit was free from tryptophan and cysteine and the beta-subunit contained no methionine or cysteine. There was no marked resemblance in tryptic peptide map between these subunit polypeptides. The alpha-subunit contained 28% by weight of carbohydrate, mainly made up of high mannose-type oligosacharides, whereas the sugar moiety of the beta-subunit amounted to 7% by weight and seemed to be predominantly composed of xylomannose-type oligosaccharides. By SDS-PAGE following deglycosylation, the molecular weights of the polypeptides of alpha- and beta-subunits were shown to be 7,800 and 14,000, respectively. These values were consistent with molecular sizes obtained for alpha- and beta-subunits by gel permeation HPLC in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. The molecular weight of the native PHA-I, 28,800, obtained by gel permeation HPLC under non-denaturing conditions, suggested a heterodimeric structure for PHA-I.

  16. Subchronic oral toxicity of a standardized white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Dilip

    2007-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing "starch blockers" are believed to reduce carbohydrate-derived calories by interfering with alpha-amylase, the digestive enzyme responsible for conversion of complex carbohydrates to simple, absorbable sugars. The present paper reports the findings of a 28-day oral toxicity study in rats of Phase 2, a standardized extract derived from the common white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), which has been shown to have alpha-amylase-inhibiting activity. In order to establish safety, eighty male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (10 animals/sex/group) received Phase 2 via oral gavage at doses of 0, 625, 1250, and 2500 mg/kg (7 days/wk) for a period of 31 (males) or 32 (females) days. There were no mortalities, clinical signs, body weight or nutritional effects, gross alterations, clinical or histopathological alterations that were considered attributable to test substance administration. Under conditions of this study and based on toxicological endpoints evaluated, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of Phase 2 was judged to be 2500 mg/kg/day in each sex for administration by oral gavage of a standardized white kidney bean extract, Phase 2 for 28 days.

  17. A Molecular Marker-Based Linkage Map of Phaseolus Vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. E.; Sakiyama, N. S.; Chase, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A seed and flower color marker (P), nine seed protein, nine isozyme and 224 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci were used to construct a linkage map of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (n = 11). The mapping population consisted of a backcross progeny between the Mesoamerican breeding line `XR-235-1-1' and the Andean cultivar `Calima'; the former was used as the recurrent parent. A bean PstI genomic library enriched for single copy sequences (95%) was the source of DNA probes. Sixty percent of the probes tested detected polymorphisms betwen the parental genotypes with at least one of the four restriction enzymes used here (DraI, EcoRI, EcoRV and HindIII). The computer software Mapmaker was used to determine the linkage relationships and linear order of segregating markers. These markers assorted into 11 linkage groups covering 960 cM of the bean genome. Partial linkage data were used to estimate the total length of the genome at 1200 cM. This estimate and that for the physical size of the genome yield an average ratio of 530 kb/cM. The relatively small size of the genome makes this crop species a good candidate for the isolation of genes via chromosome walking techniques. PMID:1352759

  18. Regulation of Cytokinin Oxidase Activity in Callus Tissues of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Great Northern 1

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield, J. Mark; Armstrong, Donald J.

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of cytokinin oxidase activity in callus tissues of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Great Northern has been examined using an assay based on the oxidation of N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine-8-14C (i6 Ade-8-14C) to adenine. Solutions of exogenous cytokinins applied directly to the surface of the callus tissues induced relatively rapid increases in cytokinin oxidase activity. The increase in activity was detectable after 1 hour and continued for about 8 hours, reaching values two- to three-fold higher than the controls. The cytokinin-induced increase in cytokinin oxidase activity was inhibited in tissues pretreated with cordycepin or cycloheximide, suggesting that RNA and protein synthesis may be required for the response. Rifampicin and chloramphenicol, at concentrations that inhibited the growth of Great Northern callus tissues, were ineffective in inhibiting the increase in activity. All cytokinin-active compounds tested, including both substrates and nonsubstrates of cytokinin oxidase, were effective in inducing elevated levels of the enzyme in Great Northern callus tissue. The cytokinin-active urea derivative, Thidiazuron, was as effective as any adenine derivative in inducing this response. The addition of Thidiazuron to the reaction volumes used to assay cytokinin oxidase activity resulted in a marked inhibition of the degradation of the labeled i6 Ade-8-14C substrate. On the basis of this result, it is possible that Thidiazuron may serve as a substrate for cytokinin oxidase, but other mechanisms of inhibition have not yet been excluded. PMID:16664650

  19. Elicitor-induced prolyl hydroxylase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Localization, purification and properties.

    PubMed

    Bolwell, G P; Robbins, M P; Dixon, R A

    1985-08-01

    The enzyme prolyl hydroxylase (proline: 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase, EC 1.14.11.12), induced in suspension-cultured cells of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (French bean) by treatment with an elicitor preparation from the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, has been investigated. The enzyme, which catalyses the hydroxylation of poly-L-proline with the stoichiometric decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate, has been shown to be localized mainly in smooth endoplasmic reticulum. After solubilization from microsomal membranes, the hydroxylase was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on poly-L-proline-Sepharose 4B. The subunit Mr, as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/poly-acrylamide-gel electrophoresis, was 65 000, the subunit apparently being recovered as a doublet: the subunits associate under non-denaturing conditions to give at least a tetramer. The bean hydroxylase has kinetic properties and cofactor requirements similar to those previously reported for the enzyme from other plants. Elicitor treatment of suspension-cultured bean cells leads to a rapid induction of prolyl hydroxylase activity concomitant with induction of a protein: arabinosyl-transferase and increased levels of an arabinosylated hydroxyproline-rich protein.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a specific enterokinase inhibitor from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Jacob, R T; Bhat, P G; Pattabiraman, T N

    1983-01-01

    A specific enterokinase inhibitor from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was purified to homogeneity. It showed a single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacryl-amide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of mercaptoethanol, and the Mr was 31000. Aspartic acid was identified as the N-terminus of the inhibitor. The Mr by gel chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was found to be 60000, indicating the dimeric nature of the inhibitor. The inhibitor was found to be a glycoprotein. The monosaccharide moieties were glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid and glucosamine in the proportions 3.15%, 5.0%, 0.85% and 1.3% respectively. The inhibitor was most active on pig enterokinase, followed by bovine and human enterokinases. Maximal inhibitory activity was elicited by preincubation of the inhibitor with the enzyme for 15 min. Digestion with pepsin resulted in loss of inhibitory activity. The inhibitor was stable to exposure to a wide range of pH values (2-10), and exposure to pH above 10 resulted in loss of inhibitory activity. Modification of arginine residues by cyclohexane 1,2-dione and ninhydrin led to complete loss of enterokinase-inhibitory activity.

  1. Identification of a novel phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Lambert, Rocío; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings accumulate ureides derived from purines after germination. The first step in the conversion of purines to ureides is the removal of the 5'-phosphate group by a phosphatase that has not been established yet. Two main phosphatase activities were detected in the embryonic axes of common bean using inosine monophosphate as substrate in an in-gel assay. Both activities differed in their sensitive to the common phosphatase inhibitor molybdate, with the molybdate-resistant as the first enzyme induced after radicle protrusion. The molybdate-resistant phosphatase has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and this is the first enzyme which shows this resistance purified and characterized from plant tissues. The native enzyme was a monomer of 55 kDa and it showed highest activity with nucleotides as substrates, with the K(m) values in the micromolar range. Among nucleotides, the highest specific constant (V(max)/K(m)) was observed for adenosine monophosphate. Furthermore, the enzyme was inhibited by nucleosides, the products of the enzymatic reaction, with maximum effect for adenosine. Common bean seedlings imbibed in the presence of adenosine monophosphate in vivo showed the highest molybdate-resistant phosphatase activity in the axes in addition to increased ureide content. The data presented suggests that purified phosphatase is involved in nucleotide metabolism in embryonic axes from common bean.

  2. Effects of Temperature on Resistance in Phaseolus vulgaris Genotypes and on Development of Meloidogyne Species

    PubMed Central

    Sydenham, G. M.; McSorley, R.; Dunn, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris lines with heat-stable resistance to Meloidogyne spp. may be needed to manage root-knot nematodes in tropical regions. Resistance expression before and during the process of nematode penetration and development in resistant genotypes were studied at pre- and postinoculation temperatures of 24 °C and 24 °C, 24 °C and 28 °C, 28 °C and 24 °C, and 28 °C and 28 °C. Resistance was effective at all temperature regimes examined, with fewer nematodes in roots of a resistant line compared with a susceptible line. Preinoculation temperature did not modify resistance expression to later infections by root-knot nematodes. However, postinoculation temperatures affected development of Meloidogyne spp. in both the resistant and susceptible bean lines tested. The more rapid development of nematodes to adults at the higher postinoculation temperature of 28 °C in both bean lines suggests direct temperature effects on nematode development instead of on resistance expression of either of two gene systems. Also, resistance was stable at 30 °C and 32 °C. PMID:19274137

  3. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of the I Locus of Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Astua-Monge, Gustavo; Jones, Valerie; Plyler, Tammy R.; Sakiyama, Ney S.; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2006-01-01

    The I locus of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, controls the development of four different phenotypes in response to inoculation with Bean common mosaic virus, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus, several other related potyviruses, and one comovirus. We have generated a high-resolution linkage map around this locus and have aligned it with a physical map constructed with BAC clones. These clones were obtained from a library of the cultivar “Sprite,” which carries the dominant allele at the I locus. We have identified a large cluster of TIR–NBS–LRR sequences associated within this locus, which extends over a distance >425 kb. Bean cultivars from the Andean or Mesoamerican gene pool that contain the dominant allele share the same haplotypes as revealed by gel blot hybridizations with a TIR probe. In contrast, beans with a recessive allele display simpler and variable haplotypes. A survey of wild accessions from Argentina to Mexico showed that this multigene family has expanded significantly during evolution and domestication. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that the TIR family of genes plays a role in the response to inoculations with BCMV or BCMNV. PMID:16322513

  4. A molecular marker-based linkage map of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C E; Sakiyama, N S; Chase, C D

    1992-07-01

    A seed and flower color marker (P), nine seed protein, nine isozyme and 224 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci were used to construct a linkage map of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (n = 11). The mapping population consisted of a backcross progeny between the Mesoamerican breeding line 'XR-235-1-1' and the Andean cultivar 'Calima'; the former was used as the recurrent parent. A bean PstI genomic library enriched for single copy sequences (95%) was the source of DNA probes. Sixty percent of the probes tested detected polymorphisms between the parental genotypes with at least one of the four restriction enzymes used here (DraI, EcoRI, EcoRV and HindIII). The computer software Mapmaker was used to determine the linkage relationships and linear order of segregating markers. These markers assorted into 11 linkage groups covering 960 cM of the bean genome. Partial linkage data were used to estimate the total length of the genome at 1200 cM. This estimate and that for the physical size of the genome yield an average ratio of 530 kb/cM. The relatively small size of the genome makes this crop species a good candidate for the isolation of genes via chromosome walking techniques.

  5. Extended map for the phaseolin linkage group ofPhaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C E; Chase, C D

    1991-09-01

    The linkage relationship of 11 bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed proteins (including phaseolin), 9 enzyme loci, and theP locus were analyzed in backcross and F2 progenies by use of the software package "Mapmaker." The progenies were obtained by crossing the breeding line 'XR-235-1' and the cultivar 'Calima'. Allelic differences for seed protein loci were detected with SDS-PAGE and those for enzyme loci with starch gel electrophoresis and activity stains. The seed coat color of 'Calima' is a red/beige mottled pattern and that of 'XR-235-1' is white. Segregation at theP locus was followed by recording the phenotype of the BC1S1 and F3 seed. A linkage group comprising ca. 90 cM was detected with the following gene order:Est-2 - 11 -Pha - 8 - (Spe/Spg) - 24 - P - 9 - (Spa/Spv) - 16 -Spba - 22 -Mdh-1. In addition, another linkage group was detected: (Spd/Spf/Sph) - 5 -Spca. Therefore, the seed proteins appear to be organized in clusters in the bean genome.

  6. Anatomical alterations of Phaseolus vulgaris L. mature leaves irradiated with X-rays.

    PubMed

    De Micco, V; Arena, C; Aronne, G

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation of higher plants in Space involves not only the development of new agro-technologies for the design of ecologically closed Space greenhouses, but also understanding of the effects of Space factors on biological systems. Among Space factors, ionising radiation is one of the main constraints to the growth of organisms. In this paper, we analyse the effect of low-LET radiation on leaf histology and cytology in Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants subjected to increasing doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50, 100 Gy). Leaves irradiated at tissue maturity were compared with not-irradiated controls. Semi-thin sections of leaves were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Digital image analysis was applied to quantify anatomical parameters, with a specific focus on the occurrence of signs of structural damage as well as alterations at subcellular level, such as the accumulation of phenolic compounds and chloroplast size. Results showed that even at high levels of radiation, general anatomical structure was not severely perturbed. Slight changes in mesophyll density and cell enlargement were detected at the highest level of radiation. However, at 100 Gy, higher levels of phenolic compounds accumulated along chloroplast membranes: this accompanied an increase in number of chloroplasts. The reduced content of chlorophylls at high levels of radiation was associated with reduced size of the chloroplasts. All data are discussed in terms of the possible role of cellular modifications in the maintenance of high radioresistance and photosynthetic efficiency.

  7. A genome-wide analysis of differentiation between wild and domesticated Phaseolus vulgaris from Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Papa, R; Acosta, J; Delgado-Salinas, A; Gepts, P

    2005-10-01

    Lack of introgression or divergent selection may be responsible for the maintenance of phenotypic differences between sympatric populations of crops and their wild progenitors. To distinguish between these hypotheses, amplified fragment length polymorphism markers were located on a molecular linkage map of Phaseolus vulgaris relative to genes for the domestication syndrome and other traits. Diversity for these same markers was then analyzed in two samples of wild and domesticated populations from Mesoamerica. Differentiation between wild and domesticated populations was significantly higher in parapatric and allopatric populations compared to sympatric populations. It was also significantly higher near genes for domestication compared to those away from these genes. Concurrently, the differences in genetic diversity between wild and domesticated populations were strongest around such genes. These data suggest that selection in the presence of introgression appears to be a major evolutionary factor maintaining the identity of wild and domesticated populations in sympatric situations. Furthermore, alleles from domesticated populations appear to have displaced alleles in sympatric wild populations, thus leading to a reduction in genetic diversity in such populations. These results also provide a possible experimental framework for assessing the long-term risk of transgene escape and the targeting of transgenes inside the genome to minimize the survival of these transgenes into wild populations following introduction by gene flow.

  8. Leaf orientation and distribution in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop and their relation to light microclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barradas, V. L.; Jones, H. G.; Clark, Jerry A.

    Changes in canopy structure parameters (leaflet orientation, leaflet inclination and leaf area index) were measured in crops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the field as the canopy developed between July and October. These changes were compared with the corresponding changes in seasonal light transmission. The beans showed clear heliotropic behaviour, with preferential orientation of leaflets towards the sun's beam, especially on sunny days. Nevertheless a significant proportion of the leaves pointed in other directions, with as much as 20% oriented towards the north. The highest proportion of leaf inclinations was in the range 30-40° on cloudy days and between 40° and 50° on sunny days. Two methods were compared for assessing changes in light transmission: (a) the use of a Sunfleck Ceptometer and (b) the use of continuous records obtained with sensors installed in the canopy. Over the growth period studied, the total of the leaf plus stem area indices (LS) increased from 0.26 to 5.2 with the transmission coefficient (τ) for photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), obtained using the Ceptometer, correspondingly decreasing from 0.72 to 0.05, and the canopy extinction coefficient decreasing from 1.4 to 0.62. The continuous records of light transmission gave generally similar estimates of τ. Some contrasting leaf angle distribution functions were compared for estimation of LS from the light measurements. The best leaf angle function to predict LS from the observed light transmission was a conical function corrected by the degree of heliotropism.

  9. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. to differing ozone regimes having identical total exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, Robert C.; Younglove, Theodore; McCool, Patrick M.

    Protocols were designed to test for differences in response of plants to ozone treatments having equal total exposure (concentration × time) but different exposure profiles Kidney beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. California Dark Red) were exposed to ozone in controlled fumigation chambers within a greenhouse Four different ozone exposure profiles were used, each having the same total cumulative exposure (SUM00) and the same 7, 12 and 24 h seasonal means. The three exposure profiles which incorporated peak concentrations more severely impacted response parameters compared to a steady-state profile which did not exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. Significant differences were found in percent necrotic leaf area, number of pods and top dry weight between exposure profiles. In additional analyses, the response parameters were regressed against seasonal cumulative ozone concentrations raised to powers of 0.33 and from 0.5 to 4 in steps of 0.5 in order to increase effective weighting of the higher concentrations. Total dry weight and leaf necrosis were best fit with the sum of the squared concentrations ( n = 2) while number of pods was best fit by the summed concentrations to the 3.5 power ( n = 3.5). These analyses suggest the peak ozone concentrations are important in determining plant response.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of the ABA-specific glucosyltransferase gene from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Chung, Gyuhwa; Kim, Sang Hyon; Yang, Seung Hwan

    2015-04-15

    Levels of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) are maintained in homeostasis by a balance of its biosynthesis, catabolism and conjugation. The detailed molecular and signaling events leading to strict homeostasis are not completely understood in crop plants. In this study, we obtained cDNA of an ABA-inducible, ABA-specific UDP-glucosyltransferase (ABAGT) from the bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) involved in conjugation of a glucose residue to ABA to form inactive ABA-glucose ester (ABA-GE) to examine its role during development and abiotic stress in bean. The bacterially expressed PvABAGTase enzyme showed ABA-specific glucosylation activity in vitro. A higher level of the PvABAGT transcript was observed in mature leaves, mature flowers, roots, seed coats and embryos as well as upon rehydration following a period of dehydration. Overexpression of 35S::PvABAGT in Arabidopsis showed reduced sensitivity to ABA compared with WT. The transgenic plants showed a high level of ABA-GE without significant decrease in the level of ABA compared with the wild type (WT) during dehydration stress. Upon rehydration, the levels of ABA and phaseic acid (PA) decreased in the WT and the PvABAGT-overexpressing lines with high levels of ABA-GE only in the transgenic plants. Our findings suggest that the PvABAGT gene could play a role in ABA homeostasis during development and stress responses in bean and its overexpression in Arabidopsis did not alter ABA homeostasis during dehydration stress.

  11. Spatial and temporal dynamics of primary and secondary metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris challenged by Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Pineda, Mónica; Díaz-Casado, Elena; Barón, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Many defense mechanisms contribute to the plant immune system against pathogens, involving the regulation of different processes of the primary and secondary metabolism. At the same time, pathogens have evolved mechanisms to hijack the plant defense in order to establish the infection and proliferate. Localization and timing of the host response are essential to understand defense mechanisms and resistance to pathogens (Rico et al. 2011). Imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and thermography, are a very valuable tool providing spatial and temporal information about a series of plant processes. In this study, bean plants challenged with two pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae have been investigated. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 elicit a compatible and incompatible interaction in bean, respectively. Both types of host-pathogen interaction triggered different changes in the activity of photosynthesis and the secondary metabolism. We conclude that the combined analysis of leaf temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence emitted by phenolics allows to discriminate compatible from incompatible P. syringae-Phaseolus vulgaris interactions in very early times of the infection, prior to the development of symptoms. These can constitute disease signatures that would allow an early identification of emerging plagues in crops.

  12. Interaction of cold radiofrequency plasma with seeds of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Shapira, Yekaterina; Grynyov, Roman; Whyman, Gene; Bormashenko, Yelena; Drori, Elyashiv

    2015-07-01

    The impact of cold radiofrequency air plasma on the wetting properties and water imbibition of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) was studied. The influence of plasma on wetting of a cotyledon and seed coat (testa) was elucidated. It was established that cold plasma treatment leads to hydrophilization of the cotyledon and tissues constituting the testa when they are separately exposed to plasma. By contrast, when the entire bean is exposed to plasma treatment, only the external surface of the bean is hydrophilized by the cold plasma. Water imbibition by plasma-treated beans was studied. Plasma treatment markedly accelerates the water absorption. The crucial role of a micropyle in the process of water imbibition was established. It was established that the final percentage of germination was almost the same in the cases of plasma-treated, untreated, and vacuum-pumped samples. However, the speed of germination was markedly higher for the plasma-treated samples. The influence of the vacuum pumping involved in the cold plasma treatment on the germination was also clarified.

  13. Molecular polymorphism related to flowering trait variation in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. collection.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Lorenzo; Tissi, Carlo; Mazzucato, Andrea; Negri, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the flowering variation and the molecular polymorphism in key regulatory genes that control flowering in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. collection of 94 accessions from Europe and the Americas. The analysis of variance revealed that the difference in days-to-flowering between accessions was significant, with European accessions characterized by flowering precocity. Population structure analysis corroborated previous data on the genetic distinction between the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. A low level of admixture was detected. Genomic sequences of 15 gene fragments were obtained. About 7.0 kb per accession were sequenced and a total of 48 nucleotide substitutions identified. A Mixed Linear Model analysis, including population structure and kinship, was used to identify marker-trait associations. Haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) associated with the studied traits were detected: in PvVRN1 and PvPHYB with days-to-flowering, in PvMYB29 with number of flower buds per inflorescence and in PvTFL1z and PvFCA with inflorescence length. The two genes associated with days-to-flowering control belong to the photoperiod and vernalization pathways. In particular, the PvVRN1 gene appears to play an important role in regulating the adaptation process of common bean.

  14. Evaluation of chitooligosaccharide application on mineral accumulation and plant growth in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Philippe G; Pintado, Manuela E; Vasconcelos, Marta W

    2014-02-01

    Chitooligosaccharides (COS) - water soluble derivatives from chitin, are an interesting group of molecules for several biological applications, for they can enter plant cells and bind negatively charged molecules. Several studies reported an enhanced plant growth and higher crop yield due to chitosan application in soil grown plants, but no studies have looked on the effect of COS application on plant mineral nutrient dynamics in hydroponically grown plants. In this study, Phaseolus vulgaris was grown in hydroponic culture and the effect of three different concentrations of COS on plant growth and mineral accumulation was assessed. There were significant changes in mineral allocations for Mo, B, Zn, P, Pb, Cd, Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Na, Al and K among treatments. Plant morphology was severely affected in high doses of COS, as well as lignin concentration in the stem and the leaves, but not in the roots. Chlorophyll A, B and carotenoid concentrations did not change significantly among treatments, suggesting that even at higher concentrations, COS application did not affect photosynthetic pigment accumulation. Plants grown at high COS levels had shorter shoots and roots, suggesting that COS can be phytotoxic to the plant. The present study is the first detailed report on the effect of COS application on mineral nutrition in plants, and opens the door for future studies that aim at utilizing COS in biofortification or phytoremediation programs.

  15. Diallel analysis to choose parents for black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding.

    PubMed

    Moura, L M; Carneiro, P C S; Vale, N M; Barili, L D; Silva, L C; Carneiro, J E S; Cruz, C D

    2016-08-29

    In this study, conducted in two different seasons, we aimed to choose parents to obtain promising segregating populations for the extraction of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines that are superior in terms of disease resistance, plant architecture, and grain yield. Twelve parents were arranged in two groups to compose a partial diallel in a 5 x 7 scheme. Group 1 was composed of parents with black grains and erect plant architecture, while group 2 was composed of parents that had carioca grains and were resistant to the main fungal diseases that occur in the common bean. The following traits were evaluated: severity of angular leaf spot (ALS), plant architecture (PAG), and grain yield (YIELD). The data were analyzed according to a partial diallel model using parents and F1 hybrids. In the genetic control of ALS and PAG, additive effects were predominant, while for YIELD, additive effects were predominant in one season and dominance effects were in another season, because it is a more complex trait than ALS and PAG. For YIELD, we observed an interaction between general combining ability and specific combining ability between seasons. The genes that control ALS, PAG, and YIELD were in eight of the 12 parents evaluated in the diallel. The cultivar 'BRS Estilo' is suitable to use as a parent in common bean breeding in terms of ALS, PAG and YIELD. Recurrent selection is the most recommended option for simultaneously breeding for PAG, YIELD, and resistance to angular leaf spot in bean culture.

  16. Interaction of cold radiofrequency plasma with seeds of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Bormashenko, Edward; Shapira, Yekaterina; Grynyov, Roman; Whyman, Gene; Bormashenko, Yelena; Drori, Elyashiv

    2015-01-01

    The impact of cold radiofrequency air plasma on the wetting properties and water imbibition of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) was studied. The influence of plasma on wetting of a cotyledon and seed coat (testa) was elucidated. It was established that cold plasma treatment leads to hydrophilization of the cotyledon and tissues constituting the testa when they are separately exposed to plasma. By contrast, when the entire bean is exposed to plasma treatment, only the external surface of the bean is hydrophilized by the cold plasma. Water imbibition by plasma-treated beans was studied. Plasma treatment markedly accelerates the water absorption. The crucial role of a micropyle in the process of water imbibition was established. It was established that the final percentage of germination was almost the same in the cases of plasma-treated, untreated, and vacuum-pumped samples. However, the speed of germination was markedly higher for the plasma-treated samples. The influence of the vacuum pumping involved in the cold plasma treatment on the germination was also clarified. PMID:25948708

  17. Carbon partitioning among leaves, fruits, and seeds during development of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, D.R.; Shieh, Wenjang; Saluke, R.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Development of vegetative and floral buds was found to be a key factor in establishing the way carbon is distributed among growing leaves and fruits in Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants. Leaves emerged principally during a period 14 to 32 days after planting while flowers were produced during a 10- to 12-day period near the end of leaf emergence. Timing of anthesis established the sigmoidal time course for dry weight accumulated by the composite of all fruits on the plant. During the first 12 days following anthesis, fruit growth mainly consisted of elongation and dry weight accumulation by the pod wall. Thereafter, seed dry weight increased for about 1 week, decreased markedly for several days, and then increased again over the next 2 weeks. Accumulation of imported carbon in individual seeds, measured by steady-state labeling, confirmed the time course for dry weight accumulation observed during seed development. Seed respiration rate initially increased rapidly along with dry weight and then remained nearly steady until seed maturation. A number of developmental events described in the literature coincided with the different phases of diauxic growth. The results demonstrated the feasibility of relating current rates of carbon import in individual seeds measured with tracer {sup 14}C to the rates of conversion of imported sucrose and use of the products for specific developmental processes. The resulting data are useful for evaluating the roles of conversion and utilization of imported sucrose in regulating import by developing seeds.

  18. Ethylene biosynthesis and cadmium toxicity in leaf tissue of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrer, J.

    1982-07-01

    Stress ethylene production in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., ev. Taylor's Horticultural) leaf tissue was stimulated by Cd/sup 2 +/ at concentrations above 1 micromolar. Cd/sup 2 +/-induced ethylene biosynthesis was dependent upon synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) by ACC synthase. Activity of ACC synthase and ethylene production rate peaked at 8 h of treatment. The subsequent decline in enzyme activity was most likely due to inactivation of the enzyme by Cd/sup 2 +/, which inhibited ACC synthase activity in vitro at concentrations as low as 0.1 micromolar. Decrease in ethylene production rate was accompanied by leakage of solutes and increasing inhibition of ACC-dependent ethylene production. Ca/sup 2 +/, present during a 2-hour preincubation, reduced the effect of Cd/sup 2 +/ on leakage and ACC conversion. This suggests that Cd/sup 2 +/ exerts its toxicity through membrane damage and inactivation of enzymes. The possibility of an indirect stimulation of ethylene biosynthesis through a wound signal from injured cells is discussed.

  19. Turnover of thylakoid membrane proteins during senescence of primary bean leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Mattoo, A.K.; Thompson, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    Pulse-labelling of primary bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris) with /sup 35/S-methionine has revealed differential changes in the rates at which proteins in thylakoid membranes are synthesized during senescence. In particular, synthesis of the 32 Kd herbicide-binding protein remains highly active throughout senescence, whereas turnover of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of ATPase and of the LHCP declines. During a 24-h pulse chase experiment with unlabelled methionine, only the 32 KD protein showed evidence of degradation. Degradation of the 32 Kd unit and, to a lesser extent, of other thylakoid proteins was also observed when the membranes were aged in vitro. The latter process resembled that observed in vivo in that it was light dependent, sensitive to DCMU, and it was inhibited by spermine and Ca/sup 2 +/, both of which alter membrane fluidity. Collectively, these observations suggest that in vitro aging of thylakoid membranes is a useful model system for studying the characteristics of the thylakoid protein degradation.

  20. Chemical composition and in vitro polysaccharide fermentation of different beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Campos-Vega, R; Reynoso-Camacho, R; Pedraza-Aboytes, G; Acosta-Gallegos, J A; Guzman-Maldonado, S H; Paredes-Lopez, O; Oomah, B D; Loarca-Piña, G

    2009-09-01

    The composition of bioactives including polysaccharide yield and resistant starch (RS) content of 4 raw and cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars was evaluated. Polysaccharide was fermented in vitro by incubation with human gut flora under anaerobic conditions and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production was compared at 6, 12, and 24 h by gas chromatography. Polysaccharide and soluble fiber contents increased upon cooking with stachyose as the major oligosaccharide. Cooked bean of cultivar Bayo Madero had the highest yield of polysaccharides (55%) and resistant starch (37%), followed by those of Negro 8025 (48% and 32%, respectively). Acetate was the most abundant SCFAs formed in all bean varieties. The concentration of SCFAs was cultivar-dependent; Bayo Madero and Negro 8025 displayed the highest concentration of butyrate (15 mmol/L), while Azufrado Higuera had the lowest and highest concentrations of acetate (39 mmol/L) and propionate (14 mmol/L), respectively. The results suggest that the common bean is an excellent source of polysaccharides that can be fermented in the colon and produce SCFAs, compounds previously reported to exert health benefits.

  1. [Nutritional evaluation of protein concentrates of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and lentils (Lens esculenta)].

    PubMed

    Kaba, H; Sanahuja, J C

    1978-06-01

    The composition and nutritive value were determined in navy bean meal (Phaseolus vulgaris) and lentil meal (Lens esculenta), and in their respective protein concentrates obtained through extraction followed by isoelectric precipitation. Sulfur amino acids per gram of nitrogen were lower in the concentrates than in the meals, while there was no difference for lysine and threonine. The white bean protein concentrate had a lower biological value than the meal but better digestibility, although trypsin inhibitor concentration was unchanged. Digestibility greatly improved with heating but it did not increase beyond 81% even after autoclaving. Autoclaved samples supplemented with methionine reached a biological value of 83. The lentil protein concentrate also had a lower biological value than the meal but digestibility was high for both samples (91%) and remained unchanged after heating. Trypsin inhibitors were absent. After supplementing with methionine, a biological value of only 63 was obtained, due to the low level of tryptophan, the second limiting amino acid. In spite of the concentrates' lower biological value, it was proved that they equalled the meals' potential for complementing cereal, as their content in lysine and threonine is high. The concentrates have the additional advantage of allowing effective supplementation without increasing the legume-cereal ratio.

  2. Protein and Metalloprotein Distribution in Different Varieties of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Effects of Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aline P.; Andrade, Geyssa Ferreira; Mateó, Bianca S. O.

    2017-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are among the main sources of protein and minerals. The cooking of the grains is imperative, due to reduction of the effect of some toxic and antinutritional substances, as well as increase of protein digestibility. In this study, the effects of cooking on albumins, globulins, prolamins, and glutelins concentration and determination of Fe associated with proteins for different beans varieties and on phaseolin concentration in common and black beans were evaluated. Different extractant solutions (water, NaCl, ethanol, and NaOH) were used for extracting albumins, globulins, prolamins, and glutelins, respectively. For the phaseolin separation NaOH, HCl, and NaCl were used. The total concentration of proteins was determined by Bradford method; Cu and Fe associated with phaseolin and other proteins were obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, respectively. Cooking promoted a negative effect on (1) the proteins concentrations (17 (glutelin) to 95 (albumin) %) of common beans and (2) phaseolin concentration (90%) for common and black beans. Fe associated with albumin, prolamin, and glutelin was not altered. In Fe and Cu associated with phaseolin there was an increase of 20 and 37% for the common and black varieties, respectively. PMID:28326316

  3. Rhythms of volatiles release from healthy and insect-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sufang, Zhang; Jianing, Wei; Zhen, Zhang; Le, Kang

    2013-10-01

    The release rhythm of volatiles is an important physiological characteristic of plants, because the timing of release can affect the function of each particular volatile compound. However, most studies on volatiles release rhythms have been conducted using model plants, rather than crop plants. Here, we analyzed the variations in volatile compounds released from healthy and leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)-infested kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), an important legume crop plant, over a 24 h period. The constituents of the volatiles mixture released from plants were analyzed every 3 h starting from 08:00. The collected volatiles were identified and quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Undamaged kidney bean plants released trace amounts of volatiles, with no obvious release rhythms. However, leafminer-damaged plants released large amounts of volatiles, in two main peaks. The main peak of emission was from 17:00 to 20:00, while the secondary peak was in the early morning. The terpene volatiles and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate showed similar rhythms as that of total volatiles. However, the green leaf volatile (Z)-3-hexen-ol was emitted during the night with peak emission in the early morning. These results give us a clear picture of the volatiles release rhythms of kidney bean plants damaged by leafminer.

  4. Rhythms of volatiles release from healthy and insect-damaged Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Sufang, Zhang; Jianing, Wei; Zhen, Zhang; Le, Kang

    2013-01-01

    The release rhythm of volatiles is an important physiological characteristic of plants, because the timing of release can affect the function of each particular volatile compound. However, most studies on volatiles release rhythms have been conducted using model plants, rather than crop plants. Here, we analyzed the variations in volatile compounds released from healthy and leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis)-infested kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), an important legume crop plant, over a 24 h period. The constituents of the volatiles mixture released from plants were analyzed every 3 h starting from 08:00. The collected volatiles were identified and quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Undamaged kidney bean plants released trace amounts of volatiles, with no obvious release rhythms. However, leafminer-damaged plants released large amounts of volatiles, in two main peaks. The main peak of emission was from 17:00 to 20:00, while the secondary peak was in the early morning. The terpene volatiles and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate showed similar rhythms as that of total volatiles. However, the green leaf volatile (Z)-3-hexen-ol was emitted during the night with peak emission in the early morning. These results give us a clear picture of the volatiles release rhythms of kidney bean plants damaged by leafminer. PMID:23887493

  5. Effects of cryopreservation of Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds on early stages of germination.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Inaudis; Vives, Karel; Laudat, Taletha; González-Olmedo, Justo; Engelmann, Florent; Martínez-Montero, Marcos Edel; Lorenzo, José Carlos

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we studied the effects of cryopreservation on various parameters of early stages of germination of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds (0, 7 and 14 days). Percentages of germination, fresh mass of different plant parts, levels of chlorophyll pigments (a, b, total), malondialdehyde, other aldehydes, phenolics (cell wall-linked, free, and total) and protein were determined. No phenotypic changes were observed visually in seedlings recovered from cryopreserved seeds. However, several significant effects of seed liquid nitrogen exposure were recorded at the biochemical level. There was a significant negative effect of cryopreservation on shoot protein content, which decreased from 3.11 mg g(-1) fresh weight for non-cryopreserved controls to 0.44 mg g(-1) fresh shoot weight for cryopreserved seeds. On the other hand, cryopreservation significantly increased levels of other aldehydes than malondialdehyde in shoots at day 7, from 56.47 μmol g(-1) for non-cryopreserved controls to 253.19 μmol g(-1) fresh shoot weight for cryopreserved samples. Liquid nitrogen exposure significantly reduced phenolics contents (free, cell-wall linked, total) in roots at day 7 after onset of germination. In general, roots were more affected by cryostorage compared with other plant parts, while leaves were the least affected. The effects of seed cryopreservation seem to decline progressively along with seedling growth.

  6. Temporal changes in genetic diversity of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions cultivated between 1800 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Maras, M; Susnik, S; Sustar-Vozlic, J; Meglic, V

    2006-07-01

    Fourteen microsatellite markers were used to describe genetic diversity in a sample of 128 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions cultivated within the territory of Slovenia and its nearby regions between 1800 and 2000. The accessions were grouped into three periods, Period I comprising accessions from the beginning of the 19th century, while the other two periods included accessions from the middle (Period II) and the end of the 20th century (Period III). Seven control accessions of known Mesoamerican and Andean origin were also included in the study. A total of 130 alleles were generated. Allelic richness, in terms of number of alleles per locus, was 6.07 for Period I, 6.71 for Period II and 6.07 for Period III. In the UPGMA dendrogram, all studied accessions were intermixed in three main clusters, indicating that the diversity in the time periods overlapped. Two clusters consisted of accessions of Andean and Mesoamerican origin, while the third represents additional variation, which existed in this area already 200 years ago. The analysis of molecular variance showed that a great part of genetic diversity has been preserved till today, confirming the results of cluster analysis. The calculation of number of alleles per locus revealed no significant quantitative change in genetic diversity over the last 200 years of common bean cultivation. However, the calculation of genetic distances indicated slight qualitative shifts in genetic diversity of common bean germplasm over time, while the calculations of allelic frequency variation and polymorphic information content revealed recent decline of some alleles' frequencies. These findings should stress the need for establishing an appropriate strategy of genetic resources management.

  7. Activity ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase accurately reflect carbamylation ratios. [Phaseolus vulgaris, Spinacla oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, N.D.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Activity ratios and carbamylation ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) were determined for leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea exposed to a variety of partial pressures of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and photon flux densities (PFD). It was found that activity ratios accurately predicted carbamylation ratios except in extracts from leaves held in low PFD. In particular, it was confirmed that the loss of FuBPCase activity in low partial pressure of O{sub 2} and high PFD results from reduced carbamylation. Activity ratios of RuBPCase were lower than carbamylation ratios for Phaseolus leaves sampled in low PFD, presumably because of the presence of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate. Spinacia leaves sampled in darkness also exhibited lower activity ratios than carbamylation ratios indicating that this species may also have an RuBPCase inhibitor even though carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate has not been detected in this species in the past.

  8. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean–rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27271618

  9. Effect of volatile substances released from Origanum majorana and Ocimum basilicum on the rhizosphere and phyllosphere fungi of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Afifi, A F

    1978-01-01

    Differences were found in the counts and occurrence of fungi in the phyllosphere and thizosphere of two representatives of the Lamiacea family, Origanum majorana and Ocimum basilicum, and in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of Phaseolus vulgaris growing separately or in coenosis with O. majorana or O. basilicum. Both the volatile substances released from ground leaves of the two latter plant species and the root exudates affected considerably spore germination of isolated phylospheric and rhizospheric fungi. The results indicated a possible role of root exudates and volatile substances released from leaves in colonization of rhizosphere and/or phyllosphere by fungi, especially in associations of various plants.

  10. High mannose oligosaccharide of phytohemagglutinin is attached to asparagine 12 and the modified oligosaccharide to asparagine 60. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Phytohemagglutinin, the lectin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris, has a high mannose and a modified (fucosylated) oligosaccharide on each polypeptide. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography of tryptic digests of (/sup 3/H)fucose or (/sup 3/H)glucosamine labeled phytohemagglutinin, followed by amino acid sequencing of the isolated glycopeptides, shows that the high mannose oligosaccharide is attached to Asn/sup 12/ and the modified oligosaccharide to Asn /sup 60/ of the protein. In animal glycoproteins, high mannose chains are rarely found at the N-terminal side of complex chains.

  11. Functional specialization of one copy of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase in ureide production from symbiotically fixed nitrogen in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Coleto, Inmaculada; Trenas, Almudena T; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Pineda, Manuel; Alamillo, Josefa M

    2016-08-01

    Purines are essential molecules formed in a highly regulated pathway in all organisms. In tropical legumes, the nitrogen fixed in the nodules is used to generate ureides through the oxidation of de novo synthesized purines. Glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PRAT) catalyses the first committed step of de novo purine synthesis. In Phaseolus vulgaris there are three genes coding for PRAT. The three full-length sequences, which are intron-less genes, were cloned, and their expression levels were determined under conditions that affect the synthesis of purines. One of the three genes, PvPRAT3, is highly expressed in nodules and protein amount and enzymatic activity in these tissues correlate with nitrogen fixation activity. Inhibition of PvPRAT3 gene expression by RNAi-silencing and subsequent metabolomic analysis of the transformed roots shows that PvPRAT3 is essential for the synthesis of ureides in P. vulgaris nodules.

  12. The Phaseolus vulgaris ZIP gene family: identification, characterization, mapping, and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Carolina; Fernandez, Andrea C.; Blair, Matthew W.; Cichy, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral for humans and plants and is involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In humans, Zn deficiency has been associated with retarded growth and reduction of immune response. In plants, Zn is an essential component of more than 300 enzymes including RNA polymerase, alkaline phosphatase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Cu/Zn superoxidase dismutase, and carbonic anhydrase. The accumulation of Zn in plants involves many genes and characterization of the role of these genes will be useful in biofortification. Here we report the identification and phlyogenetic and sequence characterization of the 23 members of the ZIP (ZRT, IRT like protein) family of metal transporters and three transcription factors of the bZIP family in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Expression patterns of seven of these genes were characterized in two bean genotypes (G19833 and DOR364) under two Zn treatments. Tissue analyzed included roots and leaves at vegetative and flowering stages, and pods at 20 days after flowering. Four of the genes, PvZIP12, PvZIP13, PvZIP16, and Pv bZIP1, showed differential expression based on tissue, Zn treatment, and/or genotype. PvZIP12 and PvZIP13 were both more highly expressed in G19833 than DOR364. PvZIP12 was most highly expressed in vegetative leaves under the Zn (−) treatment. PvZIP16 was highly expressed in leaf tissue, especially leaf tissue at flowering stage grown in the Zn (−) treatment. Pv bZIP1 was most highly expressed in leaf and pod tissue. The 23 PvZIP genes and three bZIP genes were mapped on the DOR364 × G19833 linkage map. PvZIP12, PvZIP13, and PvZIP18, Pv bZIP2, and Pv bZIP3 were located near QTLs for Zn accumulation in the seed. Based on the expression and mapping results, PvZIP12 is a good candidate gene for increasing seed Zn concentration and increase understanding of the role of ZIP genes in metal uptake, distribution, and accumulation of zinc in P. vulgaris. PMID:23908661

  13. [Polymorphism of Phaseolus vulgaris var. aborigineus (fabaceae). Evidences of natural hibridation].

    PubMed

    Hoc, Patricia S; Espert, Shirley M; Drewes, Susana I; Burghardt, Alicia D

    2003-01-01

    A polymorphic population of Phaseolus vulgaris var. aborigineus growing at the Northwest of Argentina was studied. In order to know the origin of this polymorphism, some plants belonging to the var. aborigineus, other plants showing floral dimorphism and other individuals with particular characters were collected. Their seeds, obtained after field-work treatments of autogamy and free pollination, were sown in a greenhouse, isolated of the access of pollinators. The growth of each plant was followed until its fructification, and the number of plants that died due to infections was recorded. The number of plants that flowered and fructified was registered in order to study their reproductive success. The floral, fruit and seed qualitative and quantitative characters were documented. With the results obtained, the authors concluded that those individuals that showed floral dimorphism are probably a result of hybridization and introgression between the var. aborigineus and "old cultivars". This hypothesis is supported by the presence of divergent segregation, observed in the offspring of the plants with this segregation. Other crops should allow the genic flow between the parental entities, with the consequence of the establishment of an hybrid population coexistent with their ancestors. Perhaps, as a result of introgression, the stabilized lines exhibit characters different from their parental varieties. The results of autopollination and free pollination in those individuals assigned to var. aborigineus, showed that free pollination brings a great genetic plasticity, because next generations can persist and resist infections. The offspring of the F1 was followed. The plants that belonged to var. aborigineus, product of free pollination, exhibited fast growth and were healthy, while the descendant of the individuals with the floral dimorphism showed characteristics that allowed to conclude the possible existence of degeneration of the hybrid progeny; this

  14. Protein structures of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Gepts, Paul L; Whitaker, John R

    2002-10-23

    Two nucleotide sequences for genes that encode alpha-amylase inhibitor 4 (alphaAI-4) from white kidney bean (WKB) cv. 858, designated gene alphaAI-4 (Accession No. ), and alpha-amylase inhibitor 5 (alphaAI-5) from black bean (BB), designated gene alphaAI-5 (Accession No. ), were determined. Genes alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 encode 244 amino acid prepro-alphaAI-4 and prepro-alphaAI-5 polypeptides that are 93 and 95% identical with alpha-amylase inhibitor l (alphaAI-l; Hoffman, L. M.; Ma, Y.; Barker, R. F. Nucleic Acids Res. 1982, 10, 7819-7828), 40 and 43% identical with red kidney bean lectin, and 52 and 55% identical with arcelin l of wild-type bean. The high degree of sequence similarity indicates the evolutionary relationship among these genes. PCR analysis of genomic DNA purified from six genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris showed very similar band patterns in 2% agarose gel, another indication of the conserved size homology among these genes. Proteolytic processing sites were located between Asn77 and Ser78 for pro-alphaAI-4 and pro-alphaAI-5. A bend next to Asn77 in three-dimensional model structures of alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 proinhibitors indicates that the proteolytic cleavage is necessary to remove the conformational constraint for activation to the mature protein. Mature WKB alphaAI-4 was composed of four subunits (2alpha2beta) and had a molecular weight of 50000 determined by multiangle laser light scattering and 56714 determined by laser-assisted time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  15. Effective Symbiosis between Rhizobium etli and Phaseolus vulgaris Requires the Alarmone ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Martine; Braeken, Kristien; Schoeters, Eric; Verreth, Christel; Beullens, Serge; Vanderleyden, Jos; Michiels, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium etli and Phaseolus vulgaris, the common bean plant, ultimately results in the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules. Many aspects of the intermediate and late stages of this interaction are still poorly understood. The R. etli relA gene was identified through a genome-wide screening for R. etli symbiotic mutants. RelA has a pivotal role in cellular physiology, as it catalyzes the synthesis of (p)ppGpp, which mediates the stringent response in bacteria. The synthesis of ppGpp was abolished in an R. etli relA mutant strain under conditions of amino acid starvation. Plants nodulated by an R. etli relA mutant had a strongly reduced nitrogen fixation activity (75% reduction). Also, at the microscopic level, bacteroid morphology was altered, with the size of relA mutant bacteroids being increased compared to that of wild-type bacteroids. The expression of the σN-dependent nitrogen fixation genes rpoN2 and iscN was considerably reduced in the relA mutant. In addition, the expression of the relA gene was negatively regulated by RpoN2, the symbiosis-specific σN copy of R. etli. Therefore, an autoregulatory loop controlling the expression of relA and rpoN2 seems operative in bacteroids. The production of long- and short-chain acyl-homoserine-lactones by the cinIR and raiIR systems was decreased in an R. etli relA mutant. Our results suggest that relA may play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in R. etli bacteroids and in the adaptation of bacteroid physiology. PMID:16030240

  16. Phytohemagglutinin from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) inhibits sodium and chloride absorption in the rabbit ileum.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, J W; Laurenson, J P; Gorelick, F S; Banwell, J G

    1986-06-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), can induce malabsorption and diarrhea when fed to rats. In this study, we determined the effect of PHA on ion transport in the rabbit ileum in vitro. Compared with control tissues, PHA (1 mg/ml) added to the mucosal solution increased short-circuit current (1.1 +/- 0.2 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.001), decreased net Na (-1.0 +/- 0.5 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.02) and Cl (-1.2 +/- 0.6 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.025) absorption, and decreased tissue conductance (-1.8 +/- 0.5 mS/cm2, p less than 0.001). Serosal addition of PHA had no effect on the short-circuit current or tissue conductance. Mucosal PHA did not increase mucosal levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate or cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Removal of serosal calcium did not affect the increase in short-circuit current induced by mucosal PHA. Utilizing fluorescent microscopy, rhodamine-labeled PHA was found to bind to the luminal border of villus cells, but not to crypt cells, in the ileum. In the descending rabbit colon, PHA did not affect either the short-circuit current or conductance, and rhodaminated PHA did not bind to the epithelial surface. Using the increase in short-circuit current as an indicator of absorption, PHA did not affect Na-coupled glucose or amino acid absorption in the ileum. This study suggests that dietary lectins may play a role in regulating intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Zuiderveen, Grady H.; Padder, Bilal A.; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Song, Qijian; Kelly, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS). Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481) included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219) tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans. PMID:27270627

  18. Involvement of Abscisic Acid in Regulating Water Status in Phaseolus vulgaris L. during Chilling 1

    PubMed Central

    Pardossi, Alberto; Vernieri, Paolo; Tognoni, Franco

    1992-01-01

    During the first hours of chilling, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv Mondragone) seedlings suffer severe water stress and wilt without any significant increase in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) content (P. Vernieri, A. Pardossi, F. Tognoni [1991] Aust J Plant Physiol 18: 25-35). Plants regain turgor after 30 to 40 h. We hypothesized that inability to rapidly synthesize ABA at low temperatures contributes to chilling-induced water stress and that turgor recovery after 30 to 40 h is mediated by changes in endogenous ABA content. Entire bean seedlings were subjected to long-term (up to 6 d) chilling (3°C, 0.2-0.4 kPa vapor pressure deficit, 100 μmol·m−2·s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density, continuous fluorescent light). During the first 24 h, stomata remained open, and plants rapidly wilted as leaf transpiration exceeded root water absorption. During this phase, ABA did not accumulate in leaves or in roots. After 24 h, ABA content increased in both tissues, leaf diffusion resistance increased, and plants rehydrated and regained turgor. No osmotic adjustment was associated with turgor recovery. Following turgor recovery, stomata remained closed, and ABA levels in both roots and leaves were elevated compared with controls. The application of ABA (0.1 mm) to the root system of the plants throughout exposure to 3°C prevented the chilling-induced water stress. Excised leaves fed 0.1 mm ABA via the transpiration stream had greater leaf diffusion resistance at 20 and 3°C compared with non-ABA fed controls, but the amount of ABA needed to elicit a given degree of stomatal closure was higher at 3°C compared with 20°C. These findings suggest that endogenous ABA may play a role in ameliorating plant water status during chilling. PMID:16653112

  19. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Seedlings Exposed to Prometryn Herbicide Contaminated Soil Trigger an Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Boulahia, Kerima; Carol, Pierre; Planchais, Séverine; Abrous-Belbachir, Ouzna

    2016-04-27

    Herbicides from the family of S-triazines, such as prometryn, have been widely used in crop production and can constitute an environmental pollution in both water and soil. As a valuable crop, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is grown all over the world and could be exposed to such herbicides. We wanted to investigate the possible stress sustained by the common bean growing in prometryn-polluted soil. Two situations were observed: when soil was treated with ≥100 μM prometryn, some, but not all, measured growth parameters were affected in a dose-dependent manner. Growth was reduced, and photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic products were less accumulated when soil was treated with ≥100 μM prometryn. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced had a deleterious effect, as seen by the accumulation of oxidized lipid in the form of malondialdehyde (MDA). Higher prometryn (500 μM) concentrations had a disastrous effect, reducing antioxidant activities. At a low (10 μM) concentration, prometryn increased antioxidant enzymatic activities without affecting plant growth or MDA production. Gene expression of proline metabolism genes and proline accumulation confirm that bean plants respond to a stress according to the prometryn concentration. Physiological responses such as antioxidative enzymes APX, CAT, and the enzyme implicated in the metabolization of xenobiotics, GST, were increased at 10 and 100 μM, which indicated a prevention of deleterious effects of prometryn, suggesting that bean is a suitable material both for herbicide pollution sensing and as a crop on a low level of herbicide pollution.

  20. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Ariani, Andrea; Gepts, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Plant aquaporins are a large and diverse family of water channel proteins that are essential for several physiological processes in living organisms. Numerous studies have linked plant aquaporins with a plethora of processes, such as nutrient acquisition, CO2 transport, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses. However, little is known about this protein family in common bean. Here, we present a genome-wide identification of the aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a legume crop essential for human nutrition. We identified 41 full-length coding aquaporin sequences in the common bean genome, divided by phylogenetic analysis into five sub-families (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs). Residues determining substrate specificity of aquaporins (i.e., NPA motifs and ar/R selectivity filter) seem conserved between common bean and other plant species, allowing inference of substrate specificity for these proteins. Thanks to the availability of RNA-sequencing datasets, expression levels in different organs and in leaves of wild and domesticated bean accessions were evaluated. Three aquaporins (PvTIP1;1, PvPIP2;4 and PvPIP1;2) have the overall highest mean expressions, with PvTIP1;1 having the highest expression among all aquaporins. We performed an EST database mining to identify drought-responsive aquaporins in common bean. This analysis showed a significant increase in expression for PvTIP1;1 in drought stress conditions compared to well-watered environments. The pivotal role suggested for PvTIP1;1 in regulating water homeostasis and drought stress response in the common bean should be verified by further field experimentation under drought stress.

  1. Sunfleck dynamics and canopy structure in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barradas, Victor L.; Jones, Hamlyn G.; Clark, Jerry A.

    Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) fluctuations were quantified in crops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the field as the canopy developed between July and October. Two different methods were used to select sunflecks and shadeflecks. Four ranges of zenith angles (60-70°, 50-60°, 40-50° and 30-40°) were selected for analysing PPFD fluctuations. At the base of the canopy, sunflecks contributed 18%, 53%, 10% and 4% during the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th week of growth, respectively. At a height of 20 cm above the soil surface, the respective contributions were 28% and 21% during the 6th and 7th weeks. Sunfleck lengths of 0-5 s were the most frequent, with the greatest number being found with smaller zenith angles. The proportion of short duration sunflecks increased as the growth period advanced. The number of long sunflecks decreased with time, with very few longer than 100 s by the 5th and 7th weeks. The distributions of sunfleck irradiance were similar to normal distributions and irradiance ranged in μmol m-2 s-1 from 600-900, 800-1500 and 1000-1600 respectively at zenith angles of 50-60°, 40-50° and 30-40°. A multiple regression showed that short sunflecks (<100 s) depended on zenith angle, plant height, and leaf and stem area index (Ls), whereas long sunflecks (>100 s) depended on zenith angle and Ls. Shadefleck distributions were similar to those for sunflecks but there were fewer of the shortest examples and more of the longest. The best statistical distribution to describe sunflecks and shadeflecks was the gamma distribution, which could provide the basis for the future development of a good model for sunfleck and shadefleck distributions.

  2. Development of a genome-wide anchored microsatellite map for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Pedraza, F; Buendia, H F; Gaitán-Solís, E; Beebe, S E; Gepts, P; Tohme, J

    2003-11-01

    A total of 150 microsatellite markers developed for common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were tested for parental polymorphism and used to determine the positions of 100 genetic loci on an integrated genetic map of the species. The value of these single-copy markers was evident in their ability to link two existing RFLP-based genetic maps with a base map developed for the Mesoamerican x Andean population, DOR364 x G19833. Two types of microsatellites were mapped, based respectively on gene-coding and anonymous genomic-sequences. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic (46.3%) than anonymous genomic microsatellites (64.3%) between the parents of two inter-genepool crosses. The majority of the microsatellites produced single bands and detected single loci, however four of the gene-based and three of the genomic microsatellites produced consistent double or multiple banding patterns and detected more than one locus. Microsatellite loci were found on each of the 11 chromosomes of common bean, the number per chromosome ranging from 5 to 17 with an average of ten microsatellites each. Total map length for the base map was 1,720 cM and the average chromosome length was 156.4 cM, with an average distance between microsatellite loci of 19.5 cM. The development of new microsatellites from sequences in the Genbank database and the implication of these results for genetic mapping, quantitative trait locus analysis and marker-assisted selection in common bean are described.

  3. Identification of novel drought-tolerant-associated SNPs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Villordo-Pineda, Emiliano; González-Chavira, Mario M.; Giraldo-Carbajo, Patricia; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.; Caballero-Pérez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a leguminous in high demand for human nutrition and a very important agricultural product. Production of common bean is constrained by environmental stresses such as drought. Although conventional plant selection has been used to increase production yield and stress tolerance, drought tolerance selection based on phenotype is complicated by associated physiological, anatomical, cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. These changes are modulated by differential gene expression. A common method to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest is the characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs) to link them to specific functions. In this work, we selected two drought-tolerant parental lines from Mesoamerica, Pinto Villa, and Pinto Saltillo. The parental lines were used to generate a population of 282 families (F3:5) and characterized by 169 SNPs. We associated the segregation of the molecular markers in our population with phenotypes including flowering time, physiological maturity, reproductive period, plant, seed and total biomass, reuse index, seed yield, weight of 100 seeds, and harvest index in three cultivation cycles. We observed 83 SNPs with significant association (p < 0.0003 after Bonferroni correction) with our quantified phenotypes. Phenotypes most associated were days to flowering and seed biomass with 58 and 44 associated SNPs, respectively. Thirty-seven out of the 83 SNPs were annotated to a gene with a potential function related to drought tolerance or relevant molecular/biochemical functions. Some SNPs such as SNP28 and SNP128 are related to starch biosynthesis, a common osmotic protector; and SNP18 is related to proline biosynthesis, another well-known osmotic protector. PMID:26257755

  4. Effect of air pollutants on the photosynthetic and dark respiration rates of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Borgman, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of continuous fumigations with pollutant gases on net and gross photosynthesis, dark respiration, respiration/gross photosynthesis ratios, root/shoot ratios, and chloroplast ultrastructure were examined. Plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. Blue Lakes, were grown in paired plexi-glass chambers. Photosynthetic and respiration rates of 12-19 day-old plants were measured by infrared gas analysis. The plants were dried and root/shoot ratios calculated. A significant increase (28.9%) in gross photosynthesis of plants exposed to 10 ppm. CO was evident compared to the controls. Although net photosynthesis was not significantly affected by 0.035-0.04 ppm NO/sub 2/, gross photosynthesis, dark respiration, and R/G were significantly greater than in controls. Concentrations of 0.04-0.005 SO/sub 2/ resulted in significantly greater respiration and R/G ratios. This procedure resulted in significantly reduced net and gross photosynthetic rates. Ozone exposures of 10-20 ppm for eight hours a day, five days a week, resulted in progressively lower net and gross photosynthetic rates as the week progressed and R/G ratios were significantly higher. Ozone exposures of 6-8 ppm reduced net and gross photosynthetic rates significantly. Average root/shoot ratios of all exposed plants were significantly greater (14.8%) than those grown in pollutant-free air. The concentrations employed were comparable to the federal air pollution standards. It was concluded that these low levels of pollutant gases are capable of altering physiological activities which may result in reduced yield.

  5. Punctuated Distribution of Recombination Hotspots and Demarcation of Pericentromeric Regions in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Mehul S.; Jones, Valerie A.; Vallejos, C. Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High density genetic maps are a reliable tool for genetic dissection of complex plant traits. Mapping resolution is often hampered by the variable crossover and non-crossover events occurring across the genome, with pericentromeric regions (pCENR) showing highly suppressed recombination rates. The efficiency of linkage mapping can further be improved by characterizing and understanding the distribution of recombinational activity along individual chromosomes. In order to evaluate the genome wide recombination rate in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) we developed a SNP-based linkage map using the genotype-by-sequencing approach with a 188 recombinant inbred line family generated from an inter gene pool cross (Andean x Mesoamerican). We identified 1,112 SNPs that were subsequently used to construct a robust linkage map with 11 groups, comprising 513 recombinationally unique marker loci spanning 943 cM (LOD 3.0). Comparative analysis showed that the linkage map spanned >95% of the physical map, indicating that the map is almost saturated. Evaluation of genome-wide recombination rate indicated that at least 45% of the genome is highly recombinationally suppressed, and allowed us to estimate locations of pCENRs. We observed an average recombination rate of 0.25 cM/Mb in pCENRs as compared to the rest of genome that showed 3.72 cM/Mb. However, several hot spots of recombination were also detected with recombination rates reaching as high as 34 cM/Mb. Hotspots were mostly found towards the end of chromosomes, which also happened to be gene-rich regions. Analyzing relationships between linkage and physical map indicated a punctuated distribution of recombinational hot spots across the genome. PMID:25629314

  6. Enzymatic characterization of starch synthase III from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Senoura, Takeshi; Asao, Ayako; Takashima, Yoshinori; Isono, Naoto; Hamada, Shigeki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2007-09-01

    In plants and green algae, several starch synthase isozymes are responsible for the elongation of glucan chains in the biosynthesis of amylose and amylopectin. Multiple starch synthase isozymes, which are classified into five major classes (granule-bound starch synthases, SSI, SSII, SSIII, and SSIV) according to their primary sequences, have distinct enzymatic properties. All the starch synthase isozymes consist of a transit peptide, an N-terminal noncatalytic region (N-domain), and a C-terminal catalytic region (C-domain). To elucidate the enzymatic properties of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) SSIII and the function of the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII, three recombinant proteins were constructed: putative mature recombinant SSIII, recombinant kidney bean SSIII N-domain, and recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain. Purified recombinant kidney bean SSIII displayed high specific activities for primers as compared to the other starch synthase isozymes from kidney bean. Kinetic analysis showed that the high specific activities of recombinant kidney bean SSIII are attributable to the high k(cat) values, and that the K(m) values of recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain for primers were much higher than those of recombinant kidney bean recombinant SSIII. Recombinant kidney bean SSIII and recombinant kidney bean SSIII C-domain had similar chain-length specificities for the extension of glucan chains, indicating that the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII does not affect the chain-length specificity. Affinity gel electrophoresis indicated that recombinant kidney bean SSIII and recombinant kidney bean SSIII N-domain have high affinities for amylose and amylopectin. The data presented in this study provide direct evidence for the function of the N-domain of kidney bean SSIII as a carbohydrate-binding module.

  7. Accumulation and translocation of metals in soil and different parts of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) amended with sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Chopra, A K

    2014-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the accumulation and translocation of metals in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Plants were grown in soil amended with up to 100 % sewage sludge. Significant (p < 0.01) changes to soil characteristics were observed. The maximum growth of P. vulgaris was noted in the treatment with 40 % of sewage sludge. Metal concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in P. vulgaris after sewage sludge amendment where Fe > Zn > Cd > Cu > Cr > Pb. The translocation for Fe and Zn was in the order of leaves > shoot > root > fruits, for Cd, shoot > root > leaves > fruits, for Cu and Pb shoot > leaves > root > fruits and for Cr root > shoot > leaves > fruits of P. vulgaris. All accumulated metal concentrations except Cd in the fruit were below the FAO/WHO standard limits. Thus, the amendment of agricultural soil by sewage sludge might be feasible. However, a regular monitoring of metal levels in agricultural products is recommended to prevent their accumulation in the food chain.

  8. Assesing potential effects of inulin and probiotic bacteria on Fe bioavailability from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inulin, a prebiotic, may enhance intestinal Fe absorption. Our objective was to assess the effects of supplemental inulin and two probiotic bacteria (B. infantis and L.acidophillus) on Fe availability to Caco-2 cells from common white and red beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Cooked beans were mixed o...

  9. Inheritance of high levels of resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas Axonopodis pv. Phaseoli in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap) is an important biotic factor limiting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. A few interspecific bean breeding lines such as VAX 6 exhibit a high level of resistance to a wide range of Xap strains repr...

  10. Biofortified black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in a maize/bean diet provide more bioavailable iron to piglets than standard black beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard black beans to deliver iron (Fe) for hemoglobin synthesis. Two lines of black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one standard (“Low”) and the other biofortified (“High”) in Fe (71 and 106 ug Fe/g, respectively) were used. Maize-bas...

  11. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common vean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and association with seed iron accumulation QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem, which often affects women and children of developing countries and is based on diets that are low in iron. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their root...

  12. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 is associated with the homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) play a central role in potyviral infection. Accordingly, mutations in the gene encoding eIF4E have been identified as a source of recessive resistance in several plant species. In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, bc-3...

  13. Characterization of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) ecotype "Fagiolo occhio nero di Oliveto Citra" using agronomic, biochemical and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Zaccardelli, Massimo; Pentangelo, Alfonso; Tripodi, Pasquale

    2013-09-15

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important grain legume and plays a significant role in human nutrition being a major source of dietary protein and representing a rich source of minerals and certain vitamins. Several large germplasm collections have been established, which contain large amounts of genetic diversity, including wild and domesticated species. In this study agronomic, biochemical and molecular characterization of landrace bean named "Fagiolo occhio nero di Oliveto Citra" (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), is described. Seeds were obtained by local farmers and field trials were carried out during years 2009-2010, in the typical cultivation site (Oliveto Citra, Salerno Province), using two different densities of investment. During 2011, in order to evaluate the performance in different environments, field trials were conducted in three localities (Battipaglia, Oliveto Citra and Controne). Data analysis shows good adaptability across locations and similar grain yield using two spacing's of seeds. Morphological characterization and molecular analysis, using AFLP and Minisatellite molecular markers, were performed on ten "biotypes" collected from local farmers. Seeds characterization showed variability on the violet area surrounding the hilum (named as eye) while markers have provided useful information on relationships between biotypes. Biochemical analysis, which includes the contents of protein, minerals and antioxidants, shows how the composition is consistent with respect to other landraces and commercial cultivars. The landrace under study revealed genetic stability and good adaptation to cultivated environment with best performance in the native area. In addition, the bio-agronomic characteristics are in accord with studies reported in literature.

  14. Diversity in the rhizobia associated with Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Ecuador, and comparisons with Mexican bean rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, G; Graham, P H

    2001-06-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) have centers of origin in both Mesoamerica and Andean South America, and have been domesticated in each region for perhaps 5000 years. A third major gene pool may exist in Ecuador and Northern Peru. The diversity of the rhizobia associated with beans has also been studied, but to date with an emphasis on the Mesoamerican center of origin. In this study we compared bean rhizobia from Mexico and Andean South America using both phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. When differences between the rhizobia of these two regions were shown, we then examined the influence of bean cultivar on the most probable number (MPN) count and biodiversity of rhizobia recovered from different soils. Three clusters of bean rhizobia were distinguished using phenotypic analysis and principal-component analysis of Box AIR-PCR banding patterns. They corresponded principally to isolates from Mexico, and the northern and southern Andean regions, with isolates from southern Ecuador exhibiting significant genetic diversity. Rhizobia from Dalea spp., which are infective and effective on beans, may have contributed to the apparent diversity of rhizobia recovered from the Mesoamerican region, while the rhizobia of wild Phaseolus aborigineus from Argentina showed only limited similarity to the other bean rhizobia tested. Use of P. vulgaris cultivars from the Mesoamerican and Andean Phaseolus gene pools as trap hosts did not significantly affect MPN counts of bean rhizobia from the soils of each region, but did influence the diversity of the rhizobia recovered. Such differences in compatibility of host and Rhizobium could be a factor in the poor reputation for nodulation and N2 fixation in this crop.

  15. Primary sites of ozone-induced perturbations of photosynthesis in leaves: identification and characterization in Phaseolus vulgaris using high resolution chlorophyll fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Leipner, J; Oxborough, K; Baker, N R

    2001-08-01

    High resolution imaging of chlorophyll a fluorescence was used to identify the sites at which ozone initially induces perturbations of photosynthesis in leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris. Leaves were exposed to 250 and 500 nmol mol(-1) ozone at a photosynthetically active photon flux density of 300 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for 3 h. Images of fluorescence parameters indicated that large decreases in both the maximum and operating quantum efficiencies of photosystem II had occurred in cells adjacent to stomata in the upper, but not lower, leaf surfaces. However, this treatment did not produce any significant changes in the maximum or operating quantum efficiencies of photosystem II in the leaves when estimated from fluorescence parameters measured with a conventional, integrating fluorometer. The localized decreases in photosystem II photochemical efficiencies were accompanied by an increase in the minimal fluorescence level, which is indicative of photoinactivation of photosystem II complexes and a decrease in stomatal conductance. Perturbations of photochemical efficiencies were not observed in cells associated with all of the stomata on the upper leaf surface or within cells distant from the upper leaf surface. It is concluded that ozone penetrates the leaf through stomata and initially damages only cells close to stomatal pores.

  16. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E.; Chapman, B. Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L.; Pauls, Karl P.; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  17. Biosynthesis of compatible solutes in rhizobial strains isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris nodules in Tunisian fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Associated with appropriate crop and soil management, inoculation of legumes with microbial biofertilizers can improve food legume yield and soil fertility and reduce pollution by inorganic fertilizers. Rhizospheric bacteria are subjected to osmotic stress imposed by drought and/or NaCl, two abiotic constraints frequently found in semi-arid lands. Osmostress response in bacteria involves the accumulation of small organic compounds called compatible solutes. Whereas most studies on rhizobial osmoadaptation have focussed on the model species Sinorhizobium meliloti, little is known on the osmoadaptive mechanisms used by native rhizobia, which are good sources of inoculants. In this work, we investigated the synthesis and accumulations of compatible solutes by four rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Tunisia, as well as by the reference strain Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899T. Results The most NaCl-tolerant strain was A. tumefaciens 10c2, followed (in decreasing order) by R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3, R. etli 12a3 and R. gallicum bv. phaseoli 8a3. 13C- and 1H-NMR analyses showed that all Rhizobium strains synthesized trehalose whereas A. tumefaciens 10c2 synthesized mannosucrose. Glutamate synthesis was also observed in R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3 and A. tumefaciens 10c2. When added as a carbon source, mannitol was also accumulated by all strains. Accumulation of trehalose in R. tropici CIAT 899 and of mannosucrose in A. tumefaciens 10c2 was osmoregulated, suggesting their involvement in osmotolerance. The phylogenetic analysis of the otsA gene, encoding the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, suggested the existence of lateral transfer events. In vivo 13C labeling experiments together with genomic analysis led us to propose the uptake and conversion pathways of different carbon sources into trehalose. Collaterally, the β-1,2-cyclic glucan from R. tropici CIAT 899 was co

  18. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the α-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD) between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Results Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. Conclusions We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated background through breeding. LD

  19. Mapping of angular leaf spot resistance QTL in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under different environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for human diet worldwide and the angular leaf spot (ALS) is one of the most devastating diseases of this crop, leading to yield losses as high as 80%. In an attempt to breed resistant cultivars, it is important to first understand the inheritance mode of resistance and to develop tools that could be used in assisted breeding. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to ALS under natural infection conditions in the field and under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. Results QTL analyses were made using phenotypic data from 346 recombinant inbreed lines from the IAC-UNA x CAL 143 cross, gathered in three experiments, two of which were conducted in the field in different seasons and one in the greenhouse. Joint composite interval mapping analysis of QTL x environment interaction was performed. In all, seven QTLs were mapped on five linkage groups. Most of them, with the exception of two, were significant in all experiments. Among these, ALS10.1DG,UC presented major effects (R2 between 16% - 22%). This QTL was found linked to the GATS11b marker of linkage group B10, which was consistently amplified across a set of common bean lines and was associated with the resistance. Four new QTLs were identified. Between them the ALS5.2 showed an important effect (9.4%) under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. ALS4.2 was another major QTL, under natural infection in the field, explaining 10.8% of the variability for resistance reaction. The other QTLs showed minor effects on resistance. Conclusions The results indicated a quantitative inheritance pattern of ALS resistance in the common bean line CAL 143. QTL x environment interactions were observed. Moreover, the major QTL identified on linkage group B10 could be important for bean breeding, as it was stable in all the environments. Thereby, the GATS11b marker is a potential tool

  20. Fungicide Enhancement of Nitrogen Fixation and Colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris by Rhizobium phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Linda B.; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    The number and weight of pods and the weight and nitrogen content of the tops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) derived from seeds inoculated with a thiram-resistant strain of Rhizobium phaseoli were increased if the seeds were treated with thiram before sowing in soil. A greater percentage of the nodules on 21-day-old plants were derived from the resistant strain, more nodules were formed, and these nodules were more effective in the presence of the fungicide than in its absence. These differences in nodule numbers were no longer present in 56-day-old plants, and only a small percentage of the nodules contained the resistant strain. The abundance of the fungicide-tolerant R. phaseoli increased rapidly soon after planting the seed and subsequently fell markedly, but the rate of decline was less if the seeds had been treated with the chemical. Protozoa also proliferated if thiram had not been applied to the seed, but their numbers were deleteriously influenced by thiram. Bdellovibrio, bacteriophages, and lytic micro-organisms acting on R. phaseoli were rare under these conditions. Ciliates and flagellated protozoa were initially suppressed by planting thiram-coated bean seeds in nonsterile soil, but the former were inhibited longer than the latter and the ciliate numbers never fully recovered if the seeds were treated with the fungicide. The resistant strain grew well in sterile soil also inoculated with a protozoa-free mixture of soil microorganisms whether thiram was added or not, but after an initial rise in numbers, its abundance fell if the mixture contained protozoa; the rate of this fall was delayed by the fungicide. The numbers of R. phaseoli were consistently less in sterile soil inoculated with the rhizobium plus a mixture of soil microorganisms containing ciliates and other protozoa than if the inoculum contained other protozoa but no ciliates. These results suggest that a suppression of protozoa, and possibly especially the ciliates, accounts for the

  1. Interference of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) in green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Mirshekari, B; Dabbagh Mohammadi Nasab, A; Biroonara, A

    2006-01-01

    Several species of Amaranthus are known to reduce crop yields and interference with harvest throughout the Iran. In the past few years, the occurrence of some Amaranthus species including of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) increased throughout the East Azerbaijan province in Iran, supplanting all the other Amaranthus species in large areas of the region and causing concern among farmers and researchers. Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the tropical pulse crops, that C4 weeds such as redroot pigweed can cause yield loss in this crop production. In order to determine the critical period of redroot pigweed control in green bean, two experiments were conducted in Islamic Azad University of Tabriz, Iran, at 2004 and 2005. The experimental designs in both year was a randomized complete blocks with three replications. The treatments were weed-infested and weed-free in the same periods. Both year, in weed-infested experiment, redroot pigweed was seeded immediately after green bean planting and removed after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 14 weeks after green bean emergence (WAE). In weed-free experiment, redroot pigweed seeds were transplanted to green bean plots at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 14 WAE. Data were analyzed using the MSTATC software and means were compared using Duncan's Multiple Ranges Test. Regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between green bean yield and duration of redroot pigweed interference using the REG PROCEDURE of SAS. Results indicated that the difference between years with a view to influence on all traits except stem height at the harvesting stage and pod yield at the first and second harvesting time were significant. Also, differences between treatments with a view to influence on all traits were significant. Contemporary growing of pigweed and green bean for early first month and weed interference 10 WAE had not significant effect on green bean above ground biomass. In both years, the highest green bean yield

  2. Thesis Abstract Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines: chemical composition and protein digestibility.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, F R; Silva, M I A; Corrêa, A D

    2016-05-09

    The bean represents the main source of proteins for the low income populations, although the digestibility of those proteins is relatively low. Consequently, the programs of plant genetic breeding have been working on the search for new lines with higher protein levels. Thus, with the purpose of supplying information to the researchers, in this study, 21 bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines were analyzed for the centesimal and mineral composition, protein digestibility, phenolic compounds, and trypsin inhibitor. The entirely randomized experimental design was used with 21 treatments (lines) and three repetitions. All values were within the following ranges: 22.34 to 36.28 g crude protein/100 g dry matter (DM); 7.56 to 20.91 g neutral detergent fiber/100 g DM; 0.53 to 2.55 g fat/100 g DM and 2.97 to 4.87 g ashes/100 g DM. The levels of phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and sulfur, in g/100 g DM, varied from 0.45 to 0.72; 1.51 to 2.48; 0.03 to 0.28; 0.18 to 0.34 and 0.28 to 0.45, respectively. Regarding copper, manganese, zinc and iron, the levels, in mg/kg DM, varied from 11.37 to 17.73; 14.93 to 28.90; 36.67 to 69.90 and 71.37 to 126.90, respectively. The in vitro protein digestibility varied from 18.03 to 48.32%. The levels of phenolic compounds varied from 0.28 to 1.08 mg acid tanic/100 g DM and the one of trypsin inhibitor from 59.93 to 151.07 trypsin inhibited units/mg DM. Among the lines with higher protein contents, "ESAL 569" (beige with brown stripe) presented the largest protein digestibility and considerable levels of minerals. "P-180" (beige with brown stripe) was one of the lines with higher crude protein contents and digestibilities, and also presented high levels for most of the minerals. No relation between protein digestibility and the contents of phenolic compounds or trypsin inhibitor was observed.

  3. Effect of vermicompost on soil fertility and crop productivity--beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Manivannan, S; Balamurugan, M; Parthasarathi, K; Gunasekaran, G; Ranganathan, L S

    2009-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted at Sivapuri, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu to evaluate the efficacy of vermicompost, in comparison to inorganic fertilizers-NPK, on the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the soils--clay loam soil (CLS) and sandy loam soil (SLS) and on the growth, yield and nutrient content of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris. Results showed that the application of vermicompost @ 5 tonnes ha(-1) had enhanced significantly the pore space (1.09 and 1.02 times), water holding capacity (1.1 and 1.3 times), cation exchange capacity (1.2 and 1.2 times). It reduced particles (1.2 and 1.2 times), and bulk density (1.2 and 1.2 times), pH (1 and 1.02 times) and electrical conductivity (1.4 and 1.2 times) and increased organic carbon (37 and 47 times), micro (Ca 3.07 and 1.9 times, Mg 1.6 and 1.6 times, Na 2.4 and 3.8 times, Fe 7 and 7.6 times, Mn 8.2 and 10.6 times, Zn 50 and 52 times and Cu 14 and 22 times) and macro (N 1.6 and 1.7 times, P 1.5 and 1.7 times, K 1.5 and 1.4 times) nutrients and microbial activity (1.4 and 1.5 times) in both soil types, particularly more in CLS. The growth, yield (1.6 times) and quality (protein (1.05 times) and sugar (1.01 times) content in seed) of bean were enhanced in CLS than SLS. On the other hand, the application of inorganic fertilizers @ 20:80:40 kg ha(-1) has resulted in reduced porosity (1.03 and 1.01 times), organic carbon (1.04 and 9.5 times) and microbial activity (1.02 and 1.03 times) in both soil types.

  4. Ferti-irrigational impact of sugar mill effluent on agronomical characteristics of Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) in two seasons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Chopra, A K

    2014-11-01

    Ferti-irrigation response of 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % concentrations of the sugar mill effluent (SME) on French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. Annapurna) in the rainy and summer seasons was investigated. The fertigant concentrations produced significant (P < 0.01) changes in the soil parameters, viz., electrical conductivity (EC), pH, organic carbon (OC), sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), magnesium (Mg(2+)), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), phosphate (PO4 (3-)), sulfate (SO4 (2-)), ferrous (Fe(2+)), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn), in both seasons. The contents of Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn except Cd were found to be below the maximum levels permitted for soils in India. The agronomic performance of P. vulgaris was gradually increased at lower concentrations, i.e., from 5 to 25 %, and decreased at higher concentrations, i.e., from 50 to 100 %, of the SME in both seasons when compared to controls. The accumulations of heavy metals were increased in the soil and P. vulgaris from 5 to 100 % concentrations of the SME in both seasons. The contents of Cu, Mn, and Zn except Cd and Cr were noted under the permissible limit of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO) standards. Most contents of biochemical components like crude proteins, crude fiber, and total carbohydrates were found with 25 % concentration of the SME in both seasons. The contamination factor (Cf) of various metals was in the order of Cd > Cr > Zn > Mn > Cu for soil and Mn > Zn > Cu > Cr > Cd for P. vulgaris in both seasons after fertigation with SME. Therefore, the SME can be used to improve the soil fertility and yield of P. vulgaris after appropriate dilution.

  5. Transcriptome Characterization of Developing Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Pods from Two Genotypes with Contrasting Seed Zinc Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Astudillo-Reyes, Carolina; Fernandez, Andrea C; Cichy, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds are a rich source of dietary zinc, especially for people consuming plant-based diets. Within P. vulgaris there is at least two-fold variation in seed Zn concentration. Genetic studies have revealed seed Zn differences to be controlled by a single gene in two closely related navy bean genotypes, Albion and Voyager. In this study, these two genotypes were grown under controlled fertilization conditions and the Zn concentration of various plant parts was determined. The two genotypes had similar levels of Zn in their leaves and pods but Voyager had 52% more Zn in its seeds than Albion. RNA was sequenced from developing pods of both genotypes. Transcriptome analysis of these genotypes identified 27,198 genes in the developing bean pods, representing 86% of the genes in the P. vulgaris genome (v 1.0 DOE-JGI and USDA-NIFA). Expression was detected in 18,438 genes. A relatively small number of genes (381) were differentially expressed between Albion and Voyager. Differentially expressed genes included three genes potentially involved in Zn transport, including zinc-regulated transporter, iron regulated transporter like (ZIP), zinc-induced facilitator (ZIF) and heavy metal associated (HMA) family genes. In addition 12,118 SNPs were identified between the two genotypes. Of the gene families related to Zn and/or Fe transport, eleven genes were found to contain SNPs between Albion and Voyager.

  6. Effect of cooking on aroma profile of red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and correlation with sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant K; Tripathi, Jyoti; Gupta, Sumit; Variyar, Prasad S

    2017-01-15

    Volatile aroma compounds of three varieties of red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) namely Kashmiri red, Sharmili and Chitra were extracted in raw state using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and cooked state using simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE). During cooking a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the content of several aldehydes, alcohols and terpene hydrocarbons while an increase in content of various sulfurous compounds, terpene alcohols, ketones and pyrazines was noted. Descriptive sensory analysis showed that the maximum intensity of 'kidney bean', 'earthy' and 'smoky' odour was observed in Kashmiri red while Sharmili variety was characterised by 'sulfurous' odour. Correlation of volatile profile data with descriptive sensory analysis and odour activity values clearly established the role of compounds, such as methanethiol, diethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, methional and dimethyl trisulfide, in contributing to 'cooked kidney bean' aroma, while dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethyl sulfone and ethyl methyl sulfone were responsible for 'sulfurous' aroma.

  7. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-08-05

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability.

  8. Photoacoustic study of ethylene emission and respiration rate of carbon dioxide from insulin germinated beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista-Filho, M.; Corrêa, S. F.; da Silva, L. B.; Xavier-Filho, J.; de Oliveira, J. G.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) technique was used to study ethylene and CO2 respiration emission rates from germinating bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) seeds. The concentration of ethylene was measured at 10P(12) and 10P(14) lines of the CO2 laser with the PA cell in the intracavity configuration. On the other hand, the respiration rate of CO2 was deduced (precision 1 ppm) from the concentration data measured by the commercial PA analyser operating in the infrared range. The objective of this study was to obtain better understanding of insulin signalling in the germinating seeds. The experiments were performed with seeds imbibed either in water or in aqueous solution of insulin (0,9 μg.mL-1 H2O).

  9. Isoenzymes of superoxide dismutase in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L. , Pisum sativum L. , and Vigna unguiculata (L. ) Walp

    SciTech Connect

    Becana, M.; Paris, F.J.; Sandalio, L.M.; Del Rio, L.A. Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada )

    1989-08-01

    The activity and isozymic composition of superoxide dismutase were determined in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L., Pisum sativum L., and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. A Mn-SOD was present in Rhizobium and two in Bradyrhizobium and bacteroids. Nodule mitochondria from all three legume species had a single Mn-SOD with similar relative mobility, whereas the cytosol contained several CuZn-SODs: two in Phaseolus and Pisum, and four in Vigna. In the cytoplasm of V. unguiculata nodules, a Fe-containing SOD was also present, with an electrophoretic mobility between those of CuZn- and Mn-SODs, and an estimated molecular weight of 57,000. Total SOD activity of the soluble fraction of host cells, expressed on a nodule fresh weight basis, exceeded markedly that of bacteroids. Likewise, specific SOD activities of free-living bacteria were superior or equal to those of their symbiotic forms. Soluble extracts of bacteria and bacteroids did not show peroxidase activity, but the nodule cell cytoplasm contained diverse peroxidase isozymes which were readily distinguishable from leghemoglobin components by electrophoresis. Data indicated that peroxidases and leghemoglobins did not significantly interfere with SOD localization on gels. Treatment with chloroform-ethanol scarcely affected the isozymic pattern of SODs and peroxidases, and had limited success in the removal of leghemoglobin.

  10. Development of four phylogenetically-arrayed BAC libraries and sequence of the APA locus in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kami, James; Poncet, Valérie; Geffroy, Valérie; Gepts, Paul

    2006-04-01

    The APA family of seed proteins consists of three subfamilies, in evolutionary order of hypothesized appearance: phytohaemagglutinins (PHA), alpha-amylase inhibitors (alphaAI), and arcelins (ARL). The APA family plays a defensive role against mammalian and insect seed predation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The main locus (APA) for this gene family is situated on linkage group B4. In order to elucidate the pattern of duplication and diversification at this locus, we developed a BAC library in each of four different Phaseolus genotypes that represent presumptive steps in the evolutionary diversification of the APA family. Specifically, BAC libraries were established in one P. lunatus (cv. 'Henderson: PHA+ alphaAI- ARL-) and three P. vulgaris accessions (presumed ancestral wild G21245 from northern Peru: PHA+ alphaAI+ ARL-; Mesoamerican wild G02771: PHA+ alphaAI+ ARL+; and Mesoamerican breeding line BAT93: PHA+ alphaAI+ ARL-). The libraries were constructed after HindIII digestion of high molecular weight DNA, obtained with a novel nuclei isolation procedure. The frequency of empty or cpDNA-sequence-containing clones in all libraries is low (generally <1%). The Henderson, G21245, and G02771 libraries have a 10x genome coverage, whereas the BAT93 library has a 20x coverage to allow further, more detailed genomic analysis of the bean genome. The complete sequence of a 155 kbp-insert clone of the G02771 library revealed six sequences belonging to the APA gene family, including members of the three subfamilies, as hypothesized. The different subfamilies were interspersed with retrotransposon sequences. In addition, other sequences were identified with similarity to chloroplast DNA, a dehydrin gene, and the Arabidopsis flowering D locus. Linkage between the dehydrin gene and the D1711 RFLP marker identifies a potential syntenic region between parts of common bean linkage group B4 and cowpea linkage group 2.

  11. Biochemical characterisation of an allantoate-degrading enzyme from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): the requirement of phenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Raso, María José; Muñoz, Alfonso; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2007-10-01

    In tropical legumes like French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) or soybean (Glycine max), most of the atmospheric nitrogen fixed in nodules is used for synthesis of the ureides allantoin and allantoic acid, the major long distance transport forms of organic nitrogen in these species. The purpose of this investigation was to characterise the allantoate degradation step in Phaseolus vulgaris. The degradation of allantoin, allantoate and ureidoglycolate was determined "in vivo" using small pieces of chopped seedlings. With allantoate and ureidoglycolate as substrates, the determination of the reaction products required the addition of phenylhydrazine to the assay mixture. The protein associated with the allantoate degradation has been partially purified 22-fold by ultracentrifugation and batch separation with DEAE-Sephacel. This enzyme was specific for allantoate and could not use ureidoglycolate as substrate. The activity was completely dependent on phenylhydrazine, which acts as an activator at low concentrations and decreases the affinity of the enzyme for the substrate at higher concentrations. The optimal pH for the activity of the purified protein was 7.0 and the optimal temperature was 37 degrees C. The activity was completely inhibited by EDTA and only manganese partially restored the activity. The level of activity was lower in extracts obtained from leaves and fruits of French bean grown with nitrate than in plants actively fixing nitrogen and, therefore, relying on ureides as nitrogen supply. This is the first time that an allantoate-degrading activity has been partially purified and characterised from a plant extract. The allosteric regulation of the enzyme suggests a critical role in the regulation of ureide degradation.

  12. Phaseolus immature embryo rescue technology.

    PubMed

    Geerts, Pascal; Toussaint, André; Mergeai, Guy; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Predominant among the production constraints of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris are infestation of Ascochyta blight, Bean Golden Mosaic virus (BGMV), and Bean Fly. Interbreeding with Phaseolus -coccineus L. and/or Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm has been shown to provide P. vulgaris with greater resistance to these diseases. For interspecific crosses to be successful, it is important to use P. coccineus and P. polyanthus as female parents; this prevents rapid reversal to the recurrent parent P. vulgaris. Although incompatibility barriers are post-zygotic, early hybrid embryo abortion limits the success of F1 crosses. While rescue techniques for globular and early heart-shaped embryos have improved in recent years, -success in hybridization remains very low. In this study, we describe six steps that allowed us to rescue 2-day-old P. vulgaris embryos using a pod culture technique. Our methods consisted of (i) pod culture, (ii) extraction and culture of immature embryos, (iii) dehydration of embryos, (iv) germination of embryos, (v) rooting of developed shoots, and (vi) hardening of plantlets.

  13. Small RNAs Derived from the T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in Hairy Roots of Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Pablo; Hernández-López, Alejandrina; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Sanchez, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes is a pathogenic bacteria that causes hairy root disease by transferring bacterial DNA into the plant genome. It is an essential tool for industry and research due to its capacity to produce genetically modified roots and whole organisms. Here, we identified and characterized small RNAs generated from the transfer DNA (T-DNA) of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Distinct abundant A. rhizogenes T-DNA-derived small RNAs (ArT-sRNAs) belonging to several oncogenes were detected in hairy roots using high-throughput sequencing. The most abundant and diverse species of ArT-sRNAs were those of 21- and 22-nucleotides in length. Many T-DNA encoded genes constituted phasiRNA producing loci (PHAS loci). Interestingly, degradome analysis revealed that ArT-sRNAs potentially target genes of P. vulgaris. In addition, we detected low levels of ArT-sRNAs in the A. rhizogenes-induced calli generated at the wound site before hairy root emergence. These results suggest that RNA silencing targets several genes from T-DNA of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean. Therefore, the role of RNA silencing observed in this study has implications in our understanding and usage of this unique plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:28203245

  14. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue.

  15. The influence of cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on intestinal cell turnover and faecal nitrogen excretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, S J; Gee, J M; Johnson, I T

    1983-05-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed on semi-synthetic diets containing cooked white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) or equivalent levels of protein and carbohydrate. No change was observed in over-all nitrogen balance in animals fed on the bean diet, but there was a two- to three-fold increase in their faecal excretion, compared with control rats. This was compensated by a decrease in urinary-N excretion. Homogenized small intestinal mucosa, prepared from bean-fed animals, showed a 28% increase in protein content compared with control material. Measurements of 3H-labelled thymidine turnover indicated that mucosal cell exfoliation was increased by approximately 35% in the small intestines of bean-fed rats compared with controls. It is concluded that though a diet rich in cooked P. vulgaris leads to some increase in mucosal cell turnover in the small intestine of rats, the consequent increase in mucosal protein loss could not account for the increased faecal-N excretion seen in these animals.

  16. Development of carrier-based formulation of root endophyte Piriformospora indica and its evaluation on Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swati; Das, Aparajita; Chandra, Anil; Varma, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Endophytic fungi are plant beneficial rhizospheric microorganisms often applied as bioinoculants for enhanced and disease-free crop production. The objectives of the present work were to develop a carrier-based formulation of root endophyte Piriformospora indica as a bioinoculant. Powder formulation of four different carrier materials viz., talcum powder, clay, sawdust and bioboost (organic supplement) were evaluated and a talc-based formulation was optimized for a longer shelf life with respect to microbial concentration, storage temperature and biological activity. Finally the effect of optimized talc formulation on plant productivity was determined. The application dosages were optimized by studies on plant growth parameters of Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants under green house conditions. Five percent formulation (w/w) of talcum powder was observed to be the most stable at 30 °C with 10(8) CFU g(-1) and effective for a storage period of 6 months. The application of this optimized formulation resulted in increase of growth parameters of P. vulgaris L. and better adaptation of plants under green house conditions.

  17. Small RNAs Derived from the T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in Hairy Roots of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Pablo; Hernández-López, Alejandrina; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Sanchez, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes is a pathogenic bacteria that causes hairy root disease by transferring bacterial DNA into the plant genome. It is an essential tool for industry and research due to its capacity to produce genetically modified roots and whole organisms. Here, we identified and characterized small RNAs generated from the transfer DNA (T-DNA) of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Distinct abundant A. rhizogenes T-DNA-derived small RNAs (ArT-sRNAs) belonging to several oncogenes were detected in hairy roots using high-throughput sequencing. The most abundant and diverse species of ArT-sRNAs were those of 21- and 22-nucleotides in length. Many T-DNA encoded genes constituted phasiRNA producing loci (PHAS loci). Interestingly, degradome analysis revealed that ArT-sRNAs potentially target genes of P. vulgaris. In addition, we detected low levels of ArT-sRNAs in the A. rhizogenes-induced calli generated at the wound site before hairy root emergence. These results suggest that RNA silencing targets several genes from T-DNA of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean. Therefore, the role of RNA silencing observed in this study has implications in our understanding and usage of this unique plant-bacteria interaction.

  18. Characterization of. alpha. -amylase-inhibitor, a lectin-like protein in the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect {alpha}-amylases but not of plant {alpha}-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it. The primary translation product of {alpha}Al is a polypeptide of M{sub r} 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of M{sub r} 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (M{sub r} 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that {alpha}Al is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles.

  19. Molecular analysis of the parallel domestication of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Mesoamerica and the Andes.

    PubMed

    Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Giardini, Alessandro; Rau, Domenico; Rodriguez, Monica; Biagetti, Eleonora; Santilocchi, Rodolfo; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi; Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the nucleotide diversity of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, which is characterized by two independent domestications in two geographically distinct areas: Mesoamerica and the Andes. This provides an important model, as domestication can be studied as a replicate experiment. We used nucleotide data from five gene fragments characterized by large introns to analyse 214 accessions (102 wild and 112 domesticated). The wild accessions represent a cross-section of the entire geographical distribution of P. vulgaris. A reduction in genetic diversity in both of these gene pools was found, which was three-fold greater in Mesoamerica compared with the Andes. This appears to be a result of a bottleneck that occurred before domestication in the Andes, which strongly impoverished this wild germplasm, leading to the minor effect of the subsequent domestication bottleneck (i.e. sequential bottleneck). These findings show the importance of considering the evolutionary history of crop species as a major factor that influences their current level and structure of genetic diversity. Furthermore, these data highlight a single domestication event within each gene pool. Although the findings should be interpreted with caution, this evidence indicates the Oaxaca valley in Mesoamerica, and southern Bolivia and northern Argentina in South America, as the origins of common bean domestication.

  20. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. Here, we report the transcriptional respo...

  1. A chimera-like alpha-amylase inhibitor suggesting the evolution of Phaseolus vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wato, S; Kamei, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    2000-07-01

    White kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contains two kinds of alpha-amylase inhibitors, one heat-stable (alpha AI-s) and one heat-labile (alpha AI-u). alpha AI-s has recently been revealed to be a tetrameric complex, alpha(2)beta(2), with two active sites [Kasahara et al. (1996) J. Biochem. 120, 177-183]. The present study was undertaken to reveal the molecular features of alpha AI-u, which is composed of three kinds of subunits, alpha, beta, and gamma. The gamma-subunit, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-subunits that are indistinguishable from the alpha- and beta-subunits of alpha AI-s, was found to correspond to a subunit of an alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein, which has been identified as an inactive, evolutionary intermediate between arcelin and the alpha-amylase inhibitor in a P. vulgaris defense protein family. The polypeptide molecular weight of alpha AI-u determined by the light-scattering technique, together with the polypeptide molecular weights of the subunits, suggests that alpha AI-u is a trimeric complex, alpha beta gamma. The inhibition of alpha AI-u by increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) indicates that an inactive 1:1 complex is formed between alpha AI-u and PPA. Molecular weight estimation of the complex by the light-scattering technique confirmed that it is a complex of alpha AI-u with one PPA molecule. Thus it seems probable that alpha AI-u is an evolutionary intermediate of the P. vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor.

  2. Syntenic relationships among legumes revealed using a gene-based genetic linkage map of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    McConnell, Melody; Mamidi, Sujan; Lee, Rian; Chikara, Shireen; Rossi, Monica; Papa, Roberto; McClean, Phillip

    2010-10-01

    Molecular linkage maps are an important tool for gene discovery and cloning, crop improvement, further genetic studies, studies on diversity and evolutionary history, and cross-species comparisons. Linkage maps differ in both the type of marker and type of population used. In this study, gene-based markers were used for mapping in a recombinant inbred (RI) population of Phaseolus vulgaris L. P. vulgaris, common dry bean, is an important food source, economic product, and model organism for the legumes. Gene-based markers were developed that corresponded to genes controlling mutant phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, genes undergoing selection during domestication in maize, and genes that function in a biochemical pathway in A. thaliana. Sequence information, including introns and 3' UTR, was generated for over 550 genes in the two genotypes of P. vulgaris. Over 1,800 single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were found, 300 of which were screened in the RI population. The resulting LOD 2.0 map is 1,545 cM in length and consists of 275 gene-based and previously mapped core markers. An additional 153 markers that mapped at LOD <1.0 were placed in genetic bins. By screening the parents of other mapping populations, it was determined that the markers were useful for other common Mesoamerican × Andean mapping populations. The location of the mapped genes relative to their homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana (At), Medicago truncatula (Mt), and Lotus japonicus (Lj) were determine by using a tblastx analysis with the current psedouchromosome builds for each of the species. While only short blocks of synteny were observed with At, large-scale macrosyntenic blocks were observed with Mt and Lj. By using Mt and Lj as bridging species, the syntenic relationship between the common bean and peanut was inferred.

  3. Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant. PMID:24078924

  4. Light piping driven photosynthesis in the soil: Low-light adapted active photosynthetic apparatus in the under-soil hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Sárvári, Éva; Solti, Ádám; Czégény, Gyula; Hideg, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic activity was identified in the under-soil hypocotyl part of 14-day-old soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Magnum) cultivated in pots under natural light-dark cycles. Electron microscopic, proteomic and fluorescence kinetic and imaging methods were used to study the photosynthetic apparatus and its activity. Under-soil shoots at 0-2cm soil depth featured chloroplasts with low grana and starch grains and with pigment-protein compositions similar to those of the above-soil green shoot parts. However, the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were higher; in addition a PIP-type aquaporin protein was identified in the under-soil thylakoids. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction measurements showed that the above- and under-soil hypocotyl segments had similar photochemical yields at low (10-55μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) light intensities. However, at higher photon flux densities the electron transport rate decreased in the under-soil shoot parts due to inactivation of the PSII reaction centers. These properties show the development of a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus driven by light piping of the above-soil shoot. The results of this paper demonstrate that the classic model assigning source and sink functions to above- and under-soil tissues is to be refined, and a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus in under-soil bean hypocotyls is capable of contributing to its own carbon supply.

  5. Geoperception in primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae). III. A model to explain the differential georesponsiveness of primary and lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. S.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half tip remains. Therefore, tips of lateral and primary roots produce growth effectors capable of inducing gravicurvature. The asymmetrical placement of a tip of a lateral root onto a detipped primary root results in the root bending toward the side of the root onto which the tip was placed. That is, the lesser graviresponsiveness of lateral roots as compared with primary roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth inhibitors. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of primary roots is positively correlated with the presence of columella tissues that are 3.8 times longer, 1.7 times wider, and 10.5 times more voluminous than the columellas of lateral roots. We propose that the lack of graviresponsiveness exhibited by lateral roots is due to the fact that they (i) produce smaller amounts of the inhibitor than primary (i.e., strongly graviresponsive) roots and (ii) are unable to redistribute the inhibitor so as to be able to create a concentration gradient sufficient to induce a pronounced gravitropic response.

  6. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum nodulate common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico: population genetics and biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-02-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed.

  7. Intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements between cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) revealed by BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Emanuelle Varão; de Andrade Fonsêca, Artur Fellipe; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; de Andrade Bortoleti, Kyria Cilene; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; da Costa, Antônio Félix; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana Christina

    2015-06-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is an annual legume grown in tropical and subtropical regions, which is economically relevant due to high protein content in dried beans, green pods, and leaves. In this work, a comparative cytogenetic study between V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) was conducted using BAC-FISH. Sequences previously mapped in P. vulgaris chromosomes (Pv) were used as probes in V. unguiculata chromosomes (Vu), contributing to the analysis of macrosynteny between both legumes. Thirty-seven clones from P. vulgaris 'BAT93' BAC library, corresponding to its 11 linkage groups, were hybridized in situ. Several chromosomal rearrangements were identified, such as translocations (between BACs from Pv1 and Pv8; Pv2 and Pv3; as well as Pv2 and Pv11), duplications (BAC from Pv3), as well as paracentric and pericentric inversions (BACs from Pv3, and Pv4, respectively). Two BACs (from Pv2 and Pv7), which hybridized at terminal regions in almost all P. vulgaris chromosomes, showed single-copy signal in Vu. Additionally, 17 BACs showed no signal in V. unguiculata chromosomes. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of using BAC libraries in comparative chromosomal mapping and karyotype evolution studies between Phaseolus and Vigna species, and revealed several macrosynteny and collinearity breaks among both legumes.

  8. Salinity-Induced Variation in Biochemical Markers Provides Insight into the Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Common (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Runner (P. coccineus) Beans

    PubMed Central

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Morosan, Mihaela; López-Gresa, María del Pilar; Prohens, Jaime; Vicente, Oscar; Boscaiu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of biochemical markers is important for the understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to salinity of Phaseolus beans. We have evaluated several growth parameters in young plants of three Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars subjected to four salinity levels (0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl); one cultivar of P. coccineus, a closely related species reported as more salt tolerant than common bean, was included as external reference. Biochemical parameters evaluated in leaves of young plants included the concentrations of ions (Na+, K+, and Cl−), osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, and total soluble sugars), and individual soluble carbohydrates. Considerable differences were found among cultivars, salinity levels, and in their interaction for most traits. In general, the linear component of the salinity factor for the growth parameters and biochemical markers was the most important. Large differences in the salinity response were found, with P. vulgaris cultivars “The Prince” and “Maxidor” being, respectively, the most susceptible and tolerant ones. Our results support that salt stress tolerance in beans is mostly based on restriction of Na+ (and, to a lesser extent, also of Cl−) transport to shoots, and on the accumulation of myo-inositol for osmotic adjustment. These responses to stress during vegetative growth appear to be more efficient in the tolerant P. vulgaris cultivar “Maxidor”. Proline accumulation is a reliable marker of the level of salt stress affecting Phaseolus plants, but does not seem to be directly related to stress tolerance mechanisms. These results provide useful information on the responses to salinity of Phaseolus. PMID:27657045

  9. Characterization of α-Amylase-Inhibitor, a Lectin-Like Protein in the Seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Joaquin; Altabella, Teresa; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1990-01-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect α-amylases, but not of plant α-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, α-amylase inhibitor (αAl) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Purified αAl can be resolved by SDS-PAGE into five bands (Mr 15,000-19,000), four of which have covalently attached glycans. These bands represent glycoforms of two different polypeptides. All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it (LM Hoffman [1984] J Mol Appl Genet 2: 447-453; J Moreno, MJ Chrispeels [1989] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:7885-7889). The primary translation product of αAl is a polypeptide of Mr 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of Mr 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (Mr 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that αAl is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmlc reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667338

  10. Isolation, characterization and cloning of a cDNA encoding a new antifungal defensin from Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Games, Patrícia D; Dos Santos, Izabela S; Mello, Erica O; Diz, Mariângela S S; Carvalho, André O; de Souza-Filho, Gonçalo A; Da Cunha, Maura; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Ferreira, Beatriz Dos S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2008-12-01

    The PvD1 defensin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, basically as described by Terras et al. [Terras FRG, Schoofs HME, De Bolle MFC, Van Leuven F, Ress SB, Vanderleyden J, Cammue BPA, Broekaer TWF. Analysis of two novel classes of plant antifungal proteins from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds. J Biol Chem 1992;267(22):15301-9], with some modifications. A DEAE-Sepharose, equilibrated with 20mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, was initially utilized for the separation of peptides after ammonium sulfate fractionation. The basic fraction (the non-retained peak) obtained showed the presence of one unique band in SDS-Tricine gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of approximately 6kDa. The purification of this peptide was confirmed after a reverse-phase chromatography in a C2/C18 column by HPLC, where once again only one peak was observed and denominated H1. H1 was submitted to N-terminal sequencing and the comparative analysis in databanks revealed high similarity with sequences of different defensins isolated from other plants species. The N-terminal sequence of the mature defensin isolated was used to produce a degenerated primer. This primer allowed the amplification of the defensin cDNA by RT-PCR from mRNA of P. vulgaris seeds. The sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA, named PVD1, demonstrated 314bp encoding a polypeptide of 47 amino acids. The deduced peptide presented high similarity with plant defensins of Vigna unguiculata (93%), Cicer arietinum (95%) and Pachyrhizus erosus (87%). PvD1 inhibited the growth of the yeasts, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxiannus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvD1 also presented an inhibitory activity against the growth of phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium lateritium and Rizoctonia solani.

  11. Localization of the Bacillus subtilis beta-propeller phytase transcripts in nodulated roots of Phaseolus vulgaris supplied with phytate.

    PubMed

    Maougal, Rim Tinhinen; Bargaz, Adnane; Sahel, Charaf; Amenc, Laurie; Djekoun, Abdelhamid; Plassard, Claude; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2014-04-01

    Soil organic phosphorus (Po) such as phytate, which comprises up to 80 % of total Po, must be hydrolyzed by specific enzymes called phytases to be used by plants. In contrast to plants, bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, have the ability to use phytate as the sole source of P due to the excretion of a beta-propeller phytase (BPP). In order to assess whether the B. subtilis BPP could make P available from phytate for the benefit of a nodulated legume, the P-sensitive recombinant inbred line RIL147 of Phaseolus vulgaris was grown under hydroaeroponic conditions with either 12.5 μM phytate (C₆H₁₈O₂₄P₆) or 75 μmol Pi (K₂HPO₄), and inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 alone, or co-inoculated with both B. subtilis DSM 10 and CIAT899. The in situ RT-PCR of BPP genes displayed the most intense fluorescent BPP signal on root tips. Some BPP signal was found inside the root cortex and the endorhizosphere of the root tip, suggesting endophytic bacteria expressing BPP. However, the co-inoculation with B. subtilis was associated with a decrease in plant P content, nodulation and the subsequent plant growth. Such a competitive effect of B. subtilis on P acquisition from phytate in symbiotic nitrogen fixation might be circumvented if the rate of inoculation were reasoned in order to avoid the inhibition of nodulation by excess B. subtilis proliferation. It is concluded that B. subtilis BPP gene is expressed in P. vulgaris rhizosphere.

  12. Endophytic Bacteria Isolated from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Exhibiting High Variability Showed Antimicrobial Activity and Quorum Sensing Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ralf Bruno Moura; Costa, Leonardo Emanuel de Oliveira; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2015-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria play a key role in the biocontrol of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, genotypic diversity was analyzed via repetitive element PCR (rep-PCR) of endophytic isolates of the phylum Actinobacteria that were previously collected from leaves of cultivars of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Considerable variability was observed, which has not been reported previously for this phylum of endophytic bacteria of the common bean. Furthermore, the ethanol extracts from cultures of various isolates inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria in vitro, especially Gram-positive pathogens. Extracts from cultures of Microbacterium testaceum BAC1065 and BAC1093, which were both isolated from the 'Talismã' cultivar, strongly inhibited most of the pathogenic bacteria tested. Bean endophytic bacteria were also demonstrated to have the potential to inhibit the quorum sensing of Gram-negative bacteria. This mechanism may regulate the production of virulence factors in pathogens. The ability to inhibit quorum sensing has also not been reported previously for endophytic microorganisms of P. vulgaris. Furthermore, M. testaceum with capacity to inhibit quorum sensing appears to be widespread in common bean. The genomic profiles of M. testaceum were also analyzed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and greater differentiation was observed using this method than rep-PCR; in general, no groups were formed based on the cultivar of origin. This study showed for the first time that endophytic bacteria from common bean plants exhibit high variability and may be useful for the development of strategies for the biological control of diseases in this important legume plant.

  13. The capacity of antioxidant protection during modulated ageing of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cotyledons. 1. The antioxidant enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Procházková, D; Wilhelmová, N

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to increase in plant senescence. We investigated the participation of antioxidative enzymes in initiation of cotyledon senescence. Senescence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cotyledons was modulated by UV C irradiation and by the decapitation of plant apices. Senescence was accompanied by a decrease of protein content and by a decrease of photochemical efficiency. A drop in activity of antioxidative enzymes preceded the onset of senescence in control plants. In cotyledons with prolonged life span, the decrease of antioxidant activities and the markers of senescence onset appeared at a similar age as in controls. Thus we presumed that the period from senescence initiation to cotyledon abscission was extended. On the other hand, in UV C irradiated plants we did not observe actual senescence initiation, and antioxidant enzymes although elevated, did not effectively play their role. The decrease of antioxidant enzymes activity and the markers of senescence appeared at a similar age both in control and in decapitated (D) plants, so we can presume that we prolonged mainly the period from senescence onset to cotyledon abscission in D plants. In UV C irradiated plants the antioxidative enzymes were probably destroyed before the process of senescence could begin.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response.

  15. Effect of cooking and germination on phenolic composition and biological properties of dark beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    López, Ana; El-Naggar, Tarek; Dueñas, Montserrat; Ortega, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Hernández, Teresa; Gómez-Serranillos, M Pilar; Palomino, Olga M; Carretero, M Emilia

    2013-05-01

    Legumes are the basés diet in several countries. They hold a high nutritional value, but other properties related to human health are nowadays being studied. The aim of this work was to study the influence of processes (boiling or germination) on the phenolic composition of dark beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. c.v. Tolosana) and their effect on their antioxidant, neuroprotective and anticancer ability. Phenolic composition of raw and processed dark beans was analysed by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by ORAC. Astrocytes cultures (U-373) have been used to test their neuroprotective effect. Anticancer activities were evaluated on three different cell lines (renal adenocarcinoma (TK-10), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and melanoma (UACC-62)) by sulphorhodamine B method. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition have been observed between raw and processed dark beans that influence the antioxidant activity, mainly for germinated samples which show a decrease of antioxidant capacity. Although every assayed extracts decreased reactive oxygen species release and exhibited cytotoxicity activities on cancer cell lines, raw beans proved to be the most active in neuroprotective and antitumoral effects; this sample is especially rich in phenolic compounds, mainly anthocyanins. This study further demonstrated that phenolic composition of dark beans is related with cooking process and so with their neuroprotective and anticancer activity; cooking of dark beans improves their digestion and absorption at intestinal level, while maintaining its protective ability on oxidative process at cellular level.

  16. Transformation of plastids in soil-shaded lowermost hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) during a 60-day cultivation period.

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Solymosi, Katalin; Böddi, Béla

    2017-04-01

    The maintenance but substantial transformation of plastids was found in lowermost hypocotyl segments of soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Magnum) during a 60-day cultivation period. Although the plants were grown under natural light-dark cycles, this hypocotyl segment was under full coverage of the soil in 5-7 cm depth, thus it was never exposed to light. The 4-day-old plants were fully etiolated: amyloplasts, occasionally prolamellar bodies, protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) and protochlorophyll (Pchl) were found in the hypocotyls of these young seedlings. The 633 and 654 nm bands in the 77 K fluorescence emission spectra indicated the presence of Pchlide and Pchl pigments. During aging, both the Pchlide and Pchl contents increased, however, the Pchl to Pchlide ratio gradually increased. In parallel, the contribution of the 654 nm form decreased and in the spectra of the 60-day-old samples, the main band shifted to 631 nm, and a new form appeared with an emission maximum at 641 nm. The photoactivity had been lost; bleaching took place at continuous illumination. The inner membranes of the plastids disappeared, the amount of starch storing amyloplasts decreased. These data may indicate the general importance of plastids for plant cell metabolism, which can be the reason for their maintenance. Also the general heterogeneity of plastid forms can be concluded: in tissues not exposed to light, Pchl accumulating plastids develop and are maintained even for a long period.

  17. The degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors during germination of white kidney beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; Tamminga, S; Leenaars, P P; Schering, J; Ter Maat, D W

    1994-04-01

    White kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cv Processor, contain a relatively high content of phaseolin (storage protein), lectins and a special group of glycoproteins as well as a considerable amount of protein-type trypsin inhibitors. Protein digestion of raw 'Processor' beans in monogastrics, for example pigs, is disturbed by poorly digested, phaseolin lectins, which can bind to carbohydrates in brush border membranes of the small intestinal epithelium, and trypsin inhibitors. The effect of the germination of white kidney beans on lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors was studied in order to achieve a degradation of lectins, phaseolin and trypsin inhibitors and an increase of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein of bean flour. Therefore, whole bean extracts were examined throughout a germination period of up to seven days for their lectin and phaseolin pattern, lectin content, binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes and trypsin inhibitor content. In addition the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin of the protein from flours of (un)germinated white kidney beans was studied. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a degradation of E-lectins and a disappearance of L-lectins and phaseolin during germination. Results indicated a decrease of the lectin content by 85%, a loss of binding capacities of functional lectins towards brush border membranes by 91%, and a decrease of trypsin inhibitors by 76%, in bean flour after germination for seven days. A maximum in in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of protein from bean flour was already established after germination for half a day.

  18. Conidiogenic effects of mannose-binding lectins isolated from cotyledons of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hossein; Leung, David W M; Cole, Anthony L J

    2011-01-01

    Effect of proteinaceous extracts from red kidney bean cotyledons on mycelium of Alternaria alternata growing on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates was investigated. Unexpectedly, conidia formation was induced in response to applied crude extracts. A PDA disc method was developed to quantify conidia formed. A purified fraction retaining conidiation inducing effect (CIE) was obtained following several protein purification procedures including the last step of eluting bound proteins from an Affi-gel blue gel column. Based on MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization) mass spectrometric analysis, a previously identified mannose-binding lectin (MBL) called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3-receptor interacting lectin) was present in this conidiation inducing fraction. The PvFRIL was subsequently purified using a single step mannose-agarose affinity column chromatography. When the lectin was applied exogenously to A. alternata, increased conidiation resulted. The conidia produced in response to the MBL were similar to those induced by other methods and their germ tubes were longer after 12 h growth than those induced under white light. To our knowledge this is the first report of exogenous application of a PvFRIL or another purified protein from a plant inducing conidia formation in a fungus.

  19. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  20. Developing market class specific InDel markers from next generation sequence data in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Samira Mafi; Song, Qijian; Mamidi, Sujan; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lee, Rian; Cregan, Perry; Osorno, Juan M.; McClean, Phillip E.

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequence data provides valuable information and tools for genetic and genomic research and offers new insights useful for marker development. This data is useful for the design of accurate and user-friendly molecular tools. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a diverse crop in which separate domestication events happened in each gene pool followed by race and market class diversification that has resulted in different morphological characteristics in each commercial market class. This has led to essentially independent breeding programs within each market class which in turn has resulted in limited within market class sequence variation. Sequence data from selected genotypes of five bean market classes (pinto, black, navy, and light and dark red kidney) were used to develop InDel-based markers specific to each market class. Design of the InDel markers was conducted through a combination of assembly, alignment and primer design software using 1.6× to 5.1× coverage of Illumina GAII sequence data for each of the selected genotypes. The procedure we developed for primer design is fast, accurate, less error prone, and higher throughput than when they are designed manually. All InDel markers are easy to run and score with no need for PCR optimization. A total of 2687 InDel markers distributed across the genome were developed. To highlight their usefulness, they were employed to construct a phylogenetic tree and a genetic map, showing that InDel markers are reliable, simple, and accurate. PMID:24860578

  1. Novel Rhizobium lineages isolated from root nodules of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Andean and Mesoamerican areas.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Graham, Peter H; Martinez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-09-01

    The taxonomic affiliations of nineteen root-nodule bacteria isolated from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil were investigated by analyses of 16S rRNA and of four protein-coding housekeeping genes. One strain from Mexico could be assigned to Rhizobium etli and two from Brazil to Rhizobium leucaenae, whereas another from Mexico corresponded to a recently described bean-nodulating species-level lineage related to R. etli and Rhizobium phaseoli. Ten strains isolated in Ecuador and Mexico corresponded to three novel Rhizobium lineages that fall into the R. phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade. One of those lineages, with representatives isolated mostly from Ecuador, seems to be dominant in beans from that Andean region. Only one of the Mexican strains clustered within the Rhizobium tropici clade, but as an independent lineage. Interestingly, four strains were affiliated with species within the Rhizobium radiobacter clade. The existence of yet non-described native Rhizobium lineages in both the Andean and Mesoamerican areas is discussed in relation to common-bean diversity and environmental conditions.

  2. Effect of Chitosan on Membrane Permeability of Suspension-Cultured Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Young, David H.; Köhle, Harald; Kauss, Heinrich

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of suspension-cultured Glycine max cv Harosoy 63 cells with soluble chitosan (20-500 micrograms per milliliter) increased membrane permeability as shown by leakage of electrolytes, protein, and UV absorbing material. Severe damage to the cell membrane by chitosan (100 and 500 μg/ml) was also indicated by reduced staining with fluorescein diacetate and the leakage of fluorescein from preloaded cells. Other basic polymers (poly-l-lysine, histone, DEAE-dextran, protamine sulfate, and glycol chitosan) also increased permeability, whereas the basic monomers l-lysine and d-glucosamine, and acidic or neutral polymers were not active. Chitosan-induced leakage was inhibited by divalent cations, the order of effectiveness being Ba2+ > Ca2+ > Sr2+ > Mg2+. Na polygalacturonate and Na poly-l-aspartate also reduced polycation-induced leakage, probably by formation of polycation-polyanion complexes. A chitosan-polygalacturonate complex precipitated on mixing solutions of the two polymers containing approximately equal numbers of galacturonate and glucosamine residues, but not with either polymer in excess. A similar concentration-dependent precipitation of chitosan by Na poly-l-aspartate was found. Leakage from Phaseolus vulgaris cv Grandessa cells was also induced by chitosan, and was inhibited by Ca2+ and Na polygalacturonate. PMID:16662696

  3. Bioremediation model for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils using phytoremediation (using Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and a locally adapted microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Madariaga-Navarrete, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Pastrana, Blanca Rosa; Villagómez-Ibarra, José Roberto; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio Arturo; Perry, Gregory; Islas-Pelcastre, Margarita

    2017-03-03

    The objective of the present study was to examine a biological model under greenhouse conditions for the bioremediation of atrazine contaminated soils. The model consisted in a combination of phytoremediation (using Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and rhizopheric bio-augmentation using native Trichoderma sp., and Rhizobium sp. microorganisms that showed no inhibitory growth at 10,000 mg L(-1) of herbicide concentration. 33.3 mg of atrazine 50 g(-1) of soil of initial concentration was used and an initial inoculation of 1 × 10(9) UFC mL(-1) of Rhizobium sp. and 1 × 10(5) conidia mL(-1) of Trichoderma sp. were set. Four treatments were arranged: Bean + Trichoderma sp. (B+T); Bean + Rhizobium sp. (BR); Bean + Rhizobium sp. + Trichoderma sp. (B+R+T) and Bean (B). 25.51 mg of atrazine 50 g(-1) of soil (76.63%) was removed by the B+T treatment in 40 days (a = 0.050, Tukey). This last indicate that the proposed biological model and methodology developed is useful for atrazine contaminated bioremediation agricultural soils, which can contribute to reduce the effects of agrochemical abuse.

  4. Developing market class specific InDel markers from next generation sequence data in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Samira Mafi; Song, Qijian; Mamidi, Sujan; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lee, Rian; Cregan, Perry; Osorno, Juan M; McClean, Phillip E

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequence data provides valuable information and tools for genetic and genomic research and offers new insights useful for marker development. This data is useful for the design of accurate and user-friendly molecular tools. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a diverse crop in which separate domestication events happened in each gene pool followed by race and market class diversification that has resulted in different morphological characteristics in each commercial market class. This has led to essentially independent breeding programs within each market class which in turn has resulted in limited within market class sequence variation. Sequence data from selected genotypes of five bean market classes (pinto, black, navy, and light and dark red kidney) were used to develop InDel-based markers specific to each market class. Design of the InDel markers was conducted through a combination of assembly, alignment and primer design software using 1.6× to 5.1× coverage of Illumina GAII sequence data for each of the selected genotypes. The procedure we developed for primer design is fast, accurate, less error prone, and higher throughput than when they are designed manually. All InDel markers are easy to run and score with no need for PCR optimization. A total of 2687 InDel markers distributed across the genome were developed. To highlight their usefulness, they were employed to construct a phylogenetic tree and a genetic map, showing that InDel markers are reliable, simple, and accurate.

  5. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid on fresh weight pigment and protein content of bean leaf discs (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Canakçi, S

    2003-01-01

    The effects of 100, 250, and 500 ppm acetylsalicylic acid solutions treatments on weight alteration, pigment and protein amounts in discs from the primary leaves of one month old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings produced tinder greenhouse conditions are presented. The experiments show that: 100 ppm ASA had no significant influence (P > 0.05) but 250 and 500 ppm ASA caused an increase on weight loss (P < 0.01); ASA at higher concentrations (250 and 500 ppm), generally, caused a decrease on pigment amounts (P < 0.05-P < 0.01) but 100 ppm ASA had no considerably significant influence on them (P > 0.05), none of the ASA treatments caused a statistically significant influence on carotenoid amount (P > 0.05); 100 and 250 ppm ASA treatments did not cause a significant influence on protein amount (P > 0.05). however 500 ppm ASA treatment caused an increase on protein injury (P < 0.05). Consequently, it is supposed that wet weight loss, pigment and protein injury have somewhat increased on leaf discs. depending on the toxic effect of high acetylsalicylic acid concentrations.

  6. Differential patterns of arabinosylation by membranes of suspension-cultured cells of Phaseolus vulgaris (French bean) after subculture or elicitation.

    PubMed

    Bolwell, G P

    1984-09-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of Phaseolus vulgaris (French bean) incorporated [1-3H] arabinose in vivo into high-Mr polymers that could be separated into glycoprotein and polysaccharide. Microsomal membranes from suspension-cultured cells of beans incorporated arabinose from UDP-beta-L-arabinose in vitro into both polysaccharide and glycoprotein. The enzyme involved in arabinan synthesis, arabinan synthase, appeared to be immunologically distinct from the protein:arabinosyltransferase system. Both these activities are inducible, but behave differently with either plant-growth-regulator or fungal-elicitor treatments. After subculture of cells entering the stationary growth phase the arabinan synthase activity reaches much higher values than does that of the protein transferase system during the initial period of cell division and growth, whereas after elicitation at the same growth stage, all the increased incorporation of arabinose occurs into glycoprotein of Mr higher than 200 000 and to a greater extent into a specific glycoprotein of Mr 42 500. Preliminary characterization of these glycoproteins prepared under non-reducing conditions and after acid and alkaline hydrolysis suggests that the high-Mr glycoprotein material is similar to arabinogalactan protein, whereas the lower-Mr material may be a hydroxyproline-rich protein existing as a dimer and that specifically increases during the hypersensitive response of the cells to the fungal elicitor from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

  7. Physiological and molecular analysis of the interaction between aluminium toxicity and drought stress in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; Eticha, Dejene; Albacete, Alfonso; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudana; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity and drought are two major factors limiting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in the tropics. Short-term effects of Al toxicity and drought stress on root growth in acid, Al-toxic soil were studied, with special emphasis on Al–drought interaction in the root apex. Root elongation was inhibited by both Al and drought. Combined stresses resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation than either stress alone. This result was different from the alleviation of Al toxicity by osmotic stress (–0.60 MPa polyethylene glycol) in hydroponics. However, drought reduced the impact of Al on the root tip, as indicated by the reduction of Al-induced callose formation and MATE expression. Combined Al and drought stress enhanced up-regulation of ACCO expression and synthesis of zeatin riboside, reduced drought-enhanced abscisic acid (ABA) concentration, and expression of NCED involved in ABA biosynthesis and the transcription factors bZIP and MYB, thus affecting the regulation of ABA-dependent genes (SUS, PvLEA18, KS-DHN, and LTP) in root tips. The results provide circumstantial evidence that in soil, drought alleviates Al injury, but Al renders the root apex more drought-sensitive, particularly by impacting the gene regulatory network involved in ABA signal transduction and cross-talk with other phytohormones necessary for maintaining root growth under drought. PMID:22371077

  8. Evaluation of diversity among common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from two centers of domestication using 'omics' technologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic diversity among wild accessions and cultivars of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) has been characterized using plant morphology, seed protein allozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA, restriction fragment length polymorphisms, DNA sequence analysis, chloroplast DNA, and microsatellite markers. Yet, little is known about whether these traits, which distinguish among genetically distinct types of common bean, can be evaluated using omics technologies. Results Three 'omics' approaches: transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics were used to qualitatively evaluate the diversity of common bean from two Centers of Domestication (COD). All three approaches were able to classify common bean according to their COD using unsupervised analyses; these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that differences exist in gene transcription, protein expression, and synthesis and metabolism of small molecules among common bean cultivars representative of different COD. Metabolomic analyses of multiple cultivars within two common bean gene pools revealed cultivar differences in small molecules that were of sufficient magnitude to allow identification of unique cultivar fingerprints. Conclusions Given the high-throughput and low cost of each of these 'omics' platforms, significant opportunities exist for their use in the rapid identification of traits of agronomic and nutritional importance as well as to characterize genetic diversity. PMID:21126341

  9. Genetic Dissection of ICP-Detected Nutrient Accumulation in the Whole Seed of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew Wohlgemuth; Wu, Xingbo; Bhandari, Devendra; Astudillo, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient transport to grain legume seeds is not well studied and can benefit from modern methods of elemental analysis including spectroscopic techniques. Some cations such as potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) are needed for plant physiological purposes. Meanwhile, some minerals such as copper (Cu), iron (Fe), molybdenum (Mo), and zinc (Zn) are important micronutrients. Phosphorus (P) is rich in legumes, while sulfur (S) concentration is related to essential amino acids. In this research, the goal was to analyze a genetic mapping population of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrophotometry to determine concentrations of and to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 15 elements in ground flour of whole seeds. The population was grown in randomized complete block design experiments that had been used before to analyze Fe and Zn. A total of 21 QTL were identified for nine additional elements, of which four QTL were found for Cu followed by three each for Mg, Mn, and P. Fewer QTL were found for K, Na and S. Boron (B) and calcium (Ca) had only one QTL each. The utility of the QTL for breeding adaptation to element deficient soils and association with previously discovered nutritional loci are discussed. PMID:27014282

  10. Nitric oxide increases tolerance responses to moderate water deficit in leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata bean species.

    PubMed

    Zimmer-Prados, Lucas Martins; Moreira, Ana Sílvia Franco Pinheiro; Magalhaes, Jose Ronaldo; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa

    2014-07-01

    Drought stress is one of the most intensively studied and widespread constraints, and nitric oxide (NO) is a key signaling molecule involved in the mediation of abiotic stresses in plants. We demonstrated that a sprayed solution of NO from donor sodium nitroprusside increased drought stress tolerance responses in both sensitive (Phaseolus vulgaris) and tolerant (Vigna unguiculata) beans. In intact plants subjected to halting irrigation, NO increased the leaf relative water content and stomatal conductance in both species. After cutting leaf discs and washing them, NO induced increased electrolyte leakage, which was more evident in the tolerant species. These leaf discs were then subjected to different water deficits, simulating moderate and severe drought stress conditions through polyethylene glycol solutions. NO supplied at moderate drought stress revealed a reduced membrane injury index in sensitive species. In hydrated discs and at this level of water deficit, NO increased the electron transport rate in both species, and a reduction of these rates was observed at severe stress levels. Taken together, it can be shown that NO has an effective role in ameliorating drought stress effects, activating tolerance responses at moderate water deficit levels and in both bean species which present differential drought tolerance.

  11. Effect of natural and controlled fermentation on chemical composition and nutrient dialyzability from beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Porres, Jesus M; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Urbano, Gloria

    2003-08-13

    The effect of natural and controlled fermentation with an inoculum of Lactobacillus plantarum and additional thermal treatment (dry heat at 120 degrees C for 20 min) on the availability of N, P, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ca, and Mg from Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. carrilla was estimated using an in vitro method based on equilibrium dialysis. Natural and controlled fermentations caused significant reductions in the pH and phytate content (36%) of the bean flours, with a concomitant increase in the titratable acidity and free phosphorus content, and had no effect on the other nutrients studied. The percentage of dialyzable N, P, Cu, and Mg was significantly improved by both types of fermentation, whereas Zn dialyzability was significantly reduced. The greatest reduction was observed for the bean flour fermented with an inoculum of L. plantarum. The percentage of dialyzable Fe improved significantly as a result of natural fermentation but was not affected by controlled fermentation. The application of dry heat at 120 degrees C for 20 min caused a significant increase in Fe dialyzability and a further reduction in the percentage of dialyzable Zn in fermented bean flours but did not affect the dialyzability of the other nutrients studied.

  12. Starch and Sucrose Synthesis in Phaseolus vulgaris as Affected by Light, CO2, and Abscisic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Berry, Joseph A.; Raschke, Klaus

    1985-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. leaves were subjected to various light, CO2, and O2 levels and abscisic acid, then given a 10 minute pulse of 14CO2 followed by a 5 minute chase with unlabeled CO2. After the chase period, very little label remained in the ionic fractions (presumed to be mostly carbon reduction and carbon oxidation cycle intermediates and amino acids) except at low CO2 partial pressure. Most label was found in the neutral, alcohol soluble fraction (presumed sucrose) or in the insoluble fraction digestable by amyloglucosidase. Sucrose formation was linearly related to assimilation rate (slope = 0.35). Starch formation increased linearly with assimilation rate (slope = 0.56) but did not occur if the assimilation rate was below 4 micromoles per square meter per second. Neither abscisic acid, nor high CO2 in combination with low O2 (thought to disrupt control of carbon metabolism) caused significant perturbations of the sucrose/starch formation ratio. These studies indicate that the pathways for starch and sucrose synthesis both are controlled by the rate of net CO2 assimilation, with sucrose the preferred product at very low assimilation rates. PMID:16664108

  13. Structure and Activity Changes of Phytohemagglutinin from Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Affected by Ultrahigh-Pressure Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjun; Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2015-11-04

    Phytohemagglutin (PHA), purified from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) by Affi-Gel blue affinity chromatography, was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) treatment (150, 250, 350, and 450 MPa). The purified PHA lost its hemagglutination activity after 450 MPa treatment and showed less pressure tolerance than crude PHA. However, the saccharide specificity and α-glucosidase inhibition activity of the purified PHA did not change much after UHP treatment. Electrophoresis staining by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) manifested that the glycone structure of purified PHA remained stable even after 450 MPa pressure treatment. However, electrophoresis staining by Coomassie Blue as well as circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) assay proved that the protein unit structure of purified PHA unfolded when treated at 0-250 MPa but reaggregates at 250-450 MPa. Therefore, the hemagglutination activity tends to be affected by the protein unit structure, while the stability of the glycone structure contributed to the remaining α-glucosidase inhibition activity.

  14. The nodule conductance to O₂ diffusion increases with phytase activity in N₂-fixing Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-07-01

    To understand the relationship between phosphorus use efficiency (PUE) and respiration for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in legume nodules, six recombinant inbred lines of common bean (RIL Phaseolus vulgaris L.), contrasting in PUE for SNF, were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and grown under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply (250 versus 75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)). At the flowering stage, the biomass of plants and phytase activity in nodules were analyzed after measuring O2 uptake by nodulated roots. Our results show that the P-deficiency significantly increased the phytase activity in nodules of all RILs though with highest extent for RILs 147, 29 and 83 (ca 45%). This increase in phytase activity was associated with an increase in nodule respiration (ca 22%) and in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (ca 21%). A significant correlation was found under P-deficiency between nodule O2 permeability and phytase activity in nodules for RILs 104, 34 and 115. This observation is to our knowledge the first description of a correlation between O2 permeability and phytase activity of a legume nodule. It is concluded that the variation of phytase activity in nodules can increase the internal utilization of P and might be involved in the regulation of nodule permeability for the respiration linked with SNF and the adaptation to P-deficiency.

  15. Plastic expression of heterochrony quantitative trait loci (hQTLs) for leaf growth in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Libo; Clavijo, Jose A; Sun, Lidan; Zhu, Xuli; Bhakta, Mehul S; Gezan, Salvador A; Carvalho, Melissa; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Wu, Rongling

    2015-08-01

    Heterochrony, that is, evolutionary changes in the relative timing of developmental events and processes, has emerged as a key concept that links evolution and development. Genes associated with heterochrony encode molecular components of developmental timing mechanisms. However, our understanding of how heterochrony genes alter the expression of heterochrony in response to environmental changes remains very limited. We applied functional mapping to find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for growth trajectories of leaf area and leaf mass in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) grown in two contrasting environments. We identified three major QTLs pleiotropically expressed under the two environments. Further characterization of the temporal pattern of these QTLs indicates that they are heterochrony QTLs (hQTLs) in terms of their role in influencing four heterochronic parameters: the timing of the inflection point, the timing of maximum acceleration and deceleration, and the duration of linear growth. The pattern of gene action by the hQTLs on each parameter was unique, being environmentally dependent and varying between two allometrically related leaf growth traits. These results provide new insights into the complexity of genetic mechanisms that control trait formation in plants and provide novel findings that will be of use in studying the evolutionary trends.

  16. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1350-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20502861

  17. MicroRNA expression profile in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under nutrient deficiency stresses and manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Yang, S Samuel; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Graham, Peter H; Reyes, José Luis; Vance, Carroll P; Hernández, Georgina

    2010-08-01

    *MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a pivotal role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in plants. Information on miRNAs in legumes is as yet scarce. This work investigates miRNAs in an agronomically important legume, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). *A hybridization approach employing miRNA macroarrays - printed with oligonucleotides complementary to 68 known miRNAs - was used to detect miRNAs in the leaves, roots and nodules of control and nutrient-stressed (phosphorus, nitrogen, or iron deficiency; acidic pH; and manganese toxicity) common bean plants. *Thirty-three miRNAs were expressed in control plants and another five were only expressed under stress conditions. The miRNA expression ratios (stress:control) were evaluated using principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses. A group of miRNAs responded to nearly all stresses in the three organs analyzed. Other miRNAs showed organ-specific responses. Most of the nodule-responsive miRNAs showed up-regulation. miRNA blot expression analysis confirmed the macroarray results. Novel miRNA target genes were proposed for common bean and the expression of selected targets was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. *In addition to the detection of previously reported stress-responsive miRNAs, we discovered novel common bean stress-responsive miRNAs, for manganese toxicity. Our data provide a foundation for evaluating the individual roles of miRNAs in common bean.

  18. Starch and sucrose synthesis in Phaseolus vulgaris as affected by light, CO/sub 2/, and abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Berry, J.A.; Raschke, K.

    1985-03-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. leaves were subjected to various light, CO/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/ levels and abscisic acid, then given a 10 minute pulse of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ followed by a 5 minute chase with unlabeled CO/sub 2/. After the chase period, very little label remained in the ionic fractions except at low CO/sub 2/ partial pressure. Most label was found in the neutral, alcohol soluble fraction or in the insoluble fraction digestable by amyloglucosidase. Sucrose formation was linearly related to assimilation rate. Starch formation increased linearly with assimilation rate, but did not occur if the assimilation rate was below 4 micromoles per square meter per second. Neither abscisic acid, nor high CO/sub 2/ in combination with low O/sub 2/ caused significant perturbations of the sucrose/starch formation ratio. These studies indicate that the pathways for starch and sucrose synthesis both are controlled by the rate of net CO/sub 2/ assimilation, with sucrose the preferred product at very low assimilation rates.

  19. myo-Inositol synthesis from (1-/sup 3/H)glucose in Phaseolus vulgaris L. during early stages of germination

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Taylor, I.E.P.

    1986-06-01

    Radiolabeled D-(1-/sup 3/H)glucose was fed by imbibition under sterile conditions to bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds. After 72 and 96 hours of feeding, the /sup 3/H was located in uronic acid and pentose residues as well as hexose residues of cell wall polysaccharides in growing hypocotyl and root. Free myo-inositol present in cotyledons, hypocotyl, and root also contained /sup 3/H, showing that de novo synthesis of myo-inositol from (1-/sup 3/H)glucose did occur during the first 72 hours of germination. More than 90% of the labeled, free myo-inositol was present in the cotyledons. The /sup 3/H percentage in trifluoroacetic acid-soluble arabinaose residues of cell wall polysaccharides from 72-hour-old bean hypocotyls was only half of their mole percentage. On the other hand, /sup 3/H percentages in hexose residues were higher than their mole percentages. The results suggest that myo-inositol is synthesized from reserve sugars during the very early stages of germination, and that the newly synthesized myo-inositol, as well as that stored in cotyledons, can be used for the construction of new hypocotyl and root cell wall polysaccharides after conversion into uronic acids and pentoses via the myo-inositol oxidation pathway.

  20. The effect of light on ABA catabolism in excised seedlings of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. top-crop

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, A.K.; Myemane, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Studies on the influence of light quality on ABA catabolism have implicated the involvement of phytochrome in this process. Detailed experiments were therefore carried out to determine whether light could be a factor involved in the regulation of ABA catabolism in higher plants. Excised, etiolated seedlings of Phaseolus vulgaris (4.5g fr. wt.) were supplied with (R,S,)-(2-{sup 14}C)-ABA (5.0 kBq) and exposed to various combinations of red (37 {mu}mol m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) and far-red (23 {mu}mol m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) light. Following light treatments seedlings were returned to darkness for the remainder of the 20 h incubation period. Far-red light illumination stimulated ABA catabolism whereas red light had no significant effect on this process. Kinetic studies and analysis of water-soluble conjugates revealed that far-red light treatment enhanced the sequestration of ABA and its acidic products. The apparent inhibition of ABA catabolism by red light was relieved, if red light irradiation was followed immediately by a dose of far-red light. Thus, these data indicate that ABA catabolism might be mediated by phytochrome and that control is exerted at the level of conjugation rather than oxidation.

  1. Ca sup 2+ transport in membrane vesicles from pinto bean leaves and its alteration after ozone exposure. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.J.; Heath, R.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The influence of ozone on Ca{sup 2+} transport in plant membranes from pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Pinto) leaves was investigated in vitro by means of a filtration method using purified vesicles. Two transport mechanisms located at the plasma membrane are involved in a response to ozone: (a) passive Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell and (b) active Ca{sup 2+} efflux driven by an ATP-dependent system, which has two components: a primary Ca{sup 2+} transport directly linked to ATP which is partially activated by calmodulin and a H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} antiport coupled to activity of a H{sup +}-ATPase. The passive Ca{sup 2+} permeability is increased by ozone. A triangular pulse of ozone stimulates a higher influx of Ca{sup 2+} than does a square wave, even though the total dose with the same (0.6 microliter per liter {times} hour). Leaves exposed to a square wave did not exhibit visible injury and were still able to recover from oxidant stress by activation of calmodulin-dependent Ca{sup 2+} extrusion mechanisms. On the other hand, leaves exposed to a triangular wave of ozone, exhibit visible injury and lost the ability of extruding Ca{sup 2+} out of the cell.

  2. Mild water stress of Phaseolus vulgaris plants leads to reduced starch synthesis and extractable sucrose phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vassey, T.L.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of {minus}1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O{sub 2} in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of {minus}0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO{sub 2} supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O{sub 2} inhibition and abrupt CO{sub 2} saturation of photosynthesis.

  3. Degradation of ureidoglycolate in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is catalysed by a ubiquitous ureidoglycolate urea-lyase.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alfonso; Raso, María José; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2006-06-01

    A ureidoglycolate-degrading activity was analysed in different tissues of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants during development. Activity was detected in all the tissues analysed, although values were very low in seeds before germination and in cotyledons. After radicle emergence, the activity increased due to high activity present in the axes. The highest levels of specific activity were found in developing fruits, from which the enzyme was purified and characterised. This is the first ureidoglycolate-degrading activity that has been purified to homogeneity from a ureide legume. The enzyme was purified 280 fold, and the specific activity for the pure enzyme was 4.4 units mg(-1), which corresponds to a turnover number of 1,055 min(-1). The native enzyme has a molecular mass of 240 kDa and consists of six identical or similar-sized subunits each of 38 kDa. The activity of the purified enzyme was completely dependent on manganese and asparagine. The enzyme exhibited hyperbolic, Michaelian kinetics for ureidoglycolate with a K(m) value of 3.9 mM. This enzyme has been characterised as a ureidoglycolate urea-lyase (EC 4.3.2.3).

  4. Developmental effects on ureide levels are mediated by tissue-specific regulation of allantoinase in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Leal, Juan Luis; Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Fernández, Javier; Pineda, Manuel; Alamillo, Josefa M

    2012-06-01

    The ureides allantoin and allantoate are key molecules in the transport and storage of nitrogen in ureide legumes. In shoots and leaves from Phaseolus vulgaris plants using symbiotically fixed nitrogen as the sole nitrogen source, ureide levels were roughly equivalent to those of nitrate-supported plants during the whole vegetative stage, but they exhibited a sudden increase at the onset of flowering. This rise in the level of ureides, mainly in the form of allantoate, was accompanied by increases in allantoinase gene expression and enzyme activity, consistent with developmental regulation of ureide levels mainly through the tissue-specific induction of allantoate synthesis catalysed by allantoinase. Moreover, surprisingly high levels of ureides were also found in non-nodulated plants fertilized with nitrate, at both early and late developmental stages. The results suggest that remobilized N from lower leaves is probably involved in the sharp rise in ureides in shoots and leaves during early pod filling in N(2)-fixing plants and in the significant amounts of ureides observed in non-nodulated plants.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of a Phaseolus vulgaris Trypsin Inhibitor with Antiproliferative Activity on Leukemia and Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Liu, Qin; Cui, Yajuan; Li, Dong; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2017-01-23

    A 17.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. "gold bean" with an isolation protocol including ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose (Diethylaminoethyl-cellulose), affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-sepharose (Sulfopropyl-sepharose), and gel filtration by FPLC (Fast protein liquid chromatography) on Superdex 75. It dose-dependently inhibited trypsin with an IC50 value of 0.4 μM, and this activity was reduced in the presence of dithiothreitol in a dose- and time-dependent manner, signifying the importance of the disulfide linkage to the activity. It inhibited [methyl-³H] thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells and lymphoma MBL2 cells with an IC50 value of 2.3 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. The inhibitor had no effect on fungal growth and the activities of various viral enzymes when tested up to 100 μM.

  6. A Glucosamine-Specific Lectin from Green Dragon No. 8 Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Induced Apoptosis on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    A lectin exhibiting antiproliferative activity on tumor cell lines but devoid of antifungal activity has been purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Green Dragon no. 8 seeds. The lectin was a 60 kDa dimeric protein with two 30 kDa subunits. It was a glucosamine-specific lectin as implied from the inhibitory effect of glucosamine on hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The steps for isolation of the lectin involved Affi-gel blue gel (affinity gel), Mono Q (anion exchanger), and Superdex 75 column (size exclusion). The lectin was purified 20.8-fold from the crude extract of the beans. The purified lectin showed antiproliferative activity on breast cancer MCF7 cell line and nasopharyngeal cancer HONE1 and CNE2 cell lines, but a low activity on normal skin fibroblast HSF98 cell line. The lectin was shown to induce apoptosis on HONE1 cells, as indicated by increased phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization. It also blocked HONE1 cell division and kept the cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

  7. Isolation and characterization of an antifungal peptide with antiproliferative activity from seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Spotted Bean'.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2007-02-01

    A 7.3-kDa antifungal peptide with an N-terminal sequence exhibiting remarkable homology to defensins from other leguminous plants was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Spotted Bean'. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on O-diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. It exerted an antifungal action on Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It inhibited mycelial growth in F. oxysporum with an IC(50) value of 1.8 microM. It suppressed [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells and MBL2 cells with an IC(50) value of 4.0 and 9.0 microM, respectively. There was no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity when the peptide was tested up to 0.1 mM.

  8. Reverse micellar extraction of lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): optimisation of extraction conditions by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    He, Shudong; Shi, John; Walid, Elfalleh; Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Ying; Xue, Sophia Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lectin from black turtle bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was extracted and purified by reverse micellar extraction (RME) method. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the processing parameters for both forward and backward extraction. Hemagglutinating activity analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and FTIR techniques were used to characterise the lectin. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as 77.59 mM NaCl, pH 5.65, AOT 127.44 mM sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) for the forward extraction; and 592.97 mM KCl, pH 8.01 for the backward extraction. The yield was 63.21 ± 2.35 mg protein/g bean meal with a purification factor of 8.81 ± 0.17. The efficiency of RME was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. FTIR analysis indicated there were no significant changes in the secondary protein structure. Comparison with conventional chromatographic method confirmed that the RME method could be used for the purification of lectin from the crude extract.

  9. Classification of Austrian rhizobia and the Mexican isolate FL27 obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris L. as Rhizobium gallicum.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, A; Ramírez-Saad, H; Hardarson, G; Akkermans, A D; de Vos, W M

    1997-10-01

    The phylogenetic positions of four rhizobial strains obtained from nodules of common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in an Austrian soil and of the Mexican bean isolate FL27 are described. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes revealed sequences almost identical to that of the Rhizobium gallicum type strain, R602sp, with a maximum of two nucleotide substitutions. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences with those from other bacteria indicated highest similarity to Rhizobium sp. strain OK-50, Rhizobium leguminosarum IAM 12609, and Rhizobium etli. DNA homology determined by DNA-DNA hybridization was high among the Austrian isolates and R602spT (45 to 90%) and ranged from 21 to 65% with FL27, but hybridization analysis revealed very low homology to the recognized common bean-nodulating species, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, R. etli, and Rhizobium tropici. Ribosomal gene organization was studied by Southern hybridization with the 16S rRNA gene and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, indicating identical organizations and the presence of three identical 16S rRNA copies in the genome of this species. The six strains investigated showed different plasmid profiles based on their geographical origins. We propose that the Austrian isolates and the Mexican strain FL27 are members of the species R. gallicum.

  10. Characterization of Rhizobia from Ineffective Alfalfa Nodules: Ability to Nodulate Bean Plants [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) Savi.] †

    PubMed Central

    Eardly, Bertrand D.; Hannaway, David B.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    1985-01-01

    This study was initiated to characterize Rhizobium isolates obtained from root nodules of ineffectively nodulated, field-grown alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants. The purpose was to determine if these isolates possessed characteristics which would explain either their ineffectiveness in N2 fixation or their apparent ability to tolerate the moderately acid soil conditions from which they originated. Isolates were characterized by analysis of growth rate, 39°C tolerance, acid production on conventional media, and symbiotic performance. All isolates were ineffective in N2 fixation on alfalfa, and they contained one or more anomalous characteristics. These included either slow growth rate, lack of 39°C tolerance, or lack of acid production on conventional media. Infectiveness tests on a broad range of legumes revealed that the isolates formed root nodules on M. sativa, Medicago lupulina L., and Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) Savi. (common bean). These results provide evidence that, in some situations, ineffective nodulation of M. sativa in the field may be due to the presence of promiscuous, native Rhizobium species. PMID:16346942

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis of development of basal roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Basu, Paramita; Pal, Anupam

    2011-07-01

    Temporal development of roots is key to the understanding of root system architecture of plants which influences nutrient uptake, anchorage and plant competition. Using time lapse imaging we analyzed developmental patterns of length, growth angle, depth and curvature of Phaseolus basal roots from emergence till 48 h in two genotypes, B98311 and TLP19 with contrasting growth angles. In both genotypes all basal roots appeared almost simultaneously, but their growth rates varied which accounted for differences in root length. The growth angles of the basal roots fluctuated rapidly during initial development due to oscillatory root growth causing local bends. Beyond 24 h, as the root curvature stabilized, so did the growth angle. Therefore growth angle of basal roots is not a very reliable quantity for characterizing root architecture, especially during early seedling development. Comparatively, tip depth is a more robust measure of vertical distribution of the basal roots even during early seedling development.

  12. Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing species isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to effectively nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar-Salazar, Corelly; Méndez, Rafael Díaz; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hirsch, Ann M; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina

    2013-12-01

    During a survey of Burkholderia species with potential use in agrobiotechnology, a group of 12 strains was isolated from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of tomato plants growing in Mexico (Nepantla, Mexico State). A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains are related to Burkholderia kururiensis and Burkholderia mimosarum (97.4 and 97.1 %, respectively). However, they induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on polyphasic taxonomy, the group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov. is proposed. The type species is TNe-841(T) (= LMG 26416(T) = CIP 110324(T)).

  13. Expression and validation of PvPGIP genes for resistance to white mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, R C C; Lima, T F C; Fernandes-Brum, C N; Chalfun-Junior, A; Santos, J B

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs), produced by plants, and endopolygalacturonases (PGs), produced by fungi, limits the destructive potential of PGs and can trigger plant defense responses. This study aimed to i) investigate variation in the expression of different common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes and its relationship with resistance to white mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum); ii) determine the expression levels of PvPGIP genes at different time points after inoculation with white mold; and iii) investigate differences in PvPGIP gene expression between two white mold isolates with different levels of aggressiveness. Four bean lines were analyzed, including two lines from a recurrent selection for white mold (50/5 and 84/6), one resistant line that was not adapted to Brazilian conditions (Cornell 605), and one susceptible line (Corujinha). Gene expression was investigated at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 5 days after inoculation. The isolate UFLA 03 caused no significant difference in the relative expression of any gene examined, and was inefficient in discriminating among the genotypes. For the isolate UFLA 116, all of the genes were differentially expressed, as they were associated with resistance to white mold, and the expressions increased until the third day after inoculation. The 50/5 line was not significantly different from the Corujinha line for all of the genes analyzed. However, this line had a resistance level that was similar to that of Cornell 605, according to the straw test. Therefore, the incorporation of PvPGIP genes can increase the resistance of lines derived from recurrent selection.

  14. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum Nodulate Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a Traditionally Managed Milpa Plot in Mexico: Population Genetics and Biogeographic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-01-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed. PMID:12571008

  15. Triple-Layer Plastic Bags Protect Dry Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Against Damage by Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) During Storage.

    PubMed

    Mutungi, C; Affognon, H D; Njoroge, A W; Manono, J; Baributsa, D; Murdock, L L

    2015-10-01

    Fumigated dry common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that were artificially infested with Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, and others that were not artificially infested, were stored in hermetic triple-layer PICS (Lela Agro, Kano, Nigeria) or woven polypropylene (PP) bags for 6 mo at ambient laboratory temperature conditions of 22.6 ± 1.9°C and 60.1 ± 4.3% relative humidity. In an additional trial, beans contained in PP bags were treated with Actellic Super dust before introducing A. obtectus. Moisture content, number of live adult A. obtectus, seed damage, weight loss, and seed germination were determined at monthly intervals. At 6 mo, beans stored in PICS bags retained higher moisture than those stored in PP bags, but in all treatments the moisture level remained below that recommended for safe storage of beans. In the PICS bags, proliferation of A. obtectus did not proceed and at 6 mo, beans stored in these bags did not have insect-inflicted seed damage or weight loss. In contrast, seed damage and weight loss in PP bags exceeded economic threshold after 1 mo in the absence of Actellic Super dust (Syngenta Crop protection AG, Basle, Switzerland), and after 2 mo in the presence of it. Germination of beans stored in PP bags decreased greatly whereas the beans stored in PICS bags did not show reduced germination. Chemical free storage of common beans in PICS bags protects them against damage by A. obtectus.

  16. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines. PMID:28076395

  17. Effect of White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Beldia) on Small Intestine Morphology and Function in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; Bergaoui, Nacef; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Trabelsi, Najoua; Zekri, Sami; Guémira, Fathi; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of raw or undercooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) causes functional and morphological derangement in various tissues. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the gavage effects of a raw Beldia bean variety that is widely consumed in Tunisia, on the small intestine morphology and jejunal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose in Wistar rats. Twenty young male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats. The first group served as the control and was gavaged with 300 mg of a rodent pellet flour suspension (RPFS), whereas the second experimental group was challenged with 300 mg of a Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS) for 10 days. Histological studies were performed using light and electron microcopy. The intestinal transport of water, sodium, potassium, and glucose was studied by perfusing the jejunal loops of the small bowels in vivo. The feeding experiments indicated that BBFS did not affect weight gain. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the villus heights, crypt depths, and crypt/villus ratios in the jejunum and ileum were greater in the BBFS-fed rats than controls. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the rats exposed to RPFS exhibited intact intestinal tracts; however, the BBFS-treated rats demonstrated intestinal alterations characterized by abnormal microvillus architectures, with short and dense or long and slender features, in addition to the sparse presence of vesicles near the brush border membrane. BBFS administration did not significantly affect glucose absorption. However, significant decreases were observed in water and electrolyte absorption compared with the uptake of the controls. In conclusion, raw Beldia beans distorted jejunum morphology and disturbed hydroelectrolytic flux.

  18. Structures of sugar chains of the subunits of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Funaoka, H; Iwamoto, H

    1992-03-01

    The structures of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the subunits of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from the white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were determined. Glycopeptides obtained from each subunit were treated with hydrazine, then N-acetylated. The oligosaccharides thus liberated were labeled with 2-aminopyridine at their reducing ends and purified by gel-permeation, reverse-phase, and size-fractionation HPLC. The structures of seven oligosaccharides from the alpha-subunit and eight oligosaccharides from the beta-subunit were determined by a combination of composition and molecular size analyses, exo- and endoglycosidase digestions, partial acetolysis, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The major glycan chains in the alpha-subunit were Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-3)Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-3)-Man beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc and (Man alpha 1-2)Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-3)Man alpha 1-6 (Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-3)Man beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc, while a glycan chain Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-3)(Xyl beta 1-2)Man beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc comprised more than 70% of the sugar moiety of the beta-subunit.

  19. Conformational study of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) by tryptophan fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Tang, Chuan-He; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wen, Qi-Biao

    2011-01-12

    Fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to study changes in the conformation of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) under various environmental conditions. The possible relationship between fluorescence data and DSC characteristics was also discussed. Tryptophan fluorescence and fluorescence quenching analyses indicated that the tryptophan residues in KPI, exhibiting multiple fluorophores with different accessibilities to acrylamide, are largely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein matrix, with positively charged side chains close to at least some of the tryptophan residues. GdnHCl was more effective than urea and SDS in denaturing KPI. SDS and urea caused variable red shifts, 2-5 nm, in the emission λ(max), suggesting the conformational compactness of KPI. The result was further supported by DSC characteristics that a discernible endothermic peak was still detected up to 8 M urea or 30 mM SDS, also evidenced by the absence of any shift in emission maximum (λ(max)) at different pH conditions. Marked decreases in T(d) and enthalpy (ΔH) were observed at extreme alkaline and/or acidic pH, whereas the presence of NaCl resulted in higher T(d) and ΔH, along with greater cooperativity of the transition. Decreases in T(d) and ΔH were observed in the presence of protein perturbants, for example, SDS and urea, indicating partial denaturation and decrease in thermal stability. Dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide have a slight effect on the thermal properties of KPI. Interestingly, a close linear relationship between the T(d) (or ΔH) and the λ(max) was observed for KPI in the presence of 0-6 M urea.

  20. Suppressive potential of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) flour against five species of stored-product mites (Acari: Acarididae).

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jan; Stejskal, Václav; Aspaly, Gamila; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that legume proteins have insecticidal activity against stored-product pests, but activity against stored-product mites has not been tested. A study was therefore conducted to explore the potential of bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., flour as novel botanical acaricide against five species of storage and dust mites: Acarus siro L., Aleuroglyphus ovatus (Troupeau), Caloglyphus redickorzevi (Zachvatkin), Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank), and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank). The effect of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., grain enriched with bean flour to eight concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10%) on population growth initiating from the density of 50 mites per 100 g of wheat was recorded for 21 d under laboratory conditions (grain moisture 14.6% moisture content and 25 degree C in darkness). The enrichment of grain with bean flour suppressed the population growth of all tested species: 0.01% concentration reduced population growth of all tested species to >50% in comparison with the control population. The most sensitive species were A. siro and L. destructor, followed by T. putrescentiae and C. redickorzevi. The least sensitive species was A. ovatus. The terminal (i.e., after 21 d) density of mites positively correlated with bean flour concentration. The suppressive effect of bean flour was not linear but rather asymptotic. The results of this study are discussed in the context of the application of bean flour in integrated control of stored-product mites and the elimination of stored-product mite allergens.

  1. Damaged-self recognition in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shows taxonomic specificity and triggers signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS)

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Flores, Dalia; Heil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Plants require reliable mechanisms to detect injury. Danger signals or “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs) are released from stressed host cells and allow injury detection independently of enemy-derived molecules. We studied the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to the application of leaf homogenate as a source of DAMPs and measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an early response and the secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN) as a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent late response. We observed a strong taxonomic signal in the response to different leaf homogenates. ROS formation and EFN secretion were highly correlated and responded most strongly to leaf homogenates produced using the same cultivar or closely related accessions, less to a distantly related cultivar of common bean or each of the two congeneric species, P. lunatus and P. coccineus, and not at all to homogenates prepared from species in different genera, not even when using other Fabaceae. Interestingly, leaf homogenates also reduced the infection by the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, when they were applied directly before challenging, although the same homogenates exhibited no direct in vitro inhibitory effect in the bacterium. We conclude that ROS signaling is associated to the induction of EFN secretion and that the specific blend of DAMPs that are released from damaged cells allows the plant to distinguish the “damaged-self” from the damaged “non-self.” The very early responses of plants to DAMPs can trigger resistance to both, herbivores and pathogens, which should be adaptive because injury facilitates infection, independently of its causal reason. PMID:25400650

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gomes, Kleber Alves; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2016-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the world’s most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola) are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL) controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will contribute to more

  3. Proteomic changes in the roots of germinating Phaseolus vulgaris seeds in response to chilling stress and post-stress recovery.

    PubMed

    Badowiec, Anna; Weidner, Stanisław

    2014-03-15

    Plants respond to different environmental cues in a complex way, entailing changes at the cellular and physiological levels. An important step to understand the molecular foundation of stress response in plants is the analysis of stress-responsive proteins. In this work we attempted to investigate and compare changes in the abundance of proteins in the roots of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germinating under long continuous chilling conditions (10°C, 16 days), exposed to short rapid chilling during germination (10°C, 24h), as well as subjected to recovery from stress (25°C, 24h). The results we obtained indicate that germination under continuous chilling causes alterations in the accumulation of the proteins involved in stress response, energy production, translation, vesicle transport, secondary metabolism and protein degradation. The subsequent recovery influences the accumulation of the proteins implicated in calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways, secondary metabolism and those promoting cell division and expansion. Subjecting the germinating bean seeds to short rapid chilling stress resulted in a transient changes in the relative content of the proteins taking part in energy production, DNA repair, RNA processing and translation. Short stress triggers also the mechanisms of protection against oxidative stress and promotes expression of anti-stress proteins. Subjecting bean seeds to the subsequent recovery influences the abundance of the proteins involved in energy metabolism, protection against stress and production of phytohormones. The exposure to long and short chilling did not result in the alterations of any proteins common to both treatments. The same situation was observed with respect to the recovery after stresses. Bean response to chilling is therefore strongly correlated with the manner and length of exposure to low temperature, which causes divergent proteomic alterations in the roots.

  4. Synthesis of Lectin-Like Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Normal and Phytohemagglutinin-Deficient Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Alessandro; Zoppè, Monica; Fabbrini, M. Serena; Genga, Annamaria; Rivas, Liliana; Bollini, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    The genome of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris contains a small gene family that encodes lectin and lectin-like proteins (phytohemagglutinin, arcelin, and others). One of these phytohemagglutinin-like genes was cloned by L. M. Hoffman et al. ([1982] Nucleic Acids Res 10: 7819-7828), but its product in bean cells has never been identified. We identified the product of this gene, referred to as lectin-like protein (LLP), as an abundant polypeptide synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of developing bean cotyledons. The gene product was first identified in extracts of Xenopus oocytes injected with either cotyledonary bean RNA or LLP-mRNA obtained by hybrid-selection with an LLP cDNA clone. A tryptic map of this protein was identical with a tryptic map of a polypeptide with the same SDS-PAGE mobility detectable in the ER of bean cotyledons pulse-labeled with either [3H]glucosamine or [3H]amino acids, both in a normal and in a phytohemagglutinin-deficient cultivar (cultivars Greensleeves and Pinto UI 111). Greensleeves LLP has Mr 40,000 and most probably has four asparagine-linked glycans. Pinto UI 111 LLP has Mr 38,500. Unlike phytohemagglutinin which is a tetramer, LLP appears to be a monomer by gel filtration analysis. Incorporation of [3H]amino acids indicates that synthesis of LLP accounts for about 3% of the proteins synthesized on the ER, a level similar to that of phytohemagglutinin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16666845

  5. A phytase gene is overexpressed in root nodules cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris-rhizobia symbiosis under phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara; Amenc, Laurie; Ounane, Ghania; Abadie, Josiane; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for rhizobial symbioses to convert N2 into NH4 usable for N nutrition in legumes and N cycle in ecosystems. This N2 fixation process occurs in nodules with a high energy cost. Phytate is the major storage form of P and accounts for more than 50 % of the total P in seeds of cereals and legumes. The phytases, a group of enzymes widely distributed in plant and microorganisms, are able to hydrolyze a variety of inositol phosphates. Recently, phytase activity was discovered in nodules. However, the gene expression localization and its role in N2-fixing nodules are still unknown. In this work, two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), selected as contrasting for N2 fixation under P deficiency, namely RILs 115 (P-efficient) and 147 (P-inefficient) were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899, and grown under hydroaeroponic conditions with sufficient versus deficient P supply. With in situ RT-PCR methodology, we found that phytase transcripts were particularly abundant in the nodule cortex and infected zone of both RILs. Under P deficiency, phytase transcripts were significantly more abundant for RIL115 than for RIL147, and more in the outer cortex than in the infected zone. Additionally, the high expression of phytase among nodule tissues for the P-deficient RIL115 was associated with an increase in phytase (33 %) and phosphatase (49 %) activities and efficiency in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (34 %). It is argued that phytase activity in nodules would contribute to the adaptation of the rhizobia-legume symbiosis to low-P environments.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gomes, Kleber Alves; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2016-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the world's most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola) are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL) controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will contribute to more

  7. Discrimination against 15N among recombinant inbred lines of Phaseolus vulgaris L. contrasting in phosphorus use efficiency for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Bargaz, Adnane; Carlsson, Georg; Ounane, Sidi Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-02-15

    Although isotopic discrimination processes during nitrogen (N) transformations influence the outcome of (15)N based quantification of N2 fixation in legumes, little attention has been given to the effects of genotypic variability and environmental constraints such as phosphorus (P) deficiency, on discrimination against (15)N during N2 fixation. In this study, six Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RILs), i.e. RILs 115, 104, 34 (P deficiency tolerant) and 147, 83, 70 (P deficiency sensitive), were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and hydroaeroponically grown with P-sufficient (250 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) versus P-deficient (75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) supply. Two harvests were done at 15 (before nodule functioning) and 42 (flowering stage) days after transplanting. Nodulation, plant biomass, P and N contents, and the ratios of (15)N over total N content ((15)N/Nt) for shoots, roots and nodules were determined. The results showed lower (15)N/Nt in shoots than in roots, both being much lower than in nodules. P deficiency caused a larger decrease in (15)N/Nt in shoots (-0.18%) than in nodules (-0.11%) for all of the genotypes, and the decrease in shoots was greatest for RILs 34 (-0.33%) and 104 (-0.25%). Nodule (15)N/Nt was significantly related to both the quantity of N2 fixed (R(2)=0.96***) and the P content of nodules (R(2)=0.66*). We conclude that the discrimination against (15)N in the legume N2-fixing symbiosis of common bean with R. tropici CIAT899 is affected by P nutrition and plant genotype, and that the (15)N/Nt in nodules may be used to screen for genotypic variation in P use efficiency for N2 fixation.

  8. Occurrence of polyamines in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Miguel; Cobos-Porras, Libertad; Hidalgo-Castellanos, Javier; Lluch, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds that have been shown to be an important part of plant responses to salt stress. For that reason in this work we have investigated the involvement of PAs in the response to salt stress in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici. The level and variety of PAs was higher in nodules, compared to leaves and roots, and in addition to the common PAs (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) we found homospermidine (Homspd) as the most abundant polyamine in nodules. UPLC-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of 4-aminobutylcadaverine (4-ABcad), only described in nodules of Vigna angularis before. Indeed, the analysis of different nodular fractions revealed higher level of 4-ABcad, as well as Homspd, in bacteroids which indicate the production of these PAs by the bacteria in symbiosis. The genes involved in PAs biosynthesis in nodules displayed an induction under salt stress conditions which was not consistent with the decline of free PAs levels, probably due to the nitrogen limitations provoked by the nitrogenase activity depletion and/or the conversion of free PAs to theirs soluble conjugated forms, that seems to be one of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of PAs levels. On the contrary, cadaverine (Cad) and 4-ABcad concentrations augmented by the salinity, which might be due to their involvement in the response of bacteroids to hyper-osmotic conditions. In conclusion, the results shown in this work suggest the alteration of the bacteroidal metabolism towards the production of uncommon PAs such as 4-ABcad in the response to salt stress in legume root nodules.

  9. ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dimkpa, Christian O; Hansen, Trevor; Stewart, Jacob; McLean, Joan E; Britt, David W; Anderson, Anne J

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated into commercial products are reactive on plants. Here, the influence of a root-associated bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6) on the responses of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to commercial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was examined. ZnO NPs (250-1000 mg Zn/kg) significantly (p = 0.05) impacted root elongation after 7 days; only at 1000 mg/kg was shoot growth significantly inhibited. Zn solubilized from ZnO NPs correlated with root growth inhibition (r(2 )= 0.8709); solubility of Fe (r(2 )= 0.916) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.997), and shoot accumulation of Zn (r(2 )= 0.9095), Fe (r(2 )= 0.9422) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.789). Root ferric reductase activity diminished 31% in NP-exposed plants. Amendments with Zn ions at 6 mg/kg, corresponding to Zn solubilized from the NPs, did not replicate the responses, suggesting a nano-specific contribution of the ZnO. Neither NPs (500 mg Zn/kg) nor Zn ions affected root colonization by PcO6. Siderophore production by PcO6 increased 17% by exposure to NPs and 11% with Zn ions (18 mg/kg). PcO6 restored plant ferric reduction under NP exposure, but decreased uptake of Zn and Fe, 58 and 18%, respectively, suggesting soil bacteria could reduce plant accumulation of metals under toxic exposure levels, while negatively affecting uptake of essential elements. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that growth and balance of essential metals in bean exposed to ZnO NPs were influenced by the NPs and bacterial colonization of NP-exposed roots, indicating subtle effects of NPs in plant nutrition.

  10. Race structure within the Mesoamerican gene pool of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as determined by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Díaz, L M; Blair, M W

    2006-12-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars are distinguished morphologically, agronomically and ecologically into specific races within each of the two gene pools found for the species (Andean and Mesoamerican). The objective of this study was to describe the race structure of the Mesoamerican gene pool using microsatellite markers. A total of 60 genotypes previously described as pertaining to specific Mesoamerican races as well as two Andean control genotypes were analyzed with 52 markers. A total of 267 bands were generated with an average of 5.1 alleles per marker and 0.297 heterozygosity across all microsatellites. Correspondence analysis identified two major groups equivalent to the Mesoamerica race and a group containing both Durango and Jalisco race genotypes. Two outlying individuals were classified as potentially of the Guatemala race although this race does not have a defined structure and previously classified members of this race were classified with other races. Population structure analysis with K = 1-4 agreed with this classification. The genetic diversity based on Nei's index for the entire set of genotypes was 0.468 while this was highest for the Durango-Jalisco group (0.414), intermediate for race Mesoamerica (0.340) and low for race Guatemala (0.262). Genetic differentiation (G (ST)) between the Mesoamerican races was 0.27 while genetic distance and identity showed race Durango and Jalisco individuals to be closely related with high gene flow (N (m)) both between these two races (1.67) and between races Durango and Mesoamerica (1.58). Observed heterozygosity was low in all the races as would be expected for an inbreeding species. The analysis with microsatellite markers identified subgroups, which agreed well with commercial class divisions, and seed size was the main distinguishing factor between the two major groups identified.

  11. Analysis of Rhizobium etli and of its symbiosis with wild Phaseolus vulgaris supports coevolution in centers of host diversification

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, O. Mario; Riva, Omar; Peltzer, Eitel

    2004-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) comprise three major geographic genetic pools, one in Mexico, Central America, and Colombia, another in the southern Andes, and a third in Ecuador and northern Peru. Species Rhizobium etli is the predominant rhizobia found symbiotically associated with beans in the Americas. We have found polymorphism in the common nodulation gene nodC among R. etli strains from a wide range of geographical origins, which disclosed three nodC types. The different nodC alleles in American strains show varying predominance in their regional distributions in correlation with the centers of bean genetic diversification (BD centers). By cross-inoculating wild common beans from the three BD centers with soils from Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Northwestern Argentina, the R. etli populations from nodules originated from Mexican soil again showed allele predominance that was opposite to those originated from Bolivian and Argentinean soil, whereas populations from Ecuadorian soil were intermediate. These results also indicated that the preferential nodulation of beans by geographically related R. etli lineages was independent of the nodulating environment. Coinoculation of wild common beans from each of the three BD centers with an equicellular mixture of R. etli strains representative of the Mesoamerican and southern Andean lineages revealed a host-dependent distinct competitiveness: beans from the Mesoamerican genetic pool were almost exclusively nodulated by strains from their host region, whereas nodules of beans from the southern Andes were largely occupied by the geographically cognate R. etli lineages. These results suggest coevolution in the centers of host genetic diversification. PMID:15340138

  12. Nucleotide diversity of a genomic sequence similar to SHATTERPROOF (PvSHP1) in domesticated and wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanni, L; Bitocchi, E; Bellucci, E; Rossi, M; Rau, D; Attene, G; Gepts, P; Papa, R

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary studies in plant and animal breeding are aimed at understanding the structure and organization of genetic variations of species. We have identified and characterized a genomic sequence in Phaseolus vulgaris of 1,200 bp (PvSHP1) that is homologous to SHATTERPROOF-1 (SHP1), a gene involved in control of fruit shattering in Arabidopsis thaliana. The PvSHP1 fragment was mapped to chromosome Pv06 in P. vulgaris and is linked to the flower and seed color gene V. Amplification of the PvSHP1 sequence from the most agronomically important legume species showed a high degree of interspecies diversity in the introns within the Phaseoleae, while the coding region was conserved across distant taxa. Sequencing of the PvSHP1 sequence in a sample of 91 wild and domesticated genotypes that span the geographic distribution of this species in the centers of origin showed that PvSHP1 is highly polymorphic and, therefore, particularly useful to further investigate the origin and domestication history of P. vulgaris. Our data confirm the gene pool structure seen in P. vulgaris along with independent domestication processes in the Andes and Mesoamerica; they provide additional evidence for a single domestication event in Mesoamerica. Moreover, our results support the Mesoamerican origin of this species. Finally, we have developed three indel-spanning markers that will be very useful for bean germplasm characterization, and particularly to trace the distribution of the domesticated Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools.

  13. Effects of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae) seed coat on the embryonic and larval development of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    de Sá, Leonardo Figueira Reis; Wermelinger, Tierry Torres; Ribeiro, Elane da Silva; Gravina, Geraldo de Amaral; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Xavier-Filho, José; Venancio, Thiago Motta; Rezende, Gustavo Lazzaro; Oliveira, Antonia Elenir Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Bruchid beetles infest various seeds. The seed coat is the first protective barrier against bruchid infestation. Although non-host seed coats often impair the oviposition, eclosion and survival of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus larvae, morphological and biochemical aspects of this phenomenon remain unclear. Here we show that Phaseolus vulgaris (non-host) seed coat reduced C. maculatus female oviposition about 48%, increased 83% the seed penetration time, reduced larval mass and survival about 62 % and 40 % respectively. Interestingly, we found no visible effect on the major events of insect embryogenesis, namely the formation of the cellular blastoderm, germ band extension/retraction, embryo segmentation, appendage formation and dorsal closure. Larvae fed on P. vulgaris seed coat have greater FITC fluorescence signal in the midgut than in the feces, as opposed to what is observed in control larvae fed on Vigna unguiculata. Cysteine protease, α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities were reduced in larvae fed on P. vulgaris natural seed coat. Taken together, our results suggest that although P. vulgaris seed coat does not interfere with C. maculatus embryonic development, food digestion was clearly compromised, impacting larval fitness (e.g. body mass and survivability).

  14. Phenotypic evaluation and genome wide association studies of two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) diversity panels in multiple locations highlight evaluation techniques, traits and lines useful for trait based selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity is constrained by abiotic soil conductions including drought and low fertility as well as by high temperature. High temperature primarily impacts pollen viability and growth. Soil water content and nutrients occur heterogeneously and often in a stratif...

  15. Testing the model for a dominant resistance gene expresed on leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris F2 (0313-58 X Rosada Nativa) to the common bacterial blight pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Phaseoli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common bean bacterial blight pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, is a limiting factor for bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in commercial varieties is inadequate. To test the hypothesis of the presence of strain specific genes for resistance...

  16. Characterization and sugar-binding properties of arcelin-1, an insecticidal lectin-like protein isolated from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. RAZ-2) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, C; Causse, H; Mourey, L; Koninkx, J; Rivière, M; Hendriks, H; Puzo, G; Samama, J P; Rougé, P

    1998-01-01

    Arcelin-1 is a lectin-like protein found in the seeds of wild varieties of the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). This protein displays insecticidal properties, but the mechanism of action is as yet unknown. In the present study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of arcelin-1 from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. RAZ-2. Native arcelin-1 is a dimeric glycoprotein of 60 kDa, built from the non-covalent association of two identical monomers. This dimer resists dissociation by chaotropic agents and is highly resistant to proteolytic enzymes. Each subunit contains 10% (w/w) neutral sugars which belong to the high-mannose and complex-type glycans attached to three glycosylation sites. No interaction of the protein with simple sugars could be detected, but arcelin-1 displays an intrinsic specificity in binding complex glycans. Arcelin-1 therefore differs from the closely related phytohaemagglutinin lectins and alpha-amylase inhibitor in several respects: oligomerization states, sugar-binding affinities and the type and number of glycan chains. These features may be related to the toxicity of arcelin-1. PMID:9445382

  17. A comparison of the molecular organization of genomic regions associated with resistance to common bacterial blight in two Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Gregory; Dinatale, Claudia; Xie, Weilong; Navabi, Alireza; Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Crosby, William; Yu, Kangfu; Shi, Chun; Pauls, K Peter

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, in Phaseolus vulgaris is conditioned by several loci on different chromosomes. Previous studies with OAC-Rex, a CBB-resistant, white bean variety of Mesoamerican origin, identified two resistance loci associated with the molecular markers Pv-CTT001 and SU91, on chromosome 4 and 8, respectively. Resistance to CBB is assumed to be derived from an interspecific cross with Phaseolus acutifolius in the pedigree of OAC-Rex. Our current whole genome sequencing effort with OAC-Rex provided the opportunity to compare its genome in the regions associated with CBB resistance with the v1.0 release of the P. vulgaris line G19833, which is a large seeded bean of Andean origin, and (assumed to be) CBB susceptible. In addition, the genomic regions containing SAP6, a marker associated with P. vulgaris-derived CBB-resistance on chromosome 10, were compared. These analyses indicated that gene content was highly conserved between G19833 and OAC-Rex across the regions examined (>80%). However, fifty-nine genes unique to OAC Rex were identified, with resistance gene homologues making up the largest category (10 genes identified). Two unique genes in OAC-Rex located within the SU91 resistance QTL have homology to P. acutifolius ESTs and may be potential sources of CBB resistance. As the genomic sequence assembly of OAC-Rex is completed, we expect that further comparisons between it and the G19833 genome will lead to a greater understanding of CBB resistance in bean.

  18. Projections from fetal neocortical transplants placed in the frontal neocortex of newborn rats. A Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin tracing study.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, J C; Castro, A J; Klausen, B; Zimmer, J

    1992-01-01

    Fetal rat neocortex grafted into lesion cavities made in the newborn rat neocortex can exchange multiple axonal connections with the host brain. Most previous studies demonstrating efferent transplant-to-host brain connections have used fluorescent retrograde tracers injected into the host brain (Castro et al. 1985, 1987; Floeter and Jones 1984; O'Leary and Stanfield 1989). Other studies have used anterograde axonal tracing with either tritium-labelled amino acids impregnating the transplant and its efferents (Floeter and Jones 1985) or horseradish peroxidase injected into the transplants (Chang et al. 1984, 1986). In the present study we used the anterograde axonal tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L) to examine in detail the course and termination of the efferent neocortical graft fibers. Twenty-six newborn rats had the right frontal cortex forepaw area removed by vacuum aspiration, while anesthetized by hypothermia. A piece of fetal frontal cortex 14-16 embryonic days old (E14-16) was immediately thereafter placed in the lesion, and the recipient rats allowed to survive for 5-7 months. At this time the rats were reoperated under sodium pentobarbital (Nembutal) anesthesia and the transplants iontophoretically injected with PHA-L. Two weeks later the animals were again anesthetized, perfused, and processed for PHA-L immunocytochemistry and routine histology. Analysis of acetylcholinesterase- (AChE) and Nissl-stained sections showed graft survival in 19 of the 26 animals used in this study. When these 19 brains were processed for PHA-L immunocytochemistry, 5 of them were found with certainty to have the PHA-L injection confined to the transplant. Based on these cases PHA-L-reactive fibers arising from labelled transplant neurons were traced into the ipsilateral host neocortex adjacent to the transplant and found to project through the subcortical white matter to the ipsilateral parietal neocortical area 1, and claustrum. Callosal fibers were traced to

  19. Marker-based linkage map of Andean common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and mapping of QTLs underlying popping ability traits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuña bean is a type of ancient common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) native to the Andean region of South America, whose seeds possess the unusual property of popping. The nutritional features of popped seeds make them a healthy low fat and high protein snack. However, flowering of nuña bean only takes place under short-day photoperiod conditions, which means a difficulty to extend production to areas where such conditions do not prevail. Therefore, breeding programs of adaptation traits will facilitate the diversification of the bean crops and the development of new varieties with enhanced healthy properties. Although the popping trait has been profusely studied in maize (popcorn), little is known about the biology and genetic basis of the popping ability in common bean. To obtain insights into the genetics of popping ability related traits of nuña bean, a comprehensive quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed to detect single-locus and epistatic QTLs responsible for the phenotypic variance observed in these traits. Results A mapping population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between two Andean common bean genotypes was evaluated for three popping related traits, popping dimension index (PDI), expansion coefficient (EC), and percentage of unpopped seeds (PUS), in five different environmental conditions. The genetic map constructed included 193 loci across 12 linkage groups (LGs), covering a genetic distance of 822.1 cM, with an average of 4.3 cM per marker. Individual and multi-environment QTL analyses detected a total of nineteen single-locus QTLs, highlighting among them the co-localized QTLs for the three popping ability traits placed on LGs 3, 5, 6, and 7, which together explained 24.9, 14.5, and 25.3% of the phenotypic variance for PDI, EC, and PUS, respectively. Interestingly, epistatic interactions among QTLs have been detected, which could have a key role in the genetic control of popping. Conclusions

  20. Long-term fungal inhibitory activity of water-soluble extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto and sourdough lactic acid bacteria during bread storage.

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo G; Nigro, Franco; De Angelis, Maria; Arnault, Philip; Gobbetti, Marco

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal activity of proteinaceous compounds from different food matrices was investigated. In initial experiments, water-soluble extracts of wheat sourdoughs, cheeses, and vegetables were screened by agar diffusion assays with Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1 as the indicator fungus. Water-soluble extracts of sourdough fermented with Lactobacillus brevis AM7 and Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto were selected for further study. The crude water-soluble extracts of L. brevis AM7 sourdough and P. vulgaris cv. Pinto had a MIC of 40 mg of peptide/ml and 30.9 mg of protein/ml, respectively. MICs were markedly lower when chemically synthesized peptides or partially purified protein fractions were used. The water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto showed inhibition toward a large number of fungal species isolated from bakeries. Phaseolin alpha-type precursor, phaseolin, and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin precursor were identified in the water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto by nano liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. When the antifungal activity was assayed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all three proteins were inhibitory. A mixture of eight peptides was identified from the water-soluble extract of sourdough L. brevis AM7, and five of these exhibited inhibitory activity. Bread was made at the pilot plant scale by sourdough fermentation with L. brevis AM7 and addition of the water-soluble extract (27%, vol/wt; 5 mg of protein/ml) of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto. Slices of bread packed in polyethylene bags did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage at room temperature, a level of protection comparable to that afforded by 0.3% (wt/wt) calcium propionate.

  1. Biodiversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Shaanxi Province.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cao, Ying; Wang, En Tao; Qiao, Ya Juan; Jiao, Shuo; Liu, Zhen Shan; Zhao, Liang; Wei, Ge Hong

    2016-05-01

    The biodiversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with bean in Shaanxi Province were investigated. A total of 194 bacterial isolates from bean nodules collected from 13 sampling sites were characterized based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD, and the symbiotic genes nodC and nifH. Fifteen genospecies belonging to the genera Rhizobium, Agrobacterium, Ensifer, Bradyrhizobium and Ochrobactrum were defined among the isolates, with Rhizobium sp. II, Agrobacterium sp. II, E. fredii and R. phaseoli being the dominant groups. Four symbiotic gene lineages corresponding to Rhizobium sp. I, Rhizobium sp. II, R. phaseoli and B. liaoningense were detected in the nodC and nifH sequence analyses, indicating different origins for the symbiotic genes and their co-evolution with the chromosome of the bacteria. Moreover, the Ensifer isolates harbored symbiotic genes closely related to bean-nodulating Pararhizobium giardinii, indicating possible lateral gene transfer from Rhizobium to Ensifer. Correlation of rhizobial community composition with moisture, temperature, intercropping, soil features and nutrients were detected. All the results demonstrated a great diversity of bean rhizobia in Shaanxi that might be due to the adaptable evolution of the bean-nodulating rhizobia subjected to the diverse ecological conditions in the area.

  2. An autophagy-related kinase is essential for the symbiotic relationship between Phaseolus vulgaris and both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Lascano, Ramiro; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Hernàndez, Alejandra; Barraza, Aaron; Olivares, Juan Elias; Arthikala, Manoj Kumar; Cardenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-08-30

    Eukaryotes contain three types of lipid kinases that belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family. In plants and Saccharomyces, only PI3K class III family members have been identified. These enzymes regulate the innate immune response, intracellular trafficking, autophagy, and senescence. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated down-regulation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) PI3K severely impaired symbiosis in composite P. vulgaris plants with endosymbionts such as Rhizobium tropici and Rhizophagus irregularis. Downregulation of Pv-PI3K was associated with a marked decrease in root hair growth and curling. Additionally, infection thread growth, root-nodule number, and symbiosome formation in root nodule cells were severely affected. Interestingly, root colonization by AM fungi and the formation of arbuscules were also abolished in PI3K loss-of-function plants. Furthermore, the transcript accumulation of genes encoding proteins known to interact with PI3K to form protein complexes involved in autophagy was drastically reduced in these transgenic roots. RNAi-mediated downregulation of one of these genes, Beclin1 / Atg6, resulted in a similar phenotype as observed for transgenic roots in which Pv-PI3K had been downregulated. Our findings show that an autophagy-related process is crucial for the mutualistic interactions of P. vulgaris with beneficial microorganisms.

  3. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain 4H41, an effective salt- and drought-tolerant microsymbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris

    DOE PAGES

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; ...

    2015-07-02

    We report that Ensifer meliloti 4H41 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Strain 4H41 was isolated in 2002 from root nodules of P. vulgaris grown in South Tunisia from the oasis of Rjim-Maatoug. Strain 4H41 is salt- and drought-tolerant and highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. vulgaris. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti 4H41, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,795,637 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 47 scaffolds of 47 contigs containing 6,350more » protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  4. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain 4H41, an effective salt- and drought-tolerant microsymbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-07-02

    We report that Ensifer meliloti 4H41 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Strain 4H41 was isolated in 2002 from root nodules of P. vulgaris grown in South Tunisia from the oasis of Rjim-Maatoug. Strain 4H41 is salt- and drought-tolerant and highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. vulgaris. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti 4H41, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,795,637 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 47 scaffolds of 47 contigs containing 6,350 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.

  5. RbohB, a Phaseolus vulgaris NADPH oxidase gene, enhances symbiosome number, bacteroid size, and nitrogen fixation in nodules and impairs mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by respiratory burst oxidative homologs (Rbohs) are involved in numerous plant cell signaling processes, and have critical roles in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Previously, down-regulation of RbohB in Phaseolus vulgaris was shown to suppress ROS production and abolish Rhizobium infection thread (IT) progression, but also to enhance arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization. Thus, Rbohs function both as positive and negative regulators. Here, we assessed the effect of enhancing ROS concentrations, by overexpressing PvRbohB, on the P. vulgaris--rhizobia and P. vulgaris--AMF symbioses. We estimated superoxide concentrations in hairy roots overexpressing PvRbohB, determined the status of early and late events of both Rhizobium and AMF interactions in symbiont-inoculated roots, and analyzed the nodule ultrastructure of transgenic plants overexpressing PvRbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB significantly enhanced ROS production, the formation of ITs, nodule biomass, and nitrogen-fixing activity, and increased the density of symbiosomes in nodules, and the density and size of bacteroides in symbiosomes. Furthermore, PvCAT, early nodulin, PvSS1, and PvGOGAT transcript abundances were elevated in these nodules. By contrast, mycorrhizal colonization was reduced in roots that overexpressed RbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB augmented nodule efficiency by enhancing nitrogen fixation and delaying nodule senescence, but impaired AMF colonization.

  6. An Autophagy-Related Kinase Is Essential for the Symbiotic Relationship between Phaseolus vulgaris and Both Rhizobia and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Barraza, Aarón; Olivares, Juan E.; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotes contain three types of lipid kinases that belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family. In plants and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, only PI3K class III family members have been identified. These enzymes regulate the innate immune response, intracellular trafficking, autophagy, and senescence. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated downregulation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) PI3K severely impaired symbiosis in composite P. vulgaris plants with endosymbionts such as Rhizobium tropici and Rhizophagus irregularis. Downregulation of Pv-PI3K was associated with a marked decrease in root hair growth and curling. Additionally, infection thread growth, root-nodule number, and symbiosome formation in root nodule cells were severely affected. Interestingly, root colonization by AM fungi and the formation of arbuscules were also abolished in PI3K loss-of-function plants. Furthermore, the transcript accumulation of genes encoding proteins known to interact with PI3K to form protein complexes involved in autophagy was drastically reduced in these transgenic roots. RNAi-mediated downregulation of one of these genes, Beclin1/Atg6, resulted in a similar phenotype as observed for transgenic roots in which Pv-PI3K had been downregulated. Our findings show that an autophagy-related process is crucial for the mutualistic interactions of P. vulgaris with beneficial microorganisms. PMID:27577790

  7. The expression of a chimeric Phaseolus vulgaris nodulin 30-GUS gene is restricted to the rhizobially infected cells in transgenic Lotus corniculatus nodules.

    PubMed

    Carsolio, C; Campos, F; Sánchez, F; Rocha-Sosa, M

    1994-12-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris there is a nodulin family, Npv30, of ca. 30 kDa, as detected in an in vitro translation assay [2]. We isolated a gene (npv30-1) for one of the members of this family. The nucleotide sequence of the promoter of npv30-1 contains nodule-specific motifs common to other late nodulin genes. The promoter was fused to the GUS reporter gene; this chimeric fusion was introduced into Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation. GUS activity was only detected in the infected cells of the nodules of transgenic plants. By contrast, the expression of a 35S-GUS construct was restricted to the uninfected cells and the vascular tissue.

  8. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean.

  9. Polyphenol oxidase activity and differential accumulation of polyphenolics in seed coats of pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) characterize postharvest color changes.

    PubMed

    Marles, M A Susan; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E

    2008-08-27

    Postharvest darkening of pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was evaluated in a population of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between CDC Pintium (a regular-darkening line) and 1533-15 (a slow-darkening line). Flavonoid metabolite concentrations, polyphenol oxidase activity, lignin concentration, and seed coat anatomy characteristics were assessed for cosegregation with the darkening phenotype. Significantly lower kaempferol concentrations (p = 0.00001) together with differences in polyphenol oxidase activity (p = 0.0045) were two of the key findings associated with these recombinant inbred lines. In addition, two different assays (thioglycolic acid and Klason lignin) to quantify lignin together with an assessment of extractable condensed tannin were used to estimate the contribution of these polymers to changes in the seed coat tissue. This is the first report of precise biochemical characterization of polyphenolics that associate with postharvest darkening in legumes.

  10. Effect of illumination on the content of melatonin, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity during germination of lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Liébana, Rosa; Herrera, Teresa; Rebollo-Hernanz, Miguel; Sanchez-Puelles, Carlos; Benítez, Vanesa; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2014-11-05

    This study reports the effects of two different illumination conditions during germination (12 h light/12 h dark vs 24 h dark) in lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) on the content of melatonin and phenolic compounds, as well as the antioxidant activity. Germination led to relative increase in melatonin content and significant antioxidant activity, while the content of phenolic compounds decreased. The highest melatonin content was obtained after 6 days of germination under 24 h dark for both legumes. These germinated legume seeds with improved levels of melatonin might play a protective role against free radicals. Thus, considering the potent antioxidant activity of melatonin, these sprouts can be consumed as direct foods and be offered as preventive food strategies in combating chronic diseases through the diet.

  11. A model of canopy irradiance in relation to changing leaf area in a phytotron-grown snap bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieth, J. H.; Reynolds, J. F.

    1984-03-01

    Simple exponential decay models were used to describe the variation in irradiance profiles within a snap bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) canopy over a 33-day period of canopy development. The extinction coefficients of these models were varied over time as a function of changing canopy leaf area; nonlinear least-squares procedures were used to estimate parameter values. The resultant model response surfaces depict the changes in canopy irradiance that accompany canopy maturation and illustrate the dynamic nature of canopy closure. A criterion index is defined to aid in assessing the applicability of these models for use in whole-plant simulation models, and an evaluation of these models is given based on this index, their predictive accuracy, and the utility for use within varying modeling frameworks.

  12. Determination of replacement of some inorganic elements in pulvinus of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Gina 2004) at chilling temperature by the WDXRF spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Demir, Faruk; Budak, Gokhan; Karabulut, Abdulhalik; Kadi, Nuray; Karakurt, Halil; Erdal, Serkan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, bean seedlings (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Gina 2004) were exposed to chilling temperatures until leaves are wrinkled (9 day), that is, showed nyctinastic movement. Pulvinus were subsequently were cut from the leaves. Concentrations of inorganic elements (P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cu) in the pulvinus were measured by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry. Results indicated that concentration change (%) was not significant for Ca (0.82) but it was significant for K, P, Cl, S, and especially Cu concentrations (5.4%, 12.8%, 40.2%, 43.7%, 365%, respectively) in pulvinus of plants exposed to chilling temperature compared with control group. We hypothesize here the presence of association between nyctinasti movement brought about by pulvinus at chilling temperature in bean and changes of K, P, Cl, S and especially Cu concentrations measured by WDXRF analysis method.

  13. Relationship between in vitro Fe and Zn dialysability and peptide composition of albumin and globulins extracted from cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lombardi-Boccia, G; Carbonaro, M; Cappelloni, M; Carnovale, E

    1996-11-01

    In vitro dialysability of iron, zinc and protein was determined from whole bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), albumin and globulin (G1, G2) after cooking. Albumin showed the highest iron, zinc, protein and phytic acid content. Cooking increased iron and protein dialysability only in whole bean and albumin. Compared to globulins, albumin also presented a higher in vitro protein digestibility and cystine chemical reactivity. HPLC analysis of peptides in dialysates of bean and protein fractions suggested that some aggregation occurred during dialysis. The percentage of amino acids in dialysed peptides was found to be different between albumin and globulins. The difference in iron and zinc dialysability between albumin and globulins seems to depend on the phytic acid content of the albumin fraction and the protein properties of globulins.

  14. Conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid by a NADP-dependent dehydrogenase in bean and spinach leaf. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, M.W.; Bedgar, D.L.; Saito, Kazumi; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    An NADP-dependent dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid has been isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Spinacia oleracea L. and partially purified. It is stable at {minus}20{degree}C for up to 8 months. Molecular masses, as determined by gel filtration, were 21 and 29 kilodaltons for bean and spinach enzymes, respectively. K{sub m} for sorbosone were 12 {plus minus} 2 and 18 {plus minus} 2 millimolar and for NADP{sup +}, 0.14 {plus minus} 0.05 and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.5 millimolar, for bean and spinach, respectively. Lycorine, a purported inhibitor of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, had no effect on the reaction.

  15. Dependence of the Extent and Direction of Average Stomatal Response in Zea mays L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. on the Frequency of Fluctuations in Environmental Stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Cardon, Z. G.; Berry, J. A.; Woodrow, I. E.

    1994-01-01

    Stomatal responses to fluctuating light and CO2 were investigated in Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris. Slow-moving stomata can affect carbon gain and water loss by plants during light flecks, under dynamic cloud cover, during alternating windy and calm air conditions (which influence CO2 concentrations and humidity immediately around leaves in plant canopies), at natural CO2 vents, or in growth chambers with imperfect CO2 control. It was found that the frequency of constant-amplitude fluctuations in light and CO2 dramatically affected the time-averaged stomatal conductance in both Zea and Phaseolus. During oscillations in light, average stomatal conductance was driven either above or below that observed at steady state at the average light level, depending on the frequency of the oscillations. Under oscillating CO2, the departure of average stomatal conductance away from that observed at steady state at the average CO2 level was also frequency dependent in both species. Upon cessation of oscillations and return of light or CO2 to the stable median level, stomatal conductance also returned to a steady state, matching that before oscillations were initiated. This work shows that fluctuations in light and CO2, and equally important, their frequency, can be critical in determining time-averaged stomatal conductance under unstable environmental conditions. PMID:12232261

  16. Genome-wide identification and in silico characterisation of microRNAs, their targets and processing pathway genes in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Cardoso, T C; Portilho, L G; de Oliveira, C L; McKeown, P C; Maluf, W R; Gomes, L A A; Teixeira, T A; do Amaral, L R; Spillane, C; de Souza Gomes, M

    2016-03-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae) is a globally important staple crop, which is an important source of calories, protein and essential micronutrients. At the genomic level little is known regarding the small non-coding RNAs within the common bean genome. One of the most important classes of such small non-coding RNAs is microRNAs (miRNAs), which control mRNA and protein expression levels in many eukaryotes. Computational methods have been applied to identify putative miRNAs in the genomes of different organisms. In this study, our objective was to comprehensively identify and characterise miRNAs from the genome and transcriptome of P. vulgaris, including both mature and precursor miRNA forms. We also sought to identify the putative proteins involved in miRNA processing and the likely target genes of common bean miRNAs. We identified 221 mature miRNAs and 136 precursor miRNAs distributed across 52 different miRNA families in the P. vulgaris genome. Amongst these, we distinguished 129 novel mature miRNAs and 123 miRNA precursors belonging to 24 different miRNA families. We also identified 31 proteins predicted to participate in the miRNA-processing pathway in P. vulgaris. Finally, we also identified 483 predicted miRNA targets, including many which corroborate results from other species, suggesting that miRNA regulatory systems are evolutionarily conserved and important for plant development. Our results expand the study of miRNAs and their target genes in common bean, and provide new opportunities to understand their roles in the biology of this important staple crop.

  17. Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov., an indigenous N2-fixing symbiont of the Ecuadorian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genetic pool.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Martins, Talita Busulini; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Marçon Delamuta, Jakeline Renata; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-09-01

    There are two major centres of genetic diversification of common bean (Phaseolus vilgaris L.), the Mesoamerican and the Andean, and the legume is capable of establishing nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several rhizobia; Rhizobium etli seems to be the dominant species in both centres. Another genetic pool of common bean, in Peru and Ecuador, is receiving increasing attention, and studies of microsymbionts from the region can help to increase our knowledge about coevolution of this symbiosis. We have previously reported several putative new lineages from this region and here present data indicating that strains belonging to one of them, PEL4, represent a novel species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, PEL4 strains are positioned in the Rhizobium phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade, but show unique properties in several morphological, physiological and biochemical analyses, as well as in BOX-PCR profiles ( < 75% similarity with related species). PEL4 strains also differed from related species based on multilocus sequence analysis of three housekeeping genes (glnII, gyrB and recA). Nucleotide identities of the three concatenated genes between PEL4 strains and related species ranged from 91.8 to 94.2%, being highest with Rhizobium fabae. DNA-DNA hybridization ( < 47% DNA relatedness) and average nucleotide identity values of the whole genomes ( < 90.2%) also supported the novel species status. The PEL4 strains were effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with common beans. The data supported the view that PEL4 strains represent a novel species, Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov. The type strain is CNPSo 671(T) ( = UMR 1450(T) = PIMAMPIRS I 5(T) = LMG 27578(T)).

  18. Structural characterization of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from a wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): insight into the common structural features of leguminous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, T; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Ishimoto, M; Yamaguchi, H

    1997-02-01

    The primary structures of two subunits of an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI-2) from a wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were revealed by a comparison of the amino acid sequence previously deduced from the nucleotide sequence with the amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequences determined by conventional methods. The polypeptide molecular weight of alpha AI-2 obtained by the light-scattering technique, considered together with the sequence molecular weights revealed for the subunits, indicated that alpha AI-2 has the subunit stoichiometry of an alpha 2 beta 2 complex. These structural features were closely similar to those recently elucidated for a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor, which is quite different in the inhibitory specificity from alpha AI-2. The post-translational processing of the precursor glycoproteins to form the tetrameric structure appeared to require an Arg residue close to the processing site. Further, the proper associations of the subunits into the tetrameric structures seemed to be strictly controlled by a few amino acids on the subunit interfaces.

  19. Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov., an effective N2-fixing symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with broad geographical distribution in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Andrade, Diva Souza; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N), the nutrient most required for plant growth, is key for good yield of agriculturally important crops. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can benefit from bacteria collectively called rhizobia, which are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2) in root nodules and supplying it to the plant. Common bean is amongst the most promiscuous legume hosts; several described species, in addition to putative novel ones have been reported as able to nodulate this legume, although not always effectively in terms of fixing N2. In this study, we present data indicating that Brazilian strains PRF 35(T), PRF 54, CPAO 1135 and H 52, currently classified as Rhizobium tropici, represent a novel species symbiont of common bean. Morphological, physiological and biochemical properties differentiate these strains from other species of the genus Rhizobium, as do BOX-PCR profiles (less than 60 % similarity), multilocus sequence analysis with recA, gyrB and rpoA (less than 96.4 % sequence similarity), DNA-DNA hybridization (less than 50 % DNA-DNA relatedness), and average nucleotide identity of whole genomes (less than 92.8.%). The novel species is effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with P. vulgaris, Leucaena leucocephala and Leucaena esculenta. We propose the name Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov. for this novel taxon, with strain PRF 35(T) ( = CNPSo 120(T) = LMG 27577(T) = IPR-Pv 1249(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Effect of Nigella sativa alcoholic extract and oil, as well as Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) lectin on the ultrastructure of Trichomonas vaginalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Aminou, Heba AbdelKader; Alam-Eldin, Yosra Hussein; Hashem, Hanan Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan that is the aetiological agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Currently, the compound of choice for the treatment of T. vaginalis infections is metronidazole, however, it has many side effects and an increase in metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis has been observed. Medicinal plants could be a source of new antiprotozoal drugs with high activity, low toxicity and lower price. The present work was carried out to investigate the therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa alcoholic extract and oil, as well as Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) lectin and their in vitro activity on the ultrastructure of T. vaginalis trophozoites in comparison to metronidazole, as detected by transmission electron microscope. Both N. sativa oil and P. vulgaris lectin showed high toxic effect as evidenced by severe cell damage with cytoplasmic and nuclear destruction, while the effect of N. sativa alcoholic extract was moderate. Therefore, these two extracts could offer an effective, cheaper and more safe alternative for metronidazole in treatment of trichomoniasis.

  1. Effect of an aqueous extract of Phaseolus vulgaris on the properties of tail tendon collagen of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pari, L; Venkateswaran, S

    2003-07-01

    Changes in the structural and functional properties of collagen caused by advanced glycation might be of importance for the etiology of late complications in diabetes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of oral administration of aqueous pod extract (200 mg/kg body weight) of Phaseolus vulgaris, an indigenous plant used in Ayurvedic Medicine in India, on collagen content and characteristics in the tail tendon of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, collagen content (117.01 6.84 mg/100 mg tissue) as well as its degree of cross-linking was increased, as shown by increased extent of glycation (21.70 0.90 g glucose/mg collagen), collagen-linked fluorescence (52.8 3.0 AU/ mol hydroxyproline), shrinkage temperature (71.50 2.50 C) and decreased acid (1.878 0.062 mg hydroxyproline/100 mg tissue) and pepsin solubility (1.77 0.080 mg hydroxyproline/100 mg tissue). The alpha/ ratio of acid- (1.69) and pepsin-soluble (2.00) collagen was significantly decreased in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Administration of P. vulgaris for 45 days to streptozotocin-diabetic rats significantly reduced the accumulation and cross-linking of collagen. The effect of P. vulgaris was compared with that of glibenclamide, a reference drug administered to streptozotocin-diabetic rats at the dose of 600 g/kg body weight for 45 days by gavage. The effects of P. vulgaris (collagen content, 64.18 1.97; extent of glycation, 12.00 0.53; collagen-linked fluorescence, 33.6 1.9; shrinkage temperature, 57.0 1.0; extent of cross-linking - acid-soluble collagen, 2.572 0.080, and pepsin-soluble collagen, 2.28 0.112) were comparable with those of glibenclamide (collagen content, 71.5 2.04; extent of glycation, 13.00 0.60; collagen-linked fluorescence, 38.9 2.0; shrinkage temperature, 59.0 1.5; extent of cross-linking - acid-soluble collagen, 2.463 0.078, and pepsin-soluble collagen, 2.17 0.104). In conclusion, administration of P. vulgaris pods had a positive influence on the

  2. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D. ); Oosterhuis, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  3. Similar Intracellular Location and Stimulus Reactivity, but Differential Mobility of Tailless (Vicia faba) and Tailed Forisomes (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Intact Sieve Tubes.

    PubMed

    Furch, Alexandra C U; Buxa, Stefanie V; van Bel, Aart J E

    2015-01-01

    Sieve elements of legumes contain forisomes-fusiform protein bodies that are responsible for sieve-tube occlusion in response to damage or wound signals. Earlier work described the existence of tailless and tailed forisomes. This study intended to quantify and compare location and position of tailless (in Vicia faba) and tailed (in Phaseolus vulgaris) forisomes inside sieve elements and to assess their reactivity and potential mobility in response to a remote stimulus. Location (distribution within sieve elements) and position (forisome tip contacts) of more than altogether 2000 forisomes were screened in 500 intact plants by laser scanning confocal microscopy in the transmission mode. Furthermore, we studied the dispersion of forisomes at different locations in different positions and their positional behaviour in response to distant heat shocks. Forisome distribution turned out to be species-specific, whereas forisome positions at various locations were largely similar in bushbean (Phaseolus) and broadbean (Vicia). In general, the tailless forisomes had higher dispersion rates in response to heat shocks than the tailed forisomes and forisomes at the downstream (basal) end dispersed more frequently than those at the upstream end (apical). In contrast to the tailless forisomes that only oscillate in response to heat shocks, downstream-located tailed forisomes can cover considerable distances within sieve elements. This displacement was prevented by gentle rubbing of the leaf (priming) before the heat shock. Movement of these forisomes was also prohibited by Latrunculin A, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. The apparently active mobility of tailed forisomes gives credence to the idea that at least the latter forisomes are not free-floating, but connected to other sieve-element structures.

  4. Similar Intracellular Location and Stimulus Reactivity, but Differential Mobility of Tailless (Vicia faba) and Tailed Forisomes (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Intact Sieve Tubes

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Sieve elements of legumes contain forisomes—fusiform protein bodies that are responsible for sieve-tube occlusion in response to damage or wound signals. Earlier work described the existence of tailless and tailed forisomes. This study intended to quantify and compare location and position of tailless (in Vicia faba) and tailed (in Phaseolus vulgaris) forisomes inside sieve elements and to assess their reactivity and potential mobility in response to a remote stimulus. Location (distribution within sieve elements) and position (forisome tip contacts) of more than altogether 2000 forisomes were screened in 500 intact plants by laser scanning confocal microscopy in the transmission mode. Furthermore, we studied the dispersion of forisomes at different locations in different positions and their positional behaviour in response to distant heat shocks. Forisome distribution turned out to be species-specific, whereas forisome positions at various locations were largely similar in bushbean (Phaseolus) and broadbean (Vicia). In general, the tailless forisomes had higher dispersion rates in response to heat shocks than the tailed forisomes and forisomes at the downstream (basal) end dispersed more frequently than those at the upstream end (apical). In contrast to the tailless forisomes that only oscillate in response to heat shocks, downstream-located tailed forisomes can cover considerable distances within sieve elements. This displacement was prevented by gentle rubbing of the leaf (priming) before the heat shock. Movement of these forisomes was also prohibited by Latrunculin A, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. The apparently active mobility of tailed forisomes gives credence to the idea that at least the latter forisomes are not free-floating, but connected to other sieve-element structures. PMID:26624625

  5. Inheritance of partial resistance against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus vulgaris and co-localization of quantitative trait loci with genes involved in specific resistance.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, V; Sévignac, M; De Oliveira, J C; Fouilloux, G; Skroch, P; Thoquet, P; Gepts, P; Langin, T; Dron, M

    2000-03-01

    Anthracnose, one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. A "candidate gene" approach was used to map anthracnose resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL). Candidate genes included genes for both pathogen recognition (resistance genes and resistance gene analogs [RGAs]) and general plant defense (defense response genes). Two strains of C. lindemuthianum, identified in a world collection of 177 strains, displayed a reproducible and differential aggressiveness toward BAT93 and JaloEEP558, two parental lines of P. vulgaris representing the two major gene pools of this crop. A reliable test was developed to score partial resistance in aerial organs of the plant (stem, leaf, petiole) under controlled growth chamber conditions. BAT93 was more resistant than JaloEEP558 regardless of the organ or strain tested. With a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between these two parental lines, 10 QTL were located on a genetic map harboring 143 markers, including known defense response genes, anthracnose-specific resistance genes, and RGAs. Eight of the QTL displayed isolate specificity. Two were co-localized with known defense genes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein) and three with anthracnose-specific resistance genes and/or RGAs. Interestingly, two QTL, with different allelic contribution, mapped on linkage group B4 in a 5.0 cM interval containing Andean and Mesoamerican specific resistance genes against C. lindemuthianum and 11 polymorphic fragments revealed with a RGA probe. The possible relationship between genes underlying specific and partial resistance is discussed.

  6. Identification of an ancestral resistance gene cluster involved in the coevolution process between Phaseolus vulgaris and its fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, V; Sicard, D; de Oliveira, J C; Sévignac, M; Cohen, S; Gepts, P; Neema, C; Langin, T; Dron, M

    1999-09-01

    The recent cloning of plant resistance (R) genes and the sequencing of resistance gene clusters have shed light on the molecular evolution of R genes. However, up to now, no attempt has been made to correlate this molecular evolution with the host-pathogen coevolution process at the population level. Cross-inoculations were carried out between 26 strains of the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and 48 Phaseolus vulgaris plants collected in the three centers of diversity of the host species. A high level of diversity for resistance against the pathogen was revealed. Most of the resistance specificities were overcome in sympatric situations, indicating an adaptation of the pathogen to the local host. In contrast, plants were generally resistant to allopatric strains, suggesting that R genes that were efficient against exotic strains but had been overcome locally were maintained in the plant genome. These results indicated that coevolution processes between the two protagonists led to a differentiation for resistance in the three centers of diversity of the host. To improve our understanding of the molecular evolution of these different specificities, a recombinant inbred (RI) population derived from two representative genotypes of the Andean (JaloEEP558) and Mesoamerican (BAT93) gene pools was used to map anthracnose specificities. A gene cluster comprising both Andean (Co-y; Co-z) and Mesoamerican (Co-9) host resistance specificities was identified, suggesting that this locus existed prior to the separation of the two major gene pools of P. vulgaris. Molecular analysis revealed a high level of complexity at this locus. It harbors 11 restriction fragment length polymorphisms when R gene analog (RGA) clones are used. The relationship between the coevolution process and diversification of resistance specificities at resistance gene clusters is discussed.

  7. Response of two cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (French beans) plants exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation under mountain ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Raghuvanshi, Rashmi; Sharma, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiance resulting from depletion in the ozone layer has the potential to cause detrimental effects on plants. Higher altitudes tend to receive higher doses of ambient UV-B radiation. The present study was carried out to assess the effects of enhanced UV-B (ambient + 10.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) radiation on two cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Pusa Himlata and Pusa Parvati) at growth, physiological, and biochemical levels grown under mountain ecosystem. The magnitudes of negative effects of enhanced UV-B radiation were found more in Pusa Parvati as compared to Pusa Himlata. Non-enzymatic (total phenolics and flavonoids content) and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase) were increased in both cultivars at both the ages of growth but increase was found more in Pusa Himlata as compared to Pusa Parvati. The study further showed that the economic yield of Pusa Himlata and Pusa Parvati was decreased by 14 and 44%, respectively, due to enhanced UV-B radiation. The higher decrease in the economic yield of Pusa Parvati depicted that increased amounts of total flavonoids content and stimulation of their antioxidant defense mechanism via increasing the activities of enzymatic antioxidants were not able to completely detoxify the produced reactive oxygen species under enhanced UV-B radiation and made it more sensitive to applied stress. From the present study, it can be concluded that enhanced UV-B radiation in the mountain areas of the Indian Himalayan Regions could be one of the environmental causes for lower yields of agricultural crops. Cultivation of P. vulgaris L. cv. Pusa Himlata should be promoted at higher altitudes of the Indian Himalayan Regions.

  8. Inoculation of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nodule-endophyte Agrobacterium sp. 10C2 affects richness and structure of rhizosphere bacterial communities and enhances nodulation and growth.

    PubMed

    Chihaoui, Saif-Allah; Trabelsi, Darine; Jdey, Ahmed; Mhadhbi, Haythem; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2015-08-01

    Agrobacterium sp. 10C2 is a nonpathogenic and non-symbiotic nodule-endophyte strain isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris. The effect of this strain on nodulation, plant growth and rhizosphere bacterial communities of P. vulgaris is investigated under seminatural conditions. Inoculation with strain 10C2 induced an increase in nodule number (+54 %) and plant biomass (+16 %). Grains also showed a significant increase in phosphorus (+53 %), polyphenols (+217 %), flavonoids (+62 %) and total antioxidant capacity (+82 %). The effect of strain 10C2 on bacterial communities was monitored using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. When the initial soil was inoculated with strain 10C2 and left 15 days, the Agrobacterium strain did not affect TRF richness but changed structure. When common bean was sown in these soils and cultivated during 75 days, both TRF richness and structure were affected by strain 10C2. TRF richness increased in the rhizosphere soil, while it decreased in the bulk soil (root free). The taxonomic assignation of TRFs induced by strain 10C2 in the bean rhizosphere revealed the presence of four phyla (Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) with a relative preponderance of Firmicutes, represented mainly by Bacillus species. Some of these taxa (i.e., Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus senegalensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus firmus and Paenibacillus koreensis) are particularly known for their plant growth-promoting potentialities. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of strain 10C2 observed on plant growth and grain quality are explained at least in part by the indirect effect through the promotion of beneficial microorganisms.

  9. Visualisation of abscisic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds using desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sensu, Takuya; Sato, Kei; Sato, Futoshi; Paxton, Thanai; Yumoto, Emi; Miyamoto, Koji; Asahina, Masashi; Yokota, Takao; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2017-02-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the jasmonic acid related-compound 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) play crucial roles in seed development, dormancy, and germination. However, a lack of suitable techniques for visualising plant hormones has restricted the investigation of their biological mechanisms. In the present study, desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry (DESI-IMS), a powerful tool for visualising metabolites in biological tissues, was used to visualise ABA and OPDA in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed sections. The mass spectra, peak values and chemical formulae obtained from the analysis of seed sections were consistent with those determined for ABA and OPDA standards, as were the precursor and major fragment ions observed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging. Furthermore, the precursor and fragment ion images showed similar distribution patterns. In addition, the localisation of ABA and OPDA using DESI-IMS was confirmed using liquid chromatography-MS/MS (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated that ABA was mainly distributed in the radical and cotyledon of the embryo, whereas OPDA was distributed exclusively in external structures, such as the hilum and seed coat. The present study is the first to report the visualisation of plant hormones using IMS, and demonstrates that DESI-IMS is a promising technique for future plant hormone research.

  10. A specific endogenous reference for genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) DNA quantification by real-time PCR targeting lectin gene.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Rossi, Gabriela B; Zimmermann, Naíra F; Oliveira, Jaison P; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-11-01

    The Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified (GM) common bean was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Methods for the quantification of this new genetically modified organism (GMO) are necessary. The development of a suitable endogenous reference is essential for GMO quantification by real-time PCR. Based on this, a new taxon-specific endogenous reference quantification assay was developed for Phaseolus vulgaris L. Three genes encoding common bean proteins (phaseolin, arcelin, and lectin) were selected as candidates for endogenous reference. Primers targeting these candidate genes were designed and the detection was evaluated using the SYBR Green chemistry. The assay targeting lectin gene showed higher specificity than the remaining assays, and a hydrolysis probe was then designed. This assay showed high specificity for 50 common bean samples from two gene pools, Andean and Mesoamerican. For GM common bean varieties, the results were similar to those obtained for non-GM isogenic varieties with PCR efficiency values ranging from 92 to 101 %. Moreover, this assay presented a limit of detection of ten haploid genome copies. The primers and probe developed in this work are suitable to detect and quantify either GM or non-GM common bean.

  11. Study on great northern beans (Phaseolus vulgaris): effect of drum drying process on bean flour properties and effect on gamma radiation on bean starch properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rayas-Solis, P.

    1988-01-01

    Great Northern bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) drum dried flours at native pH of 6.54, pH 6 and 7 showed reduced activities of trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha..-amylase inhibitor, hemagglutinating titer, and nitrogen solubility. Electrophoretic analyses showed a slight modification of the native bean proteins, and the presence of at least four trypsin inhibitors. The study of the effect of 2.5-20 kGy irradiation doses on Great Northern beans showed essentially no modification of the electrophoretic mobility of the storage proteins or the trypsin inhibitors. Nitrogen solubility and hemagglutinating activity were essentially unchanged. With the 20 kGy dose, decrease in ..cap alpha..-amylase inhibitor activity, decrease reactive/available lysine content, and decrease cooking time of the irradiated beans after 11 months of storage were observed. Taste panel results indicated that the control and 20 kGy irradiated bean were significantly different at 5% level. At 20 kGy dose, the beans developed a partially water soluble brown color.

  12. The use of statistical methods for censored data to evaluate the activity concentration of Pb-210 in beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Mingote, Raquel M; Nogueira, Regina A

    2016-10-01

    A survey of (210)Pb activity concentration, one of the major internal natural radiation sources to man, has been carried in the most common species of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown and consumed in Brazil. The representative bean types chosen, Carioca beans and black type sown in the Brazilian Midwestern and Southern regions, have been collected in this study and (210)Pb determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry after separation with chromatographic extraction using Sr-resin. Available values in data set of radioactivity in Brazil (GEORAD) on the (210)Pb activity concentration in black beans grown in Southeastern region have been added to the results of this study with the purpose of to amplify the population considered. Concerning the multiple detection limits and due to the high level of censored observations, a robust semi-parametric statistical method called regression on order statistics (ROS) has been employed to provide a reference value of the (210)Pb in Brazilian beans, which amounted to 41 mBq kg(-1) fresh wt. The results suggest that the (210)Pb activity concentration in carioca beans is lower than in black beans. Also evaluated was the (210)Pb activity concentration in vegetable component of a typical diet, which displays lower values than those shown in the literature for food consumed in Europe.

  13. Analyses of Methylomes Derived from Meso-American Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Using MeDIP-Seq and Whole Genome Sodium Bisulfite-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Mollee; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Hossain, Khwaja; Kalavacharla, Venu

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is economically important for its high protein, fiber, and micronutrient contents, with a relatively small genome size of ∼587 Mb. Common bean is genetically diverse with two major gene pools, Meso-American and Andean. The phenotypic variability within common bean is partly attributed to the genetic diversity and epigenetic changes that are largely influenced by environmental factors. It is well established that an important epigenetic regulator of gene expression is DNA methylation. Here, we present results generated from two high-throughput sequencing technologies, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and whole genome bisulfite-sequencing (BS-Seq). Our analyses revealed that this Meso-American common bean displays similar methylation patterns as other previously published plant methylomes, with CG ∼50%, CHG ∼30%, and CHH ∼2.7% methylation, however, these differ from the common bean reference methylome of Andean origin. We identified higher CG methylation levels in both promoter and genic regions than CHG and CHH contexts. Moreover, we found relatively higher CG methylation levels in genes than in promoters. Conversely, the CHG and CHH methylation levels were highest in promoters than in genes. This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation profiling study in a Meso-American common bean cultivar (“Sierra”) using NGS approaches. Our long-term goal is to generate genome-wide epigenomic maps in common bean focusing on chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. PMID:27199997

  14. Factors affecting the effects of EDU on growth and yield of field-grown bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), with varying degrees of sensitivity to ozone.

    PubMed

    Elagöz, Vahram; Manning, William J

    2005-08-01

    The effects of foliar applications of ethylenediurea (EDU) on responses to ozone by field-grown bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines 'S156' (O(3)-sensitive) and 'R123' (O(3)-tolerant), and cultivars 'BBL 290' (O(3)-sensitive) and 'BBL 274' (O(3)-tolerant) were investigated during the 2001 and 2002 growing seasons. EDU was applied weekly to designated plants between primary leaf expansion and pod senescence. Results were compared with control plants at harvests made at pod maturation and pod senescence. In 2001, average hourly ambient O(3) concentrations ranged between 41 and 59 ppb for a total of 303 h; in 2002, for 355 h. EDU applications prior to pod maturation significantly increased the number of marketable pods in 'R123', but not for the other cultivars. Harvests at pod senescence showed significant improvements in crop yield production in EDU-treated 'S156' plants, whereas for EDU-treated 'R123' plants significant reductions were determined in above-ground biomass and seed production. In contrast, results from 'BBL 290' and 'BBL 274' at both harvest points were inconclusive. Growth and reproductive responses of O(3)-sensitive and O(3)-tolerant bush bean plants to EDU applications varied, depending on developmental stages, duration of EDU applications, and fluctuations in ambient O(3).

  15. Complete sequence, subunit structure, and complexes with pancreatic alpha-amylase of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, K; Hayashi, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    1996-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I), which is composed of two kinds of glycopolypeptide subunits, alpha and beta, was established by conventional methods. The polypeptide molecular weight of PHA-I determined by the light-scattering technique, considered together with the sequence molecular weights revealed for the subunits, indicated that PHA-I has the subunit stoichiometry of (alpha beta)2 complex. Inhibition test of PHA-I with increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) suggested that an inactive 2:1 complex is formed between PPA and PHA-I. In fact, two complexes differing from each other in the molar ratio of PPA to PHA-I were separated by gel filtration, and molecular weight estimation by the light-scattering technique confirmed that they are complexes of PHA-I with one or two PPA molecules. The binding of PPA to PHA-I appeared to follow simple binomial statistics, suggesting that two binding sites on PHA-I are independent and of high affinity for PPA.

  16. Isolation and characterization of the subunits of a heat-labile alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney bean.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H

    1993-02-01

    The heat-labile one of the two alpha-amylase inhibitors of the white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was found to be composed of three kinds of subunits, and they were isolated and characterized. The alpha-subunit was free from tryptophan and cysteine and the beta-subunit contained no methionine or cysteine. There was no marked resemblance in tryptic peptide maps between the alpha- and beta-subunit polypeptides. The alpha-subunit contained 30% by weight of carbohydrate, mainly made up of high mannose-oligosaccharides, and the sugar moiety of the beta-subunit amounted 7% and appeared to be predominantly composed of xylomannose-type oligosaccharides. The largest subunit, gamma, was very similar in molecular features to a postulated alpha beta-dimer and its N-terminal sequence coincided with that of the alpha-subunit. The molecular weights of the polypeptides of alpha, beta-, and gamma-subunits were shown to be 7,800, 14,000, and 22,000, respectively, by SDS-PAGE. It seemed likely that the alpha- and beta-subunits are common to both of the inhibitors and that the heat-lability of this inhibitor arises from the gamma-subunit.

  17. Toxicity studies of Blockal, a dietary supplement containing Phase 2 Starch Neutralizer (Phase 2), a standardized extract of the common white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Dilip

    2006-01-01

    The number of available dietary supplements containing "starch blockers" intended for weight loss has risen dramatically in recent years. These supplements are believed to reduce carbohydrate-derived calories by interfering with alpha-amylase, the digestive enzyme responsible for conversion of complex carbohydrates to simple absorbable sugars. The present paper reports the findings of single- and multiple-dose (4-week) oral toxicity studies in rats of the marketed dietary supplement Blockal. Blockal contains as its main ingredient Phase 2 Starch Neutralizer (Phase 2 or Phaseolamin 2250), a standardized extract derived from the common white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) that has been shown to have alpha-amylase-inhibiting activity. The Blockal acute oral LD50 exceeded the highest dose tested (3 g/kg body weight [bw]), which provided a single dose of 1668 mg/kg bw of Phase 2 white kidney bean extract. The no-observed-effect level (NOEL) seen in the 4-week study was equivalent to the highest Blockal dose tested (2 g/kg bw/day), which provided 1112 mg/kg/day of Phase 2 white kidney bean extract. The results of these studies support and are consistent with the safety of the marketed dietary supplement Blockal, and indirectly, the safety of its main ingredient, Phase 2 Starch Neutralizer (Phase 2 or Phaseolamin 2250), a standardized extract derived from the common white kidney bean.

  18. Fractionation and availability of heavy metals in tannery sludge-amended soil and toxicity assessment on the fully-grown Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, J; González-Chávez, M C; Esparza-García, F J; Rodríguez-Vázquez, R

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of tannery sludge on the bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivars fully-grown on a culture sandy soil, as tannery sludge is valuable to improve soil fertility but long term studies evaluating the effect on fully grown plants are scarce. Tannery sludge amendments (0, 0.77, 1.54, 3.08 and 6.16 g tannery sludge kg(-1) soil) were characterized and the main heavy metals identified (Cr, Mn, Fe, K, and Zn) later on sequentially and singly extracted, for soil fractionation and availability determination, respectively. Metals showed different fractionation and availability patterns, being the most toxic metal (Cr) found to primarily bind to the carbonate fraction in soil, while almost 10% of the total Cr was available for plant uptake. In the green house experiments, bush bean cultivars exposed to increasing tannery sludge amendments were evaluated at different plant stages. Metal accumulation and physiological parameters (chlorophyll, carotenoids, nitrate reductase activity and dry weight) were determined. Toxicity was primarily due to Cr, stimulating or affecting the response of physiological parameters and suppressing seed formation at the highest tannery sludge ratio. Metals were mainly accumulated in the roots of bush beans, diminishing in the upper part of the plants with minimal translocation to seeds, supposing little risk for human consumption. Additionally, important correlations, antagonistic and synergistic relationships were observed between the extracted metals and metal accumulation in plant tissues.

  19. Functional properties and in vitro trypsin digestibility of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate: Effect of high-pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Tang, Chuan-He; Wen, Qi-Biao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Li, Lin

    2008-10-15

    The effects of high-pressure (HP) treatment at 200-600MPa, prior to freeze-drying, on some functional properties and in vitro trypsin digestibility of vicilin-rich red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) were investigated. Surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl (SH) and disulfide bond (SS) contents were also evaluated. HP treatment resulted in gradual unfolding of protein structure, as evidenced by gradual increases in fluorescence strength and SS formation from SH groups, and decrease in denaturation enthalpy change. The protein solubility of KPI was significantly improved at pressures of 400MPa or higher, possibly due to formation of soluble aggregate from insoluble precipitate. HP treatment at 200 and 400MPa significantly increased emulsifying activity index (EAI) and emulsion stability index (ESI); however, EAI was significantly decreased at 600MPa (relative to untreated KPI). The thermal stability of the vicilin component was not affected by HP treatment. Additionally, in vitro trypsin digestibility of KPI was decreased only at a pressure above 200MPa and for long incubation time (e.g., 120min). The data suggest that some physiochemical and functional properties of vicilin-rich kidney proteins can be improved by means of high-pressure treatment.

  20. [Development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) cultivated in the State of Parana and containing arcelin].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Costa, Cibele S; Pereira, Paulo Roberto V da S; Zukovski, Luciana

    2007-01-01

    This research intended to evaluate the development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh.), a stored-grain pest, on bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) commonly cultivated in the State of Parana and containing arcelin, and the possible resistance of these genotypes to the bruchine. Tests were performed under laboratory conditions (27 masculineC, fotophase 12h, 50 +/- 10 % RH) with the genotypes TPS-Bionobre, IAC-Una, IPR-Uirapuru, IAPAR 44, IPR Juriti, IAPAR 81, Pérola, Carioca, Bolinha, and two others containing arcelin, Arc 1 and Arc 2. The genotypes with Arc 1 and 2 alleles caused higher mortality of immature stages; in Arc 1 developmental period was prolonged and the male and female dry weights were the lowest, suggesting an antibiosis mechanism of resistance. Non-preference for oviposition was not observed for these two genotypes. Among varieties without arcelin, IAPAR 44 was the most resistant to the bruchid, being the least preferred for oviposition, and promoting low percentage of viable eggs, long developmental period and reduced male and female adult dry weight. Perola, IPR Juriti and Bolinha with high number of eggs and viable eggs, low mortality of immature stages, were the most susceptible.

  1. Transcriptional profile of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 in response to tissue extracts from a susceptible Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is a Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes "halo blight" disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This disease affects both foliage and pods, and is a major problem in temperate areas of the world. Although several bacterial genes have been determined as participants in pathogenesis, the overall process still remains poorly understood, mainly because the identity and function of many of the genes are largely unknown. In this work, a genomic library of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 was constructed and PCR amplification of individual fragments was carried out in order to print a DNA microarray. This microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed when bean leaf extracts, pod extracts or apoplastic fluid were added to the growth medium. Results Transcription profiles show that 224 genes were differentially expressed, the majority under the effect of bean leaf extract and apoplastic fluid. Some of the induced genes were previously known to be involved in the first stages of the bacterial-plant interaction and virulence. These include genes encoding type III secretion system proteins and genes involved in cell-wall degradation, phaseolotoxin synthesis and aerobic metabolism. On the other hand, most repressed genes were found to be involved in the uptake and metabolism of iron. Conclusion This study furthers the understanding of the mechanisms involved, responses and the metabolic adaptation that occurs during the interaction of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola with a susceptible host plant. PMID:20003402

  2. A novel Moringa oleifera leaf extract can mitigate the stress effects of salinity and cadmium in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Howladar, Saad M

    2014-02-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris plants were grown in the presence of NaCl and/or CdCl2 beginning from the second week, sprayed twice with moringa leaf extract (MLE) at 21 and 28 days after sowing (DAS), and were sampled at 35 DAS for growth and chemical analyses and yielded at the end of experiment. Growth traits, level of photosynthetic pigments, green pod yield and pod protein were significantly reduced with exposing the plants to NaCl and/or CdCl2. However, the follow up foliar application with MLE detoxified the stress generated by NaCl and/or CdCl2 and significantly enhanced the aforementioned parameters. Either individual or combined used stresses increased the electrolyte leakage (EL), lipid peroxidation and plant Cd(2+) content, and decreased the membrane stability index (MSI) and relative water content (RWC). However, the foliar application of MLE in the absence of the stress improved the MSI and RWC and minimized plant Cd(2+) content but could not affect EL and lipid peroxidation. Proline content and the activity of antioxidant enzymes showed a significant increase in response to MLE as well as to NaCl and/or CdCl2 stress.

  3. L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Characterization and differential expression of antigenic multiple Mr forms.

    PubMed

    Bolwell, G P; Rodgers, M W

    1991-10-01

    L-Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) purified from suspension-cultured cells of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been further characterized. A number of techniques, including use of an antiserum and affinity probes, have established that all the antigenic polypeptides represent polymorphic Mr forms of the enzyme. These peptides include an apparently higher-Mr (83,000) form which shows different kinetics of induction from the Mr-77000 forms that have been extensively characterized previously. The larger subunit appeared to be PAL by the following criteria: (a) binding to specific affinity and antibody matrices; (b) peptide mapping; (c) active-site labelling; and (d) amino acid composition. The increased Mr of the larger subunit was not completely attributable to glycosylation, although some sugar residues were detected in this Mr-83000 form but not in the other Mr forms. Mr-83000 subunits were also immunoprecipitated from translations in vitro of mRNA from cells that had been stressed for a long period. They were also detected in leaf tissues that were not yet undergoing an extensive wound response. This form of the enzyme may be constitutive and involved in the low-level accumulation of phenolics in most cell types. By contrast, the Mr-77000 forms of PAL were rapidly induced during elicitor action, wounding or cytokinin-induced xylogenesis as a key regulatory enzyme involved in the synthesis of phenolics under stress conditions or during differentiation.

  4. Appetite control and glycaemia reduction in overweight subjects treated with a combination of two highly standardized extracts from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus.

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Giacosa, Attilio; Orsini, Francesca; Opizzi, Annalisa; Villani, Simona

    2011-09-01

    The management of overweight may include the use of dietary supplements targeted to favour the increase of the satiation associated with a decrease in blood glucose and lipid levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a dietary supplementation with an extract from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus, on satiation, the glucose and lipid pattern. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 39 overweight subjects (20 supplemented group, 19 placebo group) for 2 months. The modification of satiation, by Haber's scale, was the primary end-point, and the variation of the glucose and lipid pattern, of the anthropometric parameters and of the psychodynamic tests score were the secondary end-points. At the end of treatment, the net change of the Haber's mean score increased significantly in the intervention group. The net change of the glycaemia and of the dietary restriction score of the three factor eating questionnaire (TFEQ), were reduced significantly only in the intervention group. Moreover, in the supplemented group, the homeostasis model assessment, the body mass index and the susceptibility-to-hunger score of the TFEQ, decreased significantly after intervention; these parameters did not change in the controls. This treatment appears potentially useful in the management of overweight and dysglycaemia.

  5. EDTA Shuttle Effect vs. Lignosulfonate Direct Effect Providing Zn to Navy Bean Plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L ‘Negro Polo’) in a Calcareous Soil

    PubMed Central

    Cieschi, María T.; Benedicto, Ana; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes; Lucena, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Zn-Lignosulfonates (LS) fertilizers are used as an eco-friendly alternative to chelate formulations. The mechanisms of Zn release in the rhizosphere by both types of products are compared. The ability to provide Zn to Phaseolus vulgaris L of non-modified and chemically modified ZnLS and ZnEDTA is compared in a hydroponic assay. Stable isotope 67Zn was used to study Zn source (fertilizer, ZnFer, or native, ZnNat) uptake and distribution in plants in two soil pot experiments. ZnEDTA was the best treatment to provide both ZnFer and ZnNat to navy bean plants. A shuttle effect mechanism and an isotopic exchange may occur. ZnLS from eucalyptus (ZnLSE) provides more Zn to the plant than LS from spruce. Chemical modifications of ZnLSE does not improve its efficiency. A double dose of ZnLSE provides similar ZnFer in leaves and similar soluble ZnFer content in soil than ZnEDTA. A model for the Zn fertilizers behavior in the soil and plant system is presented, showing the shuttle effect for the synthetic chelate and the direct delivery in the rhizosphere for the ZnLS complex. PMID:28018367

  6. Two glutamine synthetase genes from Phaseolus vulgaris L. display contrasting developmental and spatial patterns of expression in transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants.

    PubMed

    Forde, B G; Day, H M; Turton, J F; Shen, W J; Cullimore, J V; Oliver, J E

    1989-04-01

    The gln-gamma gene, which specifies the gamma subunit of glutamine synthetase in Phaseolus vulgaris L., has been isolated and the regulatory properties of its promoter region analyzed in transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants. A 2-kilobase fragment from the 5'-flanking region of gln-gamma conferred a strongly nodule-enhanced pattern of expression on the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Parallel studies on the promoter of another glutamine synthetase gene (gln-beta) showed that a 1.7-kilobase fragment directed 20-fold to 140-fold higher levels of beta-glucuronidase expression in roots than in shoots. Histochemical localization of beta-glucuronidase activity in nodules of the transgenic plants indicated that the chimeric gln-gamma gene was expressed specifically in the rhizobially infected cells; expression of the gln-beta construct was detected in both cortical and infected regions of young nodules, and became restricted to the vascular tissue as the nodule matured. We conclude that gln-beta and gln-gamma genes are differentially expressed both temporally and spatially in plant development and that the cis-acting regulatory elements responsible for conferring these contrasting expression patterns are located within a 2-kilobase region upstream of their coding sequences.

  7. Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Activities of the Extracts of Twelve Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Endemic Ecotypes of Southern Italy before and after Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Ombra, Maria Neve; d'Acierno, Antonio; Riccardi, Riccardo; Spigno, Patrizia; Zaccardelli, Massimo; Pane, Catello; Maione, Mena; Fratianni, Florinda

    2016-01-01

    Beans are important dietary components with versatile health benefits. We analysed the extracts of twelve ecotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris in order to determine their phenolic profiles, antioxidant activity, and the in vitro antiproliferative activity. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (UPLC-DAD) admitted us to detect and quantify some known polyphenols, such as gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epicatechin, myricetin, formononetin, caffeic acid, and kaempferol. The antioxidant activity (AA) ranged from 1.568 ± 0.041 to 66.572 ± 3.197 mg necessary to inhibit the activity of the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical by 50% (EC50). The extracts, except those obtained from the nonpigmented samples, were capable of inhibiting the proliferation of the human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells, human breast cancer cells MCF-7, and A549 NSCLC cell line. Cultivars differed in composition and concentration of polyphenols including anthocyanins; cooking affected the antioxidant activity only marginally. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition between the groups of beans influenced the biological activities; on the other hand, we did not find significant differences on the biological activities within the same variety, before and after cooking. PMID:28105248

  8. Selective microenvironmental effects play a role in shaping genetic diversity and structure in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. landrace: implications for on-farm conservation.

    PubMed

    Tiranti, B; Negri, V

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the organization of landrace diversity and about the forces that shape and maintain within- and among-landrace population diversity. However, this knowledge is essential for conservation and breeding activities. The first aim of this study was to obtain some insight into how variation has been sculptured within a cultivated environment and to identify the loci that potentially underlie selective effects by using a Phaseolus vulgaris L. landrace case study whose natural and human environment and morpho-physiological traits are known in detail. The second aim of this study was to define an appropriate on-farm conservation strategy which can serve as a model for other populations. The farmers' populations of this threatened landrace were examined with 28 single sequence repeat molecular markers. The landrace appears to be a genetically structured population in which substantial diversity is maintained at the subpopulation level (62% of the total variance). Evidence of locus-specific selective effects was obtained for five of the 13 loci-differentiating subpopulations. Their role is discussed. Our data suggest that a complex interaction of factors (differential microenvironmental selection pressures by farmers and by biotic and abiotic conditions, migration rate and drift) explains the observed pattern of diversity. Appropriate on-farm conservation of a structured landrace requires the maintenance of the entire population.

  9. Asymmetry of gene flow and differential geographical structure of molecular diversity in wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Papa, R; Gepts, P

    2003-01-01

    Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), we analyzed the genetic structure of wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica at different geographical levels to test the hypothesis of asymmetric gene flow and investigate the origin of weedy populations. We showed both by phenetic and admixture population analyses that gene flow is about three- to four-fold higher from domesticated to wild populations than in the reverse direction. This result, combined with other work, points to a displacement of genetic diversity in wild populations due to gene flow from the domesticated populations. The weedy populations appear to be genetically intermediate between domesticated and wild populations, suggesting that they originated by hybridization between wild and domesticated types rather than by escape from cultivation. In addition, the domesticated bean races were genetically similar confirming a single domestication event for the Mesoamerican gene pool. Finally, the genetic diversity of the domesticated bean population showed a lower level of geographic structure in comparison to that of the wild populations.

  10. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  11. Visualisation of abscisic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds using desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sensu, Takuya; Sato, Kei; Sato, Futoshi; Paxton, Thanai; Yumoto, Emi; Miyamoto, Koji; Asahina, Masashi; Yokota, Takao; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the jasmonic acid related-compound 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) play crucial roles in seed development, dormancy, and germination. However, a lack of suitable techniques for visualising plant hormones has restricted the investigation of their biological mechanisms. In the present study, desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry (DESI-IMS), a powerful tool for visualising metabolites in biological tissues, was used to visualise ABA and OPDA in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed sections. The mass spectra, peak values and chemical formulae obtained from the analysis of seed sections were consistent with those determined for ABA and OPDA standards, as were the precursor and major fragment ions observed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging. Furthermore, the precursor and fragment ion images showed similar distribution patterns. In addition, the localisation of ABA and OPDA using DESI-IMS was confirmed using liquid chromatography-MS/MS (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated that ABA was mainly distributed in the radical and cotyledon of the embryo, whereas OPDA was distributed exclusively in external structures, such as the hilum and seed coat. The present study is the first to report the visualisation of plant hormones using IMS, and demonstrates that DESI-IMS is a promising technique for future plant hormone research. PMID:28211480

  12. Structural and Functional Divergence of a 1-Mb Duplicated Region in the Soybean (Glycine max) Genome and Comparison to an Orthologous Region from Phaseolus vulgaris[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jer-Young; Stupar, Robert M.; Hans, Christian; Hyten, David L.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) has undergone at least two rounds of polyploidization, resulting in a paleopolyploid genome that is a mosaic of homoeologous regions. To determine the structural and functional impact of these duplications, we sequenced two ~1-Mb homoeologous regions of soybean, Gm8 and Gm15, derived from the most recent ~13 million year duplication event and the orthologous region from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), Pv5. We observed inversions leading to major structural variation and a bias between the two chromosome segments as Gm15 experienced more gene movement (gene retention rate of 81% in Gm15 versus 91% in Gm8) and a nearly twofold increase in the deletion of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons via solo LTR formation. Functional analyses of Gm15 and Gm8 revealed decreases in gene expression and synonymous substitution rates for Gm15, for instance, a 38% increase in transcript levels from Gm8 relative to Gm15. Transcriptional divergence of homoeologs was found based on expression patterns among seven tissues and developmental stages. Our results indicate asymmetric evolution between homoeologous regions of soybean as evidenced by structural changes and expression variances of homoeologous genes. PMID:20729383

  13. Assessing potential effects of inulin and probiotic bacteria on Fe availability from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Laparra, J M; Glahn, R P; Miller, D D

    2009-03-01

    Inulin, a prebiotic, may enhance intestinal Fe absorption. Our objective was to assess the effects of supplemental inulin and 2 probiotic bacteria (B. infantis and L. acidophillus) on Fe availability to Caco-2 cells from common white and red beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Cooked beans were mixed or not with supplemental inulin (4%, w/w), and then subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion (pepsin, pH 2; pancreatin, pH 7.2). Subsequently, the digests were incubated overnight with and without B. infantis or L. acidophilus. Ferritin formation in Caco-2 cells was used to evaluate Fe uptake. Total soluble phenols (Folin-Ciocalteau) and phytate (HPLC-electrochemical detection) were quantified, and the flavonoids profile (HPLC-PDA/UV detection) was monitored in the digests. Supplemental inulin did not affect Fe uptake from white nor red beans. Incubation with B. infantis increased total soluble phenols (TSP) in the digests and decreased Fe uptake. Incubation with L. acidophilus decreased TSP in the digest and increased Fe uptake. Variations in Fe uptake were not associated with soluble phytate concentrations in the digests. The largest change in flavonoids profile were found in the digests incubated with L. acidophilus, which decreased the soluble concentration of astragalin (kaempferol-3-O-glucoside). These results suggest that certain probiotics could increase Fe uptake from common beans.

  14. Effect of different soaking solutions on nutritive utilization of minerals (calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium) from cooked beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Nestares, Teresa; Barrionuevo, Mercedes; López-Frías, Magdalena; Vidal, Concepción; Urbano, Gloria

    2003-01-15

    The effects of the commonly used processing techniques of soaking (at different pH values) and cooking on the digestive and nutritive utilization of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were studied. Before the cooking step, the beans were soaked in solutions of acid (2.6 and 5.3) or basic (8.4) pH. Chemical and biological methods were used to determine nutritional parameters in growing rats, and the fiber content of the beans was established. As the pH of the soaking solution increased, so did mineral absorption and the apparent digestibility coefficient, which reached suitable values for growing rats, due to the reduced losses of soluble minerals and the increased food intake. Metabolic utilization also improved with increased pH of the soaking solution, although the values were, in general, low as a result of urinary losses under the experimental conditions. For the experimental period of 10 days, the femur and the muscle seem to be good metabolic indicators for calcium, but not for phosphorus or magnesium. The increased amount of cellulose in the soaked seed did not have a negative effect on the digestive utilization of minerals.

  15. Characterization and Comparison of Protein and Peptide Profiles and their Biological Activities of Improved Common Bean Cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mexico and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Luis; de Mejía, Elvira González

    2015-06-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a good source of protein, vitamins, minerals and complex carbohydrates. The objective was to compare protein profile, including anti-nutrient proteins, and potential bioactive peptides of improved common bean cultivars grown in Mexico and Brazil. Bean protein isolates (BPI) were prepared from 15 common bean cultivars and hydrolyzed using pepsin/pancreatin. Thirteen proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE and protein in-gel tryptic-digestion-LC/MS. Protein profile was similar among common bean cultivars with high concentrations of defense-related proteins. Major identified proteins were phaseolin, lectin, protease and α-amylase inhibitors. Lectin (159.2 to 357.9 mg lectin/g BPI), Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (inh) (4.3 to 75.5 mg trypsin inh/g BPI), Bowman-Birk inhibitor (5.4 to 14.3 μg trypsin-chymotrypsin inh/g BPI) and α-amylase inhibitor activity (2.5 to 14.9% inhibition relative to acarbose/mg BPI) were higher in Mexican beans compared to Brazilian beans. Abundant peptides were identified by HPLC-MS/MS with molecular masses ranging from 300 to 1500 Da and significant sequences were SGAM, DSSG, LLAH, YVAT, EPTE and KPKL. Potential bioactivities of sequenced peptides were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE), dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor (DPP-IV) and antioxidant capacity. Peptides from common bean proteins presented potential biological activities related to control of hypertension and type-2 diabetes.

  16. Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Activities of the Extracts of Twelve Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Endemic Ecotypes of Southern Italy before and after Cooking.

    PubMed

    Ombra, Maria Neve; d'Acierno, Antonio; Nazzaro, Filomena; Riccardi, Riccardo; Spigno, Patrizia; Zaccardelli, Massimo; Pane, Catello; Maione, Mena; Fratianni, Florinda

    2016-01-01

    Beans are important dietary components with versatile health benefits. We analysed the extracts of twelve ecotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris in order to determine their phenolic profiles, antioxidant activity, and the in vitro antiproliferative activity. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (UPLC-DAD) admitted us to detect and quantify some known polyphenols, such as gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epicatechin, myricetin, formononetin, caffeic acid, and kaempferol. The antioxidant activity (AA) ranged from 1.568 ± 0.041 to 66.572 ± 3.197 mg necessary to inhibit the activity of the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical by 50% (EC50). The extracts, except those obtained from the nonpigmented samples, were capable of inhibiting the proliferation of the human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells, human breast cancer cells MCF-7, and A549 NSCLC cell line. Cultivars differed in composition and concentration of polyphenols including anthocyanins; cooking affected the antioxidant activity only marginally. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition between the groups of beans influenced the biological activities; on the other hand, we did not find significant differences on the biological activities within the same variety, before and after cooking.

  17. The effect of wind velocity, air temperature and humidity on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hove, L. W. A.; Vredenberg, W. J.; Adema, E. H.

    The influence of wind velocity, air temperature and vapour pressure deficit of the air (VPD) on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was examined using a leaf chamber. The measurements suggested a transition in the properties of the leaf boundary layer at a wind velocity of 0.3-0.4 ms -1 which corresponds to a Recrit value of about 2000. At higher wind velocities the leaf boundary layer resistance ( rb) was 1.5-2 times lower than can be calculated from the theory. Nevertheless, the assessed relationships between rb and wind velocity appeared to be similar to the theoretical derived relationship for rb. The NH 3 flux and in particular the SO 2 flux into the leaf strongly increased at a VPD decline. The increase of the NH 3 flux could be attributed to an increase of the stomatal conductance ( gs). However, the increase of the SO 2 flux could only partly be explained by an increase of gs. An apparent additional uptake was also observed for the NH 3 uptake at a low temperature and VPD. The SO 2 flux was also influenced by air temperature which could be explained by a temperature effect on gs. The results suggest that calculation of the NH 3 and SO 2 flux using data of gs gives a serious understimation of the real flux of these gases into leaves at a low temperature and VPD.

  18. Analysis of rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris from Hispaniola Island, a geographic bridge between Meso and South America and the first historical link with Europe.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alcántara, César-Antonio; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Mulas, Daniel; García-Fraile, Paula; Gómez-Moriano, Alicia; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna; González-Andrés, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Hispaniola Island was the first stopover in the travels of Columbus between America and Spain, and played a crucial role in the exchange of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds and their endosymbionts. The analysis of recA and atpD genes from strains nodulating this legume in coastal and inner regions of Hispaniola Island showed that they were almost identical to those of the American strains CIAT 652, Ch24-10 and CNPAF512, which were initially named as Rhizobium etli and have been recently reclassified into Rhizobium phaseoli after the analysis of their genomes. Therefore, the species R. phaseoli is more abundant in America than previously thought, and since the proposal of the American origin of R. etli was based on the analysis of several strains that are currently known to be R. phaseoli, it can be concluded that both species have an American origin coevolving with their host in its distribution centres. The analysis of the symbiovar phaseoli nodC gene alleles carried by different species isolated in American and European countries suggested a Mesoamerican origin of the α allele and an Andean origin of the γ allele, which is supported by the dominance of this latter allele in Europe where mostly Andean cultivars of common beans have been traditionally cultivated.

  19. Effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate on polar lipids and fatty acids in leaves of morning glory and kidney bean. [Pharbitis nil; Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Nouchi, Isamu; Toyama, Susumu Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo )

    1988-07-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners.

  20. Effects of ozone, sulfur dioxide, and alpha and delta races of Colletotrichum Lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn. ) Bri and Cav. on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Achwanya, O.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars were evaluated for their responses to the air pollutants ozone and sulfur dioxide singly and in combination, as well as for their reaction to the alpha and delta races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Bri and Cav. Variation in response to both the pollutants and the fungus was noted among the cultivars. Anthracnose caused a reduction in the biomass of some cultivars of the order of 50%. A negative correlation of (r = -0.72, p < 0.0001) was found between the disease severity and the total plant biomass. Greater than additive effects of O/sub 3/ + SO/sub 2/ mixtures were demonstrated. Chlorophyll content and biomass were found to be reliable variables for assessing treatment effects. The pollutants appeared to stimulate the disease development. Greater pollutant injury was also in the presence of the anthracnose disease. The results indicated that there was an interaction between the fungal disease and the air pollutants. Implications for evaluating bean cultivars for resistance to C. lindemuthianum under polluted atmosphere are suggested.

  1. Early changes in apoplast composition associated with defence and disease in interactions between Phaseolus vulgaris and the halo blight pathogen Pseudomonas syringae Pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Brendan M.; Neale, Helen C.; Geilfus, Christoph‐Martin; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The apoplast is the arena in which endophytic pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae grow and interact with plant cells. Using metabolomic and ion analysis techniques, this study shows how the composition of Phaseolus vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid changes during the first six hours of compatible and incompatible interactions with two strains of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) that differ in the presence of the genomic island PPHGI‐1. Leaf inoculation with the avirulent island‐carrying strain Pph 1302A elicited effector‐triggered immunity (ETI) and resulted in specific changes in apoplast composition, including increases in conductivity, pH, citrate, γ‐aminobutyrate (GABA) and K+, that are linked to the onset of plant defence responses. Other apoplastic changes, including increases in Ca2+, Fe2/3+ Mg2+, sucrose, β‐cyanoalanine and several amino acids, occurred to a relatively similar extent in interactions with both Pph 1302A and the virulent, island‐less strain Pph RJ3. Metabolic footprinting experiments established that Pph preferentially metabolizes malate, glucose and glutamate, but excludes certain other abundant apoplastic metabolites, including citrate and GABA, until preferred metabolites are depleted. These results demonstrate that Pph is well‐adapted to the leaf apoplast metabolic environment and that loss of PPHGI‐1 enables Pph to avoid changes in apoplast composition linked to plant defences. PMID:27239727

  2. D-Glucosone and L-sorbosone, putative intermediates of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis in detached bean and spinach leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazumi; Nick, J.A.; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    D-(6-{sup 14}C)Glucosone that had been prepared enzymically from D-(6-{sup 14}C)glucose was used to compare relative efficiencies of these two sugars for L-ascorbic acid (AA) biosynthesis in detached bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv California small white) apices and 4-week-old spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv Giant Noble) leaves. At tracer concentration, {sup 14}C from glucosone was utilized by spinach leaves for AA biosynthesis much more effectively than glucose. Carbon-14 from (6-{sup 14}C)glucose underwent considerable redistribution during AA formation, whereas {sup 14}C from (6-{sup 14}C)glucosone remained almost totally in carbon 6 of AA. In other experiments with spinach leaves, L-(U-{sup 14}C)sorbosone was found to be equivalent to (6-{sup 14}C)glucose as a source of {sup 14}C for AA. In the presence of 0.1% D-glucosone, conversion of (6-{sup 14}C) glucose into labeled AA was greatly repressed. In a comparable experiment with L-sorbosone replacing D-glucosone, the effect was much less. The experiments described here give substance to the proposal that D-glucosone and L-sorbosone are putative intermediates in the conversion of D-glucose to AA in higher plants.

  3. Measurement of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate in plant leaves by isotope dilution. [Spinacea oleracea; Triticum aestivum; Arabidopsis thaliana; Maize; Phaseolus vulgaris; Petunia hybrida

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.D.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1991-05-01

    The level of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) in leaves of 12 species was determined by an isotope dilution assay. {sup 14}C-labeled standard was synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C)carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate using acid phosphatase, and was added at the initial point of leaf extraction. Leaf CA1P was purified and its specific activity determined. CA1P was found in dark-treated leaves of all species examined, including spinach (Spinacea oleracea), wheat (Triticum aestivum), Arabidopsis thaliana, and maize (Zea mays). The highest amounts were found in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and petunia (Petunia hybrida), which had 1.5 to 1.8 moles CA1P per mole ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase catalytic sites. Most species had intermediate amounts of CA1P (0.2 to 0.8 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). Such intermediate to high levels of CA1P support the hypothesis that CA1P functions in many species as a light-dependent regulator of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and whole leaf photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation. However, CA1P levels in spinach, wheat, and A. thaliana were particularly low (less than 0.09 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). In such species, CA1P does not likely have a significant role in regulating ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but could have a different physiological role.

  4. Engineering the nifH promoter region and abolishing poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate accumulation in Rhizobium etli enhance nitrogen fixation in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Humberto; Mora, Yolanda; Salazar, Emmanuel; Encarnación, Sergio; Palacios, Rafael; Mora, Jaime

    2004-06-01

    Rhizobium etli, as well as some other rhizobia, presents nitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene reiterations. Several R. etli strains studied in this laboratory showed a unique organization and contained two complete nifHDK operons (copies a and b) and a truncated nifHD operon (copy c). Expression analysis of lacZ fusion demonstrated that copies a and b in strain CFN42 are transcribed at lower levels than copy c, although this copy has no discernible role during nitrogen fixation. To increase nitrogenase production, we constructed a chimeric nifHDK operon regulated by the strong nifHc promoter sequence and expressed it in symbiosis with the common bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris), either cloned on a stably inherited plasmid or incorporated into the symbiotic plasmid (pSym). Compared with the wild-type strain, strains with the nitrogenase overexpression construction assayed in greenhouse experiments had, increased nitrogenase activity (58% on average), increased plant weight (32% on average), increased nitrogen content in plants (15% at 32 days postinoculation), and most importantly, higher seed yield (36% on average), higher nitrogen content (25%), and higher nitrogen yield (72% on average) in seeds. Additionally, expression of the chimeric nifHDK operon in a poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate-negative R. etli strain produced an additive effect in enhancing symbiosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of increased seed yield and nutritional content in the common bean obtained by using only the genetic material already present in Rhizobium.

  5. Engineering the nifH Promoter Region and Abolishing Poly-β-Hydroxybutyrate Accumulation in Rhizobium etli Enhance Nitrogen Fixation in Symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Humberto; Mora, Yolanda; Salazar, Emmanuel; Encarnación, Sergio; Palacios, Rafael; Mora, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Rhizobium etli, as well as some other rhizobia, presents nitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene reiterations. Several R. etli strains studied in this laboratory showed a unique organization and contained two complete nifHDK operons (copies a and b) and a truncated nifHD operon (copy c). Expression analysis of lacZ fusion demonstrated that copies a and b in strain CFN42 are transcribed at lower levels than copy c, although this copy has no discernible role during nitrogen fixation. To increase nitrogenase production, we constructed a chimeric nifHDK operon regulated by the strong nifHc promoter sequence and expressed it in symbiosis with the common bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris), either cloned on a stably inherited plasmid or incorporated into the symbiotic plasmid (pSym). Compared with the wild-type strain, strains with the nitrogenase overexpression construction assayed in greenhouse experiments had, increased nitrogenase activity (58% on average), increased plant weight (32% on average), increased nitrogen content in plants (15% at 32 days postinoculation), and most importantly, higher seed yield (36% on average), higher nitrogen content (25%), and higher nitrogen yield (72% on average) in seeds. Additionally, expression of the chimeric nifHDK operon in a poly-β-hydroxybutyrate-negative R. etli strain produced an additive effect in enhancing symbiosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of increased seed yield and nutritional content in the common bean obtained by using only the genetic material already present in Rhizobium. PMID:15184121

  6. Use of two varieties of hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) in the processing of koki (a steamed legume product).

    PubMed

    Mbofung, C M; Rigby, N; Waldron, K

    1999-01-01

    Koki is a nutritious cowpea-based food product usually processed by steam cooking whipped cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) paste mixed with spices and palm oil. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of the partial replacement of cowpeas (CP) with hard-to-cook (HTC) beans on the chemical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of koki. Towards this objective, two varieties of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans--RKB and mottled brown beans--MBB), each with the HTC defect, were separately incorporated into cowpea paste in the following Bean:CP ratios 0:100, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and processed into koki. Incorporation of dry HTC beans into cowpeas in the making of koki affected the bulking properties of the uncooked paste, the nutrient composition, essential amino acid content, antinutritional factors, digestibility as well as the sensory attributes of cooked koki. Sensory tests showed that a highly acceptable, nutritious and digestible koki can be processed from cowpeas partially replaced with dry HTC bean paste up to levels of about 40-50% depending on the variety of dry bean used.

  7. Analyses of Methylomes Derived from Meso-American Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Using MeDIP-Seq and Whole Genome Sodium Bisulfite-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Mollee; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Hossain, Khwaja; Kalavacharla, Venu

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is economically important for its high protein, fiber, and micronutrient contents, with a relatively small genome size of ∼587 Mb. Common bean is genetically diverse with two major gene pools, Meso-American and Andean. The phenotypic variability within common bean is partly attributed to the genetic diversity and epigenetic changes that are largely influenced by environmental factors. It is well established that an important epigenetic regulator of gene expression is DNA methylation. Here, we present results generated from two high-throughput sequencing technologies, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and whole genome bisulfite-sequencing (BS-Seq). Our analyses revealed that this Meso-American common bean displays similar methylation patterns as other previously published plant methylomes, with CG ∼50%, CHG ∼30%, and CHH ∼2.7% methylation, however, these differ from the common bean reference methylome of Andean origin. We identified higher CG methylation levels in both promoter and genic regions than CHG and CHH contexts. Moreover, we found relatively higher CG methylation levels in genes than in promoters. Conversely, the CHG and CHH methylation levels were highest in promoters than in genes. This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation profiling study in a Meso-American common bean cultivar ("Sierra") using NGS approaches. Our long-term goal is to generate genome-wide epigenomic maps in common bean focusing on chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, and DNA methylation.

  8. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications (H3K9me2 and H4K12ac) and Gene Expression in Rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) Inoculated Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Bhide, Ketaki P.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Smolinski, Tomasz G.; Manoharan, Muthusamy; Thurston, Yaqoob; Todd, Antonette; Kingham, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications such as methylation and acetylation play a significant role in controlling gene expression in unstressed and stressed plants. Genome-wide analysis of such stress-responsive modifications and genes in non-model crops is limited. We report the genome-wide profiling of histone methylation (H3K9me2) and acetylation (H4K12ac) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) stress using two high-throughput approaches, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 1,235 and 556 histone methylation and acetylation responsive genes from common bean leaves treated with the rust pathogen at 0, 12 and 84 hour-after-inoculation (hai), while RNA-Seq analysis identified 145 and 1,763 genes differentially expressed between mock-inoculated and inoculated plants. The combined ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analyses identified some key defense responsive genes (calmodulin, cytochrome p450, chitinase, DNA Pol II, and LRR) and transcription factors (WRKY, bZIP, MYB, HSFB3, GRAS, NAC, and NMRA) in bean-rust interaction. Differential methylation and acetylation affected a large proportion of stress-responsive genes including resistant (R) proteins, detoxifying enzymes, and genes involved in ion flux and cell death. The genes identified were functionally classified using Gene Ontology (GO) and EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOGs). The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified a putative pathway with ten key genes involved in plant-pathogen interactions. This first report of an integrated analysis of histone modifications and gene expression involved in the bean-rust interaction as reported here provides a comprehensive resource for other epigenomic regulation studies in non-model species under stress. PMID:26167691

  9. Manipulation of light and CO2 environments of the primary leaves of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects photosynthesis in both the primary and the first trifoliate leaves: involvement of systemic regulation.

    PubMed

    Araya, Takao; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Possible involvement of systemic regulation of the photosynthetic properties of young leaves by the local environments and/or photosynthate production of the mature leaves were examined using Phaseolus vulgaris plants. When primary leaves (PLs) were treated with air containing 150 microL CO2 L(-1) with the other plant parts in ambient air at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 300 micromol photon m(-2) s(-1), decreases in the photosynthetic rate measured at 360 microL CO2 L(-1) and a PPFD of 300 micromol photon m(-2) s(-1) (A360) were markedly retarded in both PLs and the first trifoliate leaves (TLs) as compared to plants treated with 400 microL CO2 L(-1). Conversely, when PLs were treated with 1000 microL CO2 L(-1), decreases in A360 were accelerated in both PLs and TLs. Shading of PLs accelerated the decrease in PL A360, and delayed the decrease in TLs. In the CO2 treatments, changes in A360 in TLs were mainly attributed to the changes in ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation rate, while the shading of PLs caused increases in both the RuBP carboxylation and regeneration rates in TLs. The ribulose 1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity on chlorophyll basis, an indicator of sun/shade acclimation, differed both among PLs and among TLs in accordance with the redox state of photosystem II (PSII) in PLs. Although carbohydrate contents of TLs were not affected by any manipulation of PLs, changes in the photosynthetic capacities of TLs acted to compensate for changes in PL photosynthesis. These results clearly indicate that the CO2 and shade treatments of PLs not only affect photosynthetic properties of the PLs themselves, but also systemically affected the photosynthetic properties of TLs. Possible roles of the redox state and photosynthate concentration in PLs in regulation of photosynthesis in PLs and TLs are discussed.

  10. Partitioning of photosynthetic electron flow between CO2 and O 2 reduction in a C 3 leaf (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) at different CO 2 concentrations and during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Cornic, G; Briantais, J M

    1991-01-01

    Photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf net gas exchanges (CO2 and H2O) were measured simultaneously on bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) submitted either to different ambient CO2 concentrations or to a drought stress. When leaves are under photorespiratory conditions, a simple fluorescence parameter ΔF/ Fm (B. Genty et al. 1989, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 990, 87-92; ΔF = difference between maximum, Fm, and steady-state fluorescence emissions) allows the calculation of the total rate of photosynthetic electron-transport and the rate of electron transport to O2. These rates are in agreement with the measurements of leaf O2 absorption using (18)O2 and the kinetic properties of ribulose-1,5bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. The fluorescence parameter, ΔF/Fm, showed that the allocation of photosynthetic electrons to O2 was increased during the desiccation of a leaf. Decreasing leaf net CO2 uptake, either by decreasing the ambient CO2 concentration or by dehydrating a leaf, had the same effect on the partitioning of photosynthetic electrons between CO2 and O2 reduction. It is concluded that the decline of net CO2 uptake of a leaf under drought stress is only due, at least for a mild reversible stress (causing at most a leaf water deficit of 35%), to stomatal closure which leads to a decrease in leaf internal CO2 concentration. Since, during the dehydration of a leaf, the calculated internal CO2 concentration remained constant or even increased we conclude that this calculation is misleading under such conditions.

  11. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications (H3K9me2 and H4K12ac) and Gene Expression in Rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) Inoculated Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Ayyappan, Vasudevan; Kalavacharla, Venu; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Bhide, Ketaki P; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Smolinski, Tomasz G; Manoharan, Muthusamy; Thurston, Yaqoob; Todd, Antonette; Kingham, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications such as methylation and acetylation play a significant role in controlling gene expression in unstressed and stressed plants. Genome-wide analysis of such stress-responsive modifications and genes in non-model crops is limited. We report the genome-wide profiling of histone methylation (H3K9me2) and acetylation (H4K12ac) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) stress using two high-throughput approaches, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 1,235 and 556 histone methylation and acetylation responsive genes from common bean leaves treated with the rust pathogen at 0, 12 and 84 hour-after-inoculation (hai), while RNA-Seq analysis identified 145 and 1,763 genes differentially expressed between mock-inoculated and inoculated plants. The combined ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analyses identified some key defense responsive genes (calmodulin, cytochrome p450, chitinase, DNA Pol II, and LRR) and transcription factors (WRKY, bZIP, MYB, HSFB3, GRAS, NAC, and NMRA) in bean-rust interaction. Differential methylation and acetylation affected a large proportion of stress-responsive genes including resistant (R) proteins, detoxifying enzymes, and genes involved in ion flux and cell death. The genes identified were functionally classified using Gene Ontology (GO) and EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOGs). The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified a putative pathway with ten key genes involved in plant-pathogen interactions. This first report of an integrated analysis of histone modifications and gene expression involved in the bean-rust interaction as reported here provides a comprehensive resource for other epigenomic regulation studies in non-model species under stress.

  12. Computational analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., genotype BAT93) lycopene β-cyclase and β-carotene hydroxylase gene's cDNA.

    PubMed

    Bhore, Subhash Janardhan; Amelia, Kassim; Wang, Edina; Priyadharsini, Sindhuja; Shah, Farida Habib

    2013-01-01

    The identification of genes and understanding of genes' expression and regulation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is necessary in order to strategize its improvement using genetic engineering techniques. Generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is useful in rapid isolation, identification and characterization of the genes. To study the gene expression in P. vulgaris pods tissue, ESTs generation work was initiated. Early stage and late stage bean-pod-tissues cDNA libraries were constructed using CloneMiner cDNA library construction kit. In total, 5972 EST clones were isolated using random method of gene isolation. While processing ESTs, we found lycopene β-cyclase (PvLCY-β) and β-carotene hydroxylase (PvCHY-β) gene's cDNA. In carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, PvLCY-β catalyzes the production of carotene; and PvCHY-β is known to function as a catalyst in the production of lutein and zeaxanthin. To understand more about PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β, both strands of both cDNA clones were sequenced using M13 forward and reverse primers. Nucleotide and deduced protein sequences were analyzed and annotated using online bioinformatics tools. Results showed that PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β cDNAs are 1639 and 1107 bp in length, respectively. Analysis results showed that PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β gene's cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) that encodes for 502 and 305 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced protein sequence analysis results also showed the presence of conserved domains needed for PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β functions. The phylogenetic analysis of both PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β proteins showed it's closeness with the LCY-β and CHY-β proteins from Glycine max, respectively. The nucleotide sequence of PvLCY-β and PvCHY-β gene's cDNA and it's annotation is reported in this paper.

  13. In silico comparison of genomic regions containing genes coding for enzymes and transcription factors for the phenylpropanoid pathway in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Glycine max L. Merr.

    PubMed

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Yadegari, Zeinab; Perry, Gregory E; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Wright, Lori C; McClean, Phillip E; Pauls, K Peter

    2013-01-01

    Legumes contain a variety of phytochemicals derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway that have important effects on human health as well as seed coat color, plant disease resistance and nodulation. However, the information about the genes involved in this important pathway is fragmentary in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objectives of this research were to isolate genes that function in and control the phenylpropanoid pathway in common bean, determine their genomic locations in silico in common bean and soybean, and analyze sequences of the 4CL gene family in two common bean genotypes. Sequences of phenylpropanoid pathway genes available for common bean or other plant species were aligned, and the conserved regions were used to design sequence-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced and the gene sequences along with common bean gene-based (g) markers were BLASTed against the Glycine max v.1.0 genome and the P. vulgaris v.1.0 (Andean) early release genome. In addition, gene sequences were BLASTed against the OAC Rex (Mesoamerican) genome sequence assembly. In total, fragments of 46 structural and regulatory phenylpropanoid pathway genes were characterized in this way and placed in silico on common bean and soybean sequence maps. The maps contain over 250 common bean g and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers and identify the positions of more than 60 additional phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, plus the putative locations of seed coat color genes. The majority of cloned phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences were mapped to one location in the common bean genome but had two positions in soybean. The comparison of the genomic maps confirmed previous studies, which show that common bean and soybean share genomic regions, including those containing phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, with conserved synteny. Indels identified in the comparison of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean 4CL gene sequences might be used to develop inter

  14. Effective microorganisms enhance the scavenging capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants grown in salty soils.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Neveen B

    2014-07-01

    No information is available regarding effective microorganisms (EM) influence on the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defence system involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle under saline conditions. Therefore, as a first approach, this article focuses on the contribution of EM to the scavenging capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in salt-stressed plants. It investigates some mechanisms underlying alleviation of salt toxicity by EM application. Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Nebraska plants were grown under non-saline or saline conditions (2.5 and 5.0 dSm(-1)) with and without EM application. Lipid peroxidation and H2O2 content were significantly increased in response to salinity, while they decreased with EM application in both stressed and non-stressed plants. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) increased under saline conditions; these increases were more significant in salt-stressed plants treated by EM. Activities of monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) decreased in response to salinity; however, they were significantly increased in stressed plants treated with EM. Ascorbate and glutathione contents were increased with the increasing salt concentration; moreover they further increased in stressed plants treated with EM. Ratios of AsA/DHA and GSH/GSSG decreased under saline conditions, whereas they were significantly increased with EM treatment in the presence or in the absence of soil salinization. The EM treatment detoxified the stress generated by salinity and significantly improved plant growth and productivity. Enhancing the H2O2-scavenging capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in EM-treated plants may be an efficient mechanism to attenuate the activation of plant defences.

  15. Differential expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts in nodule cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris and regulation of nodule O2 permeability.

    PubMed

    Bargaz, Adnane; Lazali, Mohamed; Amenc, Laurie; Abadie, Josiane; Ghoulam, Cherki; Farissi, Mohamed; Faghire, Mustapha; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-07-01

    Although the role of phosphatases and antioxidant enzymes have been documented in phosphorus (P) deficiency tolerance, gene expression differences in the nodules of nitrogen fixing legumes should also affect tolerance to this soil constraint. In this study, root nodules were induced by Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 in two Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RIL); RIL115 (low P-tolerant) and RIL147 (low P-sensitive) under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply. Trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts were localized within nodules in which O2 permeability was measured. Results indicate that differential tissues-specific expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts within nodules was detected particularly in infected zone and cortical cells. Under P-deficiency, trehalose 6-P phosphatase transcript was increased and mainly localized in infected zone and outer cortex of RIL115 as compared to RIL147. Ascorbate peroxidase transcript was highly expressed under P-sufficiency in the infected zone, inner cortex and vascular traces of RIL115 rather than RIL147. In addition, significant correlations were found between nodule O2 permeability and both peroxidase (r = 0.66*) and trehalose 6-P phosphatase enzyme activities (r = 0.79*) under sufficient and deficient P conditions, respectively. The present findings suggest that the tissue-specific localized trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts of infected cells and nodule cortex are involved in nitrogen fixation efficiency and are likely to play a role in nodule respiration and adaptation to P-deficiency.

  16. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Marilyn L; Udani, Jay K

    2011-03-17

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity.

  17. Characterization of Phaseolus vulgaris cDNA clones responsive to water deficit: identification of a novel late embryogenesis abundant-like protein.

    PubMed

    Colmenero-Flores, J M; Campos, F; Garciarrubio, A; Covarrubias, A A

    1997-11-01

    Six cDNA clones from Phaseolus vulgaris, whose expression is induced by water deficit and ABA treatment (rsP cDNAs) were identified and characterized. The sequence analyses of the isolated clones suggest that they encode two types of late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a class-1 cytoplasmic low-molecular-weight heat shock protein (lmw-HSP), a lipid transfer protein (LTP), and two different proline-rich proteins (PRP). One of the putative LEA proteins identified corresponds to a novel 9.3 kDa LEA-like protein. During the plant response to a mild water deficit (psi w = -0.35 MPa) all genes identified present a maximal expression at around 16 or 24 h of treatment, followed by a decline in expression levels. Rehydration experiments revealed that those genes encoding PRPs and LTP transiently re-induce or maintain their expression when water is added to the soil after a dehydration period. This is not the case for the lea genes whose transcripts rapidly decrease, reaching basal levels a few hours after rehydration (4 h). Under water deficit and ABA treatments, the highest levels of expression for most of the genes occur in the root, excluding the ltp gene whose maximum expression levels are found in the aerial regions of the plant. This indicates that for these genes, both water deficit and ABA-dependent expression are under organ-specific control. The data presented here support the importance of these proteins during the plant response to water deficit.

  18. Potential of Native Rhizobia in Enhancing Nitrogen Fixation and Yields of Climbing Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Contrasting Environments of Eastern Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Koskey, Gilbert; Mburu, Simon W.; Njeru, Ezekiel M.; Kimiti, Jacinta M.; Ombori, Omwoyo; Maingi, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Climbing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Kenya is greatly undermined by low soil fertility, especially in agriculturally prolific areas. The use of effective native rhizobia inoculants to promote nitrogen fixation could be beneficial in climbing bean production. In this study, we carried out greenhouse and field experiments to evaluate symbiotic efficiency, compare the effect of native rhizobia and commercial inoculant on nodulation, growth and yield parameters of mid-altitude climbing bean (MAC 13 and MAC 64) varieties. The greenhouse experiment included nine native rhizobia isolates, a consortium of native isolates, commercial inoculant Biofix, a mixture of native isolates + Biofix, nitrogen treated control and a non-inoculated control. In the field experiments, the treatments included the best effective native rhizobia isolate ELM3, a consortium of native isolates, a commercial inoculant Biofix, a mixture of native isolates + Biofix, and a non-inoculated control. Remarkably, four native rhizobia isolates ELM3, ELM4, ELM5, and ELM8 showed higher symbiotic efficiencies compared to the Biofix. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in symbiotic efficiency between the two climbing bean varieties. Field results demonstrated a significant improvement in nodule dry weight and seed yields of MAC 13 and MAC 64 climbing bean varieties upon rhizobia inoculation when compared to the non-inoculated controls. Inoculation with ELM3 isolate resulted to the highest seed yield of 4,397.75 kg ha−1, indicating 89% increase over non-inoculated control (2,334.81 kg ha−1) and 30% increase over Biofix (3,698.79 kg ha−1). Farm site significantly influenced nodule dry weight and seed yields. This study, therefore, revealed the potential of native rhizobia isolates to enhance delivery of agroecosystem services including nitrogen fixation and bean production. Further characterization and mapping of the native isolates will be imperative in development of

  19. Light-induced systemic regulation of photosynthesis in primary and trifoliate leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris: effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) versus spectrum.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Matsuda, R; Fujiwara, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work using Phaseolus vulgaris were to examine whether the light spectrum incident on mature primary leaves (PLs) is related to leaf-to-leaf systemic regulation of developing trifoliate leaves (TLs) in photosynthetic characteristics, and to investigate the relative importance of spectrum and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in light-induced systemic regulation. Systemic regulation was induced by altering PPFD and the spectrum of light incident on PLs using a shading treatment and lighting treatments including either white, blue, green or red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Photosynthetic characteristics were evaluated by measuring the light-limited and light-saturated net photosynthetic rates and the amounts of nitrogen (N), chlorophyll (Chl) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39). Shading treatment on PLs decreased the amounts of N, Chl and Rubisco of TLs and tended to decrease the photosynthetic rates. However, we observed no systemic effects induced by the light spectrum on PLs in this study, except that a higher amount of Rubisco of TLs was observed when the PLs were irradiated with blue LEDs. Our results imply that photoreceptors in mature leaves have little influence on photosynthetic rates and amounts of N and Chl of developing leaves through systemic regulation, although the possibility of the action of blue light irradiation on the amount of Rubisco cannot be ruled out. Based on these results, we concluded that the light spectrum incident on mature leaves has little systemic effect on developing leaves in terms of photosynthetic characteristics and that the light-induced systemic regulation was largely accounted for by PPFD.

  20. Molybdenum and copper in four varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): new data of potential utility in designing healthy diet for diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Armando Gómez; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Escobosa, Alma Rosa Corrales; Elguera, Julio César Torres; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2015-02-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that diabetic patients and individuals with impaired copper homeostasis could be at risk of molybdenum toxicity. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire revealed that in central Mexico, diabetic patients with severe complications tend to consume beans more often than individuals with less advanced disease. Four varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris were comparatively evaluated as the dietary sources of two elements; the results showed molybdenum concentration decreasing in the order peruvian > pinto > mayflower > black, whereas for copper, the order was peruvian > pinto ∼ black > mayflower. The two elements were determined in pre-soaking water, cooked legumes, and broth obtained in cooking procedure; an in vitro gut model was also applied to assess potentially bioavailable fraction of both elements in cooked beans. The results indicated that the black variety would be the healthiest bean choice for diabetic patients and individuals susceptible to Mo toxicity. Relatively low total molybdenum was found in this variety (2.9 ± 1.4 versus 4.3-10.9 μg g(-1) in other types), element availability was also low (15 % in supernatant from enzymolysis, 24.9 % in combined broth + supernatant fractions), and the molar ratio of Cu/Mo was the highest among four types (41, versus Cu/Mo <10 in peruvian, pinto, or mayflower). Considering peruvian and pinto beans, broth elimination would help to lower molybdenum intake with marginal effect on Cu/Mo molar ratio. This recommendation would be especially important for peruvian variety, which provided 1090, 803, and 197 μg day(-1) of molybdenum in raw grains, broth + supernatant, and supernatant, respectively (based on 100-g portion), exceeding the recommended daily allowance of 45 μg day(-1).

  1. Impact of commercial precooking of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on the generation of peptides, after pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis, capable to inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Luis; Chen, Karen; de Mejía, Elvira González

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the bioactive properties of the released peptides from commercially available precook common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Bioactive properties and peptide profiles were evaluated in protein hydrolysates of raw and commercially precooked common beans. Five varieties (Black, Pinto, Red, Navy, and Great Northern) were selected for protein extraction, protein and peptide molecular mass profiles, and peptide sequences. Potential bioactivities of hydrolysates, including antioxidant capacity and inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), and angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) were analyzed after digestion with pepsin/pancreatin. Hydrolysates from Navy beans were the most potent inhibitors of DPP-IV with no statistical differences between precooked and raw (IC50 = 0.093 and 0.095 mg protein/mL, respectively). α-Amylase inhibition was higher for raw Red, Navy and Great Northern beans (36%, 31%, 27% relative to acarbose (rel ac)/mg protein, respectively). α-Glucosidase inhibition among all bean hydrolysates did not show significant differences; however, inhibition values were above 40% rel ac/mg protein. IC50 values for ACE were not significantly different among all bean hydrolysates (range 0.20 to 0.34 mg protein/mL), except for Red bean that presented higher IC50 values. Peptide molecular mass profile ranged from 500 to 3000 Da. A total of 11 and 17 biologically active peptide sequences were identified in raw and precooked beans, respectively. Peptide sequences YAGGS and YAAGS from raw Great Northern and precooked Pinto showed similar amino acid sequences and same potential ACE inhibition activity. Processing did not affect the bioactive properties of released peptides from precooked beans. Commercially precooked beans could contribute to the intake of bioactive peptides and promote health.

  2. Determination of 67Zn distribution in navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) after foliar application of 67Zn-lignosulfonates using isotope pattern deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Benedicto, Ana; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes; Rivas, Inmaculada; Lucena, Juan J

    2011-08-24

    The improvement of Zn fertilizers requires new techniques to evaluate their efficacy. In this paper, the (67)Zn stable isotope was used as tracer of several Zn-lignosulfonate complexes to study the foliar-applied Zn uptake and distribution behavior in the plant, compared with ZnEDTA. Navy bean plants ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were grown hydroponically in a Zn-free nutrient solution, and six modified lignosulfonates and EDTA complexed with (67)Zn were used in foliar application in the young leaves as Zn sources. Zinc isotopes in roots, stems, and sprayed and unsprayed leaves were determined by ICP-MS, and signal interferences caused by the compounds of the digested vegetal samples were corrected. The mathematical procedure of isotope pattern deconvolution allowed the minimization of the uncertainty in the measured molar fractions of Zn from fertilizer or from natural sources. Significant differences in Zn use and distribution were observed among the fertilizers when the calculated concentrations of Zn from the fertilizer were compared, whereas they were unnoticeable attending to the total Zn in plant tissues, usually determined at the conventional studies. By foliar spray, higher Zn uptake and mobilization to leaves and stems were achieved with (67)ZnEDTA than with (67)Zn-LS complexes. The ultrafiltered LS and phenolated LS showed slightly better ability to provide Zn to the bean plants than the other LS. The foliar-applied Zn use and distribution in the plant were related with the stability of the Zn-lignosulfonates complexes. Those presenting the lower stability versus pH, but the highest complexing capacity, were slightly more suitable to supply foliar-applied Zn to navy beans.

  3. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  4. Potential forcing of CO2, technology and climate changes in maize (Zea mays) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) yield in southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. C.; Justino, F.; Oliveira, L. J. C.; Sediyama, G. C.; Ferreira, W. P. M.; Lemos, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Based upon sensitivity experiments, this study aims to investigate the impact of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration, climate changes, and ongoing technological advancements on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and maize (Zea mays) yield. This investigation assumes that the atmospheric CO2 concentration evolves according to the A2 scenario. For these analyses we have used climate data as projected by climate simulations conducted with the HadCM3 climate model for both present day and greenhouse warming conditions. The results demonstrated that warming conditions associated with increased greenhouse gases as delivered by the HadCM3 model lead to reductions in the potential productivity of maize and beans for the years 2050 and 2080 by up to 30%. This thermal response is, however, damped by the highly efficient CO2 fertilization effect which is expected to increase bean productivity as compared to present day conditions. A similar investigation for maize yield revealed a different picture. It has been found that the CO2 fertilization feedback is much weaker and cannot cancel out the thermal effect. We have found, therefore, that climate changes as simulated to occur in the future are not favorable for increasing the maize yield in southeast Brazil. By the inclusion of the third forcing evaluated, representing technological advancements, it is demonstrated that improvements in the crop system reduce the negative effect associated with warmer climate conditions for both crops. We conclude that appropriate soil and technological management as well as genetic improvements may very likely induce an increase in bean and maize yield despite the unfavorable future climate conditions.

  5. Exposure to elevated ozone levels differentially affects the antioxidant capacity and the redox homeostasis of two subtropical Phaseolus vulgaris L. varieties.

    PubMed

    Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Divan Junior, Armando Molina; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2013-09-01

    Ozone (O3) has become one of the most toxic air pollutants to plants worldwide. However, investigations on O3 impacts on crops health and productivity in South America countries are still scarce. The present study analyzed the differences on the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant system in foliar tissue of two subtropical Phaseolus vulgaris varieties exposed to high O3 concentration. Both varieties were negatively impacted by the pollutant, but the responses between each variety were quite distinct. Results revealed that Irai has higher constitutive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ascorbate (AsA) concentration, but lower total thiol levels and catalase immunocontent. In this variety catalase protein concentration was increased after O3 exposure, indicating a better cellular capacity to reduce hydrogen peroxide. On the opposite, Fepagro 26-exposed plants increased ROS generation and AsA concentration, but had the levels of total thiol content and catalase protein unchanged. Furthermore, O3 treatment reduced the levels of chlorophylls a and b, and the relationship analysis between the chlorophyll ratio (a/b) and protein concentration were positively correlated indicating that photosynthetic apparatus is compromised, and thus probably is the biomass acquisition on Fepagro 26. Differently, O3 treatment of Irai did not affect chlorophylls a and b content, and loss on the protein content was lower. Altogether, these data suggest that early accumulation of ROS on Fepagro 26 are associated with an insufficient leaf antioxidant capacity, which leads to cell structure disruption and impairs the photosynthesis. Irai seems to be more tolerant to O3 toxic effects than Fepagro 26, and the observed differences on O3 sensitivity between the two varieties are apparently based on constitutive differences involved in the maintenance of intracellular redox homeostasis.

  6. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  7. Molecular ecology and selection in the drought-related Asr gene polymorphisms in wild and cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The abscisic acid (ABA) pathway plays an important role in the plants’ reaction to drought stress and ABA-stress response (Asr) genes are important in controlling this process. In this sense, we accessed nucleotide diversity at two candidate genes for drought tolerance (Asr1 and Asr2), involved in an ABA signaling pathway, in the reference collection of cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and a core collection of wild common bean accessions. Results Our wild population samples covered a range of mesic (semi-arid) to very dry (desert) habitats, while our cultivated samples presented a wide spectrum of drought tolerance. Both genes showed very different patterns of nucleotide variation. Asr1 exhibited very low nucleotide diversity relative to the neutral reference loci that were previously surveyed in these populations. This suggests that strong purifying selection has been acting on this gene. In contrast, Asr2 exhibited higher levels of nucleotide diversity, which is indicative of adaptive selection. These patterns were more notable in wild beans than in cultivated common beans indicting that natural selection has played a role over long time periods compared to farmer selection since domestication. Conclusions Together these results suggested the importance of Asr1 in the context of drought tolerance, and constitute the first steps towards an association study between genetic polymorphism of this gene family and variation in drought tolerance traits. Furthermore, one of our major successes was to find that wild common bean is a reservoir of genetic variation and selection signatures at Asr genes, which may be useful for breeding drought tolerance in cultivated common bean. PMID:22799462

  8. Acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO sub 2 in five C sub 3 species. [Chenopodium album, Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum melongena, Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, R.F. ); Sharkey, T.D. ); Seemann, J.R. )

    1989-02-01

    The effect of long-term (weeks to months) CO{sub 2} enhancement on (a) the gas-exchange characteristics, (b) the content and activation state of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco), and (c) leaf nitrogen, chlorophyll, and dry weight per area were studied in five C{sub 3} species (Chenopodium album, Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum melongena, and Brassica oleracea) grown at CO{sub 2} partial pressures of 300 or 900 to 1000 microbars. Long-term exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} affected the CO{sub 2} response of photosynthesis in one of three ways: (a) the initial slope of the CO{sub 2} response was unaffected, but the photosynthetic rate at high CO{sub 2} increased (S. tuberosum); (b) the initial slope decreased but the CO{sub 2}-saturated rate of photosynthesis decreased (B. oleracea, S. melongena). In all five species, growth at high CO{sub 2} increased the extent to which photosynthesis was stimulated following a decrease in the partial pressure of O{sub 2} or an increase in measurement CO{sub 2} above 600 microbars. This stimulation indicates that a limitation on photosynthesis by the capacity to regenerate orthophosphate was reduced or absent after acclimation to high CO{sub 2}. Leaf nitrogen per area either increased (S. tuberosum, S. melongena) or was little changed by CO{sub 2} enhancement. The content of rubisco was lower in only two of the fives species, yet its activation state was 19% to 48% lower in all five species following long-term exposure to high CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that during growth in CO{sub 2}-enriched air, leaf rubisco content remains in excess of that required to support the observed photosynthetic rates.

  9. O/sub 2/-insensitive photosynthesis in C/sub 3/ plants: its occurrence and a possible explanation. [Phaseolus vulgaris; Xanthium strumarium L. ; Scrophularia desertorum (Shaw. ) Munz

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Leaves of C/sub 3/ plants which exhibit a normal O/sub 2/ inhibition of CO/sub 2/ fixation at less than saturating light intensity were found to exhibit O/sub 2/-insensitive photosynthesis at high light. This behavior was observed in Phaseolus vulgaris L., Xanthium strumarium L., and Scrophularia desertorum (Shaw.) Munz. O/sub 2/-insensitive photosynthesis has been reported in nine other C/sub 3/ species and usually occurred when the intercellular CO/sub 2/ pressure was about double the normal pressure. A lack of O/sub 2/ inhibition of photosynthesis was always accompanied by a failure of increased CO/sub 2/ pressure to stimulate photosynthesis to the expected degree. O/sub 2/-insensitive photosynthesis also occurred after plants had been water stressed. Under such conditions, however, photosynthesis became O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitive at physiological CO/sub 2/ pressures. Postillumination CO/sub 2/ exchange kinetics showed that O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitivity was not the result of elimination of photorespiration. It is proposed that O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurs when the concentration of phosphate in the chloroplast stroma cannot be both high enough to allow photophosphorylation and low enough to allow starch and sucrose synthesis at the rates required by the rest of the photosynthetic component processes. Under these conditions, the energy diverted to photorespiration does not adversely affect the potential for CO/sub 2/ assimilation.

  10. Cytokinin oxidase from Phaseolus vulgaris callus tissues. Enhanced in vitro activity of the enzyme in the presence of copper-imidazole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, J.M.; Armstrong, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The effects of metal ions on cytokinin oxidase activity extracted from callus tissues of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Great Northern have been examined using an assay based on the oxidation of N/sup 6/-(..delta../sup 2/-isopentenyl)-adenine-2,8-/sup 3/H (i/sup 6/ Ade) to adenine (Ade). The addition of cupric ions to reaction mixtures containing imidazole buffer markedly enhanced cytokinin oxidase activity. In the presence of optimal concentrations of copper and imidazole, cytokinin oxidase activity was stimulated more than 20-fold. The effect was enzyme dependent, specific for copper, and observed only in the presence of imidazole. The substrate specificity of the copper-imidazole enhanced reaction, as judged by substrate competition tests, was the same as that observed in the absence of copper and imidazole. Similarly, in tests involving DEAE-cellulose chromatography, elution profiles of cytokinin oxidase activity determined using a copper-imidazole enhanced assay were identical to those obtained using an assay without copper and imidazole. On the basis of these results, the addition of copper and imidazole to reaction mixtures used to assay for cytokinin oxidase activity is judged to provide a reliable and specific assay of greatly enhanced sensitivity for the enzyme. The mechanism by which copper and imidazole enhance cytokinin oxidase activity is not certain, but the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme was not inhibited by anaerobic conditions when these reagents were present. This observation suggests that copper-imidazole complexes are substituting for oxygen in the reaction mechanism by which cytokinin oxidase effects cleavage of the N/sup 6/-side chain of i/sup 6/ Ade.

  11. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee. PMID:20565807

  12. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity. PMID:21414227

  13. QUES, a new Phaseolus vulgaris genotype resistant to common bean weevils, contains the Arcelin-8 allele coding for new lectin-related variants.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Isabelle; Magni, Chiara; Panzeri, Dario; Daminati, Maria Gloria; Bollini, Roberto; Benrey, Betty; Bacher, Sven; Sparvoli, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    In common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most abundant seed proteins are the storage protein phaseolin and the family of closely related APA proteins (arcelin, phytohemagglutinin and α-amylase inhibitor). High variation in APA protein composition has been described and the presence of arcelin (Arc) has been associated with bean resistance against two bruchid beetles, the bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus Say) and the Mexican bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus Bohemian). So far, seven Arc variants have been identified, all in wild accessions, however, only those containing Arc-4 were reported to be resistant to both species. Although many efforts have been made, a successful breeding of this genetic trait into cultivated genotypes has not yet been achieved. Here, we describe a newly collected wild accession (named QUES) and demonstrate its resistance to both A. obtectus and Z. subfasciatus. Immunological and proteomic analyses of QUES seed protein composition indicated the presence of new Arc and arcelin-like (ARL) polypeptides of about 30 and 27 kDa, respectively. Sequencing of cDNAs coding for QUES APA proteins confirmed that this accession contains new APA variants, here referred to as Arc-8 and ARL-8. Moreover, bioinformatic analysis showed the two proteins are closely related to APA components present in the G12949 wild bean accession, which contains the Arc-4 variant. The presence of these new APA components, combined with the observations that they are poorly digested and remain very abundant in A. obtectus feces, so-called frass, suggest that the QUES APA locus is involved in the bruchid resistance. Moreover, molecular analysis indicated a lower complexity of the locus compared to that of G12949, suggesting that QUES should be considered a valuable source of resistance for further breeding purposes.

  14. Use of BABA and INA As Activators of a Primed State in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Aguilar, Keren; Ramírez-Carrasco, Gabriela; Hernández-Chávez, José Luis; Barraza, Aarón; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    To survive in adverse conditions, plants have evolved complex mechanisms that “prime” their defense system to respond and adapt to stresses. Their competence to respond to such stresses fundamentally depends on its capacity to modulate the transcriptome rapidly and specifically. Thus, chromatin dynamics is a mechanism linked to transcriptional regulation and enhanced defense in plants. For example, in Arabidopsis, priming of the SA-dependent defense pathway is linked to histone lysine methylation. Such modifications could create a memory of the primary infection that is associated with an amplified gene response upon exposure to a second stress-stimulus. In addition, the priming status of a plant for induced resistance can be inherited to its offspring. However, analyses on the molecular mechanisms of generational and transgenerational priming in the common bean (Phaseolus vulagris L.), an economically important crop, are absent. Here, we provide evidence that resistance to P. syringae pv. phaseolicola infection was induced in the common bean with the synthetic priming activators BABA and INA. Resistance was assessed by evaluating symptom appearance, pathogen accumulation, changes in gene expression of defense genes, as well as changes in the H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks at the promoter-exon regions of defense-associated genes. We conclude that defense priming in the common bean occurred in response to BABA and INA and that these synthetic activators primed distinct genes for enhanced disease resistance. We hope that an understanding of the molecular changes leading to defense priming and pathogen resistance will provide valuable knowledge for producing disease-resistant crop varieties by exposing parental plants to priming activators, as well as to the development of novel plant protection chemicals that stimulate the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:27242854

  15. Microbiological and toxicological effects of Perla black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) extracts: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Lara-Díaz, Víctor Javier; Gaytán-Ramos, Angel A; Dávalos-Balderas, Alfredo José; Santos-Guzmán, Jesús; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Barbosa-Quintana, Alvaro; Sanson, Misu; López-Reyes, Alberto Gabriel; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the microbiological and toxicological effects of three Perla black bean extracts on the growth and culture of selected pathogenic microorganisms, the toxicity over Vero cell lines and an in vivo rat model. Three different solvents were used to obtain Perla black bean extracts. All three Perla black bean extracts were tested for antibacterial and antiparasitic activity and further analysed for intrinsic cytotoxicity (IC(50)). Methanol Perla black bean extract was used for acute toxicity test in rats, with the up-and-down doping method. All Perla black bean extracts inhibited bacterial growth. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes showed inhibition, while Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes did not. Acidified water and acetic acid Perla black bean extract were tested in parasites. The best IC(50) was observed for Giardia lamblia, while higher concentrations were active against Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The Vero cells toxicity levels (IC(50)) for methanol, acidified water and acetic acid Perla black bean extract were [mean +/- S.D. (95% CI)]: 275 +/- 6.2 (267.9-282.0), 390 +/- 4.6 (384.8-395.2) and 209 +/- 3.39 (205.6-212.4) microg/ml, respectively. In vivo acute toxicity assays did not show changes in absolute organ weights, gross and histological examinations of selected tissues or functional tests. The acetic acid and methanol Perla black bean extract proved to exhibit strong antibacterial activity and the acidified water Perla black bean extract exerted parasiticidal effects against Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba hystolitica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The three Perla black bean extracts assayed over Vero cells showed very low toxicity and the methanol Perla black bean extract in vivo did not cause toxicity.

  16. Transcriptional and functional variation of NF-YC1 in genetically diverse accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris during the symbiotic association with Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Mazziotta, L; Reynoso, M A; Aguilar, O M; Blanco, F A; Zanetti, M E

    2013-09-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is an agronomic important legume crop native to America, where two centres of genetic diversification (GD) are recognised, one in Mesoamerica and the other in the south Andes. Mesoamerican bean accessions have preferential and more efficient nodulation with Rhizobium etli strains carrying the allele nodC type-α, which is predominant in soils of Mesoamerica. It was previously demonstrated that the host nuclear factor NF-YC1, which is involved in nodule formation and rhizobial infection, contributes to this preferential selection and enhances nodulation in the domesticated accession NAG12 from Mesoamerica. Here, we show that both domesticated and wild Mesoamerican beans exhibit higher nodulation performance with a nodC type-α than with a nodC type-δ strain. Transcripts of NF-YC1 significantly increased in roots of these accessions 24 h post-inoculation (hpi) with the nodC type-α strain. On the other hand, accessions from the Andean GD centre formed a higher number of nodules with a strain carrying the nodC type-δ, which is predominant in Andean soils. However, NF-YC1 transcript levels did not exhibit significant changes in Andean accessions upon inoculation with the nodC type-δ strain, at least at 24 hpi. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing of NF-YC1 in the domesticated Andean accession Alubia showed that NF-YC1 or a closely related member of this family is required for nodule formation and bacterial infection, in agreement with observations in Mesoamerican common beans. Isolation and sequencing of the full-length ORF of NF-YC1 from Alubia revealed that it was identical to the sequence previously identified in the Mesoamerican accession NAG12. Interestingly, overexpression of NF-YC1 had a negative impact on nodule formation in the Alubia accession, independently of the R. etli lineage. Our findings suggest that transcriptional and functional variation of NF-YC1 occurs among genetically diverse bean accessions, which

  17. L-Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Phaseolus vulgaris. Characterisation and differential induction of multiple forms from elicitor-treated cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Bolwell, G P; Bell, J N; Cramer, C L; Schuch, W; Lamb, C J; Dixon, R A

    1985-06-03

    L-Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) has been purified over 200-fold from cell cultures of bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.) exposed to elicitor heat-released from the cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Four forms of the enzyme, with identical Mr but differing apparent pI values of 5.4, 5.2, 5.05 and 4.85, were observed following the final chromatofocussing stage of the purification. A preparation (purified 43-fold by ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography) containing all four forms exhibited apparent negative rate cooperativity with respect to substrates. However, the individual forms displayed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with Km values of 0.077 mM, 0.122 mM, 0.256 mM and 0.302 mM in order of decreasing apparent pI value. A preparation purified 200-fold and containing all four forms was used to immunise rabbits for the production of anti-(phenylalanine ammonia-lyase) serum. The antiserum was characterised by: immunotitration experiments; solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays; comparison of immunoprecipitates of 35S-labelled phenylalanine ammonia-lyase subunits (synthesized both in vivo and in vitro) on both one-dimensional and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels after immunoprecipitation with the bean antiserum or antisera raised against pea and parsley phenylalanine ammonia-lyase preparations and immune blotting. SDS/polyacrylamide gels and SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immune blotting, indicated that the Mr of newly synthesized (in vivo and in vitro) bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase subunits is 77000; a 70000-Mr form is readily generated as a partial degradation product during purification. Immunoprecipitates of bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase synthesized both in vivo and in vitro showed the presence of multiple subunit types of identical Mr but differing in pI. Furthermore, treatment of bean cultures with Colletotrichum elicitor resulted in a 10

  18. Differential characteristics and subcellular localization of two starch-branching enzyme isoforms encoded by a single gene in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shigeki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Hiraga, Susumu; Inagaki, Keisuke; Nozaki, Kouichi; Isono, Naoto; Yoshimoto, Yasushi; Takeda, Yasuhito; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2002-05-10

    Starch-branching enzymes (SBE) have a dominant role for amylopectin structure as they define chain length and frequency of branch points. We have previously shown that one of the SBE isoforms of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), designated PvSBE2, has a molecular mass (82 kDa) significantly smaller than those reported for isologous SBEs from pea (SBEI), maize (BEIIb), and rice (RBE3). Additionally, in contrast to the dual location of the pea SBEI in both the soluble and starch granule fractions, PvSBE2 was found only in the soluble fraction during seed development. Analysis of a pvsbe2 cDNA suggested that PvSBE2 is generated from a larger precursor with a putative plastid targeting sequence of 156 residues. Here we describe the occurrence of a larger 100-kDa form (LF-PvSBE2) of PvSBE2 found both in the soluble and starch granule fractions of the developing seeds. The determined N-terminal sequence, VKSSHDSD, of LF-PvSBE2 corresponded to a peptide sequence located 111 amino acids upstream from the N terminus of purified PvSBE2, suggesting that LF-PvSBE2 and PvSBE2 are products of the same gene. Analysis of the products by 5'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and reverse transcription PCR indicated that the two transcripts for pre-LF-PvSBE2 and pre-PvSBE2 are generated by alternative splicing. Recombinant LF-PvSBE2 (rLF-PvSBE2) was purified from Escherichia coli and the kinetic properties were compared with those of recombinant PvSBE2 (rPvSBE2). rLF-PvSBE2 had much higher affinity for amylopectin (K(m) = 4.4 mg/ml) than rPvSBE2 (18.4 mg/ml), whereas the V(max) of rLF-PvSBE2 (135 units/mg) for this substrate was much lower than that of rPvSBE2 (561 units/mg). These results suggest that the N-terminal extension of LF-PvSBE2 plays a critical role for localization in starch granules by altering its enzymatic properties.

  19. Functional expression and activity of the recombinant antifungal defensin PvD1r from Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) seeds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Defensins are basic, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides that are important components of plant defense against pathogens. Previously, we isolated a defensin, PvD1, from Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) seeds. Results The aim of this study was to overexpress PvD1 in a prokaryotic system, verify the biologic function of recombinant PvD1 (PvD1r) by comparing the antimicrobial activity of PvD1r to that of the natural defensin, PvD1, and use a mutant Candida albicans strain that lacks the gene for sphingolipid biosynthesis to unravel the target site of the PvD1r in C. albicans cells. The cDNA encoding PvD1, which was previously obtained, was cloned into the pET-32 EK/LIC vector, and the resulting construct was used to transform bacterial cells (Rosetta Gami 2 (DE3) pLysS) leading to recombinant protein expression. After expression had been induced, PvD1r was purified, cleaved with enterokinase and repurified by chromatographic steps. N-terminal amino acid sequencing showed that the overall process of the recombinant production of PvD1r, including cleavage with the enterokinase, was successful. Additionally, modeling revealed that PvD1r had a structure that was similar to the defensin isolated from plants. Purified PvD1 and PvD1r possessed inhibitory activity against the growth of the wild-type pathogenic yeast strain C. albicans. Both defensins, however, did not present inhibitory activity against the mutant strain of C. albicans. Antifungal assays with the wild-type C. albicans strains showed morphological changes upon observation by light microscopy following growth assays. PvD1r was coupled to FITC, and the subsequent treatment of wild type C. albicans with DAPI revealed that the labeled peptide was intracellularly localized. In the mutant strain, no intracellular labeling was detected. Conclusion Our results indicate that PvD1r retains full biological activity after recombinant production, enterokinase cleavage and purification. Additionally, our

  20. Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov., from nodules of Dalea leporina, Leucaena leucocephala and Clitoria ternatea, and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, siratro, cowpea and Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    López-López, Aline; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Barois, Isabelle; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I; Martínez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-09-01

    Two novel related Rhizobium species, Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., were identified by a polyphasic approach using DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization including nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris (bean). As similar bacteria were found in the Los Tuxtlas rainforest in Mexico and in Central America, we suggest the existence of a Mesoamerican microbiological corridor. The type strain of Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. is CCGE 502(T) (= ATCC BAA-2124(T) = CFN 242(T) = Dal4(T) = HAMBI 3152(T)) and that of Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov. is CCGE 501(T) (= ATCC BAA-2123(T) = HAMBI 3151(T) = CIP 110148(T) = 1847(T)).

  1. Effect of temperature on the occurrence of O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitive photosynthesis in field grown plants. [Phaseolus vulgaris; Capsicum annum; Lycopersicon esculentum, Scrophularia desertorum; Cardaria draba, Populus fremontii

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, R.F.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthesis to O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ was measured in leaves from field grown plants of six species (Phaseolus vulgaris, Capsicum annuum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Scrophularia desertorum, Cardaria draba, and Populus fremontii) from 5/sup 0/C to 35/sup 0/C using gas-exchange techniques. In all species but Phaseolus, photosynthesis was insensitive to O/sub 2/ in normal air below a species dependent temperature. CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under the same conditions that resulted in O/sub 2/ insensitivity. A complete loss of O/sub 2/ sensitivity occurred up to 22/sup 0/C in Lycopersicon but only up to 6/sup 0/C in Scrophularia. In Lycopersicon and Populus, O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under conditions regularly encountered during the cooler portions of the day. Because O/sub 2/ insensitivity is an indicator of feedback limited photosynthesis, these results indicate that feedback limitations can play a role in determining the diurnal carbon gain in the field. At higher partial pressures of CO/sub 2/ the temperature at which O/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred was higher, indicating that feedback limitations in the field will become more important as the CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere increases.

  2. An acpXL Mutant of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli Lacks 27-Hydroxyoctacosanoic Acid in Its Lipid A and Is Developmentally Delayed during Symbiotic Infection of the Determinate Nodulating Host Plant Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dusty B.; Huang, Yu-Chu; Kannenberg, Elmar L.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Carlson, Russell W.

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a Gram-negative bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing symbioses with compatible leguminous plants via intracellular invasion and establishes a persistent infection within host membrane-derived subcellular compartments. Notably, an unusual very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) is found in the lipid A of R. leguminosarum as well as in the lipid A of the medically relevant pathogens Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Bartonella henselae, and Legionella pneumophila, which are also able to persist within intracellular host-derived membranes. These bacterial symbionts and pathogens each contain a homologous gene region necessary for the synthesis and transfer of the VLCFA to the lipid A. Within this region lies a gene that encodes the specialized acyl carrier protein AcpXL, on which the VLCFA is built. This study describes the biochemical and infection phenotypes of an acpXL mutant which lacks the VLCFA. The mutation was created in R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strain 8002, which forms symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris, a determinate nodulating legume. Structural analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant lipid A lacked the VLCFA. Compared to the parent strain, the mutant was more sensitive to the detergents deoxycholate and dodecyl sulfate and the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B, suggesting a compromise to membrane stability. In addition, the mutant was more sensitive to higher salt concentrations. Passage through the plant restored salt tolerance. Electron microscopic examination showed that the mutant was developmentally delayed during symbiotic infection of the host plant Phaseolus vulgaris and produced abnormal symbiosome structures. PMID:21764936

  3. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. PMID:26865698

  4. Phylogenetic position of Rhizobium sp. strain Or 191, a symbiont of both Medicago sativa and Phaseolus vulgaris, based on partial sequences of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Eardly, B D; Young, J P; Selander, R K

    1992-01-01

    Phenotypic and DNA sequence comparisons are presented for eight Rhizobium isolates that were cultured from field-grown alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Oregon. These isolates were previously shown to nodulate both alfalfa and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) Savi.). The objective of the present study was to determine their phylogenetic relationships to the normal symbionts of these plants, Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, respectively. Phenotypically, the Oregon isolates more nearly resemble strains from P. vulgaris than those from M. sativa. For example, even though nitrogen fixation levels were low with both host species, the symbiotic efficiency of a representative Rhizobium isolate (Or 191) with common bean was twice that observed with alfalfa. Comparative sequencing of a 260-bp segment of the 16S rRNA gene (directly sequenced after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that Or 191 is not closely related to the type strain of R. meliloti (ATCC 9930), R. leguminosarum (ATCC 10004), or Rhizobium tropici (CIAT 899). Instead, sequence comparisons of the 16S gene indicated that Or 191 belongs to a distinct and previously unrecognized taxonomic group that includes strains that have previously been called R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli type I. Unlike type I strains, however, Or 191 has only a single copy of the nifH gene (type I strains have three), and the nucleotide sequence of this gene is substantially different from those of other rhizobial and nonrhizobial nifH genes examined thus far. Images PMID:1377901

  5. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengqi; Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean), have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr) annotation, gene ontology (GO) classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies. PMID:26151849

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for treatment of acne vulgaris: a critical appraisal using the AGREE II instrument.

    PubMed

    Sanclemente, Gloria; Acosta, Jorge-Luis; Tamayo, Maria-Eulalia; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    A significant number of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) about the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents and adults have been published worldwide. However, little is known about the quality of CPGs in this field. The aim of this study was to appraise the methodological quality of published acne vulgaris CPGs. We performed a systematic review of published CPGs on acne vulgaris therapy from July 2002 to July 2012. Three reviewers independently assessed each CPG using the AGREE II instrument. A standardized score was calculated for each of the six domains. Our search strategy identified 103 citations but just six met our inclusion criteria. Agreement among reviewers was very good: 0.981. The domains that scored better were: "scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation". Those that scored worse were "stakeholder involvement", "rigor of development", and "applicability". The European and the Malaysian CPGs were the only recommended with no further modifications. In addition, the Mexican, Colombian and the United States guidelines were recommended with provisos, with lower scores regarding stakeholder involvement, rigor of development and applicability. Only two guidelines clearly reported outcome measures for evaluating efficacy or included quality of life outcomes. CPGs varied regarding the consideration of light/laser therapy or consideration of complementary/alternative medicines. None of them included cost considerations of drugs such as systemic isotretinoin. In conclusion, published acne vulgaris CPGs for acne therapy vary in quality with a clear need to improve their methodological rigor. This could be achieved with the adherence to current CPGs development standards.

  7. Peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) inhibit the angiotensin-I converting enzyme by interacting with its catalytic cavity independent of their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory potential and the antioxidant capacity of pure synthesized peptides (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) originally identified in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans (P. vulgaris L.) that had previously demonstrated antiproliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. The five peptides were able to inhibit ACE with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 65.4 (GLTSK) to 191.5 μM (MPACGSS). The combination of GLTSK and MTEEY increased the ACE inhibition by 30% compared to equieffective doses of the single peptides. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides had lower estimated free energy values (-6.47 to -9.34 kcal mol(-1)) when they interacted with the catalytic site of ACE than that of the substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (-5.41 kcal mol(-1)), thus inhibiting the enzymatic activity. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides interacted with four (His353, Ala354, Glu411 and Tyr523) out of 6 catalytic residues. Moreover, MPACGSS had the highest antioxidant activity according to Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (421.58 μmol FeSO4 mg(-1)), Fe(2+) chelation (2.01 μmol Na2EDTA mg(-1)) assays, and also in DPPH (748.39 μmol Trolox per mg of dry peptide) and ABTS (561.42 μmol Trolox mg(-1)) radical scavenging assays. The results support the hypothesis that peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may exert their physiological benefits independent of their antioxidant capacity, by ACE inhibition through interaction with its catalytic cavity.

  8. A xylosyltransferase involved in the synthesis of a protein-associated xyloglucan in suspension-cultured dwarf-French-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cells and its interaction with a glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Brett, C T; Hillman, J R

    1988-08-01

    A particulate enzyme preparation made from suspension-cultured dwarf-French-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cv. Canadian Wonder cells was shown to incorporate xylose from UDP-D-[14C]xylose into polysaccharide. The reaction was dependent upon the presence of UDP-D-glucose and was stimulated, and apparently protected, by GDP-D-glucose and GDP-D-mannose, though neither was able to replace UDP-D-glucose as a glycosyl donor. The product of the reaction was identified as xyloglucan by analysis of products of enzyme breakdown and acid hydrolysis. Mr determination after proteinase K digestion indicated that the nascent xyloglucan is closely associated with protein. Preincubation of the enzyme with UDP-D-glucose stimulated incorporation from UDP-D-[14C]xylose, suggesting an 'imprecise' mechanism of biosynthesis, as defined by Waldron & Brett [(1985) in Biochemistry of Plant Cell Walls (Brett, C. T. & Hillman, J. R., eds.) (SEB Semin. Ser. 28), pp. 79-97, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge].

  9. A flux-based assessment of the effects of ozone on foliar injury, photosynthesis, and yield of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Borlotto Nano Lingua di Fuoco) in open-top chambers.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Giacomo; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Rossini, Micol; Panigada, Cinzia; Meroni, Michele; Colombo, Roberto; Faoro, Franco; Iriti, Marcello

    2009-05-01

    Stomatal ozone uptake, determined with the Jarvis' approach, was related to photosynthetic efficiency assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence and reflectance measurements in open-top chamber experiments on Phaseolus vulgaris. The effects of O(3) exposure were also evaluated in terms of visible and microscopical leaf injury and plant productivity. Results showed that microscopical leaf symptoms, assessed as cell death and H(2)O(2) accumulation, preceded by 3-4 days the appearance of visible symptoms. An effective dose of ozone stomatal flux for visible leaf damages was found around 1.33 mmol O(3) m(-2). Significant linear dose-response relationships were obtained between accumulated fluxes and optical indices (PRI, NDI, DeltaF/F'(m)). The negative effects on photosynthesis reduced plant productivity, affecting the number of pods and seeds, but not seed weight. These results, besides contributing to the development of a flux-based ozone risk assessment for crops in Europe, highlight the potentiality of reflectance measurements for the early detection of ozone stress.

  10. Synergy between the light-induced acute response and the circadian cycle: a new mechanism for the synchronization of the Phaseolus vulgaris clock to light.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Athanasios-Dimitrios; Prombona, Anastasia

    2006-08-01

    PvLHY and Lhcb expression has been studied in primary bean leaves after exposure of etiolated leaves to two or three white light-pulses and under different photoperiods. Under the tested photoperiods, the steady-state mRNA levels exhibit diurnal oscillations with zenith in the morning between ZT21 and 4 for PvLHY and between ZT4 and 6 for Lhcb. Nadir is in the evening between ZT12 and 18 for PvLHY and ZT18 and 24 for Lhcb. Light-pulses to etiolated seedlings induce a differentiated acute response that is reciprocally correlated with the amplitude of the following circadian cycle. In addition, the clock modulates the duration of the acute response (descending part of the curve included), which according to the phase of the rhythm at light application extends from 7 to 18 h. This constitutes the response dynamics of the Phaseolus clock to light. Similarly, the waveform of PvLHY and Lhcb expression during the day of different photoperiods resembles in induction capability (accomplishment of peak after lights-on) and duration (from lights-on phase to trough) the phase-dependent progression of acute response in etiolated seedlings. Consequently, the peak of Lhcb (all tested photoperiods) and PvLHY (in LD 18:6) attained in the photophase corresponds to the acute response peak, while the peak of PvLHY during the scotophase (in LD 12:12 and 6:18) corresponds to the circadian peak. Thus, the effect of the response dynamics in the photoperiod determines the coincidence of the peak with the photo- or scotophase, respectively. This represents a new model mechanism for the adaptation of the Phaseolus clock to light.

  11. Structures of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris R-47 alpha-amylase II complexed with substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Tonozuka, T; Shimura, Y; Ichikawa, K; Kamitori, S; Sakano, Y

    2001-03-01

    The structures of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris R-47 alpha-amylase II mutant (d325nTVA II) complexed with substrate analogues, methyl beta-cyclodextrin (m beta-CD) and maltohexaose (G6), were solved by X-ray diffraction at 3.2 A and 3.3 A resolution, respectively. In d325nTVA II-m beta-CD complex, the orientation and binding-position of beta-CD in TVA II were identical to those in cyclodextin glucanotransferase (CGTase). The active site residues were essentialy conserved, while there are no residues corresponding to Tyr89, Phe183, and His233 of CGTase in TVA II. In d325nTVA II-G6 complex, the electron density maps of two glucosyl units at the non-reducing end were disordered and invisible. The four glucosyl units of G6 were bound to TVA II as in CGTase, while the others were not stacked and were probably flexible. The residues of TVA II corresponding to Tyr89, Lys232, and His233 of CGTase were completely lacking. These results suggest that the lack of the residues related to alpha-glucan and CD-stacking causes the functional distinctions between CGTase and TVA II.

  12. Evolutionary dynamics of satellite DNA repeats from Phaseolus beans.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago; Dos Santos, Karla G B; Richard, Manon M S; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Geffroy, Valérie; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) subtelomeres are highly enriched for khipu, the main satellite DNA identified so far in this genome. Here, we comparatively investigate khipu genomic organization in Phaseolus species from different clades. Additionally, we identified and characterized another satellite repeat, named jumper, associated to khipu. A mixture of P. vulgaris khipu clones hybridized in situ confirmed the presence of khipu-like sequences on subterminal chromosome regions in all Phaseolus species, with differences in the number and intensity of signals between species and when species-specific clones were used. Khipu is present as multimers of ∼500 bp and sequence analyses of cloned fragments revealed close relationship among khipu repeats. The new repeat, named jumper, is a 170-bp satellite sequence present in all Phaseolus species and inserted into the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rDNA in the P. vulgaris genome. Nevertheless, jumper was found as a high-copy repeat at subtelomeres and/or pericentromeres in the Phaseolus microcarpus lineage only. Our data argue for khipu as an important subtelomeric satellite DNA in the genus and for a complex satellite repeat composition of P. microcarpus subtelomeres, which also contain jumper. Furthermore, the differential amplification of these repeats in subtelomeres or pericentromeres reinforces the presence of a dynamic satellite DNA library in Phaseolus.

  13. The soybean (Glycine max) nodulation-suppressive CLE peptide, GmRIC1, functions interspecifically in common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), but not in a supernodulating line mutated in the receptor PvNARK.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Li, Dongxue; Hastwell, April H; Reid, Dugald E; Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2014-10-01

    Legume plants regulate the number of nitrogen-fixing root nodules they form via a process called the Autoregulation of Nodulation (AON). Despite being one of the most economically important and abundantly consumed legumes, little is known about the AON pathway of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). We used comparative- and functional-genomic approaches to identify central components in the AON pathway of common bean. This includes identifying PvNARK, which encodes a LRR receptor kinase that acts to regulate root nodule numbers. A novel, truncated version of the gene was identified directly upstream of PvNARK, similar to Medicago truncatula, but not seen in Lotus japonicus or soybean. Two mutant alleles of PvNARK were identified that cause a classic shoot-controlled and nitrate-tolerant supernodulation phenotype. Homeologous over-expression of the nodulation-suppressive CLE peptide-encoding soybean gene, GmRIC1, abolished nodulation in wild-type bean, but had no discernible effect on PvNARK-mutant plants. This demonstrates that soybean GmRIC1 can function interspecifically in bean, acting in a PvNARK-dependent manner. Identification of bean PvRIC1, PvRIC2 and PvNIC1, orthologues of the soybean nodulation-suppressive CLE peptides, revealed a high degree of conservation, particularly in the CLE domain. Overall, our work identified four new components of bean nodulation control and a truncated copy of PvNARK, discovered the mutation responsible for two supernodulating bean mutants and demonstrated that soybean GmRIC1 can function in the AON pathway of bean.

  14. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system.

  15. A comparative study of the role of the major proteinases of germinated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) seeds in the degradation of their storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, A; Carchilan, M; Stepurina, T; Rotari, V; Wilson, K; Vaintraub, I

    2004-10-01

    Two types of cysteine proteases, low-specificity enzymes from the papain family and Asn-specific from the legumain family are generally considered to be the major endopeptidases responsible for the degradation of seed storage proteins during early seedling growth. The action of the corresponding enzymes (CPPh1 and LLP, respectively) from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) on phaseolin (the common bean storage protein), and on the homologous soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) storage protein, beta-conglycinin, was studied. Under the action of LLP, proteolysis of phaseolin was limited to cleavage of its interdomain linker. No cleavage of the interdomain linker occurred in beta-conglycinin with LLP. LLP action was restricted to splitting off the disordered N-terminal extensions of alpha and alpha' subunits. No extensive hydrolysis (degradation to short TCA-soluble peptides) of either protein occurred under the action of LLP. CPPh1 cleaved the phaseolin subunits into roughly half-sized fragments at the onset of proteolysis. The cleavage was accompanied by a small (8-10%) decrease of protein. No decrease of protein occurred with further incubation. Thus the two most active proteinases detected in common bean seedlings individually were incapable of the extensive degradation of phaseolin. Extensive hydrolysis of phaseolin was only achieved by the consecutive action of LLP and CPPh1. Similar cleavages occurred during the action of CPPh1 on beta-conglycinin. However, by contrast with phaseolin, CPPh1 by itself accomplished the extensive hydrolysis of beta-conglycinin. The differences in the course of proteolysis of the proteins studied were determined by their structural peculiarities.

  16. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  17. The haem-copper oxygen reductase of Desulfovibrio vulgaris contains a dihaem cytochrome c in subunit II.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Susana A L; Almeida, Claúdia C; Carita, João N; Teixeira, Miguel; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2008-12-01

    The genome of the sulphate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, still considered a strict anaerobe, encodes two oxygen reductases of the bd and haem-copper types. The haem-copper oxygen reductase deduced amino acid sequence reveals that it is a Type A2 enzyme, which in its subunit II contains two c-type haem binding motifs. We have characterized the cytochrome c domain of subunit II and confirmed the binding of two haem groups, both with Met-His iron coordination. Hence, this enzyme constitutes the first example of a ccaa3 haem-copper oxygen reductase. The expression of D. vulgaris haem-copper oxygen reductase was found to be independent of the electron donor and acceptor source and is not altered by stress factors such as oxygen exposure, nitrite, nitrate, and iron; therefore the haem-copper oxygen reductase seems to be constitutive. The KCN sensitive oxygen reduction by D. vulgaris membranes demonstrated in this work indicates the presence of an active haem-copper oxygen reductase. D. vulgaris membranes perform oxygen reduction when accepting electrons from the monohaem cytochrome c553, thus revealing the first possible electron donor to the terminal oxygen reductase of D. vulgaris. The physiological implication of the presence of the oxygen reductase in this organism is discussed.

  18. Analysis of Phaseolus vulgaris response to its association with Trichoderma harzianum (ALL-42) in the presence or absence of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jackeline L; Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien O; Felix, Carlos R; Ricart, Carlos A O; da Silva, Francilene Lopes; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Noronha, Eliane F

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the ability of Trichoderma harzianum (ALL 42-isolated from Brazilian Cerrado soil) to promote common bean growth and to modulate its metabolism and defense response in the presence or absence of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani using a proteomic approach. T. harzianum was able to promote common bean plants growth as shown by the increase in root/foliar areas and by size in comparison to plants grown in its absence. The interaction was shown to modulate the expression of defense-related genes (Glu1, pod3 and lox1) in roots of P. vulgaris. Proteomic maps constructed using roots and leaves of plants challenged or unchallenged by T. harzianum and phytopathogenic fungi showed differences. Reference gels presented differences in spot distribution (absence/presence) and relative volumes of common spots (up or down-regulation). Differential spots were identified by peptide fingerprinting MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A total of 48 identified spots (19 for leaves and 29 for roots) were grouped into protein functional classes. For leaves, 33%, 22% and 11% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively. For roots, 17.2%, 24.1% and 10.3% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively.

  19. Biofortified red mottled beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in a maize and bean diet provide more bioavailable iron than standard red mottled beans: Studies in poultry (Gallus gallus) and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard colored beans to deliver iron (Fe) for hemoglobin synthesis. Two isolines of large-seeded, red mottled Andean beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one standard ("Low Fe") and the other biofortified ("High Fe") in Fe (49 and 71 μg Fe/g, respectively) were used. This commercial class of red mottled beans is the preferred varietal type for most of the Caribbean and Eastern and Southern Africa where almost three quarters of a million hectares are grown. Therefore it is important to know the affect of biofortification of these beans on diets that simulate human feeding studies. Methods Maize-based diets containing the beans were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements for broiler except for Fe (Fe concentrations in the 2 diets were 42.9 ± 1.2 and 54.6 ± 0.9 mg/kg). One day old chicks (Gallus gallus) were allocated to the experimental diets (n = 12). For 4 wk, hemoglobin, feed-consumption and body-weights were measured. Results Hemoglobin maintenance efficiencies (HME) (means ± SEM) were different between groups on days 14 and 21 of the experiment (P < 0.05). Final total body hemoglobin Fe contents were different between the standard (12.58 ± 1.0 mg {0.228 ± 0.01 μmol}) and high Fe (15.04 ± 0.65 mg {0.273 ± 0.01 μmol}) bean groups (P < 0.05). At the end of the experiment, tissue samples were collected from the intestinal duodenum and liver for further analyses. Divalent-metal-transporter-1, duodenal-cytochrome-B, and ferroportin expressions were higher and liver ferritin was lower (P < 0.05) in the standard group vs. the biofortified group. In-vitro analysis showed lower iron bioavailability in cells exposed to standard ("Low Fe") bean based diet. Conclusions We conclude that the in-vivo results support the in-vitro observations; biofortified colored beans contain more bioavailable-iron than standard colored beans. In addition, biofortified beans seems to be a promising vehicle

  20. Genomic basis of broad host range and environmental adaptability of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 which are used in inoculants for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 are α-Proteobacteria that establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses with a range of legume hosts. These strains are broadly used in commercial inoculants for application to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in South America and Africa. Both strains display intrinsic resistance to several abiotic stressful conditions such as low soil pH and high temperatures, which are common in tropical environments, and to several antimicrobials, including pesticides. The genetic determinants of these interesting characteristics remain largely unknown. Results Genome sequencing revealed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 share a highly-conserved symbiotic plasmid (pSym) that is present also in Rhizobium leucaenae CFN 299, a rhizobium displaying a similar host range. This pSym seems to have arisen by a co-integration event between two replicons. Remarkably, three distinct nodA genes were found in the pSym, a characteristic that may contribute to the broad host range of these rhizobia. Genes for biosynthesis and modulation of plant-hormone levels were also identified in the pSym. Analysis of genes involved in stress response showed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 are well equipped to cope with low pH, high temperatures and also with oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, the genomes of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 had large numbers of genes encoding drug-efflux systems, which may explain their high resistance to antimicrobials. Genome analysis also revealed a wide array of traits that may allow these strains to be successful rhizosphere colonizers, including surface polysaccharides, uptake transporters and catabolic enzymes for nutrients, diverse iron-acquisition systems, cell wall-degrading enzymes, type I and IV pili, and novel T1SS and T5SS secreted adhesins. Conclusions Availability of the complete genome sequences of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 may be exploited in further efforts to understand the interaction of tropical rhizobia with common bean

  1. Studies of Cream Seeded Carioca Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from a Rwandan Efficacy Trial: In Vitro and In Vivo Screening Tools Reflect Human Studies and Predict Beneficial Results from Iron Biofortified Beans.

    PubMed

    Tako, Elad; Reed, Spenser; Anandaraman, Amrutha; Beebe, Steve E; Hart, Jonathan J; Glahn, Raymond P

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a highly prevalent micronutrient insufficiency predominantly caused by a lack of bioavailable Fe from the diet. The consumption of beans as a major food crop in some populations suffering from Fe deficiency is relatively high. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether a biofortified variety of cream seeded carioca bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) could provide more bioavailable-Fe than a standard variety using in-vivo (broiler chicken, Gallus gallus) and in-vitro (Caco-2 cell) models. Studies were conducted under conditions designed to mimic the actual human feeding protocol. Two carioca-beans, a standard (G4825; 58 μg Fe/g) and a biofortified (SMC; 106 μg Fe/g), were utilized. Diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of Gallus gallus except for Fe (33.7 and 48.7 μg Fe/g, standard and biofortified diets, respectively). In-vitro observations indicated that more bioavailable-Fe was present in the biofortified beans and diet (P<0.05). In-vivo, improvements in Fe-status were observed in the biofortified bean treatment, as indicated by the increased total-body-Hemoglobin-Fe, and hepatic Fe-concentration (P<0.05). Also, DMT-1 mRNA-expression was increased in the standard bean treatment (P<0.05), indicating an upregulation of absorption to compensate for less bioavailable-Fe. These results demonstrate that the biofortified beans provided more bioavailable Fe; however, the in vitro results revealed that ferritin formation values were relatively low. Such observations are indicative of the presence of high levels of polyphenols and phytate that inhibit Fe absorption. Indeed, we identified higher levels of phytate and quercetin 3-glucoside in the Fe biofortified bean variety. Our results indicate that the biofortified bean line was able to moderately improve Fe-status, and that concurrent increase in the concentration of phytate and polyphenols in beans may limit the benefit of increased Fe-concentration. Therefore, specific

  2. Studies of Cream Seeded Carioca Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from a Rwandan Efficacy Trial: In Vitro and In Vivo Screening Tools Reflect Human Studies and Predict Beneficial Results from Iron Biofortified Beans

    PubMed Central

    Tako, Elad; Reed, Spenser; Anandaraman, Amrutha; Beebe, Steve E.; Hart, Jonathan J.; Glahn, Raymond P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a highly prevalent micronutrient insufficiency predominantly caused by a lack of bioavailable Fe from the diet. The consumption of beans as a major food crop in some populations suffering from Fe deficiency is relatively high. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether a biofortified variety of cream seeded carioca bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) could provide more bioavailable-Fe than a standard variety using in-vivo (broiler chicken, Gallus gallus) and in-vitro (Caco-2 cell) models. Studies were conducted under conditions designed to mimic the actual human feeding protocol. Two carioca-beans, a standard (G4825; 58μg Fe/g) and a biofortified (SMC; 106μg Fe/g), were utilized. Diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of Gallus gallus except for Fe (33.7 and 48.7μg Fe/g, standard and biofortified diets, respectively). In-vitro observations indicated that more bioavailable-Fe was present in the biofortified beans and diet (P<0.05). In-vivo, improvements in Fe-status were observed in the biofortified bean treatment, as indicated by the increased total-body-Hemoglobin-Fe, and hepatic Fe-concentration (P<0.05). Also, DMT-1 mRNA-expression was increased in the standard bean treatment (P<0.05), indicating an upregulation of absorption to compensate for less bioavailable-Fe. These results demonstrate that the biofortified beans provided more bioavailable Fe; however, the in vitro results revealed that ferritin formation values were relatively low. Such observations are indicative of the presence of high levels of polyphenols and phytate that inhibit Fe absorption. Indeed, we identified higher levels of phytate and quercetin 3–glucoside in the Fe biofortified bean variety. Our results indicate that the biofortified bean line was able to moderately improve Fe-status, and that concurrent increase in the concentration of phytate and polyphenols in beans may limit the benefit of increased Fe-concentration. Therefore, specific

  3. Photosystem II Excitation Pressure and Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Savitch, L. V.; Maxwell, D. P.; Huner, NPA.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris grown at 5[deg]C/150 [mu]mol m-2 s-1 mimics cells grown under high irradiance (27[deg]C/2200 [mu]mol m-2 s-1). This has been rationalized through the suggestion that both populations of cells were exposed to comparable photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressures measured as the chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching parameter, 1 - qP (D.P. Maxwell, S. Falk, N.P.A. Huner [1995] Plant Physiol 107: 687-694). To assess the possible role(s) of feed-back mechanisms on PSII excitation pressure, stromal and cytosolic carbon metabolism were examined. Sucrose phosphate synthase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities as well as the ratios of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate/fructose-6-phosphate and sucrose/starch indicated that cells grown at 27[deg]C/2200 [mu]mol m-2 s-1 appeared to exhibit a restriction in starch metabolism. In contrast, cells grown at 5[deg]C/150 [mu]mol m-2 s-1 appeared to exhibit a restriction in the sucrose metabolism based on decreased cytosolic fructose-1,6- bisphosphatase and sucrose phosphate synthase activities as well as a low sucrose/starch ratio. These metabolic restrictions may feed-back on photosynthetic electron transport and, thus, contribute to the observed PSII excitation pressure. We conclude that, although PSII excitation pressure may reflect redox regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to light and temperature in C. vulgaris, it cannot be considered the primary redox signal. Alternative metabolic sensing/signaling mechanisms are discussed. PMID:12226279

  4. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  5. Assessment of the use potential of edible sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus) processing waste within the agricultural system: influence on soil chemical and biological properties and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth in an amended acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Garau, Giovanni; Castaldi, Paola; Deiana, Salvatore; Campus, Paolo; Mazza, Antonio; Deiana, Pietrino; Pais, Antonio

    2012-10-30

    In this study we evaluated the influence of ground purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) endoskeletons, a processing waste common to all edible sea urchin plants, on the chemical, biochemical and microbiological features of an acidic (pH 5.65) sandy-loam soil. The purple sea urchin endoskeletons were characterized by a high content of total carbonates (∼94%), a moderately alkaline pH in water (pH 7.88) and electrical conductivity values (3.55 mS/cm) very similar to those of commercial lime. To evaluate the influence of the P. lividus endoskeletons on soil properties four different amendment rates were tested, notably 0.5, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0% based on soil dry weight, and the effects compared with those recorded on unamended control soil. The addition of the purple sea urchin processing waste caused an immediate and significant pH increase which was positively related to the rate of the amendment addition. After a six months equilibration period, the differences in soil pH were still evident and significant increases of electrical conductivity and available phosphorus were also detected in soils with the higher amendment rates. The number of heterotrophic and cellulolytic bacteria and actinomycetes significantly increased after amendment addition while the number of culturable fungi steadily declined. The analysis of the Biolog Community Level Physiological Profile indicated a clear influence of the purple sea urchin processing waste on the structure of the native microbial community while a significant increase of microbial functionality (i.e. dehydrogenase activity) was recorded in soil treated with the higher amendment rates (i.e. 3.0 and 5.0%). The improvement of microbial abundance and functionality as well as the change of the microbial community structure were ascribed to the pH shift induced by the P. lividus processing waste. To investigate possible effects on soil fertility, dwarf bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth were also

  6. Metabolism of /sup 14/C-zeatin in Phaseolus embryos: occurrence of O-xylosyldihydrozeatin and its ribonucleoside. [Phaseolus acutifolius; Phaseolus coccineus

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.S.; Mok, M.C.

    1987-07-01

    The metabolism of trans-(8-/sup 14/C)zeatin was examined in embryos of Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray P.I. 321637 and Phaseolus coccineus Lam. cys Scarlet Runner and Desiree. In both species zeatin was converted to ribosylzeatin, ribosylzeatin 5'-monophosphate, O-glucosyl-9-ribosylzeatin and the recently discovered O-xylosyl derivatives of zeatin and ribosylzeatin. Two new metabolites, identified by enzyme degradation and gas chromatography-mass spectrography analyses as O-xylosyldihydrozeatin and its ribonucleoside, were recovered from P. coccineus embryos. From this and previous studies it may be concluded that the potential to form O-xylosyl derivatives of zeatin is present only in embryos of three Phaseolus species (P. vulgaris L., P. coccineus, and P. acutifolius), but not in P. lunatus L., while the reduction of the side chain is most prominent in P. coccineus.

  7. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  8. Analysis of genetic and nutritional diversity among selected accessions of dry beans and nuña beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beans (Phaseolus spp.) are one of the most economically and nutritionally important crops world-wide, with a value of over $17 billion harvested annually. They are one of the most ancient crops of the New World, having been cultivated for thousands of years. They are an environmentally diverse crop...

  9. Biofortified red mottled beans (phaseolus vulgaris L.) in a maize and bean diet provide more bioavailable iron than standard red mottled beans: studies in poultry (Gallus gallus) and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard colored beans to deliver iron (Fe) for hemoglobin synthesis. Two isolines of large-seeded, red mottled Andean beans (Phaseolus valgaris L.), one standard (“Low FE”) and the other biofortified (“High Fe”) in Fe (49 and 71 ug Fe...

  10. Symbiont shift towards Rhizobium nodulation in a group of phylogenetically related Phaseolus species.

    PubMed

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Zayas-Del Moral, Alejandra; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco A; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Sánchez, Federico; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-10-01

    Bean plants from the Phaseolus genus are widely consumed and represent a nitrogen source for human nutrition. They provide biological fertilization by establishing root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. To establish a successful interaction, bean plants and their symbiotic bacteria need to synchronize a proper molecular crosstalk. Within the Phaseolus genus, P. vulgaris has been the prominent species to study nodulation with Rhizobium symbionts. However the Phaseolus genus comprises diverse species whose symbionts have not been analyzed. Here we identified and studied nodule bacteria from representative Phaseolus species not previously analyzed and from all the described wild species related to P. vulgaris. We found Bradyrhizobium in nodules from most species representing all Phaseolus clades except in five phylogenetically related species from the P. vulgaris clade. Therefore we propose that Bradyrhizobium nodulation is common in Phaseolus and that there was a symbiont preference shift to Rhizobium nodulation in few related species. This work sets the basis to further study the genetic basis of this symbiont substitution.

  11. Phase II enzyme-inducing and antioxidant activities of beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extracts from phenotypes of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Wettasinghe, Mahinda; Bolling, Bradley; Plhak, Leslie; Xiao, Hang; Parkin, Kirk

    2002-11-06

    Free-radical scavenging, reducing, and phase II enzyme-inducing activities of aqueous and 5% aqueous ethanol extracts of freeze-dried root tissue of four beet (Beta vulgaris L.) strains (red, white, orange, and high-pigment (red) phenotypes) were determined. Aqueous and ethanolic tissue extracts of the regular and high-pigment red phenotypes were most capable of inhibiting metmyoglobin/H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2-2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-mediated bleaching of beta-carotene. These same extracts were also most efficient at reducing ABTS radical cation and inducing quinone reductase in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells in vitro.

  12. Cytokinin Autonomy in Tissue Cultures of Phaseolus: A Genotype-Specific and Heritable Trait

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Machteld C.; Mok, David W. S.; Armstrong, Donald J.; Rabakoarihanta, Aimée; Kim, Sang-Gu

    1980-01-01

    Intra- and interspecific differences in cytokinin requirement were detected in callus cultures of Phaseolus vulgaris L. and P. lunatus L. Of the ten genotypes of P. vulgaris tested in the present study, one required cytokinin for callus growth, six exhibited some to moderate growth on cytokinin-free medium, and the remaining three grew uniformly in the absence of cytokinin. In contrast, six of the P. lunatus genotypes were strictly cytokinin-dependent, while four genotypes displayed irregular amount of callus growth on cytokinin-free medium. The genotype-specific behavior of Phaseolus callus tissues was independent of the tissue of origin and the time in culture. The inheritance of the cytokinin requirement of Phaseolus tissue cultures was studied in hybrid tissues resulting from crosses between a strictly cytokinin-dependent genotype (P.I. 200960) and two independent genotypes (cv. G 50 and P.I. 286303) of P. vulgaris. Fresh weights of hybrid tissues on cytokinin-free medium were intermediate between and significantly different from the parental tissues. No differences were found between reciprocal hybrids. These results suggest that cytokinin autonomy in tissue cultures of P. vulgaris is a genetic trait under nuclear control. Both parental and intermediate phenotypes were recovered in the F2 progeny. The frequency distribution of cytokinin-dependent progeny in F2 and backcross populations indicates that the cytokinin requirement of P. vulgaris callus tissue may be regulated by one set of alleles. PMID:17249014

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of chondroitin sulfate ABC lyases I and II from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Matte, A; Suzuki, S; Sugiura, N; Miyazono, H; Cygler, M

    2000-07-01

    Chondroitin sulfate ABC lyases (E.C. 4.2.2.4) are broad-specificity glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzymes. Their preferred substrates are chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate, which are broken down to short oligosaccharides. Proteus vulgaris produces two such lyases, ABC lyase I and II, with molecular weights of 112-113 kDa. Diffraction-quality crystals of both enzymes have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. ABC lyase I crystallizes in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 49.3, b = 95.1, c = 230.0 A, Z = 4, and diffracts to 1.9 A resolution. Crystals of ABC lyase II belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 64.3, c = 142.1 A, alpha = 95.7, beta = 98. 1, gamma = 95.5 degrees, Z = 2; diffraction extends to at least 2.1 A.

  14. Pemphigus vulgaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000882.htm Pemphigus vulgaris To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder of the ...

  15. Recombinant expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of chondroitinase ABC II from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Vikas; Capila, Ishan; Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-01-09

    Chondroitin lyases (or chondroitinases) are a family of enzymes that depolymerize chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) galactosaminoglycans, which have gained prominence as important players in central nervous system biology. Two distinct chondroitinase ABC enzymes, cABCI and cABCII, were identified in Proteus vulgaris. Recently, cABCI was cloned, recombinantly expressed, and extensively characterized structurally and biochemically. This study focuses on recombinant expression, purification, biochemical characterization, and understanding the structure-function relationship of cABCII. The biochemical parameters for optimal activity and kinetic parameters associated with processing of various CS and DS substrates were determined. The profile of products formed by action of cABCII on different substrates was compared with product profile of cABCI. A homology-based structural model of cABCII and its complexes with CS oligosaccharides was constructed. This structural model provided molecular insights into the experimentally observed differences in the product profile of cABCII as compared with that of cABCI. The critical active site residues involved in the catalytic activity of cABCII identified based on the structural model were validated using site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic characterization of the mutants. The development of such a contaminant-free cABCII enzyme provides additional tools to decode the biologically important structure-function relationship of CS and DS galactosaminoglycans and offers novel therapeutic strategies for recovery after central nervous system injury.

  16. 2007. Two genes from Phaseolus coccineus L. confer resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus in common bean. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132:530-533

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV), caused by a whitefly (Bemisia spp.) transmitted geminivirus, is an important disease that can limit common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Central America, the Caribbean and southern Florida. Only a few genes are currently deployed in BGYMV resista...

  17. Uptake Hydrogenase (Hup) in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rosangela B.; Vargas, Alvaro A. T.; Schröder, Eduardo C.; van Berkum, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Strains of Rhizobium forming nitrogen-fixing symbioses with common bean were systematically examined for the presence of the uptake hydrogenase (hup) structural genes and expression of uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity. DNA with homology to the hup structural genes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was present in 100 of 248 strains examined. EcoRI fragments with molecular sizes of approximately 20.0 and 2.2 kb hybridized with an internal SacI fragment, which contains part of both bradyrhizobial hup structural genes. The DNA with homology to the hup genes was located on pSym of one of the bean rhizobia. Hup activity was observed in bean symbioses with 13 of 30 strains containing DNA homologous with the hup structural genes. However, the Hup activity was not sufficient to eliminate hydrogen evolution from the nodules. Varying the host plant with two of the Hup+ strains indicated that expression of Hup activity was host regulated, as has been reported with soybean, pea, and cowpea strains. Images PMID:16349115

  18. Colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris nodules by Agrobacterium-like strains.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Mrabet, Moncef; Laguerre, Gisèle; Tiwari, Ravi; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-02-01

    Non-nodulating Agrobacterium-like strains identified among root nodule isolates of common bean were labeled with gusA, a reporter gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS). Bean plants were then co-inoculated with an infective Rhizobium strain and labeled transconjugants of Agrobacterium-like strains. Blue staining of nodules showed that Agrobacterium-like strains were able to colonize these symbiotic organs. Isolation and characterization by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes revealed a mixed population of Rhizobium and Agrobacterium-like strains in all nodules showing GUS activity. PCR amplification of the nifH gene and nodulation tests did not show any evidence of acquisition of symbiotic gene by lateral transfer from Rhizobium to Agrobacterium-like strains. Moreover, these strains were able to invade mature nodules. Based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, one of these Agrobacterium-like strains showed 99.4% sequence similarity with Agrobacterium bv. 1 reference strains and 99% similarity with an Agrobacterium bv. 1 strain isolated from Acacia mollisima in Senegal. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 and the disarmed variant AT123 did not show any ability to colonize nodules. Co-inoculation of bean seeds with Agrobacterium and Rhizobium strains did not enhance nodulation and plant yield under controlled conditions.

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  20. The polyphenolic profiles of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial S; Luthria, Devanand L

    2008-03-01

    Based on the phenolic profiles obtained by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS), 24 common bean samples, representing 17 varieties and 7 generic off-the-shelf items, belonging to ten US commercial market classes can be organized into six different groups. All of them contained the same hydroxycinnaminic acids, but the flavonoid components showed distinct differences. Black beans contained primarily the 3-O-glucosides of delphinidin, petunidin and malvidin, while pinto beans contained kaempferol and its 3-O-glycosides. Light red kidney bean contained traces of quercetin 3-O-glucoside and its malonates, but pink and dark red kidney beans contained the diglycosides of quercetin and kaempferol. Small red beans contained kaempferol 3-O-glucoside and pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside, while no flavonoids were detected in alubia, cranberry, great northern, and navy beans. This is the first report of the tentative identification of quercetin 3-O-pentosylhexoside and flavonoid glucoside malonates, and the first detailed detection of hydroxycinnamates, in common beans.

  1. Antioxidant activity of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of black bean protein concentrate using different enzymes. Bean proteins were extracted and hydrolyzed over a period of 120 min using the enzymes pepsin or alcalase. The protein hydrolysates’ molecular weight was assayed by e...

  2. Iron speciation in beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) biofortified by common breeding.

    PubMed

    Hoppler, Matthias; Egli, Ines; Petry, Nicolai; Gille, Doreen; Zeder, Christophe; Walczyk, Thomas; Blair, Matthew W; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    The iron storage protein ferritin is a potential vehicle to enhance the iron content of biofortified crops. With the aim of evaluating the potential of ferritin iron in plant breeding, we used species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry to quantify ferritin iron in bean varieties with a wide range of total iron content. Zinc, phytic acid, and polyphenols were also measured. Total iron concentration in 21 bean varieties ranged from 32 to 115 ppm and was positively correlated with concentrations of zinc (P = 0.001) and nonferritin bound iron (P < 0.001). Ferritin iron ranged from 13% to 35% of total iron and increased only slightly in high iron beans (P = 0.007). Concentrations of nonferritin bound iron and phytic acid were correlated (P = 0.001), although phytic acid:iron molar ratio decreased with increasing iron concentration (P = 0.003). Most iron in high iron beans was present as nonferritin bound iron, which confirms our earlier finding showing that ferritin iron in beans was lower than previously published. As the range of ferritin iron content in beans is relatively narrow, there is less opportunity for breeders to breed for high ferritin. The relevance of these findings to the extent of iron absorption depends on resolving the question of whether ferritin iron is absorbed or not to a greater extent than nonferritin bound iron.

  3. Biodiversity studies in Phaseolus species by DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Nicolè, Silvia; Erickson, David L; Ambrosi, Daria; Bellucci, Elisa; Lucchin, Margherita; Papa, Roberto; Kress, W John; Barcaccia, Gianni

    2011-07-01

    The potential of DNA barcoding was tested as a system for studying genetic diversity and genetic traceability in bean germplasm. This technique was applied to several pure lines of Phaseolus vulgaris L. belonging to wild, domesticated, and cultivated common beans, along with some accessions of Phaseolus coccineus L., Phaseolus lunatus L., and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. A multilocus approach was exploited using three chloroplast genic regions (rbcL, trnL, and matK), four intergenic spacers (rpoB-trnC, atpBrbcL, trnT-trnL, and psbA-trnH), and nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA sequences. Our main goals were to identify the markers and SNPs that show the best discriminant power at the variety level in common bean germplasm, to examine two methods (tree based versus character based) for biodiversity analysis and traceability assays, and to evaluate the overall utility of chloroplast DNA barcodes for reconstructing the origins of modern Italian varieties. Our results indicate that the neighbor-joining method is a powerful approach for comparing genetic diversity within plant species, but it is relatively uninformative for the genetic traceability of plant varieties. In contrast, the character-based method was able to identify several distinct haplotypes over all target regions corresponding to Mesoamerican or Andean accessions; Italian accessions originated from both gene pools. On the whole, our findings raise some concerns about the use of DNA barcoding for intraspecific genetic diversity studies in common beans and highlights its limitations for resolving genetic relationships between landraces and varieties.

  4. Genotypic Variation in Cytokinin Oxidase from Phaseolus Callus Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Kaminek, Miroslav; Armstrong, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    Genotypic variation in cytokinin oxidase has been detected in enzyme preparations from Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Great Northern and Phaseolus lunatus L. cv Kingston callus cultures. Although cytokinin oxidase preparations from Great Northern and Kingston callus tissues appear to have very similar substrate specificities, the cytokinin oxidase activities from the two callus tissues were found to differ in a number of other properties. The cytokinin oxidase from P. vulgaris cv Great Northern callus tissue exhibited a pH optimum of 6.5 (bisTris) and had a strong affinity for the lectin concanavalin A. The cytokinin oxidase from P. lunatus cv Kingston callus tissue exhibited a pH optimum of 8.4 (Taps) and did not bind to concanavalin A. The two enzymes also differed in position of elution when chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose. Both cytokinin oxidase activities exhibited enhanced activity and lower pH optima in the presence of copper-imidazole complexes, but the optimum copper-imidazole ratio and the magnitude of enhancement differed for the two activities. In both callus tissues, transient increases in the supply of exogenous cytokinins induced increases in cytokinin oxidase activity. The differences in pH optima and in glycosylation (as evidenced by the observed difference in lectin affinity) of the cytokinin oxidases from Great Northern and Kingston callus tissues suggest that the compartmentation of cytokinin oxidase may differ in the two callus tissues. The possibility that enzyme compartmentation and isozyme variation in cytokinin oxidase may play a role in the regulation of cytokinin degradation in plant tissues is discussed in relation to known differences in the rates of cytokinin degradation in Great Northern and Kingston callus tissues. Images Figure 6 PMID:16667652

  5. Investigation of simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) on dried Chlorella vulgaris from binary metal mixtures: Application of multicomponent adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Aksu, Z.; Acikel, U.; Kutsal, T.

    1999-02-01

    Although the biosorption of single metal ions to various kinds of microorganisms has been extensively studied and the adsorption isotherms have been developed for only the single metal ion situation, very little attention has been given to the bioremoval and expression of adsorption isotherms of multimetal ions systems. In this study the simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) to Chlorella vulgaris from a binary metal mixture was studied and compared with the single metal ion situation in a batch stirred system. The effects of pH and single- and dual-metal ion concentrations on the equilibrium uptakes were investigated. In previous studies the optimum biosorption pH had been determined as 4.0 for copper(II) and as 2.0 for chromium(VI). Multimetal ion biosorption studies were performed at these two pH values. It was observed that the equilibrium uptakes of copper(II) or chromium(VI) ions were changed due to the biosorption pH and the presence of other metal ions. Adsorption isotherms were developed for both single- and dual-metal ions systems at these two pH values, and expressed by the mono- and multicomponent Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. Model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. It was seen that the adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to the competitive Freundlich model in the concentration ranges studied.

  6. Pemphigus Vulgaris with Tense Bullae

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Emilie T; Lin, Shinko K; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with a history of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia presenting with pain, swelling, and crusting of the lips. One year after onset of mucosal lesions, she developed an abdominal eruption with several tense vesicles and bullae on an erythematous base. The hematoxylin and eosin stain sample was consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. The tense bullae of our patient highlight a rare phenotype of pemphigus vulgaris, which fits the mucocutaneous type because of involvement of the oral mucosa, with the exception of the findings of tense bullae. PMID:25663209

  7. Pemphigus vulgaris with tense bullae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Emilie T; Lin, Shinko K; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with a history of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia presenting with pain, swelling, and crusting of the lips. One year after onset of mucosal lesions, she developed an abdominal eruption with several tense vesicles and bullae on an erythematous base. The hematoxylin and eosin stain sample was consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. The tense bullae of our patient highlight a rare phenotype of pemphigus vulgaris, which fits the mucocutaneous type because of involvement of the oral mucosa, with the exception of the findings of tense bullae.

  8. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin M

    2004-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory skin condition that presents management difficulties to cosmetic surgeons. Acute management and treatment focuses on early diagnosis as well as treatment with topical agents, oral antibiotics, hormonal therapy,and nonablative chemical peel and laser applications. The treatment of postinflammatory scarring must be individualized to address potential macular dyschromia, cystic lesions,epithelial bridges, or deep pitted scars. A review of interventional options is presented to apply to the spectrum of acne scarring as well as a review of the literature to address objectively published reports on efficacy.

  9. Superior efficacy of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam versus ointment in patients with psoriasis vulgaris – A randomized phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Koo, John; Tyring, Stephen; Werschler, William P.; Bruce, Suzanne; Olesen, Martin; Villumsen, John; Bagel, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An aerosol foam formulation of fixed combination calcipotriene 0.005% (as hydrate; Cal) plus betamethasone dipropionate 0.064% (BD) was developed to improve psoriasis treatment. Objectives: To compare the efficacy and safety of Cal/BD aerosol foam with Cal/BD ointment after 4 weeks. Methods: In this Phase II, multicenter, investigator-blind, 4-week trial, adult patients with psoriasis vulgaris were randomized to Cal/BD aerosol foam, Cal/BD ointment, aerosol foam vehicle or ointment vehicle (3:3:1:1). The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients at week 4 who achieved treatment success (clear or almost clear with at least a two-step improvement) according to the physician’s global assessment of disease severity. Results: In total, 376 patients were randomized. At week 4, significantly more patients using Cal/BD aerosol foam achieved treatment success (54.6% versus 43.0% [ointment]; p = 0.025); mean modified (excluding the head, which was not treated) psoriasis area and severity index score was significantly different between Cal/BD aerosol foam and Cal/BD ointment (mean difference –0.6; p = 0.005). Rapid, continuous itch relief occurred with both active treatments. One adverse drug reaction was reported with Cal/BD aerosol foam (application site itch). Conclusions: Cal/BD aerosol foam demonstrates significantly greater efficacy and similar tolerability compared with Cal/BD ointment for psoriasis treatment. PMID:26444907

  10. Modeling the bound conformation of Pemphigus Vulgaris-associated peptides to MHC Class II DR and DQ Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Joo Chuan; Bramson, Jeff; Kanduc, Darja; Chow, Selwyn; Sinha, Animesh A; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Background Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a severe autoimmune blistering disorder characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies directed against desmoglein-3 (Dsg3), involving specific DR4 and DR6 alleles in Caucasians and DQ5 allele in Asians. The development of sequence-based predictive algorithms to identify potential Dsg3 epitopes has encountered limited success due to the paucity of PV-associated allele-specific peptides as training data. Results In this work we constructed atomic models of ten PV associated, non-associated and protective alleles. Nine previously identified stimulatory Dsg3 peptides, Dsg3 96–112, Dsg3 191–205, Dsg3 206–220, Dsg3 252–266, Dsg3 342–356, Dsg3 380–394, Dsg3 763–777, Dsg3 810–824 and Dsg3 963–977, were docked into the binding groove of each model to analyze the structural aspects of allele-specific binding. Conclusion Our docking simulations are entirely consistent with functional data obtained from in vitro competitive binding assays and T cell proliferation studies in DR4 and DR6 PV patients. Our findings ascertain that DRB1*0402 plays a crucial role in the selection of specific self-peptides in DR4 PV. DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503 do not necessarily share the same core residues, indicating that both alleles may have different binding specificities. In addition, our results lend credence to the hypothesis that the alleles DQB1*0201 and *0202 play a protective role by binding Dsg3 peptides with greater affinity than the susceptible alleles, allowing for efficient deletion of autoreactive T cells. PMID:16426456

  11. Differential HLA class I and class II associations in pemphigus foliaceus and pemphigus vulgaris patients from a prevalent Southeastern Brazilian region.

    PubMed

    Brochado, Maria José Franco; Nascimento, Daniela Francisca; Campos, Wagner; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloum; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    Genetic factors, particularly those concerning HLA class II, have been associated with the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Taking advantage of an area where pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV) are prevalent in the northeastern region of the state of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, we have studied the HLA class I (A, B and C) and class II (DRB1 and DQA1/DQB1) profiles in 86 and 83 patients with PF and PV, respectively, as compared with 1592 controls from the same region. Among all the HLA alleles described herein, the more prevalent susceptibility alleles for PF were HLA-A*11, 33, -B*14; -DRB1*01:01, *01:02; -DQA1*01:02; and -DQB1*05:01. In PV patients, the HLA-B*38; -C*12; -DRB1*04:02, *08:04, *14:01, *14:04; -DQA1*03:01; and -DQB1*03:02 and *05:03 alleles were associated with susceptibility. The HLA-DRB1*01:02 allele and the HLA-DRB1*01-DQA1*01-DQB1*05 haplotype in PF patients and the HLA-DRB1*04:02 and *14:01 alleles and the HLA-DRB1*14-DQA1*01-DQB1*05 haplotype in PV patients were related with the highest etiologic fraction values. Distinct genetic patterns and not yet described HLA susceptibility/protection alleles/haplotypes profiles have been observed in this series. Our findings corroborate the differential genetic markers in PF and PV in an area where pemphigus is prevalent but not yet reported.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen class II (DRB1 and DQB1) alleles and haplotypes frequencies in patients with pemphigus vulgaris among the Serbian population.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, D; Bojic, S; Medenica, L; Andric, Z; Popadic, D

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is multifactorial and includes genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immunological factors. Inheritance of certain Human class II leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is by far the best-established predisposing factor for the development of PV. Class II HLA alleles vary among racial/ethnic backgrounds. We have determined an association between HLA class II alleles and PV among the Serbian population. A total of 72 patients with confirmed diagnosis of PV were genotyped for HLA class II alleles. HLA frequencies were compared with unrelated healthy bone marrow donors. The statistical significance of differences between patients and controls was evaluated using Fisher's exact test. The DRB1*04 and DRB1*14 allelic groups were associated with PV (P adj = 4.45 × 10(-13) and 4.06 × 10(-19) respectively), while HLA-DRB1*11 was negatively associated with PV (P adj = 0.0067) suggesting a protective role. DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, DQB1*03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles were shown to be strongly associated with PV (P adj = 1.63 × 10(-12), 5.20 × 10(-7), 1.28 × 10(-6), and 4.44 × 10(-5), respectively). The frequency of HLA DRB1*04-DQB1*03 and HLA DRB1*14-DQB1*05 haplotypes in PV patients was significantly higher than in controls (31.3% vs 8.8%, P adj =7.66 × 10(-8) and 30.6% vs 6.3%, P adj = 3.22 × 10(-10), respectively). At high-resolution level, statistical significance was observed in HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes (P adj = 5.55 × 10(-12), and P adj = 3.91 × 10(-6), respectively). Our findings suggest that HLA-DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, HLA-DQB1* 03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles and HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes are genetic markers for susceptibility for PV, while DRB1*11 allelic group appears protective in Serbian population.

  13. Antioxidant activity of processed table beets (Beta vulgaris var, conditiva) and green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Jiratanan, Thudnatkorn; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-05-05

    It has been shown that thermal processing of tomatoes and sweet corn results in increased antioxidant activities despite the loss of vitamin C. Until now, it is unclear whether this positive effect of thermal processing occurs with all crop produce. Therefore, analysis of a root vegetable (beets) and of a legume (green beans) was undertaken to address this question. Antioxidant activity of beets processed under typical commercial processing conditions remained constant despite an 8% loss of vitamin C, a 60% loss of color, and 30% loss of dietary folate. There was a slight but significant 5% increase in phenolic content of processed beets. In contrast, vitamin C and dietary folate content of green beans remained constant, whereas a 32% reduction in phenolic compounds occurred after typical commercial processing conditions. The antioxidant activity of green beans was reduced by 20%. These findings along with previous works suggest that the effects of thermal processing vary with the respective produce crop type. It also reinforces the concept that optimal health benefits may be achieved when a wide variety of plant foods (fruits, vegetables and whole grains) and preparation methods are incorporated into the diet.

  14. A reproducible genetic transformation system for cultivated Phaseolus acutifolius (tepary bean) and its use to assess the role of arcelins in resistance to the Mexican bean weevil.

    PubMed

    Zambre, M; Goossens, A; Cardona, C; Van Montagu, M; Terryn, N; Angenon, G

    2005-03-01

    A reproducible Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation method that delivers fertile and morphologically normal transgenic plants was developed for cultivated tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius L. Gray). Factors contributing to higher transformation efficiencies include (1) a low initial concentration of bacteria coupled with a longer cocultivation period with callus, (2) an initial selection of callus on a medium containing low levels of the selectable agent, (3) omission of the selectable agent from the medium during callus differentiation to shoots and (4) the efficient conversion of transgenic shoots into fertile plants. All plants regenerated with this procedure (T0) were stably transformed, and the introduced foreign genes were inherited in a Mendelian fashion in most of the 33 independent transformants. Integration, stable transmission and high expression levels of the transgenes were observed in the T1 and/or T3 progenies of the transgenic lines. The binary transformation vectors contained the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene, the neomycin phosphotransferase II selectable marker gene and either an arcelin 1 or an arcelin 5 gene. Arcelins are seed proteins that are very abundant in some wild P. vulgaris L. genotypes showing resistance to the storage insect Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman) (Coleoptera, Bruchidae). Transgenic beans from two different cultivated P. acutifolius genotypes with high arcelin levels were infested with Z. subfasciatus, but they were only marginally less susceptible to infestation than the non-transgenic P. acutifolius. Hence, the arcelin genes tested here are not major determinants of resistance against Z. subfasciatus.

  15. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B B

    1989-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is a disease of the pilosebaceous unit that affects nearly all persons to some degree during the teenage years. It is a disease that should be treated because of the anxiety and disfigurement it causes in the affected patient. Acne therapy is directed against the three probable pathogenic processes in acne: (1) abnormal keratinization of the sebaceous follicle, (2) excessive production of sebum, and (3) proliferation of bacteria in the follicle. Superficial acne consisting of comedones and small papulopustules will frequently respond to topical therapy such as retinoic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and topical antibiotics. Deeper lesions require systemic antibiotics of which tetracycline is the drug of choice. Severe, recalcitrant cystic acne usually responds well to the oral retinoid, isotretinoin. The severe teratogenic effects of isotretinoin on a developing fetus make this a risky drug to prescribe for women with childbearing potential. In such cases the greatest precautions should be taken to avoid pregnancy during a course of isotretinoin. Such precautions include pregnancy testing, contraceptive counseling, and the use of at least two effective forms of birth control in sexually active women.

  16. Crystal structure of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris R-47 alpha-amylase II (TVAII) hydrolyzing cyclodextrins and pullulan at 2.6 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Kamitori, S; Kondo, S; Okuyama, K; Yokota, T; Shimura, Y; Tonozuka, T; Sakano, Y

    1999-04-16

    The crystal structure of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris R-47 alpha-Amylase II (TVAII) has been determined by multiple isomorphous replacement at 2.6 A resolution. TVAII was crystallized in an orthorhombic system with the space group P212121 and the cell dimensions a=118.5 A, b=119.5 A, c=114.5 A. There are two molecules in an asymmetric unit, related by the non-crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. Diffraction data were collected at 113 K and the cell dimensions reduced to a=114.6 A, b=117.9 A, c=114.2 A, and the model was refined against 7.0-2.6 A resolution data giving an R-factor of 0.204 (Rfree=0.272). The final model consists of 1170 amino acid residues (two molecules) and 478 water molecules with good chemical geometry. TVAII has three domains, A, B, and C, like other alpha-amylases. Domain A with a (beta/alpha)8 barrel structure and domain C with a beta-sandwich structure are very similar to those found in other alpha-amylases. Additionally, TVAII has an extra domain N composed of 121 amino acid residues at the N-terminal site, which has a beta-barrel-like structure consisting of seven antiparallel beta-strands. Domain N is one of the driving forces in the formation of the dimer structure of TVAII, but its role in the enzyme activity is still not clear. TVAII does not have the Ca2+ binding site that connects domains A and B in other alpha-amylases, rather the NZ atom of Lys299 of TVAII serves as the connector between these domains. TVAII can hydrolyze cyclodextrins and pullulan as well as starch. Based on a structural comparison with the complex between a mutant cyclodextrin glucanotransferase and a beta-cyclodextrin derivative, Phe286 located at domain B is considered the residue most likely to recognize the hydrophobic cavity of cyclodextrins. The active-site cleft of TVAII is wider and shallower than that of other alpha-amylases, and seems to be suitable for the binding of pullulan which is expected not to adopt the helical structure of amylose.

  17. Nutritional composition and cooking characteristics of tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray) in comparison with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tepary bean is a highly abiotic stress tolerant orphan crop, however, there has been limited research on its nutritional value and cooking characteristics, key aspects when considering the potential for broader adoption globally. The goal of this study was to evaluate a large set of seed composition...

  18. Translocation of Indole-3-acetic Acid-1′-14C and Tryptophan-1-14C in Seedlings of Phaseolus coccineus L. and Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, R. L.; Zalik, Saul

    1967-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid-1′-14C (IAA-14C) and tryptophan-1-14C injected in small amounts into cotyledons of Phaseolus coccineus L. seedlings were found to be translocated acropetally into the epicotyls and young shoots. Similarly IAA-14C was translocated acropetally into coleoptiles of Zea mays following injection into the endosperms. Labeled metabolites of the injected compounds were also extractable from shoot tissue. However, evidence that IAA-14C itself was translocated acropetally was obtained by collection in agar blocks applied to cut surfaces of coleoptiles of injected seedlings. The acropetal translocation in Phaseolus was shown not to occur in the transpiration stream but in living tissue. Cotyledons of Phaseolus coccineus and Phaseolus vulgaris contain extensive vascular tissue. Tryptophan-14C was not actively translocated through excised segments of Phaseolus coccineus epicotyl and Zea mays coleoptile when supplied from donor agar blocks in concentrations as high as 100 μm. The small amount of tryptophan-14C which did reach receiver blocks when high concentrations were used may be accounted for by passive diffusion through the fluid-filled xylem vessels. Translocation of a non-toxic dye, Light Green SF Yellowish, through xylem vessels was found to occur when supplied from donor blocks placed acropetally or basipetally. Metabolism of the supplied tryptophan-14C by the tissue segments was shown to occur during the 3 to 6 hour translocation experiments. IAA-14C was transported in a strictly basipetal manner in both tissues. Only 1 labeled compound with an RF value of IAA was found in receiver blocks. Composition of a simple green safelight suitable for work in plant physiology is described. Images PMID:16656664

  19. Lupus vulgaris of external nose.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B Usha

    2008-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  20. Lupus vulgaris: difficulties in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Julia; Caccetta, Tony Philip; Tait, Clare

    2013-05-01

    Lupus vulgaris is one of the most common forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. It presents a diagnostic challenge due to its paucibacillary nature. This is a report of a case of a delayed diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, presenting as perianal and peristomal plaques, followed by a review of the diagnostic tools for lupus vulgaris and their limitations.

  1. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Dhanlaklshmi, M

    2008-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Cutaneous Tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra-pulmonary manifestations of Tuberculosis. Lupus Vulgaris (LV) is one of the clinical variants of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. A case of a large plaque type psoriasiform lesion of lupus vulgaris on the thigh, of 15 years' duration, in an 18-year-old girl is reported. This case highlights the ignorance level among the patients and consequent failure to avail proper anti-tuberculous treatment despite campaign in print and audio visual media.

  2. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue. II. Characterization of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake to ATP utilization via ..delta mu..H/sup +/, no evidence for a secondary H/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Optimal uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell.

  3. Water deficit effect on ABA accumulation in leaves of two Phaseolus species that differ in drought tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, M.G.; Markhart, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Phaseolus acutifolius Gray (Pa) is regarded as a dehydration postponer and has stomata that are more sensitive to low leaf water potential than P. vulgaris L. (Pv). This study was designed to determine if the greater sensitivity of Pa stomata is related to greater ABA concentration in Pa or to a greater sensitivity of Pa stomata to ABA. To test these hypotheses bulk leaf ABA accumulation was measured and the sensitivity to ABA was monitored using epidermal strips. To determine if part of the ABA accumulated in the leaves is produced in the roots a novel detached leaf system was used. Stomatal behavior and ABA accumulation at low leaf water potential was monitored and compared to intact leaves. The results of these experiments and the usefulness of the detached leaf system are discussed.

  4. Inoculation lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, V N; Jain, S; Gupta, R

    1992-01-01

    An 11-years-old girl with lupus vulgaris on the right buttock following inoculation is described. The diagnosis was formed by the history, morphological characteristics, Mantoux test, histopathology, and was supported by an affirmative response to short course intensive chemotherapy (6 months). This route of infection acquires special significance with the worldwide-spread of HIV infection.

  5. Activity of alpha-amylase inhibitors from Phaseolus coccineus on digestive alpha-amylases of the coffee berry borer.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Arboleda Valencia, Jorge W; Grossi-De-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2008-04-09

    Seeds of scarlet runner bean ( Phaseolus coccineus L.) were analyzed for alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha-AI) activity. Through the use of polyclonal antibodies raised against pure alpha-AI-1 from common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), typical alpha-AlphaIota polypeptides (Mr 14-18 kDa) as well as a large polypeptide of Mr 32000 Da, usually referred to as "amylase inhibitor like", were detected. The inhibitor activity present in four accessions of P. coccineus was examined, both in semiquantitative zymograms allowing the separation of different isoforms and in quantitative assays against human salivary amylase, porcine pancreatic amylase, and coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) amylase. Differential inhibition curves lead to the suggestion that the gene encoding one of the inhibitors in P. coccineus (in accession G35590) would be a good candidate for genetic engineering of coffee resistance toward the coffee berry borer. An in vitro proteolytic digestion treatment of pure alpha-AlphaIota-1 resulted in a rapid loss of the inhibitory activity, seriously affecting its natural capacity to interact with mammalian alpha-amylases.

  6. Pemphigus vulgaris and disseminated nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Martín, F J; Pérez-Bernal, A M; Camacho, F

    2000-09-01

    Infectious diseases, in particular septicaemia from Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are the most severe and frequent complications for the immunosuppressive therapy of pemphigus. Infection by Nocardia asteroides in subjects with pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We report the sixth case found of such an association; the subject died of disseminated nocardiosis while receiving steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, 4 years after being diagnosed with chronic pemphigus vulgaris.

  7. Lung and lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mukta, V; Jayachandran, K

    2011-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs. This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  8. [Cefaclor induced pemphigus vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Scardina, G A; Conti, N M; Messina, P

    2004-01-01

    Pemphigus is a chronic disease with an outcome that is not without risk. It is characterised by loss of the intraepithelial cell-cell relationship (acantholysis). Underlying the disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the desmosomes are damaged by antibodies directed against particular molecules called desmogleins (particularly 3 and 1). Various types of pemphigus have been described with different antibody profiles and clinical signs. In the present paper, a case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with the medication cefaclor monohydrate is reported. Histological and immunological evaluation of the biopsy sample led to a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. The patient, who was not hospitalised, was treated with corticosteroids and systemic immunosuppressors. At present she is being controlled by low doses of systemic corticosteroids. Early diagnosis and the timely introduction of the therapeutic protocol permitted complete remission of the lesions observed at the level of the oral and conjunctival mucosa, preventing the involvement of other locations.

  9. Pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Kelsey W; Gero, Melanie J; Ragsdale, Bruce D

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) during pregnancy. The patient presented with widespread blistering dermatitis and associated burning and pruritus. At 6 weeks' gestation the patient was admitted to the hospital to expedite her diagnosis and initiate treatment. A skin biopsy revealed suprabasal acantholysis, and direct immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse intercellular IgG in the epidermis and basal intercellular C3, which confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Treatment with corticosteroids was instituted after discussions with the patient about possible adverse effects to the fetus. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in pregnancy and active PV presents potential threats of fetal spread and transient lesion production, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in the fetus. Our patient had active PV and required treatment throughout her pregnancy. The pregnancy progressed to premature delivery of the neonate without skin lesions or apparent complications.

  10. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Females (56%), 15–20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05) found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:27688440

  11. Cytochrome C oxidase activity in germinating Phaseolus vulgaris l. seeds: Effects of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, W.S. ); Sowa, S.; Roos, E.E.

    1989-04-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a key bioenergetic enzyme required for seed germination. The enzyme was isolated from 2-day germinating beans and biochemically compared to its bovine heart counterpart. Carbon monoxide, which binds to the heme a{sub 3} site of cytochrome c oxidase, we used to probe O{sub 2} utilization activity in isolated enzyme, mitochondrial particles, and whole seeds. Bean seeds under 80% CO/20% O{sub 2} exhibited 46% growth inhibition as determined by root length. Reversible, dose-dependent partial inhibition of bean seed mitochondrial respiration was observed in the presence of CO; heart mitochondria had a more sensitive, less reversible response. Effects of CO on bean and bovine heart enzyme were similar. The close correlation of CO effects observed on seedling growth, mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome oxidase activity indicate an important role for this enzyme during the early stages of seed germination.

  12. Site-specific risk factors of white mould epidemics in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Tasmania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Tasmania, Australia, if more than 5% of bean pods are found to be affected by white mould (caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) entire crops can be rejected by contracting processors. This strict quality standard is one of the main reasons for prophylactic application of fungicides over flowering...

  13. Toxicity Assessment of Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Widely Consumed by Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ismail, Hanen; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed at assessing the content and the functional properties of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in different varieties of beans widely consumed in Tunisia through soaking, cooking, autoclaving, germination, and their combinations. This study was carried out on three varieties of white beans grown in different localities of Tunisia, namely Twila, Coco, and Beldia, as well as on imported and local canned beans. All bean samples underwent biochemical and immunological evaluation by employing several techniques such as indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), hemagglutinating assay, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biochemical and immunological analyses indicated that raw dry beans contained a considerable amount of proteins and PHAs. ELISA demonstrated that soaking, either in plain water or in alkaline solution, caused an increase in the concentration of PHA. A slight increase of PHA was produced equally by germination during 4 days in all bean varieties. Cooking or autoclaving of presoaked beans resulted in a complete disappearance of PHA. ELISA test also proved that both imported and local canned beans contained fingerprints of PHA. Hemagglutination assays showed that not only cooked and autoclaved presoaked beans lacked the ability to agglutinate red blood cells but also autoclaved unsoaked beans did