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Sample records for phenol bioremediation system

  1. Bioremediation of phenol in soil through using a mobile plant-endophyte system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Li; Jin, Qing; Su, Cuizhu; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Xiaoxiang; Kou, Shumeng; Wang, Yujing; Xiao, Ming

    2017-09-01

    Plant-endophyte remediation of volatile pollutants in soil is an emerging technology. For more efficient application, plant-endophyte systems were formed through stimulation of transfer of degradative plasmids in plant tissue by co-inoculation of corn, wheat or tomato seedlings with Pseudomonas fluorescens TP13 carrying a self-transmissible degradative plasmid, and P. fluorescens streptomycin-resistant P13 strain. The corn-TP13-P13 (CTP) system had higher degradation activity than other plant-endophyte systems. Transplanting the CTP, from loam to sandy clay loam soil, from greenhouse to field trials, almost completely removed phenol from contaminated soils in 15 d. Intact transplantation of the CTP to contaminated soils was more efficient than co-transplanting of phenol-degrading bacteria and plant in detoxification of phenol. After the experiments the harvested CPT still exhibited remarkable bioremediation activity. The number of degradative plasmid-carrying endophytic bacteria in the CTP system was just slightly more than in the corn seedlings inoculated with TP13 alone, but the former substantially surpassed the latter in phenol-degrading activity, probably due to stimulation of transfer of the degradative plasmids among endophytic bacteria in plant tissues. More degradative plasmid-carrying bacteria colonized bioremediating soil and plant tissues, and higher plasmid transfer frequency and C23O activity of transconjugant were found in soils for the CTP system compared with other treatments. These results showed that the CTP system is a valuable tool to degrade volatile organic pollutants and transfer of degradative plasmids in plant tissues is important for construction of a mobile plant-endophyte system applied in bioremediation of volatile pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial Community Structure and Physiological State within an Industrial Phenol Bioremediation System

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Andrew S.; Bailey, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of bacterial populations in specific compartments of an operational industrial phenol remediation system was assessed to examine bacterial community diversity, distribution, and physiological state with respect to the remediation of phenolic polluted wastewater. Rapid community fingerprinting by PCR-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA indicated highly structured bacterial communities residing in all nine compartments of the treatment plant and not exclusively within the Vitox biological reactor. Whole-cell targeting by fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotides (directed to the α, β and γ subclasses of the class Proteobacteria [α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria, respectively], the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group, and the Pseudomonas group) tended to mirror gross changes in bacterial community composition when compared with DGGE community fingerprinting. At the whole-cell level, the treatment compartments were numerically dominated by cells assigned to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group and to the γ-Proteobacteria. The α subclass Proteobacteria were of low relative abundance throughout the treatment system whilst the β subclass of the Proteobacteria exhibited local dominance in several of the processing compartments. Quantitative image analyses of cellular fluorescence was used as an indicator of physiological state within the populations probed with rDNA. For cells hybridized with EUB338, the mean fluorescence per cell decreased with increasing phenolic concentration, indicating the strong influence of the primary pollutant upon cellular rRNA content. The γ subclass of the Proteobacteria had a ribosome content which correlated positively with total phenolics and thiocyanate. While members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group were numerically dominant in the processing system, their abundance and ribosome content data for individual populations did not correlate with any of the measured chemical

  3. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  4. Bioremediation of phenolic compounds from water with plant root surface peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, P.R.; Arora, R.; El Ghaouth, A.

    1994-09-01

    Peroxidases have been shown to polymerize phenolic compounds, thereby removing them from solution by precipitation. Others have studied the role of root surface associated peroxidases as a defense against fungal root pathogens; however, their use in detoxification of organic pollutants in vivo at the root surface has not been studied. Two plant species, waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (C. Mart) Solms-Laub.] and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.), were tested for both in vitro and in vivo peroxidase activity on the root surface. In vitro studies indicated that root surface peroxidase activities were 181 and 78 nmol tetraguaiacol formed min{sup -1} g{sup -1} root fresh wt., for tomato and waterhyacinth, respectively. Light microscope studies revealed that guaiacol was polymerized in vivo at the root surface. Although peroxidase was evenly distributed on tomato roots, it was distributed patchily on waterhyacinth roots. In vitro studies using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the efficiency of peroxidase to polymerize phenols vary with phenolic compound. We suggest that plants may be utilized as a source of peroxidases for removal of phenolic compounds that are on the EPA priority pollutant list and that root surface peroxidases may minimize the absorption of phenolic compounds into plants by precipitating them at the root surface. In this study we have identified a new use for root-associated proteins in ecologically engineering plant systems for bioremediation of phenolic compounds in the soil and water environment. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Self-bioremediation of cork-processing wastewaters by (chloro)phenol-degrading bacteria immobilised onto residual cork particles.

    PubMed

    del Castillo, I; Hernández, P; Lafuente, A; Rodríguez-Llorente, I D; Caviedes, M A; Pajuelo, E

    2012-04-15

    Cork manufacturing is a traditional industry in Southern Europe, being the main application of this natural product in wine stoppers and insulation. Cork processing begins at boiling the raw material. As a consequence, great volumes of dark wastewaters, with elevated concentrations of chlorophenols, are generated, which must be depurated through costly physicochemical procedures before discarding them into public water courses. This work explores the potential of bacteria, isolated from cork-boiling waters storage ponds, in bioremediation of the same effluent. The bacterial population present in cork-processing wastewaters was analysed by DGGE; low bacterial biodiversity was found. Aerobic bacteria were isolated and investigated for their tolerance against phenol and two chlorophenols. The most tolerant strains were identified by sequencing 16S rDNA. The phenol-degrading capacity was investigated by determining enzyme activities of the phenol-degrading pathway. Moreover, the capacity to form biofilms was analysed in a microtitre plate assay. Finally, the capacity to form biofilms onto the surface of residual small cork particles was evaluated by acridine staining followed by epifluorescence microscopy and by SEM. A low-cost bioremediation system, using phenol-degrading bacteria immobilised onto residual cork particles (a by-product of the industry) is proposed for the remediation of this industrial effluent (self-bioremediation).

  6. BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is a method for using the activities of microorganisms and-or plants to transform organic or inorganic compounds that may be harmful to humans, animals, plants or the environment to compounds that are less harmful. In many instances the toxic compounds may be compl...

  7. BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is a method for using the activities of microorganisms and-or plants to transform organic or inorganic compounds that may be harmful to humans, animals, plants or the environment to compounds that are less harmful. In many instances the toxic compounds may be compl...

  8. Characterization of a phenol-degrading bacterium isolated from an industrial effluent and its potential application for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Pajuelo-Domínguez, Eloisa; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The use of native microorganisms is a useful strategy for phenol bioremediation. In the present work, a bacterial strain, named RTE1.4, was isolated from effluents of a chemical industry. The strain was able to grow at high concentrations of phenol and its derivatives, such as guaiacol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, as well as in a medium containing industrial effluents. This bacterium was identified as Acinetobacter sp. using morphological, physiological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 degraded phenol (200 to 600 mg/L) at wide pH range and temperature (5-9 and 25-37 degrees C, respectively) demonstrating high adaptation ability to different conditions. The strain would metabolize phenol by the ortho-pathway since catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity was detected. When bacteria were grown in medium containing phenol, an altered whole-cell protein pattern was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), with the lack of some low-molecular mass polypeptides and an increase in the relative abundance of high-molecular mass proteins after treatment. Considering that the use of native strains in bioremediation studies shows several ecological advantages and that the studied bacterium showed high tolerance and biodegradation capabilities, Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 could be an appropriate microorganism for improving bioremediation and biotreatment of areas polluted with phenol and/or some of its derivatives. Moreover, the establishment of the optimal growth conditions (pH, temperature, concentration of the pollutant) would provide baseline data for bulk production of the strain and its use in bioremediation processes.

  9. Bioremediation of petroleum wastewater by hyper-phenol tolerant Bacillus cereus: Preliminary studies with laboratory-scale batch process.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ghoshal, Aloke K

    2017-09-03

    Petroleum wastewater samples from oil refinery and oil exploration site were treated by hyper phenol-tolerant Bacillus cereus (AKG1 and AKG2) in laboratory-scale batch process to assess their bioremediation efficacy. Quality of the treated wastewater samples were analyzed in terms of removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonium nitrogen content, and improvement of biological oxygen demand (BOD). Adaptation of these bacteria to the toxic environment through structural changes in their cell membranes was also highlighted. Among different combinations, the co-culture of AKG1 and AKG2 showed the best performance in degrading the wastewater samples.

  10. Mesoporous carbon nitride based biosensor for highly sensitive and selective analysis of phenol and catechol in compost bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaoyu; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Jun; Cai, Ye; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Guide; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chen; Tang, Wangwang

    2014-11-15

    Herein, we reported here a promising biosensor by taking advantage of the unique ordered mesoporous carbon nitride material (MCN) to convert the recognition information into a detectable signal with enzyme firstly, which could realize the sensitive, especially, selective detection of catechol and phenol in compost bioremediation samples. The mechanism including the MCN based on electrochemical, biosensor assembly, enzyme immobilization, and enzyme kinetics (elucidating the lower detection limit, different linear range and sensitivity) was discussed in detail. Under optimal conditions, GCE/MCN/Tyr biosensor was evaluated by chronoamperometry measurements and the reduction current of phenol and catechol was proportional to their concentration in the range of 5.00 × 10(-8)-9.50 × 10(-6)M and 5.00 × 10(-8)-1.25 × 10(-5)M with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and 0.9881, respectively. The detection limits of catechol and phenol were 10.24 nM and 15.00 nM (S/N=3), respectively. Besides, the data obtained from interference experiments indicated that the biosensor had good specificity. All the results showed that this material is suitable for load enzyme and applied to the biosensor due to the proposed biosensor exhibited improved analytical performances in terms of the detection limit and specificity, provided a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive, especially, selective monitoring of catechol and phenol simultaneously. Moreover, the obtained results may open the way to other MCN-enzyme applications in the environmental field.

  11. Biotechnological tools to improve bioremediation of phenol by Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Magallanes-Noguera, Cynthia; Kurina-Sanz, Marcela; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents as well as the environment. Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 was previously isolated from polluted environments and constitutes a promising alternative for this purpose due to its capability to remove phenol from synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In this work, this strain was identified at species level as A. tandoii RTE1.4. Phenol degradation pathway was studied and some reaction intermediates were detected, confirming that this strain degraded phenol through ortho-cleavage of the aromatic ring. Phenol removal assays were carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor and a complete degradation of the contaminant was achieved after only 7 h, at an aeration rate of 3 vvm and at agitation of 600 rpm. Moreover, this bacterium was immobilized into calcium alginate beads and an increase in phenol biodegradation with respect to free cells was observed. The immobilized cells were reused for four consecutive cycles and stored at 4°C for 9 months, during which phenol removal efficiency was maintained. Post-removal solutions were evaluated by Microtox® test, showing a toxicity reduction after bacterial treatment. These findings demonstrated that A. tandoii RTE1.4 might be considered as a useful biotechnological tool for an efficient treatment of different solutions contaminated with phenol in bioreactors, using either free or immobilized cells.

  12. Full-scale Daramend{trademark} bioremediation of industrial soils containing chlorinated phenols and PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Seech, A.G.; Bucens, P.G.; Bergeron, D.

    1994-12-31

    Daramend{trademark} bioremediation was developed under the sponsorship of, and is owned by, the Government of Canada. Grace Dearborn Inc. has acquired the license for worldwide application of this technology; which has been successfully used at full-scale to remediate soils containing chlorophenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) and petroleum hydrocarbons. Over the course of four years (1991--1994), soil was treated under a variety of conditions. During ex-situ treatment, the mean total chlorophenol concentration in excavated soil was reduced from 702 mg/kg to less than the criterion established by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) for industrial soil (5 mg/kg). In the same soil the total PAH concentration was reduced from 1.442 me/kg to 35 mg/kg. and the concentrations of all PAH isomers were reduced to less than the CCME criteria for industrial soil (i.e. 10 mg/kg for carcinogenic isomers). Standard toxicological tests, including earthworm mortality and seed germination, were performed on soil taken from the treated area and the control area after completion of the bioremediation. The tests indicated that Daramend treatment had reduced or eliminated the soil`s toxicity.

  13. Alternative systems for in situ bioremediation: Enhanced control and contact

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.K.; Rhodes, D.K.

    1995-12-31

    Much of the past emphasis on biological degradation remediation has been placed on culturing or enhancing microbes to consume contaminants within a soil or water matrix, and site contaminant characterization. This emphasis has demonstrated that microbes are effective degraders for a variety of contaminants, and at most sites, contaminant-degrading microbes are present within the subsurface. For sites where microbes are present, they typically are inefficient for in situ remediation without the appropriate environmental conditions. In situ bioremediation tends to be governed by the ability to cost effectively and rapidly distribute oxygen, microbes, nutrients, and/or surfactants throughout the subsurface soils while simultaneously maintaining a controlled subsurface environment. Adapted equipment has been used to efficiently permeate or saturate the contaminated soils with a combination of oxygen source material, nutrients, surfactants and/or microbial cultures. These technologies, combined with oxygen delivery and control systems, enhance bioremediation as a viable alternative for in situ remediation. These same systems can deliver oxidation chemistry to pretreat the soils. The development and utilization of a number of in situ bioremediation technologies with a demonstrated ability to enhance contact and control within the contaminated subsoils are discussed, focusing on Bioventing, BioSparge{sup SM}, and Deep Soil Fracture BioInjection{trademark}.

  14. Potential of the salt-tolerant laccase-producing strain Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 from an estuary in the bioremediation of phenol-polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Divya, L M; Prasanth, G K; Sadasivan, C

    2014-06-01

    Industrialization causes the generation of phenolic pollutants in the environment. The ability of laccases to oxidize phenolic compounds and reduce molecular oxygen to water has led to intensive studies on these enzymes. Although salt-tolerant fungi are potential sources of enzymes for industrial applications, they have been inadequately explored for laccase production. This study describes the isolation of a salt- and phenol-tolerant strain of Trichoderma sp. with the ability to produce laccase, and thus with the potential for industrial applications. The coconut husk retting ground in the estuaries of Kerala, India, a saline environment highly polluted with phenolic compounds, was selected for isolating the fungus. Enhanced laccase production was observed at 5-10 ppt salinity. The organism could grow even at 30 ppt salinity with reduced biomass production and laccase secretion. The optimum concentration of different phenolic compounds for enhanced laccase secretion ranged between 20 and 80 mg L(-1) . As the concentration of phenolic compounds increased beyond 200 mg L(-1) , the enzyme activity decreased and was completely inhibited at 800 mg L(-1) . The tolerance of Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 to salinity and various phenolic compounds can be utilized in the bioremediation of highly saline and phenolic compound-rich industrial effluents.

  15. Application of two bacterial strains for wastewater bioremediation and assessment of phenolics biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Quevedo, María R; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents. In this work, two bacterial strains isolated from polluted environments constitutes a promising alternative since they were able to remove several phenolic compounds not only from synthetic solutions but also from effluents derived from a chemical industry and a tannery which are complex matrices. Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 showed ability to completely remove 2-methoxyphenol (1000 mg/L) while Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 not only degrade the same concentration of this compound but also removed 4- chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol with high efficiency. Moreover, both bacteria degraded phenols naturally present or even exogenously added at high concentrations in effluents from the chemical industry and a tannery in short time (up to 5 d). In addition, a significant reduction of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values was achieved after 7 d of treatment for both effluents using Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS1, respectively. These results showed that Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 might be considered as useful biotechnological tools for an efficient treatment of different effluents, since they showed wide versatility to detoxify these complex matrices, even supplemented with high phenol concentrations.

  16. Limitation of point source pesticide pollution: results of bioremediation system.

    PubMed

    Spanoghe, P; Maes, A; Steurbaut, W

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater and surface water is at risk of contamination from the use of some agricultural pesticides. In many circumstances pesticide contamination of water resources is more likely to result from point sources than from diffuse sources following approved application to crops in the field. Such point sources include areas on farms where pesticides are handled, filled into sprayers or where sprayers are washed down. To overcome this way of contamination different kind of bio-remediation systems are nowadays in development. In Flanders, Belgium two pilot plants of bioremediation systems for the in situ retention and/or degradation of pesticides were installed. Both systems were based on the Phytobac concept, a watertight excavation filled with straw, peat, compost and soil. The channel was made in the bottom from plastic foil. All kinds of spray rests were captured by the phytobacs. This study focuses on what level pesticides leach, bio-degrade or are retained by the filling of the phytobac. The soil-properties of the filling were investigated. Pesticide tracers were added for monitoring to both phytobacs. Soil and water samples were taken during one year. Pesticides are retained at least for one month by the filling of the phytobac. Almost no pesticide leached out. In winter hardly any pesticide degradation was observed in the filling of the phytobac. In summer no detectable pesticides were still left in the phytobacs.

  17. Fuzzy Systems Modeling of In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Hazen, T. C.

    2001-12-01

    A large-scale vadose zone-groundwater bioremediation demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by injecting several types of gases (ambient air, methane, and nitrous oxide and triethyl phosphate mixtures) through a horizontal well in the groundwater at a 175 ft depth. Simultaneously, soil gas was extracted through a parallel horizontal well in the vadose zone at a 80 ft depth Monitoring revealed a wide range of spatial and temporal variations of concentrations of VOCs, enzymes, and biomass in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring boreholes over the field site. One of the powerful modern approaches to analyze uncertain and imprecise data chemical data is based on the use of methods of fuzzy systems modeling. Using fuzzy modeling we analyzed the spatio-temporal TCE and PCE concentrations and methanotroph densities in groundwater to assess the effectiveness of different campaigns of air stripping and bioremediation, and to determine the fuzzy relationship between these compounds. Our analysis revealed some details about the processes involved in remediation, which were not identified in the previous studies of the SRS demonstration. We also identified some future directions for using fuzzy systems modeling, such as the evaluation of the mass balance of the vadose zone - groundwater system, and the development of fuzzy-ruled methods for optimization of managing remediation activities, predictions, and risk assessment.

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: NEW YORK STATE MULTI-VENDOR BIOREMEDIATION - R.E. WRIGHT ENVIRONMENTAL, INC.'S IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc.‘s (REWEI) In-situ Bioremediation Treatment System is an in-situ bioremediation technology for the treatment of soils contaminated with organic compounds. According to the Developer, contaminated soils are remediated in-situ by stimulating the a...

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: NEW YORK STATE MULTI-VENDOR BIOREMEDIATION - R.E. WRIGHT ENVIRONMENTAL, INC.'S IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc.‘s (REWEI) In-situ Bioremediation Treatment System is an in-situ bioremediation technology for the treatment of soils contaminated with organic compounds. According to the Developer, contaminated soils are remediated in-situ by stimulating the a...

  20. Biomining active cellulases from a mining bioremediation system.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Keith; Armstrong, Zachary; Song, Young C; Baldwin, Susan A; Withers, Stephen G; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-09-20

    Functional metagenomics has emerged as a powerful method for gene model validation and enzyme discovery from natural and human engineered ecosystems. Here we report development of a high-throughput functional metagenomic screen incorporating bioinformatic and biochemical analyses features. A fosmid library containing 6144 clones sourced from a mining bioremediation system was screened for cellulase activity using 2,4-dinitrophenyl β-cellobioside, a previously proven cellulose model substrate. Fifteen active clones were recovered and fully sequenced revealing 9 unique clones with the ability to hydrolyse 1,4-β-D-glucosidic linkages. Transposon mutagenesis identified genes belonging to glycoside hydrolase (GH) 1, 3, or 5 as necessary for mediating this activity. Reference trees for GH 1, 3, and 5 families were generated from sequences in the CAZy database for automated phylogenetic analysis of fosmid end and active clone sequences revealing known and novel cellulase encoding genes. Active cellulase genes recovered in functional screens were subcloned into inducible high copy plasmids, expressed and purified to determine enzymatic properties including thermostability, pH optima, and substrate specificity. The workflow described here provides a general paradigm for recovery and characterization of microbially derived genes and gene products based on genetic logic and contemporary screening technologies developed for model organismal systems.

  1. Bioremediation of a PAH-contaminated gasworks site with the Ebiox vacuum heap system

    SciTech Connect

    Eiermann, D.R.; Bolliger, R.

    1995-12-31

    A former gasworks site in the industrial city of Winterthur, Switzerland, was extremely contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX); phenols; ammonia; and mineral oils. Three vacuum heaps, with a total volume of 10,500 m{sup 3} of contaminated soil, were bioremediated during 1993/94. Separating excavated soil material into different soil qualities was of particular importance because of the pathway definition of the specific soil material. Excavation of contamination took longer than 10 months, delivering continuously different contaminated soil-type material for bioremediation. Conditioning and subsequent biostimulation of the large soil volumes were the prerequisites for most advanced milieu optimization. The degradation results demonstrated the potential for successful application of bioremediation on former industrial sites. PAH-concentration reductions ranged from 75 to 83% for the soil values and from 87 to 98% for the elution values. Soil and elution target qualities were met within 6 to 12 months, depending on initial PAH-concentration and soil structure. The achieved target quality for the bioremediated soil allowed subsequent reuse as high-value backfill material for the ongoing building project.

  2. Transport, fate and bioremediation of PCBs in freshwater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Birge, W.J.; Price, D.; Robison, A. |

    1995-12-31

    PCB monitoring studies were conducted on four riverine systems that varied in order, gradient, and substrate composition. Accumulation of PCBs was greater in fine-grained sediments with organic carbon content of 1 percent or more. Due to the short residence time of PCBs in water, downstream transport occurred mostly via erosion, suspension and resuspension of sediments and floodplain soils. Residues of PCBs in fish were lowest in the green sunfish and other species, higher in black bass, and highest in bottom feeders, (e.g., channel catfish, carp). Carp and catfish were the poorest indicators of real-time contamination but more useful in assessing historical conditions. Differences in PCB half-life in fish correlated with lipid content. Sunfish were the best indicators of current levels of contamination. PCB body burden in these species decreased markedly after curtailment of PCB outfall. Residues at or above 2 mg/Kg in sunfish decreased to 0.5 mg/Kg or less within 12 to 18 months. Percent tissue lipid was a major factor affecting the rate of metabolic degradation of PCBs in fish. High lipid content may prolong the biological half-life of PCBS, whereas low content may correlate with more rapid degradation, depending on the species. Sunfish, due to their localized range, lower lipid content, and ability to metabolize PCBs may be useful tools in the bioremediation of freshwater systems. They feed largely on primary consumers (e.g. detritivores, herbivores); are adaptable to a wide variety of warm water habitats; and management practices have been well established.

  3. BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD SEARCH SYSTEM (BFSS) - USER DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bioremediation Field Initiative is a cooperative effort of the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD), Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER), and regional offices, and other federal agencies, state agencies, industry, and universities to ...

  4. BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD SEARCH SYSTEM (BFSS) - USER DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bioremediation Field Initiative is a cooperative effort of the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD), Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER), and regional offices, and other federal agencies, state agencies, industry, and universities to ...

  5. Phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manfred; Weber, Markus

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century, phenol was recovered primarily from coal tar. With the commercialization of the phenolic resins, the demand for phenol grew significantly. Currently, the cumene-to-phenol process is the predominant synthetic route for the production of phenol. It is accompanied by acetone as a co-product. Cumene is oxidized with oxygen to form cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxide is subsequently decomposed to phenol and acetone, using a strong mineral acid as catalyst. The products are purified in a series of distillation columns. The cumene-to-phenol process is described in more detail in this chapter. An overview is given about synthetic routes via direct oxidation of benzene. None of these alternative routes has been commercialized. The chapter also gives an overview of global supply and use of phenol in 2008. Finally, the main natural sources and synthetic routes for cresols, xylenols, resorcinol, and bisphenol-A are described. These components are used as comonomers for special phenolic resins.

  6. Optimalisation and feasability of bioremediation systems for the processing of spray losses of pesticides.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, T; Spanoghe, P; Ryckeboer, J; Springael, D; Jaeken, P

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of ground and surface water puts pressure on the use of pesticides. Pesticide contamination of water can often be linked to point sources rather than to diffuse sources. Examples of such point sources are areas on farms where pesticides are handled, filled into sprayers and where sprayers are cleaned. To reduce contamination from these point sources, different kinds of bio-remediation systems are in various member states of the EU. Bioremediation is the use of living organisms, primarily micro-organisms, to degrade the environmental contaminants into less toxic forms. In this study, the behaviour of six different pesticides with varying physico-chemical properties on substrates used in a bioremediation system is studied. The adsorption of individual pesticides on the substrates is determined. After determination of the adsorption coefficient Kd, it could be concluded for metalaxyl that coco chips had the highest sorption capacity, followed by straw, compost, willow chopping and a sandy loam soil.

  7. Superior cottonwood and eucalyptus clones for biomass production in wastewater biomass production in wastewater bioremediation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, D.L.; Pisano, S.M.; McConnell, W.V.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-growing cottonwood and Eucalyptus species have wastewater bioremediation potential. To estimate genetic variation in cottonwood`s response to sewage effluent, 10 clones were planted at Tallahassee in April 1992. Progenies and/or clones of E. Ampligolia (EA). E. Camaldulensis (EC), and E. Grandis (EG) were planted in a dry stormwater retention/bioremediation pond constructed in June 1993 at Tampa. Genetic variability within cottonwood and Eucalyptus species was observed and should be utilized to optimize biomass production and nutrient uptake in wastewater bioremediation applications. On good sites with freeze risk in northern Florida, three cottonwood clones are particularly productive. While as many as four EC and EG clones are promising, one EG clone appears superior for stormwater remediation, systems in central Florida.

  8. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM: DINOSEB - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic compounds without forming any toxic intermediates. The nitroaromatic compound of interest during this demonstration was dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) an agricul...

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM: DINOSEB - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J.R. Simplot Ex-situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic compounds without forming any toxic intermediates. The nitroaromatic compound of interest during this demonstration was dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) an agricul...

  10. System for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  11. Evaluation of bioremediation systems utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, K.; Nowell, C.; Marley, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon, whether in an organic or inorganic form, is composed primarily of two stable isotopes, carbon-12 and carbon-13. The ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 99:1. The stable carbon isotope ratios of most natural carbon materials of biological interest range from approximately 0 to {minus}110 per mil ({per_thousand}) versus the PDB standard. Utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis, it is often possible to determine the source(s) of the liberated carbon dioxide, thereby confirming successful mineralization of the targeted carbon compound(s) and, if the carbon dioxide results from multiple carbon compounds, in what ratio the carbon compounds are mineralized. Basic stable isotope `theory` recommended sampling procedures and analysis protocols are reviewed. A case study involving fuel oil presented on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis for the monitoring and evaluation of in situ bioremediation. At the site, where a field bioventing study was being conducted, multiple potential sources of carbon dioxide production existed. Additional potential applications of stable carbon isotope analysis for bioremediation evaluation and monitoring are discussed.

  12. Profiling bacterial communities associated with sediment-based aquaculture bioremediation systems under contrasting redox regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Georgina; Caldwell, Gary S.; Wade, Matthew J.; Free, Andrew; Jones, Clifford L. W.; Stead, Selina M.

    2016-12-01

    Deposit-feeding invertebrates are proposed bioremediators in microbial-driven sediment-based aquaculture effluent treatment systems. We elucidate the role of the sediment reduction-oxidation (redox) regime in structuring benthic bacterial communities, having direct implications for bioremediation potential and deposit-feeder nutrition. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra was cultured on sediments under contrasting redox regimes; fully oxygenated (oxic) and redox stratified (oxic-anoxic). Taxonomically, metabolically and functionally distinct bacterial communities developed between the redox treatments with the oxic treatment supporting the greater diversity; redox regime and dissolved oxygen levels were the main environmental drivers. Oxic sediments were colonised by nitrifying bacteria with the potential to remediate nitrogenous wastes. Percolation of oxygenated water prevented the proliferation of anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, which were prevalent in the oxic-anoxic sediments. At the predictive functional level, bacteria within the oxic treatment were enriched with genes associated with xenobiotics metabolism. Oxic sediments showed the greater bioremediation potential; however, the oxic-anoxic sediments supported a greater sea cucumber biomass. Overall, the results indicate that bacterial communities present in fully oxic sediments may enhance the metabolic capacity and bioremediation potential of deposit-feeder microbial systems. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating deposit-feeding invertebrates into effluent treatment systems, particularly when the sediment is oxygenated.

  13. Profiling bacterial communities associated with sediment-based aquaculture bioremediation systems under contrasting redox regimes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Georgina; Caldwell, Gary S; Wade, Matthew J; Free, Andrew; Jones, Clifford L W; Stead, Selina M

    2016-12-12

    Deposit-feeding invertebrates are proposed bioremediators in microbial-driven sediment-based aquaculture effluent treatment systems. We elucidate the role of the sediment reduction-oxidation (redox) regime in structuring benthic bacterial communities, having direct implications for bioremediation potential and deposit-feeder nutrition. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra was cultured on sediments under contrasting redox regimes; fully oxygenated (oxic) and redox stratified (oxic-anoxic). Taxonomically, metabolically and functionally distinct bacterial communities developed between the redox treatments with the oxic treatment supporting the greater diversity; redox regime and dissolved oxygen levels were the main environmental drivers. Oxic sediments were colonised by nitrifying bacteria with the potential to remediate nitrogenous wastes. Percolation of oxygenated water prevented the proliferation of anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, which were prevalent in the oxic-anoxic sediments. At the predictive functional level, bacteria within the oxic treatment were enriched with genes associated with xenobiotics metabolism. Oxic sediments showed the greater bioremediation potential; however, the oxic-anoxic sediments supported a greater sea cucumber biomass. Overall, the results indicate that bacterial communities present in fully oxic sediments may enhance the metabolic capacity and bioremediation potential of deposit-feeder microbial systems. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating deposit-feeding invertebrates into effluent treatment systems, particularly when the sediment is oxygenated.

  14. Profiling bacterial communities associated with sediment-based aquaculture bioremediation systems under contrasting redox regimes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Georgina; Caldwell, Gary S.; Wade, Matthew J.; Free, Andrew; Jones, Clifford L. W.; Stead, Selina M.

    2016-01-01

    Deposit-feeding invertebrates are proposed bioremediators in microbial-driven sediment-based aquaculture effluent treatment systems. We elucidate the role of the sediment reduction-oxidation (redox) regime in structuring benthic bacterial communities, having direct implications for bioremediation potential and deposit-feeder nutrition. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra was cultured on sediments under contrasting redox regimes; fully oxygenated (oxic) and redox stratified (oxic-anoxic). Taxonomically, metabolically and functionally distinct bacterial communities developed between the redox treatments with the oxic treatment supporting the greater diversity; redox regime and dissolved oxygen levels were the main environmental drivers. Oxic sediments were colonised by nitrifying bacteria with the potential to remediate nitrogenous wastes. Percolation of oxygenated water prevented the proliferation of anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, which were prevalent in the oxic-anoxic sediments. At the predictive functional level, bacteria within the oxic treatment were enriched with genes associated with xenobiotics metabolism. Oxic sediments showed the greater bioremediation potential; however, the oxic-anoxic sediments supported a greater sea cucumber biomass. Overall, the results indicate that bacterial communities present in fully oxic sediments may enhance the metabolic capacity and bioremediation potential of deposit-feeder microbial systems. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating deposit-feeding invertebrates into effluent treatment systems, particularly when the sediment is oxygenated. PMID:27941918

  15. Phenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenol ; CASRN 108 - 95 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  16. An adsorption-release-biodegradation system for simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Hu; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ren, Rui-Peng; Lv, Yong-Kang

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater was evaluated in a reusable system, which contained macroporous adsorption resin and Alcaligenes faecalis strain WY-01. In the system, up to 6000mg/L phenol could be completely degraded by WY-01; meanwhile, 99.03±3.95% of ammonium was removed from the initial concentration of 384mg/L. This is the first study to show the capability of single strain in simultaneous removal of ammonium and phenol in wastewater containing such high concentrations of phenol. Moreover, the resin was regenerated during the biodegradation process without any additional manipulations, indicating the system was reusable. Furthermore, enzyme assay, gene expression patterns, HPLC-MS and gas chromatography analysis confirmed that phenol biodegradation accompanied with aerobic nitrifier denitrification process. Results imply that the reusable system provides a novel strategy for more efficient biodegradation of phenol and ammonium contained in some particular industrial wastewater.

  17. Enhancing pesticide degradation using indigenous microorganisms isolated under high pesticide load in bioremediation systems with vermicomposts.

    PubMed

    Castillo Diaz, Jean Manuel; Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Núñez, Rafael; Nogales, Rogelio; Romero, Esperanza

    2016-08-01

    In biobed bioremediation systems (BBSs) with vermicomposts exposed to a high load of pesticides, 6 bacteria and 4 fungus strains were isolated, identified, and investigated to enhance the removal of pesticides. Three different mixtures of BBSs composed of vermicomposts made from greenhouse (GM), olive-mill (OM) and winery (WM) wastes were contaminated, inoculated, and incubated for one month (GMI, OMI and WMI). The inoculums maintenance was evaluated by DGGE and Q-PCR. Pesticides were monitored by HPLC-DAD. The highest bacterial and fungal abundance was observed in WMI and OMI respectively. In WMI, the consortia improved the removal of tebuconazole, metalaxyl, and oxyfluorfen by 1.6-, 3.8-, and 7.7-fold, respectively. The dissipation of oxyfluorfen was also accelerated in OMI, with less than 30% remaining after 30d. One metabolite for metalaxyl and 4 for oxyfluorfen were identified by GC-MS. The isolates could be suitable to improve the efficiency of bioremediation systems.

  18. Integrated electrochemical treatment systems for facilitating the bioremediation of oil spill contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Wang, Liang; Faustorilla, Vilma; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi; Chen, Zuliang

    2017-05-01

    Bioremediation plays an important role in oil spill management and bio-electrochemical treatment systems are supposed to represent a new technology for both effective remediation and energy recovery. Diesel removal rate increased by four times in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) since the electrode served as an electron acceptor, and high power density (29.05 W m(-3)) at current density 72.38 A m(-3) was achieved using diesel (v/v 1%) as the sole substrate. As revealed by Scanning electron microscope images, carbon fibres in the anode electrode were covered with biofilm and the bacterial colloids which build the link between carbon fibres and enhance electron transmission. Trace metabolites produced during the anaerobic biodegradation were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These metabolites may act as emulsifying agents that benefit oil dispersion and play a vital role in bioremediation of oil spills in field applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design Of Bioremediation Systems For Groundwater (Aerobic and Anaerobic Plus Representative Case Studies)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioremediation in the subsurface. The basics of aerobic, cometabolic, and anaerobic bioremediation are presented. Case studies from the Delaware Sand & Gravel Superfund Site, Dover Cometabolic Research Project and the SABR...

  20. Design Of Bioremediation Systems For Groundwater (Aerobic and Anaerobic Plus Representative Case Studies)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioremediation in the subsurface. The basics of aerobic, cometabolic, and anaerobic bioremediation are presented. Case studies from the Delaware Sand & Gravel Superfund Site, Dover Cometabolic Research Project and the SABR...

  1. Reactive transport model for bioremediation of nitrate using fumarate in groundwater system: verification and field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Yeo, I. W.; Yeum, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies showed that groundwater of rural areas in Korea is often contaminated with nitrate highly exceeding the drinking water standard of 10 mg/L (NO3-N), which poses a major threat in human and livestock health. In-situ bioremediation method has been developed to reduce high nitrate-nitrogen concentration in groundwater using slowly released encapsulated carbon source. Collaborative research of this study revealed that fumarate was found to be a very effective carbon source in terms of cost and nitrate reduction against formate, propionate, and lactate. For reactive transport modeling of the bioremediation of nitrate using fumarate, the BTEX module of RT3D incorporated in GMS, a commercial groundwater modeling software developed by AQUAVEO, was adopted, where BTEX was replaced with fumarate as a carbon source. Column tests were carried out to determine transport and reaction parameters for numerical modeling such as dispersity and first order degradation rate of nitrate by fumarate. The calibration of the numerical model against column tests strongly indicated that nitrate, known to be not reactive in groundwater system, appeared to be retarded due to sorption by fumarate. The calibrated model was tested for field-scale application to the composting facility in Gimje, Korea. The numerical results showed that the model could simulate the nitrate reduction by fumarate in field scale groundwater system. The reactive transport model for nitrate can be used as a tool for optimum design of in-situ nitrate bioremediation system, such as released depth and amount of fumarate and the spacing of wells that encapsulated fumarate is released through.

  2. Bioremediation 3.0: Engineering pollutant-removing bacteria in the times of systemic biology.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Pavel; Nikel, Pablo I; Damborský, Jiří; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2017-11-15

    Elimination or mitigation of the toxic effects of chemical waste released to the environment by industrial and urban activities relies largely on the catalytic activities of microorganisms-specifically bacteria. Given their capacity to evolve rapidly, they have the biochemical power to tackle a large number of molecules mobilized from their geological repositories through human action (e.g., hydrocarbons, heavy metals) or generated through chemical synthesis (e.g., xenobiotic compounds). Whereas naturally occurring microbes already have considerable ability to remove many environmental pollutants with no external intervention, the onset of genetic engineering in the 1980s allowed the possibility of rational design of bacteria to catabolize specific compounds, which could eventually be released into the environment as bioremediation agents. The complexity of this endeavour and the lack of fundamental knowledge nonetheless led to the virtual abandonment of such a recombinant DNA-based bioremediation only a decade later. In a twist of events, the last few years have witnessed the emergence of new systemic fields (including systems and synthetic biology, and metabolic engineering) that allow revisiting the same environmental pollution challenges through fresh and far more powerful approaches. The focus on contaminated sites and chemicals has been broadened by the phenomenal problems of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and the accumulation of plastic waste on a global scale. In this article, we analyze how contemporary systemic biology is helping to take the design of bioremediation agents back to the core of environmental biotechnology. We inspect a number of recent strategies for catabolic pathway construction and optimization and we bring them together by proposing an engineering workflow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation of in-situ bioremediation system cost using a hybrid Extreme Learning Machine (ELM)-particle swarm optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Basant; Ch, Sudheer; Mathur, Shashi; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation is the most common groundwater remediation procedure used for treating organically contaminated sites. A simulation-optimization approach, which incorporates a simulation model for groundwaterflow and transport processes within an optimization program, could help engineers in designing a remediation system that best satisfies management objectives as well as regulatory constraints. In-situ bioremediation is a highly complex, non-linear process and the modelling of such a complex system requires significant computational exertion. Soft computing techniques have a flexible mathematical structure which can generalize complex nonlinear processes. In in-situ bioremediation management, a physically-based model is used for the simulation and the simulated data is utilized by the optimization model to optimize the remediation cost. The recalling of simulator to satisfy the constraints is an extremely tedious and time consuming process and thus there is need for a simulator which can reduce the computational burden. This study presents a simulation-optimization approach to achieve an accurate and cost effective in-situ bioremediation system design for groundwater contaminated with BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes) compounds. In this study, the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is used as a proxy simulator to replace BIOPLUME III for the simulation. The selection of ELM is done by a comparative analysis with Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) as they were successfully used in previous studies of in-situ bioremediation system design. Further, a single-objective optimization problem is solved by a coupled Extreme Learning Machine (ELM)-Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to achieve the minimum cost for the in-situ bioremediation system design. The results indicate that ELM is a faster and more accurate proxy simulator than ANN and SVM. The total cost obtained by the ELM-PSO approach is held to a minimum

  4. Vinylation of Unprotected Phenols Using a Biocatalytic System.

    PubMed

    Busto, Eduardo; Simon, Robert C; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2015-09-07

    Readily available substituted phenols were coupled with pyruvate in buffer solution under atmospheric conditions to afford the corresponding para-vinylphenol derivatives while releasing only one molecule of CO2 and water as the by-products. This transformation was achieved by designing a biocatalytic system that combines three biocatalytic steps, namely the C-C coupling of phenol and pyruvate in the presence of ammonia, which leads to the corresponding tyrosine derivative, followed by deamination and decarboxylation. The biocatalytic transformation proceeded with high regioselectivity and afforded exclusively the desired para products. This method thus represents an environmentally friendly approach for the direct vinylation of readily available 2-, 3-, or 2,3-disubstituted phenols on preparative scale (0.5 mmol) that provides vinylphenols in high yields (65-83 %).

  5. Enhancing bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsberg, S.

    1997-02-01

    Oxygen is often the limiting factor in aerobic bioremediation. Without adequate oxygen, contaminant degradation will either cease or proceed by highly inefficient anaerobic processes. Researchers at Regenesis Bioremediation Products recently develope a technology to combat this problem, Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) a unique formulation of magnesium peroxide release oxygen slowly when hydrated. ORC is idea for supporting bioremediation of underground storage tank releases. ORC treatment represents a low intensity approach to remediation - simple, passive, low-cost, long term enhancement of a natural attenuation. 1 fig.

  6. BIOREMEDIATION TRAINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation encompasses a collection of technologies which use microbes to degrade or transform contaminants. Three technologies have an established track record of acceptable performance: aerobic bioventing for fuels; enhanced reductive dechlorination for chlorinated solvent...

  7. BIOREMEDIATION TRAINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation encompasses a collection of technologies which use microbes to degrade or transform contaminants. Three technologies have an established track record of acceptable performance: aerobic bioventing for fuels; enhanced reductive dechlorination for chlorinated solvent...

  8. Phenolic-compound-extraction systems for fruit and vegetable samples.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Salas, Patricia; Morales-Soto, Aranzazu; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2010-12-03

    This paper reviews the phenolic-compound-extraction systems used to analyse fruit and vegetable samples over the last 10 years. Phenolic compounds are naturally occurring antioxidants, usually found in fruits and vegetables. Sample preparation for analytical studies is necessary to determine the polyphenolic composition in these matrices. The most widely used extraction system is liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), which is an inexpensive method since it involves the use of organic solvents, but it requires long extraction times, giving rise to possible extract degradation. Likewise, solid-phase extraction (SPE) can be used in liquid samples. Modern techniques, which have been replacing conventional ones, include: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). These alternative techniques reduce considerably the use of solvents and accelerate the extraction process.

  9. Bioremediation of Crude Oil Contaminated Desert Soil: Effect of Biostimulation, Bioaugmentation and Bioavailability in Biopile Treatment Systems.

    PubMed

    Benyahia, Farid; Embaby, Ahmed Shams

    2016-02-15

    This work was aimed at evaluating the relative merits of bioaugmentation, biostimulation and surfactant-enhanced bioavailability of a desert soil contaminated by crude oil through biopile treatment. The results show that the desert soil required bioaugmentation and biostimulation for bioremediation of crude oil. The bioaugmented biopile system led to a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) reduction of 77% over 156 days while the system with polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) gave a 56% decrease in TPH. The biostimulated system with indigenous micro-organisms gave 23% reduction in TPH. The control system gave 4% TPH reduction. The addition of Tween 80 led to a respiration rate that peaked in 48 days compared to 88 days for the bioaugmented system and respiration declined rapidly due to nitrogen depletion. The residual hydrocarbon in the biopile systems studied contained polyaromatics (PAH) in quantities that may be considered as hazardous. Nitrogen was found to be a limiting nutrient in desert soil bioremediation.

  10. Bioremediation of Crude Oil Contaminated Desert Soil: Effect of Biostimulation, Bioaugmentation and Bioavailability in Biopile Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Benyahia, Farid; Embaby, Ahmed Shams

    2016-01-01

    This work was aimed at evaluating the relative merits of bioaugmentation, biostimulation and surfactant-enhanced bioavailability of a desert soil contaminated by crude oil through biopile treatment. The results show that the desert soil required bioaugmentation and biostimulation for bioremediation of crude oil. The bioaugmented biopile system led to a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) reduction of 77% over 156 days while the system with polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) gave a 56% decrease in TPH. The biostimulated system with indigenous micro-organisms gave 23% reduction in TPH. The control system gave 4% TPH reduction. The addition of Tween 80 led to a respiration rate that peaked in 48 days compared to 88 days for the bioaugmented system and respiration declined rapidly due to nitrogen depletion. The residual hydrocarbon in the biopile systems studied contained polyaromatics (PAH) in quantities that may be considered as hazardous. Nitrogen was found to be a limiting nutrient in desert soil bioremediation. PMID:26891314

  11. Processing and Properties of a Phenolic Composite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Bai, J. M.; Baughman, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic resin systems generate water as a reaction by-product via condensation reactions during curing at elevated temperatures. In the fabrication of fiber reinforced phenolic resin matrix composites, volatile management is crucial in producing void-free quality laminates. A commercial vacuum-bag moldable phenolic prepreg system was selected for this study. The traditional single-vacuum-bag (SVB) process was unable to manage the volatiles effectively, resulting in inferior voidy laminates. However, a double vacuum bag (DVB) process was shown to afford superior volatile management and consistently yielded void-free quality parts. The DVB process cure cycle (temperature /pressure profiles) for the selected composite system was designed, with the vacuum pressure application point carefully selected, to avoid excessive resin squeeze-outs and achieve the net shape and target resin content in the final consolidated laminate parts. Laminate consolidation quality was characterized by optical photomicrography for the cross sections and measurements of mechanical properties. A 40% increase in short beam shear strength, 30% greater flexural strength, 10% higher tensile and 18% higher compression strengths were obtained in composite laminates fabricated by the DVB process.

  12. Management of groundwater in-situ bioremediation system using reactive transport modelling under parametric uncertainty: field scale application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verardo, E.; Atteia, O.; Rouvreau, L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation is a commonly used remediation technology to clean up the subsurface of petroleum-contaminated sites. Forecasting remedial performance (in terms of flux and mass reduction) is a challenge due to uncertainties associated with source properties and the uncertainties associated with contribution and efficiency of concentration reducing mechanisms. In this study, predictive uncertainty analysis of bio-remediation system efficiency is carried out with the null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method which combines the calibration solution-space parameters with the ensemble of null-space parameters, creating sets of calibration-constrained parameters for input to follow-on remedial efficiency. The first step in the NSMC methodology for uncertainty analysis is model calibration. The model calibration was conducted by matching simulated BTEX concentration to a total of 48 observations from historical data before implementation of treatment. Two different bio-remediation designs were then implemented in the calibrated model. The first consists in pumping/injection wells and the second in permeable barrier coupled with infiltration across slotted piping. The NSMC method was used to calculate 1000 calibration-constrained parameter sets for the two different models. Several variants of the method were implemented to investigate their effect on the efficiency of the NSMC method. The first variant implementation of the NSMC is based on a single calibrated model. In the second variant, models were calibrated from different initial parameter sets. NSMC calibration-constrained parameter sets were sampled from these different calibrated models. We demonstrate that in context of nonlinear model, second variant avoids to underestimate parameter uncertainty which may lead to a poor quantification of predictive uncertainty. Application of the proposed approach to manage bioremediation of groundwater in a real site shows that it is effective to provide support in

  13. Cometabolic bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-15

    Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

  14. Integrated water quality, emergy and economic evaluation of three bioremediation treatment systems for eutrophic water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was targeted at finding one or more environmentally efficient, economically feasible and ecologically sustainable bioremediation treatment modes for eutrophic water. Three biological species, i.e. water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), loach (Misgurus anguillicaudatus) and ...

  15. Integrated water quality, emergy and economic evaluation of three bioremediation treatment systems for eutrophic water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was targeted at finding one or more environmentally efficient, economically feasible and ecologically sustainable bioremediation treatment modes for eutrophic water. Three biological species, i.e. water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), loach (Misgurus anguillicaudatus) and ...

  16. Bioremediation: Optimizing results

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, M.C. ); Brown, R.A. )

    1994-05-01

    As it is now practiced, bioremediation involves stimulating naturally occurring bacteria to degrade hazardous waste in soils and groundwater. While it can be employed as a stand-alone treatment method, today, bioremediation is seen more as part of an integrated treatment system. Combined with different technologies--particularly air spraying and bioventing--it can help achieve target cleanup goals at the lowest possible cost. While bioremediation cannot handle metals, and some chlorinated organics still elude it, the technology can destroy many hazardous compounds, including some that resist other forms of treatment. Microbial treatment is more expensive than such techniques as soil vapor extraction, but cheaper--in many cases--than offsite treatment and faster than many other remediation methods. It can also be used as a polishing'' treatment, to further reduce contaminant levels after another type of treatment has been used. The paper describes how it works and factors governing its success.

  17. Bioremediation of bacteria pollution using the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis in the intensive mariculture water system of turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichang; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Lingyun; Zhang, Bi; Jin, Meifang; Fu, Wantao

    2010-01-01

    Sessile filter-feeding marine sponges (Porifera) have been reported to possess high efficiency in removing bacteria pollution from natural or aquaculture seawater. However, no investigation has been carried out thus far in a true mariculture farm water system. Therefore this study sought to investigate the ability of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis to bioremediate the bacteria pollution in the intensive aquaculture water system of turbot Scophthalmus maximus. Sponge specimens were hung in fish culture effluent at different temperature to investigate the optimal temperature condition for bacteria removal by H. perlevis. Turbots S. maximus were co-cultured with sponge H. perlevis in 1.5 m(3) of water system at 15-18 degrees C for 6 weeks to control the growth of bacteria. It was found that H. perlevis was able to remove pathogenic bacteria efficiently at 10-20 degrees C, with a maximal removal of 71.4-78.8% of fecal coliform, 73.9-98.7% of pathogenic vibrio, and 75.0-83.7% of total culturable bacteria from fish-culture effluent at 15 degrees C; H. perlevis continuously showed good bioremediation of bacteria pollution in the S. maximus culture water system, achieving removal of 60.0-90.2% of fecal coliform, 37.6-81.6% of pathogenic vibrio, and 45.1-83.9% of total culturable bacteria. The results demonstrate that H. perlevis is an effective bioremediator of bacteria pollution in the turbot S. maximus culture farm water system.

  18. Distribution of the catabolic transposon Tn5271 in a groundwater bioremediation system.

    PubMed

    Wyndham, R C; Nakatsu, C; Peel, M; Cashore, A; Ng, J; Szilagyi, F

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of Tn5271-related DNA sequences in samples of groundwater and a groundwater bioremediation system at the Hyde Park (Niagara Falls, N.Y.) chemical landfill site was investigated. PCR amplification of target sequences within the cha genes of Tn5271 revealed similar sequences in the groundwater community and in samples from the sequencing batch reactors treating that groundwater. Cell dilution combined with PCR amplification indicated that cha sequences were carried in about 1 of 10 culturable bacteria from the treatment system. Characterization of isolates involved in chlorobenzoate and toluene biodegradation in the treatment system indicated that two phenotypic clusters, Alcaligenes faecalis type 2 and CDC group IVC-2, contained all of the Tn5271 probe-positive isolates from the community. These two groups differed phenotypically from recipient groups isolated following horizontal transfer of pBRC60 (Tn5271) in pristine freshwater microcosms. A genetic rearrangement in Tn5271 attributable to the intramolecular transposition of the flanking element IS1071R was detected in an isolate from the treatment system. Comparison of the structure of the intramolecular transposition derivative from groundwater isolate OCC13(pBRC13) with a laboratory-derived intramolecular transposition derivative of pBRC60 revealed similarities. The rearrangement was shown to increase the stability of the plasmid under starvation conditions.

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GRACE DEARBORN INC. DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology may be applied to the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated by a wide variety of organic contaminants including chlorinated phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. The technology may be ap...

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GRACE DEARBORN INC. DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology may be applied to the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated by a wide variety of organic contaminants including chlorinated phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. The technology may be ap...

  1. Fuzzy systems modeling of in situ bioremediation of chlorinatedsolve n ts

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, Boris; Hazen, Terry C.

    2001-09-05

    A large-scale vadose zone-groundwater bioremediationdemonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by injectingseveral types of gases (ambient air, methane, and nitrous oxide andtriethyl phosphate mixtures) through a horizontal well in the groundwaterat a 175 ft depth. Simultaneously, soil gas was extracted through aparallel horizontal well in the vadose zone at a 80 ft depth Monitoringrevealed a wide range of spatial and temporal variations ofconcentrations of VOCs, enzymes, and biomass in groundwater and vadosezone monitoring boreholes over the field site. One of the powerful modernapproaches to analyze uncertain and imprecise data chemical data is basedon the use of methods of fuzzy systems modeling. Using fuzzy modeling weanalyzed the spatio-temporal TCE and PCE concentrations and methanotrophdensities in groundwater to assess the effectiveness of differentcampaigns of air stripping and bioremediation, and to determine the fuzzyrelationship between these compounds. Our analysis revealed some detailsabout the processes involved in remediation, which were not identified inthe previous studies of the SRS demonstration. We also identified somefuture directions for using fuzzy systems modeling, such as theevaluation of the mass balance of the vadose zone - groundwater system,and the development of fuzzy-ruled methods for optimization of managingremediation activities, predictions, and risk assessment.

  2. Metabolic reengineering invoked by microbial systems to decontaminate aluminum: implications for bioremediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Auger, Christopher; Han, Sungwon; Appanna, Varun P; Thomas, Sean C; Ulibarri, Gerardo; Appanna, Vasu D

    2013-01-01

    As our reliance on aluminum (Al) increases, so too does its presence in the environment and living systems. Although generally recognized as safe, its interactions with most living systems have been nefarious. This review presents an overview of the noxious effects of Al and how a subset of microbes can rework their metabolic pathways in order to survive an Al-contaminated environment. For instance, in order to expulse the metal as an insoluble precipitate, Pseudomonas fluorescens shuttles metabolites toward the production of organic acids and lipids that play key roles in chelating, immobilizing and exuding Al. Further, the reconfiguration of metabolic modules enables the microorganism to combat the dearth of iron (Fe) and the excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promoted by Al toxicity. While in Rhizobium spp., exopolysaccharides have been invoked to sequester this metal, an ATPase is known to safeguard Anoxybacillus gonensis against the trivalent metal. Hydroxyl, carboxyl and phosphate moieties have also been exploited by microbes to trap Al. Hence, an understanding of the metabolic networks that are operative in microorganisms residing in polluted environments is critical in devising bioremediation technologies aimed at managing metal wastes. Metabolic engineering is essential in elaborating effective biotechnological processes to decontaminate metal-polluted surroundings.

  3. Network succession reveals the importance of competition in response to emulsified vegetable oil amendment for uranium bioremediation: Competition in bioremediation system

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; Zhang, Ping; Qin, Yujia; Tu, Qichao; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-08-11

    When trying to discern network interactions among different species/populations in microbial communities interests have been evoked in recent years, but little information is available about temporal dynamics of microbial network interactions in response to environmental perturbations. We modified the random matrix theory-based network approach to discern network succession in groundwater microbial communities in response to emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) amendment for uranium bioremediation. Groundwater microbial communities from one control and seven monitor wells were analysed with a functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) at different time points were reconstructed. Our results showed that the network interactions were dramatically altered by EVO amendment. Dynamic and resilient succession was evident: fairly simple at the initial stage (Day 0), increasingly complex at the middle period (Days 4, 17, 31), most complex at Day 80, and then decreasingly complex at a later stage (140–269 days). Unlike previous studies in other habitats, negative interactions predominated in a time-series fMEN, suggesting strong competition among different microbial species in the groundwater systems after EVO injection. In particular, several keystone sulfate-reducing bacteria showed strong negative interactions with their network neighbours. These results provide mechanistic understanding of the decreased phylogenetic diversity during environmental perturbations.

  4. Network succession reveals the importance of competition in response to emulsified vegetable oil amendment for uranium bioremediation: Competition in bioremediation system

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Ye; Zhang, Ping; Qin, Yujia; ...

    2015-08-11

    When trying to discern network interactions among different species/populations in microbial communities interests have been evoked in recent years, but little information is available about temporal dynamics of microbial network interactions in response to environmental perturbations. We modified the random matrix theory-based network approach to discern network succession in groundwater microbial communities in response to emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) amendment for uranium bioremediation. Groundwater microbial communities from one control and seven monitor wells were analysed with a functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) at different time points were reconstructed. Our results showed that the networkmore » interactions were dramatically altered by EVO amendment. Dynamic and resilient succession was evident: fairly simple at the initial stage (Day 0), increasingly complex at the middle period (Days 4, 17, 31), most complex at Day 80, and then decreasingly complex at a later stage (140–269 days). Unlike previous studies in other habitats, negative interactions predominated in a time-series fMEN, suggesting strong competition among different microbial species in the groundwater systems after EVO injection. In particular, several keystone sulfate-reducing bacteria showed strong negative interactions with their network neighbours. These results provide mechanistic understanding of the decreased phylogenetic diversity during environmental perturbations.« less

  5. Enhanced bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using pilot-scale bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Yazdi, Hadi; Jin, Song; Zuo, Yi; Fallgren, Paul H; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-06-15

    Two column-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) modules were installed into a 50-L pilot scale reactor packed with diesel-contaminated soils to investigate the enhancement of passive biodegradation of petroleum compounds. By using low cost electrodes such as biochar and graphite granule as non-exhaustible solid-state electron acceptors, the results show that 82.1-89.7% of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was degraded after 120 days across 1-34 cm radius of influence (ROI) from the modules. This represents a maximum of 241% increase of biodegradation compared to a baseline control reactor. The current production in the BESs correlated with the TPH removal, reaching the maximum output of 70.4 ± 0.2 mA/m(2). The maximum ROI of the BES, deducting influence from the baseline natural attenuation, was estimated to be more than 90 cm beyond the edge of the reactor (34 cm), and exceed 300 cm should a non-degradation baseline be used. The ratio of the projected ROI to the radius of BES (ROB) module was 11-12. The results suggest that this BES can serve as an innovative and sustainable technology for enhanced in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in large field scale, with additional benefits of electricity production and being integrated into existing field infrastructures.

  6. Design and implementation of a highly integrated and automated in situ bioremediation system for petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, J.C.; Rosenwinkel, P.; Norris, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed sale of an industrial property required that an environmental investigation be conducted as part of the property transfer agreement. The investigation revealed petroleum hydrocarbon compounds (PHCs) in the subsurface. Light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) varsol (a gasoline like solvent), gasoline, and fuel oil were found across a three (3) acre area and were present as liquid phase PHCs, as dissolved phase PHCs, and as adsorbed phase PHCs in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Varsol represented the majority of the PHCs present. The presence of liquid phase PHCs suggested that any remedial action incorporate free phase recovery. The volatility of varsol and gasoline and the biodegradability of the PHCs present in the subsurface suggested that bioremediation, air sparging, and soil vapor extraction/bioventing were appropriate technologies for incorporation in a remedy. The imminent conversion of the impacted area to a retail facility required that any long term remedy be unobtrusive and require minimum activity across much of the impacted area. In the following sections the site investigation, selection and testing of remedial technologies, and design and implementation of an integrated and automated remedial system is discussed.

  7. Pilot-scale benthic microbial electrochemical system (BMES) for the bioremediation of polluted river sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Henan; He, Weihua; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Chao; Tian, Yan; Feng, Yujie

    2017-07-01

    A benthic microbial electrochemical system (BMES) of 350 L is built for the bioremediation of river sediment (Ashi river, Harbin, China). Carbon mesh anode with honeycomb-structure supports and activated carbon cathodes are applied for the construction. Synthesis wastewater with glucose is added to simulate the natural condition of Ashi River as an intermittent pollutant-holding water body and accelerate the removal of accumulated bio-refractory organic contents in sediment, represented by the concentration changes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as the co-metabolic substrate for bacteria. The effluent TOC in the water layer of BMES is stable at 40 ± 2 mg L-1 and further reduced to 19 ± 5 mg L-1 after the addition of synthesis wastewater, while the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(Benzo(b)fluoranthene, Benzo(k)fluoranthene and Benzo(a)pyrene) in sediment samples reaches 74%. A maximum power density of 63 ± 3 mW m-2 is achieved by BMES, which decrease to 42 ± 2 mW m-2 due to cathode degradation and further reduce to 30 ± 3 mW m-2 attributed to substrate limitation at the end of operation. Community analyses show the diversity of anode community is improved during operation and the abundance of Chloroflexi, Firmicutes and exoelectrogenic microbes like G. psychrophilus increase.

  8. Removal of phenol in a constructed wetland system and the relative contribution of plant roots, microbial activity and porous bed.

    PubMed

    Kurzbaum, E; Zimmels, Y; Kirzhner, F; Armon, R

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of a low organic load constructed wetland (CW) system was performed in order to understand the relative role of its various components contribution in phenol removal (100 mg/L) under controlled plant biomass/gravel/water experimental ratios (50 g/450 g/100 mL). The results [expressed as phenol50/time (hours) required to remove 50% of the initial phenol concentration] showed that the highest phenol removal occurred by combined biofilms from roots and gravel attached (phenol50=19), followed by gravel biofilm (phenol50=105) and planktonic (suspended in water) bacteria (phenol50=>200). An in depth analysis revealed that plants contribution alone (antibiotics sterilized) was minor (phenol50=>89) while roots supported biofilm resulted in a significant phenol removal (phenol50=15). Therefore in this type of CW, the main phenol removal active fraction could be attributed to plant roots' biofilm bacteria.

  9. Optimal design of an in-situ bioremediation system using support vector machine and particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    ch, Sudheer; Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Ram Kailash; Mathur, Shashi

    2013-08-01

    A methodology based on support vector machine and particle swarm optimization techniques (SVM-PSO) was used in this study to determine an optimal pumping rate and well location to achieve an optimal cost of an in-situ bioremediation system. In the first stage of the two stage methodology suggested for optimal in-situ bioremediation design, the optimal number of wells and their locations was determined from preselected candidate well locations. The pumping rate and well location in the first stage were subsequently optimized in the second stage of the methodology. The highly nonlinear system of equations governing in-situ bioremediation comprises the equations of flow and solute transport coupled with relevant biodegradation kinetics. A finite difference model was developed to simulate the process of in-situ bioremediation using an Alternate-Direction Implicit technique. This developed model (BIOFDM) yields the spatial and temporal distribution of contaminant concentration for predefined initial and boundary conditions. BIOFDM was later validated by comparing the simulated results with those obtained using BIOPLUME III for the case study of Shieh and Peralta (2005). The results were found to be in close agreement. Moreover, since the solution of the highly nonlinear equation otherwise requires significant computational effort, the computational burden in this study was managed within a practical time frame by replacing the BIOFDM model with a trained SVM model. Support Vector Machine which generates fast solutions in real time was considered to be a universal function approximator in the study. Apart from reducing the computational burden, this technique generates a set of near optimal solutions (instead of a single optimal solution) and creates a re-usable data base that could be used to address many other management problems. Besides this, the search for an optimal pumping pattern was directed by a simple PSO technique and a penalty parameter approach was adopted

  10. Optimal design of an in-situ bioremediation system using support vector machine and particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ch, Sudheer; Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Ram Kailash; Mathur, Shashi

    2013-08-01

    A methodology based on support vector machine and particle swarm optimization techniques (SVM-PSO) was used in this study to determine an optimal pumping rate and well location to achieve an optimal cost of an in-situ bioremediation system. In the first stage of the two stage methodology suggested for optimal in-situ bioremediation design, the optimal number of wells and their locations was determined from preselected candidate well locations. The pumping rate and well location in the first stage were subsequently optimized in the second stage of the methodology. The highly nonlinear system of equations governing in-situ bioremediation comprises the equations of flow and solute transport coupled with relevant biodegradation kinetics. A finite difference model was developed to simulate the process of in-situ bioremediation using an Alternate-Direction Implicit technique. This developed model (BIOFDM) yields the spatial and temporal distribution of contaminant concentration for predefined initial and boundary conditions. BIOFDM was later validated by comparing the simulated results with those obtained using BIOPLUME III for the case study of Shieh and Peralta (2005). The results were found to be in close agreement. Moreover, since the solution of the highly nonlinear equation otherwise requires significant computational effort, the computational burden in this study was managed within a practical time frame by replacing the BIOFDM model with a trained SVM model. Support Vector Machine which generates fast solutions in real time was considered to be a universal function approximator in the study. Apart from reducing the computational burden, this technique generates a set of near optimal solutions (instead of a single optimal solution) and creates a re-usable data base that could be used to address many other management problems. Besides this, the search for an optimal pumping pattern was directed by a simple PSO technique and a penalty parameter approach was adopted

  11. Engineered microbial biosensors based on bacterial two-component systems as synthetic biotechnology platforms in bioremediation and biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Sambandam; Baylon, Mary Grace; Park, Si Jae; Choi, Jong-Il

    2017-04-14

    Two-component regulatory systems (TCRSs) mediate cellular response by coupling sensing and regulatory mechanisms. TCRSs are comprised of a histidine kinase (HK), which serves as a sensor, and a response regulator, which regulates expression of the effector gene after being phosphorylated by HK. Using these attributes, bacterial TCRSs can be engineered to design microbial systems for different applications. This review focuses on the current advances in TCRS-based biosensors and on the design of microbial systems for bioremediation and their potential application in biorefinery.

  12. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION PRODUCTS IN SALT AND FRESHWATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten oil spill bioremediation products were tested in the laboratory for their ability to enhance biodegradation of weathered Alaskan North Slope crude oil in both fresh and salt-water media. The products included: nutrients to stimulate inoculated microorganisms, nutrients plus a...

  13. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF A HORIZONTAL WELL, IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large field demonstration using nutrient addition to stimulate insitu anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvent contaminated soil and ground water was performed at the former U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida, from January through June, 1997. Ins...

  14. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF A HORIZONTAL WELL, IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large field demonstration using nutrient addition to stimulate insitu anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvent contaminated soil and ground water was performed at the former U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida, from January through June, 1997. Ins...

  15. BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD SEARCH SYSTEM (BFSS) - VERSION 2.0 (DISKETTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BFSS is a PC-based software product that provides access to a database of information on waste sites in the United States and Canada where bioremediation is being tested or implemented, or has been completed. BFSS allows users to search the database electronically, view data on s...

  16. BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD SEARCH SYSTEM (BFSS) - VERSION 2.0 (DISKETTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BFSS is a PC-based software product that provides access to a database of information on waste sites in the United States and Canada where bioremediation is being tested or implemented, or has been completed. BFSS allows users to search the database electronically, view data on s...

  17. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION PRODUCTS IN SALT AND FRESHWATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten oil spill bioremediation products were tested in the laboratory for their ability to enhance biodegradation of weathered Alaskan North Slope crude oil in both fresh and salt-water media. The products included: nutrients to stimulate inoculated microorganisms, nutrients plus a...

  18. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, H.S.

    1989-11-21

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10[sup [minus]4] to 10[sup [minus]7] S cm[sup [minus]1] at room temperature.

  19. Preparation of metallic cation conducting polymers based on sterically hindered phenols containing polymeric systems

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Hung S.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to ion-conducting solvent-free polymeric systems characterized as being cationic single ion conductors. The solvent-free polymer electrolytes comprise a flexible polymer backbone to which is attached a metal salt, such as a lithium, sodium or potassium salt, of a sterically hindered phenol. The solid polymer electrolyte may be prepared either by (1) attaching the hindered phenol directly to a flexible polymeric backbone, followed by neutralization of the phenolic OH's or (2) reacting the hindered phenol with a polymer precursor which is then polymerized to form a flexible polymer having phenolic OH's which are subsequently neutralized. Preferably the hindered phenol-modified polymeric backbone contains a polyether segment. The ionic conductivity of these solvent-free polymer electrolytes has been measured to be in the range of 10.sup.-4 to 10.sup.-7 S cm.sup.-1 at room temperature.

  20. Study of solar photo-Fenton system applied to removal of phenol from water.

    PubMed

    Freire, Layla F A; da Fonseca, Fabiana Valéria; Yokoyama, Lidia; Teixeira, Luiz Alberto Cesar

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of a Fenton's reaction in a falling film solar reactor (FFR), as a possible advanced oxidation process for the mineralization of the organic compound phenol in water. Preliminary tests were carried out to evaluate phenol degradation by photolysis and to select the optimal residence time in which to carry out the process using a solar photo-Fenton system. The variables studied were the initial phenol concentration (100 to 300 mg L(-1)), the [Phenol]:[H2O2] mass ratio (1.0 to 2.0) and the [H2O2]/[Fe2+] molar ratio (5 to 10). Phenol degradation of 99% and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of 97% were obtained under the following reaction conditions: phenol concentration=200 mg L(-1), mass ratio [Phenol]:[H2O2]=1.5 and molar ratio [H2O2]/[Fe2+]=7.5. Overall mineralization was achieved using the solar photo-Fenton process to destroy phenol and COD. The solar photo-Fenton process using a FFR appears to be a viable method for removing phenols in wastewaters on an industrial scale.

  1. Green synthesis of covellite nanocrystals using biologically generated sulfide: potential for bioremediation systems.

    PubMed

    da Costa, J P; Girão, Ana Violeta; Lourenço, João P; Monteiro, O C; Trindade, Tito; Costa, Maria Clara

    2013-10-15

    This work describes the synthesis of CuS powders in high yield and via an environmentally friendly and straightforward process, under ambient conditions (temperature and pressure), by adding to aqueous copper (II) a nutrient solution containing biologically generated sulfide from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The powders obtained were composed of CuS (covellite) nanoparticles (NPs) exhibiting a spheroid morphology (<5 nm). The relevance of this method to obtain CuS supported solid substrates has been demonstrated by performing the synthesis in the presence of TiO2 and SiO2 submicron particles. We further extended the work carried out, which substantiates the potential of using biogenic sulfide for the production of covellite nanocrystals and composites, using the effluent of a bioremediation column. Hence, such process results in the synthesis of added value products obtained from metal rich effluents, such as metallurgical and industrial ones, or Acid Mine Drainage (AMD), when associated with bioremediation processes.

  2. Phytoremediation`s role in bioremediation of recalcitrant soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flavonoid and coumarin compounds produced by plants supported the growth of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading bacteria, and the bacteria retained their PCB-degrading properties. Root leachates and washings from mulberry trees also supported the growth of a PCB-degrading bacterium. The release of phenolics into the soil by the network of finely separated plant roots may be thought of as a naturally occurring injection system capable of delivering desired substrates into the soil that fosters the growth and action of PCB-degrading bacteria. However, it is important to recognize that the roots of all plant species do not produce and release equal amounts and kinds of phenolic compounds; therefore, the rhizosphere zone of all plants must not be considered a haven for PCB-degrading bacteria. It may be that only a few plant species have the desired characteristics. Awareness of such species would be extremely valuable, because growing such plants at contaminated sites has the potential of selectively fostering the growth of PCB-degrading bacteria over competing organisms. The outcome could be a sustained population of PCB-degrading bacteria that would degrade PCBs over an extended time period. Plant-microbe systems have the potential of providing inexpensive, ecologically stable bioremediation systems, and thereby play a major role in bioremediation of recalcitrant soil contaminants.

  3. Monitoring system for the study of autotrophic biofilms in bioremediation of polyaromatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarie, Jean P.; Bruttig, A.; Miller, Gordon H.; Hill, Walter; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1999-02-01

    Bacterial and other natural materials such as plants and algae have received increasing interest for bioremediation efforts. The identificatIon of materials capable of biodegrading or sequestering environmental pollutants offers an attractive alternative to chemical or physical means of remediation. A number of bacteria capable of biodegrAding organic or reducing metal pollutants have received great interest. Similarly, the use of natural plants to absorb pollutants from soil anD liquid samples is another potential approach. Our interest lies in identification of naturally occurring algae and their ability to absorb polyaromatic compounds (PAC) from groundwater sources (i.e. streams). These algae could serve as natural water filters for streams contaminated with Polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Polycyclic aromatic compounds, which comprise a complex class of condensed multi-ring benzenoid compounds, are important environmental pollutants originating from a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. PACs are generally formed during incomplete combustion or pyrolysis of organic matter containing carbon and hydrogen. Because combustion of organic materials is involved in countless natural processes or human activities, PACs are omnipresent and abundant pollutants in air, soil and water. Among energy-related products, fossil fuels are the major sources of PACs. The primary sources of airborne PACs are associated with combustion, coal coking, and petroleum catalytic cracking. Coal and shale conversion also contribute to production of PACs. Production, transportation and, use of synthetic fuels and petroleum products provide emission sources for PACs. In urban environments an significant source of PACs is diesel exhaust. Food cooking and cigarette smoking activities contribute to PAC occurrence in indoor environments. Chemical analysis of PACs is of great environmental and toxicological interest because many of them have been shown to be mutagens and/or potent

  4. Hydrocarbon bioremediation -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation is the process that transforms xenobiotics introduced into the environment to a less toxic or innocuous form, or mineralizes them to inorganic species. The processes can be carried out through either aerobic or anaerobic pathways by indigenous heterotrophs or by specially engineered organisms. For some xenobiotics, the process can also be carried out by cometabolic processes, which use another compound as the carbon and energy source. This technique can be applied either in situ or ex situ. An overview is presented of real-world applications of a variety of hydrocarbon bioremediation approaches, including biopiling, bioventing, bioslurping, landfarming, electrobioreclamation, and biovertical circulation wells. Problems in translating laboratory and field-scale pilot test data to full-scale operating systems are discussed. Such issues include biodegradation enhancement, nutrient and electron acceptor delivery, alternative electron acceptors, and integration of biological, chemical, and physical approaches to hydrocarbon remediation.

  5. Degradation of cyanuric acid in soil by Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 using bioremediation with self-immobilization system.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naofumi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Nakai, Hiroaki; Fujita, Tomoko; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Katoh, Shigeo

    2006-09-01

    The rates of degradation of cyanuric acid, a key intermediate in a metabolic pathway of s-triazine herbicides, were measured for Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227. The rate of degradation was affected by the rate of cyanuric acid transport through cell membranes and the activity of cyanuric acid amidohydrolase inside the cells. At low concentrations of cyanuric acid, the acclimation of cells to cyanuric acid and/or added nutrients effectively enhanced the degradation rate. The strain was also applied to bioremediation using a Bioremediation with Self-Immobilization System (BSIS), in which Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 cells were co-immobilized with Bacillus subtilis, the latter of which secretes a viscous polymer, in a shallow layer of soil packed in a column. More than 70% of the Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 cells were co-immobilized with the B. subtilis in a 7.5 cm layer of the packed soil by self-aggregation. More than 60% of the 1 mM cyanuric acid supplied to the packed soil was degraded in this layer during a 72 h period.

  6. Spatially Oscillating Activity and Microbial Succession of Mercury-Reducing Biofilms in a Technical-Scale Bioremediation System

    PubMed Central

    von Canstein, Harald; Li, Ying; Leonhäuser, Johannes; Haase, Elke; Felske, Andreas; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Mercury-contaminated chemical wastewater of a mercury cell chloralkali plant was cleaned on site by a technical-scale bioremediation system. Microbial mercury reduction of soluble Hg(II) to precipitating Hg(0) decreased the mercury load of the wastewater during its flow through the bioremediation system by up to 99%. The system consisted of a packed-bed bioreactor, where most of the wastewater's mercury load was retained, and an activated carbon filter, where residual mercury was removed from the bioreactor effluent by both physical adsorption and biological reduction. In response to the oscillation of the mercury concentration in the bioreactor inflow, the zone of maximum mercury reduction oscillated regularly between the lower and the upper bioreactor horizons or the carbon filter. At low mercury concentrations, maximum mercury reduction occurred near the inflow at the bottom of the bioreactor. At high concentrations, the zone of maximum activity moved to the upper horizons. The composition of the bioreactor and carbon filter biofilms was investigated by 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer polymorphism analysis. Analysis of spatial biofilm variation showed an increasing microbial diversity along a gradient of decreasing mercury concentrations. Temporal analysis of the bioreactor community revealed a stable abundance of two prevalent strains and a succession of several invading mercury-resistant strains which was driven by the selection pressure of high mercury concentrations. In the activated carbon filter, a lower selection pressure permitted a steady increase in diversity during 240 days of operation and the establishment of one mercury-sensitive invader. PMID:11916716

  7. Acidolysis small molecular phenolic ether used as accelerator in photosensitive diazonaphthaquinone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haihua; Zou, Yingquan

    2006-03-01

    The photosensitive compounds in the photosensitive coatings of positive PS plates are the diazonaphthaquinone derivatives. Some acidolysis small molecular phenolic ethers, which were synthesized by some special polyhydroxyl phenols with vinyl ethyl ether, are added in the positive diazonaphthaquinone photosensitive composition to improve its sensitivity, composed with photo-acid-generators. The effects to the photosensitivity, anti-alkali property, anti-isopropyl alcohol property, dot resolution and line resolution of the coatings are studied with different additive percent of the special phenolic ethers. In the conventional photosensitive diazonaphthaquinone systems for positive PS plates, the photosensitivity is improved without negative effects to resolution, anti-alkali and anti-isopropyl alcohol properties when added about 5% of the special acidolysis phenolic ethers, EAAE or DPHE, composed with photo-acid-generators.

  8. Laboratory method used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  9. Comparison of adsorption and photo-Fenton processes for phenol and paracetamol removing from aqueous solutions: Single and binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Haririan, Ismaeil; Divsar, Faten

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, adsorption and photo-Fenton processes have been compared for the removal of phenol and paracetamol from aqueous solutions in a single and binary systems. NaX nanozeolites and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used during adsorption and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. Both nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave heating method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. Based on results, more than 99% removing percentages of phenol and paracetamol were obtained during photo-Fenton process at initial concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of phenol and paracetamol. Moreover, the complete removing of phenol and paracetamol was only achieved at lower initial concentrations than 10 mg/L for phenol and paracetamol during adsorption process. The results showed a significant dependence of the phenol and paracetamol removing on the initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol for selection of process. The photo-Fenton process could be considered an alternative method in higher initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol. However, the adsorption process due to economical issue was preferred for phenol and paracetamol removing at lower initial concentrations. The kinetic data of photo-Fenton and adsorption processes were well described using first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results of phenol and paracetamol removing in a binary system confirmed the obtained results of single removing of phenol and paracetamol in selection of process.

  10. Comparison of adsorption and photo-Fenton processes for phenol and paracetamol removing from aqueous solutions: single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Haririan, Ismaeil; Divsar, Faten

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, adsorption and photo-Fenton processes have been compared for the removal of phenol and paracetamol from aqueous solutions in a single and binary systems. NaX nanozeolites and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used during adsorption and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. Both nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave heating method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. Based on results, more than 99% removing percentages of phenol and paracetamol were obtained during photo-Fenton process at initial concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of phenol and paracetamol. Moreover, the complete removing of phenol and paracetamol was only achieved at lower initial concentrations than 10 mg/L for phenol and paracetamol during adsorption process. The results showed a significant dependence of the phenol and paracetamol removing on the initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol for selection of process. The photo-Fenton process could be considered an alternative method in higher initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol. However, the adsorption process due to economical issue was preferred for phenol and paracetamol removing at lower initial concentrations. The kinetic data of photo-Fenton and adsorption processes were well described using first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results of phenol and paracetamol removing in a binary system confirmed the obtained results of single removing of phenol and paracetamol in selection of process.

  11. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: In-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, gas membrane separation system (membrane separation)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides stakeholder evaluations on innovative technologies to be used in the remediation of volatile organic compounds from soils and ground water. The technologies evaluated are; in-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, and gas membrane separation.

  12. Effects of natural phenolic acids on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Zych, Maria; Burczyk, Jan; Trzeciak, Hanna; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2009-12-01

    Recent reports indicate the possibility of antiresorptive and/or bone formation increasing activity of natural phenolic acids, commonly present in plants which are normally consumed in the diet. The effects of 4 natural phenolic acids (ferulic, caffeic, P-coumaric or chlorogenic, 10 mg/kg P. O. daily for 4 weeks) on the skeletal system of ovariectomized (estrogen-deficient) rats were investigated. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Phenolic acids differentially affected the skeletal system of rats with osteoporotic changes induced by the ovariectomy. Caffeic acid decreased bone mass, whereas P-coumaric acid increased the bone mass/body mass ratio and bone mineral mass/body mass ratio in the long bones, in comparison with the ovariectomized control rats. The phenolic acids improved some bone histomorphometric parameters, impaired by estrogen deficiency. However, they did not increase the ratio of bone mineral mass to bone mass, decreased by estrogen deficiency, and did not significantly affect bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, different natural phenolic acids exert differential effects on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats, both favourable and deleterious.

  13. Influence of parameters on the photocatalytic degradation of phenolic contaminants in wastewater using TiO2/UV system.

    PubMed

    Saratale, Rijuta G; Noh, Hyun S; Song, Ji Y; Kim, Dong S

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous suspension using commercial TiO2 powder (Degussa P-25) irradiated with UV light was investigated. Photodegradation was compared using a photocatalyst (TiO2 alone), direct photolysis (UV alone) and TiO2/UV in a single batch reactor with mercury lamp irradiation. The study focused on the influence of various operating parameters on phenol treatment efficiency, including catalyst dosage, initial concentration of phenol, temperature, pH and change in pH were systematically investigated. The highest phenol degradation rate was obtained at pH 9.0, temperature 60°C and catalyst dose of 2 g L(-1) with higher mineralization efficiency (in terms of TOC reduction). Experimental results showed that under optimized conditions the phenol removal efficiency was 98% and 100% for the TiO2/UV and TiO2/UV/H2O2 system, respectively. No significant effect on addition of chloride and metal ions was observed. Photodegradation of phenol followed first-order kinetics. To test whether the phenol removal was possible for wastewater using a TiO2/UV system, the degradation study was conducted with the real obtained wastewater. The removal of phenol from obtained wastewater and the synthetic wastewater containing phenol was comparable. The TiO2/UV system developed here is expected to be useful for the treatment of wastewater containing phenol.

  14. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  15. Bioremediation of diesel and lubricant oil-contaminated soils using enhanced landfarming system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sih-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Chia; Hong, Andy; Chang, Yu-Min; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Lubricant and diesel oil-polluted sites are difficult to remediate because they have less volatile and biodegradable characteristics. The goal of this research was to evaluate the potential of applying an enhanced landfarming to bioremediate soils polluted by lubricant and diesel. Microcosm study was performed to evaluate the optimal treatment conditions with the addition of different additives (nutrients, addition of activated sludge from oil-refining wastewater facility, compost, TPH-degrading bacteria, and fern chips) to enhance total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal. To simulate the aerobic landfarming biosystem, air in the microcosm headspace was replaced once a week. Results demonstrate that the additives of activated sludge and compost could result in the increase in soil microbial populations and raise TPH degradation efficiency (up to 83% of TPH removal with 175 days of incubation) with initial (TPH = 4100 mg/kg). The first-order TPH degradation rate reached 0.01 1/d in microcosms with additive of activated sludge (mass ratio of soil to inocula = 50:1). The soil microbial communities were determined by nucleotide sequence analyses and 16S rRNA-based denatured gradient gel electrophoresis. Thirty-four specific TPH-degrading bacteria were detected in microcosm soils. Chromatograph analyses demonstrate that resolved peaks were more biodegradable than unresolved complex mixture. Results indicate that more aggressive remedial measures are required to enhance the TPH biodegradation, which included the increase of (1) microbial population or TPH-degrading bacteria, (2) biodegradable carbon sources, (3) nutrient content, and (4) soil permeability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  17. Photoinduced PCET in ruthenium-phenol systems: thermodynamic equivalence of uni- and bidirectional reactions.

    PubMed

    Nomrowski, Julia; Wenger, Oliver S

    2015-04-06

    Six termolecular reaction systems comprised of Ru(4,4′-bis(trifluoromethyl)-2,2′-bipyridine)32+, phenols with different para substituents, and pyridine in acetonitrile undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) upon photoexcitation of the metal complex. Five of these six phenols are found to release in concerted fashion an electron to the ruthenium photooxidant and a proton to the pyridine base. The kinetics for this concerted bidirectional PCET process and its relationship to the reaction free energy were compared to the driving-force dependence of reaction kinetics for unidirectional concerted proton–electron transfer (CPET) between the same phenols and Ru(2,2′-bipyrazine)32+, a combined electron/proton acceptor. The results strongly support the concept of thermodynamic equivalence between separated electron/proton acceptors and single-reagent hydrogen-atom acceptors. A key feature of the explored systems is the similarity between molecules employed for bi- and unidirectional CPET.

  18. Possible role of laccase from Fusarium incarnatum UC-14 in bioremediation of Bisphenol A using reverse micelles system.

    PubMed

    Chhaya, Urvish; Gupte, Akshaya

    2013-06-15

    Bisphenol A [2,2 bis (4 hydroxyphenyl) propane] is widely used in the variety of industrial and residential applications such as the synthesis of polymers including polycarbonates, epoxy resins, phenol resins, polyesters and polyacrylates. BPA has been recognized as an Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC), thus it is necessary to assess its biodegradability or fate in the natural environment. In general, environmental pollutant such as BPA does not dissolve in aqueous media, owing to their high hydrophobicity, and hence non-aqueous catalysis can be employed to enhance biodegradability of phenolic environmental pollutant. Purified laccase hosted in reverse micelles using ternary system of isooctane: AOT [Bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulphosuccinate sodium salt)]:water having hydration ratio (Wo) of 30 with protein concentration of 43.5 μg/ml was found to eliminate 91.43% of 200 ppm of Bisphenol A at 50 °C, pH-6.0 when incubated with laccase/Reverse Micelles system for 75 min. GC-MS analysis of isooctane soluble fractions detected the presence of 4,4'-(2 hydroxy propane 1,2 diyl) diphenol, bis (4-hydroxylphenyl) butenal and 2-(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl) vinyl) pent-2-enal indicated degradation of BPA by two oxidation steps and one ring opening step (C-C bond cleavage). Laccase/RM system exhibited several advantages for the oxidative degradation of hydrophobic phenols mainly because of the solubility of either enzyme or substrate was improved in organic media and the stable activity of laccase in organic media was achieved.

  19. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  20. Interfacial tension in cooled heterogeneous liquid acetonitrile-ethyl acetate-isopropanol-water-phenol systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, O. B.; Khorokhordina, E. A.; Preobrazhenskii, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    It is found that the tension at the interfacial boundary of liquid phases formed by mixtures of acetonitrile-ethyl acetate-isopropanol (85 : 15 : 0 and 80 : 15 : 5 vol/vol/vol %) and water at 263 K falls exponentially as the concentration of phenols grows within 0-1 mg/mL. It is shown that the relatively low values of interfacial tension (11-32 mN/m) observed in cooled heterogeneous systems promote the redistribution of phenols between two liquid phases.

  1. The Potential of Systems Biology to Discover Antibacterial Mechanisms of Plant Phenolics

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Caroline S.; Burris, Kellie P.; Lenaghan, Scott C.; Stewart, C. Neal

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is a growing problem that can be addressed through the discovery of compounds with novel mechanisms of antibacterial activity. Natural products, including plant phenolic compounds, are one source of diverse chemical structures that could inhibit bacteria through novel mechanisms. However, evaluating novel antibacterial mechanisms of action can be difficult and is uncommon in assessments of plant phenolic compounds. With systems biology approaches, though, antibacterial mechanisms can be assessed without the bias of target-directed bioassays to enable the discovery of novel mechanism(s) of action against drug resistant microorganisms. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of antibacterial mechanisms of action of plant phenolic compounds and discusses relevant methodology. PMID:28360902

  2. The Potential of Systems Biology to Discover Antibacterial Mechanisms of Plant Phenolics.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Caroline S; Burris, Kellie P; Lenaghan, Scott C; Stewart, C Neal

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is a growing problem that can be addressed through the discovery of compounds with novel mechanisms of antibacterial activity. Natural products, including plant phenolic compounds, are one source of diverse chemical structures that could inhibit bacteria through novel mechanisms. However, evaluating novel antibacterial mechanisms of action can be difficult and is uncommon in assessments of plant phenolic compounds. With systems biology approaches, though, antibacterial mechanisms can be assessed without the bias of target-directed bioassays to enable the discovery of novel mechanism(s) of action against drug resistant microorganisms. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of antibacterial mechanisms of action of plant phenolic compounds and discusses relevant methodology.

  3. Bioremediation of organic pollutants in a radioactive wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Oboirien, Bilainu; Molokwane, P.E.; Chirwa, Evans

    2007-07-01

    Bioremediation holds the promise as a cost effective treatment technology for a wide variety of hazardous pollutants. In this study, the biodegradation of organic compounds discharged together with radioactive wastes is investigated. Nuclear process wastewater was simulated by a mixture of phenol and strontium, which is a major radionuclide found in radioactive wastewater. Phenol was used in the study as a model compound due to its simplicity of molecular structure. Moreover, the biodegradation pathway of phenol is well known. Biodegradation studies were conducted using pure cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. The rate of phenol degradation by both species was found to be higher in the test without strontium. This suggests some degree of inhibition in the degradation of phenol by strontium. There was no phenol degradation in the sterile controls. The results indicate the feasibility of the biodegradation of organic pollutants discharged in radioactive effluents by specialised microbial cultures. (authors)

  4. Optimization of a bioremediation system of soluble uranium based on the biostimulation of an indigenous bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Maleke, Maleke; Williams, Peter; Castillo, Julio; Botes, Elsabe; Ojo, Abidemi; DeFlaun, Mary; van Heerden, Esta

    2015-06-01

    High concentrations of uranium(VI) in the Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa from mining leachate is a serious environmental concern. Treatment systems are often ineffective. Therefore, optimization of a bioremediation system that facilitates the bioreduction of U(VI) based on biostimulation of indigenous bacterial communities can be a viable alternative. Tolerance of the indigenous bacteria to high concentrations of U and the amount of citric acid required for U removal was optimized. Two bioreactor studies which showed effective U(VI) removal more than 99 % from low (0.0037 mg L(-1)) and high (10 mg L(-1)) concentrations of U to below the limit allowed by South African National Standards for drinking water (0.0015 mg L(-1)). The second bioreactor was able to successfully adapt even with increasing levels of U(VI) feed water up to 10 mg L(-1), provided that enough electron donor was available. Molecular biology analyses identified Desulfovibrio sp. and Geobacter sp. among known species, which are known to reduce U(VI). The mineralogical analysis determined that part of the uranium precipitated intracellularly, which meant that the remaining U(VI) was precipitated as U(IV) oxides and TEM-EDS also confirmed this analysis. This was predicted with the geochemical model from the chemical data, which demonstrated that the treated drainage was supersaturated with respect to uraninite > U4O9 > U3O8 > UO2(am). Therefore, the tolerance of the indigenous bacterial community could be optimized to remediate up to 10 mg L(-1), and the system can thus be upscaled and employed for remediation of U(VI) impacted sites.

  5. Effects of temperature and inorganic salts on the adsorption of phenol from multicomponent systems onto a decolorizing carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Halhouli, K.A.; Darwish, N.A.; Al-Jahmany, Y.Y.

    1997-12-01

    Experimental investigation of the effect of temperature and two inorganic salts (KCl and NaCl) on the adsorption of phenol from dilute (10-200 mg/dm{sup 3}) multi-component systems onto activated carbon was studied. Focusing on the adsorption of phenol, all combinations of phenol with two other aromatic organic components, (1,4-dihydroxybenzene and 4-amino,1-naphthalene sulfonic acid-sodium salt) in aqueous solutions were considered. Equilibrium isotherms at three different temperatures (30, 40, and 55{degrees}C) were generated. The adsorption of phenol from binary and ternary as well as from single aqueous systems increases with decreasing temperature, as expected of physical adsorption. Effects of KCl and NaCl salts as a concentration of 0.05 M at 30{degrees}C were also investigated. The adsorption of phenol from bisolute and trisolute systems slightly decreases by adding either of the salts.

  6. Intrinsic bioremediation modeling to support Superfund site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, A.H.; Day, M.J.; Johnson, R.H.; Ritter, K.J.; Stancel, S.G.; Thomson, J.A.M.

    1997-09-01

    Closure of the groundwater component of a major Superfund site has been accomplished by a combination of source control, engineered in-situ bioremediation, and subsequent long-term intrinsic bioremediation. Engineered bioremediation outside the source control area resulted in very significant contaminant mass removal. This allowed intrinsic bioremediation to be considered as a passive remedial management method of achieving cleanup objectives after active remediation needed. Modeling demonstrated that intrinsic bioremediation would achieve cleanup objectives (for this site, Federal drinking water standards) within ten years of shutdown of the active bioremediation system. Modeling showed that residual electron acceptors and nutrients distributed in the aquifer during engineered bioremediation greatly enhance the intrinsic bioremediation process. The results of the modeling effort led to the active system being shut down a year ahead of schedule, allowing the project to move into a low-maintenance intrinsic bioremediation and long-term monitoring phase. The modeling demonstration coupled Visual MODFLOW{copyright} and BioTrans{copyright} to simulate groundwater flow, solute transport, and oxygen-limited, multi-species biodegradation. Regional flow evaluation, detailed model sensitivity analyses, and subarea modeling were employed to provide support to model predictions. Predictions will be tested by subsequent progress and compliance monitoring. Site closure began in early 1996.

  7. Fungi in Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadd, G. M.

    2001-12-01

    Bioremediation research has concentrated on organic pollutants, although the range of substances that can be transformed or detoxified by microorganisms includes both natural and synthetic organic materials and inorganic pollutants. The majority of applications developed to date involve bacteria, with a distinct lack of appreciation of the potential roles and involvement of fungi in bioremediation, despite clear evidence of their metabolic and morphological versatility. This book highlights the potential of filamentous fungi, including mycorrhizas, in bioremediation and discusses the physiology and chemistry of pollutant transformations.

  8. Metabolism of benzene and phenol by a reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 and the electron-donor, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase were isolated from phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes. Both benzene and its primary metabolite phenol, were substrates for the reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system. Benzene was metabolized to phenol and the polyhydroxylated metabolites; catechol, hydroquinone and 1,2,4 benzenetriol. Benzene elicited a Type I spectral change upon its interaction with the cytochrome P-450 while phenol's interaction with the cytochrome P-450 produced a reverse Type I spectra. The formation of phenol showed a pH optimum of 7.0 compared with 6.6-6.8 for the production of the polyhyrdoxylated metabolites. Cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, such as metyrapone and SKF 525A, diminished the production of phenol from benzene but not the production of the polyhydroxylated metabolites from phenol. The radical trapping agents, DMSO, KTBA and mannitol, decreased the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites, from /sup 14/C-labeled benzene and/or phenol. As KTBA and DMSO interacted with OH. There was a concomitant release of ethylene and methane, which was measured. Desferrioxamine, an iron-chelator and catalase also depressed the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites. In summary, benzene and phenol were both substrates for this reconstituted purified enzyme system, but they differed in binding to cytochrome P-450, pH optima and mode of hydroxylation.

  9. BIOREMEDIATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) initiated the Biosystems Technology Development Program to anticipate and address research needs in managing our nation's hazardous waste. The Agency believes that bioremediation of...

  10. Thin film composite polyamide membrane parameters estimation for phenol-water system by reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Z.V.P.; Gupta, S.K.

    1998-12-01

    A commercial thin film composite polyamide reverse osmosis membrane is used to separate an aqueous phenol-water binary system. The separation data are analyzed using a combined film theory-solution-diffusion (CFSD) model and a combined film theory-Spiegler-Kedem (CFSK) model. In the present investigation a new phenomenon is observed: there exists a maximum in the rejection when it is plotted against the product flux through the membrane. This behavior is explained for both models. An equation for J{sub v,min}, which is the value of the product flux J{sub v} at which the rejection reaches a maximum, is derived from both models. Although the parameters for both models are consistent over the range of operating conditions, the CFSK model is more accurate for the phenol-water system.

  11. The state of bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbeitt, W.D.

    1995-12-01

    Bioremediation is considered, today, by many in our society to be a peculiar product of new technology. Bioremediation is presented in this paper as an entirely natural process on earth, a process that precedes the age of mankind by far more than one billion years. Bioremediation is explained as one among an array of effective proven processes that may be used to restore balance and heal wounds in our environment. The science is not offered as the universal solution to pollution. Bioremediation is presented, rather, as a natural response to organic pollution in the environment, as a cost-effective response to some environmental pollution problems, and as an entirely inappropriate response to other pollution problems. Environmental professionals may well serve their clients, customers, and the environment by expanding understanding of bioremediation-of its advantages and its disadvantages. This paper submits that no fruitful conflict can be waged between the proponents of any legitimate remediation technologies serving our environment-incineration, chemical fixation, contaminant containment, bioventing, bioremediation, or any other proven technology. It is noted that false wars have also raged pointlessly between proponents of different bioremediation methodologies-those employing only indigenous bacteria and those augmenting or accelerating bioremediation processes using imported bacterial inoculants. A fundamental point is presented that all legitimate, proven processes for response to environmental pollution can be cost-effective and correct when property employed in the proper applications in the proper manner at the proper time. This paper presents argument that jealousies and intrigues common in industry must yield to a critically required accord realized only through common sense and common purpose in an effort to better serve our environment.

  12. Bioremediation of mixed microbial mats: System development of mixed contaminants for application at the Savannah River Site. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, J.; Phillips, P.

    1996-09-24

    The fundamental objective of this project is to develop and field test the mixed microbial mat bioremediation system for decontamination of target sites at SRS. Although microbial mats have performed well in several pilot projects in the past, atypical problems and site characteristics at SRS demand special field designs. In the interest of designing a pilot and locating it at an appropriate site, the project investigators have worked closely with the technical staff at the SREL. We have concluded that the diverse characteristics of contaminations at SRS may dictate testing several pilot designs during the course of this project.

  13. Combining soil washing with bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, F.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports on soil washing system equipment fabricated by GLIC Environmental. Applications focus on soil washing to remove hydrocarbon contaminants followed by bioremediation of wash waters to reduce the volume of materials requiring disposal. Other soil washing applications include the removal of selected metals. The EPA has identified both soil washing and bioremediation as ``innovative technologies`` in its efforts to promote alternative treatment technologies within the Superfund program. Recent EPA literature has described the merits of ``treatment trains`` where contaminated materials are treated with successive treatment methods to meet such objectives as reduction of total volume of regulated materials requiring disposal. The combination of soil washing with bioremediation is an effective ``treatment train``. Specialized soil washing equipment has been assembled utilizing the soil washing field experience in remediation of GLIC Environmental personnel together with the fabrication shop capabilities of a sister company. Typically a job has $750--900,000 worth of equipment on site, and treats more than 5,000 yd{sup 3} of contaminated soil at a rate of 250--300 yd{sup 3} in a 10-hour shift.

  14. A novel integration system of magnetically immobilized cells and a pair of graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes for the bioremediation of coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Tan, Liang; Ning, Shuxiang; Shi, Shengnan

    2016-09-01

    Magnetically immobilized cells of Comamonas sp. JB coupling with electrode reaction was developed to enhance the treatment efficiency of coking wastewater containing phenol, carbazole (CA), dibenzofuran (DBF), and dibenzothiophene (DBT). The pair of graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes was chosen as the most suitable electrodes. Magnetically immobilized cells coupling with graphite plate-stainless iron mesh electrodes (coupling system) exhibited high degradation activity for all the compounds, which were significantly higher than the sum by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction at the optimal voltage. Recycling experiments demonstrated that the degradation activity of coupling system increased gradually during eight recycles, indicating that there was a coupling effect between the biodegradation and electrode reaction. Phenol hydroxylase and qPCR assays confirmed that appropriate electrical stimulation could improve phenol hydroxylase activity and promote cells growth. Toxicity assessment suggested the treatment of the coking wastewater by coupling system led to less toxicity than untreated wastewater.

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  16. Flow injection chemiluminescence analysis of phenolic compounds using the NCS-luminol system.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Behzad; Dadashvand, Reza

    2006-03-01

    A flow injection system coupled with two simple and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) methods is described for the determination of some phenolic compounds. The methods are based on the inhibition effects of the investigated phenols on the CL signal intensities of N-chlorosuccinimide-KI-luminol (NCS-KI-luminol) and NCS-luminol systems. The influences of the chemical and hydrodynamic parameters on the decrease in CL signal intensities of NCS-KI-luminol and NCS-luminol systems for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol, serving as the model compounds of analyte, were studied in the flow injection mode of analysis. Under the selected conditions, the proposed CL systems were used for the determination of some phenolic compound and analytical characteristics of the systems including calibration equation, correlation coefficient, linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and sample throughput. The limits of detection for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 0.002, 0.01, and 0.3 microM using the NCS-KI-luminol system; for the NCS-luminol system these were 0.01, 0.17, and 1.6 microM, respectively. The relative standard deviation for 10 repeated measurements of 0.04, 0.06, and 1 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 1.9, 1.4, and 2.0%, respectively, with the NCS-KI-luminol system; for 0.2, 0.5, and 4 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol these were 2.6, 2.2, and 3.7%, respectively, using the NCS-luminol system. The method was applied to the determination of catechol in known environmental water samples with a relative error of less than 6%. A possible reaction mechanism of the proposed CL system is discussed briefly.

  17. Sensitivity of geological, geochemical and hydrologic parameters in complex reactive transport systems for in-situ uranium bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Maher, K.; Caers, J.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination associated with remediated uranium mill tailings is a challenging environmental problem, particularly within the Colorado River Basin. To examine the effectiveness of in-situ bioremediation of U(VI), acetate injection has been proposed and tested at the Rifle pilot site. There have been several geologic modeling and simulated contaminant transport investigations, to evaluate the potential outcomes of the process and identify crucial factors for successful uranium reduction. Ultimately, findings from these studies would contribute to accurate predictions of the efficacy of uranium reduction. However, all these previous studies have considered limited model complexities, either because of the concern that data is too sparse to resolve such complex systems or because some parameters are assumed to be less important. Such simplified initial modeling, however, limits the predictive power of the model. Moreover, previous studies have not yet focused on spatial heterogeneity of various modeling components and its impact on the spatial distribution of the immobilized uranium (U(IV)). In this study, we study the impact of uncertainty on 21 parameters on model responses by means of recently developed distance-based global sensitivity analysis (DGSA), to study the main effects and interactions of parameters of various types. The 21 parameters include, for example, spatial variability of initial uranium concentration, mean hydraulic conductivity, and variogram structures of hydraulic conductivity. DGSA allows for studying multi-variate model responses based on spatial and non-spatial model parameters. When calculating the distances between model responses, in addition to the overall uranium reduction efficacy, we also considered the spatial profiles of the immobilized uranium concentration as target response. Results show that the mean hydraulic conductivity and the mineral reaction rate are the two most sensitive parameters with regard to the overall

  18. Monooxygenation of an appended phenol in a model system of tyrosinase: implications on the enzymatic reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jessica Nadine; Rolff, Malte; Tuczek, Felix

    2015-02-21

    A new tridentate N-donor ligand and its corresponding copper(i) complex have been synthesized to investigate the tyrosinase-like aromatic hydroxylation of an attached phenol. The results of the oxygenation reactions are compared to related systems having attached phenyl and catechol groups, respectively. The title complex is the first system mediating the monooxygenation of a phenol in the absence of an external base.

  19. Kinetics of Horseradish Peroxidase-Catalyzed Nitration of Phenol in a Biphasic System.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Qida; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2017-02-28

    The use of peroxidase in the nitration of phenols is gaining interest as compared with traditional chemical reactions. We investigated the kinetic characteristics of phenol nitration catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system using n-butanol as the organic solvent and NO2(-) and H2O2 as substrates. The reaction rate was mainly controlled by the reaction kinetics in the aqueous phase when appropriate agitation was used to enhance mass transfer in the biphasic system. The initial velocity of the reaction increased with increasing HRP concentration. Additionally, an increase in the substrate concentrations of phenol (0-2 mM in organic phase) or H2O2 (0-0.1 mM in aqueous phase) enhanced the nitration efficiency catalyzed by HRP. In contrast, high concentrations of organic solvent decreased the kinetic parameter Vmax/Km. No inhibition of enzyme activity was observed when the concentrations of phenol and H2O2 were at or below 10 mM and 0.1 mM, respectively. On the basis of the peroxidase catalytic mechanism, a double-substrate ping-pong kinetic model was established. The kinetic parameters were Km(H2O2)= 1.09 mM, Km(PhOH) = 9.45 mM, and Vmax = 0.196 mM/min. The proposed model was well fit to the data obtained from additional independent experiments under the suggested optimal synthesis conditions. The kinetic model developed in this paper lays a foundation for further comprehensive study of enzymatic nitration kinetics.

  20. Acetylene Fermentation: Primordial Biogeochemistry, the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System, and Maybe Some Earthly Bioremediation too.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) fermentation was a serendipitous find of conducting C2H2-block assays of N2O reductase. Pelobacter acetylenicus grows on C2H2 via C2H2 hydratase (AH). AH is W-containing, exothermic, witha low redox potential. Unlike nitrogenase (N2ase), AH is specific for C2H2. When hydrated it forms acetaldehyde which is dismutated to ethanol, acetate providing energy plus carbon not only for P. acetylenicus but also for satellite anaerobes (e.g., sulfate-reducers, methanogens). But is there a larger significance to organisms that express AH? C2H2 is formed in the atmospheres of anoxic planet(oid)s by photolytic reactions of methane. Hence, the methane rich gas giants (e.g., Jupiter) and Titan have C2H2. It is also appears present in the Enceladus jets. Primordial Earth likely had a methane-rich atmosphere. Perhaps AH had a role in the evolution of primordial food chains in as much as C2H2 is easily metabolized when compared to methane? Akin to an ancient pablum for infant microbes that crawled out of the primordial soup. If so, it could also be a target substrate when searching for life on planet(oid)s of the outer Solar System. With regard to bioremediation, AH activity is relatively rare in assayed anoxic sediments. The exception was ground-waters contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), where dehalogenation gives rise to C2H2. Hence, there is an anthropogenic niche for pelobacter-like organisms in subsurface TCE-contaminated sites. Recent genomic sequencing suggests that P. acetylenicus contains not only AH, but N2ase as well, making it the only microbe that has the facility to metabolize C2H2 by either of the only two enzymes known that can achieve this feat. Both N2ase and AH are thought to be relic enzymes of Earth's transition from a pre-biotic to a biotic state where they were first employed to cleanse the primordial soup of nasty toxicants (e.g., cyanide). If so, why have they persisted, and what regulates their expression are questions we hope to

  1. Bioassessment of bioremediation products in aquatic systems using cytotoxic and in vitro immune function assays

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.D.; Roszell, L.E.; Overstreet, K.B. Jr.; O`Hara, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    Estuarine sediments and overlying water were collected from Back Bay Mississippi and placed in five 7.5 x 61 cm. glass-column mesocosms with a peristaltic recirculating system. Four columns received a sample of artificially weathered Louisiana Crude Oil spiked with either N + P, a PAH-metabolizing bacterial consortium collected in situ, or both. A fifth column excluded oil, bacteria, and nutrients. Aliphatic and aromatic fractions were extracted from each system and diluted in iso-octane. Poecoliopsis Hepatoma Cells (PLHC-1) and Rat Hepatoma Cells (H4IIE) were treated with 1/100--1/800 dilutions of each extract and protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, DNA synthesis, Cytochrome P4501A induction, and viability were determined. {proportional_to}-CD3 and {proportional_to}-IgM-stimulated proliferation of mouse lymphocytes, PWM-stimulated proliferation and PMA-stimulated oxidative burst activity of catfish lymphocytes and phagocytes, respective, were also determined. All extracts were overtly toxic to cell cultures compared to controls at a 1/100 dilution but only aliphatic fractions affected viability at higher dilutions. Aromatic fractions increased protein and RNA synthesis as well as induced P4501A at 1/400 and 1/800 dilutions. Fertilization with P + N increased toxic responses. Lymphocyte proliferation and fish phagocyte responses were more sensitive to aliphatic extracts. This approach may be useful for investigating the toxicity and biological impact of effluents.

  2. Identification of biofloc microscopic composition as the natural bioremediation in zero water exchange of Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, culture in closed hatchery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, Hidayah; Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Kasan, Nor Azman; Suratman, Suhaimi; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd

    2017-09-01

    Study on the microscopic composition of biofloc in closed hatchery culture system was carried out to determine the interaction between the aggregation flocs in the bioremediation process for the decomposition and degradation of organic matter loaded in the shrimp culture tanks. The study was done for 105 days of culture period in zero water exchange. All of the organic loaded in the culture tanks identified comes from the shrimp feces, uneaten fed, and the decomposed macro- and microorganisms died in the culture tanks. All of the microscopic organisms in the biofloc were identified using Advance microscopes Nikon 80i. From the present study, there were abundances and high varieties of phytoplankton, zooplankton, protozoa, nematodes and algae species identified as aggregates together in the flocs accumulation. All of these microscopic organisms identified implemented the symbiotic process together for food supply, become the algae grazer, act as natural water stabilizer in regulating the nutrients in culture tank and serve as decomposer for dead organic matter in the water environment. Heterotrophic bacteria identified from Pseudomonas and Aeromonas family consumed the organic matter loaded at the bottom of culture tank and converted items through chemical process as useful protein food to be consumed back by the shrimp. Overall it can be concluded that the biofloc organisms identified really contributed as natural bioremediation agents in zero water exchange culture system to ensure the water quality in the optimal condition until the end of culture period.

  3. Identification of biofloc microscopic composition as the natural bioremediation in zero water exchange of Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, culture in closed hatchery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, Hidayah; Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Kasan, Nor Azman; Suratman, Suhaimi; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd

    2016-06-01

    Study on the microscopic composition of biofloc in closed hatchery culture system was carried out to determine the interaction between the aggregation flocs in the bioremediation process for the decomposition and degradation of organic matter loaded in the shrimp culture tanks. The study was done for 105 days of culture period in zero water exchange. All of the organic loaded in the culture tanks identified comes from the shrimp feces, uneaten fed, and the decomposed macro- and microorganisms died in the culture tanks. All of the microscopic organisms in the biofloc were identified using Advance microscopes Nikon 80i. From the present study, there were abundances and high varieties of phytoplankton, zooplankton, protozoa, nematodes and algae species identified as aggregates together in the flocs accumulation. All of these microscopic organisms identified implemented the symbiotic process together for food supply, become the algae grazer, act as natural water stabilizer in regulating the nutrients in culture tank and serve as decomposer for dead organic matter in the water environment. Heterotrophic bacteria identified from Pseudomonas and Aeromonas family consumed the organic matter loaded at the bottom of culture tank and converted items through chemical process as useful protein food to be consumed back by the shrimp. Overall it can be concluded that the biofloc organisms identified really contributed as natural bioremediation agents in zero water exchange culture system to ensure the water quality in the optimal condition until the end of culture period.

  4. The Arsenic Detoxification System in Corynebacteria: Basis and Application for Bioremediation and Redox Control.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Luis M; Villadangos, Almudena F; de la Rubia, Alfonso G; Mourenza, Alvaro; Marcos-Pascual, Laura; Letek, Michal; Pedre, Brandán; Messens, Joris; Gil, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is widespread in the environment and highly toxic. It has been released by volcanic and anthropogenic activities and causes serious health problems worldwide. To survive arsenic-rich environments, soil and saprophytic microorganisms have developed molecular detoxification mechanisms to survive arsenic-rich environments, mainly by the enzymatic conversion of inorganic arsenate (As(V)) to arsenite (As(III)) by arsenate reductases, which is then extruded by arsenite permeases. One of these Gram-positive bacteria, Corynebacterium glutamicum, the workhorse of biotechnological research, is also resistant to arsenic. To sanitize contaminated soils and waters, C. glutamicum strains were modified to work as arsenic "biocontainers." Two chromosomally encoded ars operons (ars1 and ars2) are responsible for As resistance. The genes within these operons encode for metalloregulatory proteins (ArsR1/R2), arsenite permeases (Acr3-1/-2), and arsenate reductases (ArsC1/C2/C1'). ArsC1/C2 arsenate reductases are coupled to the low molecular weight thiol mycothiol (MSH) and to the recently discovered mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) present in most Actinobacteria. This MSH/Mrx-1 redox system protects cells against different forms of stress, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), metals, and antibiotics. ROS can modify functional sulfur cysteines by oxidizing the thiol (-SH) to a sulfenic acid (-SOH). These oxidation-sensitive protein cysteine thiols are redox regulated by the MSH/Mrx-1 couple in Corynebacterium and Mycobacterium. In summary, the molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic resistance system in C. glutamicum have paved the way for understanding the cellular response against oxidative stress in Actinobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Erwinia amylovora modifies phenolic profiles of susceptible and resistant apple through its type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Pontais, Isabelle; Treutter, Dieter; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-03-01

    Fire blight is a disease affecting Maloideae caused by the necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora, which requires the type III protein secretion system (TTSS) for pathogenicity. Profiles of methanol-extractable leaf phenolics of two apple (Malus x domestica) genotypes with contrasting susceptibility to this disease were analyzed by HPLC after infection. Some qualitative differences were recorded between the constitutive compositions of the two genotypes but in both of them dihydrochalcones accounted for more than 90% of total phenolics. Principal component analysis separated leaves inoculated with a virulent wild-type strain from those inoculated with a non-pathogenic TTSS-defective mutant or with water. The changes in levels of the various groups of phenolics in response to the virulent bacterium were similar between the two genotypes, with a significant decrease of dihydrochalcones and a significant increase of hydroxycinnamate derivatives. Differences between genotypes were, however, recorded in amplitude and kinetic of variation in these groups. Occurrence of oxidation and polymerization reactions is proposed, based on the browning process of infected tissues, but whether some by-products act in defense as toxic compounds remain to be tested. Among direct antibacterial constitutive compounds present in apple leaves, the dihydrochalcone phloretin only was found at levels close to lethal concentrations in both genotypes. However, E. amylovora exhibited the ability to stabilize this compound at sublethal levels even in the resistant apple, rejecting the hypothesis of its involvement in the resistance of this genotype.

  6. Electronic signatures of a model pollutant-particle system: chemisorbed phenol on TiO₂(110).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Matthew C; Thibodeaux, Chad A; Kizilkaya, Orhan; Kurtz, Richard L; Poliakoff, E D; Sprunger, Phillip T

    2015-04-07

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are a class of composite organic/metal oxide pollutants that have recently been discovered to form from a wide variety of substituted benzenes chemisorbed to commonly encountered oxides. Although a qualitative understanding of EPFR formation on particulate metal oxides has been achieved, a detailed understanding of the charge transfer mechanism that must accompany the creation of an unpaired radical electron is lacking. In this study, we perform photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy on a well-defined model system-phenol chemisorbed on TiO2(110) to directly observe changes in the electronic structure of the oxide and chemisorbed phenol as a function of adsorption temperature. We show strong evidence that, upon exposure at high temperature, empty states in the TiO2 are filled and the phenol HOMO is depopulated, as has been proposed in a conceptual model of EPFR formation. This experimental evidence of charge transfer provides a deeper understanding of the EPFR formation mechanism to guide future experimental and computational studies as well as potential environmental remediation strategies.

  7. Bioremediation using Gracilaria chouae co-cultured with Sparus macrocephalus to manage the nitrogen and phosphorous balance in an IMTA system in Xiangshan Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailong; Huo, Yuanzi; Han, Fang; Liu, Yuanyuan; He, Peimin

    2015-02-15

    A cage experiment using the red alga Gracilaria chouae co-cultured with the black seabream Sparus macrocephalus in Xiangshan Bay, China was conducted to measure the nutrient flux of the integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) system. Results showed that trash fish were the main nutrient input contributor and adult fish were the main nutrient output contributor in the system. Contents of N and P in adult fish accounted for 54.45% and 59.48% of N and P in trash fish and fry, which suggests that 45.55% of N and 40.52% of P generated by fish farming were released into to the water. G. chouae proved to be an efficient bioremediation species in this IMTA system. To balance the excess nutrients generated by the system, 231.09 kg of seedlings should be cultured and 5315.07 kg of adult seaweed should be harvested.

  8. Microbial trench-based optofluidic system for reagentless determination of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sanahuja, David; Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Vigués, Núria; Ackermann, Tobias Nils; Guerrero-Navarro, Alfons Eduard; Pujol-Vila, Ferran; Sacristán, Jordi; Santamaria, Nidia; Sánchez-Contreras, María; Díaz-González, María; Mas, Jordi; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier

    2015-04-07

    Phenolic compounds are one of the main contaminants of soil and water due to their toxicity and persistence in the natural environment. Their presence is commonly determined with bulky and expensive instrumentation (e.g. chromatography systems), requiring sample collection and transport to the laboratory. Sample transport delays data acquisition, postponing potential actions to prevent environmental catastrophes. This article presents a portable, miniaturized, robust and low-cost microbial trench-based optofluidic system for reagentless determination of phenols in water. The optofluidic system is composed of a poly(methyl methacrylate) structure, incorporating polymeric optical elements and miniaturized discrete auxiliary components for optical transduction. An electronic circuit, adapted from a lock-in amplifier, is used for system control and interfering ambient light subtraction. In the trench, genetically modified bacteria are stably entrapped in an alginate hydrogel for quantitative determination of model phenol catechol. Alginate is also acting as a diffusion barrier for compounds present in the sample. Additionally, the superior refractive index of the gel (compared to water) confines the light in the lower level of the chip. Hence, the optical readout of the device is only altered by changes in the trench. Catechol molecules (colorless) in the sample diffuse through the alginate matrix and reach bacteria, which degrade them to a colored compound. The absorbance increase at 450 nm reports the presence of catechol simply, quickly (~10 min) and quantitatively without addition of chemical reagents. This miniaturized, portable and robust optofluidic system opens the possibility for quick and reliable determination of environmental contamination in situ, thus mitigating the effects of accidental spills.

  9. Phenolic Wastewater Treatment Alternatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    pH 7 retention times become excessive. The manganese dioxide (Mn02 ) precipitates as a hydrous sludge which must be removed. This sludge becomes a...the sorptive properties of the hydrous MnO 2 often render it bene- ficial to clarification (Reference 22). On the other hand, it would increase the...SYSTEMS Phenol recovery systems are widely used for petroleum refi- nery wastes, coke-oven liquors , and phenol resin plant effluents, where waste phenol

  10. New technique maps bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Before researchers can effectively harness microbial populations for bioremediation, they first need to understand why some microbes are attracted to specific minerals.A new tool for studying the feasibility of in situ bioremediation has now been shown to be able to map mineral crystals and bacterial growth on basalt, according to Mary Kauffman, a geo-microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho Falls. Kauffman described her research on December 11 at the 2001 AGU Fall Meeting.

  11. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  12. Comparison of Failure Modes in 2-D and 3-D Woven Carbon Phenolic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossman, Grant A.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Braun, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is developing Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) materials as a new class of heatshields for entry vehicles (Stackpoole). Currently, there are few options for ablative entry heatshield materials, none of which is ideally suited to the planetary probe missions currently of interest to NASA. While carbon phenolic was successfully used for the missions Pioneer Venus and Galileo (to Jupiter), the heritage constituents are no longer available. An alternate carbon phenolic would need to be qualified for probe missions, which is most efficient at heat fluxes greater than those currently of interest. Additional TPS materials such as Avcoat and PICA are not sufficiently robust for the heat fluxes required. As a result, there is a large TPS gap between the materials efficient at very high conditions (carbon phenolic) and those that are effective at low-moderate conditions (all others). Development of 3D Woven TPS is intended to fill this gap, targeting mid-density weaves that could with withstand mid-range heat fluxes between 1100 W/sq cm and 8000 W/sq cm (Venkatapathy (2012). Preliminary experimental studies have been performed to show the feasibility of WTPS as a future mid-range TPS material. One study performed in the mARC Jet Facility at NASA Ames Research Center characterized the performance of a 3D Woven TPS sample and compared it to 2D carbon phenolic samples at ply angles of 0deg, 23.5deg, and 90deg. Each sample contained similar compositions of phenolic and carbon fiber volume fractions for experimental consistency. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the TPS materials by evaluating resulting recession and failure modes. After exposing both samples to similar heat flux and pressure conditions, the 2D carbon phenolic laminate was shown to experience significant delamination between layers and further pocketing underneath separated layers. The 3D Woven TPS sample did not experience the delamination or pocketing

  13. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    environmental parameters on bioremediation is important in designing a bioremediation system to reduce petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in impacted soils.

  14. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  15. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  16. Reactions of copper(II)-phenol systems with O2: models for TPQ biosynthesis in copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Kae; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Sugimoto, Hideki; Kunishita, Atsushi; Tano, Tetsuro; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Cramer, Christopher J; Itoh, Shinobu

    2011-03-07

    Copper(II) complexes supported by a series of phenol-containing bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine N(3) ligands (denoted as L(o)H, L(m)H, and L(p)H) have been synthesized, and their O(2) reactivity has been examined in detail to gain mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis of the TPQ cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalaninequinone, TOPA quinone) in copper-containing amine oxidases. The copper(II) complex of L(o)H (ortho-phenol derivative) involves a direct phenolate to copper(II) coordination and exhibits almost no reactivity toward O(2) at 60 °C in CH(3)OH. On the other hand, the copper(II) complex of L(m)H (meta-phenol derivative), which does not involve direct coordinative interaction between the phenol moiety and the copper(II) ion, reacts with O(2) in the presence of triethylamine as a base to give a methoxy-substituted para-quinone derivative under the same conditions. The product structure has been established by detailed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) (including (18)O-labeling experiment) analyses. Density functional theory predicts that the reaction involves (i) intramolecular electron transfer from the deprotonated phenol (phenolate) to copper(II) to generate a copper(I)-phenoxyl radical; (ii) the addition of O(2) to this intermediate, resulting in an end-on copper(II) superoxide; (iii) electrophilic substitution of the phenolic radical to give a copper(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate; (iv) O-O bond cleavage concomitant with a proton migration, giving a para-quinone derivative; and (v) Michael addition of methoxide from copper(II) to the para-quinone ring and subsequent O(2) oxidation. This reaction sequence is similar to that proposed for the biosynthetic pathway leading to the TPQ cofactor in the enzymatic system. The generated para-quinone derivative can act as a turnover catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzylamine to N-benzylidene benzylamine. Another type of copper(II)-phenol

  17. Austrian pine phenolics are likely contributors to systemic induced resistance against Diplodia pinea.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Patrick; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2013-08-01

    The molecular basis of the systemic induced resistance (SIR) phenotype known to occur in Austrian pine (Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold) in response to the tip blight and canker pathogen Diplodia pinea (Desm.) remains unclear. Specialized metabolites such as phenolics are considered to be an important component of plant defense, including SIR, but the antimicrobial activity of many of these putative defensive chemicals remains untested at realistic concentrations and in conjunction with each other. Here, we examined the anti-Diplodia activity of several previously identified Austrian pine phenolics associated with SIR by comparing the diameters of fungal colonies grown on media amended with ferulic acid, coumaric acid, taxifolin, pinosylvin, pinosylvin monomethyl ether and lignin. All of the compounds were tested both individually and as clusters (combinations) previously determined to occur in planta in a co-regulated fashion. Both the individual compounds and clusters were tested at constitutive concentrations and pathogen-induced concentrations linked to an SIR phenotype. Lignin possessed the strongest antifungal activity individually, and clusters at the SIR concentrations had the greatest antifungal effects, achieving fungistasis. This study exemplifies the value of evaluating potential biomarkers of resistance at in planta concentrations that are associated with the systemically resistant phenotype, and provides strong evidence that co-regulation of chemical defenses potentiates such a phenotype.

  18. MetaRouter: bioinformatics for bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Florencio; Guijas, David; Valencia, Alfonso; De Lorenzo, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Bioremediation, the exploitation of biological catalysts (mostly microorganisms) for removing pollutants from the environment, requires the integration of huge amounts of data from different sources. We have developed MetaRouter, a system for maintaining heterogeneous information related to bioremediation in a framework that allows its query, administration and mining (application of methods for extracting new knowledge). MetaRouter is an application intended for laboratories working in biodegradation and bioremediation, which need to maintain and consult public and private data, linked internally and with external databases, and to extract new information from it. Among the data-mining features is a program included for locating biodegradative pathways for chemical compounds according to a given set of constraints and requirements. The integration of biodegradation information with the corresponding protein and genome data provides a suitable framework for studying the global properties of the bioremediation network. The system can be accessed and administrated through a web interface. The full-featured system (except administration facilities) is freely available at http://pdg.cnb.uam.es/MetaRouter. Additional material: http://www.pdg.cnb.uam.es/biodeg_net/MetaRouter. PMID:15608267

  19. Efficient treatment of phenolic wastewater with high salinity using a novel integrated system of magnetically immobilized cells coupling with electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Shi, Shengnan; Song, Lun; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan

    2016-10-01

    A novel integrated system in which magnetically immobilized cells coupled with a pair of stainless iron meshes-graphite plate electrodes has been designed and operated to enhance the treatment performance of phenolic wastewater under high salinity. With NaCl concentration increased, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and COD removal rates by integrated system increased significantly, which were obviously higher than the sum of removal rates by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction. This integrated system exhibited higher removal rates for all the compounds than that by single magnetically immobilized cells during six cycles for reuse, and it still performed better, even when the voltage was cut off. These results indicated that there was a coupling effect between biodegradation and electrode reaction. The investigation of phenol hydroxylase activity and cells concentration confirmed that electrode reaction played an important role in this coupling effect.

  20. Integrated photocatalytic and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment system for degradation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Nik Noor Athirah Nik; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah Wan Mohd; Lee, Sin-Li

    2017-04-01

    This study will examine the efficiency of the simultaneous photocatalytic and biodegradation process in the same treatment reactor. The sequencing batch reactor or also known as SBR is an effective wastewater treatment method that has been applied widely. SBR system has become an alternative method for industrial wastewater treatment with high concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and phenolic compound. In order for the photocatalytic process to occur, ZnO nanoparticles immobilized onto sponge were introduced to the reactor. It was observed that the COD value were decreased, indicated that the simultaneous biodegradation and photodegradation process in functional. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the production and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the physiochemical stability of activated sludge in hybrid growth type SBR were monitored. The percentages of removal are varied with different concentration of ZnO nanoparticles. The highest COD removal recorded is 31.5% with concentration of ZnO 0.6 mg/L. With the present of the ZnO nanoparticles, the degradation of phenol was relatively better than combination of biological of photlysis and biological.

  1. Flight test of carbon-phenolic on a spacecraft launched by the pacemaker vehicle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, T. E., Jr.; Witte, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Carbon-phenolic material consisting of 50 percent carbon fibers and 50 percent phenolic resin was flight tested on a recoverable spacecraft launched by the Pacemaker vehicle system. The heat shield of the spacecraft was fabricated so that the carbon fibers in the ablator material had different orientations over several areas of the spacecraft. The environment in which the spacecraft was tested produced heating rates on the hemispherical nose up to 13.6 MW/sq m (1200 Btu/sq ft/sec) and stagnation-point pressures up to 1.27 MN/sq m (12.5 atm). The experimental results are presented. Due to high heating rates and possible spallation and mechanical char removal the greatest mass loss occurred in the nose region. Essentially uniform surface recession and char thickness were observed on the conical section of the spacecraft. A comparison of measured heating rates with computed turbulent and laminar heating rates, as well as measurements of sound-pressure fluctuations in the boundary layer obtained with acoustic sensors, indicated that the boundary layer underwent transition. The acoustic sensor provides an interesting new data form for the general study of boundary-layer transition for free-flight investigations.

  2. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Yang, Zamin; Palmer, Robert J., Jr.; Sayler, Gary S.; Khang, Yongho

    1996-11-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, we have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminesce or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  3. Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Yang, Z.; Palmer, R.J.; Khang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, the authors have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminescence or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

  4. Sustainable biodegradation of phenol by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 isolated from the rhizosphere of duckweed Lemna aoukikusa.

    PubMed

    Yamaga, Fumiko; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2010-08-15

    Phenol-degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of duckweed (Lemna aoukikusa) using an enrichment culture method. One of the isolates, P23, exhibited an excellent ability to degrade phenol and attach to a solid surface under laboratory conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that P23 belongs to the genera Acinetobacter and has the highest similarity to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. P23 rapidly colonized on the surface of sterilized duckweed roots and formed biofilms, indicating that the conditions provided by the root system of duckweed are favorable to P23. A long-term performance test (160 h) showed that continuous removal of phenol can be attributed to the beneficial symbiotic interaction between duckweed and P23. P23 is the first growth-promoting bacterium identified from Lemna aoukikusa. The results in this study suggest the potential usefulness of dominating a particular bacterium in the rhizosphere of duckweeds to achieve efficient and sustainable bioremediation of polluted water.

  5. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Alberto, María R; de Nadra, María C Manca; Arena, Mario E

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  6. Detection of Total Phenol in Green and Black Teas by Flow Injection System and Unmodified Screen Printed Electrode

    PubMed Central

    de Mattos, Ivanildo Luiz; Zagal, José Heraclito

    2010-01-01

    A flow injection system using an unmodified gold screen-printed electrode was employed for total phenol determination in black and green teas. In order to avoid passivation of the electrode surface due to the redox reaction, preoxidation of the sample was realized by hexacyanoferrate(III) followed by addition of an EDTA solution. The complex formed in the presence of EDTA minimizes or avoids polymerization of the oxidized phenols. The previously filtered tea sample and hexacyanoferrate(III) reagent were introduced simultaneously into two-carrier streams producing two reproducible zones. At confluence point, the pre-oxidation of the phenolic compounds occurs while this zone flows through the coiled reactor and receives the EDTA solution before phenol detection. The consumption of ferricyanide was monitorized at 360 mV versus Ag/AgCl and reflected the total amount of phenolic compounds present in the sample. Results were reported as gallic acid equivalents (GAEs). The proposed system is robust, versatile, environmentally-friendly (since the reactive is used only in the presence of the sample), and allows the analysis of about 35–40 samples per hour with detection limit = 1 mg/L without the necessity for surface cleaning after each measurement. Precise results are in agreement with those obtained by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. PMID:21461407

  7. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, María R.; de Nadra, María C. Manca; Arena, Mario E.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37–40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds. PMID:24031815

  8. Influence of genotype, cultivation system and irrigation regime on antioxidant capacity and selected phenolics of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.).

    PubMed

    Cardeñosa, Vanessa; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Muriel, José Luis; Moreno, Diego A; Moreno-Rojas, José M

    2016-07-01

    Demand for and availability of blueberries has increased substantially over recent years, driven in part by their health-promoting properties. Three blueberry varieties ('Rocío', V2, and V3) were grown under two cultivation systems (open-field and plastic tunnels) and subjected to two irrigations regimes (100% and 80% of crop evapotranspiration) in two consecutive years (2011-2012). They were evaluated for their phytochemical composition and antioxidant capacity. Genotype influenced the antioxidant capacity and the content of the three groups of phenolics in the blueberries. The antioxidant activity and total flavonols content increased when the blueberries were grown under open-field conditions. Deficit irrigation conditions led to additional positive effects on their phenolics (delphinidn-3-acetilhexoside content was increased under plastic tunnel with deficit irrigation). In conclusion, the amount of phenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity of blueberries were not negatively affected by water restriction; Moreover, several changes were recorded due to growing system and genotype.

  9. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to a method for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In particular, the invention relates to remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by the injection of nutrients to stimulate growth of pollutant-degrading microorganisms. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  10. Bioremediation of groundwater pollution.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R L

    1991-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in the past year towards an understanding of the microbial processes in subsurface environments that may allow natural microbial populations to be employed for bioremediation of groundwater pollution. Among the highlights were: the discovery of several previously unknown xenobiotic-degrading abilities in groundwater microorganisms; progress in using the unique abilities of methanotrophs to oxidize halogenated solvents; and characterizations of microbial populations from subsurface soils.

  11. Remediation case studies: Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing bioremediation. This volume contains reports on nine projects that include bioventing and land treatment technologies, as well as a unique, large-scale slurry-phase project. In these projects, petroleum hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants of concern. Two land treatment projects in this volume represent completed cleanups at creosote sites.

  12. Soil and brownfield bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-09-01

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons, persistent organic pollutants, halogenated organic chemicals and toxic metal(loid)s is a serious global problem affecting the human and ecological health. Over the past half-century, the technological and industrial advancements have led to the creation of a large number of brownfields, most of these located in the centre of dense cities all over the world. Restoring these sites and regeneration of urban areas in a sustainable way for beneficial uses is a key priority for all industrialized nations. Bioremediation is considered a safe economical, efficient and sustainable technology for restoring the contaminated sites. This brief review presents an overview of bioremediation technologies in the context of sustainability, their applications and limitations in the reclamation of contaminated sites with an emphasis on brownfields. Also, the use of integrated approaches using the combination of chemical oxidation and bioremediation for persistent organic pollutants is discussed. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Improvement of phenol photodegradation efficiency by a combined g-C3N4/Fe(III)/persulfate system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Yang; Tian, Ke; Jiang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Graphite-like C3N4 (g-C3N4) is an efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst commonly used in dye decolorization with very poor photocatalytic efficiency for degrading recalcitrant organic pollutants, such as phenol. In this study, we designed a g-C3N4/Fe(III)/persulfate system to significantly improve the phenol photodegradation efficacy by combining photocatalysis and light Fenton interaction. The phenol removal ratio and degradation rate of the g-C3N4/Fe(III)/persulfate system are 16.5- and 240-fold higher than those of individual g-C3N4 system. Sulfate radicals [Formula: see text] and H2O2 are detected in the g-C3N4/Fe(III)/persulfate system, suggesting that both radical decomposition and light Fenton interaction play important roles in phenol degradation. The efficient coupled photocatalytic system of g-C3N4 combined with Fe(III) and persulfate shows significant potential for application in large-scale degradation of environmental pollutants.

  14. In situ aquifer bioremediation of organics including cyanide and carbon disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Rizk, J.A.M.; Leavitt, M.E.; Graves, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Low levels (< 1 mg/L) of acetone, cyanide, phenol, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, and carbon disulfide from an inactive industrial landfill were found above background levels in a shallow aquifer at an eastern coastal site. In situ biodegradation was evaluated for treatment of these contaminants. Two soil samples and three groundwater samples were taken from the site for a laboratory bioassessment and a biotreatability test. The positive results of the bioassessment suggested moving forward with biotreatability testing. Biotreatability test results indicated suitable site conditions for bioremediation and that all the contaminants of concern at the site could be biodegraded to nondetect or very low levels (< 50 {micro}g/L) with oxygen only; i.e., addition of nutrients was not required. Pilot-scale testing was undertaken on site to provide information for full-scale design, including oxygen requirements and air injection well spacing. This report describes the approach, the results, and their impact on the full-scale remediation system.

  15. Bioremediation of radionuclides: emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Singh, Sompal; Singh, Om V

    2007-01-01

    A large quantity of radioactive waste is being generated as the byproduct of atomic energy and related programs worldwide. There are multiple radioactive waste dumping sites, that, if exposed to the general population, may cause serious life-threatening disorders. Currently, no efficient technology is available that can store the radioactive wastes with adequate safety. Therefore, bioremediation of radionuclides/radioactive waste is an unavoidable necessity that has been tried using biotransformation, bioaccumulation, biosorption, biostimulation, and bioaugmentaion, with limited success. Genetic engineering has been implemented to develop an organism that can effectively detoxify radionuclides along with other organic pollutants present as co-contaminants in the radioactive waste sites. However, the lack of system-wide information regarding factors regulating growth and metabolism of microbial communities can be conquered by newly seeded "-omics"-based technologies, viz. transcriptomics and proteomics. Studies combining functional transcriptomics and proteomics would create a system-wide approach studying the microbial metabolism in radionuclides detoxification.

  16. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Semprini, L.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorinated solvents and their natural transformation products are the most frequently observed groundwater contaminants in the United States. In situ bioremediation using anaerobic or aerobic co-metabolic processes is a promising means of cleaning up contaminated aquifers. Studies show that under natural conditions trichloroethylene can be anaerobically degraded to dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene. Pilot scale field studies of in situ aerobic co-metabolic transformations have shown that indigenous microbes grown on phenol are more effective at degrading trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene than microbes grown on methane. Modeling studies support field observations and indicate that the removal of trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene results from the biostimulation of an indigenous microbial population. Field tests and modeling studies indicate that, at high TCE concentration, degradation becomes stoichiometrically limited. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Semprini, L

    1995-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents and their natural transformation products are the most frequently observed groundwater contaminants in the United States. In situ bioremediation using anaerobic or aerobic co-metabolic processes is a promising means of cleaning up contaminated aquifers. Studies show that under natural conditions trichloroethylene can be anaerobically degraded to dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene. Pilot scale field studies of in situ aerobic co-metabolic transformations have shown that indigenous microbes grown on phenol are more effective at degrading trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene than microbes grown on methane. Modeling studies support field observations and indicate that the removal of trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene results from the biostimulation of an indigenous microbial population. Field tests and modeling studies indicate that, at high TCE concentration, degradation becomes stoichiometrically limited. PMID:8565895

  18. Bioremediation process on Brazil shoreline. Laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Anabela P; Triguis, Jorge A

    2007-11-01

    remaining constant. Subsurface samples show more biodegradation than surface samples, probably because the first one has higher humidity. Linear alcanes are more biodegraded than isoprenoids, confirming the biodegradation susceptibility order. Saturated cyclic biomarkers and aromatic compounds show constant behavior maybe because the nutrients or time was not enough for microorganismic attack. Fertilizer does not demonstrate any toxic effects in local biota so that it does not compromise the technique applicability and the environment is not saturated by nutrients during the simulation, especially since the coastal environment is an open system affected daily by tides. Therefore, bioremediation tests can be classified as moderate, reaching level 5 in the classification scale by Peters & Moldowan (1993). The use of marine environment by the petroleum industry on exploration, production and transportation operation, transform this oil to become the most important pollutant in the oceans. Bioremediation is an important technique used to clean spilled oil impacting on shorelines, accelerating the biodegradation process by using fertilizer growing the microorganisms responsible for decontaminating the environment. We recommend confirming the efficiency of NPK nutrient used on bioremediation simulating experiments on beaches, while monitoring the chemical changes long-term. NPK fertilizer can be used to stimulate the biodegradation process on shoreline impacted by spilled oil.

  19. A combined photolytic-electrolytic system for the simultaneous recovery of copper and degradation of phenol or 4-chlorophenol in mixed solutions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Abdul J; Grimes, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The effects of the presence of copper on the photooxidation of phenol and 4-chlorophenol and of the presence of the phenols on the recovery of copper by electrodeposition are studied in three systems: a photolytic cell in the presence and absence of TiO2 as a catalyst or H2O2 as an oxidant; an electrolytic cell and a combined photolytic-electrolytic system. The optimum system for the simultaneous removal of copper and destruction of the phenols which overcomes the effects of copper-phenol reactions is a combined system with concentrator electrode technology incorporated into the electrolytic cell. This combined system achieves >99% removal of copper and destruction of phenol or 4-chlorophenol in an 8 h period.

  20. Bioremediation of wastewater using microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalivendra, Saikumar

    Population expansion and industrial development has deteriorated the quality of freshwater reservoirs around the world and has caused freshwater shortages in certain areas. Discharge of industrial effluents containing toxic heavy metals such as Cd and Cr into the environment have serious impact on human, animal and aquatic life. In order to solve these problems, the present study was focused on evaluating and demonstrating potential of microalgae for bioremediation of wastewater laden with nitrogen (N) in the form of nitrates, phosphorous (P) in the form of phosphates, chromium (Cr (VI)) and cadmium (Cd (II)). After screening several microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and algae taken from Pleasant Hill Lake were chosen as candidate species for this study. The viability of the process was demonstrated in laboratory bioreactors and various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial metal concentration, algae concentration, pH and temperature that would affect remediation rates were studied. Based on the experimental results, correlations were developed to enable customizing and designing a commercial Algae based Wastewater Treatment System (AWTS). A commercial AWTS system that can be easily customized and is suitable for integration into existing wastewater treatment facilities was developed, and capital cost estimates for system including installation and annual operating costs were determined. The work concludes that algal bioremediation is a viable alternate technology for treating wastewater in an economical and sustainable way when compared to conventional treatment processes. The annual wastewater treatment cost to remove N,P is ~26x lower and to remove Cr, Cd is 7x lower than conventional treatment processes. The cost benefit analysis performed shows that if this technology is implemented at industrial complexes, Air Force freight and other Department of Defense installations with wastewater treatment plants, it could lead to millions of dollars in

  1. Resorcinol degradation by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain under osmotic stress: mono and binary substrate matrices with phenol.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Sumaya Ferreira; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2011-04-01

    A phenol-degrading Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was able to grow at 1,000 mg l(-1) of resorcinol on solid medium. The aerobic degradation of resorcinol by P. chrysogenum CLONA2 was studied in batch cultures in minimal mineral medium with 58.5 g l(-1) of sodium chloride using resorcinol as the sole carbon source. The fungal strain showed the ability to degrade up to 250 mg l(-1) of resorcinol. Resorcinol and phenol efficiency degradation by P. chrysogenum CLONA2 was compared. This strain removes phenol faster than resorcinol. When phenol and resorcinol were in binary substrate matrices, phenol enhanced resorcinol degradation, and organic load decreased with respect to the mono substrate matrices. The acute toxicity of phenol and resorcinol, individually and in combination, to Artemia franciscana larvae has been verified before and after the bioremediation process with P. chrysogenum CLONA2. The remediation process was effective in mono and binary substrate systems.

  2. Comparative Kinetic Studies and Performance Evaluation of Biofilm and Biomass Characteristics of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Degrading Synthetic Phenolic Effluent in Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Begum, S Sabarunisha; Radha, K V

    2016-05-01

    The bioremediation potential of Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied in an Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor under batch recirculation conditions using synthetic phenolic effluent of various concentrations (400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1200 mg/l). The performance of the reactor was investigated and the characteristics of biomass and biofilm were determined by evaluating biofilm dry density and thickness, bioparticle density, suspended and attached biomass concentration, chemical oxygen demand and phenol removal efficiency. Biodegradation kinetics had been studied for suspended biomass culture and biofilm systems with respect to its specific growth and substrate consumption rates. Suspended biomass followed substrate inhibition kinetics and the experimental data fitted well with the Haldane model. The degradation kinetic behavior of biofilm revealed that a well adapted biofilm system with effective control of biofilm thickness in an inverse fluidized bed biofilm reactor overcomes substrate inhibition effects by tolerating higher phenol concentration and fitted well to the Monod model.

  3. Determination of priority phenolic pollutants exploiting an in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-multisyringe chromatography system.

    PubMed

    González, Alba; Avivar, Jessica; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-03-01

    An automatic phenolic compounds analyzer is presented. The system performs online magnetic-stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction before multisyringe chromatography (MSC) using a monolithic Chromolith Flash RP-18e column. The extraction behavior of the following phenolic pollutants: phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-diclorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, has been studied. A critical comparison of extractants (tributyl phosphate, acetonitrile, hexane, and 1-chlorobutane) and disperser solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol) was made. Tributyl phosphate and acetonitrile were chosen as the extractant and the disperser solvent, respectively, since these showed the best performance. Phenols were online back-extracted into NaOH and neutralized before multi-isocratic chromatographic separation. The proposed analyzer can be applied for wide linear working ranges, i.e., between 40 and 20,000 μg L(-1). The precision of the developed system has been proved, with maximum values for the intraday and interday precision of 4.4 % and 5.2 %, respectively, expressed as relative standard deviation, and high preconcentration factors (9.3-10.5) for most of the compounds studied. The method developed was successfully applied to natural water samples.

  4. Scale-up of BDD anode system for electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater in continuous mode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Ni, Jinren; Wei, Junjun; Xing, Xuan; Li, Hongna; Jiang, Yi

    2010-12-15

    Scale-up of boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system is significant to the practical application of electrochemical oxidation in bio-refractory wastewater treatment. In this study, the performance of a smaller BDD anode (24 cm(2)) system in continuous mode electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater was first investigated and well described by the response surface methodology (RSM). Furthermore, the RSM was extended to examine the scale-up feasibility of BDD anode systems with similar configurations. It was demonstrated that both COD degradation efficiency and specific energy consumption could be expected at the same level even as the system was enlarged over 100 times, which implied that BDD anode system could be successfully scaled up through controlling the same retention time, current density, initial COD, and conductivity conditions. Based on this study, a larger BDD anode (2904 cm(2)) system was constructed and systematic measurements were made on its performance in electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater. Very good agreement was found between measured and predicted results by RSM. At the optimized conditions, the larger BDD anode system could easily reduce the COD of phenol simulated wastewater from 633 mg L(-1) to 145 mg L(-1) (<150 mg L(-1), National Discharge Standard of China) during 80 min with specific energy consumption only 31 kWh kgCOD(-1). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF GENOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-BIOREMEDIATED SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBIN

    2004-10-20

    The relationship between toxicity and soil contamination must be understood to develop reliable indicators of environmental restoration for bioremediation. Two bacterial rapid bioassays: SOS chromotest and umu-test with and without metabolic activation (S-9 mixture) were used to evaluate genotoxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil following bioremediation treatment. The soil was taken from an engineered biopile at the Czor Polish oil refinery. The bioremediation process in the biopile lasted 4 years, and the toxicity measurements were done after this treatment. Carcinogens detected in the soil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were reduced to low concentrations (2 mg/kg dry wt) by the bioremediation process. Genotoxicity was not observed for soils tested with and without metabolic activation by a liver homogenate (S-9 mixture). However, umu-test was more sensitive than SOS-chromotest in the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil. Analytical results of soil used in the bioassays confirmed that the bioremediation process reduced 81 percent of the petroleum hydrocarbons including PAHs. We conclude that the combined test systems employed in this study are useful tools for the genotoxic examination of remediated petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  6. Development of different comprehensive two dimensional systems for the separation of phenolic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Francesco; Jandera, Pavel; Blahová, Eva; Mondello, Luigi

    2006-11-01

    Three different comprehensive 2-D HPLC systems for the separation of phenolic antioxidants have been developed on the basis of different selectivities of a PEG-silica column in the first dimension and a packed or monolithic C18 or a ZR-CARBON column, respectively, in the second dimension. Two-dimensional comprehensive liquid chromatography using a serially connected short PEG-silica column and a conventional C18-silica or a ZR-CARBON column in the second dimension was tested to improve the resolution of the earlier eluting compounds in the first dimension. Various types of interface were used to connect the columns in the first and in the second dimension: i) two injection sampling loops of 100 microL in conventional arrangement; ii) a 10-port 2-position valve equipped with two trapping X-Terra columns instead of loops; and iii) two analytical D2 columns in parallel. The mobile phase in the first dimension has a lower elution strength than in the second dimension, allowing band compression of the solutes transferred from the first to the second dimension. This effect was enhanced using trapping columns instead of sampling loops as the interface between the two dimensions, thus allowing a decrease in the time of analysis. These systems were used for the analysis of beer samples. The relative location of the components in the 2-D retention plane varied in relation to their chemical structure in each instrumental set-up and allowed positive peak identification.

  7. In silico and experimental methods revealed highly diverse bacteria with quorum sensing and aromatics biodegradation systems--a potential broad application on bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Yu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lin, Xiuchun

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic overlaps between aromatics-degrading bacteria and acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) or autoinducer (AI) based quorum-sensing (QS) bacteria were evident in literatures; however, the diversity of bacteria with both activities had never been finely described. In-silico searching in NCBI genome database revealed that more than 11% of investigated population harbored both aromatic ring-hydroxylating-dioxygenase (RHD) gene and AHL/AI-synthetase gene. These bacteria were distributed in 10 orders, 15 families, 42 genus and 78 species. Horizontal transfers of both genes were common among them. Using enrichment and culture dependent method, 6 Sphingomonadales and 4 Rhizobiales with phenanthrene- or pyrene-degrading ability and AHL-production were isolated from marine, wetland and soil samples. Thin-layer-chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass-spectrum revealed that these Sphingomonads produced various AHL molecules. This is the first report of highly diverse bacteria that harbored both aromatics-degrading and QS systems. QS regulation may have broad impacts on aromatics biodegradation, and would be a new angle for developing bioremediation technology.

  8. GRACE BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES - DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil’s ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to micro...

  9. GRACE BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES - DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil’s ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to micro...

  10. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Techtmann, Stephen M.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  11. Investigating the use of phenolic rich fraction of pyrolysis bio-oils as an adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahaf, Amir

    Fast pyrolysis allows converting of up to 75 % of biomass into a crude bio-oil, which can be separated into a phenolic rich fraction (PRF) via ethyl acetate extraction while a sugar rich fraction preferentially concentrates in the aqueous phase. Rheological and thermal characterization of heat treated PRF from pyrolysis of Douglas Fir is performed using cone and plate rheology set up, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that this material demonstrates a unique thermoplastic behavior with low Tg and softening point that can be systematically manipulated through changes in thermal history. As these materials are good candidates for development of hot melt adhesives, lap shear tests were also performed using wood stripes to evaluate their mechanical properties as an adhesive. Optimization of properties of the PRF is sought in this study through polymer blending with other bio-degradable thermoplastic poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA). Blends of PRF/PCL and PRF/PLA of different ratios are prepared by solvent casting and melt blending and thermally and thermomechanically characterized for their miscibility and phase behavior. Presence of molecular interactions are furthur investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FTIR). The blends show complete miscibility based on their Tg and melting points and significant improvement in shear strength is observed. Mechanisms leading to changes in properties are described and a physical model is proposed. The blend systems have good potential to be used as a thermoplastic bio degradable adhesives with satisfactoty properies.

  12. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS: A FLEXIBLE VARIABLE SPEED TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons has evolved into a number of different processes. These processes include in-situ aquifer bioremediation, bioventing, biosparging, passive bioremediation with oxygen release compounds, and intrinsic bioremediation. Although often viewe...

  13. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS: A FLEXIBLE VARIABLE SPEED TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons has evolved into a number of different processes. These processes include in-situ aquifer bioremediation, bioventing, biosparging, passive bioremediation with oxygen release compounds, and intrinsic bioremediation. Although often viewe...

  14. High-throughput screening system based on phenolics-responsive transcription activator for directed evolution of organophosphate-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Su; Choi, Su-Lim; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Kim, Eui-Joong; Pan, Jae-Gu; Rha, Eugene; Song, Jae Jun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2012-11-01

    Synthetic organophosphates (OPs) have been used as nerve agents and pesticides due to their extreme toxicity and have caused serious environmental and human health problems. Hence, effective methods for detoxification and decontamination of OPs are of great significance. Here we constructed and used a high-throughput screening (HTS) system that was based on phenolics-responsive transcription activator for directed evolution of OP-degrading enzymes. In the screening system, phenolic compounds produced from substrates by OP-degrading enzymes bind a constitutively expressed transcription factor DmpR, initiating the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein located at the downstream of the DmpR promoter. Fluorescence intensities of host cells are proportional to the levels of phenolic compounds, enabling the screening of OP-degrading enzymes with high catalytic activities by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Methyl parathion hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. WBC-3 and p-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphate were used as a model enzyme and an analogue of G-type nerve agents, respectively. The utility of the screening system was demonstrated by generating a triple mutant with a 100-fold higher k(cat)/K(m) than the wild-type enzyme after three rounds of directed evolution. The contributions of individual mutations to the catalytic efficiency were elucidated by mutational and structural analyses. The DmpR-based screening system is expected to be widely used for developing OP-degrading enzymes with greater potential.

  15. ORD RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD is conducting research on bioremediation impacting Superfund sites, RCRA facilities, underground storage tanks and oil spills. Work supporting Superfund is focused on understanding monitored natural recovery in sediments for contaminants including PCBs and PAHs. Under RCRA,...

  16. ORD RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD is conducting research on bioremediation impacting Superfund sites, RCRA facilities, underground storage tanks and oil spills. Work supporting Superfund is focused on understanding monitored natural recovery in sediments for contaminants including PCBs and PAHs. Under RCRA,...

  17. Bioremediation of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, C.L.; Alvarez, M.A.; Hanners, J.L.; Ogden, K.L.; Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    Manufacture and use of high explosives has resulted in contamination of ground water and soils throughout the world. The use of biological methods for remediation of high explosives contamination has received considerable attention in recent years. Biodegradation is most easily studied using organisms in liquid cultures. Thus, the amount of explosive that can be degraded in liquid culture is quite small. However, these experiments are useful for gathering basic information about the biochemical pathways of biodegradation, identifying appropriate organisms and obtaining rates of degradation. The authors` laboratory has investigated all three major areas of explosives bioremediation: explosives in solution, explosives in soil, and the disposal of bulk explosives from demilitarization operations. They investigated the three explosives most commonly used in modern high explosive formulations: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX).

  18. Construction of an evaluation and selection system of emergency treatment technology based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method for phenol spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Lean; Li, Lian

    2017-05-01

    There is often a great deal of complexity, fuzziness and uncertainties of the chemical contingency spills. In order to obtain the optimum emergency disposal technology schemes as soon as the chemical pollution accident occurs, the technique evaluation system was developed based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method, and the feasibility of the proposed methods has been tested by using a emergency phenol spill accidence occurred in highway.

  19. Authentication of geographical origin and crop system of grape juices by phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity using chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Granato, Daniel; Koot, Alex; Schnitzler, Egon; van Ruth, Saskia M

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of this work was to propose an authentication model based on the phenolic composition and antioxidant and metal chelating capacities of purple grape juices produced in Brazil and Europe in order to assess their typicality. For this purpose, organic, conventional, and biodynamic grape juices produced in Brazil (n = 65) and in Europe (n = 31) were analyzed and different multivariate class-modeling and classification statistical techniques were employed to differentiate juices based on the geographical origin and crop system. Overall, Brazilian juices, regardless of the crop system adopted, presented higher contents of total phenolic compounds and flavonoids, total monomeric anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, flavonols, flavanols, cyanidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, and malvidin-3,5-glucoside. No differences were observed for trans-resveratrol, malvidin-3-glucoside, and pelargonidin-3-glucoside between countries and among crop systems. A total of 91% of Brazilian and 97% of European juices were adroitly classified using partial least squares discriminant analysis when the producing region was considered (92% efficiency), in which the free-radical scavenging activity toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, content of total phenolic compounds, gallic acid, and malvidin-3-glucoside were the variables responsible for the classification. Intraregional models based on soft independent modeling of class analogy were able to differentiate organic from conventional Brazilian juices as well as conventional and organic/biodynamic European juices. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Flow system for the automatic screening of the effect of phenolic compounds on the luminol-hydrogen peroxide-peroxidase chemiluminescence system.

    PubMed

    Araujo, André R T S; Maya, Fernando; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S; Lima, José L F C; Estela, José M; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an automated flow-based procedure for the screening of the effect of the different phenolic compounds on the chemiluminescence (CL) luminol-hydrogen peroxide-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) system is presented. This procedure involves the combination of multisyringe flow injection analysis (MFSIA) and sequential injection analysis (SIA) techniques and exploits the ability of the different subgroups of phenols, such as cholorophenols, nitrophenols, methylphenols and polyphenols, to enhance or inhibit the described CL system. The implementation of this reaction in the SIA-MSFIA system enabled favourable and precise conditions to evaluate the effect of phenolic compounds, as it involves an in-line reaction between the phenolic derivative, hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase and subsequent oxidized HRP intermediates generation prior to the fast reaction with the chemiluminogenic reagent. Several studies were then performed with the aim of establishing the appropriate flow system configuration and reaction conditions. It was shown that phenol and chlorophenols produce an enhanced CL response and nitrophenols, methylphenols and polyphenols are inhibitors within the range of concentrations studied (1-100 mg/L). Based on these studies, the developed method was applied to the determination of total polyphenol and phenol content in wine/grape seeds and water samples, respectively, and the results obtained showed good agreement with those furnished by the corresponding Folin-Ciocalteu and 4-aminoantipyrine reference methods. The developed approach is further pursued by designing an automated generic tool for performing studies of peroxidase-catalysed CL reactions of luminol focused on the detection of compounds that will affect the rate of those reactions.

  1. Enzymatic bioremediation of cashew nut shell liquid contamination.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Soly; Abraham, Emilia T

    2010-04-15

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a by-product of the cashew kernel industry, is a caustic, viscous, dark liquid. The process is done manually, which leaves stains on the hands of the workers. The aim was to find the utility of enzymes, oxidoreductases and proteases for the bioremediation of CNSL, which contains phenolics, mainly cardanol (60-65%). The results show that peroxidase reduced the color of the CNSL solution by polymerization and precipitation, where as laccase, papain and fungal and bacterial protease degraded the phenolic constituents. The degradation was mainly at the double bonds of the C15 hydrocarbon chain of the cardanol. To improve the enzyme stability, laccase and papain was separately immobilized in alginate-starch beads. Immobilized laccase can degrade 28.6% CNSL within 2 h, where as papain takes longer duration, and at 73 h, the adsorbed phenols on the alginate (45.86%) also got degraded. MALDI-TOF MS revealed that, immobilized laccase-papain beads combination; 1:1 (w/w) degraded 60% of the cardanol and some phenolic compounds having molecular mass of 374, 390 and 407. These beads are active and stable in aqueous media, can be used to prepare a mild, nontoxic, ecofriendly, cost effective hand wash solution for the removal of phenolic stains.

  2. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO2 systems.

    PubMed

    Massa, Paola; Ivorra, Fernando; Haure, Patricia; Fenoglio, Rosa

    2011-06-15

    Three 5% CuO/CeO(2) catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80°C, during 4h. Phenol conversion, H(2)O(2) consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H(2)O(2) conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H(2)O(2) was also tested.

  3. Effects of pH and inorganic salts on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous systems on activated decolorizing charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Halhouli, K.A.; Darwish, N.A.; Al-Dhoon, N.M.

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of pH and three inorganic salts (KCl, KI, and NaCl) on the adsorption isotherms of phenol (from a dilute aqueous solution) on activated charcoal was conducted. Each salt was studied at three different concentrations, i.e., 0.1, 0.01, and 0.005 M. The effect of pH (in the pH range 3 to 11) in the presence of KI, KCl, and NaCl was also investigated. The concentration of phenol in the aqueous systems studied ranged from 10 to 200 ppm. The temperature effect was also studied, and the resulting experimental equilibrium isotherms at 30, 40, and 55{degrees}C are well represented by Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich-Paterson isotherms. The relevant parameters for these isotherms are presented.

  4. PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN DISPERSED, COMPACTED AND INTACT SOIL SYSTEMS TO ENHANCE IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of effective in situ and on-site bioremediation technologies can facilitate the cleanup of chemically-contaminated soil sites. Knowledge of biodegradation kinetics and bioavailability of organic pollutants can facilitate decisions on the efficacy of in situ and o...

  5. PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN DISPERSED, COMPACTED AND INTACT SOIL SYSTEMS TO ENHANCE IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of effective in situ and on-site bioremediation technologies can facilitate the cleanup of chemically-contaminated soil sites. Knowledge of biodegradation kinetics and bioavailability of organic pollutants can facilitate decisions on the efficacy of in situ and o...

  6. Direct automatic determination of bitterness and total phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil using a pH-based flow-injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mesa, José A; Mateos, Raquel

    2007-05-16

    Flavor and taste are sensorial attributes of virgin olive oil (VOO) highly appreciated by consumers. Among the organoleptic properties of VOO, bitterness is related to the natural phenolic compounds present in the oil. Sensorial analysis is the official method to evaluate VOO flavor and bitterness, which requires highly specialized experts. Alternatively, methods based on physicochemical determinations could be useful for the industry. The present work presents a flow-injection analysis system for the direct automatic determination of bitterness and total phenolic compounds in VOO without prior isolation, based on the spectral shift undergone by phenolic compounds upon pH variation. This system enables a complete automation of the process, including dilution of the sample and its sequential injection into buffer solutions of acidic and alkaline pH. The variation of the absorbance at 274 nm showed a high correlation with bitterness and the total phenolic content of VOO, due to the close relationship between these two parameters. Thus, the proposed method determines the bitterness and phenolic compounds, with results similar to those from reference methods (relative errors ranging from 1% to 8% for bitterness and from 2% and 7% for phenolic compounds). The precision evaluated at two levels of both parameters ranged between 0.6% and 1.5% for bitterness and between 0.7% and 2.6% for phenolic compounds.

  7. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and degradation of phenol in synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge combined with TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijuan; Li, Jie; Quan, Xie; Wu, Yan; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Fangzheng

    2007-03-06

    In the present work, a synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge combined with TiO(2) photocatalysis has been developed to investigate the degradation rate of phenol solutions by varying experimental conditions of gas bubbling varieties (air, O(2), and Ar), solution pH values, and radical scavenger additives. The hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) concentration, which indicated the amount of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the reaction system under different conditions of gas bubbling varieties and scavenger species, was also reviewed. The obtained results revealed that degradation efficiency of phenol could be increased by the addition of TiO(2) in pulsed discharge system. The gas of Ar and O(2) bubbled into the reaction system was found to be favorable for phenol degradation and H(2)O(2) formation. Both in air bubbling and in O(2) bubbling reaction system, the higher degradation rate of phenol occurred in the case of acidic solution. The addition of sodium carbonate or n-butanol in the solution displayed a negative effect for phenol removal, while the H(2)O(2) concentration showed different changing trend by adding different radical scavengers. The most effective degradation of the three main intermediates of catechol, 1,4-hydroquinone, and 1,4-benzoquinone formed during phenol decomposition existed in the synergistic system of pulsed corona discharge and TiO(2) photocatalysis bubbled with O(2).

  8. In-situ bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Rosenberg, N.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A barrier to wider use of in situ bioremediation technology is that results are often variable and difficult to predict. In situ bioremediation has shown some very notable and well publicized successes, but implementation of the technology is complex. An incomplete understanding of the effects of variable site characteristics and the lack of adequate tools to predict and measure success have made the design, control and validation of bioremediation more empirical than desired. The long-term objective of this project is to improve computational tools used to assess and optimize the expected performance of bioremediation at a site. An important component of the approach is the explicit inclusion of uncertainties and their effect on the end result. The authors have extended their biokinetics model to include microbial competition and predation processes. Predator species can feed on the microbial species that degrade contaminants, and the simulation studies show that species interactions must be considered when designing in situ bioremediation systems. In particular, the results for TCE indicate that protozoan grazing could reduce the amount of biodegradation by about 20%. These studies also indicate that the behavior of barrier systems can become complex due to predator grazing.

  9. Impact of present and future regulations on bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Bakst, J S

    1991-07-01

    Innovative treatment technologies are in increasing demand to clean up the nation's existing environmental contamination. There also are mounting pressures for industry to minimize the production or generation of hazardous pollutants. Bioremediation is a viable, cost-effective treatment option for both field remediation and treatment in enclosed systems. The use of innovative treatment technologies is largely regulatory driven. Over the last two decades, at least a dozen Federal environmental statutes have been enacted and hundreds of regulations implemented to control releases of pollutants into the air, water and on land. These statutes not only have created markets for the use of treatment technologies, they also may regulate some aspect of the application of that technology. Regarding bioremediation, four statutes should be reviewed to determine if compliance is necessary before employing microorganisms in the field or in enclosed systems. This paper summarizes the Federal statutes (i.e., the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA); and the Federal Plant Pest Act (FPPA], and regulations that may impact the bioremediation industry; outlines potential markets for bioremediation that are being driven by regulations; and highlights, within the regulatory framework, promising applications for the bioremediation of hazardous wastes.

  10. Phenol degradation in heterogeneous system generating singlet oxygen employing light activated electropolymerized phenothiazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowar, Katarzyna; Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Bernas, Paulina; Zak, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Five selected amine-derivatives of phenothiazine were electropolymerized on an ITO/glass substrate and then used in the daylight-activated process to produce in situ singlet oxygen which degrades phenol in a solution. The phenothiazines were immobilized in a simple electrochemical procedure in an acidic solution which led to the formation of an ultrathin transparent polymeric film. All films obtained on the ITO substrate including azure A (AA), azure C (AC), methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TBO), and thionine (Th) had a comparable surface coverage at the level of picomoles/cm2. The activity of these materials was then compared and presented in terms of an efficiency of the phenol degradation process in an aqueous solution by photogenerated singlet oxygen. That efficiency was determined by the UV-vis spectroscopy employing a phenol/4-aminoantipyrine complex. All the phenothiazine ultrathin polymeric films were capable of generating the singlet oxygen in the aqueous solution under daylight activation, which was used in the consecutive process of phenol degradation. The highest efficiency at a level of 51.4% and 45.4% was found for the AC/ITO and MB/ITO layers, respectively.

  11. The degradation mechanism of phenol induced by ozone in wastes system.

    PubMed

    Youmin, Sun; Xiaohua, Ren; Zhaojie, Cui; Guiqin, Zhang

    2012-08-01

    A distinct understanding for the degradation mechanism of phenol induced by ozone is very essential because the ozonation process, one of the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), is attractive and popular in wastewater treatment. In the present work, the detailed reactions of ozone and phenol are investigated employing the density functional theory B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The profiles of the potential energy surface are constructed and the possible reaction pathways are indicated. These detailed calculation results suggest two degradation reaction mechanisms. One is phenolic H atom abstraction mechanism, and the other is cyclo-addition and ring-opening mechanism. Considering the effect of solvent water, the calculated energy barriers and reaction enthalpies for the reaction of O3 and phenol in water phase are both lower than those in gas phase, though the degradation mechanisms are not changed. This reveals that these degradation reactions are more favorable in the water solvent. The main reaction products are C(6)H(5)OO· radical, a crucial precursor for forming PCDD/Fs and one ring-opening product, which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Remediation of groundwater contaminated with the lead-phenol binary system by granular dead anaerobic sludge-permeable reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Ayad A H; Abd Ali, Ziad T

    2016-12-28

    Computer solutions (COMSOL) Multiphysics 3.5a software was used for simulating the one-dimensional equilibrium transport of the lead-phenol binary system including the sorption process through saturated sandy soil as the aquifer and granular dead anaerobic sludge (GDAS) as the permeable reactive barrier. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis proved that the carboxylic and alcohol groups are responsible for the bio-sorption of lead onto GDAS, while phosphines, aromatic and alkane are the functional groups responsible for the bio-sorption of phenol. Batch tests have been performed to characterize the equilibrium sorption properties of the GDAS and sandy soil in lead and/or phenol containing aqueous solutions. Numerical and experimental results proved that the barrier plays a potential role in the restriction of the contaminant plume migration and there is a linear relationship between longevity and thickness of the barrier. A good agreement between these results was recognized with root mean squared error not exceeding 0.04.

  13. Isolation of free phenolic compounds from arboreal leaves by use of the Florisil/C18 system.

    PubMed

    Jaroszyńska, Jadwiga

    2003-10-01

    In studies of the phenolic compounds present in leaves and needles, GC and GC-MS have so far been applied only sporadically. This is probably because of the greater difficulties encountered in preparing the samples for this method than those used for liquid chromatography. When preparing a sample for gas chromatography the analyst is faced with two difficult stages-separation of the compound from the matrix without losses (stage 1) so that the final sample can be derivatized to make it suitable for analysis on a non-polar capillary column of the gas chromatograph (stage 2). This paper presents a procedure for extraction of phenolic compounds from the matrix by means of a Florisil/C(18) sorbent system and their analysis by GC. After passage through the adsorbents the recovery ranges from 32% for ferulic acid to 88% for gentisic acid. It was found that this extraction method and the GC analysis are very precise (particularly for samples of a mass <1 g) and can be used for quantification. The high-precision quantification of 15 phenolic acids, shikimic acid, and six other compounds present in pine needles has been achieved. The conditions used for GC analysis and construction of calibration curves for quantitative determination are given.

  14. Determination of antioxidant activity of phenolic antioxidants in a Fenton-type reaction system by chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Yan, Guangtao; Li, Yuanzong; Chang, Wenbao

    2003-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical (*OH) has been implicated in various diseases, and it is therefore important to establish efficient methods to screen hydroxyl radical scavengers for antioxidant therapy. In this paper, a simple chemiluminescence assay was established to evaluate the *OH-scavenging capacity of phenolic compounds. This assay took advantage of the transient property of the Fenton reaction and the reaction between luminol and the hydroxyl radical, and effectively avoided the pro-oxidant action of some phenolic compounds. Fifteen phenolic compounds were assessed for their antioxidant activity in the Fenton reaction system, and even in the case of "pro-oxidants" that were excluded from the widely used deoxyribose (DR) assay. Since it overcomes the challenges that the traditional DR assay encounters, our method has promising applicative values: it is low-cost, time-saving, and reliable. It would also be more favorable than electron spin resonance (ESR) and radiolysis technology, which are known to be expensive and not commonly available to those specialized in free radical biology and medicine.

  15. Electronic Signatures of a Model Pollutant-Particle System: Chemisorbed Phenol on TiO2(110)

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Matthew C.; Thibodeaux, Chad A.; Kizilkaya, Orhan; Kurtz, Richard L.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Sprunger, Phillip T.

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are a class of composite organic/metal oxide pollutants that have recently been discovered to form from a wide variety of substituted benzenes chemisorbed to commonly encountered oxides. Although a qualitative understanding of EPFR formation on particulate metal oxides has been achieved, a detailed understanding of the charge transfer mechanism that must accompany the creation of an unpaired radical electron is lacking. In this study, we perform photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy on a well-defined model systemphenol chemisorbed on TiO2(110) – to directly observe changes in the electronic structure of the oxide and chemisorbed phenol as a function of adsorption temperature. We show strong evidence that, upon exposure at high temperature, empty states in the TiO2 are filled and the phenol HOMO is depopulated, as has been proposed in a conceptual model of EPFR formation. This experimental evidence of charge transfer provides a deeper understanding of the EPFR formation mechanism to guide future experimental and computational studies, as well as potential environmental remediation strategies. PMID:25774565

  16. Immobilizing tyrosinase within chitosan gels: A combination catalyst and sorbent for phenol removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei-Qiang; Payne, G.F.

    1995-12-01

    Phenols are common contaminants in chemical process effluents. To remove we developed a two step bioremediation approach in which an these contaminants, we developed a two step bioremediation approach in which an enzymatic reaction was coupled with absorption. In the first step, weakly adsorbable phenols are converted to reactive o-quinones by the enzyme tyrosinase. The quinones are then strongly adsorbed onto the surface of a chitosan sorbent in the second steel. Our results show that this two step approach can selectively and efficiently remove phenols from solution. To reduce this approach into practice, we immobilized the tyrosinase within a chitosan gel yielding a combined catalyst-sorbent film. Using this tyrosinase-containing chitosan gel, phenols (i.e. phenol, cresol and catechol) can be completely removed from solution.

  17. ESR spectra and kinetics of the disproportionation of substituted phenoxyl radicals. III. Cross-disproportionation in a system containing two phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Roginskii, V.A.; Krasheninnikova, G.A.

    1987-09-01

    An ESR method was used to study the kinetics of radical reactions in systems of an initiator with two phenolic antioxidants. A theoretical analysis yielded formulas for calculating the equilibrium constant of reversible phenol-phenoxyl exchange reactions and the rate constant for the cross-disproportionation of phenoxyl radicals. Equilibrium and cross-disproportionation constants were measured for five different binary systems. From the results it was concluded that a connection exists between the cross-disproportionation rate constant and the structure of the phenol (in this case steric factors are most important than the O-H bond strength in the phenol). It is shown that the cross-disproportionation of phenoxyl radicals may lead to the generation of a more active antioxidant, as in the case of ionol + a synthetic analog of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol, leading to synergistic effects.

  18. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  19. The development and application of engineered proteins for bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1995-09-26

    Clean up of the toxic legacy of the Cold War is projected to be the most expensive domestic project the nation has yet undertaken. Remediation of the Department of Energy and Department of Defense toxic waste sites alone are projected to cost {approximately}$1 trillion over a 20-30 year period. New, cost effective technologies are needed to attack this enormous problem. Los Alamos has put together a cross-divisional team of scientist to develop science based bioremediation technology to work toward this goal. In the team we have expertise in: (1) molecular, ecosystem and transport modeling; (2) genetic and protein engineering; (3) microbiology and microbial ecology; (4) structural biology; and (5) bioinorganic chemistry. This document summarizes talks at a workshop of different aspects of bioremediation technology including the following: Introducing novel function into a Heme enzyme: engineering by excavation; cytochrome P-450: ideal systems for bioremediation?; selection and development of bacterial strains for in situ remediation of cholorinated solvents; genetic analysis and preparation of toluene ortho-monooxygenase for field application in remediation of trichloroethylene; microbial ecology and diversity important to bioremediation; engineering haloalkane dehalogenase for bioremediation; enzymes for oxidative biodegradation; indigenous bacteria as hosts for engineered proteins; performance of indigenous bacterial, hosting engineered proteins in microbial communities.

  20. 7 CFR 3201.63 - Bioremediation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bioremediation materials. 3201.63 Section 3201.63... Designated Items § 3201.63 Bioremediation materials. (a) Definition. Dry or liquid solutions (including those... with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bioremediation materials....

  1. 7 CFR 3201.63 - Bioremediation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bioremediation materials. 3201.63 Section 3201.63... Designated Items § 3201.63 Bioremediation materials. (a) Definition. Dry or liquid solutions (including those... with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased bioremediation materials....

  2. Catabolism of Phenol and Its Derivatives in Bacteria: Genes, Their Regulation, and Use in the Biodegradation of Toxic Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Nešvera, Jan; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Phenol and its derivatives (alkylphenols, halogenated phenols, nitrophenols) are natural or man-made aromatic compounds that are ubiquitous in nature and in human-polluted environments. Many of these substances are toxic and/or suspected of mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Bioremediation of the polluted soil and water using various bacteria has proved to be a promising option for the removal of these compounds. In this review, we describe a number of peripheral pathways of aerobic and anaerobic catabolism of various natural and xenobiotic phenolic compounds, which funnel these substances into a smaller number of central catabolic pathways. Finally, the metabolites are used as carbon and energy sources in the citric acid cycle. We provide here the characteristics of the enzymes that convert the phenolic compounds and their catabolites, show their genes, and describe regulatory features. The genes, which encode these enzymes, are organized on chromosomes and plasmids of the natural bacterial degraders in various patterns. The accumulated data on similarities and the differences of the genes, their varied organization, and particularly, an astonishingly broad range of intricate regulatory mechanism may be read as an exciting adventurous book on divergent evolutionary processes and horizontal gene transfer events inscribed in the bacterial genomes. In the end, the use of this wealth of bacterial biodegradation potential and the manipulation of its genetic basis for purposes of bioremediation is exemplified. It is envisioned that the integrated high-throughput techniques and genome-level approaches will enable us to manipulate systems rather than separated genes, which will give birth to systems biotechnology.

  3. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-10-01

    From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Moreover, the world`s rivers, estuaries, and oceans are threatened by contamination from petroleum leaks and spills. Fortunately, most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past two decades in applying in situ bioremediation to a variety of contaminants in all media. Good progress is being made in terms of developing innovative, cost-effective in situ approaches to bioremediation. This volume provides a comprehensive guide to the latest technological breakthroughs in both the laboratory and the field, covering such topics as air sparging, cometabolic biodegradation, treatment of MTBE, real-time control systems, nutrient addition, rapid biosensor analysis, multiphase extraction, and accelerated bioremediation.

  4. CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL SUPERFUND SITE, LIBBY MONTANA FIELD PERFORMANCE EVALUATION BIOREMEDIATION UNIT: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF THE UPPER AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field performance evaluation of the in-situ bioremediation system at Libby, Montana Superfund Site indicated that treatment appears to have occurred in the water phase under the influence of the treatment injection system. Reduced inorganic compounds may have exerted a deman...

  5. CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL SUPERFUND SITE, LIBBY MONTANA FIELD PERFORMANCE EVALUATION BIOREMEDIATION UNIT: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF THE UPPER AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field performance evaluation of the in-situ bioremediation system at Libby, Montana Superfund Site indicated that treatment appears to have occurred in the water phase under the influence of the treatment injection system. Reduced inorganic compounds may have exerted a deman...

  6. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, K.W.

    1989-02-21

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, phenol in water'' (approximately 10% phenol), and water in phenol'' (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage processes are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination. 8 figs.

  7. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, "phenol in water" (approximately 10% phenol), and "water in phenol" (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage procresses are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination.

  8. Substrate-dependent expression of laccase in genetically modified Escherichia coli: design and construction of an inducible phenol-degrading system.

    PubMed

    Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Salmanian, Ali-Hatef; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Khajeh, Khosro

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds that are produced by variety of industrial and urban activities pose dangers to live organisms and the environment. Here, an inducible phenol-degrading system was designed and constructed in Escherichia coli as the host. CapR as a transcription activator in Pseudomonas species shows sensitivity towards most common phenolic pollutants. Upon presence of inducible pollutants and conformational changes of CapR, an inducible promoter will trigger the expression of a bacterial laccase gene, which had been isolated previously from a local Bacillus species. Laccase as a multicopper oxidase has the ability to oxidize wide variety of mono and polyphenols. The sensitivity of the inducible system was verified in the presence of phenol with the concentration range of 1 nM-10 mM. A linear correlation was observed between laccase expression and phenol concentration up to 1 mM. Laccase was expressed even in the lowest concentration of phenol (1 nM) after 2 hr of exposure. 2,2-Azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a mediator of laccase oxidative reactions could induce laccase expression through conformational changes of CapR. Recognition of ABTS by CapR not only results in expression of the remediating enzyme but also extends its substrate range to nonphenolic compounds.

  9. Quinoline-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 isolated from coking activated sludge is capable of the simultaneous removal of phenol in a dual substrate system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panhong; Jia, Rong; Zhang, Yuxiu; Shi, Peili; Chai, Tuanyao

    2016-11-09

    Quinoline is a refractory organic compound in the treatment of coking wastewater. The isolation of high efficiency quinoline-degrading bacteria from activated sludge and the evaluation of their degradation characteristics in the presence of phenol or in the actual coking wastewater are important for the improvement of effluent quality. The novel bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 was isolated from a quinoline enrichment culture obtained from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The optimum temperature and initial pH for quinoline degradation were 33-38°C and 8-9, respectively. KDQ4 completely degraded 400 mg/L of quinoline within 24 h and 800 mg/L of phenol within 30 h. In the dual-substrate system, the removal efficiencies of quinoline and phenol at the same initial concentration (200 mg/L) by KDQ4 were 89% and 100% within 24 h, respectively, indicating that KDQ4 could simultaneously and quickly degrade quinoline and phenol in a coexistence system. Moreover, KDQ4 was able to adapt to actual coking wastewater containing high quinoline and phenol concentrations and rapidly remove them. KDQ4 also exhibited heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification potential under aerobic conditions. These results suggested a potential bioaugmentation role for KDQ4 in the removal of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds and phenolics from coking wastewater.

  10. Fungal Laccases and Their Applications in Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Buddolla; Rajesh, Bandi; Janardhan, Avilala; Kumar, Arthala Praveen; Narasimha, Golla

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are blue multicopper oxidases, which catalyze the monoelectronic oxidation of a broad spectrum of substrates, for example, ortho- and para-diphenols, polyphenols, aminophenols, and aromatic or aliphatic amines, coupled with a full, four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Hence, they are capable of degrading lignin and are present abundantly in many white-rot fungi. Laccases decolorize and detoxify the industrial effluents and help in wastewater treatment. They act on both phenolic and nonphenolic lignin-related compounds as well as highly recalcitrant environmental pollutants, and they can be effectively used in paper and pulp industries, textile industries, xenobiotic degradation, and bioremediation and act as biosensors. Recently, laccase has been applied to nanobiotechnology, which is an increasing research field, and catalyzes electron transfer reactions without additional cofactors. Several techniques have been developed for the immobilization of biomolecule such as micropatterning, self-assembled monolayer, and layer-by-layer techniques, which immobilize laccase and preserve their enzymatic activity. In this review, we describe the fungal source of laccases and their application in environment protection. PMID:24959348

  11. Preferential solubilization behaviours and stability of some phenolic-bearing essential oils formulated in different microemulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Edris, A E; Malone, C F R

    2012-10-01

    The solubilization behaviour of a number of essential oils (EOs) containing volatile phenolic constituents was investigated in five different micellar solutions. These oils include clove bud (Eugenia caryophyllata), thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and oregano (Thymus capitatus). Ternary and pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed to assess the ability for microemulsion formation and dilutability of each system using non-ionic surfactants. Results showed that Tween 20 (T20) was more suitable to solubilize these oils compared with Tween 80 (T80). Clove EO was found to be easily microemulsifiable compared with the other EOs, whereas oregano showed the least tendency to form a microemulsion. Particle sizes measured at different dilution lines ranged between 5.9 and 16.9 nm. The chemical composition of each EO was revealed by gas chromatography and was correlated with the observed solubilization behaviour. The presence of solubilization enhancers like poly-ols and short-chain alcohols improved solubilization of all EOs; however, establishment of new dilution lines was controlled by EO type. Physical stability assessment showed that all microemulsions were stable against alternate freeze/thaw cycles which extended for 1 week. On the contrary, each system showed different temperature sensitivity in the thermal stress assessment. The results of this investigation can be useful in fabrication of thermodynamically stable aqueous system carrying aromatic and bioactive phenolics for different applications in personal hygiene, cosmetic, fragrance and pharmaceutical products.

  12. Removal of COD, phenols and ammonium from Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using A2O-MBR system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixing; Xu, Xiaochen; Gong, Zheng; Yang, Fenglin

    2012-10-15

    As a typical industrial wastewater, coal gasification wastewater has poor biodegradability and high toxicity. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-anoxic-oxic membrane reactor (A(2)O-MBR) system was developed to investigate the treatment ability of coal gasification wastewater. The removal capacity of each pollutants used in this system were determined at different hydraulic residence times (HRT) and mixed liquor recycle ratios (R). The experimental results showed that this system could effectively deal with COD and phenol removal and remain in a stable level when the operational parameters altered, while the nitrification was sensitive to operational conditions. The best performance was obtained at HRT of 48 h and R of 3. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, NH(4)(+)-N and phenols were 97.4%, 92.8% and 99.7%, with final concentrations in the effluent of 71 mg/L, 9.6 mg/L and 3 mg/L, respectively. Organics degradation and transformation were analyzed by GC/MS and it was found that anaerobic process played an important role in degradation of refractory compounds. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. In situ bioremediation in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, A.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

  14. ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED ETHENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The failure of what have been termed convential methods to reclaim contaminated environmental media has over the years lead to the interest and development of alternative technologies. One of these technologies is bioremediation, or the utilization of microbial agents to reduce ...

  15. [Development of bioremediation in China--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhipei; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2015-06-01

    The development of bioremediation for contaminated soil in China during past 30 years was briefly reviewed, mainly including the developing stages, bioremediation techniques/strategies and their applications, and isolation, screening and characterizations of microbial strains for bioremediation as well as their efficiencies in bioremediation of contaminated soils. Finally, future development of bioremediation techniques/strategies and their applications were also discussed.

  16. Improvement of simultaneous Cr(VI) and phenol removal by an immobilised bacterial consortium and characterisation of biodegradation products.

    PubMed

    Ontañon, Ornella M; González, Paola S; Barros, Germán G; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2017-07-25

    Microbial bioremediation emerged some decades ago as an eco-friendly technology to restore polluted sites. Traditionally, the search for microorganisms suitable for bioremediation has been based on the selection of isolated strains able to remove a specific type of pollutant. However, this strategy has now become obsolete, since co-pollution is a global reality. Thus, current studies attempt to find bacterial cultures capable of coping with a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds. In this sense, the bacterial consortium SFC 500-1 has demonstrated efficiency for Cr(VI) and phenol removal, both of which are found in many industrial wastewaters. In the present study, the ability of SFC 500-1 for simultaneous removal was improved through its entrapment in a Ca-alginate matrix. This strategy led to an increased removal of Cr(VI), which was partially reduced to Cr(III). Immobilised cells were able to tolerate and degrade phenol up to 1,500mg/l at high rates, forming catechol and cis,cis-muconate as oxidation intermediates. Successful removal potential through 5 cycles of reuse, as well as after long-term storage, was another important advantage of the immobilised consortium. These characteristics make SFC 500-1 an interesting system for potential application in the biotreatment of co-polluted effluents.

  17. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils, Comprehensive Report

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.

    2001-01-12

    The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice, Poland have been cooperating in the development and implementation of innovative environmental remediation technologies since 1995. U.S. experts worked in tandem with counterparts from the IETU and CZOR throughout this project to characterize, assess and subsequently, design, implement and monitor a bioremediation system.

  18. UTILIZATION OF TREATABILITY AND PILOT TESTS TO PREDICT CAH BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple tools have been suggested to help in the design of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation systems for CAHs:
    - Extensive high quality microcosm testing followed by small-scale, thoroughly observed field pilot tests (i.e., RABITT Protocol, Morse 1998)
    - More limited ...

  19. Chlorinated phenol treatment and in situ hydrogen peroxide production in a sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Miran, Waheed; Nawaz, Mohsin; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2017-04-05

    Wastewaters are increasingly being considered as renewable resources for the sustainable production of electricity, fuels, and chemicals. In recent years, bioelectrochemical treatment has come to light as a prospective technology for the production of energy from wastewaters. In this study, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) enriched with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the anodic chamber was proposed and evaluated for the biodegradation of recalcitrant chlorinated phenol, electricity generation (in the microbial fuel cell (MFC)), and production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (in the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)), which is a very strong oxidizing agent and often used for the degradation of complex organics. Maximum power generation of 253.5 mW/m(2), corresponding to a current density of 712.0 mA/m(2), was achieved in the presence of a chlorinated phenol pollutant (4-chlorophenol (4-CP) at 100 mg/L (0.78 mM)) and lactate (COD of 500 mg/L). In the anodic chamber, biodegradation of 4-CP was not limited to dechlorination, and further degradation of one of its metabolic products (phenol) was observed. In MEC operation mode, external voltage (0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 V) was added via a power supply, with 0.4 V producing the highest concentration of H2O2 (13.3 g/L-m(2) or 974 μM) in the cathodic chamber after 6 h of operation. Consequently, SRB-based bioelectrochemical technology can be applied for chlorinated pollutant biodegradation in the anodic chamber and either net current or H2O2 production in the cathodic chamber by applying an optimum external voltage.

  20. Genome-resolved metagenomics of a bioremediation system for degradation of thiocyanate in mine water containing suspended solid tailings.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sumayah F; Kantor, Rose S; Huddy, Robert; Thomas, Brian C; van Zyl, Andries W; Harrison, Susan T L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2017-06-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN(-) ) is a toxic compound that forms when cyanide (CN(-) ), used to recover gold, reacts with sulfur species. SCN(-) -degrading microbial communities have been studied, using bioreactors fed synthetic wastewater. The inclusion of suspended solids in the form of mineral tailings, during the development of the acclimatized microbial consortium, led to the selection of an active planktonic microbial community. Preliminary analysis of the community composition revealed reduced microbial diversity relative to the laboratory-based reactors operated without suspended solids. Despite minor upsets during the acclimation period, the SCN(-) degradation performance was largely unchanged under stable operating conditions. Here, we characterized the microbial community in the SCN(-) degrading bioreactor that included solid particulate tailings and determined how it differed from the biofilm-based communities in solids-free reactor systems inoculated from the same source. Genome-based analysis revealed that the presence of solids decreased microbial diversity, selected for different strains, suppressed growth of thiobacilli inferred to be primarily responsible for SCN(-) degradation, and promoted growth of Trupera, an organism not detected in the reactors without solids. In the solids reactor community, heterotrophy and aerobic respiration represent the dominant metabolisms. Many organisms have genes for denitrification and sulfur oxidation, but only one Thiobacillus sp. in the solids reactor has SCN(-) degradation genes. The presence of the solids prevented floc and biofilm formation, leading to the observed reduced microbial diversity. Collectively the presence of the solids and lack of biofilm community may result in a process with reduced resilience to process perturbations, including fluctuations in the influent composition and pH. The results from this investigation have provided novel insights into the community composition of this industrially relevant

  1. Carbohydrate modified phenol-formaldehyde resins

    Treesearch

    Anthony H. Conner; Linda F. Lorenz

    1986-01-01

    For adhesive self-sufficiency, the wood industry needs new adhesive systems in which all or part of the petroleum-derived phenolic component is replaced by a renewable material without sacrificing high durability or ease of bonding. We tested the bonding of wood veneers, using phenolic resins in which part of the phenol-formaldehyde was replaced with carbohydrates. Our...

  2. Optimal binary solvent extraction system for phenolic antioxidants from mengkudu (Morinda citrifolia) fruit.

    PubMed

    Thoo, Yin Yin; Ho, Swee Kheng; Abas, Faridah; Lai, Oi Ming; Ho, Chun Wai; Tan, Chin Ping

    2013-06-14

    Antioxidants have been widely used in the food industry to enhance product quality by preventing oxidation of susceptible substances. This work was carried out to maximise the recovery of total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical-scavenging capacity and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity from Morinda citrifolia fruit via modification of the ethanol concentration, extraction time and extraction temperature at minimal processing cost. The optimised conditions yielded values of 881.57 ± 17.74 mg GAE/100 g DW for TPC, 552.53 ± 34.16 mg CE/100 g DW for TFC, 799.20 ± 2.97 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for ABTS and 2,317.01 ± 18.13 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for DPPH were 75% ethanol, 40 min of time and 57 °C. The four responses did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from predicted values, indicating that models obtained are suitable to the optimisation of extraction conditions for phenolics from M. citrifolia. The relative amounts of flavonoids were 0.784 ± 0.01 mg quercetin/g of extract and 1.021 ± 0.04 mg rutin/g of extract. On the basis of the results obtained, M. citrifolia extract can be used as a valuable bioactive source of natural antioxidants.

  3. Assessing a bioremediation strategy in a shallow coastal system affected by a fish farm culture--application of GIS and shellfish dynamic models in the Rio San Pedro, SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Silva, C; Yáñez, E; Martín-Díaz, M L; DelValls, T A

    2012-04-01

    An integrated multi-trophic aquaculture assessment for Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) aquaculture as a bioremediation strategy in areas impacted by fish farm effluents in Rio San Pedro was assessed by combining geographic information system with carrying capacity models. Sites of 0.44 km(2) were evaluated considering constraints; physical factors, growth and survival factors, environmental quality factors, water and sediment quality criteria, factor suitability ranges, and Multi-Criteria Evaluation. Isleta and Flamenco are promising sites for oyster production, and Dorada is of marginal interest. Carbon and nitrogen removal from the water by algae and through detritus filtration was estimated. The biodeposition of organic material from longline leases was found to have little negative impact on sediment. The eutrophication results indicate that phytoplankton removal had a positive impact on water quality at the Dorada. This case study quantified the direct profitability and bioremediative environmental service advantages that fish-shellfish farms can have relative to fish monocultures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Manufacturing of bioreactive nanofibers for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ho-Wang; Mutlu, Baris R; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aksan, Alptekin

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were successfully encapsulated in reactive membranes comprised of electrospun nanofibers that have biocompatible polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based cores entrapping the E. coli and silica-based, mechanically sturdy porous shells. The reactive membranes were produced in a continuous fashion using a coaxial electrospinning system coupled to a microfluidic timer that mixed and regulated the reaction time of the silica precursor and the PVA solution streams. A factorial design method was employed to investigate the effects of the three critical design parameters of the system (the flow rate of the core solution, protrusion of the core needle, and the viscosity of the core solution) and to optimize these parameters for reproducibly and continuously producing high-quality core/shell nanofibers. The feasibility of using the reactive membranes manufactured in this fashion for bioremediation of atrazine, a herbicide, was also investigated. The atrazine degradation rate (0.24 µmol/g of E. coli/min) of the encapsulated E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme AtzA was measured to be relatively close to that measured with the free cells in solution (0.64 µmol/g of E. coli/min). We show here that the low cost, high flexibility, water insolubility, and high degradation efficiency of the bioreactive membranes manufactured with electrospinning makes it feasible for their wide-spread use in industrial scale bioremediation of contaminated waters.

  5. C3N4-H5PMo10V2O40: a dual-catalysis system for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol

    PubMed Central

    Long, Zhouyang; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Guojian; Ge, Weilin; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxylation of benzene is a widely studied atom economical and environmental benign reaction for producing phenol, aiming to replace the existing three-step cumene process. Aerobic oxidation of benzene with O2 is an ideal and dream process, but benzene and O2 are so inert that current systems either require expensive noble metal catalysts or wasteful sacrificial reducing agents; otherwise, phenol yields are extremely low. Here we report a dual-catalysis non-noble metal system by simultaneously using graphitic carbon nitride (C3N4) and Keggin-type polyoxometalate H5PMo10V2O40 (PMoV2) as catalysts, showing an exceptional activity for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol. The dual-catalysis mechanism results in an unusual route to create phenol, in which benzene is activated on the melem unit of C3N4 and O2 by the V-O-V structure of PMoV2. This system is simple, highly efficient and thus may lead the one-step production of phenol from benzene to a more practical pathway. PMID:24413448

  6. C3N4-H5PMo10V2O40: a dual-catalysis system for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zhouyang; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Guojian; Ge, Weilin; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxylation of benzene is a widely studied atom economical and environmental benign reaction for producing phenol, aiming to replace the existing three-step cumene process. Aerobic oxidation of benzene with O2 is an ideal and dream process, but benzene and O2 are so inert that current systems either require expensive noble metal catalysts or wasteful sacrificial reducing agents; otherwise, phenol yields are extremely low. Here we report a dual-catalysis non-noble metal system by simultaneously using graphitic carbon nitride (C3N4) and Keggin-type polyoxometalate H5PMo10V2O40 (PMoV2) as catalysts, showing an exceptional activity for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol. The dual-catalysis mechanism results in an unusual route to create phenol, in which benzene is activated on the melem unit of C3N4 and O2 by the V-O-V structure of PMoV2. This system is simple, highly efficient and thus may lead the one-step production of phenol from benzene to a more practical pathway.

  7. C3N4-H5PMo10V2O40: a dual-catalysis system for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhouyang; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Guojian; Ge, Weilin; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-13

    Hydroxylation of benzene is a widely studied atom economical and environmental benign reaction for producing phenol, aiming to replace the existing three-step cumene process. Aerobic oxidation of benzene with O2 is an ideal and dream process, but benzene and O2 are so inert that current systems either require expensive noble metal catalysts or wasteful sacrificial reducing agents; otherwise, phenol yields are extremely low. Here we report a dual-catalysis non-noble metal system by simultaneously using graphitic carbon nitride (C(3)N(4)) and Keggin-type polyoxometalate H(5)PMo(10)V(2)O(40) (PMoV(2)) as catalysts, showing an exceptional activity for reductant-free aerobic oxidation of benzene to phenol. The dual-catalysis mechanism results in an unusual route to create phenol, in which benzene is activated on the melem unit of C(3)N(4) and O2 by the V-O-V structure of PMoV(2). This system is simple, highly efficient and thus may lead the one-step production of phenol from benzene to a more practical pathway.

  8. Bioremediation of nitrated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, D.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.; Jass, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the manufacture of nitrated aromatic and heterocyclic compounds intermediates are produced as well as the final products, e.g. TNT (trinitrotoluene), and RDX (cyclotri-methylene trinitramine). The red water produced is a dilute effluent containing TNT and other nitrated intermediates. Many of the intermediates are also to be found in contaminated land areas as well as the primary manufacturing products as contaminants in ground adjacent to production and storage areas. Two intermediates included as by-products are p-nitrophenol and resorcinol; both are hydroxylated aromatics and one (the former) is also nitrated. If these rings can be hydroxylated and oxidized by pure or mixed microbial cultures then the notion of using microbes for the detoxification of a wide range of nitrated aromatics and heterocyclics is possible. It is proposed in the study to accelerate this degradative process in the first instance for p-nitrophenol and resorcinol, and secondly for TNT and RDX. The use of microbes to degrade nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzenes, and mono-nitro phenols, have been described. In order to determine how aromatic degrading bacteria can also degrade substituted and nitrated aromatics several pure and mixed cultures have been utilized to demonstrate enzyme adaptation.

  9. Influence of distillation system, oak wood type, and aging time on composition of cider brandy in phenolic and furanic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Blanco Gomis, Domingo; Mangas Alonso, Juan J

    2003-12-31

    A control of phenolic and furanic compounds in cider brandy was carried out during maturation in oak casks, studying three technological factors: distillation (rectification column vs double distillation), oak wood type (French vs American), and aging time (32 months). Gallic acid and benzoic and cinnamic aldehydes significantly increased during maturation of cider brandies, the highest level of these phenolics being obtained when aging was conducted in French oak casks. Benzoic acids increased during aging, though furanic compounds were not influenced by the time factor. Distillation and wood factors significantly influenced furanic concentration; 5-hydroxymethylfurfural not was detected in fresh spirits and was extracted in the highest proportion in French oak. Volatile furanics, such as 5-methylfurfural, furfural, and 2-furylmethyl ketone, were influenced by the distillation factor, with the use of the double distillation system producing a higher level of these compounds. Scopoletin was the majority coumarin detected in cider brandies, the highest yield of which was obtained with the use of American oak.

  10. An anoxic-aerobic system for simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonia in a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qifeng; Singh, Vijay P; Fu, Zhimin; Wang, Jing; Hu, La

    2017-04-01

    A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated to treat artificial pretreated coal gasification wastewater that was mainly contained of ammonia and phenol. The efficiency of SBR fed with increasing phenol concentrations (from 150 to 300 mg l(-1)) and the relationship among phenol, nitrogen removal, and the microbial community structure were evaluated. When the phenol feeding concentration was increased to about 300 mg l(-1), the removal efficiency was above 99.0%, demonstrating the robustness of phenol removal capacity. The study showed that most phenol was degraded in anoxic stage. The average removal efficiencies of ammonia and total nitrogen were 98.4 and 81.9%, respectively, with average NH4(+)-N concentration of 107.5 mg l(-1) and COD/N 7.5. Low temperature caused sludge loss that led to the decreased performance. Increasing the temperature could not recover the performance effectively. The data from bacterial analysis revealed that Delftia, Hydrogenophaga, and unclassified Xanthomonadaceae played a significant role in phenol degradation before the temperature increase, while uncultured Syntrophococcus sp. and unclassified Rhodocyclaceae were responsible for phenol degradation after the temperature increase. These results imply that the SBR holds potential for the simultaneous removal of phenolic compounds and nitrogen through aerobic ammonia oxidation and anoxic denitrification with phenol as the co-organic carbon source.

  11. Vetiver plantlets in aerated system degrade phenol in illegally dumped industrial wastewater by phytochemical and rhizomicrobial degradation.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Teeratitayangkul, Pimpawat; Prasertsung, Isarawut; Parichatprecha, Rattapoohm; Jitsangiam, Peerapong; Chomchalow, Narong; Wichai, Siriwan

    2017-05-01

    This research evaluated the feasibility of using vetiver plantlets (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) on a floating platform with aeration to degrade phenol (500 mg/L) in illegally dumped industrial wastewater (IDIWW). The IDIWW sample was from the most infamous illegal dumping site at Nong Nae subdistrict, Phanom Sarakham district, Chachoengsao province, Thailand. Laboratory results suggested that phenol degradation by vetiver involves two phases: Phase I, phytopolymerization and phyto-oxidation assisted by root-produced peroxide (H2O2) and peroxidase (POD), followed by phase II, a combination of phase I with enhanced rhizomicrobial degradation. The first 360-400 h of phenol degradation were dominated by phytopolymerization and phyto-oxidation yielding particulate polyphenols (PPP) or particulate organic matter (POM) as by-products, while phenol decreased to around 145 mg/L. In Phase II, synergistically, rhizomicrobial growth was ∼100-folds greater on the roots of the vetiver plantlets than in the IDIWW and participated in the microbial degradation of phenol at this lower phenol concentration, increasing the phenol degradation rate by more than three folds. This combination of phytochemical and rhizomicrobiological processes eliminated phenol in IDIWW in less than 766 h (32 days), while without the vetiver plantlets, phenol degradation by aerated microbial degradation alone may require 235 days. To our knowledge, this is the first that systematically reveals the complete phenol degradation mechanism by vetiver plantlets in real aerated wastewater.

  12. Biodegradation of phenolic compounds and their metabolites in contaminated groundwater using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hedbavna, Petra; Rolfe, Stephen A; Huang, Wei E; Thornton, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study demonstrating the biodegradation of phenolic compounds and their organic metabolites in contaminated groundwater using bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). The phenols were biodegraded anaerobically via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, which were retained by electromigration in the anode chamber. Oxygen, nitrate, iron(III), sulfate and the electrode were electron acceptors for biodegradation. Electro-active bacteria attached to the anode, producing electricity (~1.8mW/m(2)), while utilizing acetate as an electron donor. Electricity generation started concurrently with iron reduction; the anode was an electron acceptor as thermodynamically favorable as iron(III). Acetate removal was enhanced by 40% in the presence of the anode. However, enhanced removal of phenols occurred only for a short time. Field-scale application of BESs for in situ bioremediation requires an understanding of the regulation and kinetics of biodegradation pathways of the parent compounds to relevant metabolites, and the syntrophic interactions and carbon flow in the microbial community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Degradation of phenol and m-toluate in Pseudomonas sp. strain EST1001 and its Pseudomonas putida transconjugants is determined by a multiplasmid system.

    PubMed Central

    Kivisaar, M A; Habicht, J K; Heinaru, A L

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of phenol, m-toluate, and salicylate (Phe+, mTol+, and Sal+ characters, respectively) in Pseudomonas sp. strain EST1001 is determined by the coordinated expression of genes placed in different plasmids, i.e., by a multiplasmid system. The natural multiplasmid strain EST1001 is phenotypically unstable. In its Phe-, mTol-, and Sal- segregants, the plasmid DNA underwent structural rearrangements without a marked loss of plasmid DNA, and the majority of segregants gave revertants. The genes specifying the degradation of phenol and m-toluate were transferable to P. putida PaW340, and in this strain a new multiplasmid system with definite structural changes was formed. The 17-kilobase transposable element, a part of the TOL plasmid pWWO present in the chromosome of PaW340, was inserted into the plasmid DNA in transconjugants. In addition, transconjugant EST1020 shared pWWO-like structures. Enzyme assays demonstrated that ortho-fission reactions were used by bacteria that grew on phenol, whereas m-toluate was catabolized by a meta-fission reaction. Salicylate was a functional inducer of the enzymes of both pathways. The expression of silent metabolic pathways of phenol or m-toluate degradation has been observed in EST1001 Phe- mTol+ and Phe+ mTol- transconjugants. The switchover of phenol degradation from the ortho- to the meta-pathway in EST1033 also showed the flexibility of genetic material in EST1001 transconjugants. Images PMID:2768199

  14. Evaluation of the isoflavone and total phenolic contents of kefir-fermented soymilk storage and after the in vitro digestive system simulation.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fernandes, Meg; Sanches Lima, Fernando; Rodrigues, Daniele; Handa, Cintia; Guelfi, Marcela; Garcia, Sandra; Ida, Elza Iouko

    2017-08-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the isoflavone and total phenolic contents in kefir-fermented soymilk storage and after the in vitro digestive system simulation (DSS). Soymilk was fermented with kefir culture (0.02UC/L) at 25°C for 15h and stored at 4°C for 4days. After the fermentation and storage, the isoflavone and total phenolic contents were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometry, respectively. The cell viability of lactic acid bacteria and yeast was evaluated. Fermentation promoted an increase of approximately 3log CFU/g cycles of the microorganisms and the storage process did not alter the aglycone isoflavones and total phenolic contents. The content of aglycone isoflavones increased 2-fold, and the total phenolic content increased 9-fold. Therefore, kefir-fermented soymilk is a good source of aglycone isoflavones and phenolics, since the content of these substances was increased significantly after the in vitro digestive system simulation of the product.

  15. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation

    DOE PAGES

    Techtmann, Stephen M.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples ofmore » the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.« less

  16. Systems Biology Approach to Bioremediation of Nitroaromatics: Constraint-Based Analysis of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransformation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Iman, Maryam; Sobati, Tabassom; Panahi, Yunes; Mobasheri, Meysam

    2017-08-14

    Microbial remediation of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) is a promising environmentally friendly and cost-effective approach to the removal of these life-threating agents. Escherichia coli (E. coli) has shown remarkable capability for the biotransformation of 2,4,6-trinitro-toluene (TNT). Efforts to develop E. coli as an efficient TNT degrading biocatalyst will benefit from holistic flux-level description of interactions between multiple TNT transforming pathways operating in the strain. To gain such an insight, we extended the genome-scale constraint-based model of E. coli to account for a curated version of major TNT transformation pathways known or evidently hypothesized to be active in E. coli in present of TNT. Using constraint-based analysis (CBA) methods, we then performed several series of in silico experiments to elucidate the contribution of these pathways individually or in combination to the E. coli TNT transformation capacity. Results of our analyses were validated by replicating several experimentally observed TNT degradation phenotypes in E. coli cultures. We further used the extended model to explore the influence of process parameters, including aeration regime, TNT concentration, cell density, and carbon source on TNT degradation efficiency. We also conducted an in silico metabolic engineering study to design a series of E. coli mutants capable of degrading TNT at higher yield compared with the wild-type strain. Our study, therefore, extends the application of CBA to bioremediation of nitroaromatics and demonstrates the usefulness of this approach to inform bioremediation research.

  17. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  18. Introduction to In Situ Bioremediation of Groundwater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bioremediation is an engineered technology that modifies environmental conditions (physical, chemical, biochemical, or microbiological) to encourage microorganisms to destroy or detoxify organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  19. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Maphosa, Farai; Lieten, Shakti H.; Dinkla, Inez; Stams, Alfons J.; Smidt, Hauke; Fennell, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respiring bacteria and also via hydrolytic, oxygenic, and reductive mechanisms by aerobic bacteria. Microbial ecogenomics has enabled us to not only study the microbiology involved in these complex processes but also develop tools to better monitor and assess these sites during bioremediation. Microbial ecogenomics have capitalized on recent advances in high-throughput and -output genomics technologies in combination with microbial physiology studies to address these complex bioremediation problems at a system level. Advances in environmental metagenomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have provided insights into key genes and their regulation in the environment. They have also given us clues into microbial community structures, dynamics, and functions at contaminated sites. These techniques have not only aided us in understanding the lifestyles of common organohalide respirers, for example Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter, and Desulfitobacterium, but also provided insights into novel and yet uncultured microorganisms found in organohalide respiring consortia. In this paper, we look at how ecogenomic studies have aided us to understand the microbial structures and functions in response to environmental stimuli such as the presence of chlorinated pollutants. PMID:23060869

  20. Air sparging for in situ bioremediation of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Leonard, W.C.; Leahy, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater contamination was discovered at a manufacturing site in New York State. The contamination was due to the use of a burn pit to dispose of waste solvents, primarily toluene and a mixture of chlorinated ethenes. These solvents were partiality absorbed into a sandy fill. Over a period of time, these adsorbed solvents leached into the groundwater and eventually impacted a local wetlands. Of longer term environmental concern was the existence of a municipal water well approximately 1,200 ft downgradient of the site. Air sparging was chosen as the remedial method to address the soil and groundwater contamination on site. Air sparging was chosen as a direct volatilization method and as an oxygen source for bioremediation. This case history illustrates the efficacy and limitations of air sparging for in situ bioremediation applications. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the selection, design, and operation of an air sparging/bioremediation system so that a remediation practitioner can adequately evaluate the use of air sparging for in situ bioremediation applications.

  1. Soluble and cell wall-bound phenolic acids and ferulic acid dehydrodimers in rye flour and five bread model systems: insight into mechanisms of improved availability.

    PubMed

    Dynkowska, Wioletta M; Cyran, Malgorzata R; Ceglińska, Alicja

    2015-03-30

    The bread-making process influences bread components, including phenolics that significantly contribute to its antioxidant properties. Five bread model systems made from different rye cultivars were investigated to compare their impact on concentration of ethanol-soluble (free and ester-bound) and insoluble phenolics. Breads produced by a straight dough method without acid addition (A) and three-stage sourdough method with 12 h native starter preparation (C) exhibited the highest, genotype-dependent concentrations of free phenolic acids. Dough acidification by direct acid addition (method B) or by gradual production during prolonged starter fermentation (24 and 48 h, for methods D and E) considerably decreased their level. However, breads B were enriched in soluble ester-bound fraction. Both direct methods, despite substantial differences in dough pH, caused a similar increase in the amount of insoluble ester-bound fraction. The contents of phenolic fractions in rye bread were positively related to activity level of feruloyl esterase and negatively to those of arabinoxylan-hydrolysing enzymes in wholemeal flour. The solubility of rye bread phenolics may be enhanced by application of a suitable bread-making procedure with respect to rye cultivar, as the mechanisms of this process are also governed by a response of an individual genotype with specific biochemical profile. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Relationship between wood color parameters measured by the CIELab system and extractive and phenol content in Acacia mangium and Vochysia guatemalensis from fast-growth plantations.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Soto Fallas, Roy; Jiménez Bonilla, Pablo; Tenorio, Carolina

    2012-03-26

    The heterogeneity of color distribution between sapwood and heartwood limits the market for wood from fast-growth plantations of tropical species. Wood color is associated with wood extractives contents. This study presents the relationship between wood color parameters measured by the CIELab color system and total amount of extractives and phenolic-type extractives in ethanol-toluene and hot water extracts of wood from two fast-growth plantation species. The results demonstrated that the difference in sapwood and hardwood color in Vochysia guatemalensis and Acacia mangium is caused by lower concentrations of extractives in sapwood of both species. Additionally, variations in total extractive and phenolic content have different effects on the color parameters (L*, a* and b*) of both species studied. In Vochysia guatemalensis wood, parameter L* decreases as total extractive and phenolic content increases; however, parameter a* increases as the content of extractives and phenols increases. In Acacia mangium, the amount of phenols showed no relationship with the color parameters. The ethanol-toluene total extractive content, however, shows a relationship with several color parameters. An increase in the content of total extractives in water and ethanol-toluene increases parameter a*, but decreases parameter L*.

  3. Growth and phenolic compounds of Lactuca sativa L. grown in a closed-type plant production system with UV-A, -B, or -C lamp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Jeong; Son, Jung Eek; Oh, Myung-Min

    2014-01-30

    The production of high-quality crops based on phytochemicals is a strategy for accelerating the practical use of plant factories. Previous studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) light is effective in improving phytochemical production. This study aimed to determine the effect of various UV wavelengths on growth and phenolic compound accumulation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in a closed-type plant production system. Seven days, 1 day and 0.25 day were determined as the upper limit of the irradiation periods for UV-A, -B, and -C, respectively, in the lettuce based on physiological disorders and the fluorescence parameter F(v)/F(m). Continuous UV-A treatment significantly induced the accumulation of phenolic compounds and antioxidants until 4 days of treatment without growth inhibition, consistent with an increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) gene expression and PAL activity. Repeated or gradual UV-B exposure yielded approximately 1.4-3.6 times more total phenolics and antioxidants, respectively, than the controls did 2 days after the treatments, although both treatments inhibited lettuce growth. Repeated UV-C exposure increased phenolics but severely inhibited the growth of lettuce plants. Our data suggest that UV irradiation can improve the accumulation of phenolic compounds with antioxidant properties in lettuce cultivated in plant factories. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Influence of phenolic acids on indole acetic acid production and on the type III secretion system gene transcription in food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Kamila; Schmidt, Marcin T; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Leja, Katarzyna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the reduction capability of phenolic acids (ferulic, chlorogenic, gallic, and p-coumaric acids) on indole acetic acid synthesis by food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05. Specific genetic primer for the type III secretion system (TTSS) in P. fluorescens KM05 was designed and the influence of phenolic acids on its expression was investigated. In the work the ferulic and chlorogenic acids at the concentration of 0.02 and 0.04 μg/ml affected on bacterial growth pattern and the signal molecules production. The phenolic acids, that were appreciable effective against P. fluorescens KM05 indole acetic acid production, significantly suppressed TTSS gene.

  5. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) as Thermal Protection Systems for Discovery Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Johnson, Christine E.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Hui, Frank C. L.; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Chen, Timothy; Chen, Y. K.; Paragas, Daniel; Kobayashi, Loreen

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the light weight Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) and its thermal performance in a simulated heating environment for planetary entry vehicles. The PICA material was developed as a member of the Light Weight Ceramic Ablators (LCA's), and the manufacturing process of this material has since been significantly improved. The density of PICA material ranges from 14 to 20 lbm/ft(exp 3), having uniform resin distribution with and without a densified top surface. The thermal performance of PICA was evaluated in the Ames arc-jet facility at cold wall heat fluxes from 375 to 2,960 BtU/ft(exp 2)-s and surface pressures of 0.1 to 0.43 atm. Heat loads used in these tests varied from 5,500 to 29,600 BtU/ft(exp 2) and are representative of the entry conditions of the proposed Discovery Class Missions. Surface and in-depth temperatures were measured using optical pyrometers and thermocouples. Surface recession was also measured by using a template and a height gage. The ablation characteristics and efficiency of PICA are quantified by using the effective heat of ablation, and the thermal penetration response is evaluated from the thermal soak data. In addition, a comparison of thermal performance of standard and surface densified PICA is also discussed.

  6. Phenol Analysis -- Some Analytical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, R. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of potable water supplies with halogenated phenols in concentrations of 2-10 parts per billion (ppb) produces objectionable tastes and odors capable of influencing consumer acceptability. Routine analysis by the distillation/ 4-aminoantipyrine method is limited by lack of sensitivity and subject to interference by aryl amines. This has been overcome by developing a continuous liquid-liquid extraction system to selectively isolate phenols and eliminate major interfering substances. Stable reagents have been formulated to reduce blank color and extend sensitivity. Equipment suitable for analysis of phenols at the 1 ppb level or less in 20 minutes is described.

  7. 7 CFR 3201.63 - Bioremediation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bioremediation materials. 3201.63 Section 3201.63... Designated Items § 3201.63 Bioremediation materials. (a) Definition. Dry or liquid solutions (including those containing bacteria or other microbes but not including sorbent materials) used to clean oil, fuel, and...

  8. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  9. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED FINE SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil contamination has been shown to be effective for cobble and sandy shorelines. To assess the operational limitations of this technology, this project studied its potential to treat buried oil in fine sediments. The effectiveness of bioremediation by nutrient ...

  10. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED FINE SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil contamination has been shown to be effective for cobble and sandy shorelines. To assess the operational limitations of this technology, this project studied its potential to treat buried oil in fine sediments. The effectiveness of bioremediation by nutrient ...

  11. Bioremediation of treated wood with bacteria

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews prior research in the field of bacterial bioremediation for wood treated with oilborne and inorganic preservatives. Current state of the art is summarized along with potential benefits and pitfalls of a pilot-scale bioremediation process for CCA-treated waste wood.

  12. Mathematical modeling of the integrated process of mercury bioremediation in the industrial bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Głuszcz, Paweł; Petera, Jerzy; Ledakowicz, Stanisław

    2011-03-01

    The mathematical model of the integrated process of mercury contaminated wastewater bioremediation in a fixed-bed industrial bioreactor is presented. An activated carbon packing in the bioreactor plays the role of an adsorbent for ionic mercury and at the same time of a carrier material for immobilization of mercury-reducing bacteria. The model includes three basic stages of the bioremediation process: mass transfer in the liquid phase, adsorption of mercury onto activated carbon and ionic mercury bioreduction to Hg(0) by immobilized microorganisms. Model calculations were verified using experimental data obtained during the process of industrial wastewater bioremediation in the bioreactor of 1 m³ volume. It was found that the presented model reflects the properties of the real system quite well. Numerical simulation of the bioremediation process confirmed the experimentally observed positive effect of the integration of ionic mercury adsorption and bioreduction in one apparatus.

  13. Diverse Metabolic Capacities of Fungi for Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Radhika; Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation refers to cost-effective and environment-friendly method for converting the toxic, recalcitrant pollutants into environmentally benign products through the action of various biological treatments. Fungi play a major role in bioremediation owing to their robust morphology and diverse metabolic capacity. The review focuses on different fungal groups from a variety of habitats with their role in bioremediation of different toxic and recalcitrant compounds; persistent organic pollutants, textile dyes, effluents from textile, bleached kraft pulp, leather tanning industries, petroleum, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and pesticides. Bioremediation of toxic organics by fungi is the most sustainable and green route for cleanup of contaminated sites and we discuss the multiple modes employed by fungi for detoxification of different toxic and recalcitrant compounds including prominent fungal enzymes viz., catalases, laccases, peroxidases and cyrochrome P450 monooxygeneses. We have also discussed the recent advances in enzyme engineering and genomics and research being carried out to trace the less understood bioremediation pathways.

  14. Effect of Selected Plant Phenolics on Fe(2+)-EDTA-H₂O₂ System Mediated Deoxyribose Oxidation: Molecular Structure-Derived Relationships of Anti- and Pro-Oxidant Actions.

    PubMed

    de Graft-Johnson, Jeffrey; Nowak, Dariusz

    2016-12-31

    In the presence of transition metal ions and peroxides, polyphenols, well-known dietary antioxidants, can act as pro-oxidants. We investigated the effect of 13 polyphenols and their metabolites on oxidative degradation of deoxyribose by an (•)OH generating Fenton system (Fe(2+)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-H₂O₂). The relationship between phenolics pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant effects and their molecular structure was analyzed using multivariate analysis with multiple linear regression and a backward stepwise technique. Four phenolics revealed a significant inhibitory effect on OH-induced deoxyribose degradation, ranging from 54.4% ± 28.6% (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) to 38.5% ± 10.4% (catechin) (n = 6), correlating with the number of -OH substitutions (r = 0.58). Seven phenolics augmented the oxidative degradation of deoxyribose with the highest enhancement at 95.0% ± 21.3% (quercetin) and 60.6% ± 12.2% (phloridzin). The pro-oxidant effect correlated (p < 0.05) with the number of -OH groups (r = 0.59), and aliphatic substitutes (r = -0.22) and weakly correlated with the occurrence of a catechol structure within the compound molecule (r = 0.17). Selective dietary supplementation with phenolics exhibiting pro-oxidant activity may increase the possibility of systemic oxidative stress in patients treated with medications containing chelating properties or those with high plasma concentrations of H₂O₂ and non-transferrin bound iron.

  15. Application of immobilized and granular dried anaerobic biomass for stabilizing and increasing anaerobic bio-systems tolerance for high organic loads and phenol shocks.

    PubMed

    Massalha, Nedal; Brenner, Asher; Sheindorf, Chaim; Sabbah, Isam

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the stability and tolerance of continuous-flow bioreactors inoculated with anaerobic methanogens in three different configurations: (R1) dried granular biomass immobilized in PAC-enriched hydrophilic polyurethane foam, (R2) dried granular biomass, and (R3) wet granular biomass. These systems were tested under two different organic loading rates (OLR) of 6.25 and 10.94 (gCOD/(Lreactor∗d)), using a glucose-based synthetic mixture. The effect of an instantaneous shock load of phenol (5g/L for three days), and of phenol inclusion in the feed (0.5g/L) were also tested. At the lower OLR, all reactors performed similarly, however, increasing the OLR lead to a significant biomass washout and failure of R3. Biomass in R1 was more tolerant to phenol shock load than R2, though activity was recovered in both systems after about one month. PAC provided protection and shortened the adaptation time for 0.5g/L phenol that continuously was fed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling and simulation of photocatalytic oxidation mechanism of chlorohalogenated substituted phenols in batch systems: Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach.

    PubMed

    Khuzwayo, Z; Chirwa, E M N

    2015-12-30

    This study investigated, modelled and simulated the influence of multi-chlorohalogenation in heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of substituted phenols (pentachlorophenol (PCP), trichlorophenol (TCP), dichlorophenol (DCP), and monochlorophenol (CP)). The Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach was applied to determine oxidation kinetics. Aquasim 2.0 computational software was used to model, simulate and estimate model parameters of the different chlorophenols. Chemical adsorption equilibrium isotherms for the four chlorophenols and phenol were studied and modelled for adsorption onto titanium dioxide (TiO2) semiconductor catalyst. Langmuir adsorption parameters were determined and used to calculate adsorption constant and maximum adsorption capacity. The adsorption of chloride phenolics onto titanium dioxide catalyst increased in the order of 4 - CP < DCP < Ph < TCP < PCP. Photocatalytic studies analysed the efficiency of oxidation and found improved degradation with higher chloride substituted phenolics in the order of PCP > TCP > DCP ≥ 4 - CP. Photocatalytic parameters were calculated and estimated along with sensitivity and uncertainty analyses.

  17. O-Allylation of phenols with allylic acetates in aqueous media using a magnetically separable catalytic system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic ethers were synthesized in water using magnetically recoverable heterogeneous Pd catalyst via O-allylation of phenols with allylic acetates under ambient conditions. Aqueous reaction medium, easy recovery of the catalyst using an external magnet, efficient recycling, and ...

  18. O-Allylation of phenols with allylic acetates in aqueous media using a magnetically separable catalytic system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic ethers were synthesized in water using magnetically recoverable heterogeneous Pd catalyst via O-allylation of phenols with allylic acetates under ambient conditions. Aqueous reaction medium, easy recovery of the catalyst using an external magnet, efficient recycling, and ...

  19. Salt-tolerant phenol-degrading microorganisms isolated from Amazonian soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A E; Moon, D H; Rossi, A; Trevors, J T; Tsai, S M

    2000-11-01

    Two phenol-degrading microorganisms were isolated from Amazonian rain forest soil samples after enrichment in the presence of phenol and a high salt concentration. The yeast Candida tropicalis and the bacterium Alcaligenes faecoalis were identified using several techniques, including staining, morphological observation and biochemical tests, fatty acid profiles and 16S/18S rRNA sequencing. Both isolates, A. faecalis and C. tropicalis, were used in phenol degradation assays, with Rhodococcus erythropolis as a reference phenol-degrading bacterium, and compared to microbial populations from wastewater samples collected from phenol-contaminated environments. C. tropicalis tolerated higher concentrations of phenol and salt (16 mM and 15%, respectively) than A. faecalis (12 mM and 5.6%). The yeast also tolerated a wider pH range (3-9) during phenol degradation than A. faecalis (pH 7-9). Phenol degradation was repressed in C. tropicalis by acetate and glucose, but not by lactate. Glucose and acetate had little effect, while lactate stimulated phenol degradation in A. faecalis. To our knowledge, these soils had never been contaminated with man-made phenolic compounds and this is the first report of phenol-degrading microorganisms from Amazonian forest soil samples. The results support the idea that natural uncontaminated environments contain sufficient genetic diversity to make them valid choices for the isolation of microorganisms useful in bioremediation.

  20. Interactions of proteins with other polyelectrolytes in a two-phase system containing phenol and aqueous buffers at various pH values

    PubMed Central

    Pusztai, A.

    1966-01-01

    1. Interactions of proteins with neutral polysaccharides and such polyacids as polygalacturonic acid, chondroitin sulphate, RNA and DNA in a two-phase system composed of phenol and aqueous buffers in the pH range 1·5–10 were studied. 2. Analysis of the products of the interaction was facilitated by the absolute preference of the proteins studied for the phenol-rich phase at all pH values. 3. The polyacids, on the other hand, in the absence of interactions were recovered mainly from the aqueous phases. 4. The interaction, the extent of which was mainly determined by the pH-dependent ionization state of the reacting partners, followed the patterns of antigen–antibody interactions with a well-defined equivalence point (maximum point of precipitation) and with the formation of soluble complexes. 5. The soluble complexes formed below the equivalence point were composed of proteins with small amounts of polyacids attached, and so passed into the phenol-rich phase; those formed above the maximum precipitation point were polyacidic in character and found in the aqueous phases. 6. Glycoproteins, with small amounts of covalently linked sugar residues, passed quantitatively into the phenol-rich phases. 7. The possibilities of developing a method for the analysis of glycoproteins and other applications are discussed. PMID:5965351

  1. Use of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for the bioremediation of contaminants.

    PubMed

    Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem; Stark, Benjamin; Pagilla, Krishna

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a critical review of the literature on the application of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) in bioremediation. The important aspects of using GEMs in bioremediation, such as development of novel strains with desirable properties through pathway construction and the modification of enzyme specificity and affinity, are discussed in detail. Particular attention is given to the genetic engineering of bacteria using bacterial hemoglobin (VHb) for the treatment of aromatic organic compounds under hypoxic conditions. The application of VHb technology may advance treatment of contaminated sites, where oxygen availability limits the growth of aerobic bioremediating bacteria, as well as the functioning of oxygenases required for mineralization of many organic pollutants. Despite the many advantages of GEMs, there are still concerns that their introduction into polluted sites to enhance bioremediation may have adverse environmental effects, such as gene transfer. The extent of horizontal gene transfer from GEMs in the environment, compared to that of native organisms including benefits regarding bacterial bioremediation that may occur as a result of such transfer, is discussed. Recent advances in tracking methods and containment strategies for GEMs, including several biological systems that have been developed to detect the fate of GEMs in the environment, are also summarized in this review. Critical research questions pertaining to the development and implementation of GEMs for enhanced bioremediation have been identified and posed for possible future research.

  2. Monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, J.R.; Prince, R.C.; Harner, J.; Atlas, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, extensive research was conducted by the US Environments Protection Agency and Exxon to develop and implement bioremediation techniques for oil spill cleanup. A key challenge of this program was to develop effective methods for monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness on extremely heterogenous intertidal shorelines. Fertilizers were applied to shorelines at concentrations known to be safe, and effectiveness achieved in acceleration biodegradation of oil residues was measure using several techniques. This paper describes the most definitive method identified, which monitors biodegradation loss by measuring changes in ratios of hydrocarbons to hopane, a cycloalkane present in the oil that showed no measurable degradation. Rates of loss measured by the hopane ratio method have high levels of statistical confidence, and show that the fertilizer addition stimulated biodegradation rates as much a fivefold. Multiple regression analyses of data show that fertilizer addition of nitrogen in interstitial pore water per unit of oil load was the most important parameter affecting biodegradation rate, and results suggest that monitoring nitrogen concentrations in the subsurface pore water is preferred technique for determining fertilizer dosage and reapplication frequency.

  3. Geochemical indicators of intrinsic bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, R.C.; Gomez, C.A.; Becker, M.T.

    1995-03-01

    A detailed field investigation has been completed at a gasoline-contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC, to examine possible indicators of intrinsic bioremediation and identify factors that may significantly influence the rae and extent of bioremediation. The dissolved plume of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in ground water is naturally degrading. Toluene and o-xylene are most rapidly degraded followed by m-, p-xylene, and benzene. Ethylbenzene appears to degrade very slowly under anaerobic conditions present in the center of the plume. The rate and extent of biodegradation appears to be strongly influenced by the type and quantity of electron acceptors present in the aquifer. At the upgradient edge of the plume, nitrate, ferric iron, and oxygen are used as terminal electron acceptors during hydrocarbon biodegradation. The equivalent of 40 to 50 mg/l of hydrocarbon is degraded based on the increase in dissolved CO{sub 2} relative to background ground water. Immediately downgradient of the source area, sulfate and iron are the dominant electron acceptors. Toluene and o-xylene are rapidly removed in this region. Once the available oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate are consumed, biodegradation is limited and appears to be controlled by mixing and aerobic biodegradation at the plume fringes.

  4. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined

  5. Tyrosinase extract from Agaricus bisporus mushroom and its in natura tissue for specific phenol removal.

    PubMed

    Kameda, E; Langone, M A P; Coelho, M A Z

    2006-11-01

    Phenols are toxic pollutants found in industrial wastes imposing several risks to human health. Tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) is an oxygenase oxyreductase found in several life forms, like the mushroom Agaricus bisporus. This enzyme is readily available from this fungal tissue leading to high activity extracts without extensive purification, thus suggesting its potential as a biocatalyst for applications involving biomodification of phenols or bioremediation of phenol-polluted waters. The purpose of this work was to employ a crude extract from the Agaricus bisporus mushroom and its biomass for the removal of phenol from polluted water. Experiments were carried out without pH control. The initial phenol concentration in all solutions was 100 mg l(-1). Four enzymatic concentrations (50, 100, 200 and 400 U ml(-1)) were tested. Reactions, with 200 U ml(-1) and 400 U ml(-1) enzymatic activity, led to 90% of phenol removal. Chitosan was used as a coagulant, but no significant improvement was observed. The in natura fungi was also able to remove 90% of phenol, demostrating its viability as a biocatalyst in bioremediation process.

  6. Potential of Penicillium Species in the Bioremediation Field

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2009-01-01

    The effects on the environment of pollution, particularly that caused by various industrial activities, have been responsible for the accelerated fluxes of organic and inorganic matter in the ecosphere. Xenobiotics such as phenol, phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals, even at low concentrations, can be toxic to humans and other forms of life. Many of the remediation technologies currently being used for contaminated soil and water involve not only physical and chemical treatment, but also biological processes, where microbial activity is the responsible for pollutant removal and/or recovery. Fungi are present in aquatic sediments, terrestrial habitats and water surfaces and play a significant part in natural remediation of metal and aromatic compounds. Fungi also have advantages over bacteria since fungal hyphae can penetrate contaminated soil, reaching not only heavy metals but also xenobiotic compounds. Despite of the abundance of such fungi in wastes, penicillia in particular have received little attention in bioremediation and biodegradation studies. Additionally, several studies conducted with different strains of imperfecti fungi, Penicillium spp. have demonstrated their ability to degrade different xenobiotic compounds with low co-substrate requirements, and could be potentially interesting for the development of economically feasible processes for pollutant transformation. PMID:19440525

  7. Phenolic acids inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products in food simulation systems depending on their reducing powers and structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hengye; Virk, Muhammad Safiullah; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-06-01

    The concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in foods, which are formed by Maillard reaction, has demonstrated as risk factors associated with many chronic diseases. The AGEs inhibitory activities of five common phenolic acids (protocatechuic acid, dihydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and salicylic acid) with different chemical properties had been investigated in two food simulation systems (glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and oleic acid-BSA). The results substantiated that the AGEs inhibitory abilities of phenolic acids in the oleic acid BSA system were much better than the glucose-BSA system for their strong reducing powers and structures. Among them, dihydrogenferulic acid showed strong inhibition of AGEs formation in oleic acid-BSA system at 0.01 mg/mL compared to nonsignificant AGEs inhibitory effect in oleic acid-BSA system at 10-fold higher concentration (0.1 mg/mL). This study suggests that edible plants rich in phenolic acids may be used as AGEs inhibitor during high-fat cooking.

  8. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-01-01

    From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past two decades in applying in situ bioremediation to a variety of contaminants in all media. This volume provides a comprehensive guide to the latest technological breakthroughs in both the laboratory and the field, covering such topics as air sparging, co-metabolic biodegradation, treatment of MTBE, real-time control systems, nutrient addition, rapid biosensor analysis, multiphase extraction, and accelerated bioremediation.

  9. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past two decades in applying in situ bioremediation to a variety of contaminants in all media. This volume provides a comprehensive guide to the latest technological breakthroughs in both the laboratory and the field, covering such topics as air sparging, co-metabolic biodegradation, treatment of MTBE, real-time control systems, nutrient addition, rapid biosensor analysis, multiphase extraction, and accelerated bioremediation.

  10. Soluble and cell wall-bound phenolic acids and ferulic acid dehydrodimers in rye flour and five bread model systems: insight into mechanisms of improved availability

    PubMed Central

    Dynkowska, Wioletta M; Cyran, Malgorzata R; Ceglińska, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Background The bread-making process influences bread components, including phenolics that significantly contribute to its antioxidant properties. Five bread model systems made from different rye cultivars were investigated to compare their impact on concentration of ethanol-soluble (free and ester-bound) and insoluble phenolics. Results Breads produced by a straight dough method without acid addition (A) and three-stage sourdough method with 12 h native starter preparation (C) exhibited the highest, genotype-dependent concentrations of free phenolic acids. Dough acidification by direct acid addition (method B) or by gradual production during prolonged starter fermentation (24 and 48 h, for methods D and E) considerably decreased their level. However, breads B were enriched in soluble ester-bound fraction. Both direct methods, despite substantial differences in dough pH, caused a similar increase in the amount of insoluble ester-bound fraction. The contents of phenolic fractions in rye bread were positively related to activity level of feruloyl esterase and negatively to those of arabinoxylan-hydrolysing enzymes in wholemeal flour. Conclusion The solubility of rye bread phenolics may be enhanced by application of a suitable bread-making procedure with respect to rye cultivar, as the mechanisms of this process are also governed by a response of an individual genotype with specific biochemical profile. © 2014 Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute, National Research Institute. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25410263

  11. Derivative of plant phenolic compound inhibits the type III secretion system of Dickeya dadantii via HrpX/HrpY two-component signal transduction and Rsm systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hutchins, William; Wu, Xiaogang; Liang, Cuirong; Zhang, Chengfang; Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Chen, Xin; Che, Yizhou; Wang, Qi; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-02-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence factor in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and represents a particularly appealing target for antimicrobial agents. Previous studies have shown that the plant phenolic compound p-coumaric acid (PCA) plays a role in the inhibition of T3SS expression of the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937. This study screened a series of derivatives of plant phenolic compounds and identified that trans-4-hydroxycinnamohydroxamic acid (TS103) has an eight-fold higher inhibitory potency than PCA on the T3SS of D. dadantii. The effect of TS103 on regulatory components of the T3SS was further elucidated. Our results suggest that TS103 inhibits HrpY phosphorylation and leads to reduced levels of hrpS and hrpL transcripts. In addition, through a reduction in the RNA levels of the regulatory small RNA RsmB, TS103 also inhibits hrpL at the post-transcriptional level via the rsmB-RsmA regulatory pathway. Finally, TS103 inhibits hrpL transcription and mRNA stability, which leads to reduced expression of HrpL regulon genes, such as hrpA and hrpN. To our knowledge, this is the first inhibitor to affect the T3SS through both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways in the soft-rot phytopathogen D. dadantii 3937. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Treatment of a mud pit by bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Avdalović, Jelena; Đurić, Aleksandra; Miletić, Srdjan; Ilić, Mila; Milić, Jelena; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2016-08-01

    The mud generated from oil and natural gas drilling, presents a considerable ecological problem. There are still insufficient remedies for the removal and minimization of these very stable emulsions. Existing technologies that are in use, more or less successfully, treat about 20% of generated waste drilling mud, while the rest is temporarily deposited in so-called mud pits. This study investigated in situ bioremediation of a mud pit. The bioremediation technology used in this case was based on the use of naturally occurring microorganisms, isolated from the contaminated site, which were capable of using the contaminating substances as nutrients. The bioremediation was stimulated through repeated inoculation with a zymogenous microbial consortium, along with mixing, watering and biostimulation. Application of these bioremediation techniques reduced the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons from 32.2 to 1.5 g kg(-1) (95% degradation) during six months of treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Emerging technologies in bioremediation: constraints and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rayu, Smriti; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Singh, Brajesh K

    2012-11-01

    Intensive industrialisation, inadequate disposal, large-scale manufacturing activities and leaks of organic compounds have resulted in long-term persistent sources of contamination of soil and groundwater. This is a major environmental, policy and health issue because of adverse effects of contaminants on humans and ecosystems. Current technologies for remediation of contaminated sites include chemical and physical remediation, incineration and bioremediation. With recent advancements, bioremediation offers an environmentally friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable option to remove contaminants from the environment. Three main approaches of bioremediation include use of microbes, plants and enzymatic remediation. All three approaches have been used with some success but are limited by various confounding factors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview on the approaches, their limitations and highlights emerging technologies that have potential to revolutionise the enzymatic and plant-based bioremediation approaches.

  14. Microbial melanins for radioprotection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Vij, Raghav; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    Microbial melanins provide a biocompatible and scalable approach for bioremediation and radioprotection technologies due to their physicochemical properties. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Biosurfactant-enhanced soil bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, N.; Lu, G.; Velikonja, J.

    1995-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with organic chemicals is a viable alternative method for clean-up and remedy of hazardous waste sites. The final objective in this approach is to convert the parent toxicant into a readily biodegradable product which is harmless to human health and/or the environment. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil can also efficiently be enhanced by addition or in-situ production of biosufactants. It was generally observed that the degradation time was shortened and particularly the adaptation time for the microbes. More data from our laboratories showed that chlorinated aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-dichlorophenol, a herbicide Metolachlor, as well as naphthalene are degraded faster and more completely when selected biosurfactants are added to the soil. More recent data demonstrated an enhanced biodegradation of heavy hydrocarbons in petrochemical sludges, and in contaminated oil when biosurfactants were present or were added prior to the biodegradation process.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF STRATEGIES FOR OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION: POTENTIAL AND LIMITATION, LABORATORY TO FIELD (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important additional research efforts were identified during the development of test systems and protocols for assessing the effectiveness and environmental safety of oil spill commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs). Research that examined CBA efficacy issues included: (...

  17. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF STRATEGIES FOR OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION: POTENTIAL AND LIMITATION, LABORATORY TO FIELD (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important additional research efforts were identified during the development of test systems and protocols for assessing the effectiveness and environmental safety of oil spill commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs). Research that examined CBA efficacy issues included: (...

  18. Treatment of coal gasification wastewater by a two-continuous UASB system with step-feed for COD and phenols removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Han, Hongjun; Yuan, Min; Li, Huiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Ke

    2011-05-01

    A two-continuous mesophilic (37 ± 2°C) UASB system with step-feed was investigated as an attractive optimization strategy for enhancing COD and total phenols removal of the system and improving aerobic biodegradability of real coal gasification wastewater. Through the step-feed period, the maximum removal efficiencies of COD and total phenols reached 55-60% and 58-63% respectively in the system, at an influent flow distribution ratio of 0.2 and influent COD concentration of 2500 mg/L; the corresponding efficiencies were at low levels of 45-50% and 43-50% respectively at total HRT of 48 h during the single-feed period. The maximum specific methanogenic activity and substrate utilization rate were 592 ± 16 mg COD-CH(4)/(g VSS d) and 89 ± 12 mg phenol/(g VSS d) during the step-feed operation. After the anaerobic digestion with step-feed, the aerobic effluent COD concentration decreased from 270 ± 9 to 215 ± 10 mg/L. The results suggested that step-feed enhanced the degradation of refractory organics in the second reactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of the differences in the phenolic composition of five strawberry cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) grown in two different soilless systems.

    PubMed

    Hernanz, Dolores; Recamales, Angeles F; Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Heredia, Francisco J

    2007-03-07

    The phenolics from different strawberry cultivars (Aromas, Camarosa, Diamante, Medina, and Ventana) cultivated in two different soilless systems (with and without recycling nutrient solution) were quantified to assess differences in their profiles as a function of both the variety and the cultivation system. Considering groups of phenols, it was found that either anthocyanins (including pelargonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-rutinoside, pelargonidin-3-acetylglucoside, and two unidentified pelargonidin derivatives) or phenolic acids (including caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, p-hydroxybenzoic, and ellagic acid) were quantitatively more important than those of flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol); the ranges of values were 78.81-198.88, 49.77-128.37, and 12.85-43.04 microg/g, respectively. Considering individual compounds and after applying relevant pattern recognition techniques, it was concluded that the contents of cyanidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-rutinoside, p-coumaric acid, and pelargonidin-3-glucoside were the most appropriate variables to discriminate among varieties, whereas those of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and pelargonidin-derivative 1 were the most appropriate to discriminate between cultivation systems. The first factor of PCA was mainly linked to anthocyanins and quercetin, whereas the second principal component (PC) was related to kaempferol and p-coumaric acid.

  20. Numerical simulation of in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1998-12-31

    Models that couple subsurface flow and transport with microbial processes are an important tool for assessing the effectiveness of bioremediation in field applications. A numerical algorithm is described that differs from previous in situ bioremediation models in that it includes: both vadose and groundwater zones, unsteady air and water flow, limited nutrients and airborne nutrients, toxicity, cometabolic kinetics, kinetic sorption, subgridscale averaging, pore clogging and protozoan grazing.

  1. Bioremediation and phytoremediation: Chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Bioremediation and phytoremediation have progressed, especially with regard to the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. Sites contaminated with chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds have proven more resistant to these approaches, but exciting progress is being made both in the laboratory and in the field. This book brings together the latest breakthrough thinking and results in bioremediation, with chapters on cometabolic processes, aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms, biological reductive dechlorination processes, bioaugmentation, biomonitoring, and phytoremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds.

  2. Petroleum biodegradation and oil spill bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Bioremediation for the cleanup of different oil spills has employed either the application of fertilizer to enhance the abilities of the indigenous hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria or the addition of naturally occurring adapted microbial hydrocarbon degraders by seeding. Laboratory experiments that closely model environmental conditions are helpful for demonstrating the potential applicability of bioremediation. Field demonstrations of enhanced numbers of hydrocarbon degraders and depressed levels of oxygen are useful indicators of hydrocarbon degradation activities, but chemical analyses of residues ultimately are necessary to establish that bioremediation enhances the natural rates of oil biodegradation. Owing to the patchy distribution of oil in the environment following a spill, an internal standard that is not biodegraded is necessary to serve as a reference for statistical analyses of compositional changes that can be attributed to biodegradation. Well designed and extensive experiments, with appropriate controls, are necessary to establish the efficacy of oil spill bioremediation. Only in a few cases has there been rigorous proof of the effectiveness of bioremediation. As a result fertilization has been shown to be an effective bioremediation treatment of oil spills, with rate enhancements of about 5 times, but seeding has not yet been shown to work in the field.

  3. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    DOEpatents

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  4. The optimization of phenolic compounds extraction from cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) skin in a reflux system using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Aguirre Joya; Heliodoro, De La Garza Toledo; Alejandro, Zugasti Cruz; Ruth, Belmares Cerda; Noé, Aguilar Cristóbal

    2013-06-01

    To extract, quantify, and evaluate the phenolic content in Opuntia ficus-indica skin for their antioxidant capacity with three different methods (ABTS, DPPH, and lipid oxidation) and to optimize the extraction conditions (time, temperature and ethanol concentration) in a reflux system. The extraction process was done using a reflux system. A San Cristobal II experimental design with three variables and three levels was used. The variables evaluated were time of extraction (h), concentration of ethanol (%, v/v) and temperature (°C). The extraction process was optimized using a response surface methodology. It was observed that at higher temperature more phenolic compounds were extracted, but the antioxidant capacity was decreased. The optimum conditions for phenolic compounds extraction and antioxidant capacity mixing the three methods were as follows: 45% of ethanol, 80 °C and 2 hours of extraction. Values obtained in our results are little higher that other previously reported. It can be concluded the by-products of Opuntia ficus-indica represent a good source of natural antioxidants with possible applications in food, cosmetics or drugs industries.

  5. The optimization of phenolic compounds extraction from cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) skin in a reflux system using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Aguirre Joya; Heliodoro, De La Garza Toledo; Alejandro, Zugasti Cruz; Ruth, Belmares Cerda; Noé, Aguilar Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To extract, quantify, and evaluate the phenolic content in Opuntia ficus-indica skin for their antioxidant capacity with three different methods (ABTS, DPPH, and lipid oxidation) and to optimize the extraction conditions (time, temperature and ethanol concentration) in a reflux system. Methods The extraction process was done using a reflux system. A San Cristobal II experimental design with three variables and three levels was used. The variables evaluated were time of extraction (h), concentration of ethanol (%, v/v) and temperature (°C). The extraction process was optimized using a response surface methodology. Results It was observed that at higher temperature more phenolic compounds were extracted, but the antioxidant capacity was decreased. The optimum conditions for phenolic compounds extraction and antioxidant capacity mixing the three methods were as follows: 45% of ethanol, 80 °C and 2 hours of extraction. Values obtained in our results are little higher that other previously reported. Conclusions It can be concluded the by-products of Opuntia ficus-indica represent a good source of natural antioxidants with possible applications in food, cosmetics or drugs industries. PMID:23730555

  6. Salinity source-induced changes in yield, mineral composition, phenolic acids and flavonoids in leaves of artichoke and cardoon grown in floating system.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Daniela; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Rea, Elvira; Lucini, Luigi; Colla, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Leaves of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. scolymus (L.) Hegi) and cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L. var. altilis DC) are traditionally used as herbal medicine. Moderate salt stress could enhance antioxidant activity and phytochemicals in leaves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chloride salts (NaCl, KCl and CaCl2) on biomass production, mineral composition, phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity in leaves of artichoke and cardoon grown in a floating system. In both crops, NaCl and KCl treatments reduced biomass production, while similar values were recorded in CaCl2 and control treatments. In both crops, KCl treatment enhanced total phenolic and flavonoid contents, antioxidant activity and target polyphenols in leaves harvested at 48, 82 and 105 days after sowing (DAS), while leaf quality was improved by NaCl and CaCl2 treatments only at 82 and 105 DAS. Irrespective of salinity, leaves of cardoon had higher total phenolic and flavonoid contents, antioxidant activity and target polyphenols than those of artichoke. The results showed that application of KCl can be considered an effective way to produce high-quality leaves of artichoke and cardoon during the whole cropping cycle, although resulting in a 30% reduction in plant biomass. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Guidelines for the Bioremediation of Oil-Contaminated Salt Marshes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document includes a review and critique of the literature and theories pertinent to oil biodegradation and nutrient dynamics and provides examples of bioremediation options and case studies of oil bioremediation in coastal wetland environments.

  8. Potential for bioremediation of xenobiotic compounds by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Paszczynski, A.; Crawford, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    The white-rot fungi produce an unusual enzyme system, characterized by a specialized group of peroxidases, that catalyzes the degradation of the complex plant polymer lignin. This ligninolytic system shows a high degree of nonspecificity and oxidizes a very large variety of compounds in addition to lignin. Among these compounds are numerous environmental pollutants. Thus, the white-rot fungi show considerable promise as bioremediation agents for use in the restoration of environments contaminated by xenobiotic molecules. One white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, has been studied in great detail with regard to ligninolytic enzymes and the degradation of anthropogenic chemicals. It has been widely promoted as a bioremediation agent. This article examines literature concerning the degradation of xenobiotic compounds by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and attempts to critically assess this organism`s real potential as a bioremediation tool. 130 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Bioremediation of industrial pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hedi Ben; Mosrati, Ridha; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2012-07-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn toward the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment. In recent years, many reports have been made on the occurrence of the large, differentiated group of pharmaceuticals in wastewater (PW), surface water, ground water, and in soil. The pharmaceutical sector is currently expanding in Tunisia, with more than 34 industries. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 to treat PW. P. putida was very efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS), and turbidity of solution (85.5, 89.1, and 81.5%, respectively). Genotoxicity of effluent, before and after biodegradation, was evaluated in vivo in mouse bone marrow by assessing the percentage of cells bearing different chromosome aberrations. Results indicated that PW showed a significant ability to induce DNA damage. In addition, PW induced a remarkable lipid peroxidation (LPO) effect, however, activities of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were unchanged when treated with PW, compared to nontreated PW. This toxicity was imputed to the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater. However, chromosome aberration, as well as LPO of PW, were significantly reduced after bioremediation. Thus, the use of this strain for testing on the industrial scale seems possible and advantageous.

  10. Guidelines offered for in-situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1993-11-22

    General guidelines for use in evaluating in-situ bioremediation projects have been proposed by a committee of the National Research Council (NRC). The three-step strategy, outlined by committee members at a workshop early this month in Washington, D.C., is a response to controversy surrounding bioremediation that, in the eyes of the committee, prevents the full potential of the technology from being realized. Controversy arises, in part, from the rapidly increasing number of vendors of bioremediation services that has resulted from availability of site-cleanup funding and ever-tightening environmental regulation. The committee elected to focus on two aspects of bioremediation in its deliberations. The first was to restrict its attention to in-situ decontamination, using microorganisms to remove contamination from groundwater and soils that remain in place. This leaves out the subjects of ocean-tanker spills, in-plant waste streams, and sludge treatment. The second was to provide guidance in determining the effectiveness of bioremediation. This paper discusses these two aspects.

  11. Bioremediation potential of terrestrial fuel spills.

    PubMed

    Song, H G; Wang, X; Bartha, R

    1990-03-01

    A bioremediation treatment that consisted of liming, fertilization, and tilling was evaluated on the laboratory scale for its effectiveness in cleaning up a sand, a loam, and a clay loam contaminated at 50 to 135 mg g of soil by gasoline, jet fuel, heating oil, diesel oil, or bunker C. Experimental variables included incubation temperatures of 17, 27, and 37 degrees C; no treatment; bioremediation treatment; and poisoned evaporation controls. Hydrocarbon residues were determined by quantitative gas chromatography or, in the case of bunker C, by residual weight determination. Four-point depletion curves were obtained for the described experimental variables. In all cases, the disappearance of hydrocarbons was maximal at 27 degrees C and in response to bioremediation treatment. Poisoned evaporation controls underestimated the true biodegradation contribution, but nevertheless, they showed that biodegradation makes only a modest contribution to gasoline disappearance from soil. Bunker C was found to be structurally recalcitrant, with close to 80% persisting after 1 year of incubation. The three medium distillates, jet fuel, heating oil, and diesel oil, increased in persistence in the listed order but responded well to bioremediation treatment under all test conditions. With bioremediation treatment, it should be possible to reduce hydrocarbons to insignificant levels in contaminated soils within one growing season.

  12. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated polar soils.

    PubMed

    Aislabie, Jackie; Saul, David J; Foght, Julia M

    2006-06-01

    Bioremediation is increasingly viewed as an appropriate remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated polar soils. As for all soils, the successful application of bioremediation depends on appropriate biodegradative microbes and environmental conditions in situ. Laboratory studies have confirmed that hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria typically assigned to the genera Rhodococcus, Sphingomonas or Pseudomonas are present in contaminated polar soils. However, as indicated by the persistence of spilled hydrocarbons, environmental conditions in situ are suboptimal for biodegradation in polar soils. Therefore, it is likely that ex situ bioremediation will be the method of choice for ameliorating and controlling the factors limiting microbial activity, i.e. low and fluctuating soil temperatures, low levels of nutrients, and possible alkalinity and low moisture. Care must be taken when adding nutrients to the coarse-textured, low-moisture soils prevalent in continental Antarctica and the high Arctic because excess levels can inhibit hydrocarbon biodegradation by decreasing soil water potentials. Bioremediation experiments conducted on site in the Arctic indicate that land farming and biopiles may be useful approaches for bioremediation of polar soils.

  13. Modified kraft lignin for bioremediation applications.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Diva A Simões; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Evtuguin, Dmitry V

    2012-01-01

    Kraft lignin (KL) from industrial pulping of E. globulus wood was subjected to the oxidative modification with the aim to produce sorbent mimicking humic matter for the bioremediation purposes. Lignin was oxidized by polyoxometalate Na(5)[PMo(10)V(2)O(40)] (POM), solely or in the presence of laccase, under pre-selected aerobic conditions (50-60°C, 1-2h, oxygen pressure 5 bar). The most pronounced lignin oxidation without its depolymerisation was observed in the reaction system POM/O(2). Modified lignins possessed increased amounts of COOH (up to 15 %) and CO (up to 500 %) groups, when compared to unmodified KL, and significantly higher molecular weights. Sorption capacity of KL before and after modification towards transition metals (cadmium (II) and mercury (II)) and triazine pesticide (atrazine) was assessed in batch experiments under equilibrium conditions. KL oxidation improved sorption capacity towards transition metals (up to 15 %) but not necessarily the uptake of atrazine that was higher for unmodified KL.

  14. Method for phosphate-accelerated bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Lombard, Kenneth H.; Hazen, Terry C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Borthen, James W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for supplying a vapor-phase nutrient to contaminated soil for in situ bioremediation. The apparatus includes a housing adapted for containing a quantity of the liquid nutrient, a conduit in fluid communication with the interior of the housing, means for causing a gas to flow through the conduit, and means for contacting the gas with the liquid so that a portion thereof evaporates and mixes with the gas. The mixture of gas and nutrient vapor is delivered to the contaminated site via a system of injection and extraction wells configured to the site. The mixture has a partial pressure of vaporized nutrient that is no greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid. If desired, the nutrient and/or the gas may be heated to increase the vapor pressure and the nutrient concentration of the mixture. Preferably, the nutrient is a volatile, substantially nontoxic and nonflammable organic phosphate that is a liquid at environmental temperatures, such as triethyl phosphate or tributyl phosphate.

  15. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioremediation of organic contaminants: a review of processes and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Gill, R T; Harbottle, M J; Smith, J W N; Thornton, S F

    2014-07-01

    There is current interest in finding sustainable remediation technologies for the removal of contaminants from soil and groundwater. This review focuses on the combination of electrokinetics, the use of an electric potential to move organic and inorganic compounds, or charged particles/organisms in the subsurface independent of hydraulic conductivity; and bioremediation, the destruction of organic contaminants or attenuation of inorganic compounds by the activity of microorganisms in situ or ex situ. The objective of the review is to examine the state of knowledge on electrokinetic bioremediation and critically evaluate factors which affect the up-scaling of laboratory and bench-scale research to field-scale application. It discusses the mechanisms of electrokinetic bioremediation in the subsurface environment at different micro and macroscales, the influence of environmental processes on electrokinetic phenomena and the design options available for application to the field scale. The review also presents results from a modelling exercise to illustrate the effectiveness of electrokinetics on the supply electron acceptors to a plume scale scenario where these are limiting. Current research needs include analysis of electrokinetic bioremediation in more representative environmental settings, such as those in physically heterogeneous systems in order to gain a greater understanding of the controlling mechanisms on both electrokinetics and bioremediation in those scenarios.

  16. Evaluation of oil removal efficiency and enzymatic activity in some fungal strains for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation. Methods In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran) and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA) media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase) was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w). Results Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected as the most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed the highest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp., Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively. Conclusions Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities. PMID:23369665

  17. Effects of paraoxon, p-nitrophenol, phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate, and phenol on the rat interleukin 2 system.

    PubMed

    Pruett, S B; Chambers, J E

    1988-01-01

    Two organophosphorus compounds, paraoxon and phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate, as well as p-nitrophenol and phenol which are structurally related to paraoxon, were tested for their effects on interleukin 2 (IL2) production and responsiveness by rat splenocytes in vitro. Three of the four compounds inhibited mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation as well as IL2 production and responsiveness. However, phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate produced maximal inhibition at a much lower concentration (0.5 microM) than p-nitrophenol (200 microM) or paraoxon (200 microM). Phenol was not inhibitory at any concentration tested (up to 250 microM). Since the production of and response to IL2 are key events in immune responses, compounds which suppress these events can be identified as potential suppressors of host resistance to disease.

  18. Review of chlorinated phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used extensively except in the production of higher chlorophenols and chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides. Pentachlorophenol and some tetrachlorophenols are used worldwide, primarily as wood preservatives or fungicides. Residues of chlorophenols have been found worldwide in soil, water and air samples, in food products, and in human and animal tissues and body fluids. Environmental contamination with these chemicals occurs from industrial effluents, agricultural runoff, breakdown of chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides and hexachlorobenzene, and from spontaneous formation following chlorination of water for disinfection and deodorization. The acute toxicity of these chemicals is relatively low and little is known concerning their chronic effects. Chlorophenols have not been shown conclusively to be mutagens, teratogens or carcinogens. However, these compounds may act as promotors or cocarcinogens and the immune system is particularly sensitive to their toxic effects. Transplacental exposure to chlorophenols may result in embryotoxicity and abortion. The major mode of toxic action is as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The toxicity of chlorophenols decreases with decreasing chlorination. These chemicals are mild hepatotoxins and are stored mainly in hepatic and renal tissues.

  19. Study on bioremediation of eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Shan, Mingjun; Wang, Yanqiu; Shen, Xue

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation is considered as one of the effective ways to deal with the pollution of natural water because of its high efficiency, low cost and causing no secondary pollution. The multiple microbial preparation is composed of bacteria that can transfer nutritive material harmless and some natural humic acid which can destroy algae. The qualified bacteria were selected, separated, and enriched from the water and bottom sediment of eutrophic lake. A field trial of bioremediation was carried out in 60 m(3) of eutrophic water body in Yingze Lake of Anshan for four months. TN (total nitrogen), TP (total phosphorus), ammonia nitrogen, CODCr, and turbidity of the trial water and untreated water were measured termly. Contrastive analysis showed the mulriple microbial preparation can increase the water capacity of self-purification, decrease the turbidity, inhibit algae growth and improve water quality gradually at substantially lower cost. Thus the problem of lake eutrophication can be solved radically by bioremediation.

  20. Soil mesocosm studies on atrazine bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Nousiainen, Aura; Shaligram, Shraddha; Björklöf, Katarina; Lindström, Kristina; Jørgensen, Kirsten S; Kapley, Atya

    2014-06-15

    Accumulation of pesticides in the environment causes serious issues of contamination and toxicity. Bioremediation is an ecologically sound method to manage soil pollution, but the bottleneck here, is the successful scale-up of lab-scale experiments to field applications. This study demonstrates pilot-scale bioremediation in tropical soil using atrazine as model pollutant. Mimicking field conditions, three different bioremediation strategies for atrazine degradation were explored. 100 kg soil mesocosms were set-up, with or without atrazine application history. Natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation were tested, where augmentation with an atrazine degrading consortium demonstrated best pollutant removal. 90% atrazine degradation was observed in six days in soil previously exposed to atrazine, while soil without history of atrazine use, needed 15 days to remove the same amount of amended atrazine. The bacterial consortium comprised of 3 novel bacterial strains with different genetic atrazine degrading potential. The progress of bioremediation was monitored by measuring the levels of atrazine and its intermediate, cyanuric acid. Genes from the atrazine degradation pathway, namely, atzA, atzB, atzD, trzN and trzD were quantified in all mesocosms for 60 days. The highest abundance of all target genes was observed on the 6th day of treatment. trzD was observed in the bioaugmented mesocosms only. The bacterial community profile in all mesocosms was monitored by LH-PCR over a period of two months. Results indicate that the communities changed rapidly after inoculation, but there was no drastic change in microbial community profile after 1 month. Results indicated that efficient bioremediation of atrazine using a microbial consortium could be successfully up-scaled to pilot scale.

  1. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  2. Review of heavy metal bio-remediation in contaminated freeway facilitated by adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    Toxicity around biological systems is a significant issue for environmental health in a long term. Recent biotechnological approaches for bio-remediation of heavy metals in freeway frequently include mineralization, bio-adsorption or even remediation. Thus, adequate restoration in freeway requiring cooperation, integration and assimilation of such biotechnological advances along with traditional and ethical wisdom to unravel the mystery of nature in the emerging field of bio-remediation was reviewed with highlights to better understand problems associated with toxicity of heavy metals and eco-friendly technologies.

  3. Phenol red-silk tyrosine cross-linked hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sundarakrishnan, Aswin; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Coburn, Jeannine; Chwalek, Karolina; Partlow, Benjamin; Kaplan, David L

    2016-09-15

    Phenol red is a cytocompatible pH sensing dye that is commonly added to cell culture media, but removed from some media formulations due to its structural mimicry of estrogen. Phenol red free media is also used during live cell imaging, to avoid absorbance and fluorescence quenching of fluorophores. To overcome these complications, we developed cytocompatible and degradable phenol red-silk tyrosine cross-linked hydrogels using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Phenol red added to silk during tyrosine crosslinking accelerated di-tyrosine formation in a concentration-dependent reaction. Phenol red diffusion studies and UV-Vis spectra of phenol red-silk tyrosine hydrogels at different pHs showed altered absorption bands, confirming entrapment of dye within the hydrogel network. LC-MS of HRP-reacted phenol red and N-acetyl-l-tyrosine reaction products confirmed covalent bonds between the phenolic hydroxyl group of phenol red and tyrosine on the silk. At lower phenol red concentrations, leak-proof hydrogels which did not release phenol red were fabricated and found to be cytocompatible based on live-dead staining and alamar blue assessments of encapsulated fibroblasts. Due to the spectral overlap between phenol red absorbance at 415nm and di-tyrosine fluorescence at 417nm, phenol red-silk hydrogels provide both absorbance and fluorescence-based pH sensing. With an average pKa of 6.8 and good cytocompatibiltiy, phenol red-silk hydrogels are useful for pH sensing in phenol red free systems, cellular microenvironments and bioreactors. Phenol red entrapped within hydrogels facilitates pH sensing in phenol red free environments. Leak-proof phenol red based pH sensors require covalent binding techniques, but are complicated due to the lack of amino or carboxyl groups on phenol red. Currently, there is no simple, reliable technique to covalently link phenol red to hydrogel matrices, for real-time pH sensing in cell culture environments. Herein

  4. Ecotoxicological evaluation of diesel-contaminated soil before and after a bioremediation process.

    PubMed

    Molina-Barahona, L; Vega-Loyo, L; Guerrero, M; Ramírez, S; Romero, I; Vega-Jarquín, C; Albores, A

    2005-02-01

    Evaluation of contaminated sites is usually performed by chemical analysis of pollutants in soil. This is not enough either to evaluate the environmental risk of contaminated soil nor to evaluate the efficiency of soil cleanup techniques. Information on the bioavailability of complex mixtures of xenobiotics and degradation products cannot be totally provided by chemical analytical data, but results from bioassays can integrate the effects of pollutants in complex mixtures. In the preservation of human health and environment quality, it is important to assess the ecotoxicological effects of contaminated soils to obtain a better evaluation of the healthiness of this system. The monitoring of a diesel-contaminated soil and the evaluation of a bioremediation technique conducted on a microcosm scale were performed by a battery of ecotoxicological tests including phytotoxicity, Daphnia magna, and nematode assays. In this study we biostimulated the native microflora of soil contaminated with diesel by adding nutrients and crop residue (corn straw) as a bulking agent and as a source of microorganisms and nutrients; in addition, moisture was adjusted to enhance diesel removal. The bioremediation process efficiency was evaluated directly by an innovative, simple phytotoxicity test system and the diesel extracts by Daphnia magna and nematode assays. Contaminated soil samples were revealed to have toxic effects on seed germination, seedling growth, and Daphnia survival. After biostimulation, the diesel concentration was reduced by 50.6%, and the soil samples showed a significant reduction in phytotoxicity (9%-15%) and Daphnia assays (3-fold), confirming the effectiveness of the bioremediation process. Results from our microcosm study suggest that in addition to the evaluation of the bioremediation processes efficiency, toxicity testing is different with organisms representative of diverse phylogenic levels. The integration of analytical, toxicological and bioremediation data

  5. Biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives by engineered bacteria: current knowledge and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rucká, Lenka; Nešvera, Jan; Pátek, Miroslav

    2017-09-06

    Biodegradation of phenolic compounds is a promising alternative to physical and chemical methods used to remove these toxic pollutants from the environment. The ability of various microorganisms to metabolize phenol and its derivatives (alkylphenols, nitrophenols and halogenated derivatives) has therefore been intensively studied. Knowledge of the enzymes catalyzing the individual reactions, the genes encoding these enzymes and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the expression of the respective genes in bacteria serves as a basis for the development of more efficient degraders of phenols via genetic engineering methods. Engineered bacteria which efficiently degrade phenolic compounds were constructed in laboratories using various approaches such as cloning the catabolic genes in multicopy plasmids, the introduction of heterologous genes or broadening the substrate range of key enzymes by mutagenesis. Efforts to apply the engineered strains in in situ bioremediation are problematic, since engineered strains often do not compete successfully with indigenous microorganisms. New efficient degraders of phenolic compounds may be obtained by complex approaches at the organism level, such as genome shuffling or adaptive evolution. The application of these engineered bacteria for bioremediation will require even more complex analysis of both the biological characteristics of the degraders and the physico-chemical conditions at the polluted sites.

  6. Recognizing potential toxicity of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Brancato, D.J.

    1982-02-01

    Data is presented which correlates phenol levels in human urine with inhalatory and skin exposures (phenol is rapidly collected and excreted in urine). ''Normal'' phenol levels in human urine are compared with urine levels resulting from exposure to phenol. A correlation is made between urine phenol levels and potential human toxicity.

  7. Applying automated data acquisition and management technology to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Widing, M.A.; Leser, C.

    1995-06-01

    Operating a bioremediation process requires timely and accurate analysis of physical and chemical parameters that can affect the system. At a fuel oil spill site, the operation of an in-situ bioremediation system, consisting of fluid and nutrient injection, fluid withdrawal, and aeration cycles, is monitored by means of electronic downhole sensors and on-site chemical analysis. A data acquisition and management system was designed and implemented to rapidly analyze data for operational decision malting. A hardware suite, containing an electronic monitoring system data acquisition computer, and data analysis workstation, was also developed. Through the use of both commercial software products and custom software, suites of data management and analysis tools were provided. The data acquisition suite of software tools assisted in programming dataloggers, automatically recording monitored data, and integrating these data with manually sampled chemical data. The data analysis suite of software tools assisted in downloading data to remote workstations, sampling the database for trend analysis, and automating the interface to commercial analysis packages.

  8. Origin and processing of terrestrial organic carbon in the Amazon system: lignin phenols in river, shelf, and fan sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuwen; Schefuß, Enno; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Sawakuchi, André O.; Zabel, Matthias; Baker, Paul A.; Hefter, Jens; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2017-05-01

    The Amazon River transports large amounts of terrestrial organic carbon (OCterr) from the Andean and Amazon neotropical forests to the Atlantic Ocean. In order to compare the biogeochemical characteristics of OCterr in the fluvial sediments from the Amazon drainage basin and in the adjacent marine sediments, we analysed riverbed sediments from the Amazon mainstream and its main tributaries as well as marine surface sediments from the Amazon shelf and fan for total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13CTOC), and lignin phenol compositions. TOC and lignin content exhibit positive correlations with Al / Si ratios (indicative of the sediment grain size) implying that the grain size of sediment discharged by the Amazon River plays an important role in the preservation of TOC and leads to preferential preservation of lignin phenols in fine particles. Depleted δ13CTOC values (-26.1 to -29.9 ‰) in the main tributaries consistently correspond with the dominance of C3 vegetation. Ratios of syringyl to vanillyl (S / V) and cinnamyl to vanillyl (C / V) lignin phenols suggest that non-woody angiosperm tissues are the dominant source of lignin in the Amazon basin. Although the Amazon basin hosts a rich diversity of vascular plant types, distinct regional lignin compositions are not observed. In the marine sediments, the distribution of δ13CTOC and Λ8 (sum of eight lignin phenols in organic carbon (OC), expressed as mg/100 mg OC) values implies that OCterr discharged by the Amazon River is transported north-westward by the North Brazil Current and mostly deposited on the inner shelf. The lignin compositions in offshore sediments under the influence of the Amazon plume are consistent with the riverbed samples suggesting that processing of OCterr during offshore transport does not change the encoded source information. Therefore, the lignin compositions preserved in these offshore sediments can reliably reflect the vegetation in the Amazon

  9. Bioremediation of treated wood with fungi

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed technologies for fungal bioremediation of waste wood treated with oilborne or metal-based preservatives. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood-decay fungi, obtained through strain selection to obtain preservative-tolerant fungi. This waste management approach provides a product with reduced wood volume and the...

  10. MTBE BIODEGRADATION AND BIOREMEDIATION (ROCKY GAP, MD*)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE contamination in ground water at gasoline spill sites can be treated with in situ aerobic bioremediation. All that is usually necessary is to provide sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen demand of the fuel components in the ground water. The field scale performance of the ...

  11. MTBE BIODEGRADATION AND BIOREMEDIATION (ROCKY GAP, MD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE contamination in ground water at gasoline spill sites can be treated with in situ aerobic bioremediation. All that is usually necessary is to provide sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen demand of the fuel components in the ground water. The field scale performance of the ...

  12. BIOREMEDIATION AT WOOD-PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of organic compounds from ground water during bioremediation at wood-preserving sites is a function of the stoichiometric demand for electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate) to metabolize the organic contaminants and the supply of the electron acceptors in th...

  13. BIOREMEDIATION AT WOOD-PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of organic compounds from ground water during bioremediation at wood-preserving sites is a function of the stoichiometric demand for electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate) to metabolize the organic contaminants and the supply of the electron acceptors in th...

  14. Bioremediation of recalcitrant organics 3(7)

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Hoeppel, R.E.; Anderson, D.B.

    1995-12-31

    This volume focuses on biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds in soil and aqueous environments. Articles discuss the bioremediation of media contaminated with PAHs, PCBs, PCP, pesticides, explosives, bis(2)-ethylhexyl-phthalate, pharmaceutical residues, and alkylpyridines. Also covered is the variation of nutrient supplies for optimizing hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  15. Engineering away lysosomal junk: medical bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Bruce E; Schloendorn, John

    2007-09-01

    Atherosclerosis, macular degeneration, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, are associated with the intracellular accumulation of substances that impair cellular function and viability. Reversing this accumulation may be a valuable therapy, but the accumulating substances resist normal cellular catabolism. On the other hand, these substances are naturally degraded in the soil and water by microorganisms. Thus, we propose the concept of "medical bioremediation," which derives from the successful field of in situ environmental bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons. In environmental bioremediation, communities of microorganisms mineralize hydrophobic organics using a series of enzymes. In medical bioremediation, we hope to utilize one or several microbial enzymes to degrade the intracellular accumulators enough that they can be cleared from the affected cells. Here, we present preliminary, but promising results for the bacterial biodegradation of 7-ketocholesterol, the main accumulator of foam cells associated with atherosclerosis. In particular, we report on the isolation of several Nocardia strains able to biodegrade 7-ketocholesterol and as an ester of 7-ketocholoesterol. We also outline key intermediates in the biodegradation pathway, a key step towards identifying the key enzymes that may lead to a therapy.

  16. Getting rid of wastes biodegradation and bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.

    1994-12-31

    This book examines the topics of biodegradation and bioremediation of hazardous wastes from the focus of a single author, a microbiologist. Molecular-biology approaches to biodegradation and the engineering approach to degradation are deemphasized, while the kinetics of degradation reactions are covered well. A general approach to the subjects is appropriate for between undergraduate and professional level reading.

  17. Phytochemical phenolics in organically grown vegetables.

    PubMed

    Young, Janice E; Zhao, Xin; Carey, Edward E; Welti, Ruth; Yang, Shie-Shien; Wang, Weiqun

    2005-12-01

    Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely correlated with risks for several chronic diseases in humans. Phytochemicals, and in particular, phenolic compounds, present in plant foods may be partly responsible for these health benefits through a variety of mechanisms. Since environmental factors play a role in a plant's production of secondary metabolites, it was hypothesized that an organic agricultural production system would increase phenolic levels. Cultivars of leaf lettuce, collards, and pac choi were grown either on organically certified plots or on adjacent conventional plots. Nine prominent phenolic agents were quantified by HPLC, including phenolic acids (e. g. caffeic acid and gallic acid) and aglycone or glycoside flavonoids (e. g. apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin). Statistically, we did not find significant higher levels of phenolic agents in lettuce and collard samples grown organically. The total phenolic content of organic pac choi samples as measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, however, was significantly higher than conventional samples (p < 0.01), and seemed to be associated with a greater attack the plants in organic plots by flea beetles. These results indicated that although organic production method alone did not enhance biosynthesis of phytochemicals in lettuce and collards, the organic system provided an increased opportunity for insect attack, resulting in a higher level of total phenolic agents in pac choi.

  18. Discovery of Plant Phenolic Compounds That Act as Type III Secretion System Inhibitors or Inducers of the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23770912

  19. Analysis of community composition of biofilms in a submerged filter system for the removal of ammonia and phenol from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Lorenzo, C; Molina-Muñoz, M L; Gómez-Villalba, B; Vilchez, R; Ramos, A; Rodelas, B; Hontoria, E; González-López, J

    2006-02-01

    The bacterial diversity of a submerged filter, used for the removal of ammonia and phenol from an industrial wastewater with high salinity, was studied by a cultivation-independent approach based on PCR/TGGE (temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis). The wastewater treatment plant (laboratory scale) combined the nitrification and denitrification processes and consisted of two separated columns (one anoxic and one aerated) connected through a valve. The spatial diversity of bacterial communities in the plant biofilms was analysed by taking samples at four different heights in the system. TGGE profiles of PCR-amplified sequences of the 16 S rRNA gene (V3-hypervariable region) showed significant variations of the bacterial diversity, mainly depending on the concentration of O(2) along the system. Several bands separated by TGGE were reamplified and sequenced, in order to explore the composition of the microbial communities in the biofilms. Most of the sequenced bands (10 out of 13) were closely related to the 16 S rRNA gene of marine alpha-proteobacteria, mainly grouping in the periphery of the genus Roseobacter. Other sequences were related to those of gamma-proteobacteria, the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira marina and anaerobic phenol-degrading bacteria of the Desulfobacteraceae.

  20. Discovery of plant phenolic compounds that act as type III secretion system inhibitors or inducers of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2013-09-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens.

  1. In situ degradation of phenol and promotion of plant growth in contaminated environments by a single Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujing; Song, Jing; Zhao, Wei; He, Xiaoli; Chen, Jun; Xiao, Ming

    2011-08-15

    For bioremediation of contaminated environments, a bacterial strain, SZH16, was isolated and found to reduce phenol concentration in a selective medium. Using the reaction vessel containing the soil mixed with phenol and bacteria, we found that the single strain degraded efficiently the phenol level in soil samples. The strain was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the basis of biochemical tests and by comparison of 16S rDNA sequences, and phosphate solubilization and IAA production were not observed in the strain. Simultaneous examination of the role of strain SZH16 in the plant growth and phenol biodegradation was performed. Results showed that inoculation of the single strain in the phenol-spiked soil resulted in corn growth promotion and in situ phenol degradation and the increase in plant biomass correlated with the decrease in phenol content. Colonization experiments showed that the population of the SZH16 strain remained relatively constant. All these findings indicated that the corn growth promotion might be due to reduction in phytotoxicity, a result of phenol biodegradation by the single strain SZH16. Furthermore, the strain was found to stimulate corn growth and reduce phenol concentration simultaneously in phenol-containing water, and even historically contaminated field soils. It is attractive for environment remediation and agronomic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. UTILIZATION OF TREATABILITY AND PILOT TESTS TO PREDICT CAH BIOREMEDIATION (Battelle)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple tools have been suggested to help in the design of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation systems for CAHs:
    Extensive high quality microcosm testing followed by small-scale, thoroughly observed, induced flow field pilot tests (i.e. RABITT Protocol, Morse 1998)
    More...

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF PROTOCOLS FOR EVALUATION OF OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols were developed and evaluated to assess the efficacy and environmental safety of commercial oil spill bioremediation agents (CBAs). Test systems that simulate oil slicks on open water or oiled sandy beaches were used to test the effectiveness of CBAs. Gravimetric and gas...

  4. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY - TNT - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J. R. Simplot Ex-Situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System, also known as the J.R. Simplot Anaerobic Biological Remediaton Process (the SABRE™ Process), is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic and energetic compounds. The process does not evolve any known toxic intermedi...

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF PROTOCOLS FOR EVALUATION OF OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols were developed and evaluated to assess the efficacy and environmental safety of commercial oil spill bioremediation agents (CBAs). Test systems that simulate oil slicks on open water or oiled sandy beaches were used to test the effectiveness of CBAs. Gravimetric and gas...

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: EX-SITU ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY - TNT - J.R. SIMPLOT COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The J. R. Simplot Ex-Situ Anaerobic Bioremediation System, also known as the J.R. Simplot Anaerobic Biological Remediaton Process (the SABRE™ Process), is a technology designed to destroy nitroaromatic and energetic compounds. The process does not evolve any known toxic intermedi...

  7. UTILIZATION OF TREATABILITY AND PILOT TESTS TO PREDICT CAH BIOREMEDIATION (Battelle)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple tools have been suggested to help in the design of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation systems for CAHs:
    Extensive high quality microcosm testing followed by small-scale, thoroughly observed, induced flow field pilot tests (i.e. RABITT Protocol, Morse 1998)
    More...

  8. Method for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  9. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.

    PubMed Central

    Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

    1996-01-01

    Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environment is well established, and research has demonstrated the capability of the indigenous microflora to degrade many components of petroleum shortly after exposure. Studies have identified numerous factors which affect the natural biodegradation rates of oil, such as the origin and concentration of oil, the availability of oil-degrading microorganisms, nutrient concentrations, oxygen levels, climatic conditions, and sediment characteristics. Bioremediation strategies based on the application of fertilizers have been shown to stimulate the biodegradation rates of oil in aerobic intertidal sediments such as sand and cobble. The ratio of oil loading to nitrogen concentration within the interstitial water has been identified to be the principal controlling factor influencing the success of this bioremediation strategy. However, the need for the seeding of natural environments with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria has not been clearly demonstrated under natural environmental conditions. It is suggested that bioremediation should now take its place among the many techniques available for the treatment of oil spills, although there is still a clear need to set operational limits for its use. On the basis of the available evidence, we have proposed preliminary operational guidelines for bioremediation on shoreline environments. PMID:8801437

  10. Dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapy for local and systemic complications of acute pancreatitis mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianbo; Zhang, Jinjie; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Jiang, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-08-28

    To inhibit both the local and systemic complications with acute pancreatitis, an effective therapy requires a drug delivery system that can efficiently overcome the blood-pancreas barrier while achieving lung-specific accumulation. Here, we report the first dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapeutic strategy mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Using the proposed dual-targeting ligand, an anti-inflammatory compound Rhein has been tailored to preferentially accumulate in the pancreas and lungs with rapid distribution kinetics, excellent tissue-penetrating properties and minimum toxicity. Accordingly, the drug-ligand conjugate remarkably downregulated the proinflammatory cytokines in the target organs thus effectively inhibiting local pancreatic and systemic inflammation in rats. The dual-specific targeting therapeutic strategy may help pave the way for targeted drug delivery to treat complicated inflammatory diseases.

  11. Lipid encapsulated phenolics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenolic compounds have numerous health benefits when included in the human diet and have emerged as a functional food and feed additive. Current sources of phenolics include commodity grains such as corn, oat, and wheat but may also be obtained as a co-product from agricultural residues and other l...

  12. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  13. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  14. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a Rhodococcus strain with phenol-degrading ability and its potential use for tannery effluent biotreatment.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Busto, Víctor D; Talou, Julián Rodríguez; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Wastewater derived from leather production may contain phenols, which are highly toxic, and their degradation could be possible through bioremediation technologies. In the present work, microbial degradation of phenol was studied using a tolerant bacterial strain, named CS1, isolated from tannery sediments. This strain was able to survive in the presence of phenol at concentrations of up to 1,000 mg/L. On the basis of morphological and biochemical properties, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis, the isolated strain was identified as Rhodococcus sp. Phenol removal was evaluated at a lab-scale in Erlenmeyer flasks and at a bioreactor scale in a stirred tank reactor. Rhodococcus sp. CS1 was able to completely remove phenol in a range of 200 to 1,000 mg/L in mineral medium at 30 ± 2 °C and pH 7 as optimal conditions. In the stirred tank bioreactor, we studied the effect of some parameters, such as agitation (200-600 rpm) and aeration (1-3 vvm), on growth and phenol removal efficiency. Faster phenol biodegradation was obtained in the bioreactor than in Erlenmeyer flasks, and maximum phenol removal was achieved at 400 rpm and 1 vvm in only 12 h. Furthermore, Rhodococcus sp. CS1 strain was able to grow and completely degrade phenols from tannery effluents after 9 h of incubation. Based on these results, Rhodococcus sp. CS1 could be an appropriate microorganism for bioremediation of tannery effluents or other phenol-containing wastewaters.

  16. Metals, minerals and microbes: geomicrobiology and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2010-03-01

    Microbes play key geoactive roles in the biosphere, particularly in the areas of element biotransformations and biogeochemical cycling, metal and mineral transformations, decomposition, bioweathering, and soil and sediment formation. All kinds of microbes, including prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their symbiotic associations with each other and 'higher organisms', can contribute actively to geological phenomena, and central to many such geomicrobial processes are transformations of metals and minerals. Microbes have a variety of properties that can effect changes in metal speciation, toxicity and mobility, as well as mineral formation or mineral dissolution or deterioration. Such mechanisms are important components of natural biogeochemical cycles for metals as well as associated elements in biomass, soil, rocks and minerals, e.g. sulfur and phosphorus, and metalloids, actinides and metal radionuclides. Apart from being important in natural biosphere processes, metal and mineral transformations can have beneficial or detrimental consequences in a human context. Bioremediation is the application of biological systems to the clean-up of organic and inorganic pollution, with bacteria and fungi being the most important organisms for reclamation, immobilization or detoxification of metallic and radionuclide pollutants. Some biominerals or metallic elements deposited by microbes have catalytic and other properties in nanoparticle, crystalline or colloidal forms, and these are relevant to the development of novel biomaterials for technological and antimicrobial purposes. On the negative side, metal and mineral transformations by microbes may result in spoilage and destruction of natural and synthetic materials, rock and mineral-based building materials (e.g. concrete), acid mine drainage and associated metal pollution, biocorrosion of metals, alloys and related substances, and adverse effects on radionuclide speciation, mobility and containment, all with immense social

  17. Phenolic content and ferric reducing-antioxidant power of cow's milk produced in different pasture-based production systems in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kuhnen, Shirley; Moacyr, Juliana R; Mayer, Jaqueline K; Navarro, Bruno B; Trevisan, Rafael; Honorato, Luciana A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz C

    2014-12-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely present in forage. However, few studies have been carried out to investigate the presence of these compounds in animal products such as milk. In this study, the total phenolic content (TPC) and ferric reducing-antioxidant power (FRAP) of milk produced under agroecological and conventional management systems in southern Brazil were determined. Three systems were compared: (a) agroecological, with intensive rotational grazing, also known as Voisin grazing (ECO); (b) semi-intensive conventional (SIC); and (c) conventional grazing (CGR) (n = 8 per group). Pastures with distinct and more diverse botanical composition were observed on the ECO farms. Significantly (P < 0.05) lower amounts of TPC were found in agroecologically produced milk in autumn and summer and the CGR system showed the highest FRAP value (P < 0.05) for the samples collected in autumn. Positive correlations where found between the TPC and FRAP values obtained for the milk samples (0.198, P < 0.05), milk FRAP and forage TPC values (0.344, P < 0.05), and the TPC and FRAP values obtained for the forage (0.70, p < 0.01). PCA applied to the UV spectra dataset (200-350 nm) clearly distinguished the samples collected from the ECO system in the winter. Our results revealed that, under the conditions prevalent in southern Brazil, since the cows were allowed to graze in all of the systems, the TPC and antioxidant capacity of the milk samples showed minimal variation. However, since the forage TPC and FRAP values for the milk were correlated, TPC appears to be a promising variable for the purpose of monitoring forage prior to its selection aimed at enhancing the antioxidant activity of milk. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS DETERMINATION METHODS FOR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN SOIL TO ENHANCE IN-SITU AND ON-SITE BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of biodegradation rates of organics in soil slurry and compacted soil systems is essential for evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation for treatment of contaminated soils. In this paper, a systematic protocol has been developed for evaluating bioknetic and transp...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS DETERMINATION METHODS FOR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN SOIL TO ENHANCE IN-SITU AND ON-SITE BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of biodegradation rates of organics in soil slurry and compacted soil systems is essential for evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation for treatment of contaminated soils. In this paper, a systematic protocol has been developed for evaluating bioknetic and transp...

  20. An Eco-tank system containing microbes and different aquatic plant species for the bioremediation of N,N-dimethylformamide polluted river waters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jibo; Chu, Shuyi; Tian, Guangming; Thring, Ronald W; Cui, Lingzhou

    2016-12-15

    An Eco-tank system of 10m was designed to simulate the natural river. It consisted of five tanks sequentially connected containing microbes, biofilm carriers and four species of floating aquatic plants. The purification performance of the system for N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) polluted river water was evaluated by operating in continuous mode. DMF was completely removed in Tanks 1 and 2 at influent DMF concentrations between 75.42 and 161.05mg L(-1). The NH4(+)-N concentration increased in Tank 1, followed by a gradual decrease in Tanks 2-5. Removal of NH4(+)-N was enhanced by aeration. The average effluent NH4(+)-N concentration of Tank 5 decreased to a minimum of 0.89mg L(-1), corresponding to a decrease of 84.8% when compared with that before aeration. TN concentration did not decrease significantly as expected after inoculation with denitrifying bacteria. The average effluent TN concentration of the system was determined to be 4.58mg L(-1), still unable to satisfy the Class V standard for surface water environmental quality. The results of this study demonstrated that the Eco-tank system is an efficient process in removing DMF, TOC, and NH4(+)-N from DMF polluted river water. However, if possible, alternative technologies should be adopted for controlling the effluent TN concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioremediation of storage tank bottom sludge by using a two-stage composting system: Effect of mixing ratio and nutrients addition.

    PubMed

    Koolivand, Ali; Rajaei, Mohammad Sadegh; Ghanadzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Saeedi, Reza; Abtahi, Hamid; Godini, Kazem

    2017-03-21

    The effect of mixing ratio and nutrients addition on the efficiency of a two-stage composting system in removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from storage tank bottom sludge (STBS) was investigated. The system consisted of ten windrow piles as primary composting (PC) followed by four in-vessel reactors as secondary composting (SC). Various initial C/N/P and mixing ratios of STBS to immature compost (IC) were examined in the PC and SC for 12 and 6weeks, respectively. The removal rates of TPH in the two-stage system (93.72-95.24%) were higher than those in the single-stage one. Depending on the experiments, TPH biodegradation fitted to the first- and second-order kinetics with the rate constants of 0.051-0.334d(-1) and 0.002-0.165gkg(-1)d(-1), respectively. The bacteria identified were Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus sp., and Proteus sp. The study verified that a two-stage composting system is effective in treating the STBS.

  2. Tapping bioremediation's potential -- A matter of sweat and tiers

    SciTech Connect

    Merski, A.T.; Griffin, W.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Bioremediation's potential for treating environmental contamination is gaining greater recognition among regulators and the regulated community. For example, biological treatment is routinely applied to municipal wastewater, which typically contains readily biodegradable materials. Industrial wastewaters, by contrast, often contain higher concentrations of materials that present unique challenges to biological treatment. In both areas, biological treatment has succeeded by using contained, relatively controlled systems engineered to optimize performance of the biological component. Uncontrolled releases into such matrices as soil, and fresh and marine waters increase the complexity of the biological challenge, requiring development of novel products and procedures for efficient biological treatment and monitoring. One of the goals of the National Environmental Technology Applications Corporation (NETAC; Pittsburgh) is to support scientific development of bioremediation technology. NETAC is a non-profit corporation formed in 1988 through a cooperative agreement between EPA and the University of Pittsburgh Trust. Its overall mission is to accelerate development, application and commercialization of priority environmental technologies for national and international markets. NETAC provides technical and business expertise to assist in evaluating, commercializing and publicizing new environmental technologies. The organization assumes no financial interest in any technology but provides independent third-party support and analysis on a fee-for-service basis to technology users and developers.

  3. Pilot-scale bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.P.; Paterek, J.R.; Liu, B.Y.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) conducted a pilot-scale study at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in New Jersey. The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of an innovative chemical/biological treatment process (MGP-REM process) to remediate soils contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to identify the benefits of the MGP-REM process, the system was also operated in the conventional bioremediation mode. Results showed that the MGP-REM process can effectively treat PAH-contaminated MGP site soils, and it reduced the toxicity of the soil by a factor of 50, as indicated by the Microtox Toxicity Test. The MGP-REM process was 70% more efficient than conventional bioremediation in the removal of the PAHs from the soils. Air emissions data suggest that minimal air pollution control and monitoring are required for the slurry-phase application of both the MGP-REM process and the conventional biological treatment. Process economics indicate that the MGP-REM process in a slurry-phase mode has an estimated treatment cost of $100/cubic yard for remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. 7 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Stimulating sediment bioremediation with benthic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and sustainable technologies for cleaning up of contaminated sediments are under urgent demand. Bioremediation by utilizing the natural metabolic activities of sediment-inhabited microorganisms has been widely accepted as a viable option, but the relatively low efficiency and poor controllability severely limite its application. Here, we bring out the concept that electrochemical approaches may be used as an efficient means to stimulate sediment bioremediation. Although still at the very beginning, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFC) as a remediation technology show many potential benefits, such as accelerated decontamination, self-sustained operation, relatively easy deployment and control, and environmental benignity. The unique features of BMFC setup and operation also give rise to substantially different challenges compared to conventional MFCs. In this review, we present a critical overview on the characteristics, possible application niches, and state-of-the-art progress of this technology. Especially, the current limitations in respect of system design, electrode selection, microbial control and selection of deployment environment are discussed in details, and the needed future research endeavors to promote its practical application are highlighted.

  5. Biomarkers for monitoring efficacy of bioremediation by microbial inoculants.

    PubMed

    Jansson, J K; Björklöf, K; Elvang, A M; Jørgensen, K S

    2000-02-01

    Bioaugmentation of contaminated sites with microbes that are adapted or genetically engineered for degradation of specific toxic compounds is an area that is currently being explored as a clean-up option. Biomarkers have been developed to track the survival and efficacy of specific bacteria that are used as inocula for bioremediation of contaminated soil. Examples of biomarkers include the luc gene, encoding firefly luciferase and the gfp gene, encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The luc gene was used to tag different bacteria used for bioremediation of gasoline or chlorophenols. The bacteria were monitored on the basis of luciferase activity in cell extracts from soil. The gfp gene was also used to monitor bacteria during degradation of chlorophenol in soil, based on fluorescence of the GFP protein. Other biomarkers can also be used for monitoring of microbial inocula used for bioaugmentation of contaminated sites. The choice of biomarker and monitoring system depends on the particular site, bacterial strain and sensitivity and specificity of detection required.

  6. Bioremediation using Gracilaria lemaneiformis to manage the nitrogen and phosphorous balance in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture system in Yantian Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhangliang; You, Jiaguo; Wu, Hailong; Yang, Fangfang; Long, Lijuan; Liu, Qiao; Huo, Yuanzi; He, Peimin

    2017-08-15

    To reduce negative environmental impacts from human aquaculture activities, the red alga Gracilaria lemaneiformis was co-cultured with the fish Pseudosciaena crocea in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) system for 35d in Yantian Bay. The eutrophication index value decreased from 14.5 to 8.4 after seaweeds were co-cultured in cage farming areas, which indicated that the eutrophic water column in Yantian Bay could be mediated by IMTA. Total DIN and DIP of the tidal input and output were 9.23kg, 0.19kg and 11.08kg, and 0.27kg, respectively. Total 5.24kg of dissolved N and 0.81kg of dissolved P were released from IMTA system. These results indicate that G. lemaneiformis co-cultured in IMTA system could not completely remove all excess nutrients. In theory, at least 324.48kg of seaweed seedlings would be required to balance excess nutrients generated from fish cages. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Phenol degradation by halophilic fungal isolate JS4 and evaluation of its tolerance of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Shang, Yu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-02-01

    Phenol is one of the most common pollutants in many kinds of industrial wastewater, some of which are in high salinity, resulting in more difficulties of biodegradation. In this work, a halophilic strain capable of utilizing phenol as sole source of carbon and energy in both hypersaline and no-salt media was isolated and identified as genus Debaryomyces. The optimization of environmental parameters including phenol concentration, pH, dissolved oxygen as well as salinity was carried out and tolerance of heavy metals by the strain was evaluated. The strain Debaryomyces sp. was able to grow in culture when initial phenol concentration, pH, agitation and salinity were at wide ranges (0-1200 mg L(-1), 4.0-10.0, 50-200 rpm, 0 %-15 %, respectively). High removal efficiency was hardly affected in the presence of 5 mM of Zn (II) and Mn (II). Under optimal conditions (pH 6.0, 200 rpm, 1 % of salinity without heavy metals), 500 mg L(-1) of phenol could be completely degraded within 32 h. The high removal efficiency of phenol by the strain with significant variations of process parameters might contribute to the bioremediation of phenol-polluted environments under hypersaline or no-salt conditions.

  8. Enhancement of Phenol Biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through Ultraviolet-Induced Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhen; Yu, Chenyang; Xin, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane’s kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h−1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h−1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters. PMID:25837630

  9. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  10. Bioremediation of oil sludge-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, N; Rajaram, P

    2001-05-01

    Bioremediation has become an important method for the restoration of oil-polluted environments by the use of indigenous or selected microbial flora. Several factors such as aeration, use of inorganic nutrients or fertilizers and the type of microbial species play a major role in the remediation of oil-contaminated sites. Experiments were undertaken for bioremediation of oil sludge-contaminated soil in the presence of a bacterial consortium, inorganic nutrients, compost and a bulking agent (wheat bran). Experiments were conducted in glass troughs for the 90-day period. Bulked soil showed more rapid degradation of oil compared to all other amendments. During the experimental period, wheat bran-amended soil showed 76% hydrocarbon removal compared to 66% in the case of inorganic nutrients-amended soil. A corresponding increase in the number of bacterial populations was also noticed. Addition of the bacterial consortium in different amendments significantly enhanced the removal of oil from the petroleum sludge from different treatment units.

  11. Bioremediation Education Science and Technology (BEST) Program Annual Report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2000-07-01

    The Bioremediation, Education, Science and Technology (BEST) partnership provides a sustainable and contemporary approach to developing new bioremedial technologies for US Department of Defense (DoD) priority contaminants while increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities and women in an exciting new biotechnical field. This comprehensive and innovative bioremediation education program provides under-represented groups with a cross-disciplinary bioremediation cirruculum and financial support, coupled with relevant training experiences at advanced research laboratories and field sites. These programs are designed to provide a stream of highly trained minority and women professionals to meet national environmental needs.

  12. Use of molecular techniques in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Płaza, G; Ulfig, K; Hazen, T C; Brigmon, R L

    2001-01-01

    In a practical sense, biotechnology is concerned with the production of commercial products generated by biological processes. More formally, biotechnology may be defined as "the application of scientific and engineering principles to the processing of material by biological agents to provide goods and services" (Cantor, 2000). From a historical perspective, biotechnology dates back to the time when yeast was first used for beer or wine fermentation, and bacteria were used to make yogurt. In 1972, the birth of recombinant DNA technology moved biotechnology to new heights and led to the establishment of a new industry. Progress in biotechnology has been truly remarkable. Within four years of the discovery of recombinant DNA technology, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) were making human insulin, interferon, and human growth hormone. Now, recombinant DNA technology and its products--GMOs are widely used in environmental biotechnology (Glick and Pasternak, 1988; Cowan, 2000). Bioremediation is one of the most rapidly growing areas of environmental biotechnology. Use of bioremediation for environmental clean up is popular due to low costs and its public acceptability. Indeed, bioremediation stands to benefit greatly and advance even more rapidly with the adoption of molecular techniques developed originally for other areas of biotechnology. The 1990s was the decade of molecular microbial ecology (time of using molecular techniques in environmental biotechnology). Adoption of these molecular techniques made scientists realize that microbial populations in the natural environments are much more diverse than previously thought using traditional culture methods. Using molecular ecological methods, such as direct DNA isolation from environmental samples, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), PCR methods, nucleic acid hybridization etc., we can now study microbial consortia relevant to pollutant degradation in the environment. These techniques promise to

  13. Decomposer animals and bioremediation of soils.

    PubMed

    Haimi, J

    2000-02-01

    Although microorganisms are degrading the contaminants in bioremediation processes, soil animals can also have important--while usually an indirect--role in these processes. Soil animals are useful indicators of soil contamination, both before and after the bioremediation. Many toxicity and bioavailability assessment methods utilizing soil animals have been developed for hazard and risk-assessment procedures. Not only the survival of the animals, but also more sensitive parameters like growth, reproduction and community structure have often been taken into account in the assessment. The use of bioassays together with chemical analyses gives the most reliable results for risk analyses. This is because physical, chemical and biological properties of the remediated soil may be changed during the process, and it is possible that transformation rather than mineralization of the contaminants has taken place. In addition, the soil may contain other harmful substances than those searched in chemical analyses. Finally, because the ultimate goal of the bioremediation should be--together with mineralization of the harmful substances--the ecological recovery of the soil, development of diverse decomposer community as a basis of the functioning ecosystem should be ensured. Soil animals, especially the large ones, can also actively take part in the ecological recovery processes through their own activity. The potential risk of transfer of contaminants accumulated in soil animals to the above-ground food webs should be borne in mind.

  14. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading bacterium strain Bacillus thuringiensis J20 from olive waste in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Ereqat, Suheir I; Abdelkader, Ahmad A; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed F; Al-Jawabreh, Amer O; Zaid, Taher M; Letnik, Ilya; Abdeen, Ziad A

    2017-10-05

    This study aimed at isolation of phenol degrading bacteria from olive mill wastes in Palestine. The efficiency of phenol removal and factors affecting phenol degradation were investigated. A bacterial strain (J20) was isolated from solid olive mill waste and identified as Bacillus thuringiensis based on standard morphological, biochemical characteristics and 16SrRNA sequence analysis. The strain was able to grow in a phenol concentration of 700 mg/L as the sole carbon and energy source. The culture conditions showed a significant impact on the ability of these cells to remove phenol. This strain exhibited optimum phenol degradation performance at pH 6.57 and 30 °C . Under the optimized conditions, this strain could degrade 88.6% of phenol (700 mg/L) within 96 h when the initial cell density was OD600 0.2. However, the degradation efficiency could be improved from about 88% to nearly 99% by increasing the cell density. Immobilization of J20 was carried out using 4% sodium alginate. Phenol degradation efficiency of the immobilized cells of J20 was higher than that of the free cells, 100% versus 88.6% of 700 mg/L of phenol in 120 h, indicating the improved tolerance of the immobilized cells toward phenol toxicity. The J20 was used in detoxifying crude OMWW, phenolic compounds levels were reduced by 61% compared to untreated OMWW after five days of treatment. Hence, B. thuringiensis-J20 can be effectively used for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated sites in Palestine. These findings may lead to new biotechnological applications for the degradation of phenol, related to olive oil production.

  15. Combination of aquifer thermal energy storage and enhanced bioremediation: Biological and chemical clogging.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhuobiao; van Gaans, Pauline; Rijnaarts, Huub; Grotenhuis, Tim

    2017-09-19

    Interest in the combination concept of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) and enhanced bioremediation has recently risen due to the demand for both renewable energy technology and sustainable groundwater management in urban areas. However, the impact of enhanced bioremediation on ATES is not yet clear. Of main concern is the potential for biological clogging which might be enhanced and hamper the proper functioning of ATES. On the other hand, more reduced conditions in the subsurface by enhanced bioremediation might lower the chance of chemical clogging, which is normally caused by Fe(III) precipitate. To investigate the possible effects of enhanced bioremediation on clogging with ATES, we conducted two recirculating column experiments with differing flow rates (10 and 50mL/min), where enhanced biological activity and chemically promoted Fe(III) precipitation were studied by addition of lactate and nitrate respectively. The pressure drop between the influent and effluent side of the column was used as a measure of the (change in) hydraulic conductivity, as indication of clogging in these model ATES systems. The results showed no increase in upstream pressure during the period of enhanced biological activity (after lactate addition) under both flow rates, while the addition of nitrate lead to significant buildup of the pressure drop. However, at the flow rate of 10mL/min, high pressure buildup caused by nitrate addition could be alleviated by lactate addition. This indicates that the risk of biological clogging is relatively small in the investigated areas of the mimicked ATES system that combines enhanced bioremediation with lactate as substrate, and furthermore that lactate may counter chemical clogging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plant Enhanced Bioremediation of Dissolved Toluene in Large Scale Column Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Yadav, B. K.; Mathur, S.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrocarbons like BTEX compounds entering the soil-water system through anthropogenic activities can be long lasting sources of pollution, and thus, it is essential to look for remediation options that are environmentally benign. Bioremediation is a promising cost effective technique causing no harm to the contaminated ecosystem as compared to the traditional physicochemical methods. Natural microbes degrade contaminants from polluted soil water resources in bioremediation; however this process of natural bioremediation is quite slow under prevailing environmental conditions of a typical polluted site. Research has also proven that plants play an important role when it comes to accelerate the degradation rate cost-effectively in enhanced bioremediation technique. Thus in this study, fate and transport of dissolved toluene from a source zone to down-gradient receptors in a continuous soil-water plant system was investigated. For this, two sets of large scale column experiments were performed by connecting them with a treatment wetland having canna plants in first set and unplanted gravel bed in the second set. A continuous source of toluene contaminated water was supplied at the top of the column setups. A constant groundwater flow velocity of 0.625 cm/hr was maintained in the vertical direction. Free drainage was allowed at the bottom and a constant hydraulic head of 2.0 cm was maintained at the top boundary throughout the period of the experiments in both the cases. The observed microbial colonies using the plate counting method along with measured dissolved oxygen (DO) proved that the BTEX compound degraded aerobically at a faster rate in the first set. Plants played a positive role in enhancing biodegradation rate of the BTEX compound during its transport through the porous media. Finally the observed data of the column experiments were compared with the breakthrough curves obtained numerically solving the advection dispersion equation. The results of this

  17. The evolution of a technology: The in situ bioremediation of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Norris, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrocarbon contamination of soils and groundwater is a significant problem due to the large quantities of hydrocarbons transported and stored. In situ bioremediation was one of the first remediation technologies to successfully address both dissolved and adsorbed-phase hydrocarbon contamination. Pioneering work by Richard L. Raymond be in 1972 demonstrated the commercial potential of in situ bioremediation. In the early 1980s it was recognized that the lack of an efficient oxygen supply limited implementation of the technology. Early systems used diffusers to saturate injected water with air. These systems, however, introduced limited amounts of oxygen and were prone to fouling. The innovation of using hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) provided oxygen at a rate up to two orders of magnitude faster than did the existing technology. Although H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used successfully at a number of sites, problems including too rapid decomposition, gas blockage, and inefficient use were encountered at other sites. Subsequently, alternatives such as the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor, bioventing, and air sparging have been evaluated and implemented based on cost and/or technical advantages. This paper discusses the evolution of in situ bioremediation from the early use of in well aeration to the current use of air sparging. Much of the evolution of in situ bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been a search for a cost effective electron acceptor. This paper examines the driving forces behind the use of oxygen, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and alternative electron acceptors in the development of in situ bioremediation.

  18. Phenolic Resin for Refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shunsuke; Rappolt, James

    Refractories are used in furnaces and boilers that process steel, cement, or glass as well as incinerators that operate at high temperatures. A variety of binders is used when refractories are manufactured. In this chapter, the use of phenolic resin as a binder for refractories is described. There are several factors that support the use of phenolic resins in comparison to other refractory binders. These include the following: 1. Both adhesion and green body strength are high.

  19. Bioremediation of cadmium-contaminated water systems using intact and alkaline-treated alga (Hydrodictyon reticulatum) naturally grown in an ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ammari, Tarek G; Al-Atiyat, Marrwa; Abu-Nameh, Eyad S; Ghrair, Ayoup; Jaradat, Da'san; Abu-Romman, Saeid

    2017-05-04

    Cadmium can enter water, soil, and food chain in amounts harmful to human health by industrial wastes. The use of intact and NaOH-treated dried algal tissues (Hydrodictyon reticulatum), a major ecosystem bio-component, for Cd removal from aqueous solutions was characterized. Cadmium biosorption was found to be dependent on solution pH, bioadsorbent dose, the interaction between pH and dose, contact time, and initial Cd concentration. The experimental results indicated that the biosorption performance of alkaline-treated algal tissues was better than that of intact tissues. The maximum biosorption capacities were 7.40 and 12.74 mg g(-1) for intact and alkaline-treated bioadsorbents, respectively, at optimum operating conditions. Biosorption reaches equilibrium after 24 and 240 minutes of contact, respectively, for alkaline-treated and intact bioadsorbents. Cadmium biosorption was best fitted to Langmuir isotherm model (R(2) ≈ 0.99) and the kinetic study obeyed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which suggests chemisorption as the rate-limiting step in the biosorption process. Alkaline-treated algal tissues can be used as a new material of low-cost bioadsorbent for continuous flow rate treatment systems.

  20. Bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil in South Africa by landfarming.

    PubMed

    Atagana, H I

    2004-01-01

    To determine the combined effects of biostimulation and bioaugmentation in the landfarming of a mispah form (lithosol; food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)) soil contaminated with >310000 mg kg-1 creosote with a view to developing a bioremediation technology for soils heavily contaminated with creosote. The excavated soil was mixed with 2500 kg ha-1 dolomitic lime and 2000 kg ha-1 mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) before spreading over a treatment bed of shale reinforced with clay. Sewage sludge (500 kg) was ploughed into 450 m3 of contaminated soil in the second and sixth months of treatment. A further 1000 kg ha-1 MAP was added to the soil at the end of the fifth month. Moisture was maintained at 70% field capacity. Total creosote was determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method 418.1 and concentrations of selected creosote components were determined by gas chromatography/flame ionisation detection (GC/FID). Total creosote was reduced by more than 90% by the 10th month of landfarming. The rate of reduction in creosote concentration was highest after the addition of sewage sludge. The three-ring PAHs were more slowly removed than naphthalene and the phenolic compounds. The four- and five-ring PAHs, although persist until the end of treatment, were reduced by 76-87% at the end of the experiment. A combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation during landfarming could enhance the bioremediation of soils heavily contaminated with creosote. The study provides information on the management of a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation during landfarming, and contributes to the knowledge and database necessary for the development of a technology for bioremediating creosote-contaminated land.

  1. Toxic effects of phenol on grey mullet, Mugil auratus Risso

    SciTech Connect

    Krajnovic-Ozretic, M.; Ozretic, B.

    1988-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are frequently found as contaminants in surface waters, including marine coastal waters. Phenols are generally classified as nonspecific metabolic inhibitors, and the main toxic effects are manifested on the nervous system due to the dissolution of lipids, whereas in the circulatory system phenols act as hemolysing agents of the erythrocytes. Data about sublethal effects of phenol, particularly to marine organisms are rather scarce. In several fresh water fish species exposed to phenol, the number of erythrocytes and the amount of serum proteins were decreased while lesion of gill filaments with edema and blood infiltration with degenerative changes in liver were also observed. These investigations concerned the identification of some physiological and biochemical changes in mullet blood as a consequence of exposure to phenol and some observations about the behavior and gross pathology of poisoned fish were also made.

  2. Enhanced bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils with higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    Introduction of higher plants into a bioremediation system can enhance degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons and target compounds, particularly relatively immobile and recalcitrant organic molecules. Over the past several years, an interdisciplinary team of civil engineers, chemical engineers, soil chemists, soil microbiologists, and plant scientists at Kansas State University have been studying phytoremediation systems. Greenhouse experiments have focused on selecting plants that are most adapted to degrading target compounds and to surviving in soils highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Plant species do not seem to differ in their ability to aid in the decomposition of pyrene and anthracene, but benzo[a]pyrene is much more difficult to degrade. Most species are ineffective in enhancing the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene. Four field studies have been initiated in California, Texas, New Jersey, and Virginia to test some of our greenhouse observations.

  3. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  4. Insoluble-Bound Phenolics in Food.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Yeo, Ju-Dong

    2016-09-11

    This contribution provides a review of the topic of insoluble-bound phenolics, especially their localization, synthesis, transfer and formation in plant cells, as well as their metabolism in the human digestive system and corresponding bioactivities. In addition, their release from the food matrix during food processing and extraction methods are discussed. The synthesis of phenolics takes place mainly at the endoplasmic reticulum and they are then transferred to each organ through transport proteins such as the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter at the organ's compartment membrane or via transport vesicles such as cytoplasmic and Golgi vesicles, leading to the formation of soluble and insoluble-bound phenolics at the vacuole and cell wall matrix, respectively. This part has not been adequately discussed in the food science literature, especially regarding the synthesis site and their transfer at the cellular level, thus this contribution provides valuable information to the involved scientists. The bound phenolics cannot be absorbed at the small intestine as the soluble phenolics do (5%-10%), thus passing into the large intestine and undergoing fermentation by a number of microorganisms, partially released from cell wall matrix of foods. Bound phenolics such as phenolic acids and flavonoids display strong bioactivities such as anticancer, anti-inflammation and cardiovascular disease ameliorating effects. They can be extracted by several methods such as acid, alkali and enzymatic hydrolysis to quantify their contents in foods. In addition, they can also be released from the cell wall matrix during food processing procedures such as fermentation, germination, roasting, extrusion cooking and boiling. This review provides critical information for better understanding the insoluble-bound phenolics in food and fills an existing gap in the literature.

  5. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  6. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  7. Biosensing and bioremediation of Cr(VI) by cell free extract of Enterobacter aerogenes T2.

    PubMed

    Panda, Jigisha; Sarkar, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium or Cr(VI) enters the environment through several anthropogenic activities and it is highly toxic and carcinogenic. Hence it is required to be detected and remediated from the environment. In this study, low-cost and environment-friendly methods of biosensing and bioremediation of Cr(VI) have been proposed. Crude cell free extract (CFE) of previously isolated Enterobacter aerogenes T2 (GU265554; NII 1111) was prepared and exploited to develop a stable biosensor for direct estimation of Cr(VI) in waste water, by using three electrodes via cyclic voltammetry. For bioremediation studies, a homogeneous solution of commercially available sodium alginate and CFE was added dropwise in a continuously stirred calcium chloride solution. Biologically modified calcium alginate beads were produced and these were further utilized for bioremediation studies. The proposed sensor showed linear response in the range of 10-40 μg L(-1) Cr(VI) and the limit of detection was found to be 6.6 μg L(-1) Cr(VI). No interference was observed in presence of metal ions, e.g., lead, cadmium, arsenic, tin etc., except for insignificant interference with molybdenum and manganese. In bioremediation studies, modified calcium alginate beads showed encouraging removal rate 900 mg Cr(VI)/m(3) water per day with a removal efficiency of 90%, much above than reported in literature. The proposed sensing system could be a viable alternative to costly measurement procedures. Calcium alginate beads, modified with CFE of E. aerogenes, could be used in bioremediation of Cr(VI) since it could work in real conditions with extraordinarily high capacity.

  8. MUTAGENICITY OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOILS DURING BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of contaminated soils is considered an effective method for reducing potential health hazards. Although it is assumed that (bio)remediation is a detoxifying process, degradation products of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) can be more toxic th...

  9. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION - HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Bioremediation Field Initiative as part of its overall strategy to increase the use of bioremediation to treat hazardous wastes at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabil- ity Act (C...

  10. MUTAGENICITY OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOILS DURING BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of contaminated soils is considered an effective method for reducing potential health hazards. Although it is assumed that (bio)remediation is a detoxifying process, degradation products of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) can be more toxic th...

  11. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  12. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION - HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Bioremediation Field Initiative as part of its overall strategy to increase the use of bioremediation to treat hazardous wastes at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabil- ity Act (C...

  13. Relationships of quantitative structure-activity to comparative toxicity of selected phenols in the Pimephales promelas and Tetrahymena pyriformis test systems.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Holcombe, G W; Phipps, G L

    1986-10-01

    The relative toxic response of 27 selected phenols in the 96-hr acute flowthrough Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) and the 48- to 60-hr chronic static Tetrahymena pyriformis (ciliate protozoan) test systems was evaluated. Log Kow-dependent linear regression analyses revealed that the data from each test system consisted of two linear equations. The less toxic chemicals form a relationship which models polar narcosis; these chemicals are slightly more active than the baseline toxicity of nonionic narcotic chemicals. The more toxic chemicals form a relationship which models uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Regression analysis of fathead minnow toxicity (log LC50 (mol/liter] vs Tetrahymena toxicity (log BR (mmol/liter] showed good correlation between the two systems. An exception appears to be 4-nitrophenol, which is more active in the Tetrahymena system than in the fathead minnow and lies outside the 95% confidence interval. Reanalysis following deletion of 4-nitrophenol results in the equation log LC50 = -0.9192 (log BR) -3.5035; n = 26, r2 = 0.887.

  14. The hydrogen bond strength of the phenol-phenolate anionic complex: a computational and photoelectron spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Buytendyk, Allyson M; Graham, Jacob D; Collins, Kim D; Bowen, Kit H; Wu, Chia-Hua; Wu, Judy I

    2015-10-14

    The phenol-phenolate anionic complex was studied in vacuo by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy using 193 nm photons and by density functional theory (DFT) computations at the ωB97XD/6-311+G(2d,p) level. We characterize the phenol-phenolate anionic complex as a proton-coupled phenolate pair, i.e., as a low-barrier hydrogen bond system. Since the phenol-phenolate anionic complex was studied in the gas phase, its measured hydrogen bond strength is its maximal ionic hydrogen bond strength. The D(PhO(-)···HOPh) interaction energy (26-30 kcal mol(-1)), i.e., the hydrogen bond strength in the PhO(-)···HOPh complex, is quite substantial. Block-localized wavefunction (BLW) computations reveal that hydrogen bonded phenol rings exhibit increased ring π-electron delocalization energies compared to the free phenol monomer. This additional stabilization may explain the stronger than expected proton donating ability of phenol.

  15. Total phenolic compounds and free phenol in softwood structural plywood

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedeman, G.T.; Isaacson, R.L. ); Sellers, T. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Construction-grade plywood panels manufactured at five plywood mills were analyzed for total phenolic compounds and free phenol detection. Small samples of plywood were ground <1-mm-size powders. The samples were subjected to an ambient temperature, methylene chloride extraction, and tested for free phenol content by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The plywood samples were also analyzed for total phenolic compounds by a distillation-colorimetric method. The range of total phenolic compounds was 6.8 to 25.3 mg/kg and the range of free phenol was 0.090 to 0.73 mg/kg. The sources of phenolic compounds in plywood are wood components, the phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive, and the ligno-cellulosic adhesive fillers. The source of free phenol in structural plywood is presumably the phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive. The extraction procedures used in this study were extreme and are not typical for plywood in service. Yet the levels of phenolic compounds and free phenol detected were so low that they most often were beyond the quantitative accuracy of the test methods and instruments, requiring extrapolative techniques. The low levels are supportive of the fact that structural wood composites bonded with phenol-formaldehyde resins have been found to be very safe environmentally for multiple uses.

  16. Phenolics and plant allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ruan, Xiao; Pan, Cun-De; Jiang, De-An

    2010-12-07

    Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide) metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  17. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environment through bioremediation: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kriti; Chandra, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation play key role in the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Exposure of petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment occurs either due to human activities or accidentally and cause environmental pollution. Petroleum hydrocarbon cause many toxic compounds which are potent immunotoxicants and carcinogenic to human being. Remedial methods for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment include various physiochemical and biological methods. Due to the negative consequences caused by the physiochemical methods, the bioremediation technology is widely adapted and considered as one of the best technology for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment. Bioremediation utilizes the natural ability of microorganism to degrade the hazardous compound into simpler and non hazardous form. This paper provides a review on the role of bioremediation in the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment, discuss various hazardous effects of petroleum hydrocarbon, various factors influencing biodegradation, role of various enzymes in biodegradation and genetic engineering in bioremediation.

  18. Phenolic composition of champagnes from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir vintages.

    PubMed

    Chamkha, Mohamed; Cathala, Bernard; Cheynier, Véronique; Douillard, Roger

    2003-05-07

    Nineteen phenolic compounds including hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonoids, phenolic alcohols, and phenolic aldehydes have been identified and quantified in two monovarietal champagnes, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, by using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system coupled with diode array detection. The identification of four hydroxycinnamic tartaric esters (caftaric, coutaric, fertaric, and 2-S-glutathionylcaftaric acids), two flavanonols (astilbin and engeletin), and some other compounds was confirmed by HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry. Caftaric acid and tyrosol were the major phenols. Hydroxybenzoic acids and flavonoids were present at low concentrations. The phenolic compositions of 2000 and 2001 Chardonnay and Pinot Noir vary quantitatively according to the year and the variety, but the chemical natures of the molecules are the same. The total phenolic content determined by colorimetric measurement ranges from 176 to 195 mg/L of gallic acid equivalent and is similar to that described in white wines.

  19. Soil Bioremediation Strategies Based on the Use of Fungal Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Christian; Boukcim, Hassan; Jolivalt, Claude

    The pollution of soil due to chemical compounds is an important problem worldwide. For that reason, the development of bioremediation processes remains an important challenge. In that context, filamentous fungi and their enzymatic systems appear to be potent tools to decrease the levels of contaminants in soils, by contaminant degradation or stabilisation. The structures and modes of action of selected fungal enzymes, namely peroxidases and laccases, have been extensively studied and are now well-known. Nevertheless, some improvement of their catalytic characteristics can be attempted through genetic engineering, in order to develop specific properties. In addition, some research is still needed to overcome several of their limitations for their efficient use in soils.

  20. Use of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sing-Lai; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2010-10-01

    The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001 for bioremediation of textile wastewater (TW) was investigated using four batches of cultures in high rate algae ponds (HRAP) containing textile dye (Supranol Red 3BW) or TW. The biomass attained ranged from 0.17 to 2.26 mg chlorophyll a/L while colour removal ranged from 41.8% to 50.0%. There was also reduction of NH(4)-N (44.4-45.1%), PO(4)-P (33.1-33.3%) and COD (38.3-62.3%) in the TW. Supplementation of the TW with nutrients of Bold's Basal Medium (BBM) increased biomass production but did not improve colour removal or reduction of pollutants. The mechanism of colour removal by C. vulgaris is biosorption, in accordance with both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The HRAP using C. vulgaris offers a good system for the polishing of TW before final discharge. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced bioremediation of oil spills in the sea.

    PubMed

    Ron, Eliora Z; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2014-06-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in the sea, including hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria that utilize hydrocarbons almost exclusively as carbon and energy sources. However, the rates at which they naturally degrade petroleum following an oil spill appear to be too slow to prevent oil from reaching the shore and causing environmental damage, as has been documented in the Exxon Valdez and Gulf of Mexico disasters. Unfortunately, there is, at present, no experimentally demonstrated methodology for accelerating the degradation of hydrocarbons in the sea. The rate-limiting factor for petroleum degradation in the sea is availability of nitrogen and phosphorus. Oleophilic fertilizers, such as Inipol EAP 22 and urea-formaldehyde polymers, have stimulated hydrocarbon degradation on shorelines but are less effective in open systems. We suggest uric acid as a potentially useful fertilizer enhancing bioremediation at sea.

  2. Selenite bioremediation potential of indigenous microorganisms from industrial activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Garbisu, C; Alkorta, I; Carlson, D E; Leighton, T; Buchanan, B B

    1997-12-01

    Ten bacterial strains were isolated from the activated sludge waste treatment system (BIOX) at the Exxon refinery in Benicia, California. Half of these isolates could be grown in minimal medium. When tested for selenite detoxification capability, these five isolates (members of the genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter and Aeromonas), were capable of detoxifying selenite with kinetics similar to those of a well characterized Bacillus subtilis strain (168 Trp+) studied previously. The selenite detoxification phenotype of the Exxon isolates was stable to repeated transfer on culture media which did not contain selenium. Microorganisms isolated from the Exxon BIOX reactor were capable of detoxifying selenite. Treatability studies using the whole BIOX microbial community were also carried out to evaluate substrates for their ability to support growth and selenite bioremediation. Under the appropriate conditions, indigenous microbial communities are capable of remediating selenite in situ.

  3. In situ and on-site bioremediation. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1997-11-01

    Volume 1 includes articles on the natural attenuation and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. The volume includes case studies of a number of specific applications as well as review articles summarizing the performance of a variety of remediation systems. Articles on air sparging and related technologies, bioventing applications and extensions, bioslurping, and biopiles examine the performance of these technologies and their application under a variety of environmental conditions to remediate hydrocarbons and free-product contamination. Also addressed are the challenges presented to bioremediation technologies by unusual or extreme environmental conditions, such as subarctic temperature and recalcitrant organics, and the potential for extensions and integration of these technologies to clean up hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and groundwater.

  4. Electro-assisted groundwater bioremediation: fundamentals, challenges and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Bioremediation is envisaged as an important way to abate groundwater contamination, but the need for chemical addition and limited bioavailability of electron donors/acceptors or contaminants hamper its application. As a promising means to enhance such processes, electrochemical system has drawn considerable attention, as it offers distinct advantages in terms of environmental benignity, controllability and treatment efficiency. Meanwhile, there are also potential risks and considerable engineering challenges for its practical application. This review provides a first comprehensive introduction of this emerging technology, discusses its potential applications and current challenges, identifies the knowledge gaps, and outlooks the future opportunities to bring it to field application. The need for a better understanding on the microbiology under electrochemical stimulation and the future requirements on process monitoring, modeling and evaluation protocols and field investigations are highlighted.

  5. Bioremediation of Mixtures of High Molecular Weight Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Wu, J.; Shi, X.; Sun, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Although bioremediation has been considered as one of the most promising means to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from polluted environments, the efficacy of PAHs bioremediation still remains challenged, especially for high molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) and their mixtures. This study was focused on (a) isolation and characterization of pure strain and mixed microbial communities able to degrade HMW PAHs and (b) further evaluation of the ability of the isolated microbes to degrade HMW PAHs mixtures in the absence and presence of indigenous flora. Fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene were selected as the representative HMW PAHs in this study. A pure bacterial strain, identified as Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1, was isolated from activated sludge. A mixed bacterial community designated as consortium-4 was isolated from petroleum contaminated soils, containing Pseudomonas sp. FbP1、Enterobacter sp. FbP2、Hydrogenophaga sp. FbP3 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that bacterial strains of Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4 can also degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene. Experiment results showed that both strain FA1 and consortium-4 could degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene within a wide range of temperature, pH and initial PAHs concentration. Degradation of HMW PAHs mixtures (binary and ternary) demonstrated the interactive effects that can alter the rate and extent of biodegradation within a mixture. The presence of indigenous flora was found to either increase or decrease the degradation of HMW PAHs, suggesting possible synergistic or competition effects. Biodegradation kinetics of HMW PAHs for sole substrates, binary and ternary systems was evaluated, with the purpose to better characterize and compare the biodegradation process of individual HMW PAH and mixtures of HMW PAHs. Results of this study

  6. Utilization of microbial biofilms as monitors of bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Aaron D.; IstokD., Jonathan; Krumholz, Lee R.; Geyer, Roland; Kinsall, Barry Lee; Watson, David B; Sublette, K.; White, David C.

    2004-03-01

    A down-well aquifer microbial sampling system was developed using glass wool or Bio-Sep beads as a solid-phase support matrix. Here we describe the use of these devices to monitor the groundwater microbial community dynamics during field bioremediation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Programs Field Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During the 6-week deployment, microbial biofilms colonized glass wool and bead internal surfaces. Changes in viable biomass, community composition, metabolic status, and respiratory state were reflected in sampler composition, type of donor, and groundwater pH. Biofilms that formed on Bio-Sep beads had 2-13 times greater viable biomass; however, the bead communities were less metabolically active [higher cyclopropane/monoenoic phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) ratios] and had a lower aerobic respiratory state (lower total respiratory quinone/PLFA ratio and ubiquinone/menaquinone ratio) than the biofilms formed on glass wool. Anaerobic growth in these systems was characterized by plasmalogen phospholipids and was greater in the wells that received electron donor additions. Partial 16S rDNA sequences indicated that Geobacter and nitrate-reducing organisms were induced by the acetate, ethanol, or glucose additions. DNA and lipid biomarkers were extracted and recovered without the complications that commonly plague sediment samples due to the presence of clay or dissolved organic matter. Although microbial community composition in the groundwater or adjacent sediments may differ from those formed on down-well biofilm samplers, the metabolic activity responses of the biofilms to modifications in groundwater geochemistry record the responses of the microbial community to biostimulation while providing integrative sampling and ease of recovery for biomarker analysis.

  7. Utilization of microbial biofilms as monitors of bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A D; Chang, Y J; Istok, J D; Krumholz, L; Geyer, R; Kinsall, B; Watson, D; Sublette, K L; White, D C

    2004-04-01

    A down-well aquifer microbial sampling system was developed using glass wool or Bio-Sep beads as a solid-phase support matrix. Here we describe the use of these devices to monitor the groundwater microbial community dynamics during field bioremediation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Program's Field Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During the 6-week deployment, microbial biofilms colonized glass wool and bead internal surfaces. Changes in viable biomass, community composition, metabolic status, and respiratory state were reflected in sampler composition, type of donor, and groundwater pH. Biofilms that formed on Bio-Sep beads had 2-13 times greater viable biomass; however, the bead communities were less metabolically active [higher cyclopropane/monoenoic phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) ratios] and had a lower aerobic respiratory state (lower total respiratory quinone/ PLFA ratio and ubiquinone/menaquinone ratio) than the biofilms formed on glass wool. Anaerobic growth in these systems was characterized by plasmalogen phospholipids and was greater in the wells that received electron donor additions. Partial 16S rDNA sequences indicated that Geobacter and nitrate-reducing organisms were induced by the acetate, ethanol, or glucose additions. DNA and lipid biomarkers were extracted and recovered without the complications that commonly plague sediment samples due to the presence of clay or dissolved organic matter. Although microbial community composition in the groundwater or adjacent sediments may differ from those formed on down-well biofilm samplers, the metabolic activity responses of the biofilms to modifications in groundwater geochemistry record the responses of the microbial community to biostimulation while providing integrative sampling and ease of recovery for biomarker analysis.

  8. Attenuation of chromium toxicity by bioremediation technology.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chromium is an important toxic environmental pollutant. Chromium pollution results largely from industrial activities, but other natural and anthropogenic sources also contribute to the problem. Plants that are exposed to environmental contamination by chromium are affected in diverse ways, including a tendency to suffer metabolic stress. The stress imposed by Cr exposure also extends to oxidative metabolic stress in plants that leads to the generation of active toxic oxygen free radicals. Such active free radicals degrade essential biomolecules and distort plant biological membranes. In this chapter, we describe sources of environmental chromium contamination, and provide information about the toxic impact of chromium on plant growth and metabolism. In addition, we address different phytoremediation processes that are being studied for use worldwide, in contaminated regions, to address and mitigate Cr pollution. There has been a long history of attempts to successfully mitigate the toxic effects of chromium-contaminated soil on plants and other organisms. One common approach, the shifting of polluted soil to landfills, is expensive and imposes environmental risks and health hazards of its own. Therefore, alternative eco-friendly bioremediation approaches are much in demand for cleaning chromium-polluted areas. To achieve its cleaning effects, bioremediation utilizes living organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants) that are capable of absorbing and processing chromium residues in ways which amend or eliminate it. Phytoremediation (bioremediation with plants) techniques are increasingly being used to reduce heavy metal contamination and to minimize the hazards of heavy metal toxicity. To achieve this, several processes, viz., rhizofiltration, phytoextraction, phytodetoxification, phytostabilization, and phytovolatilization, have been developed and are showing utility in practice, or promise. Sources of new native hyperaccumulator plants for use at contaminated

  9. Developing strategies for PAH and TCE bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffey, W.R.; Nelson, M.; Kinsella, J. ); Compeau, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Bioremediation is the controlled use of microbes, commonly bacteria and fungi, to reclaim soil and water contaminated with substances that are deleterious to human health and the environment. The organisms used often naturally inhabit the polluted matrix; however, they may inhabit a different environment and be used as seed organisms because of their ability to degrade a specific class of substances. It is because of the wide diversity of microbial metabolic potential that bioremediation is possible. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are present in fossil fuels and are formed during the incomplete combustion of organic material. PAHs exhibit low volatility and low aqueous solubility. As the molecular weight of these compounds increases, there is an exponential decrease in solubility and volatility. PAHs tend to adsorb onto soils and sediments because of their hydrophobic character, which is an intrinsic function of molecular size. The microbial degradation of individual PAHs by pure cultures and mixed populations occurs under a wide range of soil types and environmental conditions. Generally, the factors having the greatest influence on PAH biodegradation rates are soil moisture content, pH, inorganic nutrients present, PAH loading rates, initial PAH concentrations, and the presence of an acclimated microbial population. Feasibility studies are essential for developing a bioremediation strategy and are performed in a phased testing program that is designed to accomplish a number of objectives. These objectives include establishing an indigenous microbial population that will degrade specific contaminants, defining the rate-limiting factors for enhanced PAH degradation and the optimal treatment in terms of rates and cleanup levels attainable, and developing design parameters for field operations.

  10. Bioremediation technologies for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) are common and challenging contaminants that affect soil and sediments. Methods for treating PAHs have undergone change and refinement in the recent past, and this volume presents the latest trends in PAH remediation theory and practice. The papers in this volume cover topics ranging from the remediation of manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites to the remediation of sediments. The papers present lab and field studies, characterization studies, comparison studies, and descriptions of technologies ranging from composting to thermally enhanced bioremediation to fungal technologies and other innovative approaches.

  11. Quantitative determination of phenol in phenolated calamine lotion USP.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, V; Bomer, K A

    1975-07-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of phenol in phenolated calamine lotion USP is described. The method is based on spectrophotometrically measuring the color produced by reacting phenol with either ferric chloride or ferric nitrate. Beer's law is followed. The effect of ferric-ion concentration on the sensitivity of the assay method is reported.

  12. The influence of ripening stage and cultivation system on the total antioxidant activity and total phenolic compounds of yellow passion fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Macoris, Mariana S; De Marchi, Renata; Janzantti, Natália S; Monteiro, Magali

    2012-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the influence of both ripening stage and cultivation system on the total phenolic compounds (TPC) and total antioxidant activity (TAA) of passion fruit pulp. TPC extraction was optimized using a 2³ central composed design. The variables were fruit pulp volume, methanol volume and extraction solution volume. TPC was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu reaction, and TAA using the ABTS radical reaction. The conditions to extract TPC were 2 mL passion fruit pulp and 9 mL extraction solution containing 40% methanol:water (v/v). TPC values increased in the passion fruit pulp during ripening for both cultivation systems, ranging from 281.8 to 361.9 mg gallic acid L⁻¹ (P ≤ 0.05) for the organic pulp and from 291.0 to 338.6 mg gallic acid L⁻¹ (P ≤ 0.05) for the conventional pulp. TPC values increased during ripening for both organic and conventional passion fruit. The same was true for TAA values for conventional passion fruit. For organic passion fruit, however, TAA values were highest at the initial ripening stages. These results suggest that antioxidant compounds exert strong influence on the initial ripening stages for organic passion fruit, when TPC still did not reach its maximum level. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  14. Impact of inorganic contaminants on microalgae productivity and bioremediation potential.

    PubMed

    Torres, Eric M; Hess, Derek; McNeil, Brian T; Guy, Tessa; Quinn, Jason C

    2017-05-01

    As underdeveloped nations continue to industrialize and world population continues to increase, the need for energy, natural resources, and goods will lead to ever increasing inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals, in various waste streams that can have damaging effects on plant life, wildlife, and human health. This work is focused on the evaluation of the potential of Nannochloropsis salina to be integrated with contaminated water sources for the concurrent production of a biofuel feedstock while providing an environmental service through bioremediation. Individual contaminants (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, Hg, Se, and Zn) at various concentrations ranging from a low concentration (1X) to higher concentrations (10X, and 40X) found in contaminated systems (mine tailings, wastewater treatment plants, produced water) were introduced into growth media. Biological growth experimentation was performed in triplicate at the various contaminant concentrations and at 3 different light intensities. Results show that baseline concentrations of each contaminant slightly decreased biomass growth to between 89% and 99% of the control with the exception of Ni which dramatically reduced growth. Increased contaminant concentrations resulted in progressively lower growth rates for all contaminants tested. Lipid analysis shows most baseline contaminant concentrations slightly decrease or have minimal effects on lipid content at all light levels. Trace contaminant analysis on the biomass showed Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn were sorbed by the microalgae with minimal contaminants remaining in the growth media illustrating the effectiveness of microalgae to bioremediate these contaminants when levels are sufficiently low to not detrimentally impact productivity. The microalgae biomass was less efficient at sorption of As, Cr, Ni, and Se.

  15. Method for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M.L.; Taylor, R.T.

    1999-03-30

    An improved method is disclosed for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method is presented for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system is also disclosed for in situ field water remediation. 31 figs.

  16. Comparison of bioventing and air sparging for in situ bioremediation of fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kampbell, D.H.; Griffin, C.J.; Blaha, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Bioremediation pilot-scale subsurface venting and sparging systems were operated at a low aeration rate at an aviation gasoline spill site. Bioventing removed 99 percent of vadose zone contamination in 8 months with minimal surface emissions. The biosparging process is presently operating and has removed one-third of oily phase residue below the water table in 1 year. The ground water plume has been cleansed of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) components by sparging.

  17. The gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) model system reveals that the phenolic compound pyrogallol protects against infection through its prooxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Duy Phong, Ho Phuong Pham; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Defoirdt, Tom; Bossier, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phenolic compound pyrogallol is the functional unit of many polyphenols and currently there has been a growing interest in using this compound in human and animal health owing to its health-promoting effects. The biological actions of pyrogallol moiety (and polyphenols) in inducing health benefitting effects have been studied; however, the mechanisms of action remain unclear yet. Here, we aimed at unravelling the underlying mechanism of action behind the protective effects of pyrogallol against bacterial infection by using the gnotobiotically-cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and pathogenic bacteria Vibrio harveyi as host-pathogen model system. The gnotobiotic test system represents an exceptional system for carrying out such studies because it eliminates any possible interference of microbial communities (naturally present in the experimental system) in mechanistic studies and furthermore facilitates the interpretation of the results in terms of a cause effect relationship. We provided clear evidences suggesting that pyrogallol pretreament, at an optimum concentration, induced protective effects in the brine shrimp against V. harveyi infection. By pretreating brine shrimp with pyrogallol in the presence or absence of an antioxidant enzyme mixture (catalase and superoxide dismutase), we showed that the Vibrio-protective effect of the compound was caused by its prooxidant action (e.g. generation of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). We showed further that generation of prooxidant is linked to the induction of heat shock protein Hsp70, which is involved in eliciting the prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase immune responses. The ability of pyrogallol to induce protective immunity makes it a potential natural protective agent that might be a potential preventive modality for different host-pathogen systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Kwajalein bioremediation demonstration: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.R. Jr.; Walker, A.B.

    1994-12-01

    The US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base, located in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) in the east-central Pacific Ocean, has significant petroleum hydrocarbon contamination resulting from years of military activities. Because of its remoteness, the lack of on-site sophisticated remediation or waste disposal facilities, the amenability of petroleum hydrocarbons to biodegradation, and the year-round temperature favorable for microbial activity, USAKA requested, through the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), that a project be conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using bioremediation for environmental restoration of contaminated sites within the atoll. The project was conducted in four distinct phases: (1) initial site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies, (2) selection of the demonstration area and collection of soil columns, (3) laboratory column biotreatability studies, and (4) an on-site bioremediation demonstration. The results of phases (1) and (3) have been detailed in previous reports. This report summarizes the results of phases (1) and (3) and presents phases (2) and (4) in detail.

  19. Bioremediation of marine sediments impacted by petroleum.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aike C; de Oliveira, Fernando J S; Bernardes, Diogo S; de França, Francisca P

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated sand sediment through the biostimulation technique. The soil was obtained in the mid-tide zone of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and was artificially contaminated with crude oil at 14 g kg(-1). Bioremediation optimization was performed using an experimental design and statistical analysis of the following factors: supplementation with commercial biosurfactant Jeneil IBR 425 and commercial mineral NPK fertilizer. The response variable used was the biodegradation of the heavy oil fraction, HOF. The analysis of the studied factors and their interactions was executed using contour plots, Pareto diagram and ANOVA table. Experimental design results indicated that the supplementation with fertilizer at 100:25:25 C/N/P ratio and biosurfactant at 2 g kg(-1) yielded biodegradation of HOF at about 30% during 30 days of process. Some experiments were carried out using the experimental design results, yielding 65% of biodegradation of HOF and 100% of n- alkanes between C15 and C30 during 60 process days. Intrinsic biodegradation test was carried out, yielding 85% of biodegradation of n-alkanes between C15 and C30 during 30 days of process.

  20. Bioremediation of glyphosate-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Inna T; Kiseleva, Nina I; Shushkova, Tatyana; Zharikov, Mikhail; Zharikov, Gennady A; Leontievsky, Alexey A

    2010-09-01

    Based on the results of laboratory and field experiments, we performed a comprehensive assessment of the bioremediation efficiency of glyphosate-contaminated soddy-podzol soil. The selected bacterial strains Achromobacter sp. Kg 16 (VKM B-2534D) and Ochrobactrum anthropi GPK 3 (VKM B-2554D) were used for the aerobic degradation of glyphosate. They demonstrated high viability in soil with the tenfold higher content of glyphosate than the recommended dose for the single in situ treatment of weeds. The strains provided a two- to threefold higher rate of glyphosate degradation as compared to indigenous soil microbial community. Within 1-2 weeks after the strain introduction, the glyphosate content of the treated soil decreased and integral toxicity and phytotoxicity diminished to values of non-contaminated soil. The decrease in the glyphosate content restored soil biological activity, as is evident from a more than twofold increase in the dehydrogenase activity of indigenous soil microorganisms and their biomass (1.2-fold and 1.6-fold for saprotrophic bacteria and fungi, respectively). The glyphosate-degrading strains used in this study are not pathogenic for mammals and do not exhibit integral toxicity and phytotoxicity. Therefore, these strains are suitable for the efficient, ecologically safe, and rapid bioremediation of glyphosate-contaminated soils.

  1. Healthy environments for healthy people: bioremediation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, C; Johnson, F M

    1997-01-01

    Increases in environmental contamination lead to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality. This condition challenges our global society to find effective measures of remediation to reverse the negative conditions that severely threaten human and environmental health. We discuss the progress being made toward this goal through application of bioremediation techniques. Bioremediation generally utilizes microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and algae), although higher plants are used in some applications. New bioremediation approaches are emerging based on advances in molecular biology and process engineering. Bioremediation continues to be the favored approach for processing biological wastes and avoiding microbial pathogenesis. Bioremediation may also play an increasing role in concentrating metals and radioactive materials to avoid toxicity or to recover metals for reuse. Microbes can biodegrade organic chemicals; purposeful enhancement of this natural process can aid in pollutant degradation and waste-site cleanup operations. Recently developed rapid-screening assays can identify organisms capable of degrading specific wastes and new gene-probe methods can ascertain their abundance at specific sites. New tools and techniques for use of bioremediation in situ, in biofilters, and in bioreactors are contributing to the rapid growth of this field. Bioremediation has already proven itself to be a cost-effective and beneficial addition to chemical and physical methods of managing wastes and environmental pollutants. We anticipate that it will play an increasingly important role as a result of new and emerging techniques and processes. Images Figure 3. PMID:9114274

  2. Ex situ bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Chen; Pan, Po-Tsen; Cheng, Sheng-Shung

    2010-04-15

    An innovative bioprocess method, Systematic Environmental Molecular Bioremediation Technology (SEMBT) that combines bioaugmentation and biostimulation with a molecular monitoring microarray biochip, was developed as an integrated bioremediation technology to treat S- and T-series biopiles by using the landfarming operation and reseeding process to enhance the bioremediation efficiency. After 28 days of the bioremediation process, diesel oil (TPH(C10-C28)) and fuel oil (TPH(C10-C40)) were degraded up to approximately 70% and 63% respectively in the S-series biopiles. When the bioaugmentation and biostimulation were applied in the beginning of bioremediation, the microbial concentration increased from approximately 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/g dry soil along with the TPH biodegradation. Analysis of microbial diversity in the contaminated soils by microarray biochips revealed that Acinetobacter sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the predominant groups in indigenous consortia, while the augmented consortia were Gordonia alkanivorans and Rhodococcus erythropolis in both series of biopiles during bioremediation. Microbial respiration as influenced by the microbial activity reflected directly the active microbial population and indirectly the biodegradation of TPH. Field experimental results showed that the residual TPH concentration in the complex biopile was reduced to less than 500 mg TPH/kg dry soil. The above results demonstrated that the SEMBT technology is a feasible alternative to bioremediate the oil-contaminated soil.

  3. Healthy environments for healthy people: bioremediation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, C; Johnson, F M

    1997-02-01

    Increases in environmental contamination lead to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality. This condition challenges our global society to find effective measures of remediation to reverse the negative conditions that severely threaten human and environmental health. We discuss the progress being made toward this goal through application of bioremediation techniques. Bioremediation generally utilizes microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and algae), although higher plants are used in some applications. New bioremediation approaches are emerging based on advances in molecular biology and process engineering. Bioremediation continues to be the favored approach for processing biological wastes and avoiding microbial pathogenesis. Bioremediation may also play an increasing role in concentrating metals and radioactive materials to avoid toxicity or to recover metals for reuse. Microbes can biodegrade organic chemicals; purposeful enhancement of this natural process can aid in pollutant degradation and waste-site cleanup operations. Recently developed rapid-screening assays can identify organisms capable of degrading specific wastes and new gene-probe methods can ascertain their abundance at specific sites. New tools and techniques for use of bioremediation in situ, in biofilters, and in bioreactors are contributing to the rapid growth of this field. Bioremediation has already proven itself to be a cost-effective and beneficial addition to chemical and physical methods of managing wastes and environmental pollutants. We anticipate that it will play an increasingly important role as a result of new and emerging techniques and processes.

  4. Hydraulic control for manipulating subsurface conditions for in situ experiments of uranium(VI) bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P.; Luo, J.; Wu, W.; Carley, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Watson, D.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.

    2007-12-01

    A field test on in-situ subsurface bioremediation of uranium (VI) is underway at the Y-12 National Security Complex in the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. A four-well system, including two downgradient extraction and two upgradient injection wells were installed to create an inner cell, which functioned as the treatment zone, nested within an outer cell, which protected the inner cell from the influence of regional flow. The proposed four- well system has several advantages in the subsurface flow field manipulation: (1) the recirculation ratio within the nested inner cell is less sensitive to the regional flow direction; (2) a transitional recirculation zone between the inner and outer cells can capture flow leakage from the inner cell, minimizing the release of untreated contaminants; (3) the size of the recirculation zone and residence times can be better controlled within the inner cell by changing the pumping rates. A three-phase remediation strategy was applied in this experiment. It included first removing nitrate prior to stimulation of U(VI) reduction, then adjusting the pH to levels favorable for activity of U(VI)-reducing bacteria, i.e., to about neutral values, and finally adding electron donor to the in-situ reactor to foster reduction and immobilization of U(VI). Tracer tests and bioremediation experiments demonstrated that the designed multiple-well system and the experimental strategy were successful in creating favorable subsurface chemical and biological conditions for uranium bioremediation.

  5. Laboratory-scale in situ bioremediation in heterogeneous porous media: Biokinetics-limited scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin; Hong, Eunyoung; Seagren, Eric A.

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface heterogeneities influence interfacial mass-transfer processes and affect the application of in situ bioremediation by impacting the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. However, for difficult-to-degrade compounds, and/or cases with inhibitory biodegradation conditions, slow biokinetics may also limit the overall bioremediation rate, or be as limiting as mass-transfer processes. In this work, a quantitative framework based on a set of dimensionless coefficients was used to capture the effects of the competing interfacial and biokinetic processes and define the overall rate-limiting process. An integrated numerical modeling and experimental approach was used to evaluate application of the quantitative framework for a scenario in which slow-biokinetics limited the overall bioremediation rate of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (naphthalene). Numerical modeling was conducted to simulate the groundwater flow and naphthalene transport and verify the system parameters, which were used in the quantitative framework application. The experiments examined the movement and biodegradation of naphthalene in a saturated, heterogeneous intermediate-scale flow cell with two layers of contrasting hydraulic conductivities. These experiments were conducted in two phases: Phase I, simulating an inhibited slow biodegradation; and Phase II, simulating an engineered bioremediation, with system perturbations selected to enhance the slow biodegradation rate. In Phase II, two engineered perturbations to the system were selected to examine their ability to enhance in situ biodegradation. In the first perturbation, nitrogen and phosphorus in excess of the required stoichiometric amounts were spiked into the influent solution to mimic a common remedial action taken in the field. The results showed that this perturbation had a moderate positive impact, consistent with slow biokinetics being the overall rate-limiting process. However, the second perturbation, which was to

  6. Laboratory-scale in situ bioremediation in heterogeneous porous media: biokinetics-limited scenario.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Hong, Eunyoung; Seagren, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface heterogeneities influence interfacial mass-transfer processes and affect the application of in situ bioremediation by impacting the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. However, for difficult-to-degrade compounds, and/or cases with inhibitory biodegradation conditions, slow biokinetics may also limit the overall bioremediation rate, or be as limiting as mass-transfer processes. In this work, a quantitative framework based on a set of dimensionless coefficients was used to capture the effects of the competing interfacial and biokinetic processes and define the overall rate-limiting process. An integrated numerical modeling and experimental approach was used to evaluate application of the quantitative framework for a scenario in which slow-biokinetics limited the overall bioremediation rate of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (naphthalene). Numerical modeling was conducted to simulate the groundwater flow and naphthalene transport and verify the system parameters, which were used in the quantitative framework application. The experiments examined the movement and biodegradation of naphthalene in a saturated, heterogeneous intermediate-scale flow cell with two layers of contrasting hydraulic conductivities. These experiments were conducted in two phases: Phase I, simulating an inhibited slow biodegradation; and Phase II, simulating an engineered bioremediation, with system perturbations selected to enhance the slow biodegradation rate. In Phase II, two engineered perturbations to the system were selected to examine their ability to enhance in situ biodegradation. In the first perturbation, nitrogen and phosphorus in excess of the required stoichiometric amounts were spiked into the influent solution to mimic a common remedial action taken in the field. The results showed that this perturbation had a moderate positive impact, consistent with slow biokinetics being the overall rate-limiting process. However, the second perturbation, which was to

  7. Efficient bioremediation of radioactive iodine using biogenic gold nanomaterial-containing radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Hee; Jeong, Sun-Wook; Shim, Ha Eun; Yun, Seong-Jae; Mushtaq, Sajid; Choi, Dae Seong; Jang, Beom-Su; Yang, Jung Eun; Choi, Yong Jun; Jeon, Jongho

    2017-04-04

    We herein report a new bioremediation method using a radiation-resistant bacterium. Biogenic gold nanomaterial-containing Deinococcus radiodurans R1 showed excellent capability for the removal of radioactive iodine (>99%) in several aqueous solutions. These observations demonstrated that our remediation system would be efficiently applied to the treatment of radioactive wastes.

  8. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  9. Bioremediation techniques applied to aqueous media contaminated with mercury.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Benavides-Otaya, Holman D

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the environmental and human health impacts of mercury contamination have driven the search for alternative, eco-efficient techniques different from the traditional physicochemical methods for treating this metal. One of these alternative processes is bioremediation. A comprehensive analysis of the different variables that can affect this process is presented. It focuses on determining the effectiveness of different techniques of bioremediation, with a specific consideration of three variables: the removal percentage, time needed for bioremediation and initial concentration of mercury to be treated in an aqueous medium.

  10. Scientific foundations of bioremediation: Current status and future needs

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.T.; Sayler, G.S.

    1993-11-01

    Bioremediation can be defined as a process that uses living organisms or their catalysts to enhance the rate or extent of pollutant destruction. In this context, bioremediation can be considered as a viable component of hazardous waste management technology. The major goal of waste management is to reduce the exposure of organisms or receiving environments to the effects of environmental contaminants. As bioremediation is currently practiced, the predominant organisms in use are microorganisms (bacteria and fungi), but potential developments of the technology also include the use of algae, plankton, protozoa, plants, and controlled or assembled ecosystems.

  11. Comparison of analytical methods used to measure petroleum hydrocarbons in soils and their applications to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; McMillen, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Chemical measurements provide a means to evaluate crude oil and refined product bioremediation effectiveness in field and laboratory studies. These measurements are used to determine the net decrease in product or target compound concentrations in complex soil systems. The analytical methods used to evaluate these constituents will have a direct impact on the ability of the investigator to; (1) detect losses due to biodegradation, (2) understand the processes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation and, (3) determine the rates of hydrocarbon degradation. The applications and limitations of standard EPA methodologies (EPA Methods 418.1, 8270, and modified 8015) will be evaluated in soil mesocosm petroleum biodegradation studies and compared to several new analytical methods currently being used by the petroleum industry [gross compositional analysis, TLC-FID analysis, and enhanced EPA Method 8270 (e.g., C30-17{alpha}(H),21{beta}(H)-hopane)] to evaluate bioremediation effectiveness in soils.

  12. Phenolic compounds in Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cartea, María Elena; Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo

    2010-12-30

    Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  13. Phenol degrading ability of Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from activated sludge plants in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sheena; Chetty, Dereshen; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2013-01-01

    Phenol, a common constituent in many industrial wastewaters is a major pollutant and has several adverse effects on the environment. The potential of various microorganisms to utilize phenol for their metabolic activity has been observed to be an effective means of remediating this toxic compound from the environment particularly wastewater. Five indigenous bacterial isolates (PD1-PD5) were obtained from phenol bearing industrial wastewater using the mineral salts medium. The isolates were further characterized based on their morphology, biochemical reactions and 16S rRNA phylogeny. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis using universal primers (27f/1492r) revealed that PD1, PD2, PD3 and PD4 were closely related to the actinomycete Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans (99%) and PD5 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (99%). Growth kinetic patterns and phenol degradation abilities of the two representative isolates (PD1 and PD5) were also evaluated. Both the species were effective in utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source and could tolerate phenol concentrations of up to 500 to 600 mg/L. The ability of these isolates to utilize higher concentrations of phenol as their sole carbon source makes them potential candidates and better competitors in the bioremediation process.

  14. Dynamics of microbial community during bioremediation of phenanthrene and chromium(VI)-contaminated soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ibarrolaza, Agustín; Coppotelli, Bibiana M; Del Panno, María T; Donati, Edgardo R; Morelli, Irma S

    2009-02-01

    The combined effect of phenanthrene and Cr(VI) on soil microbial activity, community composition and on the efficiency of bioremediation processes has been studied. Biometer flask systems and soil microcosm systems contaminated with 2,000 mg of phenanthrene per kg of dry soil and different Cr(VI) concentrations were investigated. Temperature, soil moisture and oxygen availability were controlled to support bioremediation. Cr(VI) inhibited the phenanthrene mineralization (CO(2) production) and cultivable PAH degrading bacteria at levels of 500-2,600 mg kg(-1). In the bioremediation experiments in soil microcosms the degradation of phenanthrene, the dehydrogenase activity and the increase in PAH degrading bacteria counts were retarded by the presence of Cr(VI) at all studied concentrations (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)). These negative effects did not show a correlation with Cr(VI) concentration. Whereas the presence of Cr(VI) had a negative effect on the phenanthrene elimination rate, co-contamination with phenanthrene reduced the residual Cr(VI) concentration in the water exchangeable Cr(VI) fraction (WEF) in comparison with the soil microcosm contaminated only with Cr(VI). Clear differences were found between the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of each soil microcosm, showing that the presence of different Cr(VI) concentrations did modulate the community response to phenanthrene and caused perdurable changes in the structure of the microbial soil community.

  15. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  16. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  17. Zero-valent iron supported on nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by fenton-like system.

    PubMed

    Messele, S A; Soares, O S G P; Órfão, J J M; Bengoa, C; Font, J

    2017-09-03

    Nitrogen-free and nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel materials, from urea and melamine precursors, were prepared at different pH and evaluated as adsorbents/catalysts in the removal of phenol. Then, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was supported on these carbon xerogel materials and its activity was again evaluated for phenol removal by adsorption and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO). The prepared samples were characterized by N2 adsorption at -196°C, pH at the point of zero charge (pHPZC) and elemental analysis. The textural properties of the N-free and N-doped carbon xerogels are strongly influenced by pH of the preparation solution and precursor used. The presence of ZVI on all carbon xerogel supports improved the phenol removal efficiency. ZVI supported on urea- and melamine-doped carbon xerogels show a good performance, reaching above 87% phenol conversion after 60 min of CWPO. On the contrary, pure adsorption and CWPO using the same materials without the presence of ZVI gives low phenol removal efficiency. A correlation was found between the activity of ZVI catalysts in CWPO and the N-content of the supports.

  18. Searching bioremediation patents through Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC).

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    Patent classification systems have traditionally evolved independently at each patent jurisdiction to classify patents handled by their examiners to be able to search previous patents while dealing with new patent applications. As patent databases maintained by them went online for free access to public as also for global search of prior art by examiners, the need arose for a common platform and uniform structure of patent databases. The diversity of different classification, however, posed problems of integrating and searching relevant patents across patent jurisdictions. To address this problem of comparability of data from different sources and searching patents, WIPO in the recent past developed what is known as International Patent Classification (IPC) system which most countries readily adopted to code their patents with IPC codes along with their own codes. The Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC) is the latest patent classification system based on IPC/European Classification (ECLA) system, developed by the European Patent Office (EPO) and the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) which is likely to become a global standard. This paper discusses this new classification system with reference to patents on bioremediation.

  19. Anti-inflammatory Natural Prenylated Phenolic Compounds - Potential Lead Substances.

    PubMed

    Brezáni, Viliam; Šmejkal, Karel; Hošek, Jan; Tomášová, Veronika

    2017-08-10

    Natural phenolics are secondary plant metabolites, which can be divided into several categories with the common structural feature of phenolic hydroxyl. The biological activity of phenolics is often modified and enhanced by prenylation by prenyl and geranyl; higher terpenoid chains are rare. The type of prenyl connection and modification affects their biological activity. This review summarizes information about prenylated phenols and some of their potential sources, and provides an overview of their anti-inflammatory potential in vitro and in vivo. The literature search was performed using Scifinder and keywords prenyl, phenol, and inflammation. For individual compounds, an additional search was performed to find information about further activities and mechanisms of effects. We summarized the effects of prenylated phenolics in vitro in cellular or biochemical systems on the production and release of inflammation-related cytokines; their effects on inhibition of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases; the effects on production of nitric oxide, antiradical and antioxidant activity; and the effect on the inhibition of the release of enzymes and mediators from neutrophils, mast cells and macrophages. The information about the antiphlogistic potential of prenylated phenolics is further supported by a review of their action in animal models. Almost 400 prenylated phenols were reviewed to overview their anti-inflammatory effect. The bioactivity of several prenylated phenols was confirmed also using in vivo assays. A pool of natural prenylated phenols represents a source of inspiration for synthesis, and prenylated phenols as components of various medicinal plants used to combat inflammation could be their active principles. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION AND MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Enhanced Bioremediation and Monitored Natural Attenuation research for the remediation of organic and inorganic contamina...

  1. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils: A recipe for success

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenbach, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation of land crude oil and lube oil spills is an effective and economical option. Other options include road spreading (where permitted), thermal desorption, and off-site disposal. The challenge for environment and operations managers is to select the best approach for each remediation site. Costs and liability for off-site disposal are ever increasing. Kerr-McGee`s extensive field research in eastern and western Texas provides the data to support bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical, bioremediation also offers a lower risk of, for example, Superfund clean-up exposure than off-site disposal.

  2. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION AND MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Enhanced Bioremediation and Monitored Natural Attenuation research for the remediation of organic and inorganic contamina...

  3. Bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil using poultry litter

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G; Tao, J.

    1996-10-01

    Contaminated soil, excavated from around a leaking underground gasoline storage tank, is commonly subjected to thermal degradation to remove the gasoline. Bioremediation as an alternative treatment technology is now becoming popular. The important hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria include Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Flavobacterium. Poultry litter contains a large number of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas, as well as many inorganic nutrients and organic biomass that may assist in biodegrading gasoline in contaminated soil. During bioremediation of contaminated soil, microbial densities are known to increase by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, bioremediation may result in a increase in the toxic characteristics of the soil due to the production of potentially toxic degradation intermediates. The objective of this research was to study the influence of the addition of poultry litter on the bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil by quantifying the changes in the densities of microorganisms and by monitoring the toxicity of the degradation products. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Guidelines for the Bioremediation of Marine Shorelines and Freshwater Wetlands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For oil spill responders:presents rational approach, evaluates current practices and state-of-the-art research results pertaining to bioremediation of hydrocarbon contamination relative to types and amounts of amendments used, application frequency, extent

  5. Development of high reliability and high processability thermosets for electronic packaging applications based on ternary systems of benzoxazine, epoxy and phenolic resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimdusit, Sarawut

    We have developed new polymeric systems based on the ternary mixture of benzoxazine, epoxy, and phenolic novolac resins. Low melt viscosity resins render void free specimens with minimal processing steps. The material properties show a wide range of desirable reliability and processability which are highly dependent on the composition of the monomers in the mixture. Fourier transform mechanical spectroscopy techniques (FTMS) are utilized as a powerful tool to study the sol-gel transition of covalently bonded polymeric networks. The gelation of the ternary mixture shows an Arrhenius-type behavior and the gel time can be well-predicted by the Arrhenius equation. The synergism in the glass transition temperature of these ternary systems is also reported. The molecular rigidity from benzoxazine and the improved crosslink density from epoxy contribute to the synergestic behavior. The mechanical relaxation spectra of the fully cured ternary systems in the temperature range of -140°C to 350°C show four types of relaxation transitions i.e. gamma, beta, alpha1, and alpha2-transitions. Thermal conductivity of the molding compounds based on these ternary mixtures exhibits a very high value of about 27 W/mk in aggregate-type boron nitride filler and the value of about 8.6 W/mk in flake-like crystal boron nitride filler comparing at the same filler loading of 68% by volume. The presence of epoxy resin in the ternary systems is found to provide improvement in a high temperature adhesion. The curing kinetics based on dynamic DSC results of this ternary system show nth order kinetics with an overall reaction order of 1.5 having activation energy of 111 kJ/mol whereas that of the gelation process is 75 kJ/mol. Thermal degradation process of this resin is deceleratory type with activation energy of 185 kJ/mol. A choice of a resin used for the study can provide maximum Tg of about 220°C in its fully cured specimen. The system has a potential use as high performance electronic

  6. Metabolism of xenobiotics by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Phenol degradation under conditions affecting photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nazos, Theocharis T; Kokarakis, Emmanouel J; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the biodegradation of phenol by axenic cultures of the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated. Biodegradation proved to be a dynamic bioenergetic process, affected by changes in the culture conditions. Microalgae biodegraded defined amounts of phenol, as a result of the induced stress caused at high concentrations, despite the fact that this process proved to be energy demanding and thus affected growth of the culture. High levels of biodegradation were observed both in the absence of an alternative carbon source and in the presence of acetate as a carbon source. Biodegradation of phenol by Chlamydomonas proved to be an aerobic, photoregulated process. This is the first time that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used for bioremediation purposes. This study has demonstrated that the most important factor in the biodegradation of phenol is the selection of the appropriate culture conditions (presence or absence of alternative carbon source, light intensity, and oxygen availability) that provide the best bioenergetic balance among growth, induced stress, and biodegradation of phenol.

  7. Letter report: Ari Patrinos -- Subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Happer, W.; MacDonald, G.J.; Ruderman, M.A.; Treiman, S.B.

    1995-07-26

    During the past summer, the authors had the opportunity to examine aspects of the remediation program of the Department of Energy (DOE). The most important conclusion that they have come to is that there is an urgent need to mount a comprehensive research program in remediation. It is also clear to them that DOE does not have the funding to carry out a program on the scale that is required. On the other hand, Environmental Management could very well fund such activities. They would hope that in the future there would be close collaboration between Environmental Management and Energy Research in putting together a comprehensive and well thought-out research program. Here, the authors comment on one aspect of remediation: subsurface bioremediation.

  8. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  9. Optimal conditions for bioremediation of oily seawater.

    PubMed

    Zahed, Mohammad Ali; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Mohajeri, Leila; Mohajeri, Soraya

    2010-12-01

    To determine the influence of nutrients on the rate of biodegradation, a five-level, three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed for bioremediation of seawater artificially contaminated with crude oil. Removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was the dependent variable. Samples were extracted and analyzed according to US-EPA protocols. A significant (R(2)=0.9645, P<0.0001) quadratic polynomial mathematical model was generated. Removal from samples not subjected to optimization and removal by natural attenuation were 53.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Numerical optimization was carried out based on desirability functions for maximum TPH removal. For an initial crude oil concentration of 1g/L supplemented with 190.21 mg/L nitrogen and 12.71 mg/L phosphorus, the Design-Expert software predicted 60.9% hydrocarbon removal; 58.6% removal was observed in a 28-day experiment.

  10. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Abramowicz, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  11. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J. ); Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl{sub 4}, nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations.

  12. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J.; Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M.

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl{sub 4}, nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations.

  13. Bioremediation of crude oil spills in marine and terrestrial environments

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation can be a safe and effective tool for dealing with crude oil spills, as demonstrated during the cleanup following the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska. Crude oil has also been spilled on land, and bioremediation is a promising option for land spills too. Nevertheless, there are still areas where understanding of the phenomenon is rather incomplete. Research groups around the world are addressing these problems, and this symposium provides an excellent overview of some of this work.

  14. Effectiveness of bioremediation for the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, James R.; Prince, Roger C.; Harner, E. James; Atlas, Ronald M.

    1994-03-01

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for oil spills has been difficult to establish on dynamic, heterogeneous marine shorelines. A new interpretative technique used following the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska shows that fertilizer applications significantly increased rates of oil biodegradation. Biodegradation rates depended mainly on the concentration of nitrogen within the shoreline, the oil loading, and the extent to which natural biodegradation had already taken place. The results suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of bioremediation measures in the future.

  15. Development of combinatorial bacteria for metal and radionuclide bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Matin, Ph. D.

    2006-06-15

    The grant concerned chromate [Cr(VI)] bioremediation and it was our aim from the outset to construct individual bacterial strains capable of improved bioremediation of multiple pollutants and to identify the enzymes suited to this end. Bacteria with superior capacity to remediate multiple pollutants can be an asset for the cleanup of DOE sites as they contain mixed waste. I describe below the progress made during the period of the current grant, providing appropriate context.

  16. Bioremediation, an environmental remediation technology for the bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Iain M M; Philp, Jim C

    2013-06-01

    Bioremediation differs from other industrial biotechnologies in that, although bioremediation contractors must profit from the activity, the primary driver is regulatory compliance rather than manufacturing profit. It is an attractive technology in the context of a bioeconomy but currently has limitations at the field scale. Ecogenomics techniques may address some of these limitations, but a further challenge would be acceptance of these techniques by regulators.

  17. Removal performance and microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor treating hypersaline phenol-laden wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wei, Li; Zhang, Huining; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-10-01

    Hypersaline phenol-rich wastewater is hard to be treated by traditional biological systems. In this work, a sequencing batch reactor was used to remove phenol from hypersaline wastewater. The removal performance was evaluated in response to the variations of operating parameters and the microbial diversity was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. The results showed that the bioreactor had high removal efficiency of phenol and was able to keep stable with the increase of initial phenol concentration. DO, pH, and salinity also affected the phenol removal rate. The most abundant bacterial group was phylum Proteobacteria in the two working conditions, and class Gammaproteobacteria as well as Alphaproteobacteria was predominant subgroup. The abundance of bacterial clusters was notably different along with the variation of operation conditions, resulting in changes of phenol degradation rates. The high removal efficiency of phenol suggested that the reactor might be promising in treating phenol-laden industrial wastewater in high-salt condition.

  18. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-24

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of

  19. Impact of bioaccessibility and bioavailability of phenolic compounds in biological systems upon the antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract of Triplaris gardneriana seeds.

    PubMed

    Neto, José Joaquim Lopes; de Almeida, Thiago Silva; de Medeiros, Jackeline Lima; Vieira, Leonardo Rogério; Moreira, Thaís Borges; Maia, Ana Isabel Vitorino; Ribeiro, Paulo Riceli Vasconcelos; de Brito, Edy Sousa; Farias, Davi Felipe; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2017-04-01

    The most studied bioactive potential of phenolic compounds corresponds to antioxidant activity, which in turn, is associated with a reduction in the incidence of various human diseases. However, the total quantity of these bioactive substances in foods and medicinal preparations does not reflect the amount absorbed and metabolized by the body. The present study aimed to investigate the bioaccessibility of Triplaris gardneriana seeds ethanolic extract (EETg) by determination of phenolic composition and antioxidant activities before and after in vitro digestion as well as to estimate its bioavailability by chemical analysis of plasma and urine in animal models after oral administration. The bioaccessibility indexes of phenolic compounds in EETg were 48.65 and 69.28% in the presence and absence of enzymes, respectively. Among the identified phenolics classes, flavonoids, represented by galloylated procyanidins type B, proved to be more bioaccessible, 81.48 and 96.29% in the post-intestinal phase with and without enzymes, respectively. The oral administration in Wistar rats resulted in a significant decrease in plasma of the total antioxidant capacity, TAC, by FRAP assay 4h after beginning the experiment. For urine samples, an increase in TAC by DPPH and FRAP was observed from 1 and 4h after administration, respectively. UPLC-QTOF analysis of urine detected 2 metabolites originated from the degradation of phenolic compounds, i.e. hippuric acid and phenylacetil glycine. These results suggest that phenolic compounds in T. gardneriana are unstable under gastrointestinal conditions, being flavonoids the components with higher bioaccessibility; besides that, they showed limited bioavailability due to their rapid biotransformation and urinary elimination.

  20. Actinobacteria: Current research and perspectives for bioremediation of pesticides and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Analia; Saez, Juliana Maria; Davila Costa, José Sebastian; Colin, Veronica Leticia; Fuentes, María Soledad; Cuozzo, Sergio Antonio; Benimeli, Claudia Susana; Polti, Marta Alejandra; Amoroso, María Julia

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacteria exhibit cosmopolitan distribution since their members are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the environment they play relevant ecological roles including recycling of substances, degradation of complex polymers, and production of bioactive molecules. Biotechnological potential of actinobacteria in the environment was demonstrated by their ability to remove organic and inorganic pollutants. This ability is the reason why actinobacteria have received special attention as candidates for bioremediation, which has gained importance because of the widespread release of contaminants into the environment. Among organic contaminants, pesticides are widely used for pest control, although the negative impact of these chemicals in the environmental balance is increasingly becoming apparent. Similarly, the extensive application of heavy metals in industrial processes lead to highly contaminated areas worldwide. Several studies focused in the use of actinobacteria for cleaning up the environment were performed in the last 15 years. Strategies such as bioaugmentation, biostimulation, cell immobilization, production of biosurfactants, design of defined mixed cultures and the use of plant-microbe systems were developed to enhance the capabilities of actinobacteria in bioremediation. In this review, we compiled and discussed works focused in the study of different bioremediation strategies using actinobacteria and how they contributed to the improvement of the already existing strategies. In addition, we discuss the importance of omic studies to elucidate mechanisms and regulations that bacteria use to cope with pollutant toxicity, since they are still little known in actinobacteria. A brief account of sources and harmful effects of pesticides and heavy metals is also given.

  1. Role of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in the Detoxification and Bioremediation of Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lu; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Zheyi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Microbial bioremediation is a promising technology to treat heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the efficiency of filamentous fungi as bioremediation agents remains unknown, and the detoxification mechanism of heavy metals by filamentous fungi remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the cell morphology and antioxidant systems of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in response to different cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0–10 mM) by using physico-chemical and biochemical methods. Cd in XJ-1 was mainly bound to the cell wall. The malondialdehyde level in XJ-1 cells was increased by 14.82–94.67 times with the increase in Cd concentration. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) peaked at 1 mM Cd, whereas that of catalase peaked at 5 mM Cd. Cd exposure increased the glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and the activities of GR and G6PDH in XJ-1. These results suggested that the Cd detoxification mechanism of XJ-1 included biosorption, cellular sequestration, and antioxidant defense. The application of XJ-1 in Cd-polluted soils (5–50 mg kg-1) successfully reduced bioavailable Cd and increased the plant yield, indicating that this fungus was a promising candidate for in situ bioremediation of Cd-polluted soil. PMID:26733967

  2. Bioremediation as an efficient method to degrade creosote and improve groundwater quality

    SciTech Connect

    Newbern, V.A.

    1994-09-01

    A hydrogeologic monitoring evaluation was conducted to determine the efficiency of bioremediation on a site at which creosote is used for pressure treating and wood preservation. Initially, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and diesel fuel were incorporated with the creosote. The waste water generated from the process was disposed of in three unlined surface impoundments until 1982. Thirteen monitoring wells were installed between August 1981 and the first half of 1982 where both PCP and creosote releases were found and attributed to the impoundments. A groundwater quality assessment program was initiated in April 1986 and a subsequent pilot groundwater remediation program begun in February 1987. A Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been in operation since August 1987 and was designed to remediate groundwater from the uppermost water-bearing sand (Bentley sand), which was affected by the impoundment areas. With the CAP, a system of 21 recovery wells set in 4 lines were implemented to withdraw the groundwater. The groundwater was then treated in above-ground bioreactors where microorganisms were introduced to degrade the creosote compounds. Treated groundwater was then discharged to the public waste-water facility or injected to recharge the Bentley sands by the use of either of the two recharge trenches. Both nutrients and oxygen were added to the water prior to injection to increase the in-situ bioremediation of the creosote and PCP contaminants via two air sparging lines. The results demonstrate the reduction of creosote constituents from the groundwater with the use of bioremediation.

  3. In-situ bioremediation of ground water and geological material: A review of technologies. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.D.; Hichee, R.E.; Brown, R.; McCarty, P.L.; Semprini, L.

    1993-07-01

    The report provides the reader with a detailed background of the technologies available for the bioremediation of contaminated soil and ground water. The document has been prepared for scientists, consultants, regulatory personnel, and others who are associated in some way with the restoration of soil and ground water at hazardous waste sites. It provides the most recent scientific understanding of the processes involved with soil and ground-water remediation, as well as a definition of the state-of-the-art of these technologies with respect to circumstances of their applicability and their limitations. In addition to discussions and examples of developed technologies, the report also provides insights to emerging technologies which are at the research level of formation, ranging from theoretical concepts, through bench scale inquiries, to limited field-scale investigations. The report centers around a number of bioremediation technologies applicable to the various subsurface compartments into which contaminants are distributed. The processes which drive these remediation technologies are discussed in depth along with the attributes which direct their applicability and limitations according to the phases into which the contaminants have partitioned. These discussions include in-situ remediation systems, air sparging and bioventing, use of electron acceptors alternate to oxygen, natural bioremediation, and the introduction of organisms into the subsurface. The contaminants of major focus in the report are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  4. Using sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) for bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Sherafatmand, Mohammad; Ng, How Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was explored to bioremediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water originated from soil. The results showed consistent power generations of 6.02±0.34 and 3.63±0.37 mW/m(2) under an external resistance of 1500 Ω by the aerobic and anaerobic SMFC, respectively. Although the power generations were low, they had relatively low internal resistances (i.e., 436.6±69.4 and 522.1±1.8 Ω for the aerobic and anaerobic SMFC, respectively) in comparison with the literature. Nevertheless, the significant benefit of this system was its bioremediation capabilities, achieving 41.7%, 31.4% and 36.2% removal of naphthalene, acenaphthene and phenanthrene, respectively, in the aerobic environment and 76.9%, 52.5% and 36.8%, respectively, in the anaerobic environment. These results demonstrated the ability of SMFCs in stimulating microorganisms for bioremediation of complex and recalcitrant PAHs.

  5. Endophytic microorganisms--promising applications in bioremediation of greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Stępniewska, Z; Kuźniar, A

    2013-11-01

    Bioremediation is a technique that uses microbial metabolism to remove pollutants. Various techniques and strategies of bioremediation (e.g., phytoremediation enhanced by endophytic microorganisms, rhizoremediation) can mainly be used to remove hazardous waste from the biosphere. During the last decade, this specific technique has emerged as a potential cleanup tool only for metal pollutants. This situation has changed recently as a possibility has appeared for bioremediation of other pollutants, for instance, volatile organic compounds, crude oils, and radionuclides. The mechanisms of bioremediation depend on the mobility, solubility, degradability, and bioavailability of contaminants. Biodegradation of pollutions is associated with microbial growth and metabolism, i.e., factors that have an impact on the process. Moreover, these factors have a great influence on degradation. As a result, recognition of natural microbial processes is indispensable for understanding the mechanisms of effective bioremediation. In this review, we have emphasized the occurrence of endophytic microorganisms and colonization of plants by endophytes. In addition, the role of enhanced bioremediation by endophytic bacteria and especially of phytoremediation is presented.

  6. Bioremediation Well Borehole Soil Sampling and Data Analysis Summary Report for the 100-N Area Bioremediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Gamon

    2009-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings acquired during the drilling and construction of seven bioremediation wells in the 100-N Area in conjunction with remediation of the UPR-100-N-17 petroleum waste site.

  7. Effect of different cultural systems on antioxidant capacity, phenolic content, and fruit quality of strawberries (Fragaria x aranassa Duch.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiow Y; Millner, Patricia

    2009-10-28

    The effect of cultivation practices for controlling strawberry black root rot (BRR) on fruit quality, antioxidant capacity, and flavonoid content in two strawberry cultivars Allstar and Chandler (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) was evaluated. Strawberry fruits used in this study were from plants grown in soils which had a prior history of BRR and red stele, and had not been fumigated during the seven years prior to the study. Results from this study showed that fruit from plants grown in compost socks had significantly higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), flavonoids, anthocyanins, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acid (TA), fructose, glucose, sucrose, malic acid, and citric acid than fruit produced in the black plastic mulch or matted row systems. Cultivar Chandler surpassed cv. Allstar in sugar content, acid content, and flavonoid content regardless of preplanting vinegar drenching and various culture treatments. However, preplanting vinegar treatment increased cyanidin-based and pelargonidin-based anthocyanins but decreased sugar content in fruits of both cultivars.

  8. Suicidal genetically engineered microorganisms for bioremediation: need and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Paul, Debarati; Pandey, Gunjan; Jain, Rakesh K

    2005-05-01

    In the past few decades, increased awareness of environmental pollution has led to the exploitation of microbial metabolic potential in the construction of several genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for bioremediation purposes. At the same time, environmental concerns and regulatory constraints have limited the in situ application of GEMs, the ultimate objective behind their development. In order to address the anticipated risks due to the uncontrolled survival/dispersal of GEMs or recombinant plasmids into the environment, some attempts have been made to construct systems that would contain the released organisms. This article discusses the designing of safer genetically engineered organisms for environmental release with specific emphasis on the use of bacterial plasmid addiction systems to limit their survival thus minimizing the anticipated risk. We also conceptualize a novel strategy to construct "Suicidal Genetically Engineered Microorganisms (SGEMs)" by exploring/combining the knowledge of different plasmid addiction systems (such as antisense RNA-regulated plasmid addiction, proteic plasmid addiction etc.) and inducible degradative operons of bacteria.

  9. An enhanced cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G chemiluminescence system using guest-host interactions in a lab-on-a-chip platform for estimating the total phenolic content in food samples.

    PubMed

    Al Haddabi, Buthaina; Al Lawati, Haider A J; Suliman, FakhrEldin O

    2016-04-01

    Two chemiluminescence-microfluidic (CL-MF) systems, e.g., Ce(IV)-rhodamine B (RB) and Ce(IV)-rhodamine 6G (R6G), for the determination of the total phenolic content in teas and some sweeteners were evaluated. The results indicated that the Ce(IV)-R6G system was more sensitive in comparison to the Ce(IV)-RB CL system. Therefore, a simple (CL-MF) method based on the CL of Ce(IV)-R6G was developed, and the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of this system were evaluated. Selected phenolic compounds (PCs), such as quercetin (QRC), catechin (CAT), rutin (RUT), gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and syringic acid (SA), produced analytically useful chemiluminescence signals with low detection limits ranging from 0.35 nmol L(-1) for QRC to 11.31 nmol L(-1) for SA. The mixing sequence and the chip design were crucial, as the sensitivity and reproducibility could be substantially affected by these two factors. In addition, the anionic surfactant (i.e., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) can significantly enhance the CL signal intensity by as much as 300% for the QRC solution. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the enhancement was due to a strong guest-host interaction between the cationic R6G molecules and the anionic amphiphilic environment. Other parameters that could affect the CL intensities of the PCs were carefully optimized. Finally, the method was successfully applied to tea and sweetener samples. Six different tea samples exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 7.32 to 13.5 g per 100g of sample with respect to GA. Four different sweetener samples were also analyzed and exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 500.9 to 3422.9 mg kg(-1) with respect to GA. The method was selective, rapid and sensitive when used to estimate the total phenolic/antioxidant level, and the results were in good agreement with those reported for honey and tea samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Four marine-derived fungi for bioremediation of raw textile mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ashutosh Kumar; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Naik, Chandrakant Govind

    2010-04-01

    Textile dye effluents pose environmental hazards because of color and toxicity. Bioremediation of these has been widely attempted. However, their widely differing characteristics and high salt contents have required application of different microorganisms and high dilutions. We report here decolorization and detoxification of two raw textile effluents, with extreme variations in their pH and dye composition, used at 20-90% concentrations by each of the four marine-derived fungi. Textile effluent A (TEA) contained an azo dye and had a pH of 8.9 and textile effluent B (TEB) with a pH of 2.5 contained a mixture of eight reactive dyes. The fungi isolated from mangroves and identified by 18S and ITS sequencing corresponded to two ascomycetes and two basidiomycetes. Each of these fungi decolorized TEA by 30-60% and TEB by 33-80% used at 20-90% concentrations and salinity of 15 ppt within 6 days. This was accompanied by two to threefold reduction in toxicity as measured by LC(50) values against Artemia larvae and 70-80% reduction in chemical oxygen demand and total phenolics. Mass spectrometric scan of effluents after fungal treatment revealed degradation of most of the components. The ascomycetes appeared to remove color primarily by adsorption, whereas laccase played a major role in decolorization by basidiomycetes. A process consisting of a combination of sorption by fungal biomass of an ascomycete and biodegradation by laccase from a basidiomycete was used in two separate steps or simultaneously for bioremediation of these two effluents.

  11. Potential for bioremediation of agro-industrial effluents with high loads of pesticides by selected fungi.

    PubMed

    Karas, Panagiotis A; Perruchon, Chiara; Exarhou, Katerina; Ehaliotis, Constantinos; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G

    2011-02-01

    Wastewaters from the fruit packaging industry contain a high pesticide load and require treatment before their environmental discharge. We provide first evidence for the potential bioremediation of these wastewaters. Three white rot fungi (WRF) (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) and an Aspergillus niger strain were tested in straw extract medium (StEM) and soil extract medium (SEM) for degrading the pesticides thiabendazole (TBZ), imazalil (IMZ), thiophanate methyl (TM), ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), diphenylamine (DPA) and chlorpyrifos (CHL). Peroxidase (LiP, MnP) and laccase (Lac) activity was also determined to investigate their involvement in pesticide degradation. T. versicolor and P. ostreatus were the most efficient degraders and degraded all pesticides (10 mg l⁻¹) except TBZ, with maximum efficiency in StEM. The phenolic pesticides OPP and DPA were rapidly degraded by these two fungi with a concurrent increase in MnP and Lac activity. In contrast, these enzymes were not associated with the degradation of CHL, IMZ and TM implying the involvement of other enzymes. T. versicolor degraded spillage-level pesticide concentrations (50 mg l⁻¹) either fully (DPA, OPP) or partially (TBZ, IMZ). The fungus was also able to rapidly degrade a mixture of TM/DPA (50 mg l⁻¹), whereas it failed to degrade IMZ and TBZ when supplied in a mixture with OPP. Overall, T. versicolor and P. ostreatus showed great potential for the bioremediation of wastewaters from the fruit packaging industry. However, degradation of TBZ should be also achieved before further scaling up.

  12. Versatility of Streptomyces sp. M7 to bioremediate soils co-contaminated with Cr(VI) and lindane.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, JuanDaniel; Solá, María Zoleica Simón; Benimeli, Claudia Susana; Amoroso, María Julia; Polti, Marta Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of environmental factors on the bioremediation of Cr(VI) and lindane contaminated soil, by an actinobacterium, Streptomyces sp. M7, in order to optimize the process. Soil samples were contaminated with 25 µg kg(-1) of lindane and 50 mg kg(-1) of Cr(VI) and inoculated with Streptomyces sp. M7. The lowest inoculum concentration which simultaneously produced highest removal of Cr(VI) and lindane was 1 g kg(-1). The influence of physical and chemical parameters was assessed using a full factorial design. The factors and levels tested were: Temperature: 25, 30, 35°C; Humidity: 10%, 20%, 30%; Initial Cr(VI) concentration: 20, 50, 80 mg kg(-1); Initial lindane concentration: 10, 25, 40 µg kg(-1). Streptomyces sp. M7 exhibited strong versatility, showing the ability to bioremediate co-contaminated soil samples at several physicochemical conditions. Streptomyces sp. M7 inoculum size was optimized. Also, it was fitted a model to study this process, and it was possible to predict the system performance, knowing the initial conditions. Moreover, optimum temperature and humidity conditions for the bioremediation of soil with different concentrations of Cr(VI) and lindane were determined. Lettuce seedlings were a suitable biomarker to evaluate the contaminants mixture toxicity. Streptomyces sp. M7 carried out a successful bioremediation, which was demonstrated through ecotoxicity test with Lactuca sativa.

  13. Genetic basis and importance of metal resistant genes in bacteria for bioremediation of contaminated environments with toxic metal pollutants.

    PubMed

    Das, Surajit; Dash, Hirak R; Chakraborty, Jaya

    2016-04-01

    Metal pollution is one of the most persistent and complex environmental issues, causing threat to the ecosystem and human health. On exposure to several toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and mercury, several bacteria has evolved with many metal-resistant genes as a means of their adaptation. These genes can be further exploited for bioremediation of the metal-contaminated environments. Many operon-clustered metal-resistant genes such as cadB, chrA, copAB, pbrA, merA, and NiCoT have been reported in bacterial systems for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, and nickel resistance and detoxification, respectively. The field of environmental bioremediation has been ameliorated by exploiting diverse bacterial detoxification genes. Genetic engineering integrated with bioremediation assists in manipulation of bacterial genome which can enhance toxic metal detoxification that is not usually performed by normal bacteria. These techniques include genetic engineering with single genes or operons, pathway construction, and alternations of the sequences of existing genes. However, numerous facets of bacterial novel metal-resistant genes are yet to be explored for application in microbial bioremediation practices. This review describes the role of bacteria and their adaptive mechanisms for toxic metal detoxification and restoration of contaminated sites.

  14. Oxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and of a non-phenolic lignin structure in the manganese peroxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation system

    Treesearch

    Alexander N. Kapich; Tatyana V. Korneichik; Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids have been proposed to mediate the oxidation of recalcitrant, non-phenolic lignin structures by fungal manganese peroxidases (MnP), but their precise role remains unknown. We investigated the oxidizability of three fatty acids with varying degrees of polyunsaturation (linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids) by measuring conjugated dienes...

  15. Binary solvent extraction system and extraction time effects on phenolic antioxidants from kenaf seeds (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) extracted by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yu Hua; Lau, Hwee Wen; Tan, Chin Ping; Long, Kamariah; Nyam, Kar Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best parameter for extracting phenolic-enriched kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seeds by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The antioxidant activities of ultrasonic-assisted kenaf seed extracts (KSE) were determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity assay, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assay, β -carotene bleaching inhibition assay, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) evaluations were carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents in KSE. The KSE from the best extraction parameter was then subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the phenolic compounds. The optimised extraction condition employed 80% ethanol for 15 min, with the highest values determined for the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assay. KSE contained mainly tannic acid (2302.20 mg/100 g extract) and sinapic acid (1198.22 mg/100 g extract), which can be used as alternative antioxidants in the food industry.

  16. Binary Solvent Extraction System and Extraction Time Effects on Phenolic Antioxidants from Kenaf Seeds (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) Extracted by a Pulsed Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Hwee Wen; Nyam, Kar Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best parameter for extracting phenolic-enriched kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seeds by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The antioxidant activities of ultrasonic-assisted kenaf seed extracts (KSE) were determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity assay, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assay, β-carotene bleaching inhibition assay, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) evaluations were carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents in KSE. The KSE from the best extraction parameter was then subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the phenolic compounds. The optimised extraction condition employed 80% ethanol for 15 min, with the highest values determined for the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assay. KSE contained mainly tannic acid (2302.20 mg/100 g extract) and sinapic acid (1198.22 mg/100 g extract), which can be used as alternative antioxidants in the food industry. PMID:24592184

  17. Olive oil phenols and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2013-11-01

    Olive oil is a rich source of phenolic components which have a wide variety of beneficial health effects in vitro, in vivo, and clinically. The beneficial effects of olive oil phenols attributed to a variety of biological activities including free radical scavenging/antioxidant actions, anti-inflammatory effects, anti-carcinogenic properties, and anti-microbial activities. On the other hand, olive oil phenols have been shown to be some of neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia, spinal cord injury, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, aging, and peripheral neuropathy. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of olive oil phenols.

  18. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal

  19. Influence of industrial and alternative farming systems on contents of sugars, organic acids, total phenolic content, and the antioxidant activity of red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris Rote Kugel).

    PubMed

    Bavec, Martina; Turinek, Matjaz; Grobelnik-Mlakar, Silva; Slatnar, Ana; Bavec, Franc

    2010-11-24

    The contents of sugars, organic acids, total phenolic content, and the antioxidant activity were quantified in the flesh of red beet from conventional (CON), integrated (INT), organic (ORG), biodynamic (BD), and control farming systems using established methods. Significant differences were measured for malic acid, total phenolic content (TPC), and total antioxidant activity, where malic acid content ranged from 2.39 g kg(-1) FW (control) to 1.63 g kg(-1) FW (CON, ORG, and INT). The highest TPC was measured in BD and control samples (0.677 and 0.672 mg GAE g(-1), respectively), and the lowest in CON samples (0.511 mg GAE g(-1)). Antioxidant activity was positively correlated with TPC (r2=0.6187) and ranged from 0.823 μM TE g(-1) FW to 1.270 μM TE g(-1) FW in CON and BD samples, respectively, whereas total sugar content ranged from 21.03 g kg(-1) FW (CON) to 31.58 g kg(-1) FW (BD). The importance of sugars, organic acids, phenols, and antioxidants for human health, as well as for plant resilience and health, gained from this explorative study, is discussed and put into perspective.

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization multi-stage mass spectrometric screening of an insect/plant system: the case of Spodoptera littoralis/Lycopersicon esculentum phenolics and alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Taveira, Marcos; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Oliveira, Luísa; Teixeira, Tânia; Valentão, Patrícia; Simões, Nelson; Andrade, Paula B

    2011-07-30

    High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization multi-stage mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n)) is considered to be a very valuable tool for the characterization of compounds found in trace amounts in natural matrices, as their previous isolation and clean-up steps can be avoided. Micro-scale separation increases the potential of this analytical technique, allowing the determination of compounds in reduced samples. Spodoptera littoralis represents a major challenge to Solanaceae plants, as it is one of the most deleterious pests. The S. littoralis/Lycopersicon esculentum system was studied for the first time concerning glycoalkaloids and phenolics. Using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) we were able to characterize 15 phenolic compounds in L. esculentum leaves. Nine of them are reported for the first time. Some differences were found between leaves of cerasiforme and 'Bull's heart' varieties. However, in the materials of S. littoralis (larvae, adults, exuviae and excrements) reared in both L. esculentum leaves no phenolics were identified. α-Tomatine was the main glycoalkaloid in the host plant. The glycoalkaloid composition of the different S. littoralis materials was distinct, with α-tomatine and dehydrotomatine being the main detected compounds in larvae and excrements. These results add knowledge to the ecological interaction in this insect/plant duo, for which it is hard to obtain considerable sample amounts. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lipids and Molecular Tools as Biomarkers in Monitoring Air Sparging Bioremediation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heipieper, Hermann J.; Fischer, Janett

    2010-05-01

    .J., Junca H. (2009) Enhancement of the microbial community biomass and diversity during air sparging bioremediation of a Northern Bohemia soil highly contaminated with kerosene and BTEX. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 82:565-577. Heipieper H.J. (2009) Isolation and analysis of lipids, biomarkers. In: Timmis K.N. (Ed.) Handbook of Hydrocarbon and Lipid Microbiology. Springer, Berlin. Vol. 5, Part 2, pp. 3743-3750. Unell M., Kabelitz N., Jansson J.K., Heipieper H.J. (2007) Adaptation of the psychrotroph Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 to growth temperature and the presence of phenols by changes in the anteiso/iso ratio of branched fatty acids. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 266 : 138-143.

  2. Cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols in contaminated soil slurries.

    PubMed

    Allan, Ian J; Semple, Kirk T; Hare, Rina; Reid, Brian J

    2007-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the relative contribution of soil catabolic activity, contaminant bioaccessibility, and nutrient levels on the biodegradation of field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds in three municipal gas plant site soils. Extents of biodegradation achieved, in 6 week-long soil slurry assays, under the following conditions were compared: (i) with inoculation of catabolically active PAH and phenol-degrading microorganisms, (ii) with and without hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin supplementation (HPCD; 100 g L(-1)), and finally (iii) with the provision of additional inorganic nutrients in combination with HPCD. Results indicated no significant (p < 0.05) differences between biodegradation endpoints attained in treatments inoculated with catabolically active microorganisms as compared with the uninoculated control. Amendments with HPCD significantly (p < 0.05) lowered biodegradation endpoints for most PAHs and phenolic compounds. Only in one soil did the combination of HPCD and nutrients consistently achieve better bioremediation endpoints with respect to the HPCD-only treatments. Thus, for most compounds, biodegradation was not limited by the catabolic activity of the indigenous microorganisms but rather by processes resulting in limited availability of contaminants to degraders. It is therefore suggested that the bioremediation of PAH and phenol impacted soils could be enhanced through HPCD amendments. In addition, the biodegradability of in situ and spiked (deuterated analogues) PAHs following 120 days aging of the soils suggested that this contact time was not sufficient to obtain similar partitions to that observed for field-aged contaminants; with the spiked compounds being significantly (p < 0.05) more available for biodegradation.

  3. Cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols in contaminated soil slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Ian J. Allan; Kirk T. Semple; Rina Hare; Brian J. Reid

    2007-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the relative contribution of soil catabolic activity, contaminant bioaccessibility, and nutrient levels on the biodegradation of field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds in three municipal gas plant site soils. Extents of biodegradation achieved, in 6 week-long soil slurry assays, under the following conditions were compared: (i) with inoculation of catabolically active PAH and phenol-degrading microorganisms, (ii) with and without hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin supplementation (HPCD; 100 g L{sup -1}), and finally (iii) with the provision of additional inorganic nutrients in combination with HPCD. Results indicated no significant (p {lt} 0.05) differences between biodegradation endpoints attained in treatments inoculated with catabolically active microorganisms as compared with the uninoculated control. Amendments with HPCD significantly (p {lt} 0.05) lowered biodegradation endpoints for most PAHs and phenolic compounds. Only in one soil did the combination of HPCD and nutrients consistently achieve better bioremediation endpoints with respect to the HPCD-only treatments. Thus, for most compounds, biodegradation was not limited by the catabolic activity of the indigenous microorganisms but rather by processes resulting in limited availability of contaminants to degraders. It is therefore suggested that the bioremediation of PAH and phenol impacted soils could be enhanced through HPCD amendments. In addition, the biodegradability of in situ and spiked (deuterated analogues) PAHs following 120 days aging of the soils suggested that this contact time was not sufficient to obtain similar partitions to that observed for field-aged contaminants; with the spiked compounds being significantly (p {lt} 0.05) more available for biodegradation. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Domestic wastewater treatment by constructed wetlands enhanced with bioremediating rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Irina; Cárcamo, Herlen; Carballo, María Elena; Cruz, Mario; Del Carmen Durán, María

    2017-06-23

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) offer several advantages for treating waters; however, the successful application of these systems remains a challenge. Practical solutions to pollution through CWs remain incipient because wetlands are still studied as "black boxes"; further studies are required regarding the involvement of rhizosphere bacteria in the removal of pollutants. This research focused on increasing the performance of CWs treatment systems for the removal of inorganic and organic pollutants from domestic wastewater, by the application of native bioremediating rhizobacteria. A bacterial consortium (CAD/1S) was designed with four rhizobacteria strains isolated from Typha domingensis plants of natural wetlands. Each individual strain was identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. This consortium removed organic matter, ammonium, and phosphate with percentages over 70% from model wastewater. The evaluation of abiotic and biotic factors' influence on pollutant removal indicated the best conditions to remove pollutants: a neutral pH, a 72-h contact time, and an inoculum from single growth of each strain. The subsequent bioaugmentation with the consortium of CWs at laboratory scale allowed 100%, greater than 70 and 55% removal of organic matter, ammonium, and phosphate, respectively. The set of results allowed the proposal of a new strategy for the improvement of CWs technology for the treatment of domestic wastewater pollutants.

  5. Enhancement of bioremediation of a creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.P.E.; Mesania, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing concern in the US about the increasing number of industrial sites containing concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in their soil and waste sludge above background levels. PAHs, neutral and non-polar organic compounds, consist of two or more fused benzene rings which are generated from industrial activities such as creosote wood treating, gas manufacturing, coke making, coal tar refining, petroleum refining, and aluminum smelting. Low molecular weight PAHs are generally considered as extremely toxic compounds, whereas the higher molecular weight PAHs are carcinogenic in nature. Bioremediation, a viable option for treatment of PAHs contaminated soil, can be enhanced by the use of surfactant. In this study a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, was investigated. Abiotic soil desorption experiments were performed to determine the kinetics of release of selected PAH compounds from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Respirometric experiments were also conducted to evaluate the effect of nonionic surfactant on biodegradation. The N-Con system respirometer was used to monitor the oxygen uptake by the microorganisms. The abiotic experiments results indicated that the addition of surfactant to soil/water systems increases the desorption of PAH compounds. The increase in PAHs availability to the microorganisms produced an increase in oxygen uptake.

  6. In situ air sparging for bioremediation of groundwater and soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, D.; Lei, J.; Chapdelaine, M.C.; Sansregret, J.L.; Cyr, B.

    1995-12-31

    Activities at a former petroleum products depot resulted in the hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater over a 30,000-m{sup 2} area. Site remediation activities consisted of three phases: site-specific characterization and treatability study, pilot-scale testing, and full-scale bioremediation. During Phase 1, a series of site/soil/waste characterizations was undertaken to ascertain the degree of site contamination and to determine soil physical/chemical and microbiological characteristics. Treatability studies were carried out to simulate an air sparging process in laboratory-scale columns. Results indicated 42% mineral oil and grease removal and 94% benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) removal over an 8-week period. The removal rate was higher in the unsaturated zone than in the saturated zone. Phase 2 involved pilot-scale testing over a 550-m{sup 2} area. The radius of influence of the air sparge points was evaluated through measurements of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the groundwater and of groundwater mounding. A full-scale air sparging system (Phase 3) was installed on site and has been operational since early 1994. Physical/chemical and microbiological parameters, and contaminants were analyzed to evaluate the system performance.

  7. Integrated dissolved gas management for contaminated aquifer in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Gantzer, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Integrated management is the simultaneous management of a target gas concentration and the total gas pressure in an aqueous stream. A membrane-based integrated gas management system is presented that allows the aqueous delivery of elevated dissolved concentrations of gaseous microbial substrates to an aquifer with no potential for bubble formation. The delivery of gaseous microbial substrates can enhance the in situ bioremediation of a contaminated aquifer. Bubble information in an aquifer is undesirable for three reasons: substrate is wasted, gases migrate off site, and the aquifer clogs with bubbles. Integrated gas management is a two-step process. The first step consists of the nonselective removal of dissolved gases to reduce the total gas pressure of the injection water. The second step consists of dissolving the desired gaseous substrate. The resulting water has an elevated concentration of the gaseous substrate and a total gas pressure less than the absolute hydrostatic pressure at the delivery point for the aquifer. A membrane-based integrated gas management system has operated for 9 months at a former manufactured gas plant site and delivers 5 gpm of oxygenated water (25 mg O{sub 2}/L) to a silt-clay aquifer at a total gas pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  8. Apparatus and method for phosphate-accelerated bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Pfiffner, S.M.; Phelps, T.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.; Borthen, J.W.

    1998-05-19

    An apparatus and method are provided for supplying a vapor-phase nutrient to contaminated soil for in situ bioremediation. The apparatus includes a housing adapted for containing a quantity of the liquid nutrient, a conduit in communication with the interior of the housing, means for causing a gas to flow through the conduit, and means for contacting the gas with the liquid so that a portion evaporates and mixes with the gas. The mixture of gas and nutrient vapor is delivered to the contaminated site via a system of injection and extraction wells configured to the site and provides for the use of a passive delivery system. The mixture has a partial pressure of vaporized nutrient that is no greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid. If desired, the nutrient and/or the gas may be heated to increase the vapor pressure and the nutrient concentration of the mixture. Preferably, the nutrient is a volatile, substantially nontoxic and nonflammable organic phosphate that is a liquid at environmental temperatures, such as triethyl phosphate or tributyl phosphate. 8 figs.

  9. Apparatus and method for phosphate-accelerated bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Lombard, Kenneth H.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borthen, James W.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for supplying a vapor-phase nutrient to contaminated soil for in situ bioremediation. The apparatus includes a housing adapted for containing a quantity of the liquid nutrient, a conduit in communication with the interior of the housing, means for causing a gas to flow through the conduit, and means for contacting the gas with the liquid so that a portion thereof evaporates and mixes with the gas. The mixture of gas and nutrient vapor is delivered to the contaminated site via a system of injection and extraction wells configured to the site and provides for the use of a passive delivery system. The mixture has a partial pressure of vaporized nutrient that is no greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid. If desired, the nutrient and/or the gas may be heated to increase the vapor pressure and the nutrient concentration of the mixture. Preferably, the nutrient is a volatile, substantially nontoxic and nonflammable organic phosphate that is a liquid at environmental temperatures, such as triethyl phosphate or tributyl phosphate.

  10. BENCH-SCALE PERFORMANCE OF PARTITIONING ELECTRON DONORS FOR TCE DNAPL BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Source Area Bioremediation (SABRE) project, an international collaboration of twelve companies, two government agencies and three research institutions, is to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated ethen...

  11. BENCH-SCALE PERFORMANCE OF PARTITIONING ELECTRON DONORS FOR TCE DNAPL BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Source Area Bioremediation (SABRE) project, an international collaboration of twelve companies, two government agencies and three research institutions, is to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated ethen...

  12. Rehabilitation of oil polluted soils by bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Mihail; Parvan, Lavinia; Cioroianu, Mihai; Carmen, Sirbu; Constantin, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    In Romania about 50,000 ha are polluted with oil and/or brine. The main sources of pollution are the different activities using petroleum products: extraction, transport, treatment, refining and distribution. Taking into acoount the large areas and the cost per unit area, bioremediation was tested as a method of rehabilitation. To stimulate the performance of the bioremediation process for a polluted soil (luvisol) by 3% oil, different methods were tested: -application of a bacterial inoculum consisting of species of the Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter genera;- application of two types of absorbent materials, 16 t/ha peat and 16, respectively, 32 kg/ha Zeba (starch-based polymer, superabsorbent); -mineral fertilization with N200P200K200 and 5 different liquid fertilizer based on potassium humates extracted from lignite in a NPK matrix with micronutrients and added monosaccharides (4 and 8%). After 45 days from the treatment (60 days from pollution) the following observations have been noticed: • the application of only bacterial inoculum had no significant effect on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons; • the use of 650 l/ha AH-SH fertilizer (potassium humate in a NPK matrix) led to a 47% decrease of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons); • the application of 16 t/ha peat, together with the bacterial inoculum and the AH-SG2 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 8% monosaccharides, in which the nitrogen is amide form) led to a 50% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 16 kg/ha Zeba absorbent together with bacterial inoculum and 650 l/ha AH-SG1 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 4% monosaccharide in which the nitrogen is in amide form) led to a 57% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 32 kg/ha Zeba absorbent, together with the AH-SG2 fertilizer, led to a 58% decrease of the TPH content.

  13. Rapid bioremediation of Alizarin Red S and Quinizarine Green SS dyes using Trichoderma lixii F21 mediated by biosorption and enzymatic processes.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Liyana Amalina; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd; Hadibarata, Tony; Ameen, Fuad

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a newly isolated ascomycete fungus Trichoderma lixii F21 was explored to bioremediate the polar [Alizarin Red S (ARS)] and non-polar [Quinizarine Green SS (QGSS)] anthraquinone dyes. The bioremediation of ARS and QGSS by T. lixii F21 was found to be 77.78 and 98.31 %, respectively, via biosorption and enzymatic processes within 7 days of incubation. The maximum biosorption (ARS = 33.7 % and QGSS = 74.7 %) and enzymatic biodegradation (ARS = 44.1 % and QGSS = 23.6 %) were observed at pH 4 and 27 °C in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The laccase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase produced by T. lixii F21 were involved in the molecular conversions of ARS and QGSS to phenolic and carboxylic acid compounds, without the formation of toxic aromatic amines. This study suggests that T. lixii F21 may be a good candidate for the bioremediation of industrial effluents contaminated with anthraquinone dyes.

  14. Extraction of phenol in wastewater with annular centrifugal contactors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Quan; Duan, Wu-Hua; Zhou, Xiu-Zhu; Zhou, Jia-Zhen

    2006-04-17

    Solvent extraction is an effective way to treat and recover the phenolic compounds from the high content phenolic wastewater at present. The experimental study on treating the wastewater containing phenol has been carried out with QH-1extractant (the amine mixture) and annular centrifugal contactors. The distribution ratio of phenol was 108.6 for QH-1-phenol system. The mass-transfer process of phenol for the system was mainly controlled by diffusion. When the flow ratio (aqueous/organic) was changed from 1/1 to 4/1, the rotor speed was changed from 2500 to 4000 r/min, and the total flow of two phases was changed from 20 to 70 mL/min, the mass-transfer efficiency E of the single-stage centrifugal contactor was more than 95%. When the flow ratio was changed from 4.4/1 to 4.9/1, the rotor speed was 3000 r/min, and the total flow of two phases was changed from 43.0 to 47.0 mL/min, the extraction rate rho of the three-stage cascade was more than 99%. When 15% NaOH was used for stripping of phenol in QH-1, the stripping efficiency of the three-stage cascade was also more than 99% under the experimental conditions.

  15. Isolation and growth kinetics of a novel phenol-degrading bacterium Microbacterium oxydans from the sediment of Taihu Lake (China).

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqiong; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Dai, Yu; Wu, Yue; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Seven phylogenetically diverse phenol-degrading bacterial strains designated as P1 to P7 were isolated from the industry-effluent dump sites of an industrial area near Taihu Lake, China. Through the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, these strains were widely distributed among five different genera: Rhodococcus (P1), Pseudomonas (P2-P4), Acinetobacter (P5), Alcaligenes (P6), and Microbacterium (P7). All seven isolates were capable of growing with phenol as the sole carbon source. Strain P7 was found to be a novel phenol-degrading strain by detailed morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristic analysis as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analyses, and was named Microbacterium oxydans LY1 (M. oxydans LY1 in its short form). Degradation experiments of phenol at various initial concentrations (20-1,000 mg/L) revealed that phenol is an inhibitory substrate to M. oxydans LY1. In a batch culture experiment, more than 95% of the phenol (500 mg/L) was degraded by M. oxydans LY1 at 30°C, pH 7.0 and 120 rpm within 88 h. Phenol concentration higher than 200 mg/L was found to inhibit the bacterial growth. The growth kinetics correlated well with the Haldane model with μmax (maximum specific cell growth rate) = 0.243 h(-1), Ks (saturation constant) = 25.7 mg/L, and Ki (self-inhibition constant) = 156.3 mg/L. This is the first report of the ability of M. oxydans to degrade phenol, and the results could provide important information for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated environments.

  16. Engineered marine Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125: a promising micro-organism for the bioremediation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Papa, R; Parrilli, E; Sannia, G

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant Antarctic Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (P. haloplanktis TAC/tou) expressing toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) can efficiently convert several aromatic compounds into their corresponding catechols in a broad range of temperature. When the genome of P. haloplanktis TAC125 was analysed in silico, the presence of a DNA sequence coding for a putative laccase-like protein was revealed. It is well known that bacterial laccases are able to oxidize dioxygenated aromatic compounds such as catechols. We analysed the catabolic features, conferred by recombinant ToMO activity and the endogenous laccase enzymatic activity, of P. haloplanktis TAC/tou engineered strain and its ability to grow on aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. Results presented highlight the broad potentiality of P. haloplanktis TAC/tou cells expressing recombinant ToMO in bioremediation and suggest the use of this engineered Antarctic bacterium in the bioremediation of chemically contaminated marine environments and/or cold effluents. This paper demonstrates the possibility to confer new and specific degradative capabilities to a bacterium isolated from an unpolluted environment (Antarctic seawater) transforming it into a bacterium able to grow on phenol as sole carbon and energy source.

  17. Bioremediation of synthetic fatliquors under microaerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, B; Priya, K; Rajaram, Rama

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic fatliquors are useful as a fatliquoring agent, flotation agent and emulsifying agent in a wide range of industrial applications such as leather, pharmacy and farm chemicals. These fatliquors remain recalcitrant to natural biota in existing treatment plants. In the present study, the isolated microaerophilic Serratia sp. HA1 strain CSMB3 is capable of utilizing structurally different fatliquors as the sole substrate for their growth under microaerobic conditions. Degradation of vegetable fatliquors was observed from 95 to 97% in terms of lipids, with the production of lipase at 72 h. Degradation of synthetic fatliquors was observed in terms of chemical oxygen demand from 85% to a minimum of 25%. It is in the order of sulfited/sulfated fatliquors > sulfochlorinated fatliquors > chlorinated fatliquors. A thin layer chromatography chromatogram confirmed the degradation of non polar fatliquor to polar compounds. Production of the red pigment prodigiosin in synthetic fatliquors enhanced the growth of the isolate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the bioremediation of sulfochlorinated fatliquor into lipids and fatty acids and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) results confirmed that alcohols and esters are the final end products. Thus the isolated strain CSMB3 may be used in the treatment of wastewaters containing vegetable and synthetic fatliquors.

  18. (Bioremediation of mercury-contaminated sites)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.R.

    1989-09-27

    The purpose of this travel was to allow the traveler to (1) attend the 7th International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment held in Geneva, Switzerland; (2) chair two sessions (Wastewater Purification and Organometallic Compounds, respectively) of the conference; and (3) present a paper describing research (supported jointly by the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)) on the bioremediation of mercury-contaminated sites. The title of the paper was Volatilization, Methylation, and Demethylation of Mercury in a Mercury-Contaminated Stream.'' The traveler was also a co-author of another paper, Gene Probes to Predict Responses of Aquatic Microbial Communities to Toxic Metals,'' which was presented by the USEPA collaborator (T. Barkay). The conference brought together international experts to present and discuss research findings on many aspects of metals in the environment and thus provided the traveler the opportunity to interact beneficially with researchers in the subfields of mercury biogeochemistry and microbial ecology. The traveler also attended conference sessions on metals and acid deposition, groundwater, wastewater purification, and municipal solid waste. 2 refs.

  19. Medical bioremediation: a concept moving toward reality.

    PubMed

    Schloendorn, John; Webb, Tim; Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Jackemeyer, David; Jiang, Lijing; Mathieu, Jacques; Rebo, Justin; Sankman, Jonathan; Sherman, Lindsey; Tontson, Lauri; Qureshi, Ateef; Alvarez, Pedro; Rittmann, Bruce

    2009-12-01

    Abstract A major driver of aging is catabolic insufficiency, the inability of our bodies to break down certain substances that accumulate slowly throughout the life span. Even though substance buildup is harmless while we are young, by old age the accumulations can reach a toxic threshold and cause disease. This includes some of the most prevalent diseases in old age-atherosclerosis and macular degeneration. Atherosclerosis is associated with the buildup of cholesterol and its oxidized derivatives (particularly 7-ketocholesterol) in the artery wall. Age-related macular degeneration is associated with carotenoid lipofuscin, primarily the pyridinium bisretinoid A2E. Medical bioremediation is the concept of reversing the substance accumulations by using enzymes from foreign species to break down the substances into forms that relieve the disease-related effect. We report on an enzyme discovery project to survey the availability of microorganisms and enzymes with these abilities. We found that such microorganisms and enzymes exist. We identified numerous bacteria having the ability to transform cholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol. Most of these species initiate the breakdown by same reaction mechanism as cholesterol oxidase, and we have used this enzyme directly to reduce the toxicity of 7-ketocholesterol, the major toxic oxysterol, to cultured human cells. We also discovered that soil fungi, plants, and some bacteria possess peroxidase and carotenoid cleavage oxygenase enzymes that effectively destroy with varied degrees of efficiency and selectivity the carotenoid lipofuscin found in macular degeneration.

  20. Oil bioremediation using insoluble nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, E; Legman, R; Kushmaro, A; Adler, E; Abir, H; Ron, E Z

    1996-11-15

    Oil bioremediation is limited by the availability of nitrogen and phosphorous, which are needed by the bacteria and not present in sufficient amounts in hydrocarbons. The supply of these two essential elements as water-soluble salts presents several problems. These include the rapid dilution of the salts in the large volumes of polluted land or water and their utilization by other bacteria that do not degrade oil. In addition, increasing the concentration of mobile nitrogen creates further environmental problems. The use of hydrophobic sources of nitrogen and phosphorous that have a low water solubility can overcome these problems. We have studied one such compound. F-1, that is not used by most bacteria but serves as a good nitrogen and phosphorous source for those bacterial strains that are capable of utilizing it. We have shown that bacteria using F-1 do not cross-feed other bacterial strains. Moreover, when the concentration of the pollutant is sufficiently reduced, the multiplication of the bacteria slows down until they become a negligible fraction of the bacterial population. Chemical analysis indicated that following a 28-day treatment of Alaskan crude oil, most of the hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatics, are degraded to undetectable levels. The C34 and C35 components were also degraded, although their degradation was not completed within this time period. In treatment of a sandy beach that was accidentally polluted with crude heavy oil, about 90% degradation was obtained within about 4 months at an outside average temperature of 5 -10 degrees C.

  1. Enhancing in situ bioremediation with pneumatic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Peyton, B.M.; Liskowitz, J.L.; Fitzgerald, C.; Schuring, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    A major technical obstacle affecting the application of in situ bioremediation is the effective distribution of nutrients to the subsurface media. Pneumatic fracturing can increase the permeability of subsurface formations through the injection of high pressure air to create horizontal fracture planes, thus enhancing macro-scale mass-transfer processes. Pneumatic fracturing technology was demonstrated at two field sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Tests were performed to increase the permeability for more effective bioventing, and evaluated the potential to increase permeability and recovery of free product in low permeability soils consisting of fine grain silts, clays, and sedimentary rock. Pneumatic fracturing significantly improved formation permeability by enhancing secondary permeability and by promoting removal of excess soil moisture from the unsaturated zone. Postfracture airflows were 500% to 1,700% higher than prefracture airflows for specific fractured intervals in the formation. This corresponds to an average prefracturing permeability of 0.017 Darcy, increasing to an average of 0.32 Darcy after fracturing. Pneumatic fracturing also increased free-product recovery rates of number 2 fuel from an average of 587 L (155 gal) per month before fracturing to 1,647 L (435 gal) per month after fracturing.

  2. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Sack, W.A.; Carriere, P.E.; Whiteman, C.S.; Davis, M.P.; Raman, S.; Cuddeback, J.E.; Shiemke, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic is receiving growing support and widespread testing in the field. It is an attractive alternative with the potential to destroy contaminants almost completely. The research seeks to exploit the natural symbiotic relationship between methanogenic and methanotrophic microorganisms. The methanogens are able to carry out anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of highly chlorinated solvents while producing methane. The methanotrophs in turn utilize the end products of the methanogens, including the methane, to aerobically degrade the residual CAH compounds to environmentally acceptable end products. Both groups of organisms degrade the CAH compounds cometabolically and require a primary substrate. The purpose of the research is to evaluate and optimize the ability of methanotrophic, methanogenic, and other selected bacteria for cost-effective biotransformation of TCE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This paper describes initial studies using separate anaerobic and aerobic columns. As soon as the initial column studies are complete, the anaerobic and aerobic columns will be combined in both sequential and simultaneous modes to evaluate complete CAH destruction.

  3. Bioremediation treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils: influencing parameters.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Masoud; Barabadi, Abbas; Barabady, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The Arctic environment is very vulnerable and sensitive to hydrocarbon pollutants. Soil bioremediation is attracting interest as a promising and cost-effective clean-up and soil decontamination technology in the Arctic regions. However, remoteness, lack of appropriate infrastructure, the harsh climatic conditions in the Arctic and some physical and chemical properties of Arctic soils may reduce the performance and limit the application of this technology. Therefore, understanding the weaknesses and bottlenecks in the treatment plans, identifying their associated hazards, and providing precautionary measures are essential to improve the overall efficiency and performance of a bioremediation strategy. The aim of this paper is to review the bioremediation techniques and strategies using microorganisms for treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils. It takes account of Arctic operational conditions and discusses the factors influencing the performance of a bioremediation treatment plan. Preliminary hazard analysis is used as a technique to identify and assess the hazards that threaten the reliability and maintainability of a bioremediation treatment technology. Some key parameters with regard to the feasibility of the suggested preventive/corrective measures are described as well.

  4. Application of bioemulsifiers in soil oil bioremediation processes. Future prospects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, C; Manzanera, M; Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; González-López, J

    2009-06-01

    Biodegradation is one of the primary mechanisms for elimination of petroleum and other hydrocarbon pollutants from the environment. It is considered an environmentally acceptable way of eliminating oils and fuel because the majority of hydrocarbons in crude oils and refined products are biodegradable. Petroleum hydrocarbon compounds bind to soil components and are difficult to remove and degrade. Bioemulsifiers can emulsify hydrocarbons enhancing their water solubility and increasing the displacement of oily substances from soil particles. For these reasons, inclusion of bioemulsifiers in a bioremediation treatment of a hydrocarbon polluted environment could be really advantageous. There is a useful diversity of bioemulsifiers due to the wide variety of producer microorganisms. Also their chemical compositions and functional properties can be strongly influenced by environmental conditions. The effectiveness of the bioemulsifiers as biostimulating agent in oil bioremediation processes has been demonstrated by several authors in different experimental assays. For example, they have shown to be really efficient in combination with other products frequently used in oil bioremediation such as they are inorganic fertilizer (NPK) and oleophilic fertilizer (i.e. S200C). On the other hand, the bioemulsifiers have shown to be more efficient in the treatment of soil with high percentage of clay. Finally, it has been proved their efficacy in other biotechnological processes such as in situ treatment and biopiles. This paper reviews literature concerning the application of bioemulsifiers in the bioremediation of soil polluted with hydrocarbons, and summarizes aspects of the current knowledge about their industrial application in bioremediation processes.

  5. A comparison of organophosphate degradation genes and bioremediation applications.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Iken, Brian; Damania, Ashish

    2013-12-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) form the bulk of pesticides that are currently in use around the world accounting for more than 30% of the world market. They also form the core for many nerve-based warfare agents including sarin and soman. The widespread use and the resultant build-up of OP pesticides and chemical nerve agents has led to the development of major health problems due to their extremely toxic interaction with any biological system that encounters them. Growing concern over the accumulation of OP compounds in our food products, in the soils from which they are harvested and in wastewater run-off has fuelled a growing interest in microbial biotechnology that provides cheap, efficient OP detoxification to supplement expensive chemical methods. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge of OP pesticide and chemical agent degradation and attempt to clarify confusion over identification and nomenclature of two major families of OP-degrading enzymes through a comparison of their structure and function. The isolation, characterization, utilization and manipulation of the major detoxifying enzymes and the molecular basis of degradation of OP pesticides and chemical nerve agents are discussed as well as the achievements and technological advancements made towards the bioremediation of such compounds.

  6. Air sparging and bioremediation: The case for in situ mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, W.S.; Brown, R.A.; Bass, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging has sparked considerable controversy in the remediation industry. Some feel air sparging is a significant advance in remedial technology, whereas others feel that air sparging is a very limited technology. A central question in this debate is the presence (or lack thereof) of groundwater mixing during air sparging. Groundwater mixing is important to overcome the diffusion limitations of sparging caused by air channeling and effectively deliver oxygen for in situ bioremediation. Possible mechanisms of groundwater mixing include physical displacement, capillary interactions of air and water, frictional drag, makeup of evaporative loss, thermal convection, and movement of fines. Physical groundwater displacement and groundwater movement resulting from capillary pressure gradients are the two most likely and most commonly effective mechanisms. An important question is the relative degree of groundwater mixing during nonsteady-state and steady-state sparging. Evidence indicates that mixing occurs primarily during nonsteady-state air sparging. Because groundwater mixing is important to overcome the diffusion limitations of air sparging, it is important to operate sparging systems to maximize mixing. Field data show that pulsed sparging, which emphasizes the nonsteady-state aspects of air sparging, greatly enhances groundwater mixing.

  7. Apparatus and method for phosphate-accelerated bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Phelps, T.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Pfiffner, S.M.; Lombard, K.H.; Borthen, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for supplying a vapor-phase nutrient to contaminated soil for in situ bioremediation. The apparatus includes a housing adapted for containing a quantity of the liquid nutrient, a conduit in fluid communication with the interior of the housing, means for causing a gas to flow through the conduit, and means for contacting the gas with the liquid so that a portion thereof evaporates and mixes with the gas. The mixture of gas and nutrient vapor is delivered to the contaminated site via a system of injection and extraction wells configured to the site. The mixture has a partial pressure of vaporized nutrient that is no greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid. If desired, the nutrient and/or the gas may be heated to increase the vapor pressure and the nutrient concentration of the mixture. Preferably, the nutrient is a volatile, substantially nontoxic and nonflammable organic phosphate that is a liquid at environmental temperatures, such as triethyl phosphate or tributyl phosphate.

  8. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  9. The study of phenolic compounds as natural antioxidants in wine.

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, M; Martínez-Martínez, F; Del Valle-Ribes, C

    2003-01-01

    Plant phenolics present in fruit and vegetables, and that are particularly rich in red wine, have received considerable attention because of their potential antioxidant activity. Human consumption of antioxidants has many alleged health benefits, including protection against cardiovascular diseases, and, most recently, cancer. Red wines contain a variety of polyphenolic antioxidants. Five samples of commercial red wines from Spain and four phenolic compounds of red wine: gallic acid, trans-resveratrol, quercetin and rutin, have been studied. The total phenolics content and the total antioxidant activity (TAA) of wines was determined. The total phenolic content, determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method, varied from 1800 to 2300 mg/L, expressed as gallic acid equivalents (GAE). The antioxidative effects of wine phenolics were determined using a system based on the inhibition by antioxidants of the absorbance of the radical cation. The relationship between antioxidant activity of phenolic comounds, as hydrogen donating free radical scavengers, and their chemical structures was studied. Furthermore, the total antioxidant activity of the wines investigated was well correlated with phenol content. Thus, the results confirm that red wine polyphenols are, in vitro, significant antioxidants.

  10. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro Anti-oxidant Activity and HPLC-DAD System Based Phenolic Content Analysis of Codiaeum variegatum Found in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Saffoon, Nadia; Uddin, Riaz; Subhan, Nusrat; Hossain, Hemayet; Reza, Hasan Mahmud; Alam, Md Ashraful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant potential of two varieties of Codiaeum variegatum leaves (spiral (CP) and royal like (BP)) extracts. Methods: The different antioxidant assays, including DPPH free radical scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide, reducing power, total antioxidant activity, protection of lipid peroxidation and RBC membrane stabilization activity, were studied. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode-array detection was used to identify and quantify the phenolic compounds in the royal like (BP) leaves extract. Results: Codiaeum variegatum extracts showed effective DPPH free radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging and nitric oxide scavenging activity. However, reducing power of ferric ion was not significant compared to the standard antioxidant activity. In addition, Codiaeum variegatum extracts exhibited protection against lipid peroxidation. The total antioxidant activity was increased dose dependently when compared with standard drug ascorbic acid. (-)-Epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, rutin hydrate and ellagic acid were identified in the extract. Among the phenolic compounds, ellagic acid was abundantly present in the extract. Conclusion: Our investigation suggests that Codiaeum variegatum leaves contain high amount of phenolic compounds which may responsible for its biological activities in folkloric medicine. PMID:25671186

  12. Simple and rapid method for the analysis of phenolic compounds in beverages and grains.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marjorie B

    2011-03-09

    A new method for the detection of phenolics in food systems was developed. This method is based on interactions of phenolics with Fast Blue BB diazonium salt in alkali pH, forming azo complexes, with the absorbance measured at 420 nm after 60 min. The linear regression correlations (R(2)) of gallic acid calibration standards were >0.99. The phenolic content (gallic acid equivalent) of samples analyzed yielded higher ratios (1.7-6.6) of the total phenolics by Fast Blue BB to Folin-Ciocalteu methods in most beverages and grain samples, but in flaxseed and some juice blends, the ratios were <1. The lower ratios suggest the presence of non-phenolic reducing constituents measured with the Folin-Ciocalteu method as "total phenolics". This method is simple and inexpensive and can be used to rapidly assess the total phenolics of foods and beverages.

  13. Phase behavior of itraconazole-phenol mixtures and its pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Mansour, Heidi M; Oh, Tack-Oon; Kim, Ju-Young; Ha, Jung-Myung; Lee, Beom-Jin; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Park, Eun-Seok

    2012-10-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the phase behavior of itraconazole-phenol mixtures and assess the feasibility of topical formulations of itraconazole using eutectic mixture systems. Itraconazole-phenol eutectic mixtures were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, and powder X-ray diffractometry. The skin permeation rates of itraconazole-phenol eutectic formulations were determined using Franz diffusion cells fitted with excised hairless mouse skins. Itraconazole can form eutectic compounds with phenol, and the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the carbonyl group in the itraconazole and hydroxyl group in phenol play a major role in itraconazole-phenol eutectic formation. Despite its high molecular weight and hydrophobicity, the drug (i.e., itraconazole) can be permeated through excised hairless mouse skins from itraconazole-phenol eutectic formulations. The findings of this study emphasize the capabilities of the topical application of itraconazole via external preparations.

  14. Phenol- and Toluene-Degrading Microbial Populations from an Aquifer in Which Successful Trichloroethene Cometabolism Occurred

    PubMed Central

    Fries, M. R.; Forney, L. J.; Tiedje, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    - and toluene-stimulated TCE removal that occurred during the field assessment of this remediation process. This suggests that naturally occurring communities of only moderate TCE-cooxidizing ability may support successful TCE bioremediation as long as the phenol or toluene present is not limiting. This activity, however, may not be sustainable for the long term, because TCE-inactive populations that consumed toluene at rates equal to that of the best TCE degraders were present and hence would be expected to eventually dominate the community. PMID:16535577

  15. Treatment of wastewater containing phenol using a tubular ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ersu, C B; Ong, S K

    2008-02-01

    The performance of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a tubular ceramic membrane for phenol removal was evaluated under varying hydraulic retention times (HRT) and a fixed sludge residence time (SRT) of 30 days. The tubular ceramic membrane was operated with a mode of 15 minutes of filtration followed by 15 seconds of permeate backwashing at a flux of 250 l m(-2)hr(-1) along with an extended backwashing of 30 seconds every 3 hours of operation, which maintained the transmembrane pressure (TMP) below 100 kPa. Using a simulated municipal wastewater with varying phenol concentrations, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removals observed were greater than 88% with excellent suspended solids (SS) removal of 100% at low phenol concentrations (approx. 100 mg l(-1) of phenol). Step increases in phenol concentration showed that inhibition was observed between 600 to 800 mg l(-1) of phenol with decreased sludge production rate, mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, and removal performance. The sludge volume index (SVI) of the biomass increased to about 450 ml g(-1) for a phenol input concentration of 800 mg l(-1). When the phenol concentration was decreased to 100 mg l(-1), the ceramic tubular MBR was found to recover rapidly indicating that the MBR is a robust system retaining most of the biomass. Experimental runs using wastewater containing phenol indicated that the MBR can be operated safely without upsets for concentrations up to 600 mg l(-1) of phenol at 2-4 hours HRT and 30 days SRT.

  16. Bioremediation of Industrial Waste Through Enzyme Producing Marine Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Sivaperumal, P; Kamala, K; Rajaram, R

    2017-01-01

    Bioremediation process using microorganisms is a kind of nature-friendly and cost-effective clean green technology. Recently, biodegradation of industrial wastes using enzymes from marine microorganisms has been reported worldwide. The prospectus research activity in remediation area would contribute toward the development of advanced bioprocess technology. To minimize industrial wastes, marine enzymes could constitute a novel alternative in terms of waste treatment. Nowadays, the evidence on the mechanisms of bioremediation-related enzymes from marine microorganisms has been extensively studied. This review also will provide information about enzymes from various marine microorganisms and their complexity in the biodegradation of comprehensive range of industrial wastes.

  17. Engineered approaches for in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    Throughout the world there are sites contaminated with chlorinated compounds such as perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloromethene, carbon tetrachloride, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated benzenes, and various pesticide/herbicide compounds. Not only do these compounds carry health risks, but they also are challenging and often expensive to treat in the field. However, progress is being made, and this volume brings together the most up-to-date laboratory findings and the latest full-scale results from bioremediation efforts at actual field sites. Engineering approaches discussed include biobarriers, cometabolism, bioaugmentation, in situ oxidation, Genton`s Reagent, in situ bioremediation, and more.

  18. Preliminary technology report for Southern Sector bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; White, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Jones, D.; Berry, C.

    1997-06-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate the potential of intrinsic bioremediation and phytoremediation in the Southern Sector of the A/M-Area at the Savannah River Site. A subsurface plume of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) is present in the Lost Lake aquifer upgradient of the study site and is predicted to impact the area at some point in the future. The surface area along the Lost lake aquifer seep line where the plume is estimated to emerge was identified. Ten sites along the seep line were selected for biological, chemical, and contaminant treatability analyses. A survey was undertaken in this area to to quantify the microbial and plant population known to be capable of remediating TCE and PCE. The current groundwater quality upgradient and downgradient of the zone of influence was determined. No TCE or PCE was found in the soils or surface water from the area tested at this time. A TCE biodegradation treatability test was done on soil from the 10 selected locations. From an initial exposure of 25 ppm of TCE, eight of the samples biodegraded up to 99.9 percent of all the compound within 6 weeks. This biodegradation of TCE appears to be combination of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activity as intermediates that were detected in the treatability test include vinyl chloride (VC) and the dichloroethenes (DCE) 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethylene. The TCE biological treatability studies were combines with microbiological and chemical analyses. The soils were found through immunological analysis with direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) and microbiological analysis with direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) and microbiological analysis to have a microbial population of methanotrophic bacteria that utilize the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) and cometabolize TCE.

  19. In situ bioremediation technique for sites underlain by silt and clay

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, B.K.; Ford, C.G.

    1999-12-01

    An in situ trickling filter system, named Trickling Trench, is being used to treat biodegradable organic compounds at a site underlain by silt and clay. This method provides the containment advantages of pump-and-treat remediation with the low-cost benefits of in situ bioremediation. A design method is presented using a conventional trickling filter analytical model with kinetic coefficients for various organic compounds calculated from published data. Performance monitoring data obtained from the Trickling Trench bioreactor are compared to design predictions.

  20. Effect of petrochemical sludge concentrations of changes in mutagenic activity during soil bioremediation process.

    PubMed

    Morelli, I S; Vecchioli, G I; Del Panno, M T; Painceira, M T

    2001-10-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effect of the petrochemical sludge application rate on the mutagenic activity (Ames test) of soil and the persistence of mutagenic activity during laboratory soil bioremediation process. Sludge-soil systems were prepared at four different sludge application rates (1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10% w/w). Unamended soil was used as a control. Immediately following sludge application, in the absence or presence of S9, a linear correlation between sludge application rates and mutagenicity was found but differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the control system only at higher application rates (5 and 10% w/w). The direct mutagenicity of all systems decreases during the bioremediation process, and after a year of treatment only the 10% system induced a mutagenic response that was significantly different from the control system. On the other hand, an initial increase of the indirect mutagenicity was observed at all application rates. The time required for observing this increase was inversely proportional to the initial sludge concentration. After a year of treatment, the indirect mutagenicity of all sludge-amended soils was not significantly different but was significantly different from the unamended soils. The persistence of the direct mutagenic activity of the sludge-amended soils was related to the sludge concentration, whereas the indirect mutagenic persistence was related to the relationship between easily degradable hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons concentration and independent from the initial application rate.