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Sample records for phenol red mucosal

  1. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  2. Phenolic and Chromatic Properties of Beibinghong Red Ice Wine during and after Vinification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Chen; Li, Si-Yu; He, Fei; Yuan, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Tao; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2016-04-20

    The phenolic and chromatic characteristics of a special red ice wine made from a Vitis amurensis × V. vinifera hybrid cultivar Beibinghong were studied. Results from two different vintages (2013 and 2014) showed that during vinification, the phenolic acid content increased, while the level of flavonoids (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) reduced by a variable extent. The color intensity and red % decreased together with a decrease in anthocyanin content. This was accompanied by an increase in hue as well as yellow %. The final phenolic content was found to be between 119.54 and 180.93 mg/L, with anthocyanins as the predominant phenolic group (92.06%-93.03%), of which 3,5-O-diglucosidic anthocyanins made up 53.55%-79.04%. Phenolic acids were the primary non-anthocyanin phenolics at about 6.64%-7.5%. The phenolic contents and color parameters of Beibinghong dry red wine and several V. vinifera dry red wines of superior color quality were also used in an attempt to clarify the relationship between phenolics and color in the Beibinghong red ice wine. By using Pearson correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA), it was found that 3,5-O-diglucosidic anthocyanins and protocatechuic acid were the only characteristic phenolics that differentiated Beibinghong wines from the other selected red wines from more traditional varieties. They were also the main phenolics to be positively correlated with the hue and yellow % of the wine at the early stages leading into maturation. Their presence might, therefore, explain the relatively high hue and yellow % of Beibinghong ice wine.

  3. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lipovac, Markus; Chedraui, Peter; Gruenhut, Christine; Gocan, Anca; Kurz, Christine; Neuber, Benedikt; Imhof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE) isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n = 109) were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A) or placebo of equal appearance (Group B) for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups) reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular) status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup). Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups) as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women. PMID:22135679

  4. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Lipovac, Markus; Chedraui, Peter; Gruenhut, Christine; Gocan, Anca; Kurz, Christine; Neuber, Benedikt; Imhof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE) isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n = 109) were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A) or placebo of equal appearance (Group B) for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups) reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular) status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup). Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups) as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women.

  5. Volatile phenols depletion in red wine using molecular imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rafaela; Dopico-García, Sonia; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; López-Vilariño, José M; González-Rodríguez, Victoria; Cela-Pérez, Concepción; Silva, Luís R

    2015-12-01

    Wines can be modified by microorganisms during the ageing process, by producing off-flavours like volatile phenols (VP), leading to their deterioration, with great economic losses. The development of methods to recover wines affected by unwanted VP became an important target. Molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are synthetic materials with artificially-generated recognition sites for selective extraction of organic compounds from different matrices. In this work, two MIPs to remove unwanted VP from wines were developed and their effects were evaluated. Volatile compounds were determined by GC-FID and GC-IT/MS and phenolic compounds (non-coloured and anthocyanins) by HPLC-DAD. The treatment with MIP-4EG and MIP-4EP significantly reduced the content of 4-ethylguaiacol and 4-ethylphenol, respectively. Nevertheless, the changes observed in wine non-coloured and coloured phenolics and sensorial analysis indicate that their specificity and selectivity regarding off-flavours still needs to be improved.

  6. Extraction, evolution, and sensory impact of phenolic compounds during red wine maceration.

    PubMed

    Casassa, L Federico; Harbertson, James F

    2014-01-01

    We review the extraction into wine and evolution of major phenolic classes of sensory relevance. We present a historical background to highlight that previously established aspects of phenolic extraction and retention into red wine are still subjects of much research. We argue that management of the maceration length is one of the most determining factors in defining the proportion and chemical fate of phenolic compounds in wine. The extraction of anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and oligomeric and polymeric proanthocyanidins (PAs) is discussed in the context of their individual extraction patterns but also with regard to their interaction with other wine components. The same approach is followed to present the sensory implications of phenolic and phenolic-derived compounds in wine. Overall, we conclude that the chemical diversity of phenolic compounds in grapes is further enhanced as soon as vacuolar and pulp components are released upon crushing, adding a variety of new sensory dimensions to the already present chemical diversity. Polymeric pigments formed by the covalent reaction of anthocyanin and PAs are good candidates to explain some of the observed sensory changes in the color, taste, and mouthfeel attributes of red wines during maceration and aging.

  7. Determination of some phenolic compounds in red wine by RP-HPLC: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Burin, Vívian Maria; Arcari, Stefany Grützmann; Costa, Léa Luzia Freitas; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2011-09-01

    A methodology employing reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of five phenolic compounds in red wine. The chromatographic separation was carried out in a C(18) column with water acidify with acetic acid (pH 2.6) (solvent A) and 20% solvent A and 80% acetonitrile (solvent B) as the mobile phase. The validation parameters included: selectivity, linearity, range, limits of detection and quantitation, precision and accuracy, using an internal standard. All calibration curves were linear (R(2) > 0.999) within the range, and good precision (RSD < 2.6%) and recovery (80-120%) was obtained for all compounds. This method was applied to quantify phenolics in red wine samples from Santa Catarina State, Brazil, and good separation peaks for phenolic compounds in these wines were observed.

  8. Estrogen and phenol red free medium for osteoblast culture: study of the mineralization ability.

    PubMed

    de Faria, A N; Zancanela, D C; Ramos, A P; Torqueti, M R; Ciancaglini, P

    2016-08-01

    To design an estrogen and phenol red free medium for cell culture and check its effectiveness and safety on osteoblast growth it is necessary to maintain the estrogen receptors free for tests. For this purpose, we tested some modifications of the traditional culture media: estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum; estrogen charcoal stripped fetal bovine serum and phenol red free α-MEM. The aim of this work is to examine the effects of its depletion in the proliferation, differentiation, and toxicity of mesenchymal stromal cells differentiated into osteoblasts to obtain an effective interference free culture medium for in vitro studies, focused on non-previously studied estrogen receptors. We performed viability tests using the following techniques: MTT, alkaline phosphatase specific activity, formation of mineralized matrix by Alizarin technique and analysis of SEM/EDX of mineralized nodules. The results showed that the culture media with estrogen free α-MEM + phenol red free α-MEM did not impact viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of the osteoblasts culture compared to control. In addition, its nodules possess Ca/P ratio similar to hydroxyapatite nodules on the 14th and 21st day. In conclusion, the modified culture medium with phenol red free α-MEM with estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum can be safely used in experiments where the estrogen receptors need to be free.

  9. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  10. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine made from grapes treated with different fungicides.

    PubMed

    Mulero, J; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cermeño, S; Cayuela, J M; Zafrilla, P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Barba, A

    2015-08-01

    The effect of treating grapes with six fungicides, applied under critical agricultural practices (CAP) on levels of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wines of Monastrell variety was studied. Vinifications were performed through addition of active dry yeast (ADY). Measurement of phenolic compounds was made with HPLC-DAD. Determination of antioxidant activity was through reaction of the wine sample with the DPPH radical. The wine prepared from grapes treated with quinoxyfen shows a greater increase of phenolic compounds than the control wine. In contrast, the wine obtained from grapes treated with trifloxystrobin showed lower total concentration of phenolic compounds, including stilbenes, whilst treatments with kresoxim-methyl, fluquinconazole, and famoxadone slightly reduced their content. Hence, the use of these last four fungicides could cause a decrease in possible health benefits to consumers. Antioxidant activity hardly varied in the assays with quinoxyfen, fluquinconazole and famoxadone, and decreased in the other wines.

  11. Red Maple (Acer rubrum) Aerial Parts as a Source of Bioactive Phenolics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-08-01

    The bark and stems of red maple (Acer rubrum) are reported to contain bioactive phenolics but its aerial parts, namely, flowers and leaves, remain largely unexplored. This is unfortunate considering that various parts of the red maple were used for traditional medicinal purposes by the indigenous peoples of eastern North America, where this species is found. Herein, we report the identification of twenty-five (1-25) phenolics, including two new galloyl derivatives (1 and 2), from red maple flowers and leaves. Of these, ten compounds (1-10), including the new compounds, were isolated and identified by NMR and HRESIMS data while the remaining fifteen compounds (11-25) were identified by HPLC-DAD analyses (by comparison with chemical standards). The isolates (1-10), along with the clinical drug, acarbose, were evaluated for their alpha-glucosidase enzyme inhibitory activities.

  12. Comparative study of microbial-derived phenolic metabolites in human feces after intake of gin, red wine, and dealcoholized red wine.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Girón, Ana; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Boto-Ordóñez, Maria; Muñoz-González, Irene; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Monagas, Maria; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Murri, Mora; Tinahones, Francisco J; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2013-04-24

    The analysis of microbial phenolic metabolites in fecal samples from in vivo studies is crucial to understanding the potential modulatory effects derived from polyphenol consumption and its overall health effects, particularly at the gut level. In this study, the composition of microbial phenolic metabolites in human feces collected after regular consumption of either red wine, dealcoholized red wine, or gin was analyzed by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Red wine interventions produce a change in the content of eight phenolic acids, which are probably derived from the catabolism of flavan-3-ols and anthocyanins, the main flavonoids in red wine. Moreover, alcohol seemed not to influence the formation of phenolic metabolites by the gut microbiota. A principal component analysis revealed large interindividual differences in the formation of microbial metabolites after each red wine polyphenol intervention, but not after the gin intervention, indicating differences in the gut microbial composition among subjects.

  13. A Comparative Study of the Phenolic and Technological Maturities of Red Grapes Grown in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Rajha, Hiba N.; El Darra, Nada; El Kantar, Sally; Hobaika, Zeina; Louka, Nicolas; Maroun, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    Grape harvest date is determined according to the technological and phenolic maturities. These parameters were calculated for different red grape (Vitis vinifera L.) varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc) over four years (2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011) (642 samples). Titratable acidity and sugar content of the grapes were used to determine the technological maturity, whereas Glories (1 and 2) and ITV (Institut Technique de la Vigne et du Vin) methods were used to monitor their phenolic maturity. The ITV method allows the monitoring of phenolic maturity by the quantification of total polyphenol index and anthocyanins, while the Glories method enables the quantitative evolution of extractable anthocyanins and tannins of the grapes. A correlation was shown between the harvest dates obtained by both ITV and Glories (R2 = 0.7 – 0.93). Phenolic maturity of grapes can, therefore, be optimized by the application of both ITV and Glories. Similarly, a correlation was observed between technological and phenolic harvest dates. The effect of climate on the phenolic content of grapes was also studied. The highest temperatures (up to 25 °C) accompanied by the lowest rainfall (null value), induced the maximal concentration of polyphenols in grapes. Thermal and water stresses were also shown to enhance the grapes’ polyphenolic production. PMID:28134785

  14. [Effects of pulsed electric fields on phenols and colour in young red wine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Ruo-bing; Wang, Xiu-qin; Luo, Wei; Mo, Meng-bin; Wang, Li-ming; Guan, Zhi-cheng

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) applied on the 2 phenolic acids and 3 flavan-3-ols in young red wine, as well as the changes in colour intensity and colour hue, were investigated using a parallel treatment chamber. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with UV-visible detector was used to analyze the contents of these two phenols. The high voltage pulse generator in this experiment designed and produced by Tsinghua University can generate exponential decay pulses. The chambers of this experiment were parallel plate treatment chambers with interelectrode distances of 0.5 cm. The experimental results show that after PEF treatment (energy density: 24.5, 40.5, 60.5 J x mL(-1)) the concentration of most phenolic compounds changed significantly. Moreover, the energy density of 60. 5 J x mL(-1) was chosen as the optimal parameter.

  15. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation.

  16. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation. PMID:27148345

  17. Betalain, Acid ascorbic, phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pears.

    PubMed

    Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Cruz-Jaime, Sandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; García-Paredes, Juan Diego; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Martinez-Cardenas, Leonardo; Alanís-García, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Commercialization of cactus pears based on their antioxidant properties can generate competitive advantages, and these can turn into business opportunities and the development of new products and a high-value ingredient for the food industry. This work evaluated the antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, protection against oxidation of a β-carotene-linoleic acid emulsion, and iron (II) chelation), the content of total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, betacyanin, betaxanthin and the stability of betacyanin pigments in presence of Cu (II)-dependent hydroxyl radicals (OH•), in 18 cultivars of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pear from six Mexican states. Our results indicated that the antiradical activities from yellow and white cactus pear cultivars were not significantly different (p < 0.05) and were lower than the average antiradical activities in red and purple cultivars. The red cactus pear from the state of Zacatecas showed the highest antioxidant activity. The free radical scavenging activity for red cactus pears was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the concentration of total phenolic compounds (R(2) = 0.90) and ascorbic acid (R(2) = 0.86). All 18 cultivars of cactus pears studied showed significant chelating activity of ferrous ions. The red and purple cactus pears showed a great stability when exposed to OH•.

  18. Betalain, Acid Ascorbic, Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Properties of Purple, Red, Yellow and White Cactus Pears

    PubMed Central

    Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Cruz-Jaime, Sandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; García-Paredes, Juan Diego; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Martinez-Cardenas, Leonardo; Alanís-García, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Commercialization of cactus pears based on their antioxidant properties can generate competitive advantages, and these can turn into business opportunities and the development of new products and a high-value ingredient for the food industry. This work evaluated the antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, protection against oxidation of a β-carotene-linoleic acid emulsion, and iron (II) chelation), the content of total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, betacyanin, betaxanthin and the stability of betacyanin pigments in presence of Cu (II)-dependent hydroxyl radicals (OH•), in 18 cultivars of purple, red, yellow and white cactus pear from six Mexican states. Our results indicated that the antiradical activities from yellow and white cactus pear cultivars were not significantly different (p < 0.05) and were lower than the average antiradical activities in red and purple cultivars. The red cactus pear from the state of Zacatecas showed the highest antioxidant activity. The free radical scavenging activity for red cactus pears was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the concentration of total phenolic compounds (R2 = 0.90) and ascorbic acid (R2 = 0.86). All 18 cultivars of cactus pears studied showed significant chelating activity of ferrous ions. The red and purple cactus pears showed a great stability when exposed to OH•. PMID:22072899

  19. Phenolic profiles and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene expression of red clover (Trifolium pratense) selected for decreased postharvest browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a legume forage abundant in phenolic compounds. It tends to brown when cut for hay, due to oxidation of phenolic compounds catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and subsequent binding to proteins. Selecting for a greener hay may provide information about the re...

  20. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manfred; Weber, Markus

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century, phenol was recovered primarily from coal tar. With the commercialization of the phenolic resins, the demand for phenol grew significantly. Currently, the cumene-to-phenol process is the predominant synthetic route for the production of phenol. It is accompanied by acetone as a co-product. Cumene is oxidized with oxygen to form cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxide is subsequently decomposed to phenol and acetone, using a strong mineral acid as catalyst. The products are purified in a series of distillation columns. The cumene-to-phenol process is described in more detail in this chapter. An overview is given about synthetic routes via direct oxidation of benzene. None of these alternative routes has been commercialized. The chapter also gives an overview of global supply and use of phenol in 2008. Finally, the main natural sources and synthetic routes for cresols, xylenols, resorcinol, and bisphenol-A are described. These components are used as comonomers for special phenolic resins.

  2. Polyphenols content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to conventional red wines.

    PubMed

    Garaguso, Ivana; Nardini, Mirella

    2015-07-15

    Wine exerts beneficial effects on human health when it is drunk with moderation. Nevertheless, wine may also contain components negatively affecting human health. Among these, sulfites may induce adverse effects after ingestion. We examined total polyphenols and flavonoids content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of eight organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to those of eight conventional red wines. Polyphenols and flavonoids content were slightly higher in organic wines in respect to conventional wines, however differences did not reach statistical significance. The phenolic acids profile was quite similar in both groups of wines. Antioxidant activity was higher in organic wines compared to conventional wines, although differences were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition are comparable to conventional red wines with regard to the total polyphenols and flavonoids content, the phenolics profile and the antioxidant activity.

  3. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  4. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis.

  5. Chromoendoscopy with red phenol in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Garcés, Héctor Rubén; Castellanos-González, Víctor V; González-Fabián, Licet; Infante-Velázquez, Mirtha; Peña, Kevin; Andrain-Sierra, Yudit

    2012-02-01

    An analytic study to validate a diagnostic test was carried out at the Institute of Gastroenterology in Havana, Cuba in adult patients of both sexes in whom chromoendoscopy was carried out with red phenol at 0.1% over the gastric mucosa for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection between November 2008 and December 2010. The staining with red phenol at 0.1% is included in the invasive tests for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and of the reactive techniques. The sensibility of red phenol dye in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the patients studied was of 72.6% with a confidence interval (C.I.) of 95% (64.9 to 79.2%) and a specificity of 75.5% C.I. 95% (61.9 to 85.4%). The positive predictive value was of 89.8% C.I. 95% (83.1 to 94.1%) and the negative predictive value of 48.1% C.I. 95% (37.3 to 59.0%). The proportion of false positives was of 24.5% C.I. 95% (14.6 to 38.1%)and the proportion of false negatives was of 27.4% C.I. 95% (20.8 to 35.1%). The diagnostic accuracy of the dye on the patients studied was 73.3% C.I. 95% (66.7 to 79.0%). The diagnostic odds ratio was 8.17 C.I. 95% (3.88 to 17.23), the J Youden ratio of 0.5 and the Kappa coefficient of 0.40 C.I. 95% (0.27 to 0.54). The staining dye with red phenol at 0.1% resulted in a useful method in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the gastric mucosa, it can be applied in our environment and has multiple advantages (topographic localization, avoids contamination and fast and immediate reading).

  6. Relations between high-affinity binding sites for L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1983-01-01

    Binding of L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red to defatted human serum albumin was studied by ultrafiltration at pH 7.0. All ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with association constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5)M-1. The number of secondary binding sites was found to vary from zero to five, with association constants about 10(3)M-1. Competitive binding studies with different pairs of the ligands were performed. Binding of both ligands was determined simultaneously. L-Tryptophan and diazepam were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site on albumin. The following combinations of ligands do not bind competitively to albumin: L-tryptophan-Phenol Red, L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate. On the other hand, high-affinity bindings of the three ligands do not take place independently but in such a way that binding of one of the ligands results in a decrease in binding of the other ligands. The decreases in binding are reciprocal and can be accounted for by introducing a coupling constant. The magnitude of the constant is dependent on the ligands being bound. In the present study, the mutual decrease in binding was more pronounced with L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate than with L-tryptophan-Phenol Red. PMID:6847607

  7. Profiling of microbial-derived phenolic metabolites in human feces after moderate red wine intake.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Irene; Jiménez-Girón, Ana; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2013-10-02

    A controlled and randomized trial study involving 41 healthy volunteers (33 intervention and 8 control subjects) was performed in order to establish changes in the microbial-derived phenolic metabolite profile of feces after moderate consumption of red wine (250 mL/day, 4 weeks). Out of the 35 phenolic metabolites identified, 10 compounds (mainly benzoic and 4-hydroxyvaleric acids) showed statistically significant increases (P < 0.05) after the wine intake. Also, the total phenolic metabolites content was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the samples after the wine intake (625 ± 380 μg/g feces) in comparison to the samples before (358 ± 270 μg/g feces), and a tentative distribution of the volunteers into three groups could be established: <500, 500-1000, and >1000 μg/g feces. These results suggest that a different gut microbial capacity to metabolize wine polyphenols exists among the human population, as observed for polyphenols from other sources.

  8. Antioxidant capacity, phenolic constituents and toxicity of hot water extract from red maple buds.

    PubMed

    Meda, Naamwin R; Poubelle, Patrice E; Stevanovic, Tatjana

    2017-03-11

    The present study reports, for the first time, the results of the antioxidant capacity and the phenolic composition of a hot water extract from red maple buds (RMB), as well as its safety. In this regard and comparatively to antioxidant standards, this extract exhibits a significant antiradical capacity when tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) and anion superoxide trapping assays. High-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analyses permitted to determine for the first time, in red maple species, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, quercetin-3-O-arabinoside and quercetin. Also, the quantification of individual phenolics by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method revealed that ginnalin A at 117.0 mg/g is the major compound of RMB hot water extract. Finally, using flow cytometry evaluation, the extract of RMB was determined to have no toxicity neither to cause significant modification of apoptosis process, up to concentration of 100 μg / mL, on human peripheral blood neutrophils. These results allow anticipating various fields of application of RMB water extract. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 006 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Phenol ( CAS No . 108 - 95 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington D.C . DISCLAIMER Mention of trade names or commercial products does n

  10. Identification of flavonoid and phenolic antioxidants in black currants, blueberries, raspberries, red currants, and cranberries.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gina; Degeneve, Alexandra; Mullen, William; Crozier, Alan

    2010-04-14

    The antioxidant capacity (AOC) of black currant, blueberry, raspberry, red currant, and cranberry extracts was determined using the FRAP assay. In addition, the vitamin C content of the berries was determined and phenolic and polyphenolic compounds in the extracts were analyze by reversed-phase HPLC-PDA-MS(3) and by reversed-phase HPLC-PDA with an online antioxidant detection system. A complex spectrum of anthocyanins was the major contributor to the AOC of black currants and blueberries, whereas the lower AOC of red currants and cranberries was due mainly to a reduced anthocyanin content. Raspberries also had a lower anthocyanin content than black currants and blueberries, but there was only a slight decline in the AOC because of the presence of the ellagitannins sanguin H-6 and lambertianin C, which were responsible for 58% of the HPLC-AOC of the berries. Vitamin C was responsible for 18-23% of the HPLC-AOC of black currants, red currants, and cranberries and for 11% of that of raspberries but did not contribute to the AOC of the blueberry extract that was examined. Seven percent of the HPLC-AOC of the cranberry extract was attributable to procyanidin dimers. However, the contribution of polymeric proanthocyanidins to the AOC of the five berries was not determined as when analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC these high molecular weight flavan-3-ols are either retained by the column or eluted as a broad unresolved band.

  11. Temporary reduction of radiation does not permanently reduce flavonoid glycosides and phenolic acids in red lettuce.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christine; Kläring, Hans-Peter; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    Applying transparent daytime screens in greenhouses in cool seasons reduces the amount of energy needed for heating, but also the solar radiation available for crops. This can reduce yield and product quality of leafy vegetables because of constrained photosynthesis and altered biosynthesis. To study this, we cultivated five-week old red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) for four weeks in growth chambers under a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 225 and 410 μmol m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Some plants were exchanged between radiation intensities after two weeks. We investigated the concentration of five flavonoid glycosides, three caffeic acid derivatives, reducing sugars as well as plant growth. Remarkably, no significant influence of radiation intensity on the concentration of phenolic acids or anthocyanin glycosides was observed. In contrast, quercetin and luteolin glycoside concentration was between 14 and 34% lower in plants growing under lower compared to higher PPFD. Already after two weeks of cultivation, plants grown under lower PPFD contained less quercetin and luteolin glycosides but they completely compensated if subsequently transferred to higher PPFD until harvest. Hence, marketable lettuce heads which experienced temporary shading followed by an unshaded phase did not contain lower concentrations of flavonoid glycosides or phenolic acids. Also, there was no reduction of head mass in this variant. Our results suggest that saving energy in early growth stages is feasible without losses in yield or health promoting phenolic substances. In addition, there was a close correlation between the concentration of reducing sugars and some flavonoid glycosides, indicating a close metabolic connection between their biosynthesis and the availability of carbohydrates.

  12. Effect of addition of commercial grape seed tannins on phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of red wine.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana C; Spranger, Maria I; Zhao, Yuqing; Leandro, Maria C; Sun, Baoshan

    2010-11-24

    The effect of addition of grape seed tannins on the phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of red wine was studied. Two highly pure commercial grape seed tannins (GSE100 and GSE300) were selected, and their phenolic compositions were determined. Two types of red wines were made with Castelão/Tinta Miúda (3/2, w/w) grapevine varieties by fermentation on skin using two different maceration times, which correspond to the wines rich and poor in polyphenols, respectively. Each of these wines was used for experimentation with the addition of GSE100 and GSE300 before and immediately after alcoholic fermentation. Phenolic composition, chromatic characteristics, and antioxidant activity of the finished red wines were analyzed by HPLC-DAD, CIElab 76 convention, and DPPH radical test, respectively. The results showed that the addition of grape seed tannins had obvious effects of increasing color intensity and antioxidant activity only in the wines poor in polyphenols. Although GSE300 contained much higher amounts of di- and trimer procyanidins and a lower amount of polymeric proanthocyanidins, it provided effects of increasing the color intensity and antioxidant activity of the wines poor in polyphenols similar to those of GSE100. Furthermore, GSE100 released more gallic acid to wines than GSE300, although no gallic acid was detected in GSE100. Tannins added after alcoholic fermentation had a better effect on phenolic composition of red wine than tannins added before alcoholic fermentation.

  13. Effect of steam-cooking and parboiling on phenolics and antioxidant capacities of red and purple rice cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red and purple rice cultivars contain high concentrations of phenolics, such as proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins, respectively. We investigated the effect of cooking processes on these antioxidants and antioxidant capacities of pigmented and common light-brown bran rice. The cooking processes incl...

  14. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  15. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE PAGES

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; ...

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore » the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  16. Red Fruits: Extraction of Antioxidants, Phenolic Content, and Radical Scavenging Determination: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Gádor-Indra; Almajano, María Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Red fruits, as rich antioxidant foods, have gained over recent years capital importance for consumers and manufacturers. The industrial extraction of the phenolic molecules from this source has been taking place with the conventional solvent extraction method. New non-conventional extraction methods have been devised as environmentally friendly alternatives to the former method, such as ultrasound, microwave, and pressure assisted extractions. The aim of this review is to compile the results of recent studies using different extraction methodologies, identify the red fruits with higher antioxidant activity, and give a global overview of the research trends regarding this topic. As the amount of data available is overwhelming, only results referring to berries are included, leaving aside other plant parts such as roots, stems, or even buds and flowers. Several researchers have drawn attention to the efficacy of non-conventional extraction methods, accomplishing similar or even better results using these new techniques. Some pilot-scale trials have been performed, corroborating the applicability of green alternative methods to the industrial scale. Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) emerge as the berries with the highest antioxidant content and capacity. However, several new up and coming berries are gaining attention due to global availability and elevated anthocyanin content. PMID:28106822

  17. Application of phenol red as a marker ligand for bilirubin binding site at subdomain IIA on human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The drug-bilirubin interaction for all drugs administered especially to infants with hyperbilirubinemia should be evaluated for their ability to displace bilirubin and vice versa. In order to examine whether phenol red (PhRed) can be used as a marker for bilirubin binding site located in subdomain IIA the interaction between PhRed and human serum albumin (HSA) in buffer solution or in normal and pathological sera solutions with different HSA:bilirubin molar ratio was investigated using absorption/absorption difference spectroscopy and molecular docking method. Six sulfonamides representing the binding site in the subdomain IIA and known to influence the binding of bilirubin were used for the PhRed displacement studies. The absorption spectra for PhRed completely bound to HSA showed significant differences in the spectral characteristic relative to the spectral profile of free PhRed. The intensity of the peak originating from the bivalent anionic form of dye was strongly reduced and the maximum peak position was red-shifted by 12 nm. The binding constant (K) of the bivalent anionic form of PhRed, calculated from absorbance data, was 1.61 · 10(4) L mol(-1). The variations of the absorption and absorption difference spectra of PhRed in the presence of HSA-bilirubin complex were indicative of the inhibition of PhRed binding process by bilirubin. Binding of PhRed carried out in the presence of sulfonamides showed that drugs and PhRed have a common site which also involves bilirubin. In agreement with the results of the spectroscopic analysis and molecular docking it was concluded that PhRed may be applied as a marker in the study of the binding of drugs to high-affinity bilirubin binding site.

  18. Identification of phenolic compounds in red wine extract samples and zebrafish embryos by HPLC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Boix, Nuria; Piqué, Ester; Gómez-Catalan, Jesús; Medina-Remon, Alexander; Sasot, Gemma; Mercader-Martí, Mercè; Llobet, Juan M; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M

    2015-08-15

    The zebrafish embryo is a highly interesting biological model with applications in different scientific fields, such as biomedicine, pharmacology and toxicology. In this study, we used liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) to identify the polyphenol compounds in a red wine extract and zebrafish embryos. Phenolic compounds and anthocyanin metabolites were determined in zebrafish embryos previously exposed to the red wine extract. Compounds were identified by injection in a high-resolution system (LTQ-Orbitrap) using accurate mass measurements in MS, MS(2) and MS(3) modes. To our knowledge, this research constitutes the first comprehensive identification of phenolic compounds in zebrafish by HPLC coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  19. Interferences in automated phenol red method for determination of bromide in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basel, C.L.; Defreese, J.D.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    The phenol red method for the determination of bromide in water has been automated by segmented flow analysis. Samples can be analyzed at a rate of 20 samples/h with a method detection limit, defined, as the concentration giving a signal about three times the standard deviation of replicate anaiyte determinations in reagent water, of 10 ??g/L. Samples studied include oil-field brines, halite solution brines, ground-waters contaminated with these brines, and fresh groundwaters. Chloride and bicarbonate cause significant positive interferences at levels as low as 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively. Ammonia gives a negative interference that is important at levels as low as 0.05 mg/L. An ionic strength buffer is used to suppress a positive ionic strength interference, correction curves are used to compensate for the chloride interference, the bicarbonate interference is minimized by acidification, and the ammonia interference is eliminated by its removal by ion exchange. Reaction product studies are used to suggest a plausible mode of chloride interference. ?? 1982 American Chemical Society.

  20. Total Phenolics, Total Anthocyanins, Antioxidant and Pro-oxidant Activity of Some Red Fruits Teas.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Bianca; Hosu, Anamaria; David, Luminita; Cimpoiu, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Fruits represent one of the main dietary sources of bioactive compounds. Due to their remarkable health benefits, many functional foods of fruit origin, including fruit teas, are present on the market and there is an increased interest regarding the investigation of their nutritional parameters and quality. The aims of our study were: 1) to determine the total phenolic content (TPC), total anthocyanins content (TAC), antioxidant activity (AA), the scavenging capacity (IC50), the pro-oxidant activity (Pro-ox) and Pro-Antidex of 12 commercially available red fruit teas, 2) to classify the analysed teas and 3) to evaluate the similarities between samples. The TPC was between 12.5 and 29.3 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g tea, the TAC varied between 2.6 and 5.6 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-glu)/g tea and AA was in the range of 10.9-19.1 mg ascorbic acid equivalents (AAE)/g tea. The Pro-ox activity varied between 3.9 and 10.0 mg/mL tea extract and Pro-Antidex was between 3.3 and 7.3.

  1. Pre-bottling use of dehydrated waste grape skins to improve colour, phenolic and aroma composition of red wines.

    PubMed

    Pedroza, Miguel Angel; Carmona, Manuel; Alonso, Gonzalo Luis; Salinas, Maria Rosario; Zalacain, Amaya

    2013-01-01

    Different dehydrated waste grape skins from the juice industry were added into aged and young red wines as an innovative way of compensating for colour loss before bottling. After addition of grape skins, colour intensity of wines increased a mean 11% and a maximum of 31% with predominance of the red component. Total polyphenols mean increase was 10% with a maximum value of 20%. Analysis of low molecular weight phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD showed a significant (p<0.05) content increase of the bioactive compounds gallic acid, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and (E)-resveratrol. Anthocyanins content also increased at an average of 50mg/l. The volatile profile of wines analysed by SBSE-GC-MS was only moderately influenced by the treatments. Mixtures of dehydrated waste grape skins were useful to improve the colour and polyphenol profile of red wines, considering them a useful tool for correcting colour loss before bottling.

  2. Impact of adding white pomace to red grapes on the phenolic composition and color stability of Syrah wines from a warm climate.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Belén; Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco J; Jara-Palacios, M José; Ramírez-Pérez, Pilar; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-03-26

    The influence of the fermentative addition of Pedro Ximenez grape pomace (PXGP, white variety) on the phenolic composition and color of Syrah red wines from a warm climate was studied. Changes on phenolic composition (HPLC), copigmentation/polymerization (spectrophotometry), and color (tristimulus colorimetry) allowed differences among the maceration treatments to be established. PXGP additions at the rates studied increased the extraction of total phenolics, phenolic acids, and monomeric flavanols. However, the effect on the anthocyanins, copigmentation, and polymerization depended on the doses applied, with important consequences on the color. PXGP addition at 10% led to wines with higher polymerization, more stable colors, and bluish hues. in contrast, perceptibly lighter and less intense wines were obtained with PXGP addition at 20%. Thus, the use of white grape byproducts as wine additives at appropriate levels (10% w/w) could improve the phenolic potential of red young wines from a warm climate, contributing to preserve their color characteristic.

  3. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of phenolic rich extracts from white and red common beans.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Moro, Carlos; Manchón, Noelia; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia; Villares, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Rostagno, Mauricio; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura

    2014-10-15

    According to epidemiological evidence, diets rich in fruits and vegetables can reduce the incidence of several chronic diseases that share an inflammatory component. These protective effects are attributed, in part, to the occurrence of different antioxidant components, mainly phenolic compounds. Our aim was to characterise phenolic composition, and to determine antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of phenolic rich extracts obtained from two kinds of common beans, white kidney beans (WKB) and round purple beans (RPB). Phenolic acids were the predominant component in WKB extracts, whereas RPB extracts presented higher concentrations of phenolic compounds, mainly catechin derivatives, proanthocyanidins and catechin glucoside. In addition, RPB extracts showed higher antioxidant capacity and higher anti-inflammatory activity by the reduction of NO production and cytokine mRNA expression of LPS stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that common bean extracts may be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as a dietary complement for health promotion.

  4. Study of low molecular weight phenolic compounds during the aging of sparkling wines manufactured with red and white grape varieties.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Bayón, M Angeles; Hernández, M Teresa; Martín-Alvarez, Pedro J; Polo, M Carmen

    2003-03-26

    Thirty-two phenolic compounds of low molecular weight were identified in 36 white, blanc de noir, and rosé sparkling wines by using HPLC with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detection. Some of the identified compounds, such as cis- and trans-ethylcaftaric, cis- and trans-ethylcaffeic, and cis- or trans-ethyl-p-coumaric acids, 2R,3R-dihydroquercetin, 2R,3R-dihydrokaempferol 3-O-beta-d-glucoside, and a lignan derivative are described for the first time in sparkling wines manufactured with grapes of red varieties. This is also the first time that cis- or trans-diethylfertaric acids have been identified in wines. When cluster analysis was applied to the data of 19 of the 32 identified compounds, the greatest differences found in the low molecular weight phenolic compounds in sparkling wines were due to the grape variety from which they were manufactured, whereas aging time did not significantly influence phenolic composition. Nine phenolic compounds, that is, trans-p-coumaric and trans-caftaric acids, trans-resveratrol glucoside, cis-coutaric, trans-coutaric, cis-p-coumaric, and cis-caftaric acids, tryptophol, and syringic acid, permit the wines to be classified correctly in accordance with the grape variety from which they were manufactured.

  5. Fabrication of a Multi-Walled Nanotube (MWNT) Ionic Liquid Electrode and Its Application for Sensing Phenolics in Red Wines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyo-Il; Kang, Hee-Young; Lee, Jae-Chan; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2009-01-01

    A multi-walled nanotube (MWNT) ionic liquid was prepared by the immobilization of 1-butylimidazole bromide onto an epoxy group on a poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted MWNT, which was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate onto MWNT in an aqueous solution. Subsequently, a MWNT ionic liquid electrode was fabricated by hand-casting MWNT ionic liquid, tyrosinase, and chitosan solution as a binder on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass. The sensing ranges of the MWNT ionic liquid electrode with immobilized tyrosinase was in the range of 0.01-0.08 mM in a phosphate buffer solution. The optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, and effects of different phenolic compounds were determined. The total phenolic compounds of three commercial red wines were also determined on the tyrosinase-immobilized biosensor. PMID:22399973

  6. Color Change of Phenol Red by Integrated Smart Phone Camera as a Tool for the Determination of Neurotoxic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kostelnik, Adam; Cegan, Alexander; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The use of a cell phone as a detection system is easy, simple and does not require trained personnel, which is in contrast to standard laboratory instruments. This paper deals with immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in a gelatin matrix, and phenol red, as an indicator of AChE activity, is used in order to establish a method that is easily compatible with a camera device. AChE splits acetylcholine into choline and acetic acid, which changes the pH of a medium, resulting in a phenol red color change. The coloration changed in presence of an AChE inhibitor. Measurements were performed on 3D-printed, tube-shaped holder, and digital photography, with subsequent analysis of red-green-blue (RGB), served for assay purposes. Calibration of AChE inhibitors, tacrine and galantamine, was performed, with limit of detection equal to 1.1 nM and 1.28 µM, respectively. Interferences were also measured, resulting in a proof-of-method stability. The method was further successfully validated for the standard Ellman’s assay, and verified on murine plasma samples spiked with inhibitors. PMID:27618041

  7. Evolution of phenolic compounds and astringency during aging of red wine: effect of oxygen exposure before and after bottling.

    PubMed

    Gambuti, Angelita; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Ugliano, Maurizio; Moio, Luigi

    2013-02-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oxygen exposure of red wine, before (micro-oxygenation) and after (nano-oxygenation) bottling, on the phenolic composition and astringency of wine. The astringency was evaluated by sensory analysis and by a method based on the SDS-PAGE of salivary proteins after reaction of saliva with wine (SPI, saliva precipitation index). Micro-oxygenation caused a stabilization of color, but this effect disappeared after long aging. For the wine with the lower pH a decrease of wine astringency and SPI was observed 42 months after micro-oxygenation. Oxygen ingress through the closure postbottling was positively correlated with the decrease of SPI. Therefore, the astringency and reactivity of wines toward salivary proteins of a bottled red wine can be modulated by controlled oxygen exposure during aging. For both experiments the effect of oxygen exposure depended on wine composition.

  8. Comparison of Aquitaine and Rioja Red Wines: Characterization of Their Phenolic Composition and Evolution from 2000 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Quaglieri, Cindy; Prieto-Perea, Noelia; Berrueta, Luis Angel; Gallo, Blanca; Rasines-Perea, Zurine; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2017-01-24

    Wine chemical analysis was carried out on 194 commercial blended red wines produced by two major wine-growing areas-the Aquitaine (France) and Rioja (Spain) regions-in order to compare the wines of both regions. Anthocyanins and derived pigments, tannins and derivatives were identified and quantified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS (high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector and mass spectrometry using the electrospray ionization interface). Mean degree of polymerization (mDP) was determined. The influence of the wine-growing region and the predominance of the properties of some grape varieties used are confirmed by the significant differences observed between both regions. Rioja and Bordeaux "generic" (Bordeaux and Bordeaux-Supérieur appellations) red wines showed the highest anthocyanic content and the highest mDP, as these wines are in a majority made from Merlot (Bordeaux "generic") and Tempranillo (Rioja). On the contrary, Bordeaux "specific" regions (Blayais, Médoc, Graves, and Libournais) showed the red wines with the highest total phenolic content and tannin concentration, as the predominant grape variety used is Cabernet Sauvignon. A principal component analysis (PCA) and a hierarchical ascendant classification (HAC) suggesting patterns between the chemical parameters and the distribution of the red wines in three groups were proposed. The comparison of the two wine-growing areas also reveals some similarities between the various grape varieties used. A general effect of a progressive decrease in anthocyanins, anthocyanin-derived pigment and tannins is observed for older wines.

  9. Comparison of three extraction methods used to evaluate phenolic ripening in red grapes.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Sandra; Mestres, Montserrat; Busto, Olga; Guasch, Josep

    2010-04-14

    Because there is not a single method for carrying out phenolic ripening analysis, it is very difficult to compare the results obtained by different researchers. In this study, the three most widely used extraction methods of polyphenols (Glories, AWRI, and ITV) have been analytically compared by evaluating two of the most important parameters for the wine industry: total polyphenols and total anthocyanins. Samples from different grape varieties (Tempranillo, Garnacha, Carinena, Syrah, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon), from three different vintages (2006, 2007, and 2008), and at different ripening states (from the beginning of ripeness until harvest) were analyzed to obtain a wide range of representative phenolic contents. To avoid external interferences on the comparisons, the same grape puree was used to make the maceration assays using the different solvents according to each extraction method. Although every extraction method exhibits a different extraction efficiency, the correlation between the results obtained with each one was very good both for total anthocyanins and for total polyphenols. Thus, after having determined a parameter value of the phenolic ripeness using a specific method, the relationship found can be used to predict the parameter value of the phenolic ripeness provided by the other two methods.

  10. Phenolic compositions of 50 and 30 year sequences of Australian red wines: the impact of wine age.

    PubMed

    McRae, Jacqui M; Dambergs, Robert G; Kassara, Stella; Parker, Mango; Jeffery, David W; Herderich, Markus J; Smith, Paul A

    2012-10-10

    The phenolic composition of red wine impacts upon the color and mouthfeel and thus quality of the wine. Both of these characteristics differ depending on the age of a wine, with the purple of young wines changing to brick red and the puckering or aggressive astringency softening in older wines. This study investigated the color parameters, tannin concentrations and tannin composition of a 50 year series of Cabernet Sauvignon wines from a commercial label as well as 30 year series of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz wines from a separate commercial label to assess the impact of wine age on phenolic composition and concentration. The wine color density in wines of 40 to 50 years old was around 5 AU compared with 16 AU of wine less than 12 months old, which correlated well with the concentration of non-bleachable pigments and pigmented polymers. Conversely, the anthocyanin concentrations in 10 year old wines were substantially lower than that of recently bottled wines (around 100 mg/L compared with 627 mg/L, respectively), adding further evidence that non-bleachable pigments including pigmented polymers play a much larger role in long-term wine color than anthocyanins. No age-related trend was observed for tannin concentration, indicating that the widely noted softer astringency of older red wines cannot necessarily be directly related to lower concentrations of soluble wine tannin and is potentially a consequence of changes in tannin structure. Wine tannins from older wines were generally larger than tannins from younger wines and showed structural changes consistent with oxidation.

  11. Solid cation exchange phase to remove interfering anthocyanins in the analysis of other bioactive phenols in red wine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Letícia Flores; Guerra, Celito Crivellaro; Klein, Diandra; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2017-07-15

    Bioactive phenols (BPs) are often targets in red wine analysis. However, other compounds interfere in the liquid chromatography methods used for this analysis. Here, purification procedures were tested to eliminate anthocyanin interference during the determination of 19 red-wine BPs. Liquid chromatography, coupled to a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and a mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS), was used to compare the direct injection of the samples with solid-phase extractions: reversed-phase (C18) and strong cation-exchange (SCX). The HPLC-DAD method revealed that, out of 13BPs, only six are selectively analyzed with or without C18 treatment, whereas SCX enabled the detection of all BPs. The recovery with SCX was above 86.6% for eight BPs. Moreover, UPLC-MS demonstrated the potential of SCX sample preparation for the determination of 19BPs. The developed procedure may be extended to the analysis of other red wine molecules or to other analytical methods where anthocyanins may interfere.

  12. Evolution of phenolic composition of red wine during vinification and storage and its contribution to wine sensory properties and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baoshan; Neves, Ana C; Fernandes, Tiago A; Fernandes, Ana L; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Vítor; Leandro, Conceição; Spranger, Maria I

    2011-06-22

    The objective of this work was to study the evolution of the phenolic composition of red wine during vinification and storage and its relationship with some sensory properties (astringency and bitterness) and antioxidant activities. Thus, red wine was made by a classic vinification method with Castelão and Tinta Miúda grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) harvested at maturity (3:2; w/w). Samples were taken at 2 and 7 days of maceration, at second racking, at the time of bottling and at 6 and 14 months after bottling. The total polyphenols extract (TPx) in each sample was isolated by column chromatography. The phenolic composition (anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins), in vitro antioxidant activity, and sensory property (astringency, bitterness) of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages were evaluated through high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhidrazyl radical test, ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, total phenolic index, MWI (polyphenol molecular weight index), TSA (tannin specific activity), and sensory panel tasting. The results showed that the phenolic composition of red wine varied significantly during winemaking. The intensity of astringency (IA) and the intensity bitterness (IB) of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages increased from 2 days of maceration until second racking and then decreased. Furthermore, MWI and TSA are positively correlated with IA and IB. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages maintained unchanged after alcoholic fermentation, which was independent of the variation of phenolic composition and sensory properties.

  13. Effect of maceration duration on physicochemical characteristics, organic acid, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine from Vitis vinifera L. Karaoglan.

    PubMed

    Kocabey, N; Yilmaztekin, M; Hayaloglu, A A

    2016-09-01

    Effects of different maceration times (5, 10 and 15 days) on composition, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of red wines made from the Vitis vinifera L. Karaoglan grown in Malatya were investigated. Maceration duration changed some chemical constituents and color of Karaoglan red wines. A linear relationship was observed between antioxidant activity of wine and maceration duration. Major organic acid was tartaric acid which was at the highest concentration in wine macerated for 10 days. A total of 25 phenolic compounds was determined in wine samples. Within these phenolics; procyanidin B2, trans-caftaric acid, gallic acid, trans-caffeic acid, (+) catechin, (-) epicatechin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics regardless of maceration duration. In general, extended maceration duration resulted in increase in the concentration of phenolic compounds, reflecting the antioxidant activities of wine. In conclusion, the highest concentrations of total and individual phenolic compounds as well as antioxidant activities were found in wines macerated for 15 days.

  14. Immobilized humic substances as redox mediator for the simultaneous removal of phenol and Reactive Red 2 in a UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Claudia M; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    The present study reports a novel treatment concept combining the redox-mediating capacity of immobilized humic substances with the biodegrading activity of anaerobic sludge for the simultaneous removal of two representative pollutants of textile wastewaters (e.g., phenol and Reactive Red 2 (RR2)) in a high-rate anaerobic reactor. The use of immobilized humic substances (1 g total organic carbon (TOC) L(-1), supported on an anion exchange resin) in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor increased the decolorization efficiency of RR2 (~90 %), extent of phenol oxidation (~75 %), and stability as compared to a control UASB reactor operated without immobilized humic substances, which collapsed after 120 days of dye introduction (50-100 mg L(-1)). Increase in the concentration of immobilized humic substances (2 g TOC L(-1)) further enhanced the stability and efficiency of the UASB reactor. Detection of aniline in the effluent as RR2 reduction product confirmed that reduction of RR2 was the major mechanism of dye removal. This is the first demonstration of immobilized humic substances serving as effective redox mediators for the removal of recalcitrant pollutants from wastewater in a high-rate anaerobic bioreactor. The novel treatment concept could also be applicable to remove a wide variety of contaminants susceptible to redox conversion, which are commonly found in different industrial sectors.

  15. Pre-fermentative cold maceration, saignée, and various thermal treatments as options for modulating volatile aroma and phenol profiles of red wine.

    PubMed

    Lukić, Igor; Budić-Leto, Irena; Bubola, Marijan; Damijanić, Kristijan; Staver, Mario

    2017-06-01

    The effects of six maceration treatments on volatile aroma and phenol composition of Teran red wine were studied: standard maceration (control C), cold pre-fermentation maceration (CPM), saignée (S), pre-fermentation heating with extended maceration (PHT) or juice fermentation (PHP), and post-fermentation heating (POH). PHP wine contained the highest amounts of esters, fatty acids and anthocyanins, and the lowest content of other phenols. Alternative treatments decreased higher alcohols in relation to control C. CPM treatment lowered the extraction of seed tannins, exhibited the highest acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and C6-compounds levels, and had increased ester levels in relation to control C. POH wine contained the highest concentration of total phenols, flavonoids, monomeric, oligomeric and polymeric flavanols, and color intensity and hue. S and PHT wines contained lower amount of total phenols, but higher than in C and CPM wines. The calculated Odor Activity Values were used to establish significant differences between the treatments.

  16. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  17. Improvement of Cencibel red wines by oxygen addition after malolactic fermentation: study on color-related phenolics, volatile composition, and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cejudo-Bastante, Maria Jesús; Hermosín-Gutiérrez, Isidro; Pérez-Coello, Maria Soledad

    2012-06-13

    The objective of this paper was to check whether a micro-oxygenation technique applied after malolactic fermentation could improve the quality of Cencibel red wines. For that purpose, the color-related phenolics, volatile composition, and sensory characteristics during the micro-oxygenation treatment have been considered. The phenolic compounds more affected by the oxygen addition were hydroxycinnamic acids and their derivatives [(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin], flavonols (glycosilated forms), and anthocyanins-related pigments. The fact that the concentration of pyranoanthocyanins and hydroxyphenyl-pyranoanthocyanins was higher in treated red wines is closely related to their color stabilization. As a consequence, higher values of the yellow and red component of the color (b* and a*, respectively) were also observed in micro-oxygenated red wines. Red wine aroma quality was also improved in treated wines. A significant decrease in herbaceous notes, bitterness, acidity, and astringency was found, as well as higher scores of red fruits, plum, liquorice, and spicy attributes in oxygen-added red wines.

  18. Chemical characterization of red wine grape (Vitis vinifera and Vitis interspecific hybrids) and pomace phenolic extracts and their biological activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Thimothe, Joanne; Bonsi, Illeme A; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Koo, Hyun

    2007-12-12

    Grapes are rich sources of potentially bioactive polyphenols. However, the phenolic content is variable depending on grape variety, and may be modified during vinification. In this study, we examined the chemical composition and biological activity of phenolic extracts prepared from several red wine grape varieties and their fermented byproduct of winemaking (pomace) on some of the virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans a well-known dental pathogen. Grape phenolic extracts were obtained from Vitis vinifera varieties Cabernet Franc and Pinot Noir and Vitis interspecific hybrid varieties Baco Noir and Noiret. The anthocyanins and flavan-3-ols content were highly variable depending on grape variety and type of extract (whole fruit vs fermented pomace). Nevertheless, all grape phenolic extracts remarkably inhibited glucosyltransferases B and C (70-85% inhibition) at concentrations as low as 62.5 microg/mL (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the glycolytic pH-drop by S. mutans cells was inhibited by the grape extracts without affecting the bacterial viability; an effect that can be attributed to partial inhibition of F-ATPase activity (30-65% inhibition at 125 microg/mL; P < 0.01). The biological activity of fermented pomace was either as effective as or significantly better than whole fruit grape extracts. The results showed that grape phenolic extracts, especially from pomace, are highly effective against specific virulence traits of S. mutans despite major differences in their phenolic content.

  19. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of betalain extracts from intact plants and hairy root cultures of the red beetroot Beta vulgaris cv. Detroit dark red.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Vasil Georgiev; Weber, Jost; Kneschke, Eva-Maria; Denev, Petko Nedyalkov; Bley, Thomas; Pavlov, Atanas Ivanov

    2010-06-01

    Betalains are water-soluble plant pigments that are widely used as food colorants, and have a wide range of desirable biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anti-cancer properties. They can be produced from various plants, notably beetroot, but betalain products obtained in this way also have some undesirable properties and are difficult to standardize. A potentially attractive alternative is to use hairy root cultures. In the study reported here, we found that betalain extracts obtained from hairy root cultures of the red beetroot B. vulgaris cv. Detroit Dark Red also had higher antioxidant activity than extracts obtained from mature beetroots: six-fold higher 2,2-dyphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging ability (90.7% inhibition, EC(50) = 0.11 mg, vs 14.2% inhibition, EC(50) = 0.70 mg) and 3.28-fold higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity (4,100 microM TE/g dry extract, vs 1,250 microM TE/g dry extract). The high antioxidant activity of the hairy root extracts was associated with increased concentrations (more than 20-fold) of total phenolic concomitant compounds, which may have synergistic effects with betalains. The presence of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, caffeic acid, catechin hydrate, and epicatechin were detected in both types of extract, but at different concentrations. Rutin was only present at high concentration (1.096 mg.g(-1) dry extract) in betalain extracts from the hairy root cultures, whereas chlorogenic acid was only detected at measurable concentrations in extracts from intact plants.

  20. Antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of three red seaweeds (Division: Rhodophyta) harvested from the Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Joseph, Deepu; Praveen, Nammunayathuputhenkotta Krishnankartha

    2015-04-01

    The antioxidant activities of methanol extract and its solvent fractions (n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate) of three red seaweeds (Hypnea musciformis, H. valentiae, and Jania rubens) collected from the Gulf of Mannar of South eastern coast of India were evaluated, using different in vitro systems, viz., DPPH, ABTS, HO radical scavenging activities, H2O2 scavenging ability, Fe(2+) ion chelating ability and reducing potential. Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content of the extracts/fractions, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g of the seaweed extracts/fractions. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) inhibition assay was employed to assess the ability of the seaweed extracts/fractions to inhibit lipid oxidation. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fractions of H. musciformis exhibited significantly higher total phenolic content (205.5 mg GAE/g), DPPH· scavenging activity (IC50 0.6 mg/mL), ABTS(.+) scavenging activity (IC50 0.51 μg/mL), Fe(2+) chelating ability (IC50 0.70 mg/mL), H2O2 scavenging activity (IC50 0.39 mg/mL), reducing ability (Abs700 nm 1.46) and lipid peroxidation inhibitory ability (2.71 MDAEC/kg) (P < 0.05) compared to its n-hexane, DCM fractions, crude MeOH extract and MeOH extracts/fractions of H. valentiae and J. rubens. DCM fraction of J. rubens showed significantly higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50 0.55 mg/mL) compared with H. musciformis and H. valentiae (P < 0.05). This study indicated the potential use of red seaweeds, in particular, H. musciformis as candidate species to be used as food supplement for increasing the shelf-life of food industry, and candidates in combating carcinogenesis and inflammatory diseases.

  1. Hypotheses on the effects of enological tannins and total red wine phenolic compounds on Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Chasseriaud, Laura; Krieger-Weber, Sibylle; Déléris-Bou, Magali; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre Louis; Claisse, Olivier; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline

    2015-12-01

    Lot of articles report on the impact of polyphenols on wine lactic acid bacteria, but it is clear that the results still remain confusing, because the system is complicated both in term of chemical composition and of diversity of strains. In addition, red wines polyphenols are multiple, complex and reactive molecules. Moreover, the final composition of wine varies according to grape variety and to extraction during winemaking. Therefore it is nearly impossible to deduce their effects on bacteria from experiments in oversimplified conditions. In the present work, effect of tannins preparations, currently considered as possible technological adjuvants, was assessed on growth and malolactic fermentation for two malolactic starters. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory medium and in a white wine. Likewise, impact of total polyphenolic extracts obtained from different grape variety red wines was evaluated in the white wine as culture medium. As expected growth and activity of both strains were affected whatever the additions. Results suggest some interpretations to the observed impacts on bacterial populations. Influence of tannins should be, at least partly, due to redox potential change. Results on wine extracts show the need for investigating the bacterial metabolism of some galloylated molecules. Indeed, they should play on bacterial physiology and probably affect the sensory qualities of wines.

  2. Structure elucidation of phenolic compounds from red/white wine with antiatherogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2003-06-10

    The oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is supposed to play a critical role in atherogenesis. During this oxidation a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator named platelet activating factor (PAF) is produced, and it is believed to be the key for the initiation of the inflammation and therefore for the process of atherogenesis. From many studies, it is established that wine has beneficial effects on health, including protection against cardiovascular diseases. According to our point of view, the cardioprotective effect of wine may be attributed partly to the existence of PAF antagonists in red or white wine and partly to the existence of antioxidants that reduce the oxidation of LDL and therefore the production of PAF. In this study, wine compounds that antagonize PAF were isolated and purified via chromatographic procedures, and determined structurally using chemical, enzymatic and spectroscopic methods.

  3. An organic dye-polymer (phenol red-poly (vinyl alcohol)) composite architecture towards tunable -optical and -saturable absorption characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Sreeja; Illyaskutty, Navas; Sreedhanya, S.; Philip, Reji; Muneera, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that blending an organic dye (guest/filler), with a vinyl polymer (host template), is an inexpensive and simple approach for the fabrication of multifunctional photonic materials which could display an enhancement in the desirable properties of the constituent materials and, at the same time provide novel synergistic properties for the guest-host system. A new guest-host nanocomposite system comprising Phenol Red dye and poly (vinyl alcohol) as guest and host template, respectively, which exhibits tunable optical characteristics and saturable absorption behavior, is introduced. The dependence of local electronic environment provided by the polymer template and the interactions of the polymer molecules with the encapsulated guest molecules on the observed optical/nonlinear absorption behavior is discussed. An understanding of the tunability of the optical/ photophysical processes, with respect to the filler content, as discussed herein could help in the design of improved optical materials for several photonic device applications like organic light emitting diodes and saturable absorbers.

  4. Measurement of tear production using phenol red thread and standardized endodontic absorbent paper points in European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Mood, Maneli Ansari; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Williams, David L

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the aqueous fraction of the tear film using the phenol red thread test (PRTT) and paper point tear test (PPTT) in healthy adult European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis). Twenty-four healthy adult European pond turtles were studied. Measurement of tear secretion was performed using the PRTT and standardized endodontic absorbent PPTT. Horizontal palpebral fissure length (HPFL) was measured using digital calipers and was correlated with the weight of the animal. The mean ± SD PRTT, PPTT, and HPFL values for the left and right eyes were 5.12 ± 1.54 mm/15 sec and 4.62 ± 1.76 mm/15 sec; 4.50 ± 1.25 mm/1 min and 4.20 ± 1.53 mm/1 min; and 8.4 ± 0.6 mm and 8.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. No significant differences were detected between right and left eyes of individual turtles or between males and females in all tests. This study represents reference values of tear production in European pond turtles obtained from PRTT and PPTT methods and forms an important baseline study in defining the healthy chelonian ocular surface.

  5. Effect of synthesis conditions on the photocatalytic property of multiferroic BiFeO3 towards the degradation of phenol red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanalakshmi, Radhalayam; Muneeswaran, M.; Giridharan, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 has been synthesized through hydrothermal route under different reaction conditions. From the basic characterization such as of X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), the synthesized Nps were found to having rhombohedral structure with R3c space group. Photodegradation studies of toxic dye phenol red have been investigated under visible light irradiation. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis has been carried out to identify the magnetic properties and recycle ability photocatalysts.

  6. Antioxidant Activity and Total Phenolic and Flavonoid Content of Various Solvent Extracts from In Vivo and In Vitro Grown Trifolium pratense L. (Red Clover)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Banisalam, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the extracts of in vivo and in vitro grown plants as well as callus tissue of red clover were tested for their antioxidant activities, using different extraction solvent and different antioxidant assays. The total flavonoid and phenolic contents as well as extraction yield of the extracts were also investigated to determine their correlation with the antioxidant activity of the extracts. Among all the tested extracts the highest amounts of total phenolic and total flavonoids content were found in methanol extract of in vivo grown plants. The antioxidant activity of tested samples followed the order in vivo plant extract > callus extract > in vitro extract. The highest reducing power, 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging, and chelating power were found in methanol extracts of in vivo grown red clover, while the chloroform fraction of in vivo grown plants showed the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and hydrogen peroxide scavenging compared to the other tested extracts. A significant correlation was found between the antioxidant activity of extracts and their total phenolic and total flavonoid content. According to the findings, the extract of in vitro culture of red clover especially the callus tissue possesses a comparable antioxidant activity to the in vivo cultured plants' extract. PMID:26064936

  7. Contribution of low molecular weight phenols to bitter taste and mouthfeel properties in red wines.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Diago, Ana; Dizy, Marta; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between low molecular weight compounds present in wines and their sensory contribution. Six young red wines were fractionated by gel permeation chromatography and subsequently each fraction obtained was separated from sugars and acids by solid phase extraction. Wines and both fractions were in-mouth evaluated by a trained sensory panel and UPLC-MS analyses were performed. The lack of ethanol and proanthocyanidins greatly increased the acidity perceived. The elimination of organic acids enabled the description of the samples, which were evaluated as bitter, persistent and slightly astringent. Coutaric acid and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside appear to be relevant astringent compounds in the absence of proanthocyanidins. Bitter taste was highly correlated with the in-mouth persistence. A significant predictive model for bitter taste was built by means of PLSR. Further research must be carried out to validate the sensory contribution of the compounds involved in bitterness and astringency and to verify the sensory interactions observed.

  8. Changes in the flavonoid and phenolic acid contents and antioxidant activity of red leaf lettuce (Lollo Rosso) due to cultivation under plastic films varying in ultraviolet transparency.

    PubMed

    García-Macías, Paulina; Ordidge, Matthew; Vysini, Eleni; Waroonphan, Saran; Battey, Nicholas H; Gordon, Michael H; Hadley, Paul; John, Philip; Lovegrove, Julie A; Wagstaffe, Alexandra

    2007-12-12

    Red leaf lettuce (Lollo Rosso) was grown under three types of plastic films that varied in transparency to UV radiation (designated as UV block, UV low, and UV window). Flavonoid composition was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), total phenolics by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, and antioxidant capacity by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Exposure to increased levels of UV radiation during cultivation caused the leaves to redden and increased concentrations of total phenols and the main flavonoids, quercetin and cyanidin glycosides, as well as luteolin conjugates and phenolic acids. The total phenol content increased from 1.6 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g of fresh weight (FW) for lettuce grown under UV block film to 2.9 and 3.5 mg of GAE/g of FW for lettuce grown under the UV low and UV window films. The antioxidant activity was also higher in lettuce exposed to higher levels of UV radiation with ORAC values of 25.4 and 55.1 micromol of Trolox equivalents/g of FW for lettuce grown under the UV block and UV window films, respectively. The content of phenolic acids, quantified as caffeic acid, was also different, ranging from 6.2 to 11.1 micromol/g of FW for lettuce cultivated under the lowest and highest UV exposure plastic films, respectively. Higher concentrations of the flavonoid glycosides were observed with increased exposure to UV radiation, as demonstrated by the concentrations of aglycones after hydrolysis, which were cyanidin (ranging from 165 to 793 microg/g), quercetin (ranging from 196 to 880 microg/g), and luteolin (ranging from 19 to 152 microg/g). The results demonstrate the potential of the use of UV-transparent plastic as a means of increasing beneficial flavonoid content of red leaf lettuce when the crop is grown in polytunnels.

  9. Influence of Conventional and Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction on Phenolic Contents, Betacyanin Contents, and Antioxidant Capacity of Red Dragon Fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Nurul Shazini; Ismail, Patimah; Rahmat, Asmah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of extraction methods on antioxidant capacities of red dragon fruit peel and flesh. Antioxidant capacities were measured using ethylenebenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent while quantitative determination of total flavonoid content (TFC) was conducted using aluminium trichloride colorimetric method. Betacyanin content (BC) was measured by spectrophotometer. Red dragon fruit was extracted using conventional (CV) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UE) technique to determine the most efficient way of extracting its antioxidant components. Results indicated that UE increased TFC, reduced the extraction yield, BC, and TPC, but exhibited the strongest scavenging activity for the peel of red dragon fruit. In contrast, UE reduced BC, TFC, and scavenging activity but increased the yield for the flesh. Nonetheless, UE slightly increases TPC in flesh. Scavenging activity and reducing power were highly correlated with phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Conversely, the scavenging activity and reducing power were weakly correlated with betacyanin content. This work gives scientific evidences for the consideration of the type of extraction techniques for the peel and flesh of red dragon fruit in applied research and food industry. PMID:25379555

  10. Influence of conventional and ultrasonic-assisted extraction on phenolic contents, betacyanin contents, and antioxidant capacity of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus).

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nurul Shazini; Ismail, Patimah; Rahmat, Asmah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of extraction methods on antioxidant capacities of red dragon fruit peel and flesh. Antioxidant capacities were measured using ethylenebenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent while quantitative determination of total flavonoid content (TFC) was conducted using aluminium trichloride colorimetric method. Betacyanin content (BC) was measured by spectrophotometer. Red dragon fruit was extracted using conventional (CV) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UE) technique to determine the most efficient way of extracting its antioxidant components. Results indicated that UE increased TFC, reduced the extraction yield, BC, and TPC, but exhibited the strongest scavenging activity for the peel of red dragon fruit. In contrast, UE reduced BC, TFC, and scavenging activity but increased the yield for the flesh. Nonetheless, UE slightly increases TPC in flesh. Scavenging activity and reducing power were highly correlated with phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Conversely, the scavenging activity and reducing power were weakly correlated with betacyanin content. This work gives scientific evidences for the consideration of the type of extraction techniques for the peel and flesh of red dragon fruit in applied research and food industry.

  11. Co-pigmentation of pelargonidin derivatives in strawberry and red radish model solutions by the addition of phenolic fractions from mango peels.

    PubMed

    Müller-Maatsch, Judith; Bechtold, Lena; Schweiggert, Ralf M; Carle, Reinhold

    2016-12-15

    Pelargonidin-based colors suffer from notorious instability. A phenolic mango peel extract and defined phenolic fractions thereof were shown to effectively modulate the visible absorption of anthocyanins from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) and red radish (Raphanus sativus L.) by intermolecular co-pigmentation. Consistently, non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives from strawberry exerted significantly greater hyper- and bathochromic spectral shifts than their acylated counterparts from red radish. The addition of low molecular-weight co-pigments such as gallic acid and monogalloyl glucoses to strawberry anthocyanins led to strong hyperchromic shifts from 30% to 48%, while gallotannins (>six galloyl units) exerted smaller co-pigmentation effects (36±2%; Δλmax 13nm), possibly due to steric hindrances. In contrast, penta- and hexa-O-galloyl-glucose induced greatest and most stable co-pigmentation effects (53±2%; Δλmax 13nm). Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms and the responsible compounds, phenolic mango peel extracts might represent suitable color enhancers for coloring foodstuff, particularly for those containing non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives.

  12. Fabrication of a microbial biosensor based on QD-MWNT supports by a one-step radiation reaction and detection of phenolic compounds in red wines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Kwen, Hai-Doo; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    An Acaligense sp.-immobilized biosensor was fabricated based on QD-MWNT composites as an electron transfer mediator and a microbe immobilization support by a one-step radiation reaction and used for sensing phenolic compounds in commercial red wines. First, a quantum dot-modified multi-wall carbon nanotube (QD-MWNT) composite was prepared in the presence of MWNT by a one-step radiation reaction in an aqueous solution at room temperature. The successful preparation of the QD-MWNT composite was confirmed by XPS, TEM, and elemental analysis. Second, the microbial biosensor was fabricated by immobilization of Acaligense sp. on the surface of the composite thin film of a glassy carbon (GC) electrode, which was prepared by a hand casting method with a mixture of the previously obtained composite and Nafion solution. The sensing ranges of the microbial biosensor based on CdS-MWNT and Cu(2)S-MWNT supports were 0.5-5.0 mM and 0.7-10 mM for phenol in a phosphate buffer solution, respectively. Total concentration of phenolic compounds contained in commercial red wines was also determined using the prepared microbial immobilized biosensor.

  13. The content of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues of white (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) and red horse chestnut (Aesculus carea H.) colonized by the horse chestnut leaf miner (Cameraria ohridella Deschka & Dimić).

    PubMed

    Oszmiański, Jan; Kalisz, Stanisław; Aneta, Wojdyło

    2014-09-15

    Normally, plant phenolics are secondary metabolites involved in the defense mechanisms of plants against fungal pathogens. Therefore, in this study we attempted to quantify and characterize phenolic compounds in leaves of white and red horse chestnut with leaf miner larvae before and after Cameraria ohridella attack. A total of 17 phenolic compounds belonging to the hydroxycinnamic acid, flavan-3-ols and flavonol groups were identified and quantified in white and red horse chestnut leaf extracts. Significantly decreased concentrations of some phenolic compounds, especially of flavan-3-ols, were observed in infected leaves compared to the non-infected ones. Additionally, a higher content of polyphenolic compounds especially (-)-epicatechin and procyanidins in leaves of red-flowering than in white-flowering horse chestnut may explain their greater resistance to C. ohridella insects.

  14. A simple, cheap and reliable method for control of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in red wines. Screening of fining agents for reducing volatile phenols levels in red wines.

    PubMed

    Milheiro, Juliana; Filipe-Ribeiro, Luís; Cosme, Fernanda; Nunes, Fernando M

    2017-01-15

    Brettanomyces/Dekkera produces 4-ethylphenol (4-EP) and 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG) from hydroxycinnamic acids that affect the wine aroma and overall quality. A simple, cheap, fast and reliable quantitation method is needed for routine quality control of wines. In this work a simple method based on one simple liquid-liquid extraction with pentane/diethyl ether (2:1) and analysis by GC-MS allow to obtain very good recoveries (98-102%) and low quantification limits (24 and 11μg/L for 4-EP and 4-EG, respectively), well below the sensory threshold for these volatile phenols and with an adequate measurement uncertainty: 70, 1.75 and 78, 1.95 and 1.35μg/L for levels of 1000, 25μg/L for 4-EP and 1000, 25 and 10μg/L for 4-EG, respectively. In addition a screening of eight fining agents (mineral, protein and polysaccharide based) for reducing the levels of these volatile phenols in red wines was performed, and the impact on the physicochemical characteristics of red wines was evaluated. At the levels used, activated carbon was the most efficient fining agent in removing 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol from red wines (57%) resulting in a 75% decrease of headspace concentration of these volatile phenols. Lower reductions were observed when using egg albumin (19%) resulting in a 30% decrease in the headspace concentration. Other fining agents although not reducing the total amount of the volatile phenols present in wine decreased their concentrations in the headspace like isinglass (27%), carboxymethylcellulose (15%) and chitosan (27%). All of these fining agents could be a possibility for treating wine contaminated with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol.

  15. Phenolic phytochemicals derived from red pine (Pinus densiflora) inhibit the invasion and migration of SK-Hep-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Ki Won; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Chun, Ji Young; Kim, Seo Young; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2007-01-01

    Considerable attention has recently been focused on identifying chemopreventive phytochemicals derived from medicinal plants. Here, we analyzed phenolic phytochemicals from red pine (RP) leaves and found epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epigallocatechin (EGC), and catechin gallate (CG) as their major phenolic phytochemicals. This article also investigated whether RP leaf extract and its phenolic phytochemicals inhibit the invasion of SK-Hep-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SK-Hep-1 cells). RP suppressed the invasion and the migration of SK-Hep-1 cells. EGCG and CG also inhibited the invasion and migration, with EGC exhibiting a lower efficacy. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly gelatinase-A (MMP-2) and gelatinase-B (MMP-9), degrade components of the basement membrane and are strongly implicated in invasion and metastasis formation of malignant tumors. RP suppressed both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. EGCG and CG reduced the activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner, with EGC exhibiting a lower efficacy on both MMPs. Our results suggest that RP inhibits tumor invasion and migration, which may be attributed to the effects of EGCG and CG. In particular, EGCG plays a key role in the efficacy of RP against hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Characterization of phenolics, in vitro reducing capacity and anti-glycation activity of red grape skins recovered from winemaking by-products.

    PubMed

    Sri Harsha, P S C; Gardana, Claudio; Simonetti, Paolo; Spigno, Giorgia; Lavelli, Vera

    2013-07-01

    Red grape skins recovered from ten winemaking processes were analyzed for total phenolic content (Folin Ciocalteu assay), proanthocyanidins (n-butanol/HCl assay), individual phenolics (UPLC-DAD-MS), in vitro ferric ion reducing capacity and anti-glycation activity by bovine serum albumin/fructose and bovine serum albumin/methylglyoxal model systems. The aim was to assess if these by-products have potential as dietary anti-glycation agents, to prevent the glyco-oxidative stress associated with type-2 diabetes. Variability was observed in total phenolics (12.1-53.6g gallic acid Eq/kg), proanthocyanidins (7.2-51.1g/kg), anthocyanins (2.5-13.8 g malvidin 3-O glucoside Eq/kg), flavonols (0.3-2.6g quercetin 3-O glucoside Eq/kg) and reducing capacity (103-511 mmol Fe(II) Eq/kg). For all samples, the anti-glycation effectiveness was higher than that of commercial nutraceutical preparations. Hence, in spite of differences in cultivar, location of the vineyard and winemaking procedures, these by-products could be used as a source of cost-effective anti-glycation agent either as a food ingredient or as a nutraceutical preparation.

  17. Effect of the aging on lees and other alternative techniques on the low molecular weight phenols of Tempranillo red wine aged in oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Ortega-Heras, Miriam

    2012-06-30

    The effect of different alternative techniques to the traditional aging on lees on the low molecular weight phenolic compounds of red wines was study as well as their evolution during the aging in oak wood barrels for six months. The study was carried out with Tempranillo red grapes from two consecutive vintages. The techniques assayed were the traditional aging on lees with or without the addition of exogenous β-glucanase enzymes, the use of yeast derivative preparations also with or without the addition of exogenous β-glucanase enzymes, the micro-oxygenation applied together with the aging on lees, and the use of non-toasted oak wood chips. Hydroxycinnamic acids were the compounds most affected by these treatments, mainly in the wines treated with chips and commercial yeast derivative products, which showed higher concentrations of the free acids, compounds that play an important role in wine stabilization color since they can act as anthocyanin copigments. The differences found between the assayed treatments were more important in the 2007 vintage than in the 2008. However, a more significant effect of micro-oxygenation in the 2008 vintage was observed, which could be related to the fact that in this vintage the treatment was longer. In the 2008 vintage, the differences between treatments decreased along the aging in barrel. This vintage effect could be associated to the differences in the phenolic concentration of the initial wines. In this sense more research should be done to corroborate this fact.

  18. Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Red and Green Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Hulls (Exo- and Mesocarp) by HPLC-DAD-ESI-(HR)-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Erşan, Sevcan; Güçlü Üstündağ, Özlem; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2016-07-06

    Phenolic constituents of the nonlignified red and green pistachio hulls (exo- and mesocarp) were assessed by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) as well as by HR-MS. A total of 66 compounds was identified in the respective aqueous methanolic extracts. Among them, gallic acid, monogalloyl glucoside, monogalloyl quinic acid, penta-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose, hexagalloyl hexose, quercetin 3-O-galactoside, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, and (17:1)-, (13:0)-, and (13:1)-anacardic acids were detected at highest signal intensity. The main difference between red and green hulls was the presence of anthocyanins in the former ones. Differently galloylated hydrolyzable tannins, anthocyanins, and minor anacardic acids were identified for the first time. Pistachio hulls were thus shown to be a source of structurally diverse and potentially bioactive phenolic compounds. They therefore represent a valuable byproduct of pistachio processing having potential for further utilization as raw material for the recovery of pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and chemical products.

  19. Phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of yellow and purple-red Ecuadorian cultivars of tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cav.).

    PubMed

    Espin, Susana; Gonzalez-Manzano, Susana; Taco, Verónica; Poveda, Cristina; Ayuda-Durán, Begoña; Gonzalez-Paramas, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino

    2016-03-01

    Tree tomato fruits from the yellow giant, giant purple and New Zealand purple cultivars, cultivated in Ecuador were analysed for their phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity. Twelve hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives and four anthocyanins (in the purple cultivars) were detected and identified. The hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives mostly derived from caffeic acid, being 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid and rosmarinic acid the majority compounds. Furthermore, various rosmarinic acid glucosides, caffeoyl glucoside, feruloyl glucoside and two ferulic acid dehydrodimers were tentatively identified. The presence of rosmarinic acid is particularly relevant as it constituted a majority phenolic compound in the four studied tree tomato cultivars and it had not been reported previously in this fruit. In the purple cultivars main anthocyanins were pelargonidin 3-O-rutinoside and delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside. The New Zealand purple cultivar was by far the richest sample in both hydroxycinnamates (421.6mg/100g dry pulp) and anthocyanins (168.9mg/100g dry pulp). Antioxidant capacity, as determined by FRAP, ABTS and ORAC assays, followed the same pattern as phenolic contents, with the New Zealand purple cultivar being the one with the highest and the yellow giant cultivar with the lowest values.

  20. Analysis of total phenolic, flavonoids, anthocyanins and tannins content in Romanian red wines: prediction of antioxidant activities and classification of wines using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hosu, Anamaria; Cristea, Vasile-Mircea; Cimpoiu, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Wine is one of the most consumed beverages over the world containing large quantities of polyphenolic compounds. These compounds are responsible for quality of red wines, influencing the antioxidant activity, astringency, bitterness and colour, their composition in wine being influenced by the varieties, the vintage and the wineries. The aim of the present work is to build software instruments intended to work as data-mining tools for predicting valuable properties of wine and for revealing different wine classes. The developed ANNs are able to reveal the relationships between the concentration of total phenolic, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and tannins content, associated to the antioxidant activity, and the wine distinctive classes determined by the wine variety, harvesting year or winery. The presented ANNs proved to be reliable software tools for assessment or validation of the wine essential characteristics and authenticity and may be further used to establish a database of analytical characteristics of wines.

  1. Identification of phenolic constituents in red chicory salads (Cichorium intybus) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carazzone, Chiara; Mascherpa, Dora; Gazzani, Gabriella; Papetti, Adele

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic acids and flavonoids extracted from several types of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre salads ("Chioggia", "Treviso", "Treviso tardivo", and "Verona") were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry. Among the 64 compounds detected, several hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including 8 mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids, 3 tartaric acid derivatives, 31 flavonol and 2 flavone glycosides, as well as 10 anthocyanins were characterised based on UV spectra and MS(n) fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, several isomers of caffeic acid derivatives were distinguished for the first time by their specific mass spectral data. This is the first study reporting the glycosylation type and position of mono- and diglycosylated flavonoids in red salads.

  2. Major phenolic and volatile compounds and their influence on sensorial aspects in stem-contact fermentation winemaking of Primitivo red wines.

    PubMed

    Suriano, S; Alba, V; Di Gennaro, D; Basile, T; Tamborra, M; Tarricone, L

    2016-08-01

    In red winemaking de-stemming is crucial since the stems contain polymeric phenolic compounds responsible for the astringency of wine. Wine such as Primitivo has low phenolic constituents and tannins and stems affect aroma, taste body and olfactory characteristics. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of presence of stems during fermentation on polyphenolic, volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of wine. Primitivo grapes vinified in presence of different percentage of stems: 100 % de-stemmed (D100), 75 % de-stemmed (D75) and 50 % de-stemmed (D50). Results confirmed that the wines vinified in presence of stems were higher in tannins, flavans, to vanillin and proanthocyanidins, colour intensity with lower anthocyanins. The presence of stems during fermentation conferred more structure and flavour to wines. They facilitated must aeration thus promoting synthesis of higher alcohols and ethyl esters by yeast. In particular, a higher content of hexan-1-ol, hex-3-en-1-ol and 2-phenyl ethanol in D50 and D75 gave the wines that suggest green grass, herb and floral. Wine from D75 seemed to be better than D50 in terms of volatile compounds as well as fruity, floral and balsamic components preserved, without any unpleasant taste of long chain fatty acids found in D50.

  3. Hypocholesterolemic metabolism of dietary red pericarp glutinous rice rich in phenolic compounds in mice fed a high cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Eun-Hye; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of red pericarp glutinous rice rich in polyphenols (Jakwangchalbyeo, red rice) on serum and hepatic levels of cholesterol and hepatic protein expression linked to synthesis and degradation of cholesterol in a hypercholesterolemic mice diet as compared with brown rice. MATERIALS/METHODS C57BL/6 male mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 each), which were fed different diets for a period of 12 weeks: American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93G diet, AIN-93G diet with 2% cholesterol, brown rice with 2% cholesterol, or red rice with 2% cholesterol. RESULT Consumption of red rice resulted in a significant decrease in serum level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic levels of triglyceride and total-cholesterol. Expression of acyl-coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2), sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), and 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was decreased, while expression of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK ratio, cholesterol 7-α-hydroxylase (CYP7a1), and sterol 12-α-hydroxylase (CYP8b1) was increased in mice fed red rice. Brown rice had similar effects on cholesterol metabolism, but the effect of red rice was significantly greater than that of brown rice. CONCLUSIONS The current study suggested that red rice had a hypocholesterolemic effect by lowering hepatic cholesterol synthesis through ACAT-2, HMG-CoA reductase, and SREBP-2, and by enhancing hepatic cholesterol degradation through CYP7a1 and CYP8b1 in mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. PMID:25489402

  4. Concentrations of oligomers and polymers of proanthocyanidins in red and purple rice bran and their relationships to total phenolics, flavonoids, antioxidant capacity and whole grain color.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; McClung, Anna M; Bergman, Christine J

    2016-10-01

    Proanthocyanidins, a flavonoids subgroup, are proposed to have chronic disease modulation properties. With the eventual goal of enhancing rice phytonutrient concentrations, we investigated the genotypic variation of the concentrations of individual oligomers and polymers of proanthocyanidins in red and purple rice brans. A 4.3-fold variation in total proanthocyanidins (sum of oligomers and polymers) in the extractable fraction was found and the concentration was highly correlated with total phenolics, total flavonoids and antiradical capacity. Variation in the proportion of oligomers and polymers existed, with monomers to trimers, 4-6mers, 7-10mers and polymers accounting for 7, 18, 26.5 and 48.7%, respectively, of the total. The redness value a(∗) of whole grain rice measured in CIE L(∗)a(∗)b(∗) color space was negatively and positively correlated with extractable and non-extractable proanthocyanidins, respectively. The variation found indicates it is possible to select rice with bran containing high levels of total proanthocyanidins and specific degree of polymerization profiles.

  5. Comparison Between Malolactic Fermentation Container and Barrel Toasting Effects on Phenolic, Volatile and Sensory Profile of Red Wines.

    PubMed

    González-Centeno, María Reyes; Chira, Kleopatra; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2017-04-01

    Ellagitannin and anthocyanin profiles, woody volatile composition and sensory properties of wines in which malolactic fermentation (MLF) took place in barrels or stainless steel tanks, have been compared after 12 months of barrel ageing. Three different barrel toastings were evaluated. Barrel-fermented wines generally presented 1.2-fold higher total phenolics, whereas tank-fermented wines exhibited 1.1 and 1.2-fold greater total proanthocyanidin and anthocyanin contents, respectively. Concerning ellagitannin composition, barrel toasting effect seemed to be more important than differences due to MLF-container. Certain woody and fruity volatiles varied significantly (p < 0.05) depending on whether MLF occurred in barrels or tanks. Barrel-fermented wines were preferred in mouth, while olfactory preference depended on barrel toasting. This is the first study that evaluates the impact of oak wood during MLF on ellagitannin composition of wine, as well as the barrel toasting effect on wine attributes during ageing when MLF occurred whether in barrels or tanks.

  6. Specific phenolic compounds and sensory properties of a new dealcoholized red wine with pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract.

    PubMed

    Tárrega, Maria Amparo; Varela, Paula; Fromentin, Emilie; Feuillère, Nicolas; Issaly, Nicolas; Roller, Marc; Sanz-Buenhombre, Marisa; Villanueva, Sonia; Moro, Carlos; Guadarrama, Alberto; Fiszman, Susana

    2014-09-01

    The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has a long history of human consumption and possesses notable antioxidant and cardiovascular properties. This work evaluated the feasibility to provide a new functional beverage based on a dealcoholized red wine matrix supplemented by a pomegranate extract. The potential bioactive compounds in the pomegranate extract, punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid, were analyzed during the downstream process in order to evaluate the functional dose in the final beverage. The addition of pomegranate extract to the dealcoholized red wine resulted in a product with more intense yeast odor, acidity, yeast flavor, and astringency and with a less intense berry flavor. Consumer acceptance of the product was also investigated and the results revealed the existence of a niche of consumers willing to consume dealcoholized wine enriched with pomegranate extract. After tasting, 50% and 40% of those consumers initially interested by this product concept declared to be interested to purchase the control sample and the functional beverage, respectively. The daily consumption of two servings of 250 mL of this new pomegranate-enriched dealcoholized wine provides 82 mg of total ellagitannins, corresponding to the sum of punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid.

  7. Tear Production Rate in a Mouse Model of Dry Eye According to the Phenol Red Thread and Endodontic Absorbent Paper Point Tear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Servet

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the endodontic absorbent paper point test (EAPTT) and the phenol red thread test (PRTT) for the assessment of tear production rate in a mouse model of dry eye. Fourteen BALB/c breed female mice were allocated into experimental and control groups of equal number. For 6 wk, the experimental group was kept in dry-eye cabinets, whereas the control group was kept in normal cages under ambient conditions. In both groups, the tear production rate was measured by using EAPTT and PRTT before the study, at study baseline, and at weeks 2, 4, and 6. Tear production at weeks 2, 4, and 6 differed significantly between groups and tests. Evaluating the groups independently in terms of the test technique revealed significant differences in tear production rate between the 2 groups at the same measurement times. Due to their persistent exposure to evaporative stress factors, the tear production rate of the mice in the dry-eye cabinet was consistently lower than that of controls. Unlike PRTT, EAPTT can be readily applied to the small globes of laboratory animals without the need for forceps, thus saving time and effort. In addition, EAPTT was practical and imposed no undue stress on the mice, due to the test material's firmer structure. Therefore, compared with PRTT, EAPTT is safer and more reliable for the diagnosis of dry-eye syndrome in mice. PMID:27780003

  8. Tear Production Rate in a Mouse Model of Dry Eye According to the Phenol Red Thread and Endodontic Absorbent Paper Point Tear Tests.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Servet; Kulualp, Kadri

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the endodontic absorbent paper point test (EAPTT) and the phenol red thread test (PRTT) for the assessment of tear production rate in a mouse model of dry eye. Fourteen BALB/c breed female mice were allocated into experimental and control groups of equal number. For 6 wk, the experimental group was kept in dry-eye cabinets, whereas the control group was kept in normal cages under ambient conditions. In both groups, the tear production rate was measured by using EAPTT and PRTT before the study, at study baseline, and at weeks 2, 4, and 6. Tear production at weeks 2, 4, and 6 differed significantly between groups and tests. Evaluating the groups independently in terms of the test technique revealed significant differences in tear production rate between the 2 groups at the same measurement times. Due to their persistent exposure to evaporative stress factors, the tear production rate of the mice in the dry-eye cabinet was consistently lower than that of controls. Unlike PRTT, EAPTT can be readily applied to the small globes of laboratory animals without the need for forceps, thus saving time and effort. In addition, EAPTT was practical and imposed no undue stress on the mice, due to the test material's firmer structure. Therefore, compared with PRTT, EAPTT is safer and more reliable for the diagnosis of dry-eye syndrome in mice.

  9. Effects of pH, sample size, and solvent partitioning on recovery of soluble phenolic acids and isoflavonoids in leaves and stems of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland).

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A

    2011-11-01

    Several extraction parameters were tested to determine optimal conditions for extracting phenolics from leaves and stems of red clover (Trifolium pratense L. cv. Kenland), with the goal of using extracts in bioassays and in assessment of phenolic profiles. HPLC-UV profiles were compared before and after partitioning a methanolic extract of soluble phenolics with ethyl acetate-ethyl ether (1:1, v/v). The effect of extract pH on the partitioning of phenolics into the ethyl acetate-ethyl ether (EtOAc-Et2O) phase was evaluated, and several tissue weights were extracted to determine a minimum amount that could be extracted without loss of information. HPLC profiles of soluble phenolics were similar in the methanolic extracts and the partitioned EtOAc-Et2O extracts. However, recoveries in unpartitioned extracts were 2- to 4-fold greater than in the acidified, partitioned extracts. Also, recovery was considerably affected by the pH to which extracts were adjusted prior to partitioning. In extracts acidified to pH 2, recoveries were 2- to 7-fold higher than in extracts partitioned at pH 6. In extracts prepared from 250, 120, or 60 mg of tissue, peak areas of methanolic extracts were directly proportional to the amount of tissue extracted.

  10. An analysis on flavonoids, phenolics and organic acids contents in brewed red wines of both non-skin contact and skin contact fermentation techniques of Mao Luang ripe fruits (Antidesma bunius) harvested from Phupan Valley in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Samappito, S; Butkhup, L

    2008-07-01

    The experiment was carried out at the Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Mahasarakham University, Northeast Thailand during the 2006. The study aimed to determine amounts of flavonoids, phenolics and organic acids in ripe fruits and brewed red wines of both non-skin contact and skin contact winemaking techniques where Mao Luang ripe fruits of both Fapratan and Sangkrow2 cultivars were used. The experiment was laid in a Completely Randomised Design (CRD) with four replications. The results showed that mean values of primary data of fresh Mao Luang ripe fruits on weight of 100 berries (g) and mean values of juice:solids, pH, total soluble solid (TSS, 0brix), total organic acids (TOA, mg L(-1)), TSS:TOA (%), total flavonoids contents (TFC, mg L(-l)), total phenolic acids (TPA, mg L(-1)), total procyanidins contents (TPC, mg L(-1)) and reducing sugar (g L(-1)) were 65.62, 3.28, 3.51, 16.50, 49.36, 28.10, 397.90, 76.04, 156.21 and 184.32, respectively. Skin contact Mao Luang red wine gave higher amounts of flavonoids, phenolic acids, anthocyanins of procyanidin B1 and procyanidin B2, organic acids than non-skin contact red wine. The differences were highly significant. Furthermore, ethanol (%) and total acidity (g L(-1) citric acid) were much higher for skin contact wine than non-skin contact wine but a reverse was found with total soluble solids (0brix), pH where non-skin contact wine gave higher mean values than skin contact wine.

  11. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation therapy - mouth ...

  12. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  13. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  14. Influence of industrial and alternative farming systems on contents of sugars, organic acids, total phenolic content, and the antioxidant activity of red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris Rote Kugel).

    PubMed

    Bavec, Martina; Turinek, Matjaz; Grobelnik-Mlakar, Silva; Slatnar, Ana; Bavec, Franc

    2010-11-24

    The contents of sugars, organic acids, total phenolic content, and the antioxidant activity were quantified in the flesh of red beet from conventional (CON), integrated (INT), organic (ORG), biodynamic (BD), and control farming systems using established methods. Significant differences were measured for malic acid, total phenolic content (TPC), and total antioxidant activity, where malic acid content ranged from 2.39 g kg(-1) FW (control) to 1.63 g kg(-1) FW (CON, ORG, and INT). The highest TPC was measured in BD and control samples (0.677 and 0.672 mg GAE g(-1), respectively), and the lowest in CON samples (0.511 mg GAE g(-1)). Antioxidant activity was positively correlated with TPC (r2=0.6187) and ranged from 0.823 μM TE g(-1) FW to 1.270 μM TE g(-1) FW in CON and BD samples, respectively, whereas total sugar content ranged from 21.03 g kg(-1) FW (CON) to 31.58 g kg(-1) FW (BD). The importance of sugars, organic acids, phenols, and antioxidants for human health, as well as for plant resilience and health, gained from this explorative study, is discussed and put into perspective.

  15. The influence of g-C3N4 loading on the photocatalytic activity of Bi12O17Br2/Bi2O3 composite in the phenol red degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Jiang, S. S.; Lin, Z.; Wang, M.; Yan, Y. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the influence of graphite-like C3N4 (g-C3N4) loading on the photocatalytic performance of Bi12O17Br2/Bi2O3 composite was studied. The results indicated that g-C3N4-Bi12O17Br2/Bi2O3 photocatalysts displayed much higher photocatalytic efficiency for the phenol red degradation than the bare Bi2O3 and Bi2O3/Bi12O17Br2 composite under visible light illumination. The best photocatalytic performance of the composite sample with almost 100% phenol red degradation located at g-C3N4-Bi12O17Br2/Bi2O3-50 under visible light illumination for 80 mins. This excellent photocatalytic performance was displayed according to the efficient separation and transportation of the photogenerated charges, which was resulted from the coupling of C3N4 and Bi12O17Br2/Bi2O3.

  16. Assessment of the chemical changes during storage of phenol-formaldehyde resins pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inverse gas chromatography and Fourier transform infra red methods.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A; Zięba-Palus, J; Lachowicz, T

    2014-09-12

    The chemical changes occurring in the phenol-formaldehyde resins (resol and novolac type) during their storage were investigated. In this paper the FT-IR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography methods were applied for assessment of the changes occurring during storage of the phenolic resins. We have found that during storage some examined resins occurred partial curing. The results from all techniques applied are consistent. Py-GCMS is useful technique for screening the storage processes but IGC seems to be most sensitive one.

  17. Molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells by phenolic acids from the red-flesh peach BY00P6653

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide variety of fruits and vegetables extracts have been shown to protect against cancer cell growth in vitro. Increasing evidence suggests that phenolics compounds found in fruits and vegetables may have anticancer properties. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-proliferative...

  18. Cosmetic applications of glucitol-core containing gallotannins from a proprietary phenolic-enriched red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves extract: inhibition of melanogenesis via down-regulation of tyrosinase and melanogenic gene expression in B16F10 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hang; Xu, Jialin; DaSilva, Nicholas A; Wang, Ling; Wei, Zhengxi; Guo, Liangran; Johnson, Shelby L; Lu, Wei; Xu, Jun; Gu, Qiong; Seeram, Navindra P

    2017-03-10

    The red maple (Acer rubrum) is a rich source of phenolic compounds which possess galloyl groups attached to different positions of a 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol core. While these glucitol-core containing gallotannins (GCGs) have reported anti-oxidant and anti-glycative effects, they have not yet been evaluated for their cosmetic applications. Herein, the anti-tyrosinase and anti-melanogenic effects of a proprietary phenolic-enriched red maple leaves extract [Maplifa(™); contains ca. 45% ginnalin A (GA) along with other GCGs] were investigated using enzyme and cellular assays. The GCGs showed anti-tyrosinase activity with IC50 values ranging from 101.4 to 1047.3 μM and their mechanism of tyrosinase inhibition (using GA as a representative GCG) was evaluated by chelating and computational/modeling studies. GA reduced melanin content in murine melanoma B16F10 cells by 79.1 and 56.7% (at non-toxic concentrations of 25 and 50 μM, respectively), and its mechanisms of anti-melanogenic effects were evaluated by using methods including fluorescent probe (DCF-DA), real-time PCR, and western blot experiments. These data indicated that GA was able to: (1) reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species, (2) down-regulate the expression of MITF, TYR, TRP-1, and TRP-2 gene levels in a time-dependent manner, and (3) significantly reduce protein expression of the TRP-2 gene. Therefore, the anti-melanogenic effects of red maple GCGs warrant further investigation of this proprietary natural product extract for potential cosmetic applications.

  19. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on phenol content, antioxidant activity and biological activity of black maca and red maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii walp).

    PubMed

    Zevallos-Concha, A; Nuñez, D; Gasco, M; Vasquez, C; Quispe, M; Gonzales, G F

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on UV spectrum on maca, total content of polyphenols, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activities and in vivo biological activities of red and black maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii). Adult mice of the strain Swiss aged 3 months and weighing 30-35 g in average were used to determine biological activities. Daily sperm production, effect on testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia and forced swimming test were used to determine the effect of irradiation on biological activities of maca extracts. Irradiation did not show differences in UV spectrum but improves the amount of total polyphenols in red maca as well as in black maca extracts. In both cases, black maca extract has more content of polyphenols than red maca extract (p < 0.01). Gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant capacity (p < 0.05). No difference was observed in daily sperm production when irradiated and nonirradiated maca extract were administered to mice (p > 0.05). Black maca extract but not red maca extract has more swimming endurance capacity in the forced swimming test. Irradiation of black maca extract increased the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05). This is not observed with red maca extract (p > 0.05). Testosterone enanthate (TE) increased significantly the ventral prostate weight. Administration of red maca extract in animals treated with TE prevented the increase in prostate weight. Irradiation did not modify effect of red maca extract on prostate weight (p > 0.05). In conclusion, irradiation does not alter the biological activities of both black maca and red maca extracts. It prevents the presence of microorganisms in the extracts of black or red maca, but the biological activities were maintained.

  1. Effects of Ultrasonic Irradiation on Phenolic Compounds in Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Ide, Masao

    2000-05-01

    Red wine has been of interest recently because many poly-phenols, that are considered to be good for health, are contained therein. Since ultrasonic irradiation accelerates maturation, its effects on phenolic compounds in wine were investigated in this study. Effects were evaluated using the indices developed by Glories. It was found that weak ultrasonic irradiation promotes an increase in the amount of phenolic compounds in red wine.

  2. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, K.W.

    1989-02-21

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, phenol in water'' (approximately 10% phenol), and water in phenol'' (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage processes are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination. 8 figs.

  3. Pervaporation of phenols

    DOEpatents

    Boddeker, Karl W.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous phenolic solutions are separated by pervaporation to yield a phenol-depleted retentate and a phenol-enriched permeate. The separation effect is enhanced by phase segregation into two immiscible phases, "phenol in water" (approximately 10% phenol), and "water in phenol" (approximately 70% phenol). Membranes capable of enriching phenols by pervaporation include elastomeric polymers and anion exchange membranes, membrane selection and process design being guided by pervaporation performance and chemical stability towards phenolic solutions. Single- and multiple-stage procresses are disclosed, both for the enrichment of phenols and for purification of water from phenolic contamination.

  4. Mucosal melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballester Sánchez, R; de Unamuno Bustos, B; Navarro Mira, M; Botella Estrada, R

    2015-03-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a rare melanoma subtype that differs from the cutaneous form of the tumor in its biology, clinical manifestations, and management. Diagnosis is usually late due to a lack of early or specific signs and the location of lesions in areas that are difficult to access on physical examination. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for localized disease. The value of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is still unclear. Radiotherapy can be used as adjuvant therapy for the control of local disease. c-KIT mutations are more common than in other types of melanoma and this has led to significant advances in the use of imatinib for the treatment of metastatic mucosal melanoma.

  5. Sodium alginate inhibits methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Itoh, Tomokazu; Nasu, Reishi; Kajiwara, Eiji; Nishida, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is one of the most prevalent side effects of chemotherapy. Methotrexate is a pro-oxidant compound that depletes dihydrofolate pools and is widely used in the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies. Through its effects on normal tissues with high rates of proliferation, methotrexate treatment leads to gastrointestinal mucositis. In rats, methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is histologically characterized by crypt loss, callus fusion and atrophy, capillary dilatation, and infiltration of mixed inflammatory cells. The water-soluble dietary fiber sodium alginate (AL-Na) is derived from seaweed and has demonstrated muco-protective and hemostatic effects on upper gastrointestinal ulcers. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of AL-Na on methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis in rats. Animals were subcutaneously administered methotrexate at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg once daily for 3 d. Rats were treated with single oral doses of AL-Na 30 min before and 6 h after methotrexate administration. On the 4th day, small intestines were removed and weighed. Subsequently, tissues were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and bromodeoxyuridine. AL-Na significantly prevented methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis. Moreover, AL-Na prevented decreases in red blood cell numbers, hemoglobin levels, and hematocrit levels. These results suggest the potential of AL-Na as a therapy for methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis.

  6. Differences in Vvufgt and VvmybA1 Gene Expression Levels and Phenolic Composition in Table Grape (Vitis vinifera L.) 'Red Globe' and Its Somaclonal Variant 'Pink Globe'.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Luis; Sáez, Vania; Hinrichsen, Patricio; Castro, María H; Vergara, Carola; von Baer, Dietrich; Mardones, Claudia

    2017-04-05

    A novel 'Red Globe' (RG)-derived grape variety, 'Pink Globe' (PG), was described and registered as a new genotype, with earlier ripening and sweeter taste than those of RG. Microsatellite analysis revealed that PG and RG are undifferentiable; however, the PG VvmybA1c contains six single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the coding and noncoding region, possibly related to the reduced VvmybA1 expression levels. Conversely, HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed significantly lower anthocyanin content in PG skin than in RG skin, and PG had no detectable trihydroxylated anthocyanins. Total flavonols did not differ between the variants, although some quercetin derivate concentrations were lower in PG. HPLC-FLD analysis revealed slightly higher concentrations of epicatechin and a procyanidin dimer in PG seeds, although the antioxidant capacity of crude extracts from either variety did not differ significantly. These differences, particularly in monomeric anthocyanin content, can be attributed to altered activity of a MYB-type transcription factor, reducing Vvufgt expression.

  7. Organizing a mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Rodney D; Lorenz, Robin G

    2005-08-01

    Gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue can be divided into loosely organized effector sites, which include the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and more organized structures, such as mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), Peyer's patches (PPs), isolated lymphoid follicles, and cryptopatches (CPs). These organized structures in the gastrointestinal tract have been hypothesized to play the role of primary lymphoid organ, supporting the extrathymic development of T lymphocytes (CPs), secondary lymphoid organs involved in the induction of the mucosal immune response (PPs), and tertiary lymphoid structures whose function is still under debate (isolated lymphoid follicles). The most widely studied lymphoid structure found in the small intestine is the PP. PPs are secondary lymphoid structures, and their development and function have been extensively investigated. However, single lymphoid aggregates resembling PPs have been also described in humans and in the murine small intestines. These isolated lymphoid follicles have both germinal centers and an overlying follicle-associated epithelium, suggesting that they also can function as inductive sites for the mucosal immune response. This review compares and contrasts the development and function of the four main organized gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues: CPs, isolated lymphoid follicles, PPs, and mesenteric LNs.

  8. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  9. Application of artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least-squares regression (PLSR) to predict the changes of anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, Total phenols, flavonoids, and antioxidant activity during storage of red bayberry juice based on fractal analysis and red, green, and blue (RGB) intensity values.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Jiang, Lingling; Lou, Heqiang; Hu, Ya; Kong, Xuecheng; Lu, Hongfei

    2011-01-26

    Artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least-squares regression (PLSR) models were developed to predict the changes of anthocyanin (AC), ascorbic acid (AA), total phenols (TP), total flavonoid (TF), and DPPH radical scavenging activity (SA) in bayberry juice during storage based on fractal analysis (FA) and red, green, and blue (RGB) intensity values. The results show the root mean squared error (RMSE) of ANN-FA decreased 2.44 and 12.45% for AC (RMSE = 18.673 mg/100 mL, R(2) = 0.939) and AA (RMSE = 8.694 mg/100 mL, R(2) = 0.935) compared with PLSR-RGB, respectively. In addition, PLSR-FA (RMSE = 5.966%, R(2) = 0.958) showed a 12.01% decrease in the RMSE compared with PLSR-RGB for predicting SA. For the prediction of TP and TF, however, both models showed poor performances based on FA and RGB. Therefore, ANN and PLSR combined with FA may be a potential method for quality evaluation of bayberry juice during processing, storage, and distribution, but the selection of the most adequate model is of great importance to predict different nutritional components.

  10. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  11. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  12. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    DOEpatents

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  13. The Molecular Immunology of Mucositis: Implications for Evidence-Based Research in Alternative and Complementary Palliative Treatments

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The terms ‘mucositis’ and ‘stomatitis’ are often used interchangeably. Mucositis, however, pertains to pharyngeal-esophago-gastrointestinal inflammation that manifests as red, burn-like sores or ulcerations throughout the mouth. Stomatitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues proper, which can present with or without sores, and is made worse by poor dental hygiene. Mucositis is observed in a variety of immunosuppressed patients, but is most often consequential to cancer therapy. It appears as early as the third day of intervention, and is usually established by Day 7 of treatment. Mucositis increases mortality and morbidity and contributes to rising health care costs. The precise immune components involved in the etiology of mucositis are unclear, but evidence-based research (EBR) data has shown that applications of granulocyte–macrophage-colony stimulating factor prevent the onset or the exacerbation of oropharyngeal mucositis. The molecular implications of this observation are discussed from the perspective of future developments of complementary and alternative treatments for this condition. It must be emphasized that this article is meant to be neither a review on mucositis and the various treatments for it, nor a discussion paper on its underlying molecular immunology. It is a statement of the implications of EBR for CAM-based interventions for mucositis. It explores and discusses the specific domain of molecular immunology in the context of mucositis and its direct implications for EBR research in CAM-based treatments for mucositis. PMID:16322806

  14. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight) of th...

  15. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  16. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  17. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients.

  18. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Crispian; Bagan, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients. Key words:Oral, precancer, cancer, clinical tool. PMID:26241449

  19. Mucosal immunology of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Berin, M Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A

    2013-05-06

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors, such as dietary factors and microbiota, in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and the microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy.

  20. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  1. Phenolic Wastewater Treatment Alternatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    pH 7 retention times become excessive. The manganese dioxide (Mn02 ) precipitates as a hydrous sludge which must be removed. This sludge becomes a...the sorptive properties of the hydrous MnO 2 often render it bene- ficial to clarification (Reference 22). On the other hand, it would increase the...SYSTEMS Phenol recovery systems are widely used for petroleum refi- nery wastes, coke-oven liquors , and phenol resin plant effluents, where waste phenol

  2. Idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cornegliani, Luisa; Vercelli, Antonella; Abramo, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    A new papillomatous clinical entity is described affecting the penile mucosa of dogs. The animals, 11 male dogs of different breeds, ageing from 6 to 13 years, were presented for genital mass and occasional haematuria. Surgical incision of the prepuce skin of the anaesthetized dogs showed the presence of single pedunculated, soft, pink-red, cauliflower-like masses arising from the penile mucosa, with diameter ranging from 2 to 8 cm. In all cases, histopathological examination of the excised masses showed normal epithelial differentiation with digitiform expansion of all the layers and elongated rete ridges slanted towards the periphery of the lesion. Evidence of ballooning degeneration or basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies was not found. Both immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction techniques failed to reveal papillomavirus. According to the histological World Health Organization classification of papillomatous lesions and due to the lack of evidence of a viral origin the masses were identified as idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas. Urinary problems resolved after surgical excision, haematuria was therefore considered secondary to ulceration of the papillated masses.

  3. Image-enhanced bronchoscopic evaluation of bronchial mucosal microvasculature in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Fathy, Eman Mahmoud; Shafiek, Hanaa; Morsi, Tamer S; El Sabaa, Bassma; Elnekidy, Abdelaziz; Elhoffy, Mohamed; Atta, Mohamed Samy

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial vascular remodeling is an underresearched component of airway remodeling in COPD. Image-enhanced bronchoscopy may offer a less invasive method for studying bronchial microvasculature in COPD. Objectives To evaluate endobronchial mucosal vasculature and changes in COPD by image-enhanced i-scan3 bronchoscopy and correlate them pathologically by analyzing bronchial mucosal biopsies. Methods This case–control study analyzed 29 COPD patients (41.4% Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease B [GOLD B] and 58.6% GOLD D) and ten healthy controls admitted at Alexandria Main University Hospital, Egypt. Combined high-definition white light bronchoscopy (HD WLB) with i-scan3 was used to evaluate endobronchial mucosal microvasculature. The vascularity was graded according to the level of mucosal red discoloration (ie, endobronchial erythema) from decreased discoloration to normal, mild, moderate, and severe increased red discoloration (G−1, G0, G+1, G+2, and G+3, respectively) and scored by three bronchoscopists independently. Bronchial mucosal biopsies were taken for microvascular density counting using anti-CD34 antibody as angiogenesis marker. Results Different grades of endobronchial erythema were observed across/within COPD patients using combined HD WLB + i-scan3, with significant agreement among scorers (P=0.031; median score of G+1 [G−1–G+2]) being higher in GOLD D (P=0.001). Endobronchial erythema significantly correlated with COPD duration, exacerbation frequency, and body mass index (P<0.05). Angiogenesis was significantly decreased among COPD patients versus controls (10.6 [8–13.3] vs 14 [11–17.1]; P=0.02). Mucosal surface changes (including edema, atrophy, and nodules) were better visualized by the combined HD WLB + i-scan3 rather than HD WLB alone. Conclusion Combined HD WLB + i-scan3 seems to be valuable in evaluating mucosal microvasculature and surface changes in COPD, which may represent vasodilatation rather than

  4. Herpetiform genital lesions in a heifer with mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Fabis, J J; Szkudlarek, L; Risatti, G R; Sura, R; Garmendia, A E; Van Kruiningen, H J

    2008-03-01

    A 14-month-old heifer with a 17-day history of unresponsive bloody diarrhea was necropsied. There were focal, pink-red erosions of the nares and hard palate; ulcers and fissures of the tongue; and multiple ulcerative lesions of the alimentary canal. Interdigital skin of both rear limbs was ulcerated and bleeding; and the margins of the vulva contained punctiform red ulcers. The gross lesions were consistent with mucosal disease. Histopathology and laboratory testing ruled out rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, and vesicular stomatitis, and identified bovine virus diarrhea virus to be the cause of this disease. Lesions of the vulva similar to those seen in some stages of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis were negative for bovine herpesvirus-1 and tested positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by immunohistochemistry.

  5. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xian; Chen, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1), a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies. PMID:21994611

  6. Topical therapy for mucosal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    Summers, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal yeast infection is best understood as a consequence of compromised mucosal cell-mediated and innate immunity. Defense against oral candidiasis is dominantly cell mediated. The innate immune system may play the main role in regulating vulvovaginal yeast infection. Conditions that compromise cell-mediated immunity such as leukemia, severe illness and HIV infection must be considered as predisposing factors for recurrent oral candidiasis. Compromise of vaginal innate immunity due to mucosal allergy or due to a genetic defect such as mannose-binding lectin deficiency contributes to chronic vulvovaginal yeast infection. Treatment of cofactors must be considered in order to achieve control in recurrent mucosal yeast infection.

  7. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  8. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  9. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  10. Mucosal immunity and probiotics in fish.

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-07-01

    Teleost mucosal immunity has become the subject of unprecedented research studies in recent years because of its diversity and defining characteristics. Its immune repertoire is governed by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) which are divided into gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissues (GIALT). The direct contact with its immediate environment makes the mucosal surfaces of fish susceptible to a wide variety of pathogens. The inherent immunocompetent cells and factors in the mucosal surfaces together with the commensal microbiota have pivotal role against pathogens. Immunomodulation is a popular prophylactic strategy in teleost and probiotics possess this beneficial feature. Most of the studies on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in fish mainly discussed their impacts on systemic immunity. In contrast, few of these studies discussed the immunomodulatory features of probiotics in mucosal surfaces and are concentrated on the influences in the gut. Significant attention should be devoted in understanding the relationship of mucosal immunity and probiotics as the present knowledge is limited and are mostly based on extrapolations of studies in humans and terrestrial vertebrates. In the course of the advancement of mucosal immunity and probiotics, new perspectives in probiotics research, e.g., probiogenomics have emerged. This review affirms the relevance of probiotics in the mucosal immunity of fish by revisiting and bridging the current knowledge on teleost mucosal immunity, mucosal microbiota and immunomodulation of mucosal surfaces by probiotics. Expanding the knowledge of immunomodulatory properties of probiotics especially on mucosal immunity is essential in advancing the use of probiotics as a sustainable and viable strategy for successful fish husbandry.

  11. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  12. Antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, analgesics, and nutritional supplements for alimentary tract mucositis.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Elad, Sharon; Altman, Arnold; Damato, Kathryn; Epstein, Joel

    2006-06-01

    This review focuses on the value of several groups of agents for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. The review refers to alimentary mucositis as a generalized term that includes oral mucositis and gastrointestinal mucositis. This paper is part of the systematic review made by the mucositis study group which operates in the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/International Society of Oral Oncology (ISOO). Several new guidelines are suggested in this review as an update to the primary systematic review that was published by the same group in 2004.

  13. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vk; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement.

  14. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  15. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  16. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  17. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  18. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production.

  19. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  20. Mucositis management in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2006-04-01

    Mucositis is an important toxicity to be aware of in anticancer therapy. It contributes to a reduction in cure rates from cancer. Until recently, it has been poorly understood and therefore has not been well managed. It causes patient distress, delays in treatment administration, and reductions in dose intensity, and it costs the health-care system a large amount of money. Mucositis has traditionally been associated more with hematologic malignancies than with solid tumors, because the incidence of severe mucositis has been much higher with the high-dose chemotherapy regimens used in hematologic malignancies. However, the chemotherapy used in solid tumors also causes mucositis and deserves further study. The separation between oral and gastrointestinal mucositis is potentially false and is being removed, with much research now investigating the entire alimentary canal. There are similarities and differences between radiation therapy- and chemotherapy-induced mucositis, and these have implications for treatment and prevention scheduling and type. Risk prediction is another area that requires more work, but there is real hope that, in the future, we might be able to predict who will suffer from mucositis and in which parts of the alimentary canal, thus enabling us to appropriately target the newer antimucotoxic therapies. The Mucositis Study Goup of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer has recently published management guidelines for oral and gastrointestinal mucositis and is in the process of updating them. The guidelines serve as an excellent starting place for future mucositis research because they not only review the available treatments but also discuss mechanisms and epidemiology.

  1. Phenolic compounds and chromatographic profiles of pear skins (Pyrus spp.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2008-10-08

    A standardized profiling method based on liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD-ESI/MS) was used to analyze the phenolic compounds in the skins of 16 pears (Pyrus spp.). Thirty-four flavonoids and 19 hydroxycinnamates were identified. The main phenolic compounds (based on peak area) in all of the pear skins were arbutin and chlorogenic acid. The remaining phenolics varied widely in area and allowed the pears to be divided into four groups. Group 1, composed of four Asian pears (Asian, Asian brown, Korean, and Korean Shinko), contained only trace quantities of the remaining phenolics. Yali pear (group 2) contained significant amounts of dicaffeoylquinic acids. Fragrant pear (group 3) contained significant quantities of quercetin glycosides and lesser quantities of isorhamnetin glycosides and the glycosides of luteolin, apigenin, and chrysoeriol. The remaining 10 pears (group 4) (Bartlett, Beurre, Bosc, Comice, D'Anjou, Forelle, Peckham, Red, Red D'Anjou, and Seckel) contained significant quantities of isorhamnetin glycosides and their malonates and lesser quantities of quercetin glycosides. Red D'Anjou, D'Anjou, and Seckel pears also contained cyanidin 3-O-glucoside. Thirty-two phenolic compounds are reported in pear skins for the first time.

  2. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-28

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  3. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  4. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-05

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  5. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology

    PubMed Central

    Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. PMID:28127567

  6. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  7. Animal models of mucositis: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Joanne M; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2011-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major acute complication in the clinical setting, occurring in a large percentage of patients undergoing cytotoxic therapy. One of the major problems with alimentary mucositis is that the underlying mechanisms behind its development are not entirely understood, which makes it extremely difficult to develop effective interventions. Animal models provide a critical source of knowledge when sampling from patients is unavailable or interventions are yet to be fully tested. This review focuses on the animal models used to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of mucositis and translate new antimucotoxic agents into clinical trials.

  8. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  9. Role of oxygen radicals and neutrophils in hemorrhagic shock-induced gastric mucosal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The role of oxygen radicals and neutrophils was examined in ischemia-reperfusion injury to the gastric mucosa in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Gastric mucosal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-labelled red blood cells was measured during a 30 minute control period, 30 minute ischemic period, and a 60 minute reperfusion period. In untreated rats, a dramatic rise in the leakage of /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cells into the gastric lumen was observed only during the reperfusion period. Ischemia-reperfusion was also associated with the formation of both grossly visible and histologically demonstrable mucosal lesions. Pretreatment with dimethylsulfoxide or deferoxamine largely prevented gastric bleeding and gross lesion formation, indicating that the hydroxyl radical, generated by the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, is the primary cytotoxic oxygen species involved in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. Phenolic compound in beans as protection against mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Telles, Annie Campello; Kupski, Larine; Furlong, Eliana Badiale

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, their inhibitory activity against fungal amylase and the occurrence of aflatoxins were determined in edible beans. The free, conjugated and bounded phenolic compounds and their phenolic acid profiles were determined in ten bean varieties. A method for aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 determination and confirmation by LC-MS/MS was validated. The red and carioca beans presented the highest total phenolic content (1.8 and 1.2mg.g(-1), respectively); the fradinho and white beans the lowest (0.18 and 0.19mg.g(-1), respectively). In the free and conjugated forms, chlorogenic acid was present in 60% of the samples, while in the bounded phenolic, ferulic acid was in 90% of the samples. The phenolic extracts were able to inhibit fungal amylase, and the PCA analysis confirmed that the relation between the chlorogenic and gallic acids is important to this effect. The absence of aflatoxins in samples confirm the protector effects of these phenolic compounds.

  11. Characterisation of phenolics, betanins and antioxidant activities in seeds of three Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genotypes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Peter X; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is known for its exceptional nutritional value and potential health benefits. The present study identified the composition of different forms of extractable phenolics and betacyanins of quinoa cultivars in white, red and black, and how they contribute to antioxidant activities. Results showed that at least 23 phenolic compounds were found in either free or conjugated forms (liberated by alkaline and/or acid hydrolysis); the majority of which were phenolic acids, mainly vanillic acid, ferulic acid and their derivatives as well as main flavonoids quercetin, kaempferol and their glycosides. Betacyanins, mainly betanin and isobetanin, were confirmed for the first time to be the pigments of the red and black quinoa seeds, instead of anthocyanins. Darker quinoa seeds had higher phenolic concentration and antioxidant activity. Findings of these phenolics, along with betacyanins in this study add new knowledge to the functional components of quinoa seeds of different cultivar background.

  12. Phenolics and plant allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ruan, Xiao; Pan, Cun-De; Jiang, De-An

    2010-12-07

    Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide) metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  13. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  14. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  15. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure.

    PubMed

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2013-06-06

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases.

  16. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  17. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  18. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  19. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  20. Polyamines and Gut Mucosal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Jennifer; Chang, Elizabeth T.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Rao, Jaladanki N.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa has the most rapid turnover rate of any tissue in the body and its integrity is preserved through the dynamic balance between cell migration, proliferation, growth arrest and apoptosis. To maintain tissue homeostasis of the GI mucosa, the rates of epithelial cell division and apoptosis must be highly regulated by various extracellular and intracellular factors including cellular polyamines. Natural polyamines spermidine, spermine and their precursor putrescine, are organic cations in eukaryotic cells and are implicated in the control of multiple signaling pathways and distinct cellular functions. Normal intestinal epithelial growth depends on the available supply of polyamines to the dividing cells in the crypts, and polyamines also regulate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis. Although the specific molecular processes controlled by polyamines remains to be fully defined, increasing evidence indicates that polyamines regulate intestinal epithelial integrity by modulating the expression of various growth-related genes. In this review, we will extrapolate the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the roles of polyamines in gut mucosal homeostasis and highlight progress in cellular and molecular mechanisms of polyamines and their potential clinical applications. PMID:25237589

  1. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  2. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  3. Melatonin inhibits alcohol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, Anna; Saudi, Wan Salman Wan; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is often associated with epithelial inflammation, leaky gut, or other pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. We recently found that melatonin decreases basal duodenal mucosal permeability, suggesting a mucosal protective mode of action of this agent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of melatonin on ethanol-, wine-, and HCl-induced changes of duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability and motility. Rats were anesthetized with thiobarbiturate and a ~30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum was perfused in situ. Effects on duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability, assessed by measuring the blood-to-lumen clearance of ⁵¹Cr-EDTA, motility, and morphology, were investigated. Perfusing the duodenal segment with ethanol (10 or 15% alcohol by volume), red wine, or HCl (25-100 mM) induced concentration-dependent increases in paracellular permeability. Luminal ethanol and wine increased, whereas HCl transiently decreased duodenal motility. Administration of melatonin significantly reduced ethanol- and wine-induced increases in permeability by a mechanism abolished by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium (iv) or mecamylamine (luminally). Signs of mucosal injury (edema and beginning of desquamation of the epithelium) in response to ethanol exposure were seen only in a few villi, an effect that was histologically not changed by melatonin. Melatonin did not affect HCl-induced increases in mucosal permeability or decreases in motility. Our results show that melatonin reduces ethanol- and wine-induced increases in duodenal paracellular permeability partly via an enteric inhibitory nicotinic-receptor dependent neural pathway. In addition, melatonin inhibits ethanol-induced increases in duodenal motor activity. These results suggest that melatonin may serve important gastrointestinal barrier functions.

  4. Grape seed extract protects IEC-6 cells from chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity and improves parameters of small intestinal mucositis in rats with experimentally-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Yazbeck, Roger; Wright, Tessa H; Whitford, Eleanor J; Payne, Caroline; Butler, Ross N; Bastian, Susan E P

    2009-02-01

    Mucositis is a common side-effect of high-dose chemotherapy regimens. Grape seed extract (GSE) represents a rich source of proanthocyanidins with the potential to decrease oxidative damage and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. We evaluated GSE for its capacity to decrease the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: GSE was administered to IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells prior to damage induced by 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell viability was determined by neutral red assay. In vivo: Female Dark Agouti rats (130-180 g) were gavaged with 1 ml GSE (400 mg/kg) daily (day 3-11) and received 5-FU (150 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection on day nine to induce mucositis. Rats were sacrificed at day 12 and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase and sucrase activity assays and histological analyses. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA. GSE prevented the decrease in IEC-6 cell viability induced by 5-FU (p < 0.01). Compared with 5-FU controls, GSE significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity by 86% and 27% in the proximal jejunum (p < 0.001) and distal ileum (p < 0.05) respectively; decreased qualitative histological scores of damage (p < 0.05) in the proximal jejunum; increased villus height in the proximal jejunum (17%; p < 0.05) and distal ileum (50%; p < 0.01), and attenuated the 5-FU-induced reduction of mucosal thickness by 16% in the jejunum (p < 0.05) and 45% in the ileum (p < 0.01). GSE partially protected IEC-6 cells from 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and ameliorated intestinal damage induced by 5-FU in rats. GSE may represent a promising prophylactic adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal mucositis.

  5. Phenolic compounds in Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cartea, María Elena; Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo

    2010-12-30

    Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  6. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Naglik, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions. PMID:21776285

  7. C. albicans Colonization of Human Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Peter; Horbul, Julie; Maher, Diane; Davis, Dana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a low level commensal organism in normal human populations with the continuous potential to expand and cause a spectrum of clinical conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using ex vivo human organ cultures and populations of primary human cells, we have developed several related experimental systems to examine early-stage interactions between C. albicans and mucosal surfaces. Experiments have been conducted both with exogenously added C. albicans and with overtly normal human mucosal surfaces supporting pre-existing infections with natural isolates of Candida. Under different culture conditions, we have demonstrated the formation of C. albicans colonies on human target cells and filament formation, equivalent to tissue invasion. Conclusions/Significance These organ culture systems provide a valuable new resource to examine the molecular and cellular basis for Candida colonization of human mucosal surfaces. PMID:18446191

  8. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

  9. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  10. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy.

  11. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commensal bacteria, with keratin dispersed in the intercellular spaces. Neutrophils migrate through the oral mucosa and form nests within the biofilm mass. The cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan is exposed during mucosal biofilm growth and is more uniformly present on the surface of biofilm organisms invading the oral mucosa. We conclude that C. albicans forms complex mucosal biofilms consisting of both commensal bacterial flora and host components. These discoveries are important since they can prompt a shift of focus for current research in investigating the role of Candida-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of mucosal infections as well as the role of β-glucan mediated signaling in the host response. PMID:19956771

  12. Treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii reduces the inflammation and dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract in 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Justino, Priscilla F C; Melo, Luis F M; Nogueira, Andre F; Costa, Jose V G; Silva, Luara M N; Santos, Cecila M; Mendes, Walber O; Costa, Marina R; Franco, Alvaro X; Lima, Aldo A; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Soares, Pedro M G

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal mucositis is an important toxic side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. Saccharomyces boulardii is known to protect from intestinal injury via an effect on the gastrointestinal microbiota. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of S. boulardii on intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU in a murine model. Mice were divided into saline, saline (control)+5-FU or 5-FU+S. boulardii (16 × 10⁹ colony-forming units/kg) treatment groups, and the jejunum and ileum were removed after killing of mice for the evaluation of histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and non-protein sulfhydryl group (mainly reduced glutathione; GSH), nitrite and cytokine concentrations. To determine gastric emptying, phenol red was administered orally, mice were killed 20 min after administration, and the absorbance of samples collected from the mice was measured by spectrophotometry. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rate of lactulose and mannitol following oral administration. S. boulardii significantly reversed the histopathological changes in intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU and reduced the inflammatory parameters: neutrophil infiltration (control 1·73 (SEM 0·37) ultrastructural MPO (UMPO)/mg, 5-FU 7·37 (SEM 1·77) UMPO/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 4·15 (SEM 0·73) UMPO/mg); nitrite concentration (control 37·00 (SEM 2·39) μm, 5-FU 59·04 (SEM 11·41) μm and 5-FU+S. boulardii 37·90 (SEM 5·78) μm); GSH concentration (control 477·60 (SEM 25·25) μg/mg, 5-FU 270·90 (SEM 38·50) μg/mg and 5-FU+S. boulardii 514·00 (SEM 38·64) μg/mg). Treatment with S. Boulardii significantly reduced the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β by 48·92 and 32·21 % in the jejunum and 38·92 and 61·79 % in the ileum. In addition, S. boulardii decreased the concentrations of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 by 5-fold in the jejunum and 3-fold in the ileum. Interestingly, S. boulardii reduced the delay in gastric emptying

  13. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  14. Olive oil phenols and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2013-11-01

    Olive oil is a rich source of phenolic components which have a wide variety of beneficial health effects in vitro, in vivo, and clinically. The beneficial effects of olive oil phenols attributed to a variety of biological activities including free radical scavenging/antioxidant actions, anti-inflammatory effects, anti-carcinogenic properties, and anti-microbial activities. On the other hand, olive oil phenols have been shown to be some of neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia, spinal cord injury, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, aging, and peripheral neuropathy. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of olive oil phenols.

  15. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS analysis of phenolic compounds during ripening in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-López, Armando; Yahia, Elhadi

    2013-12-01

    Identification of phenolic compounds was done by means of liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) using the electrospray ionization interface (ESI). Quantification of phenolic compounds was carried out by using HPLC with diode array detector (DAD) in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit at 6 different ripeness stages (mature-green, breakers, turning, pink, light-red, and red). Several phenolic compounds were identified including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and rutin and some combined phenolic acids were tentatively identified, mainly glycosides, such as caffeoyl hexose I, caffeoyl hexose II, caffeoylquinic acid isomer, dicaffeoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl hexose I, p-coumaroyl hexose II, feruloyl hexose I, feruloyl hexose II, siringyl hexose, and caffeoyl deoxyhexose hexose. Fruit exocarp had higher quantities of total soluble phenolics (TSP) compared to mesocarp. During ripening, TSP increased in both exocarp and mesocarp, mainly in exocarp. While rutin increased, chlorogenic acid decreased in both tissues: exocarp and mesocarp.

  16. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them.

  17. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  18. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including B. anthracis in experimental models of disease. PMID:23835515

  19. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease.

  20. Total phenol content of guava fruit and development of an in vitro regeneration protocol amenable to genetic improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total soluble phenolics in two white (‘Allahabad Safeda’ and ‘Lucknow-49’), two pink (‘Beaumont’ and ‘Gushiken Sweet’), and three red fleshed (‘Ka Hua Kola’, ‘Ruby Supreme’ and ‘Red Fleshed’) guava (Psidium guajava. L.) fruits were assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. ‘Allahabad Safeda’ and...

  1. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections.

  3. Association constants and enthalpies of formation of heteroassociates of anions of cresol red and thymol blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The tendency of anions of sulfophthaleine dyes to heteroassociation was studied in aqueous solutions of phenol red, cresol red, thymol blue, and non-substituted phenol red. It was spectrophotometrically determined that single (HAn-) and doubly charged anions (An2-) of sulfophthaleines can form stable heteroassociates of the composition Ct+ · HAn- and (Ct+)2 · An2- with cations (Ct+) of polymethine dyes, pinacyanol, and quinaldine red. The values of enthalpy formation of ions of dyes and heteroassociates were calculated semi-empirically and compared with experimentally determined values of the equilibrium association constants.

  4. Sensitive determination of phenolic compounds using high-performance liquid chromatography with cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G-phenolic compound chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunlin; Cui, Hua; Myint, Aung; Lian, Mei; Liu, Lijuan

    2005-11-18

    A simple, selective and sensitive determination method of 20 phenolic compounds has been developed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with chemiluminescence detection. The method is based on the chemiluminescent enhancement by phenolic compound of the cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G system in sulfuric acid medium. Twenty phenolic compounds were separated on a XDB-C(8) column with a gradient elution using a mixture of methanol and 1.0% acetic acid as a mobile phase. Under the optimized conditions, a linear working range extends 2 orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precision below 4.0%, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were in the range of 1.5-82.1 ng/ml. The chemiluminescence reaction was compatible with the mobile phase of high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the assay of phenolic compounds in red wine without any pretreatment.

  5. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  6. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  7. Dermoscopic appearance of an amelanotic mucosal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Andreas; Beck-Zoul, Ulrike; Held, Laura; Haase, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypomelanotic or amelanotic melanomas are challenging to identify, especially at mucosal sites. The dermoscopic clues to the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas have been reported to be structureless zones with the presence of blue, gray, or white colors. Case A female in her seventies noted a new lesion on the inside of her right labia that first appeared two months prior. Her past medical history was significant for rheumatoid arthritis requiring ongoing treatment with methotrexate for 20 years and adalimumab for 10 years. After no response to two weeks of local treatment for suspected herpes simplex infection, her gynecologist performed a skin biopsy. Based on the histopathological diagnosis of an amelanotic melanoma (Breslow thickness of 1.3 mm) the patient was referred to dermatology for further assessment. Polarized dermoscopy revealed a distinct asymmetric, sharply demarcated homogenous white papule (4 × 5 mm) as well as polymorphous vessels. Conclusion Dermoscopy may aid in the diagnosis of amelanotic mucosal melanomas. Our case revealed a structureless white area and polymorphous vessels. Additional clues to the diagnosis were the advanced age of the patient and the clinical presentation of a new lesion. PMID:27867742

  8. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  9. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P < 0.05) association between mucosal lesions and the use of dentures and tobacco, whereas stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  10. Mucosal perforators from the facial artery.

    PubMed

    Coronel-Banda, Mauricio E; Serra-Renom, Jose M; Lorente, Marian; Larrea-Terán, Wendy P

    2014-07-01

    The cutaneous perforators of the facial artery have been well described, but to our knowledge the oral mucosal perforators have not. We studied 10 facial arteries from 10 hemifaces in 5 cadavers. The arteries were injected with latex, and we studied all perforators that extended from the facial artery and headed directly to the oral mucosa. The diameter and length of the facial artery and its mucosal perforators were measured and compared. We found 52 oral mucosal perforators in the 10 facial arteries injected with latex. Their mean (SD) diameter was 0.5 (0.2) mm and the mean (SD) number/facial artery was 5.2 (1.1). Their mean (SD) length was 16.4 (5.3) mm. Most of those to the cheek were localised between the branching-off points of the inferior and superior labial arteries. The facial artery has perforators to the oral mucosa of the cheek, most of them between the points at which the labial arteries emerge.

  11. Phenolic acid induced growth of gold nanoshells precursor composites and their application in antioxidant capacity assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyuan; Qian, Weiping

    2010-11-15

    In the present work, the gold nanoshells (GNSs) precursor composites were preadsorbed onto the surface of ITO substrates. With the treatment of modified electrodes immersed in the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) growth solution containing different phenolic acids, the GNSs precursor composites were enlarged to varying degrees. Phenolic acids with one or more phenolic hydroxyl groups served as reductants for the growth of GNPs. The enlargement conditions varied with the different reducing capacity of phenolic acids, exhibiting specific morphologies differ from the complete GNSs. Consequently, the UV-vis-NIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry curves for the phenolic acid-treated ITO electrode were gradually changed. Results showed that the higher reducing capacity for phenolic acid to reduce AuCl(4)(-) to Au(0) resulted in the intensified localized surface plasmon resonance features and reduced cathodic currents. The spectral wavelength peaks red shifted hundreds of nanometers across the visible region. Moreover, the antioxidant capacity of phenolic acids correlates well with their reducing activity, both of which reflect their tendency to donate electrons. Thus, the optical and electrochemical results could be used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of phenolic acids by utilizing GNSs precursor composites as nanoprobes. The method is simple, rapid and could be used in visual analysis to a certain extent.

  12. Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation: bad, good or context dependent.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Sorrell, M F; Batra, S K; Dhawan, P; Singh, A B

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease. A breach in the mucosal barrier, otherwise known as "leaky gut," is alleged to promote mucosal inflammation by intensifying immune activation. However, interaction between the luminal antigen and mucosal immune system is necessary to maintain mucosal homeostasis. Furthermore, manipulations leading to deregulated gut permeability have resulted in susceptibility in mice to colitis as well as to creating adaptive immunity. These findings implicate a complex but dynamic association between mucosal permeability and immune homeostasis; however, they also emphasize that compromised gut permeability alone may not be sufficient to induce colitis. Emerging evidence further supports the role(s) of proteins associated with the mucosal barrier in epithelial injury and repair: manipulations of associated proteins also modified epithelial differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the role of gut permeability and proteins associated in regulating mucosal inflammatory diseases appears to be more complex than previously thought. Herein, we review outcomes from recent mouse models where gut permeability was altered by direct and indirect effects of manipulating mucosal barrier-associated proteins, to highlight the significance of mucosal permeability and the non-barrier-related roles of these proteins in regulating chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions.

  13. Chemopreventive effects of free and bound phenolics associated to steep waters (nejayote) obtained after nixtamalization of different maize types.

    PubMed

    Rojas-García, Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2012-03-01

    Free and bound phenolics extracts from nejayote solids were obtained after optimally lime-cooking blue, normal white, red, normal yellow, high-carotenoid and quality protein maize types. The extraction yield ranged from 4.47 to 10.05%. Bound phenolics extracts had higher content of total phenolics, antioxidant activity and ferulic acid compared to the free phenolics extracts. In general, free phenolics extracts were less cytotoxic than the bound phenolics counterparts. Bound phenolics extracts had higher induction of quinone reductase (QR) and particularly the normal yellow nejayote exerted the highest chemopreventive index tested in Hepa1c1c7 cells. When tested for monofunctional phase 2 induction capacity in BPrc1 cells, the bound phenolics extracts of blue, normal white and quality protein nejayotes were better inducers than the normal yellow counterpart. Particularly, the free phenolics extract of the white maize nejayote induced BPrc1 cells QR and exerted a higher chemopreventive index compared to the bound phenolics extract. Therefore, the nejayote of the normal white maize was the best source of monofunctional phase 2 enzyme inducers.

  14. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs. PMID:28382025

  15. Phenol Analysis -- Some Analytical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, R. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of potable water supplies with halogenated phenols in concentrations of 2-10 parts per billion (ppb) produces objectionable tastes and odors capable of influencing consumer acceptability. Routine analysis by the distillation/ 4-aminoantipyrine method is limited by lack of sensitivity and subject to interference by aryl amines. This has been overcome by developing a continuous liquid-liquid extraction system to selectively isolate phenols and eliminate major interfering substances. Stable reagents have been formulated to reduce blank color and extend sensitivity. Equipment suitable for analysis of phenols at the 1 ppb level or less in 20 minutes is described.

  16. Buccal mucosal graft in reconstructive urology: uses beyond urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhishek; Dican, Razvan; Beier, Jörn; Keller, Hansjörg

    2014-07-01

    The use of buccal mucosal grafts for the reconstruction of urethral strictures is an established procedure. Because of its robustness, the buccal mucosal graft could also potentially provide an alternative for other indications in reconstructive urology. We report here six consecutive patients who received a buccal mucosal graft for ureteral strictures, glans reconstruction and stoma stenosis. The follow up for all patients ranged from 26 to 50 months. The buccal mucosal graft showed excellent functional results for the ureteral strictures and stenosis from ureterocutaneostomy. For glans reconstructions, the buccal mucosal grafts delivered excellent cosmetic and functional results without causing meatal stenosis. We conclude the buccal mucosal graft can be used in reconstructive surgery beyond the reconstruction of urethral strictures.

  17. Bioavailability of phenols from a phenol-enriched olive oil.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Manuel; Valls, Rosa M; Romero, Maria-Paz; Macià, Alba; Fernández, Sara; Giralt, Montse; Solà, Rosa; Motilva, Maria-José

    2011-12-01

    Phenolic compounds are one of the main reasons behind the healthy properties of virgin olive oil (VOO). However, their daily intake from VOO is low compared with that obtained from other phenolic sources. Therefore, the intake of VOO enriched with its own phenolic compounds could be of interest to increase the daily dose of these beneficial compounds. To evaluate the effectiveness of enrichment on their bioavailability, the concentration of phenolic compounds and their metabolites in human plasma (0, 60, 120, 240 and 300 min) from thirteen healthy volunteers (seven men and six women, aged 25 and 69 years) was determined after the ingestion of a single dose (30 ml) of either enriched virgin olive oil (EVOO) (961·17 mg/kg oil) or control VOO (288·89 mg/kg oil) in a cross-over study. Compared with VOO, EVOO increased plasma concentration of the phenol metabolites, particularly hydroxytyrosol sulphate and vanillin sulphate (P < 0·05). After the consumption of VOO, the maximum concentration of these peaks was reached at 60 min, while EVOO shifted this maximum to 120 min. Despite these differences, the wide variability of results indicates that the absorption and metabolism of olive oil phenols are highly dependent on the individual.

  18. Enhancement of gastric mucosal blood flow with sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M; Sorghi, M; Tittobello, A

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients with dyspepsia whose gastric abnormalities ranged from diffuse reddening of the mucosa to multiple erosions were treated for 4 weeks with oral sulglycotide, a sulphated glycopeptide with known gastroprotective and ulcer-healing properties. Before and after treatment, gastric mucosal blood flow was assessed by means of laser Doppler flowmetry. A significant (P < 0.01) increase in mucosal perfusion was observed after sulglycotide treatment, suggesting that enhancement of mucosal blood flow may contribute to the therapeutic properties of the drug.

  19. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  20. Effects of seasonal variation on sensory properties and total phenolic content of 5 lettuce cultivars.

    PubMed

    Bunning, Marisa L; Kendall, Patricia A; Stone, Martha B; Stonaker, Frank H; Stushnoff, Cecil

    2010-04-01

    Butterhead, crisphead, green leaf, red leaf, and romaine types of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) are all commonly available in U.S. markets. Sensory properties of lettuce may vary in response to environmental factors that often fluctuate widely throughout the growing season. Bitterness is generally thought to increase in lettuce grown at higher temperatures and may be related to phenolic content. This study evaluated sensory properties and total phenolic content of 5 lettuce cultivars harvested early, midway, and late in the growing season and investigated possible correlations with environmental temperature and light intensity indexes. Thirty panelists rated bitterness, appearance, flavor, texture, and overall acceptability of "Crisp and Green" (green leaf), "Crispino" (crisphead), "Green Forest" (romaine), "Lochness" (butterhead), and "Vulcan" (red leaf) lettuce. There was considerable variation in sensory ratings among the 5 cultivars (P < 0.005) but few differences within cultivars across the growing season. The crisphead cultivar, Crispino, received higher scores (P < 0.01) for flavor, texture, and overall acceptability and was rated less bitter (P < 0.05) than other cultivars. Total phenolic content varied significantly (P < 0.001) among cultivars with the red leaf cultivar, Vulcan, exhibiting the highest levels. There was no correlation between bitterness and total phenolic content or environmental factors. Differences among lettuce cultivars appear to have a larger impact on sensory and phenolic profiles than environmental variation during the growing season.

  1. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  2. Gastric mucosal injury in the rat. Role of iron and xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.; Grisham, M.B.; Manci, E.A.; Granger, D.N.; Kvietys, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Recent studies have implicated oxygen free radicals in ischemia-reperfusion injury to the gastric mucosa. The aims of the present study were to test the hypothesis that the enzyme xanthine oxidase is the source of the oxygen radicals in the ischemic stomach and determine the importance of the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction in generating the cytotoxic oxygen radicals. Gastric mucosal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cells was measured during a 30-min control period, a 30-min ischemic period (hemorrhage to 25 mmHg arterial pressure), and a 60-80-min reperfusion period (reinfusion of shed blood). In untreated (control) rats, a dramatic rise (100-fold) in the leakage of /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cells into the gastric lumen was observed only during the reperfusion period. After the reperfusion period, gastric mucosal damage was further assessed using gross lesion area and histology. Rats were placed on a sodium tungstate diet (to inactivate xanthine oxidase), or treated with either deferoxamine (an iron chelating agent) or superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger). All three interventions substantially reduced /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell clearance and gross lesion area relative to untreated rats. However, tissue injury assessed histologically was similar in both treated and untreated animals. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oxygen free radicals mediate the hemorrhagic shock-induced extravasation of red blood cells. The data also indicate that xanthine oxidase is the source of the oxy-radicals and that the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction is largely responsible for hydroxyl radical generation in this model.

  3. Gut mucosal immunostimulation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vitiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M; de Budeguer, M V; Perdigón, G

    2000-12-01

    The beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on human health have been frequently demonstrated. The interaction of LAB with the lymphoid cells associated to the gut to activate the mucosal immune system and the mechanisms by which they can exert an adjuvant effect is still unclear, as well as if this property is common for all the LAB. We studied the influence of the oral administration of different geneous of LAB such as Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined if the LAB assayed were able to stimulate the specific, the non-specific immune response (inflammatory response), or both. We demonstrated that all the bacteria assayed were able to increase the number of IgA producing cells associated to the lamina propria of small intestine. This effect was dose dependent. The increase in IgA+ producing cells was not always correlated with an increase in the CD4+ T cell number, indicating that some LAB assayed only induced clonal expansion of B cells triggered to produce IgA. Most of them, induced an increase in the number of cells involved in the inflammatory immune response. CD8+ T cell were diminished or not affected, with exception of L. plantarum that induced an increase at low dose. This fact would mean that LAB are unable to induce cytotoxicity mechanisms. We demonstrated the importance in the selection of LAB to be used as gut mucosal adjuvant. The different behaviours observed among them on the gut mucosal immune response, specially those that induce inflammatory immune response, show that not all the LAB can be used as oral adjuvant and that the beneficial effect of them can not generalized to genous or specie. The immunoadjuvant capacity would be a property of the strain assayed.

  4. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G.; Nephew, Karla R.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been great progress in treating HIV-1 infection1, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission2–4. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the SIV-rhesus macaque model point to opportunities in the earliest stages of infection where a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry5, 6. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3α, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5+cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruit CD4+T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate, a widely used antimicrobial compound 7 with inhibitory activity against production of MIP-3α and other proinflammatory cytokines8, can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This novel approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission. PMID:19262509

  5. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  6. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Peterson, Marnie L; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G; Nephew, Karla R; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Carlis, John V; Haase, Ashley T

    2009-04-23

    Although there has been great progress in treating human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model point to opportunities at the earliest stages of infection in which a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3alpha (also known as CCL20), plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5(+ )cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruits CD4(+) T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate-a widely used antimicrobial compound with inhibitory activity against the production of MIP-3alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines-can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo it can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This new approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for the development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

  7. Vitamin D and mucosal immune function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Significant advances have been made in the characterization of Vitamin D and the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) in immune function. The studies of signaling pathways involved in the response to infection and inflammation have led to a more detailed understanding of the cellular response to Vitamin D through VDR. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding how Vitamin D contributes to mucosal immune function, particularly in relation to the molecular mechanisms by which Vitamin D and VDR influence mucosal immunity, bacterial infection, and inflammation. Recent findings Recently, it was shown that Vitamin D modulates the T cell antigen receptor, further demonstrating that Vitamin D has a nonclassical role in immunoregulation. The anti-inflammation and anti-infection functions for Vitamin D are newly identified and highly significant activities. Vitamin D/VDR have multiple critical functions in regulating the response to intestinal homeostasis, tight junctions, pathogen invasion, commensal bacterial colonization, antimicrobe peptide secretion, and mucosal defense. Interestingly, microorganisms modulate the VDR signaling pathway. Summary Vitamin D is known as a key player in calcium homeostasis and electrolyte and blood pressure regulation. Recently, important progress has been made in understanding how the noncanonical activities of Vitamin D influence the pathogenesis and prevention of human disease. Vitamin D and VDR are directly involved in T cell antigen receptor signaling. The involvement of Vitamin D/VDR in anti-inflammation and anti-infection represents a newly identified and highly significant activity for VDR. Studies have indicated that the dysregulation of VDR may lead to exaggerated inflammatory responses, raising the possibility that defects in Vitamin D and VDR signaling transduction may be linked to bacterial infection and chronic inflammation. Further characterization of Vitamin D/VDR will help elucidate the pathogenesis of

  8. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital.

  9. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  10. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  11. The development of mucosal vaccines for both mucosal and systemic immune induction and the roles played by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful immunological practice that improves the quality of human life and health. Vaccine materials include antigens of pathogens and adjuvants potentiating the effectiveness of vaccination. Vaccines are categorized using various criteria, including the vaccination material used and the method of administration. Traditionally, vaccines have been injected via needles. However, given that most pathogens first infect mucosal surfaces, there is increasing interest in the establishment of protective mucosal immunity, achieved by vaccination via mucosal routes. This review summarizes recent developments in mucosal vaccines and their associated adjuvants. PMID:28168169

  12. Light and temperature effects on phenolics in dark-skinned grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade we refined our understanding of the effects of solar radiation and temperature on the accumulation of phenolic compounds in grapes in the field, particularly dark-skinned cultivars used for red wine. The work was precipitated by nearly universal prescriptive advice a decade pr...

  13. Low molecular-weight phenols in Tannat wines made by alternative winemaking procedures.

    PubMed

    Favre, Guzmán; Peña-Neira, Álvaro; Baldi, Cecilia; Hernández, Natalia; Traverso, Sofía; Gil, Graciela; González-Neves, Gustavo

    2014-09-01

    Low molecular weight phenols of Tannat red wines produced by Traditional Maceration (TM), Prefermentative Cold Maceration (PCM), Maceration Enzyme (ENZ) and grape-Seed Tannins additions (ST), were performed and discussed. Alternatives to TM increased wine phenolic contents but unequally, ST increased mainly smaller flavans-3-ol, PCM anthocyanins and ENZ proanthocyanidins (up to 2250 mg/L). However low molecular weight flavan-3-ols remained below 9 mg/L in all wines, showing that there is not necessarily a correspondence between wine richness in total tannins and flavan-3-ols contents at low molecular weight. PCM wines had particularly high concentrations of tyrosol and tryptophol, yeast metabolism derived compounds. The use of grape-seed enological tannins did not increase grape seed derived phenolic compounds such as gallic acid. Caftaric acid was found in concentrations much higher than those reported in other grape varieties. Wine phenolic content and composition was considerably affected by the winemaking procedures tested.

  14. Phenolic compounds and the colour of oranges subjected to a combination treatment of waxing and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C.

    2000-03-01

    The effects of waxing, irradiation dose and storage on phenolics and colour of irradiated oranges were investigated. Mature oranges ( Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0, 1 or 2 kGy radiation and stored up to 9 weeks at 20°C and 40-50% r.h. Colour of the oranges, total phenols and flavones in the peel were measured. Phenolic compounds increased with irradiation dose and storage time. Hue angle, value and chroma of the orange colour were more affected by waxing and storage time than the irradiation treatment. Changes in the phenolic compounds were linked with changes in the redness and saturation of the orange colour. Irradiation stimulated synthesis of flavones; waxing controlled changes induced by irradiation.

  15. American Red Cross

    MedlinePlus

    ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store Toggle Navigation Menu ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store ...

  16. Iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Ouyang, Jie; Wieczorek, Rosemary; DeSoto, Fidelina

    2009-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal erosion, ulcer, necrosis and strictures after an acute iron overdose are well described. However, gastric mucosal injury in patients receiving therapeutic iron has received only scant recognition despite its wide use. We report a case of iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury in a 76-year-old male who presented with iron deficiency anemia and had been taking ferrous sulfate tablet for 4 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a pale, villous appearing flat lesion along the lesser curvature of gastric body. Histopathologic examination of EGD biopsies of the flat lesion showed brown crystalline materials deposited in the lamina propria of gastric mucosa, which was accompanied with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and foreign body reaction. The crystalline materials were covered and admixed with gastric epithelium. Prussian blue iron stain confirmed that the brown crystalline materials were iron. The iron and hemosiderin accumulation was also seen in cytoplasm of epithelial cells and lumen of fundic gastric glands. The recognition and reporting by pathologists of iron-induced changes in EGD biopsies will alert clinicians to this underrecognized but easily correctable complication by alternative forms of iron therapy, such as liquid preparation.

  17. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  18. Th17 cells and Mucosal Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Shean J.; Dubin, Patricia J.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Th17 cells are a new lineage of T-cells that are controlled by the transcription factor RORγt and develop independent of GATA-3, T-bet, Stat 4 and Stat 6. Novel effector molecules produced by these cells include IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and IL-26. IL-17RA binds IL-17A and IL-17F and is critical for host defense against extracellular planktonic bacteria by regulating chemokine gradients for neutrophil emigration into infected tissue sites as well as host granulopoiesis. Moreover IL-17 and IL-22 regulate the production of antimicrobial proteins in mucosal epithelium. Although TGF-β1 and IL-6 have been shown to be critical for development of Th17 cells from naïve precursors, IL-23 is also important in regulating IL-17 release in mucosal tissues in response to infectious stimuli. Compared to Th1 cells, IL-23 and IL-17 show limited roles in controlling host defense against primary infections with intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggesting a predominate role of the Th17 lineage in host defense against extracellular pathogens. However in the setting of chronic biofilm infections, as that occurs with Cystic Fibrosis or bronchetctasis, Th17 cells may be key contributors of tissue injury. PMID:18054248

  19. Testing adaptive plasticity to UV: costs and benefits of stem elongation and light-induced phenolics.

    PubMed

    Weinig, Cynthia; Gravuer, Kelly A; Kane, Nolan C; Schmitt, Johanna

    2004-12-01

    On exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV), many plant species both reduce stem elongation and increase production of phenolic compounds that absorb in the UV region of the spectrum. To demonstrate that such developmental plasticity to UV is adaptive, it is necessary to show that the induced phenotype is both beneficial in inductive environments and maladaptive in non-inductive environments. We measured selection on stem elongation and phenolic content of seedlings of Impatiens capensis transplanted into ambient-UV and UV-removal treatments. We extended the range of phenotypes expressed, and thus the opportunity for selection in each UV treatment, by pretreating seedlings with either a low ratio of red:far-red wavelengths (R:FR), which induced stem elongation and reduced phenolic concentrations, or high R:FR, which had the opposite effect on these two phenotypic traits. Reduced stem length relative to biomass was advantageous for elongated plants under ambient UV, whereas increased elongation was favored in the UV-removal treatment. Selection favored an increase in the level of phenolics induced by UV in the ambient-UV treatment, but a decrease in phenolics in the absence of UV. These results are consistent with the hypotheses that reduced elongation and increased phenolic concentrations serve a UV-protective function and provide the first explicit demonstration in a wild species that plasticity of these traits to UV is adaptive. The observed cost to phenolics in the absence of UV may explain why many species plastically upregulate phenolic production when exposed to UV, rather than evolve constitutively high levels of these compounds. Finally, pretreatment with low R:FR simulating foliar shade did not exacerbate the fitness impact of UV exposure when plants had several weeks to acclimate to UV. This observation suggests that the evolution of adaptive shade avoidance responses to low R:FR in crowded stands will not be constrained by increased sensitivity to UV in

  20. Oxidative phenols in forage crops containing polyphenol oxidase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Ifat; Threadgill, Michael D; Moorby, Jon M; Winters, Ana

    2010-02-10

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-containing enzymes that catalyze oxidation of endogenous monophenols to ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds and of ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds to ortho-quinones. Subsequent nucleophilic addition reactions of phenols, amino acids, and proteins with the electrophilic ortho-quinones form brown-, black-, or red-colored secondary products associated with the undesired discolouration of fruit and vegetables. Several important forage plants also exhibit significant PPO activity, and a link with improved efficiency of ruminant production has been established. In ruminant animals, extensive degradation of forage proteins, following consumption, can result in high rates of excretion of nitrogen, which contributes to point-source and diffuse pollution. Reaction of quinones with forage proteins leads to the formation of protein-phenol complexes that are resistant to proteolytic activity during ensilage and during rumen fermentation. Thus, PPO in red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been shown to improve protein utilization by ruminants. While PPO activity has been demonstrated in a number of forage crops, little work has been carried out to identify substrates of PPO, knowledge of which would be beneficial for characterizing this trait in these forages. In general, a wide range of 1,2-dihydroxyarenes can serve as PPO substrates because these are readily oxidized because of the ortho positioning of the hydroxy groups. Naturally occurring phenols isolated from forage crops with PPO activity are reviewed. A large number of phenols, which may be directly or indirectly oxidized as a consequence of PPO activity, have been identified in several forage grass, legume, cereal, and brassica species; these include hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamates, and flavonoids. In conclusion, a number of compounds are known or postulated to enable PPO activity in important PPO-expressing forage crops. Targeting the matching of these compounds with PPO activity

  1. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula.

  2. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  3. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  4. Iron bioavailability to piglets from red and white common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols in foods may chelate dietary Fe and lower its bioavailability. Concentrations of phenols are substantially higher in red beans than in white beans. The aim of this study was to compare iron bioavailabilities from red and white beans in a piglet hemoglobin repletion model. Fe deficient cr...

  5. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses.

  6. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  7. Characterization of total antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of differently pigmented rice varieties and their changes during domestic cooking.

    PubMed

    Zaupa, Maria; Calani, Luca; Del Rio, Daniele; Brighenti, Furio; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-11-15

    In the recent years, the pigmented rice varieties are becoming more popular due to their antioxidant properties and phenolic content. In this study, we characterized the antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the phenolic profile in white, red and black rice varieties, and evaluated the effect of two cooking methods (i.e. "risotto" and boiling) on these compounds. Before the cooking, all the varieties contained several phenolic acids, whereas anthocyanins and flavonols were peculiar of black rice and flavan-3-ols of red rice. Among the rice varieties, the black had the highest TAC value. The content of (poly)phenolic compounds and TAC decreased after cooking in all three varieties, but to a lesser extent after the risotto method. As a consequence, the risotto cooking, which allows a complete absorption of water, would be a good cooking method to retain (poly)phenolic compounds and TAC in pigmented and non-pigmented whole-meal rice.

  8. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  9. Development of a phenol-enriched olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds and complementary phenols from thyme.

    PubMed

    Rubió, Laura; Motilva, Maria-José; Macià, Alba; Ramo, Tomás; Romero, Maria-Paz

    2012-03-28

    Besides affecting the oil's sensorial characteristics, the presence of herbs and spices has an impact on the nutritional value of the flavored oils. The aim of the study was to develop a new product based on the phenol-enrichment of a virgin olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds (secoiridoid derivatives) plus additional complementary phenols from thyme (flavonoids). We studied the effect of the addition of phenolic extracts (olive cake and thyme) on phenolic composition, oxidative stability, antioxidant activity, and bitter sensory attribute of olive oils. Results showed that flavonoids from thyme appeared to have higher transference ratios (average 89.7%) from the phenolic extract to oil, whereas secoiridoids from olive presented lower transference ratios (average 35.3%). The bitter sensory attribute of the phenol-enriched oils diminished with an increase of the concentration of phenols from thyme, which might denote an improvement in the consumer acceptance.

  10. Biocatalytic trifluoromethylation of unprotected phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Robert C.; Busto, Eduardo; Richter, Nina; Resch, Verena; Houk, Kendall N.; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Organofluorine compounds have become important building blocks for a broad range of advanced materials, polymers, agrochemicals, and increasingly for pharmaceuticals. Despite tremendous progress within the area of fluorination chemistry, methods for the direct introduction of fluoroalkyl-groups into organic molecules without prefunctionalization are still highly desired. Here we present a concept for the introduction of the trifluoromethyl group into unprotected phenols by employing a biocatalyst (laccase), tBuOOH, and either the Langlois' reagent or Baran's zinc sulfinate. The method relies on the recombination of two radical species, namely, the phenol radical cation generated directly by the laccase and the CF3-radical. Various functional groups such as ketone, ester, aldehyde, ether and nitrile are tolerated. This laccase-catalysed trifluoromethylation proceeds under mild conditions and allows accessing trifluoromethyl-substituted phenols that were not available by classical methods.

  11. Biocatalytic trifluoromethylation of unprotected phenols

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Robert C.; Busto, Eduardo; Richter, Nina; Resch, Verena; Houk, Kendall N.; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Organofluorine compounds have become important building blocks for a broad range of advanced materials, polymers, agrochemicals, and increasingly for pharmaceuticals. Despite tremendous progress within the area of fluorination chemistry, methods for the direct introduction of fluoroalkyl-groups into organic molecules without prefunctionalization are still highly desired. Here we present a concept for the introduction of the trifluoromethyl group into unprotected phenols by employing a biocatalyst (laccase), tBuOOH, and either the Langlois' reagent or Baran's zinc sulfinate. The method relies on the recombination of two radical species, namely, the phenol radical cation generated directly by the laccase and the CF3-radical. Various functional groups such as ketone, ester, aldehyde, ether and nitrile are tolerated. This laccase-catalysed trifluoromethylation proceeds under mild conditions and allows accessing trifluoromethyl-substituted phenols that were not available by classical methods. PMID:27834376

  12. Mucosal drug delivery: membranes, methodologies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; Wang, Yiping; Thakur, Rashmi; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, extensive research into novel forms of drug delivery has suggested that mucosal approaches offer a promising therapeutic alternative, especially for systemically acting drugs. Transmucosal drug delivery offers many benefits, including noninvasive administration, convenience, rapid onset, as well as elimination of hepatic first-pass metabolism. The investigated absorptive surfaces consist of the nasal, buccal, ocular, vaginal, and rectal mucosae. Among these, the nasal and buccal routes have proved the most promising to date. The bioavailability achieved mainly depends upon the pathophysiological state of the mucosa and the properties of both the drug and delivery systems. Various agents can increase the efficacy of transmucosal drug delivery. These include cyclodextrins, bile salts, surfactants, fusidic acid derivatives, microspheres, liposomes, and bioadhesive agents. The mechanisms of action, effectiveness, and toxicity profiles of these enhancers have been investigated extensively in both animal and human models.

  13. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  14. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  15. Red clover polyphenol oxidase and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, G; Lee, M R F; Fievez, V

    2011-02-01

    Increasing the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of milk is acknowledged to be of benefit to consumer health. Despite the high PUFA content of forages, milk fat contains only about 3% of PUFA and only about 0.5% of n-3 fatty acids. This is mainly due to intensive lipid metabolism in the rumen (lipolysis and biohydrogenation) and during conservation (lipolysis and oxidation) such as drying (hay) and ensiling (silage). In red clover, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been suggested to protect lipids against degradation, both in the silage as well as in the rumen, leading to a higher output of PUFA in ruminant products (meat and milk). PPO mediates the oxidation of phenols and diphenols to quinones, which will readily react with nucleophilic binding sites. Such binding sites can be found on proteins, resulting in the formation of protein-bound phenols. This review summarizes the different methods that have been used to assess PPO activity in red clover, and an overview on the current understanding of PPO activity and activation in red clover. Knowledge on these aspects is of major importance to fully harness PPO's lipid-protecting role. Furthermore, we review the studies that evidence PPO-mediated lipid protection and discuss its possible importance in lab-scale silages and further in an in vitro rumen system. It is demonstrated that high (induction of) PPO activity can lead to lower lipolysis in the silage and lower biohydrogenation in the rumen. There are three hypotheses on its working mechanism: (i) protein-bound phenols could directly bind to enzymes (e.g. lipases) as such inhibiting them; (ii) binding of quinones in and between proteins embedded in a lipid membrane (e.g. in the chloroplast) could lead to encapsulation of the lipids; (iii) direct binding of quinones to nucleophilic sites in polar lipids also could lead to protection. There is no exclusive evidence on which mechanism is most important, although there are strong indications that only lipid

  16. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic Csbnd H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences

  17. Organochalcogen substituents in phenolic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Valgimigli, Luca; Johansson, Henrik; Engman, Lars

    2010-05-21

    Little is known about the ED/EW character of organochalcogen substituents and their contribution to the O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in phenolic compounds. A series of ortho- and para-(S,Se,Te)R-substituted phenols were prepared and investigated by EPR, IR, and computational methods. Substituents lowered the O-H BDE by >3 kcal/mol in the para position, while the ortho-effect was modest due to hydrogen bonding ( approximately 3 kcal/mol) to the O-H group.

  18. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  19. Microbes and mucosal immune responses in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Johnston, Sebastian L; Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-03-09

    The substantial increase in the worldwide prevalence of asthma and atopy has been attributed to lifestyle changes that reduce exposure to bacteria. A recent insight is that the largely bacterial microbiome maintains a state of basal immune homoeostasis, which modulates immune responses to microbial pathogens. However, some respiratory viral infections cause bronchiolitis of infancy and childhood wheeze, and can exacerbate established asthma; whereas allergens can partly mimic infectious agents. New insights into the host’s innate sensing systems, combined with recently developed methods that characterise commensal and pathogenic microbial exposure, now allow a unified theory for how microbes cause mucosal inflammation in asthma. The respiratory mucosa provides a key microbial interface where epithelial and dendritic cells interact with a range of functionally distinct lymphocytes. Lymphoid cells then control a range of pathways, both innate and specific, which organise the host mucosal immune response. Fundamental to innate immune responses to microbes are the interactions between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and pattern recognition receptors, which are associated with production of type I interferons, proinflammatory cytokines, and the T-helper-2 cell pathway in predisposed people. These coordinated, dynamic immune responses underlie the differing asthma phenotypes, which we delineate in terms of Seven Ages of Asthma. An understanding of the role of microbes in the atopic march towards asthma, and in causing exacerbations of established asthma, provides the rationale for new specific treatments that can be assessed in clinical trials. On the basis of these new ideas, specific host biomarkers might then allow personalised treatment to become a reality for patients with asthma.

  20. The oral mucosal surface and blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Detailed information about the size of the oral mucosa is scarce in the literature, and those studies that do exist do not take into account the size of the tongue or the enlargement of the surface by the papillae. Because of the various functions of the oral mucosa in the maintenance of oral health, knowledge of its true size may provide a better understanding of the physiology of the oral cavity and some oral diseases and direct future therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to determine the total size of the oral mucosa. Methods Five human adult cadaver heads were cut in the median sagittal plane, and the total area of the oral surface was determined using silicon casts. The surface of the tongue was measured with quantitative profilometry. Photographs of oral blood vessels were taken in different areas of the oral mucosa of adult test subjects using intravital microscopy, and the pictures were compared with vessel casts of the oral mucosal capillaries of a maccaca fasciculrais monkey, which was studied using a scanning electron microscope. Results The results showed that the dorsal side of the tongue comprises a large proportion of the total oral mucosal surface. The surface area of the epithelium increases moving from anterior to posterior on the tongue, and the number of underlying blood vessels increases proportionally. Conclusions It can be concluded that the back of the tongue plays an important role in the oral resorption of drugs. Clinical relevance: The results may be of relevance for the delivery and development of oral drug application. PMID:23497446

  1. Modulation of Phenol Oxidation in Cofacial Dyads.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon Jun; Huynh, Michael; Halbach, Robert L; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-09-23

    The presentation of two phenols on a xanthene backbone is akin to the tyrosine dyad (Y730 and Y731) of ribonucleotide reductase. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two phenol moieties are cofacially disposed at 4.35 Å. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that phenol oxidation is modulated within the dyad, which exhibits a splitting of one-electron waves with the second oxidation of the phenol dyad occurring at larger positive potential than that of a typical phenol. In contrast, a single phenol appended to a xanthene exhibits a two-electron process, consistent with reported oxidation pathways of phenols in acetonitrile. The perturbation of the phenol potential by stacking is reminiscent of a similar effect for guanines stacked within DNA base pairs.

  2. Lipid encapsulated phenolic compounds by fluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities with applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a phenolic compound present in grain crops and lignocellulose biomass, was encapsulated with saturated triglycerides using a laboratory fluidizer. Stability of t...

  3. 40 CFR 721.7210 - Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. 721.7210 Section 721.7210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.7210 Epoxidized copolymer of phenol and substituted phenol. (a)...

  4. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  5. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  6. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  7. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  8. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  9. Electroanalytical tools for antioxidant evaluation of red fruits dry extracts.

    PubMed

    de Macêdo, Isaac Yves Lopes; Garcia, Luane Ferreira; Oliveira Neto, Jerônimo Raimundo; de Siqueira Leite, Karla Carneiro; Ferreira, Valdir Souza; Ghedini, Paulo César; de Souza Gil, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Red fruits are rich sources of antioxidant compounds with recognized health benefits. Since they are perishable, dried extracts emerge as more durable products and their quality control must include antioxidant capacity assays. In this study, the redox behavior of commercial dried products obtained from camu-camu, açai, acerola and cranberry red fruits was evaluated by electroanalytical approaches. The antioxidant potential was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical assay and the electrochemical index concept. The total phenol content was estimated by using a laccase based biosensor. A significant correlation was found between all methods and literature data. The voltammetric profile (cyclic, differential and square wave) obtained for each type of dried extract showed distinguishable features that were correlated with their main major markers, being also useful for identification purposes. The electrochemical methods were cheaper and more practical for evaluation of antioxidant properties and total phenol content in dried powders obtained from different red fruits.

  10. Phenol-mediated decolorization and removal of disperse dyes by bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Satar, Rukhsana; Husain, Qayyum

    2009-12-14

    Salt-fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins were employed for the decolorization of disperse dyes in the presence of H2O2. The effect of various experimental conditions such as concentration of enzyme, H2O2, phenol, reaction time, pH and temperature on the decolorization of dyes was investigated. Dyes were recalcitrant to the decolorization catalysed by bitter gourd peroxidase. However, these dyes were decolorized significantly in the presence of a redox mediator, phenol. Bitter gourd peroxidase (0.215 U/mL) could decolorize about 60% of Disperse Red 17 in the presence of 0.2 mM phenol, whereas Disperse Brown 1 was decolorized by only 40% even in the presence of 0.4 mM phenol. Maximum decolorization of dyes was achieved in the presence of 0.75 mM H2O2 in a buffer ofpH 3.0 and 40 degrees C within 30 min. The K(m) values obtained were 0.625 mg/(L x h) and 2.5 mg/(L x h) for Disperse Red 17 and Disperse Brown 1, respectively. In all the experiments, Disperse Brown 1 was found to be more recalcitrant to decolorization catalysed by bitter gourd peroxidise, as compared to Disperse Red 17.

  11. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5763 - Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols... Substances § 721.5763 Methylenebisbenzotriazolyl phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... phenols (P-94-1042) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  13. Lignin phenols derivatives in lichens.

    PubMed

    Zavarzina, A G; Romankevich, E A; Peresypkin, V I; Ulyantzev, A S; Belyaev, N A; Zavarzin, A A

    2015-01-01

    Lignin monophenols have been measured in the cupric oxide oxidation products from lichens of different systematic groups. It is shown for the first time that syringyl structures in most lichens strongly dominate over vanillyl and p-hydroxyl ones (S/V 7-583, S/P 3-30). This distinguishes lichens from algae and mosses (p-hydroxyl phenols are dominant) and from higher plants (S/V ratios are from 0 in gymnosperms to 1.1-5.2 in angiosperms). Molecular ratios of phenols as well as the ratios of acids to aldehydes in lichens were different from lignin of higher plants, suggesting contribution of non-lignin phenols in CuO oxidation products. The contents of syringyl and vanillyl phenols in some lichen species were comparable to non-woody tissues of higher plants. Results of the study suggest that lichens can be important source of aromatic structures in soils and hydrosphere, particularly in the regions were lichens are abundant.

  14. The untapped capacity of phenolics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research focuses on understanding the dynamics of plant primary and secondary metabolites. Though plant metabolites, including phenolics, make up only a small portion of the compounds found in a fruit or its final product, they are crucial for their contribution towards appearance (color), taste ...

  15. Deactivation of cellulases by phenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials may result in the release of inhibitors and deactivators of cellulose enzyme hydrolysis. We report the identification of phenols with major inhibition and/or deactivation effect on enzymes used for conversion of cellulose to ethanol. The inhibition effects w...

  16. Red chicory (Cichorium intybus L. cultivar) as a potential source of antioxidant anthocyanins for intestinal health.

    PubMed

    D'evoli, Laura; Morroni, Fabiana; Lombardi-Boccia, Ginevra; Lucarini, Massimo; Hrelia, Patrizia; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Tarozzi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Fruit- and vegetable-derived foods have become a very significant source of nutraceutical phytochemicals. Among vegetables, red chicory (Cichorium Intybus L. cultivar) has gained attention for its content of phenolic compounds, such as the anthocyanins. In this study, we evaluated the nutraceutical effects, in terms of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities, of extracts of the whole leaf or only the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory (a typical Italian red leafy plant) in various intestinal models, such as Caco-2 cells, differentiated in normal intestinal epithelia and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. The results show that the whole leaf of red chicory can represent a good source of phytochemicals in terms of total phenolics and anthocyanins as well as the ability of these phytochemicals to exert antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in differentiated Caco-2 cells and antiproliferative effects in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, compared to red chicory whole leaf extracts, the red part of leaf extracts had a significantly higher content of both total phenolics and anthocyanins. The same extracts effectively corresponded to an increase of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities. Taken together, these findings suggest that the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory with a high content of antioxidant anthocyanins could be interesting for development of new food supplements to improve intestinal health.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  19. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  20. Gastrointestinal mucositis: the role of MMP-tight junction interactions in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity known as mucositis. The pathogenesis of mucositis is ill defined. Recent clinical research guidelines have highlighted epithelial junctional complexes as emerging targets within mucositis research. Given the robust biological evidence linking tight junctions and matrix metalloproteinases, key mediators of mucositis, tight junction proteins have received significant attention. Despite this, the link between tight junctions, matrix metalloproteinases and mucositis development is yet to be established. This critical review therefore aims to describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases in mucositis, and how matrix metalloproteinase-dependent tight junction disruption may contribute to the pathobiology of mucositis.

  1. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  2. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  3. Gene, environment, microbiome and mucosal immune tolerance in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.; Scher, Jose U.

    2016-01-01

    RA is a complex multifactorial chronic disease that transitions through several stages. Multiple studies now support that there is a prolonged phase in early RA development during which there is serum elevation of RA-related autoantibodies including RF and ACPAs in the absence of clinically evident synovitis. This suggests that RA pathogenesis might originate in an extra-articular location, which we hypothesize is a mucosal site. In discussing this hypothesis, we will present herein the current understanding of mucosal immunology, including a discussion about the generation of autoimmune responses at these surfaces. We will also examine how other factors such as genes, microbes and other environmental toxins (including tobacco smoke) could influence the triggering of autoimmunity at mucosal sites and eventually systemic organ disease. We will also propose a research agenda to improve our understanding of the role of mucosal inflammation in the development of RA. PMID:25539828

  4. Alleviating mucositis: are we on track for a novel therapeutic?

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V

    2015-02-01

    Oral and gastrointestinal mucositis has emerged as an important toxicity of cancer therapy. In addition to supportive care measures, agents for the prevention or treatment of mucositis in specific patient populations are described in the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines published by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology. However, there still remains an unmet clinical need for preventive and therapeutic agents in several patient populations. The successful development of such agents will rely on our improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying mucositis. Studies are also underway on novel delivery mechanisms and risk prediction models that can facilitate the selective use of interventions for mucositis in a targeted and cost-effective manner. A large number of agents are at various stages in the clinical development pipeline. Enhanced management of this dose-limiting toxicity will allow the delivery of optimal cancer therapy and improve patient prognosis.

  5. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  6. Soluble and bound phenolic compounds in different Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Montilla, Elyana; Hillebrand, Silke; Antezana, Amalia; Winterhalter, Peter

    2011-07-13

    In nine Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) varieties the content of phenolic compounds as well as the anthocyanin composition has been determined. The phenotypes under investigation included four red and five blue varieties (Kulli, Ayzuma, Paru, Tuimuru, Oke, Huaca Songo, Colorado, Huillcaparu, and Checchi). In purple corn, phenolic compounds were highly concentrated in cell walls. Thus, simultaneous determination of soluble and bound-form phenolics is essential for analysis, extraction, and quantification. The present study reports the determination of soluble and insoluble-bound fraction of phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) in Bolivian purple corn varieties. Enzymatic, thermal, and alkaline hydrolyses were used to obtain the cell wall-linked phenolic compounds. Ferulic acid values ranged from 132.9 to 298.4 mg/100 g, and p-coumaric acid contents varied between 251.8 and 607.5 mg/100 g dry weight (DW), respectively, and were identified as the main nonanthocyanin phenolics. The total content of phenolic compounds ranged from 311.0 to 817.6 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW, and the percentage contribution of bound to total phenolics varied from 62.1 to 86.6%. The total monomeric anthocyanin content ranged from 1.9 to 71.7 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 g DW. Anthocyanin profiles are almost the same among the different samples. Differences are observed only in the relative percentage of each anthocyanin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside and its malonated derivative were detected as major anthocyanins. Several dimalonylated monoglucosides of cyanidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin were present as minor constituents.

  7. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  8. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  9. Mucosal disease series. Number IV. Erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Farthing, P; Bagan, J-V; Scully, C

    2005-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterised by a skin eruption, with or without oral or other mucous membrane lesions. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. EM has been classified into a number of different variants based on the degree of mucosal involvement and the nature and distribution of the skin lesions. EM minor typically affects no more than one mucosa, is the most common form and may be associated with symmetrical target lesions on the extremities. EM major is more severe, typically involving two or more mucous membranes with more variable skin involvement - which is used to distinguish it from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), where there is extensive skin involvement and significant morbidity and a mortality rate of 5-15%. Both EM major and SJS can involve internal organs and typically are associated with systemic symptoms. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may be a severe manifestation of EM, but some experts regard it as a discrete disease. EM can be triggered by a number of factors, but the best documented is preceding infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), the lesions resulting from a cell mediated immune reaction triggered by HSV-DNA. SJS and TEN are usually initiated by drugs, and the tissue damage is mediated by soluble factors including Fas and FasL.

  10. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  11. Berberine Reduces Uremia-Associated Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhu, Cuilin; Kang, Xin; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Shuang; Fan, Shulin; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Berberine treatment resulted in significant decreases in the serum D-lactate level, intestinal permeability, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal mucosal and submucosal edema and inflammation, and the Chiu's scores assessed for intestinal mucosal injury. The intestinal MDA level was reduced and the intestinal SOD activity was increased following berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage induced by uremia, which is most likely due to its anti-oxidative activity. It may be developed as a potential treatment for preserving intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with uremia.

  12. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  13. [New routes of administration: epidermal, transcutaneous mucosal ways of vaccination].

    PubMed

    Denis, François; Alain, Sophie; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2007-04-01

    A successful vaccine triggers the interaction of various cells of the immune system as does a regular immune response. It is thus necessary to introduce the vaccine antigens into an anatomic site where they will contact immune cells. The route of administration is thus critical for the outcome of vaccination. Intramuscular or subcutaneous injections are the most popular. Antigens injected intramuscularly can form persistent precipitates that are dissolved and re-absorbed relatively slowly. If injecting antigens is a quick, easy and reproducible way to vaccination, it requires trained personnel. Alternatives exist, through non-invasive formulations which allow administration by the patient or a third party with no particular expertise. The skin, especially its epidermal layer, is an accessible and competent immune environment and an attractive target for vaccine delivery, through transcutaneous delivery or immunostimulant patches. Mucosal immunization is another strategy: its major rationale is that organisms invade the body via mucosal surfaces. Therefore, local protection at mucosal surface as well as systemic defense is beneficial. Various formulations of mucosal vaccines have been developed, such as the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV), rotavirus vaccines, cold-adapted influenza vaccines or vaccine against typhoid fever. Thus we are entering in an era where mucosal and transcutaneous immunisation will play an important role in disease management. However, it has not been so easy to obtain regulatory approval for mucosal or transcutaneous formulations and needle-based vaccines continue to dominate the market.

  14. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinical examination was conducted using the dental preset tray. The condition of the oral mucosa was determined using the WHO scale for oral mucositis. Results In the first period of antineoplastic therapy the pathological lesions of the oral mucosa of the mucositis type were observed among the examined patients. The lesions had various levels of intensity. Pain was found to be the primary symptom of oral mucositis. In this study the following were observed: local erythema of the oral mucosa in 35%, white pseudomembranous lesions in 18%, erosions in 40% and oral ulcerative lesions in 4% of patients who underwent the antineoplastic therapy. Oral mucositis was observed in 3.17% of children after 6 months of chemotherapy. Conclusion Local treatment of oral mucositis with polyantibiotic-antifungal mixture, supporting antifungal systemic treatment, and improving the overall peripheral blood conditions in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia improve the condition of the oral mucosa. PMID:23788849

  15. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  16. High performance phenolic pultrusion resin

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.P.; Ingram, W.H.; Smith, C.

    1996-11-01

    Today, Phenol-Formaldehyde (PF) resins are the materials of choice for aerospace interior applications, primarily due to low FST (flame, smoke and toxicity). Since 1990, growth of PF resins has been steadily increasing in non-aerospace applications (which include mass transit, construction, marine, mine ducting and offshore oil) due to low FST and reasonable cost. This paper describes one component phenol-formaldehyde resin that was jointly developed with Morrison Molded Fiber Glass for their pultrusion process. Physical properties of the resin with flame/smoke/toxicity, chemical resistance and mechanical performance of the pultruded RP are discussed. Neat resin screening tests to identify high-temperature formulations are explored. Research continues at Georgia-Pacific to investigate the effect of formulation variables on processing and mechanical properties.

  17. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  18. Total phenolics, flavonoids, antioxidant activity, crude fibre and digestibility in non-traditional wheat flakes and muesli.

    PubMed

    Sumczynski, Daniela; Bubelova, Zuzana; Sneyd, Jan; Erb-Weber, Susanne; Mlcek, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    The five different types of muesli composed of non-traditional wheat flakes were prepared and analysed. Dickkopf wheat, red wheat, kamut and spelt were compared with commercial wheat flakes. Wheat flakes and muesli were assessed for basic analyses (dry matter, ash, protein, starch and fat content), total phenolic and flavonoid content, antioxidant activity (ABTS and DPPH assays), crude fibre content and in vitro digestibility. Furthermore, sensory evaluation of muesli involving scale and ranking preference tests was provided. Flakes and muesli made from Dickkopf wheat and red wheat showed the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content and, consequently, the highest antioxidant activity. Moreover, these cereals were high in crude fibre and thus were less digestible. On the other hand, the lowest total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity were determined in commercial flakes and muesli produced from these flakes. The flakes made from non-traditional wheat were sensorially comparable to commercial products.

  19. Adaptation of a phenol-degrading denitrifying bacteria to high concentration of phenol in the medium.

    PubMed

    Son, T T; Błaszczyk, M; Mycielski, R

    1998-01-01

    The growth and uptake of phenol by 8 strains isolated from wastewater sediments in stationary cultures in medium with increasing concentrations of phenol (from 100 to 600 mg/L) under denitrifying conditions were studied. All the strains grew in media containing 250 mg phenol/L and only strains 101/1, 83/2 and 21/1/ in consecutive passages visibly increased both specific growth rate (mu day-1) as well as phenol-degrading activity (mg/L x day). Consecutive passages of the culture in medium containing 400 mg phenol/L resulted in the elimination of 3 out of the 5 strains growing in the medium in the first passage. Only strain 101/1 demonstrated high specific growth rate and phenol-degrading activity in medium containing 600 mg phenol/L. In consecutive passages in medium containing 250, 400 and 600 mg phenol/L the specific growth (mu day-1) and phenol-degrading activity (mg/L x day) of P. aeruginosa 101/1 were 0.38 and 36; 0.12 and 19; 0.09 and 20, respectively.

  20. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-12-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naïve T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity.

  1. Mucosal immunization using recombinant plant-based oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J

    2006-02-01

    The induction of mucosal immunity is very important in conferring protection against pathogens that typically invade via mucosal surfaces. Delivery of a vaccine to a mucosal surface optimizes the induction of mucosal immunity. The apparent linked nature of the mucosal immune system allows delivery to any mucosal surface to potentially induce immunity at others. Oral administration is a very straightforward and inexpensive approach to deliver a vaccine to the mucosal lining of the gut. However, vaccines administered by this route are subject to proteolysis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, dose levels for protein subunit vaccines are likely to be very high and the antigen may need to be protected from proteolysis for oral delivery to be efficacious. Expression of candidate vaccine antigens in edible recombinant plant material offers an inexpensive means to deliver large doses of vaccines in encapsulated forms. Certain plant tissues can also stably store antigens for extensive periods of time at ambient temperatures, obviating the need for a cold-chain during vaccine storage and distribution, and so further limiting costs. Antigens can be expressed from transgenes stably incorporated into a host plant's nuclear or plastid genome, or from engineered plant viruses infected into plant tissues. Molecular approaches can serve to boost expression levels and target the expressed protein for appropriate post-translational modification. There is a wide range of options for processing plant tissues to allow for oral delivery of a palatable product. Alternatively, the expressed antigen can be enriched or purified prior to formulation in a tablet or capsule for oral delivery. Fusions to carrier molecules can stabilize the expressed antigen, aid in antigen enrichment or purification strategies, and facilitate delivery to effector sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Many antigens have been expressed in plants. In a few cases, vaccine candidates have entered into early phase

  2. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  3. Chemistry and health of olive oil phenolics.

    PubMed

    Cicerale, Sara; Conlan, Xavier A; Sinclair, Andrew J; Keast, Russell S J

    2009-03-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially attributed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Most recent interest has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have shown that olive oil phenolics have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, and antimicrobial activity. Presumably, regular dietary consumption of virgin olive oil containing phenolic compounds manifests in health benefits associated with a Mediterranean diet. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the physiological effects of olive oil phenolics. Moreover, a number of factors have the ability to affect phenolic concentrations in virgin olive oil, so it is of great importance to understand these factors in order to preserve the essential health promoting benefits of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of germination on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in sorghum varieties.

    PubMed

    Dicko, Mamoudou H; Gruppen, Harry; Traore, Alfred S; van Berkel, Willem J H; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2005-04-06

    The screening of 50 sorghum varieties showed that, on average, germination did not affect the content in total phenolic compounds but decreased the content of proanthocyanidins, 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, and flavan-4-ols. Independent of germination, there are intervarietal differences in antioxidant activities among sorghum varieties. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were more positively correlated in ungerminated varieties than in germinated ones. Sorghum grains with pigmented testa layer, chestnut color glumes, and red plants had higher contents, larger diversity of phenolic compounds, and higher antioxidant activities than other sorghums. Some red sorghum varieties had higher antioxidant activities (30-80 mumol of Trolox equiv/g) than several sources of natural antioxidants from plant foods. Among varieties used for "to", "dolo", couscous, and porridge preparation, the "dolo"(local beer) varieties had the highest average content and diversity in phenolic compounds as well as the highest antioxidant activities. The biochemical markers determined are useful indicators for the selection of sorghum varieties for food and agronomic properties.

  5. Comparative study of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in different species of cherries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Xinyan; Zhong, Fei; Tian, Rongrong; Zhang, Kaichun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Tianhong

    2011-05-01

    A new spectrometric method ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric with high precision and rapid analysis was developed to separate 17 phenolic compounds. Different species of cherries, including 10 sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars, a tart cherry (P. cerasus L.) rootstock (CAB), and a hybrid rootstock 'Colt' (P. avium × P. pseudocerasus), were analyzed for phenolics contents by this method. The results showed that significant differences were observed among the phenolic compound contents in different cherry species. In 10 sweet cherry cultivars, the contents of neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3O-rutinoside were much higher in red-colored fruits (for example, 64.60 and 44.50 mg/100 g fresh weight in Burlat, respectively) than those in bicolored ones. Principal component analysis revealed that cyanidin-3O-rutinoside was an effective index for grouping the cultivars with similar species and fruit colors. Moreover, there were strong positive correlations between phenolics content and antioxidant activity, which was higher in red-colored cherries.

  6. Removal Of Phenol From Wastewater By Using Low-Cost Catalyst From Metal Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbičková, Blanka; Soldán, Maroš; Belčík, Michal; Balog, Karol

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of AOPs (Advanced oxidation processes) as an emerging technology for removing of pollutants from wastewater is developed. In this paper, UV photodegradation was used for removing of phenol from wastewater. As a source of UV radiation medium pressure mercury lamp with output 400W was used. The influence of low-cost catalysts on this process was also monitored. Wastes from metal production, red mud and black nickel mud, were used as catalysts.

  7. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Goudar, C.T.; Ganji, S.H.; Pujar, B.G.; Strevett, K.A.

    2000-02-01

    Phenol biodegradation was studied in batch experiments using an acclimated inoculum and initial phenol concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.3 g/L. Phenol depletion an associated microbial growth were monitored over time to provide information that was used to estimate the kinetics of phenol biodegradation. Phenol inhibited biodegradation at high concentrations, and a generalized substrate inhibition model based on statistical thermodynamics was used to describe the dynamics of microbial growth in phenol. For experimental data obtained in this study, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form that is analogous to the Andrews equation, and the biokinetic parameters {micro}{sub max}, maximum specific growth; K{sub s}, saturation constant; and K{sub i}, inhibition constant were estimated as 0.251 h{sup {minus}1}, 0.011 g/L, and 0.348 g/L, respectively, using a nonlinear least squares technique. Given the wide variability in substrate inhibition models used to describe phenol biodegradation, an attempt was made to justify selection of particular model based on theoretical considerations. Phenol biodegradation data from nine previously published studies were used in the generalized substrate inhibition model to determine the appropriate form of the substrate inhibition model. In all nine cases, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form analogous to the Andrews equation suggesting the suitability of the Andrews equation to describe phenol biodegradation data.

  8. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  9. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  10. Mucosal mast cells and developmental changes in gastric absorption.

    PubMed

    Catto-Smith, A G; Ripper, J L

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether gastric mucosal mast cells undergo degranulation during normal postnatal development and to correlate this with gastric electrical parameters, paracellular permeability, and macromolecular absorption. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied between 10 and 30 days after birth. Gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation occurred and was maximal on days 15 and 17, measured by histology and gastric and serum levels of rat mast cell protease II. Short-circuit current, transepithelial conductance, and permeability of voltage-clamped glandular stomach were elevated in younger animals, falling with age except for a transient but significant increase in conductance and permeability at 17 days, closely correlated with maximal mast cell degranulation. Macromolecular uptake was significantly increased in animals aged 10-15 days. Concanavalin A and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation increased conductance and permeability in vitro in younger animals. We conclude that 1) gastric mucosal mast cells degranulate during development, 2) the neonatal stomach has increased permeability and uptake of macromolecules, and 3) gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation during development may affect mucosal permeability.

  11. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  12. Awareness assessment in Turkish subpopulation with chronic oral mucosal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Ozlem; Kalkan, Sevda; Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of group Turkish patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases by chronic oral mucosal diseases questionnaires (COMDQ). Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases were participated in the study. A detailed medical history of each patient was taken, and all the COMDQ questions, which were translated from English version, were filled out. The data were analyzed with the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences Statistics 22.0. Results: The mean ages of patients were 48.91 ± 13.36 years. Of the total 80 cases of chronic oral mucosal diseases identified 52 (65%) were female and 28 (35%) male. The standardized mean scores for COMDQ were 1.72 ± 1.11 for “pain and functional limitation,” 1.09 ± 0.94 for “medication and treatment,” 2.31 ± 1.06 for “social and emotional,” and 2.27 ± 0.83 for “patient support,” respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the COMDQ has the profitable psychometric peculiarity and comfortable to patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases in Turkey. PMID:26929697

  13. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Peatman, Eric; Lange, Miles; Zhao, Honggang; Beck, Benjamin H

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catfish depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Our understanding of these barriers, while growing, is still limited relative to that of mammalian model systems. Nevertheless, a combination of molecular and cellular studies in catfish over the last few decades, and particularly within the last few years, has helped to elucidate many of the primary actors and pathways critical to their mucosal health. Here we describe aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses in the primary mucosal tissues (skin, gill, and intestine) of catfish, focusing on mucus-driven responses, pathogen recognition, soluble mediators, and immunoglobulin and T-cell derived immunity. Modulation of mucosal barriers will be critical moving forward for crafting better diets, improving vaccine delivery, enhancing water quality, and ensuring sustainable production practices in catfish. PMID:26716071

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Misty M.; Donald, David V.; Hagemann, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis affects more than three-fourths of patients undergoing chemotherapy and represents a significant burden to patients and caregivers. Lesions develop as a result of chemotherapeutic agents attacking the rapidly dividing cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Severity can range from mild, painless tissue changes to bleeding ulcerations that prevent oral intake and require narcotic pain relievers. Oral mucositis also leads to an increased risk of infection and can often delay further chemotherapy treatment. A number of assessment scales have been developed to better qualify the symptoms associated with this condition. Few pharmacologic agents have been approved to either prevent the development or alleviate the symptoms of oral mucositis. Current options include the use of antimicrobial mouthwashes, amino acid rinses, and topical healing agents. Palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, may be a future option after its use in children is explored. With achievements in other areas of supportive care in patients undergoing chemotherapy, oral mucositis should represent the forefront of new research. This review will provide a comprehensive examination of available options for children who have oral mucositis. PMID:23413048

  15. 40 CFR 721.10237 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. 721.10237 Section 721.10237 Protection of Environment... acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products and phenol, sodium salts (PMN P-09-146; CAS No. 1065544-88-8) is subject to...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10237 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. 721.10237 Section 721.10237 Protection of Environment... acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products and phenol, sodium salts (PMN P-09-146; CAS No. 1065544-88-8) is subject to...

  17. Phenolic Profiles and Contribution of Individual Compounds to Antioxidant Activity of Apple Powders.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Liaudanskas, Mindaugas; Viskelis, Jonas; Pukalskas, Audrius; Janulis, Valdimaras

    2016-05-01

    Apples (Malus domestica L.) are the most common source of phenolic compounds in northern European diet. Besides pectins, dietary fibers, vitamins, and oligosaccharides they contain phenolic compounds of different classes. Apple powders are convenient functional forms retaining significant amounts of phenolic antioxidants. In this study reducing and radical scavenging profiles of freeze-dried powders of "Aldas,ˮ "Auksis,ˮ "Connel Red,ˮ "Ligol,ˮ "Lodel,ˮ and "Rajkaˮ were determined and phenolic constituents were identified using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole and time-of-flight mass spectrometers. A negative ionization mode was applied and seventeen compounds: phenolic acids (coumaroylquinic, chlorogenic), flavonoids (quercetin derivatives), and procyanidin derivatives (B1, B2, and C1) were identified in all tested apple samples. Total values of Trolox equivalents varied from 7.72 ± 0.32 up to 20.02 ± 0.52 and from 11.10 ± 0.57 up to 21.42 ± 0.75 μmol/g of dry weight of apple powder in FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) and ABTS (2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) postcolumn assays, respectively. The greatest Trolox equivalent values were determined for apples of "Aldasˮ cultivar. Chlorogenic acid and procyanidin C1 were the most significant contributors to total reducing and radical scavenging activity in all apple cultivars tested, therefore they could be considered as markers of antioxidant activity.

  18. Further knowledge on the phenolic profile of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Shott.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Gonçalves, Rui F; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Valentão, Patrícia; Silva, Artur M S; Silva, João B; Santos, Delfim; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-07-18

    Colocasia esculenta (L.) Shott, commonly called taro, is an ancient species selected for its edible tuber. Its huge "elephant ear" like leaves are also consumed in sauces and stews or as soups. Forty-one phenolic metabolites (11 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and 30 glycosylated flavonoids) were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)) in the leaves of two C. esculenta varieties cultivated in Azores Islands. To our knowledge, 34 of the 41 phenolic compounds are being reported for the first time in this species. Phenolics quantification was achieved by an HPLC-DAD accurate and sensitive validated method. Although the qualitative profile of the two varieties is quite similar, quantitative differences were observed between them. "Giant white" and "red" varieties (local denomination) contain, respectively, ca. 14 and 21% of phenolic acids, 37 and 28% of flavones mono-C-glycosides, 42 and 43% of flavones di-C-glycosides, 3 and 4% of flavones mono-C-(O-glycosyl)glycosides, and both of them ca. 2% of flavones di-C-(O-glycosyl)glycosides and 2% of flavones-O-glycosides. Luteolin-6-C-hexoside was the compound present in higher amounts in both varieties. The established phenolic profile is an added value for the authenticity and quality control of C. esculenta and may be useful in the discrimination of its varieties.

  19. Phenolics, antioxidant capacity and bioaccessibility of chicory varieties (Cichorium spp.) grown in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sahan, Yasemin; Gurbuz, Ozan; Guldas, Metin; Degirmencioglu, Nurcan; Begenirbas, Aynur

    2017-02-15

    In this study, the changes in phenolics, anthocyanin, antioxidant capacity, and bioaccessibility of chicory varieties (Cichorium spp.) in Turkey were investigated. A total of 19 phenolic standards were screened in the chicory varieties studied and the most abundant compounds in the samples, extracted with methanol, were phenolic acids, syringic (2.54mg/kg) and trans-ferulic acid (1.85mg/kg), whilst (+)-catechin was the major flavanol. The highest flavanol content using either methanol or ethanol was determined in the green chicory samples (0.62mg/kg). The red chicory variety had higher anthocyanin (12.80mg/kg), and contained more phenolics, extractable (8855.50mg GAE/100g) and hydrolysable (7005.51mg GAE/100g), than the other varieties. Also, the antioxidant capacities in this variety, as measured using the CUPRAC assay (570.54 and 425.14μmol Trolox/g dw, respectively), had a wider range of difference than was found in the other assays used. Total phenolics were more bioaccessible from the white chicory variety (61.48%). However, the bioaccessibility of antioxidants was higher in the green chicory variety.

  20. Expression Profile of Human Fc Receptors in Mucosal Tissue: Implications for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Effector Functions Targeting HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Hannah M.; Carias, Ann M.; Evans, Abbey B.; Olejniczak, Natalia J.; Ziprin, Paul; King, Deborah F. L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of new Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 infections are acquired via sexual transmission at mucosal surfaces. Partial efficacy (31.2%) of the Thai RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial has been correlated with Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting the V1V2 region of the HIV-1 envelope. This has led to speculation that ADCC and other antibody-dependent cellular effector functions might provide an important defense against mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, the ability of antibody-dependent cellular effector mechanisms to impact on early mucosal transmission events will depend on a variety of parameters including effector cell type, frequency, the class of Fc-Receptor (FcR) expressed, the number of FcR per cell and the glycoslyation pattern of the induced antibodies. In this study, we characterize and compare the frequency and phenotype of IgG (CD16 [FcγRIII], CD32 [FcγRII] and CD64 [FcγRI]) and IgA (CD89 [FcαR]) receptor expression on effector cells within male and female genital mucosal tissue, colorectal tissue and red blood cell-lysed whole blood. The frequency of FcR expression on CD14+ monocytic cells, myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells were similar across the three mucosal tissue compartments, but significantly lower when compared to the FcR expression profile of effector cells isolated from whole blood, with many cells negative for all FcRs. Of the three tissues tested, penile tissue had the highest percentage of FcR positive effector cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to determine the location of CD14+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cells within the three mucosal tissues. We show that the majority of effector cells across the different mucosal locations reside within the subepithelial lamina propria. The potential implication of the observed FcR expression patterns on the effectiveness of FcR-dependent cellular effector functions to impact on the initial events in

  1. The mucosal immune system: from fundamental concepts to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J; Dertzbaugh, M T; Eldridge, J H; Hirasawa, M; Kiyono, H

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies in experimental animals and humans have shown that the mucosal immune system, which is characterized by secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies as the major humoral defence factor, contains specialized lymphoid tissues where antigens are encountered from the environment, are taken up and induce B- and T-cell responses. This event is followed by an exodus of specific lymphocytes, which home to various effector sites such as the lamina propria regions and glands. These responses are regulated by T cells and cytokines and lead to plasma cell differentiation and subsequent production of S-IgA antibodies in external secretions. This knowledge has led to practical approaches for vaccine construction and delivery into mucosal inductive sites in an effort to elicit host protection at mucosal surfaces where the infection actually occurs.

  2. Immunomodulation by mucosal gene transfer using TGF-beta DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kuklin, N A; Daheshia, M; Chun, S; Rouse, B T

    1998-01-01

    This report evaluates the efficacy of DNA encoding TGF-beta administered mucosally to suppress immunity and modulate the immunoinflammatory response to herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. A single intranasal administration of an eukaryotic expression vector encoding TGF-beta1 led to expression in the lung and lymphoid tissue. T cell-mediated immune responses to HSV infection were suppressed with this effect persisting as measured by the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction for at least 7 wk. Treated animals were more susceptible to systemic infection with HSV. Multiple prophylactic mucosal administrations of TGF-beta DNA also suppressed the severity of ocular lesions caused by HSV infection, although no effects on this immunoinflammatory response were evident after therapeutic treatment with TGF-beta DNA. Our results demonstrate that the direct mucosal gene transfer of immunomodulatory cytokines provides a convenient means of modulating immunity and influencing the expression of inflammatory disorders. PMID:9664086

  3. Potential Benefits of Oral Cryotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wodzinski, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies that causes painful, erythematous lesions to develop in the gastrointestinal tract. These lesions can lead to malnutrition, increased risk for serious infection, prolonged hospital stays, and reduced quality of life. Oral cryotherapy, or the use of ice chips to cool the mucous membranes during bolus chemotherapy infusions (e.g., 5-fluorouracil [Adrucil®] and melphalan [Alkeran®]), is the most readily accessible and cost-effective intervention available. Although many factors may contribute to the development of mucositis during cancer treatment, studies have found a reduction in the incidence and the severity of mucositis with the use of oral cryotherapy.


  4. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A; Camacho, Zenaido T; Hillestad, Matthew L; Crosby, Catherine M; Turner, Mallory A; Guenzel, Adam J; Fadel, Hind J; Mercier, George T; Barry, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination.

  5. XRD analysis and leachability of solidified phenol-cement mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Vipulanandan, C.; Krishnan, S. . Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    The microstructure and leachability of phenol from solidified phenol-Portland cement mixtures cured up to 6 months were investigated. Phenol was solidified with Type I Portland cement at concentrations of 0.5% and 2% by weight of the cement. XRD studies and pore fluid analyses indicate that phenol inhibits cement setting by reacting with the calcium hydroxide produced during the hydration of cement. Phenol leachability was studied using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test recommended by the U. S. EPA. The quantity of phenol leached is dependent on the initial phenol concentration and the curing time and a simple model has been proposed to predict the leachability. Phenol increases the initial and final setting times of cement. The compressive strength of the solidified cement-phenol mixtures decrease with increasing phenol content in the matrix and increase with curing time. The relationship between leaching of phenol and strength of cement-phenol mixtures has been verified.

  6. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  7. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  8. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  9. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  10. Targeting early infection to prevent HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2010-03-11

    Measures to prevent sexual mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are urgently needed to curb the growth of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and ultimately bring it to an end. Studies in animal models and acute HIV-1 infection reviewed here reveal potential viral vulnerabilities at the mucosal portal of entry in the earliest stages of infection that might be most effectively targeted by vaccines and microbicides, thereby preventing acquisition and averting systemic infection, CD4 T-cell depletion and pathologies that otherwise rapidly ensue.

  11. Improved Techniques for Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) in Colorectal Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Sold, Moritz; Kähler, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Endoscopic therapy of colorectal adenomas and early cancers is a standard method. Besides oncological criteria, the method is limited by polyp location, size, and texture. Method Based on the current literature, technical modifications and developments in endoscopic mucosal resection are described. Results Numerous approaches exist to improve the conditions of resection, including optimisation of mucosal elevation and modification of techniques, tools, and devices. Conclusion Endoscopic therapy of sessile and flat colorectal polyps remains a challenge. Some of the presented modifications can help to address this challenge. PMID:26286120

  12. A case of unexpected regeneration of small intestinal mucosal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Youn Joon

    2012-01-01

    If full-thickness mucosa, including the mucosal crypt, has been almost denuded, mucosa cannot regenerate as has been shown by animal models. The authors experienced an unusual mucosal regeneration exceed denuded bowel that occur in midgut volvulus of duration 2 days in a 6-day-old infant. Santulli's jejunostomy was performed using seriously denuded small bowel to prevent short bowel syndrome, despite the risks of leakage or stricture. Subsequently, stomal mucosa was fully regenerated when grossly identified 19 days after the second operation without any surgical complications.

  13. Impact of dose and volume on radiation-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Giovanna; Manfrida, Stefania; Cellini, Francesco; Giammarino, Daniela; Petrone, Adelina; Vitucci, Pasquale; Cellini, Numa

    2005-01-01

    There is a relationship between a given radiation dose and the resulting biological effect in the management of head and neck cancer. Radiation mucositis represents a frequent complication in cancer chemoradiation. Its prevention and treatment are major goals in radiation therapy schedules. Critical tissues can be spared using high conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) based on consensus guidelines for target volume. Current approaches to radiation mucositis with respect to the dose and volume impact are illustrated. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  14. Antioxidant Activity of a Red Lentil Extract and Its Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Amarowicz, Ryszard; Estrella, Isabell; Hernández, Teresa; Dueñas, Montserrat; Troszyńska, Agnieszka; Agnieszka, Kosińska; Pegg, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from red lentil seeds using 80% (v/v) aqueous acetone. The crude extract was applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column. Fraction 1, consisting of sugars and low-molecular-weight phenolics, was eluted from the column by ethanol. Fraction 2, consisting of tannins, was obtained using acetone-water (1:1; v/v) as the mobile phase. Phenolic compounds present in the crude extract and its fractions demonstrated antioxidant and antiradical activities as revealed from studies using a β-carotene-linoleate model system, the total antioxidant activity (TAA) method, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity assay, and a reducing power evaluation. Results of these assays showed the highest values when tannins (fraction 2) were tested. For instance, the TAA of the tannin fraction was 5.85 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, whereas the crude extract and fraction 1 showed 0.68 and 0.33 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, respectively. The content of total phenolics in fraction 2 was the highest (290 mg/g); the tannin content, determined using the vanillin method and expressed as absorbance units at 500 nm per 1 g, was 129. There were 24 compounds identified in the crude extract using an HPLC-ESI-MS method: quercetin diglycoside, catechin, digallate procyanidin, and p-hydroxybenzoic were the dominant phenolics in the extract. PMID:20054484

  15. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  16. Extraction of phenolic compounds from soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the composition and amount of phenolic inputs from plants is important for studies of soil organic matter formation and nutrient cycling. However, some phenolic compounds, including tannins, can sorb or complex with the soil making them difficult to extract. We extracted soils with a...

  17. Food phenolics and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; de las Rivas, Blanca; López de Felipe, Félix; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-06-30

    Phenolic compounds are important constituents of food products of plant origin. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavour, astringency, and colour. In addition, the presence of phenolic compounds on the diet is beneficial to health due to their chemopreventive activities against carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, mainly due to their antioxidant activities. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are autochthonous microbiota of raw vegetables. To get desirable properties on fermented plant-derived food products, LAB has to be adapted to the characteristics of the plant raw materials where phenolic compounds are abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum is the commercial starter most frequently used in the fermentation of food products of plant origin. However, scarce information is still available on the influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and viability of L. plantarum and other LAB species. Moreover, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis or degradation of phenolic compounds in LAB have not been completely described. Results obtained in L. plantarum showed that L. plantarum was able to degrade some food phenolic compounds giving compounds influencing food aroma as well as compounds presenting increased antioxidant activity. Recently, several L. plantarum proteins involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds have been genetically and biochemically characterized. The aim of this review is to give a complete and updated overview of the current knowledge among LAB and food phenolics interaction, which could facilitate the possible application of selected bacteria or their enzymes in the elaboration of food products with improved characteristics.

  18. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified ...

  19. Gastric invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and induction of protective mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, D F; Farrar, P L; Kratz-Owens, K; Shaffer, D

    1996-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite transmitted from a reduviid insect vector to humans by exposure of mucosal surfaces to infected insect excreta. We have used an oral challenge murine model that mimics vector-borne transmission to study T. cruzi mucosal infection. Although gastric secretions have microbicidal activity against most infectious pathogens, we demonstrate that T. cruzi can invade and replicate in the gastric mucosal epithelium. In addition, gastric mucosal invasion appears to be the unique portal of entry for systemic T. cruzi infection after oral challenge. The mucosal immune responses stimulated by T. cruzi gastric infection are protective against a secondary mucosal parasite challenge. This protective mucosal immunity is associated with increased numbers of lymphocytes that secrete parasite-specific immunoglobulin A. Our results document the first example of systemic microbial invasion through gastric mucosa and suggest the feasibility of a mucosal vaccine designed to prevent infection with this important human pathogen. PMID:8751932

  20. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming a cell called a proerythroblast, it will develop into a new red blood cell. The formation of a red ...

  1. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Phenol-Triethylsilane Dihydrogen-Bonded Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Haruki; Kawasaki, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Dihydrogen bond is a hydrogen bond between oppositely charged two hydrogen atoms, X-H\\cdotsH-Y, where X = O, N and Y = B, metal atoms, for example. In 2005, Ishikawa and coworkers reported the observation of the dihydrogen-bond system involving Si-H group as the proton acceptor. They carried out infrared (IR) spectroscopy of phenol(PhOH)-Diethylmethylsilane(DEMS) clusters. All of the three isomers of PhOH-DEMS 1:1 clusters observed exhibit a small red-shift of ˜{ν}_{ OH} of the PhOH moiety in the cluster compared with that of bare PhOH. The largest shift is -29 cm^{-1}. The small red-shift is considered to be the result of the competition between the O-H\\cdotsH-Si dihydrogen-bond and the dispersion interaction of alkyl group of DEMS with phenyl ring. It means that the strength of the O-H\\cdotsH-Si dihydrogen-bond is comparable to the dispersion force. In the present study, we have performed fluorescence excitation (FE) and IR spectroscopies of phenol-triethylsilane(TES) to widen the knowledge of the dihydrogen bond. Similar to the case of PhOH-DEMS system, the electronic origin bands of three PhOH-TES isomers appear in the vicinity of that of PhOH monomer in the FE spectrum. In the present study, we have found an origin band of another PhOH-TES isomer showing a red-shift of -120 cm^{-1}. The shift of ˜{ν}_{ OH} of this cluster is found to be -78 cm^{-1}. This value is much larger than those of the other PhOH-TES 1:1 clusters. It is expected that the spatial overlap of between the TES and the phenyl ring in this cluster is small so that the contribution of the O-H\\cdotsH-Si dihydrogen-bond becomes larger than the other isomers. We have performed density-functional-theory (DFT) calculation of the PhOH-TES clusters using M05-2X functional. The result of the DFT calculation supported the cluster structure and the large red-shift of ˜{ν}_{ OH} of the newly found isomer of PhOH-TES. H. Ishikawa, A. Saito, M. Sugiyama, N. Mikami, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 224309 (2005).

  3. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 5. Recovery of Benzene/Benzene Plus Phenol From the Great Plains Gasification Plant Crude Phenol Stream

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    GPGP Crude Phenol Results - Benzene and Phenol Yields ...... 21 5 GPGP Crude Phenol Results - Cresol, Xylenol and Ethylphenol 22 6 GPGP Crude Phenol...Results - Toluene, Xylene and Ethylbenzene 23 7 GPGP Crude Phenol Results - CI-C 3 Gas Yields ............... 24 8 GPGP Crude Phenol Results - CO, CO2...and Total Gas Yields ... 25 9 GPGP Crude Phenol Results - Hydrogen Consumption ........... 26 10 GPGP Cut Phenol Results - Benzene and Phenol Yields

  4. Lipid microparticles for mucosal immunization against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Surbhi; Mishra, Dinesh; Asthana, Abhay; Jain, Renu; Singh, Surinder; Jain, N K

    2006-01-09

    Parenteral administration of vaccines often does not lead to optimal or long lasting protection against disease causing organisms particularly those that are inhaled, ingested or sexually transmitted. For optimal mucosal protection induction of immune response via mucosal routes is therefore highly desirable. Double emulsion-solvent evaporation (w/o/w) method best suited for water-soluble bioactives was selected for the preparation of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) loaded lipid microparticles. Intranasal route was considered for mucosal administration and hence to prepare the delivery system biocompatible and least irritable, soyalecithin (phospholipid) was taken instead of polymer because phosphatidylcholine is the major component of endogenous lung surfactant. The studies performed in present work included antigen characterization, development of lipid microparticles, stability studies of the prepared lipid microparticle formulations, percent mucoadhesion, ex vivo cellular uptake studies and in vivo studies. The general order obtained from in vivo studies for mucosal immune response (IgA) followed the sequence: LMST-HBsAg (IN)>LM-HBsAg (IN)>alum-HBsAg (IN)>LMST-HBsAg (IM)>alum-HBsAg (IM)>or=LM-HBsAg (IM)>plain HBsAg (IN)>plain HBsAg (IM).

  5. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma).

  6. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  7. Management and treatment of mucosal melanoma of the genital tract.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Sabina; Barisani, Alessia; Dika, Emi; Fanti, Pier A; DE Iaco, Pierandrea; Gurioli, Carlotta; Tosti, Giulio

    2017-01-24

    Melanoma of the genital mucosa is a rare melanocytic neoplasm that affects both sexes. The diagnosis is often delayed; a useful diagnostic tool may be represented by videodermatoscopy, The treatment is complex and multidisciplinary. We report the main diagnostic features and therapeutic approaches for mucosal melanoma of the genital tract.

  8. Enhancing the buccal mucosal uptake and retention of triamcinolone acetonide.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzo, Joseph A; Reed, Barry L; Finnin, Barrie C

    2005-07-20

    In this study, the buccal mucosal uptake and retention of triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) were assessed in the presence of the skin penetration enhancer, Azone (AZ). Porcine buccal mucosa was excised, mounted in modified Ussing chambers, and pretreated with ethanolic solutions of AZ. After 2 h, the rate of TAC disappearance from the donor chamber and TAC appearance in the receptor chamber was monitored, and the mucosal retention of TAC was determined at the completion of the experiment. The permeability and mucosal uptake of TAC was also determined using the TAC-containing proprietary product, Kenalog in Orabase (KO), in the presence and absence of AZ. Pretreatment of the buccal mucosa with AZ increased the TAC disappearance permeability coefficient from 4.78+/-0.31x10(-5) cm/s to 7.12+/-0.53x10(-5) cm/s. While the TAC appearance permeability coefficient was also enhanced 3.8-fold, a 4.4-fold increase in the tissue concentration of TAC was observed. Incorporation of AZ into KO did not result in an enhanced tissue concentration of TAC, however, when the tissue was pretreated with AZ, significantly higher amounts of TAC accumulated in the tissue. Pretreatment of the buccal mucosa with AZ results in increased tissue concentrations of TAC, which may be of clinical benefit in the treatment of oral mucosal inflammatory conditions.

  9. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, mucosal immunity—i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism’s various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes—has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders. PMID:27803185

  10. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  11. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  12. Individual mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits digest various starch structures differently

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch digestion in the human body requires two luminal enzymes,salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities related to the maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) complexes. Starch consists of two polysaccharides, amylose (AM) and ...

  13. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  14. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  15. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Katja; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2016-11-01

    Historically, mucosal immunity-i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism's various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes-has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders.

  16. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6  J/cm(2) during 6  s/point, 0.24  J/point, for a total dose of 1.44  J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  17. Why Chitosan? From properties to perspective of mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Vimal, Archana; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-10-01

    Non-parenteral drug delivery routes primarily remove the local pain at the injection site. The drugs administered through the oral route encounter the process of hepatic first pass metabolism. Among the alternative delivery routes, mucosal route is being investigated as the most preferred route. Different mucosal routes include the gastrointestinal tract (oral), vagina, buccal cavity and nasal cavity. Novel formulations are being developed using natural and synthetic polymers that could increase the residence time of the drug at mucosal surface in order to facilitate permeation and reduce (or bypass) the first pass metabolism. For recombinant drugs, the formulations are accompanied by enzyme inhibitors and penetration enhancers. Buccal cavity (buccal and sublingual mucosa) has smaller surface area than the gastrointestinal tract but the drugs can easily escape the first pass metabolism. Chitosan is the most applied natural polymer while synthetic polymers include Carbopol and Eudragit. Chitosan has inherent properties of mucoadhesion and penetration enhancement apart from biodegradability and efflux pump inhibition. This review hoards the important research purview of chitosan as a compatible drug carrier macromolecule for mucosal delivery on single platform.

  18. Phenol removal efficiencies of sewage treatment processes and ecological risks associated with phenols in effluents.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjue; Wang, Donghong; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-05-30

    Phenols pose a risk to the environment and to human health. Phenols found in rivers mainly originate from sewage treatment plants (STPs). In this paper, analytical procedures, based on deconvolution technology and retention time locking technology, were investigated to simultaneously identify and determine the concentrations of fifty different phenols in sewage water and effluents. Seventeen different phenols were found in sewage and five - including two regulated phenols (phenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) and three un-regulated phenols (2-chlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichloro-3-ethyl-6-nitrophenol) - were identified in effluents of five STPs. A number of processes undertaken in five STPs were also investigated. These processes can be used to remove phenols at efficiency levels of between 88.95% and 99.97%. Among the processes tested, a combination of anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O), continuous microfiltration (CMF), ozone oxidation (O(3)), and chlorination, appeared to be the best option for the removal of key phenols. Among the five phenols identified in effluents, 2,5-dichlorophenol (1.89 μg/L) and 2,4-dichloro-3-ethyl-6-nitrophenol (22.6 μg/L) pose the greatest ecological risk to receiving waters.

  19. Developments in the production of mucosal antibodies in plants.

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Smales, C Mark; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Schiermeyer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mucosal antibodies represent attractive target molecules for the development of next generation biopharmaceuticals for passive immunization against various infectious diseases and treatment of patients suffering from mucosal antibody deficiencies. As these polymeric antibodies require complex post-translational modifications and correct subunit assembly, they are considered as difficult-to-produce recombinant proteins. Beside the traditional, mammalian-based production platforms, plants are emerging as alternative expression hosts for this type of complex macromolecule. Plant cells are able to produce high-quality mucosal antibodies as shown by the successful expression of the secretory immunoglobulins A (IgA) and M (IgM) in various antibody formats in different plant species including tobacco and its close relative Nicotiana benthamiana, maize, tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. Importantly for biotherapeutic application, transgenic plants are capable of synthesizing functional IgA and IgM molecules with biological activity and safety profiles comparable with their native mammalian counterparts. This article reviews the structure and function of mucosal IgA and IgM antibodies and summarizes the current knowledge of their production and processing in plant host systems. Specific emphasis is given to consideration of intracellular transport processes as these affect assembly of the mature immunoglobulins, their secretion rates, proteolysis/degradation and glycosylation patterns. Furthermore, this review provides an outline of glycoengineering efforts that have been undertaken so far to produce antibodies with homogenous human-like glycan decoration. We believe that the continued development of our understanding of the plant cellular machinery related to the heterologous expression of immunoglobulins will further improve the production levels, quality and control of post-translational modifications that are 'human-like' from plant systems and enhance the

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of phenol using graphite anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Y.M.; Abuzaid, N.S.

    1999-02-01

    The effects of current and pH on the electrochemical oxidation of phenol on graphite electrodes is investigated in this study. There was no sign of deterioration of the graphite bed after 5 months of operation. Phenol removal efficiency was a function of the current applied and was around 70% at a current of 2.2 A. The increase of phenol removal efficiency with current is attributed to the increase of ionic transport which increases the rate of electrode reactions responsible for the removal process. The percentage of complete oxidation of phenol increases with current, with a maximum value of about 50%. However, at pH 0.2 it is slightly higher than that at pH 0.5 at all currents. The phenol removal rate increases with increases of current and pH. While the current (CO{sub 2}) efficiency reaches a maximum value in the current range of 1.0--1.2 A, it increases with an increase of acid concentration. The findings of this study have important implications: while anodic oxidation of phenol on graphite can achieve acceptable removal of phenol, the extent of oxidation should not be overlooked.

  1. Phenolic acids in berries, fruits, and beverages.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Pirjo; Hellström, Jarkko; Törrönen, Riitta

    2006-09-20

    The contents of soluble and total phenolic acids were analyzed in samples of 29 berries and berry products, 24 fruits and fruit peels, and 12 beverages. Variation of phenolic acids in berries was also studied. Soluble phenolic acids were extracted with methanolic acetic acid, and a tentative quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total phenolic acid content was determined by HPLC after alkaline and acid hydrolyses. The content of total phenolic acids as aglycones in the above samples varied from 0 (pear cider) to 103 mg/100 g fresh weight (rowanberry). Besides rowanberry, the best phenolic acid sources among berries were chokeberry (96 mg/100 g), blueberry (85 mg/100 g), sweet rowanberry (75 mg/100 g), and saskatoon berry (59 mg/100 g). Among fruits, the highest contents (28 mg/100 g) were determined in dark plum, cherry, and one apple variety (Valkea Kuulas). Coffee (97 mg/100 g) as well as green and black teas (30-36 mg/100 g) were the best sources among beverages. Caffeic acid dominated in all of these samples except in tea brews. Variation in the phenolic acid contents of the berries was either small or moderate.

  2. Chemical oxidation of biologically treated phenolic effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, S.; Kallas, J.; Munter, R.; Trapido, M.

    1995-12-01

    Experimental research into the oxidative purification of biologically treated phenolic effluents of the Estonian oil shale chemical industry was undertaken. The main phenolic compounds identified in this wastewater were phenol, cresols, resorcinol and 5-methylresorcinols. For chemical oxidation of phenols different advanced oxidation methods (O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV, O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}/UV, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV, O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) were tested. For tracking of the changes in the concentration of different phenols during the treatment process, HPLC and colorimetry were applied. It was shown that, in principle, phenols can be reduced almost by any oxidation method studied. Oxidation with molecular ozone has the most potential for practical application. Methods not including ozone (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) had, in general, lower efficiency for total phenols reduction than the methods combining ozone.

  3. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic C-H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the

  4. Toxicity of phenolic compounds to sediment bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dean-Ross, D.; Rahimi, M.

    1995-08-01

    Biodegradation of organic compounds plays an important role in remediation of polluted environments. Several factors influence the rate and extent of biodegradation: number of degrading organisms, adequate supply of nutrients, adequate availability of a suitable electron acceptor. One important factor is the toxicity of the organic chemical itself. Very often chemicals may be susceptible to biodegradation at low concentrations, yet may be toxic to the degrading population at higher concentrations, thus inhibiting their own biodegradation. Phenolic compounds are known to exhibit toxicity to bacteria. Under batch conditions, a strain of Pseudomonas could degrade 0.1% phenol in approximately 48 hr, while taking over 130 hr to degrade 0.15% phenol. A concentration of 0.2% phenol was inhibitory to the cells, killing 50% of the inoculum within 10 d. Activated sludge bacteria maintained in pulse fed batch reactors were inhibited by concentrations of phenol in excess of 50 mg/L. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by Alcaligenes sp. A 7-2 showed a similar concentration effect, being inhibited at concentrations above 160 mg/L in fed-batch culture. The present report is part of an investigation on the biodegradation of phenol in contaminated soils and sediments in northwestern Indiana. Phenol has been found in groundwater aquifers which drain into the Grand Calumet watershed, and in groundwater contaminated by a Superfund site. Data on phenol toxicity were needed in order to assess the potential for in situ biodegradation of phenol and related compounds in sediments of the Grand Calumet River. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  5. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  6. Bioactive potential of Vitis labrusca L. grape juices from the Southern Region of Brazil: phenolic and elemental composition and effect on lipid peroxidation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; Alves, Tatiana de Lima; de Gois, Jefferson Santos; Borges, Daniel L G; Cunha, Heloisa Pamplona; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2015-04-15

    Grapes are rich in polyphenols with biologically active properties. Although the bioactive potential of grape constituents are frequently reported, the effects of Brazilian Vitis labrusca L. grape juices ingestion have not been demonstrated in humans. This study identified the phenolic and elemental composition of red and white grape juices and the effect of organic and conventional red grape juice consumption on lipid peroxidation in healthy individuals. Concentrations of anthocyanins, flavanols and phenolic acids and the in vitro antioxidant activity were significantly higher in the organic juice. The macro-elements K, Ca, Na and Mg were the most abundant minerals in all juices. The acute consumption of red grape juices promoted significant decrease of lipid peroxides in serum and TBARS levels in plasma. It is concluded that red V. labrusca L. grape juices produced in Southern Brazil showed lipid peroxidation inhibition abilities in healthy subjects, regardless of the cultivation system.

  7. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  8. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  9. Molecular identification of Sarcocystis rileyi sporocysts in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Prakas, Petras; Liaugaudaitė, Simona; Kutkienė, Liuda; Sruoga, Aniolas; Švažas, Saulius

    2015-05-01

    Despite the fact that Sarcocystis rileyi is one of the earliest described species of the genus Sarcocystis forming macrocysts in ducks, the life cycle of this species is still unknown in Europe. Sarcocystis spp. oocysts/sporocysts were observed in faeces of four of 23 (17.4 %) and in small intestine mucosal scrapings of four of 20 (20.0 %) red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and in small intestine mucosal scrapings of seven of 13 (53.8 %) raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) hunted in Lithuania. A very small number of Sarcocystis sporocysts measuring 11.9 × 8.3 μm (n = 5) was found in faecal samples, whereas considerably more sporulated Sarcocystis oocysts and free sporocysts were detected in the small intestines of red foxes and raccoon dogs. These sporocysts measured 12.9 × 8.1 μm (n = 16) and 12.1 × 8.1 μm (n = 54) in red foxes and raccoon dogs, respectively. Using species-specific PCR and subsequent sequencing, internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region partial sequences of oocysts/sporocysts from small intestine mucosal scrapings of six raccoon dogs and three red foxes were identified as belonging to S. rileyi. The present study provides strong evidence showing that the red fox and the raccoon dog can serve as final hosts of S. rileyi in Europe; however, transmission experiments are needed for the ultimate approval.

  10. Differential metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by two Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains grown in red wines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids) and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric acids, respectively) are found in red wines in varying concentrations depending on cultivars and other factors. While some Brettanomyces form volatile phenols...

  11. The French Paradox: Determining the Superoxide-Scavenging Capacity of Red Wine and Other Beverages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Barry A.; Hammond, Matthew P.; Stormo, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds such as those found in red wine, tea, and certain fruit juices may protect against cardiovascular disease by detoxifying (scavenging) superoxide and other unstable reactive oxygen species. We present a laboratory exercise that can be used to assess the superoxide-scavenging capacity of beverages. Among the…

  12. Garnacha Tintorera-based sweet wines: chromatic properties and global phenolic composition by means of UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-González, M; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2013-09-01

    Valdeorras (the N.W. corner of Spain) wants to promote the production and marketing of new sweet wines. The present work represents the first study on sweet wines manufactured with red grapes Vitis vinifera L. Garnacha Tintorera, a teinturier cultivar. Two different red sweet wines were elaborated: the first one was made with dried grapes; Vitis vinifera L. Garnacha Tintorera has excellent potential to produce wines from raisined grapes; the second one, a fortified sweet wine aged in oak barrels. Different red Garnacha Tintorera-based wines (a dry base wine, GBW; a naturally sweet wine, GNSW; and a fortified sweet wine, GFSW) were characterized. Chromatic characteristics and phenolic compounds were established by spectrophotometric methods in order to assess the technology of Garnacha Tintorera-based sweet wines. High molecular weight brown polymers, produced during the grape drying process and isolated from sweet wines by the dialysis process, were responsible for the brown colour of sweet wines. As a consequence, yellowness of sweet wines was also higher which was confirmed by colorimetric indexes. With respect to phenolic content, GFSW presented the lowest content because the maceration-alcoholic fermentation was stopped through the addition of alcohol before the diffusion of red pigments from skins to must was complete. GNSW presented the highest phenolic content due to the concentration effect resulting from evaporation of water from the grapes. Anthocyanins of sweet wines were polymerised in great extent. The percentage of polymerised tannins was sufficient to guarantee the aging process of sweet wines.

  13. Assessment of antioxidant capacities and phenolic contents of nigerian cultivars of onions (Allium cepa L) and garlic (Allium sativum L).

    PubMed

    Onyeoziri, Ukoha Pius; Romanus, Ekere Nwachukwu; Onyekachukwu, Uzodinma Irene

    2016-07-01

    This report assessed and compared the antioxidant potentials, quantities of ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds in methanolic extract of varieties of onions and garlic cultivars in Nigeria. The pH and total acidity of the extracts were equally determined. Antioxidancy of the cultivars were analysed using the in vitro assay techniques with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl Hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and ferric reducing capacity. Ascorbic acid phenolic content were determined by volumetric and Folin-Ciocalteu's method respectively. The pH and total acidity were respectively 5.65 and 0.150mmol/L (red onion), 5.69 and 0.123mmol/L (white onion) and 6.94 and 0.105mmol/L (garlic). Red onion had the highest value of total phenols, ascorbic acid and free radical scavenging activity of 14.25±0.35mg GAE/ml, 229.098mg/100g, 66.44% respectively. In DPPH assay, red and white onion showed higher tendency to inhibit auto-oxidation when compared to garlic. The ferric reducing ability was greatest in garlic and least in white onions. These data indicate that with respect to antioxidant activity, red onion variety has highest health promoting potential among others.

  14. Novel Phr1 mutations and the evolution of phenol reaction variation in US weedy rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Gross, Briana L; Skare, Karl J; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2009-12-01

    *Red rice, a major agricultural weed, is phenotypically diverse and possesses traits that are similar to both wild and cultivated rice. The genetic resources available for rice make it possible to examine the molecular basis and evolution of traits characterizing this weed. Here, we assess the phenol reaction - a classical trait for distinguishing among cultivated rice varieties - in red rice at the phenotypic and molecular levels. *We phenotyped more than 100 US weed samples for the phenol reaction and sequenced the underlying Phr1 locus in a subset of samples. Data were analyzed in combination with previously published Phr1 data for cultivated rice. *Most weed accessions (96.3%) are positive for the phenol reaction, and samples with a negative response carry loss-of-function alleles that are rare or heretofore undocumented. One such allele may have evolved through mutational convergence of a 1-bp frameshift insertion. Haplotype sharing between red rice and US cultivars suggests occasional crop-weed hybridization. *Our discovery of previously undocumented nonfunctional phr1 alleles suggests that there are likely to be other loss-of-function mutations segregating in Oryza sativa around the world. Red rice may provide a useful study system for understanding the adaptive significance of Phr1 variation in agricultural settings.

  15. Phenolic acids, anthocyanins, and antioxidant capacity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grains at four stages of development after flowering.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yafang; Xu, Feifei; Sun, Xiao; Bao, Jinsong; Beta, Trust

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated differences in total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant capacity, and phenolic acids in free, conjugated and bound fractions of white (unpolished), red and black rice at 1-, 2-, and 3-weeks of grain development after flowering and at maturity. Unlike the TPC (mg/100g) of white rice (14.6-33.4) and red rice (66.8-422.2) which was significantly higher at 1-week than at later stages, the TPC of black rice (56.5-82.0) was highest at maturity. The antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH radical scavenging and ORAC methods generally followed a similar trend as TPC. Only black rice had detectable anthocyanins (26.5-174.7mg/100g). Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) and peonidin-3-glucoside (P3G) were the main anthocyanins in black rice showing significantly higher levels at 2- and 3-weeks than at 1-week development and at maturity. At all stages, the phenolic acids existed mainly in the bound form as detected by HPLC and confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Black rice (20.1-31.7mg/100g) had higher total bound phenolic acids than white rice and red rice (7.0-11.8mg/100g). Protocatechuic acid was detected in red rice and black rice with relatively high levels at 1-week development (1.41mg/100g) and at maturity (4.48mg/100g), respectively. Vanillic acid (2.4-5.4mg/100g) was detected only in black rice where it peaked at maturity. p-Coumaric acid (<3.5mg/100g) did not differ significantly at most stages with somewhat high levels at 1-week for red and black rice. Ferulic acid (4.0-17.9mg/100g), the most abundant bound phenolic acid, had an inconsistent trend with higher levels being observed in black rice where it peaked at maturity. Isoferulic acid levels (0.8-1.6mg/100g) were generally low with slightly elevated values being observed at maturity. Overall black rice had higher total bound phenolic acids than white and red rice while white rice at all stages of development after flowering.

  16. Immunogold Labelling to Localize Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) During Wilting of Red Clover Leaf Tissue and the Effect of Removing Cellular Matrices on PPO Protection of Glycerol-Based Lipid in the Rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants. PPO catalyses the conversion of phenols to quinones which can react with nucleophilic cellular constituents (e.g. proteins), forming protein-phenol complexes that may reduce protei...

  17. Humoral immune responses among mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis patients caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Valli, L C; Passos, V M; Dietze, R; Callahan, H L; Berman, J D; Grogl, M

    1999-12-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis is arguably the most morbid sequelae of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The importance of early diagnosis for effective therapy, coupled with the difficulty of diagnosing the disease parasitologically, prompted this investigation of humoral immune markers of mucosal disease. Promastigote soluble antigens of Leishmania braziliensis, isolated from cutaneous and mucosal lesions, were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; antigens were identified by immunoblotting with parasite-specific IgG antibody-positive sera of patients with mucosal disease (n = 18) and cutaneous disease (n = 23). For antigens of the cutaneous parasite WR 2095, mucosal sera generally reacted intensely to antigens of 75, 66, and 45 kDa and weakly to 48-50-kDa antigens, whereas cutaneous sera generally detected weakly the first 3 antigens and intensely the latter doublet. The data suggest that the transition from the cutaneous antigenic profile to a mucosal antigenic profile could be used to predict mucosal disease in approximately half of mucosal patients. An additional finding was that antibodies present in the sera of patients with mucosal disease labeled a 66-kDa peptide of normal human lip mucosa more intensely than did cutaneous sera. Autoimmune processes stimulated by the reaction of IgG, originally directed against the 66-kDa of L. braziliensis, to the 66-kDa antigen of mucosal tissue may contribute to the clinical presentation of mucosal leishmaniasis.

  18. Identification of (poly)phenol treatments that modulate the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher T; Richardson, Siân; McArdle, Francis; Lotito, Silvina B; Crozier, Alan; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-05-28

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV), which contain (poly)phenols, protect against age-related inflammation and chronic diseases. T-lymphocytes contribute to systemic cytokine production and are modulated by FV intake. Little is known about the relative potency of different (poly)phenols in modulating cytokine release by lymphocytes. We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Test compounds were incubated with Jurkat cells for 48 h at 1 and 30 µm, with or without phorbol ester treatment at 24 h to induce cytokine release. Three test compounds that reduced cytokine release were further incubated with primary lymphocytes at 0·2 and 1 µm for 24 h, with lipopolysaccharide added at 5 h. Cytokine release was measured, and generation of H2O2 by test compounds was determined to assess any potential correlations with cytokine release. A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release. Resveratrol, isorhamnetin, curcumin, vanillic acid and specific (poly)phenol mixtures reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from T-lymphocytes, and there was evidence for interaction between (poly)phenols to further modulate cytokine release. The release of interferon-γ induced protein 10 by primary lymphocytes was significantly reduced following treatment with 1 µm isorhamnetin (P<0·05). These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

  19. Regional gastric mucosal blood flow measurements by hydrogen gas clearance in the anesthetized rat and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Leung, F W; Guth, P H; Scremin, O U; Golanska, E M; Kauffman, G L

    1984-07-01

    Hydrogen gas clearance using 3% hydrogen in air and platinum contact electrodes was employed for measuring antral and corpus mucosal blood flow in anesthetized animals. Significantly greater antral than corpus mucosal blood flow was consistently demonstrated. Corpus but not antral mucosal blood flow showed a significant dose-related increase with intravenous pentagastrin. Vasopressin induced a significant dose-related decrease in both antral and corpus mucosal blood flow. Simultaneous measurement of basal corpus mucosal blood flow by hydrogen gas clearance and of gastric mucosal blood flow by aminopyrine clearance gave similar values, but the changes with intravenous pentagastrin or vasopressin measured by aminopyrine clearance were of a much higher order of magnitude. Hydrogen gas clearance, however, reflected changes in left gastric artery blood flow much more closely than did aminopyrine clearance. Therefore, we conclude that the hydrogen gas clearance technique as described is valid for measuring regional gastric mucosal blood flow. It is safe and has potential application in human studies.

  20. Dark Agouti rat model of chemotherapy-induced mucositis: establishment and current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bateman, Emma; Mayo, Bronwen; Vanlancker, Eline; Stringer, Andrea; Thorpe, Daniel; Keefe, Dorothy

    2015-06-01

    Mucositis is a major oncological problem. The entire gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract and also other mucosal surfaces can be affected in recipients of radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy. Major progress has been made in recent years in understanding the mechanisms of oral and small intestinal mucositis, which appears to be more prominent than colonic damage. This progress is largely due to the development of representative laboratory animal models of mucositis. This review focuses on the development and establishment of the Dark Agouti rat mammary adenocarcinoma model by the Mucositis Research Group of the University of Adelaide over the past 20 years to characterize the mechanisms underlying methotrexate-, 5-fluorouracil-, and irinotecan-induced mucositis. It also aims to summarize the results from studies using different animal model systems to identify new molecular and cellular markers of mucositis.

  1. Dark Agouti rat model of chemotherapy-induced mucositis: Establishment and current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bateman, Emma; Mayo, Bronwen; Vanlancker, Eline; Thorpe, Daniel; Keefe, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Mucositis is a major oncological problem. The entire gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract and also other mucosal surfaces can be affected in recipients of radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy. Major progress has been made in recent years in understanding the mechanisms of oral and small intestinal mucositis, which appears to be more prominent than colonic damage. This progress is largely due to the development of representative laboratory animal models of mucositis. This review focuses on the development and establishment of the Dark Agouti rat mammary adenocarcinoma model by the Mucositis Research Group of the University of Adelaide over the past 20 years to characterize the mechanisms underlying methotrexate-, 5-fluorouracil-, and irinotecan-induced mucositis. It also aims to summarize the results from studies using different animal model systems to identify new molecular and cellular markers of mucositis. PMID:25966981

  2. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2015-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  3. Evaluation of the phenolic content in the aerial parts of different varieties of Cichorium intybus L.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Marzia; Gallori, Sandra; Giaccherini, Catia; Ieri, Francesca; Vincieri, Franco F; Mulinacci, Nadia

    2005-08-10

    Fresh aerial parts of different chicory varieties: green chicory (c.v. "Catalogna"), two red chicory varieties ("radicchio rosso di Chioggia" and "radicchio rosso di Treviso"), and Witloof or Belgian endive were analyzed by HPLC/DAD/MS. The chromatographic fingerprint was diagnostic for each variety. A monocaffeoyl tartaric acid, chlorogenic acid, and chicoric acid were detected in all the varieties, while cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, delphinidin 3-O-(6'' malonyl) glucoside, and cyanidin 3-O-(6'' malonyl) glucoside were the main phenolic compounds in the red varieties. The flavonoidic compounds, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide and luteolin 7-O-glucuronide, were absent in the Witloof sample. The phenolic compounds from total leaves were the same as those obtained from only the colored parts; nevertheless, the total amount was remarkably lower with a decrease of up to 80% for Belgian endive. Chemical stability at high temperature was observed for the phenolic fraction from the green variety after decoction at 100 degrees C for 30 min.

  4. Evolution of colour and phenolic compounds during Garnacha Tintorera grape raisining.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-González, M; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2013-12-01

    The off-vine drying is one of the most important steps in the production of a high quality naturally sweet wine. However, only few studies have analyzed the changes in colour and phenolic compounds of the grapes throughout the process. In this work, UV/Vis spectrophotometry and HPLC/DAD-ESI/MS were applied to determine, respectively, the evolution of colour and phenolic compounds in the red grapes of Garnacha Tintorera during the raisining process. The total water loss in 83 days was about 62% and the sugar concentration rose from 225 to 464 g L(-1). Browning and low-medium molecular weight compounds increase during the dehydration process. In CIELab coordinates, raisining decreases a(*) (red/green) and lightness and increases b(∗) (yellow/blue), colour saturation and hue angle. In general, most of the phenolic compounds determined (anthocyanins, flavonols, esters of hydroxycinnamic acids, flavan-3-ol monomers and proanthocyanidins) increase but to a lesser extent than expected because of the water loss of the grapes during drying. The lower increase was observed for esters of hydroxicinnamic acids suggesting these compounds could undergo strong enzymatic degradation. Despite this, both the terminal and the extension subunit compositions show little changes, while the mean degree of polymerization of proanthocyanidins decreases as raisining progresses.

  5. Sesquiterpenoids and phenolics from Taraxacum hondoense.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, Wanda; Michalska, Klaudia

    2005-09-01

    Eleven sesquiterpene lactones, including the new guaianolide 11beta-hydroxydeacetylmatricarin-8-O-beta-glucopyranoside, along with four known phenolic glucosides were isolated from Taraxacum hondoense. The compounds were characterized by spectral methods.

  6. Phenolic glycosides of Paulownia tomentosa bark.

    PubMed

    Sticher, O; Lahloub, M F

    1982-11-01

    The isolation of acteoside and coniferin from Paulownia tomentosa bark along with the previously reported phenolic glucoside syringin is described. The structure of both, acteoside and coniferin, have been assigned by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  8. Modification of the Lowry assay to measure proteins and phenols in covalently bound complexes.

    PubMed

    Winters, Ana L; Minchin, Frank R

    2005-11-01

    It is well established that phenols interfere with many routine protein assays and a number of protocols have been developed to overcome this. One such method is based on the differences in response obtained with the Lowry assay in the presence and absence of copper. This assumes that the phenol response with the Lowry assay is not affected by copper. However ortho-diphenols such as catechol, methylcatechol, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and phaselic acid show decreased responses in the presence of copper. Three methods of estimating protein were compared for their accuracy in measuring proteins in the presence of covalently bound ortho-diphenols; the Lowry assay, the modified Lowry assay, and a new method including a calculation to take into account differences in ortho-diphenol response in the presence and absence of copper. The ortho-diphenols were caffeic acid and phaselic acid, which were bound to bovine serum albumin and red clover protein either chemically or enzymatically. For all assays, the new method gave values within 4 to 8% of control values for protein (without bound phenols) as determined by the modified Lowry method. Values for the Lowry and modified Lowry methods varied by 20-50% from control protein values. The new method also gave a good approximation of protein-bound phenol content.

  9. A way to treat phenolic caustic

    SciTech Connect

    Berne, F.; Cadron, E.

    1987-10-01

    Caustic used in the fluid catalytic cracking process will usually have more phenols than most spent caustic. Phenols place an added burden on the job of disposing of the spent caustic. Here is a scheme that has worked satisfactorily for the past three years at Lindsey Oil Refinery Ltd., Killingholm, UK. The system uses acidification, gas stripping, light cycle oil extraction and final deoiling with a coalescer.

  10. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  11. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  12. Solvent extraction of phenols from water

    SciTech Connect

    Greminger, D.C.; Burns, G.P.; Lynn, S.; Hanson, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE) have been evaluated as solvents for extraction of phenols, at high dilution, from water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) have been measured for phenol, dihydroxybenzenes and trihydroxybenzenes in both solvents as a function of pH. Particularly for the multihydric phenols, MIBK gives substantially higher values of K/sub D/ than does DIPE. The effect of pH can be described quantitatively through a simple ionization model, using published values of dissociation constants for the various phenols. Some method for removal of residual dissolved solvent must ordinarily be included in any extraction process for phenols. Possibilities include atmospheric-steam or inert-gas stripping, vacuum-steam stripping, and extraction with a second solvent. Vacuum-steam stripping is a particularly attractive choice for removal of MIBK; this reinforces the utility of MIBK as a solvent. The optimal temperature for vacuum stripping is generally the temperature of the extraction operation, which in turn is related to the effect of temperature on K/sub D/. Values of K/sub D/ for phenol-water-MIBK were determined at 30, 50, and 75/sup 0/C, and were found to decrease with increasing temperature at all concentrations.

  13. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  14. Rapid Inflammasome Activation following Mucosal SIV Infection of Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Ghneim, Khader; Bosche, William J; Li, Yuan; Berkemeier, Brian; Hull, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Cameron, Mark; Liu, Jinyan; Smith, Kaitlin; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Li, Hualin; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Colantonio, Arnaud; Kang, Hyung-Joo; Li, Wenjun; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2016-04-21

    The earliest events following mucosal HIV-1 infection, prior to measurable viremia, remain poorly understood. Here, by detailed necropsy studies, we show that the virus can rapidly disseminate following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and trigger components of the inflammasome, both at the site of inoculation and at early sites of distal virus spread. By 24 hr following inoculation, a proinflammatory signature that lacked antiviral restriction factors was observed in viral RNA-positive tissues. The early innate response included expression of NLRX1, which inhibits antiviral responses, and activation of the TGF-β pathway, which negatively regulates adaptive immune responses. These data suggest a model in which the virus triggers specific host mechanisms that suppress the generation of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses in the first few days of infection, thus facilitating its own replication. These findings have important implications for the development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent infection.

  15. Novel ways for immune intervention in immunotherapy: mucosal allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mascarell, Laurent; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently the only curative treatment for allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been successfully used to treat patients who are allergic to insect venom, house dust mites, or tree or grass pollens. In the context of potentially severe, albeit infrequent, side effects associated with SCIT, mucosal routes of administration are being investigated to conduct allergenic desensitization. This article reviews recent developments in the field of nasal, oral, and sublingual immunotherapy as they relate to safety, clinical efficacy, and immune mechanisms of action. Implications for the design and development of improved allergy vaccines that could be used through such nonparenteral routes are discussed. Specifically, allergen presentation platforms and adjuvants facilitating the targeting of immune cells at mucosal surfaces to promote tolerance induction are reviewed.

  16. Induction of allergen-specific tolerance via mucosal routes.

    PubMed

    Mascarell, Laurent; Zimmer, Aline; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Tourdot, Sophie; Moingeon, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of allergies against insect venom, house dust mites, tree/grass pollens, or cat dander. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is successful to reorient the immune system and re-establish long-term tolerance. However, major drawbacks for using this route include: repeated injections, as well as the risk of anaphylaxis. In this context, alternative mucosal routes of administration are being considered together with the combined use of adjuvants/vector systems and recombinant allergens or peptide fragments. Herein, we review the current status in the use of mucosal routes (i.e., sublingual, oral, intranasal) for allergen-specific immunotherapy, as well as the latest understanding with respect to underlying mechanisms of action.

  17. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  18. Mucosal Schwann cell “Hamartoma”: A new entity?

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Paola; Baiocchini, Andrea; Falasca, Laura; Annibali, Dante; Gimbo, Guido; Pace, Francesco; Nonno, Franca Del

    2009-01-01

    Schwannoma is a well-described, benign nerve sheath tumor of the soft tissue, but is rare in the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal schwannomas are often incidentally discovered as small polypoid intraluminal lesions. In this report, we describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of a distinctive neural mucosal polyp composed of a diffuse cellular proliferation of uniform bland spindled cells in the lamina propria that entraps the colonic crypts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong and diffuse positivity for the S-100 protein. To avoid confusion of these solitary colorectal polyps containing pure spindled Schwann cell proliferation in the lamina propria with neural lesions that have significant association with inherited syndromes, it is better to use the designation “mucosal Schwann hamartoma”. PMID:19437573

  19. [Miltefosine versus meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of mucosal leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Garcia Bustos, Maria F; Barrio, Alejandra; Parodi, Cecilia; Beckar, Josefina; Moreno, Sonia; Basombrio, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The conventional treatment for tegumentary leishmaniasis is meglumine antimoniate, which needs parenteral administration, has increased therapeutic failure, and produces serious adverse effects, justifying the search for therapeutic alternatives. We report here the preliminary results of a phase II clinical trial in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, in which the efficacy of oral miltefosine versus the antimonial compound was assessed. The evaluation of response to the treatment was performed by monitoring with nasopharyngeal video-fibroscopy, using a score of mucosal injury severity for patients at each follow-up point. We found no significant differences so far between the number of patients cured with miltefosine or conventional chemotherapy. The favorable results of this study suggest that miltefosine could be an effective and safe oral therapeutic alternative in the region.

  20. The role of Th17 cytokines in primary mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kolls, Jay K.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2010-01-01

    The T helper type 17 (Th17) lineage of CD4+ T-cells produce several effector molecules including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. In addition to CD4+, αβ T-cells, these cytokines can be produced by natural killer and γδ T-cells. These effector cytokines can be produced rapidly upon infection at mucosal sites and evidence to date strongly implicates that this arm of the immune system plays a critical role in mucosal immunity to many extracellular pathogens. Moreover these cytokines can also coordinate adaptive immunity to some intracellular pathogens. In this review, we will highlight recent progress in our understanding of these cytokines, and mechanisms of their effector function in the mucosa. PMID:21095154

  1. [Mucosal healling: a realistic aim or marketing myth?].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Valle; Iglesias-Flores, Eva

    2011-12-01

    The classical aim of the treatment of ulcerative colitis is to induce and maintain remission. However, this aim has not been shown to prevent long-term complications. Current treatment goals attempt to prevent complications. In some studies, healing of the intestinal mucosa has been shown to improve long-term outcomes. In ulcerative colitis, mucosal healing reduces recurrence, the risk of colorectal cancer and the need for surgery, and improves patients' quality of life. The drugs for which there is greatest evidence of their efficacy in inducing and maintaining mucosal healing are salicylates and biological agents. In the near future, endoscopic monitoring may be required to evaluate response to the treatment and decisions may have to be taken according to the persistence or disappearance of these lesions.

  2. Effect of cooking on the anthocyanins, phenolic acids, glycoalkaloids, and resistant starch content in two pigmented cultivars of Solanum tuberosum L.

    PubMed

    Mulinacci, Nadia; Ieri, Francesca; Giaccherini, Catia; Innocenti, Marzia; Andrenelli, Luisa; Canova, Giulia; Saracchi, Marco; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina

    2008-12-24

    HPLC/DAD/MS analysis of the phenolic acids and anthocyanin content of three cultivars of Solanum tuberosum L. (Vitelotte Noire, Highland Burgundy Red, with pigmented flesh, and Kennebec with white pulp) was performed. The analyses were carried out both on fresh tubers and after cooking treatments (boiling and microwaves). Starch digestibility and the % of resistant starch were also determined on cooked tubers by in vitro methods. For the pigmented potatoes, the heating treatment did not cause any changes in the phenolic acids content, while anthocyanins showed only a small decrement (16-29%). The cv. Highland Burgundy Red showed anthocyanins and phenolic acid concentrations close to 1 g/kg and more than 1.1 g/kg, respectively. Vitellotte Noire showed the highest amounts of resistant starch. Potato starch digestibility and % of resistant starch, considered as a component of dietary fiber, were affected both by cultivar and by heating/cooling treatments.

  3. Eucoleus boehmi infection in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from Italy.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Morganti, Giulia; di Cesare, Angela; Lepri, Elvio; Cassini, Rudi; Zanet, Stefania; Deni, Dario; Chiari, Mario; Ferroglio, Ezio

    2014-12-15

    In the last decade an increase of the number of red foxes in anthropized habitats across European countries, including Italy, has been observed. This pones implications in terms of disease transmission between wildlife and domestic animals; in fact, there are evidences of the role of foxes as reservoirs and amplifiers of a broad spectrum of parasites infecting pets. The present study evaluated the prevalence of Eucoleus boehmi, an emerging extra-intestinal nematodes of the Capillariinae subfamily, in red foxes. The nasal passages and sinuses of 179 red foxes culled from several areas of northern and central Italy were inspected and the mucosal surfaces were scrapped and examined for adult nematodes and eggs, microscopically and genetically identified. Overall 55 foxes (30.7%) were found to be infected with E. boehmi, i.e. 27 on inspection of the nasal passages and sinuses and 28 on mucosal flush and scraping. The occurrence of E. boehmi was significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to the sampling location, the age and gender of the animals examined; the higher rates of prevalence were observed in animals culled in Piedmont (43.3%) and in female (60.6%) and adult (38.1%) subjects. A total of 184 adult parasites were recovered, with a mean intensity of infection of 3.34, and a more frequent localization of E. boehmi in the nasal passages rather than in the sinuses. A significant (p < 0.05) relationship was found between the parasite burden and body condition and age of the animals; the intensity of infection was significantly higher in juveniles (mean: 6.3 specimens) and in animals showing poor fox body condition (mean: 7.8 specimens). These results show that E. boehmi is highly prevalent in the red fox populations of certain areas of Italy. Epidemiological implications are discussed, with a special focus on the role that this wild canid may have in the increasing transmission of nasal eucoleosis to domestic dogs.

  4. Free and bound total phenolics, procyanidin and anthocyanin profiles and their antioxidant capacities in whole grain rice (Oryza sativa L.) of different bran colors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the polyphenols in whole grain rice varying in bran color, total phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant capacities of the solvent-extractable (Free) and cell-wall bound (Bound) fractions and the profiles of procyanidins and anthocyanins were determined. Red and purple bran rices had signific...

  5. Cultivation of Human Oral Mucosal Explants on Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Zsebik, Barbara; Ujlaky-Nagy, László; Losonczy, Gergely; Vereb, György; Takács, Lili

    2017-03-24

    Purpose/Aim: Autologous cultivated oral mucosal (OM) epithelial transplantation has been successfully used as corneal epithelial replacement in bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Recently, lotrafilcon A contact lens (CL) surface was described as a suitable carrier for cultured stem cells in corneal epithelial transplantation. Our aim was to establish explant cultures from human OM on CL carriers that are free of animal-derived materials and feeder cells.

  6. What interactions drive the salivary mucosal pellicle formation?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbins, Hannah L.; Yakubov, Gleb E.; Proctor, Gordon B.; Wilson, Stephen; Carpenter, Guy H.

    2014-01-01

    The bound salivary pellicle is essential for protection of both the enamel and mucosa in the oral cavity. The enamel pellicle formation is well characterised, however the mucosal pellicle proteins have only recently been clarified and what drives their formation is still unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary pellicle on particles with different surface properties (hydrophobic or hydrophilic with a positive or negative charge), to determine a suitable model to mimic the mucosal pellicle. A secondary aim was to use the model to test how transglutaminase may alter pellicle formation. Particles were incubated with resting whole mouth saliva, parotid saliva and submandibular/sublingual saliva. Following incubation and two PBS and water washes bound salivary proteins were eluted with two concentrations of SDS, which were later analysed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Experiments were repeated with purified transglutaminase to determine how this epithelial-derived enzyme may alter the bound pellicle. Protein pellicles varied according to the starting salivary composition and the particle chemistry. Amylase, the single most abundant protein in saliva, did not bind to any particle indicating specific protein binding. Most proteins bound through hydrophobic interactions and a few according to their charges. The hydrophobic surface most closely matched the known salivary mucosal pellicle by containing mucins, cystatin and statherin but an absence of amylase and proline-rich proteins. This surface was further used to examine the effect of added transglutaminase. At the concentrations used only statherin showed any evidence of crosslinking with itself or another saliva protein. In conclusion, the formation of the salivary mucosal pellicle is probably mediated, at least in part, by hydrophobic interactions to the epithelial cell surface. PMID:24921197

  7. JAM-related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that belong to the cortical thymocyte marker for Xenopus family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-like protein, Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR-like membrane protein and endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule. JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration, and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation.

  8. Small intestinal mucosal abnormalities in post-perinatal deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Variend, S; Sunderland, R

    1984-01-01

    Examination of small intestinal mucosa from cases of post-perinatal death in Sheffield between September 1980 and September 1981 showed mucosal changes before death in 18 of 78 cases (20%). There was no significant difference in prevalence between explained and unexplained deaths, nor was there any positive association with viral isolation from the small intestine. The lesion was much more common in males than females and showed a strong association with bottle feeding--no infant wholly breast fed showed an enteropathy. There was a low incidence of symptoms referrable to the gastrointestinal tract among affected infants, and no appreciable evidence of failure to thrive, as reflected by the postmortem body weight, was present. Mucosal changes of the small intestine in cases of sudden infant death syndrome have previously been reported and attributed to heatstroke. Although the finding of similar lesions in infants who died explicably does not appear to support this view, overheating is difficult to exclude as most of the explained deaths with a mucosal lesion occurred at home. Images PMID:6699191

  9. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  10. Enhancing the buccal mucosal delivery of peptide and protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Caon, Thiago; Jin, Liang; Simões, Cláudia M O; Norton, Raymond S; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    With continuing advances in biotechnology and genetic engineering, there has been a dramatic increase in the availability of new biomacromolecules, such as peptides and proteins that have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of many poorly-treated diseases. Although most of these macromolecular therapeutics exhibit high potency, their large molecular mass, susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, immunogenicity and tendency to undergo aggregation, adsorption, and denaturation have limited their ability to be administered via the traditional oral route. As a result, alternative noninvasive routes have been investigated for the systemic delivery of these macromolecules, one of which is the buccal mucosa. The buccal mucosa offers a number of advantages over the oral route, making it attractive for the delivery of peptides and proteins. However, the buccal mucosa still exhibits some permeability-limiting properties, and therefore various methods have been explored to enhance the delivery of macromolecules via this route, including the use of chemical penetration enhancers, physical methods, particulate systems and mucoadhesive formulations. The incorporation of anti-aggregating agents in buccal formulations also appears to show promise in other mucosal delivery systems, but has not yet been considered for buccal mucosal drug delivery. This review provides an update on recent approaches that have shown promise in enhancing the buccal mucosal transport of macromolecules, with a major focus on proteins and peptides.

  11. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  12. Intestinal epithelial cells and their role in innate mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Contreras, A L; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts are covered by a layer of epithelial cells that are responsible for sensing and promoting a host immune response in order to establish the limits not only for commensal microorganisms but also for foreign organisms or particles. This is a remarkable task as the human body represents a composite of about 10 trillion human-self cells plus non-self cells from autochthonous or indigenous microbes that outnumber human cells 10:1. Hence, the homeostasis of epithelial cells that line mucosal surfaces relies on a fine-tuned immune system that patrols the boundaries between human and microbial cells. In the case of the intestine, the epithelial layer is composed of at least six epithelial cell lineages that act as a physiological barrier in addition to aiding digestion and the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes. In this review, we highlight the immense role of the intestinal epithelium in coordinating the mucosal innate immune response.

  13. Strategies for Preventing Mucosal Cell-Associated HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Kevin J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be transmitted through either cell-free virions or leukocytes harboring intracellular HIV in bodily fluids. In recent years, the early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy leading to virological suppression has resulted in decreased HIV transmission to uninfected partners. Additionally, the efficacy of primary chemoprophylaxis with oral or topical antiretroviral regimens containing tenofovir (with or without emtricitabine) has been demonstrated. However, the efficacy of these approaches may be compromised by suboptimal adherence, decreased drug concentrations in mucosal compartments in women, and genital inflammation. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the effects of tenofovir on cell-associated HIV transmission have produced conflicting results. Preclinical studies suggest that combination preventive approaches may be most effective in stopping the transmission of HIV after mucosal exposure. Since the development of antibodies were found to correlate with protection in the only effective HIV vaccine trial, the administration of preformed mucosal and systemic antibodies may inform the development of safe and effective antibody-based oral, topical, and/or systemic preexposure prophylaxis agents and provide guidance in the development of HIV vaccines that effectively block cell-associated HIV transmission. PMID:25414423

  14. JAM related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) that belong to the CTX (Cortical Thymocyte marker for Xenopus) family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, -B and –C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-Like protein (JAM-L), Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), CAR-Like Membrane Protein (CLMP) and Endothelial cell-Selective Adhesion Molecule (ESAM). JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation. PMID:24667924

  15. Feline immunodeficiency virus clade C mucosal transmission and disease courses.

    PubMed

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-05-01

    The transmissibility and pathogenicity of a clade C feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-C) was examined via the oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosa. FIV-C was transmissible by all three mucosal routes. Vaginal transmission was most efficient (100%), oral exposure resulted in a 80% infection rate, and rectal transmission was least effective (44%). In contrast to previous intravenous passage studies, a broader range of host-virus relationships was observed after mucosal exposure. Three categories of FIV-C infection were defined: (1) rapidly progressive infection marked by high virus burdens and rapid CD4+ cell depletion (43% of vaginally exposed animals); (2) conventional (typical) infection featuring slowly progressive CD4+ cell decline (61% of all exposed animals); and (3) regressive (transient) infection marked by low and then barely detectable virus burdens and no CD4+ cell alterations (22% of rectally inoculated cats). These disease courses appear to have parallels in mucosal HIV and SIV infections, emphasizing the importance of the virus-mucosa interface in lentiviral pathogenesis.

  16. Plausibility of HIV-1 Infection of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, M.C.; Vacharaksa, A.; Gebhard, K.H.; Giacaman, R.A.; Ross, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues. Little is understood about how HIV gains access to permissive cells across mucosal surfaces, yet such knowledge is crucial to the development of successful topical anti-HIV-1 agents and mucosal vaccines. HIV-1 rapidly internalizes and integrates into the mucosal keratinocyte genome, and integrated copies of HIV-1 persist upon cell passage. The virus does not appear to replicate, and the infection may become latent. Interactions between HIV-1 and oral keratinocytes have been modeled in the context of key environmental factors, including putative copathogens and saliva. In keratinocytes, HIV-1 internalizes within minutes; in saliva, an infectious fraction escapes inactivation and is harbored and transferable to permissive target cells for up to 48 hours. When incubated with the common oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, CCR5− oral keratinocytes signal through protease-activated receptors and Toll-like receptors to induce expression of CCR5, which increases selective uptake of infectious R5-tropic HIV-1 into oral keratinocytes and transfer to permissive cells. Hence, oral keratinocytes—like squamous keratinocytes of other tissues—may be targets for low-level HIV-1 internalization and subsequent dissemination by transfer to permissive cells. PMID:21441479

  17. Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: the neglected pathway.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deborah J; Le Grand, Roger

    2014-12-15

    This supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases is devoted to the important and understudied topic of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV) mucosal transmission. It stems from a workshop held in Boston, Massachusetts, in October 2013, in which scientists discussed their research and insights regarding cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission. The 10 articles in this supplement present the case for cell-associated HIV transmission as an important element contributing to the HIV epidemic, review evidence for the efficacy of current HIV prevention strategies against cell-associated HIV transmission and opportunities for further development, and describe in vitro, ex vivo, and animal cell-associated transmission models that can be used to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission and test HIV prevention strategies. We hope that these articles will help to inform and invigorate the HIV prevention field and contribute to the development of more-effective vaccine, treatment, and microbicide strategies for HIV prevention.

  18. Effect of supplemental ultraviolet radiation on the concentration of phytonutrients in green and red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Steven; Caldwell, Charles; Mirecki, Roman; Slusser, James; Gao, Wei

    2005-08-01

    Eight cultivars each of red and green leaf lettuce were raised in a greenhouse with supplemental UV radiation, either UV-A (wavelengths greater than ca. 315 nm) or UV-A+UV-B (wavelengths greater than ca. 290 nm; 6.4 kJ m-2 daily biologically effective UV-B), or no supplemental UV (controls). Several phytonutrients were analyzed in leaf flours to identify lines with large differences in composition and response to UV-B. Red leaf lettuce had higher levels of phenolic acid esters, flavonols and anthocyanins than green lines. Both green and red lines exposed to UV-B for 9 days showed 2-3-fold increases in flavonoids compared to controls, but only 45% increases in phenolic acid esters, suggesting these compounds may be regulated by different mechanisms. There were large differences between cultivars in levels of phenolic compounds under control conditions and also large differences in UV-B effects. Among red varieties, cv. Galactic was notable for high levels of phenolics and a large response to UV-B. Among green varieties, cvs. Black-Seeded Simpson and Simpson Elite had large increases in phenolics with UV-B exposure. Photosynthetic pigments were also analyzed. Green leaf lettuce had high levels of pheophytin, a chlorophyll degradation product. Total chlorophylls (including pheophytin) were much lower in green compared to red varieties. Lutein, a carotenoid, was similar for green and red lines. Total chlorophylls and lutein increased 2-fold under supplemental UV-B in green lines but decreased slightly under UV-B in red lines. Lettuce appears to be a valuable crop to use to study phytochemical-environment interactions.

  19. Effects of γ-irradiation on phenolics content, antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of whole grainrice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yafang; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Wang, Yuefei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    Three rice genotypes with different color were gamma irradiated at a dose of 2, 4, 6, 8and 10 kGy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the phenolics content and the antioxidant activity, as well as physicochemical properties of whole grain rice. The bound phenolics content in all the genotypes were significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation. Gamma irradiation at high dose significantly increased the free, bound and total antioxidant activities of three rice genotypes except for the free antioxidant activities of red rice. Though the color parameters were slightly changed, these changes could not be visibly identified. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) viscosities and gel hardness decreased continuously with the increase of the irradiation doses. It is suggested that gamma irradiation enhanced the antioxidant potential and eating quality of whole grainrice.

  20. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. Results After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p < 0.05) and therefore had a greater weight loss (p < 0.05). The treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p < 0.05). There were no differences in mucosal lesions, intestinal permeability and sIgA secretion (p > 0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. Conclusions S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil. PMID:24721659

  1. Risk analysis, diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal mucositis in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; Tissing, Wim J E

    2015-04-01

    Mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes of the alimentary tract upon chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment in oncology patients. Mucositis can be subdivided in oral and gastrointestinal mucositis (GI mucositis). The damage to the gastrointestinal tract compromises the intestinal function and thereby the nutritional status and the quality of life, and eventually affects survival. The literature on GI mucositis focuses mainly on adults. This review focuses on data available on GI mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. An evaluation of the clinical presentation and consequences of GI mucositis in children is outlined. The review summarizes key issues for clinicians with respect to risk analysis for developing mucositis and the diagnosis of this condition in children. Information on these issues is obtained from clinical trials in children and adults, and from animal models. Diagnostic tools and assessment of severity of GI mucositis in children is elaborated on. Furthermore, the clinical management of the symptoms and consequences of GI mucositis in children, with specific focus on nutritional support, are discussed.

  2. An Overview of Challenges Limiting the Design of Protective Mucosal Vaccines for Finfish

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein, it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish. PMID:26557121

  3. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  4. Selective defunctionalization by TiO2 of monomeric phenolics from lignin pyrolysis into simple phenols.

    PubMed

    Mante, Ofei D; Rodriguez, Jose A; Babu, Suresh P

    2013-11-01

    This study is focused on defunctionalizing monomeric phenolics from lignin into simple phenols for applications such as phenol/formaldehyde resins, epoxidized novolacs, adhesives and binders. Towards this goal, Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used to selectively remove hydroxyl, methoxy, carbonyl and carboxyl functionalities from the monomeric phenolic compounds from lignin to produce mainly phenol, cresols and xylenols. The results showed that anatase TiO2 was more selective and active compared to rutile TiO2. Catechols were found to be the most reactive phenolics and 4-ethylguaiacol the least reactive with anatase TiO2. An overall conversion of about 87% of the phenolics was achieved at 550°C with a catalyst-to-feed ratio of 5 w/w. Over 97% conversion of phenolics is achievable at moderate temperatures (550°C or ≤ 600°C) and a moderate catalyst-to-feed ratio of 6.5:1. The reactivity of catechols on TiO2 suggests that titania is a promising catalyst in the removal of hydroxyl moiety.

  5. Identification and characterization of phenol hydroxylase from phenol-degrading Candida tropicalis strain JH8.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Zhixiong; Cheng, Li

    2014-09-01

    The gene phhY encoding phenol hydroxylase from Candida tropicalis JH8 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene phhY contained an open reading frame of 2130 bp encoding a polypeptide of 709 amino acid residues. From its sequence analysis, it is a member of a family of flavin-containing aromatic hydroxylases and shares 41% amino acid identity with phenol hydroxylase from Trichosporon cutaneum. The recombinant phenol hydroxylase exists as a homotetramer structure with a native molecular mass of 320 kDa. Recombinant phenol hydroxylase was insensitive to pH treatment; its optimum pH was at 7.6. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 30 °C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 60 °C. Under the optimal conditions with phenol as substrate, the K(m) and V(max) of recombinant phenol hydroxylase were 0.21 mmol·L(-1) and 0.077 μmol·L(-1)·min(-1), respectively. This is the first paper presenting the cloning and expression in E. coli of the phenol hydroxylase gene from C. tropicalis and the characterization of the recombinant phenol hydroxylase.

  6. Phenolic composition and inhibitory effect against oxidative DNA damage of cooked cowpeas as affected by simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Nderitu, Alice M; Dykes, Linda; Awika, Joseph M; Minnaar, Amanda; Duodu, Kwaku G

    2013-12-01

    Cowpeas contain phenolic compounds with potential health benefits. The effect of simulated gastrointestinal digestion on phenolic composition of cooked cowpeas and the ability of the digests to inhibit radical-induced DNA damage was determined. A red and a cream-coloured cowpea type were used. The phenolic composition of acetone extracts and enzyme digests of cooked cowpeas was determined using UPLC-MS. Compounds such as p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-coumaric acid, coumaroylaldaric acid and feruloylaldaric acid were present in the acetone extracts of the cooked cowpeas but were not detected in the enzyme digests. Glycosides of quercetin and myricetin decreased upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of cooked cowpeas whereas flavan-3-ols were hardly present except catechin glucoside. The enzyme digest of the red cowpea type was about thrice as effective as that of the cream cowpea type in protecting DNA from oxidative damage. The observation that enzyme digests of cooked cowpeas inhibited radical-induced DNA damage suggests that cowpea phenolics retain some radical scavenging activity after gastrointestinal digestion.

  7. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    PubMed

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  8. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  9. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater. PMID:27005648

  10. Plant Phenols as Antibiotic Boosters: In Vitro Interaction of Olive Leaf Phenols with Ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Lim, Anxy; Subhan, Nusrat; Jazayeri, Jalal A; John, George; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Obied, Hassan K

    2016-03-01

    The antimicrobial properties of olive leaf extract (OLE) have been well recognized in the Mediterranean traditional medicine. Few studies have investigated the antimicrobial properties of OLE. In this preliminary study, commercial OLE and its major phenolic secondary metabolites were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, both individually and in combination with ampicillin. Besides luteolin 7-O-glucoside, OLE and its major phenolic secondary metabolites were effective against both bacteria, with more activity on S. aureus. In combination with ampicillin, OLE, caffeic acid, verbascoside and oleuropein showed additive effects. Synergistic interaction was observed between ampicillin and hydroxytyrosol. The phenolic composition of OLE and the stability of olive phenols in assay medium were also investigated. While OLE and its phenolic secondary metabolites may not be potent enough as stand-alone antimicrobials, their abilities to boost the activity of co-administered antibiotics constitute an imperative future research area.

  11. Rectal mucosal endometriosis primarily misinterpreted as adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Qiuping; Liu, Shaoyan; Xiong, Hanzhen; Jiang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis involving intestinal mucosa is relatively uncommon. It poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and pathologists. We herein report a case of colonoscopic specimen revealing rectal mucosal endometriosis. A 39-year-old woman complained of red rectal bleeding and intermittent abdominal pain. Colonoscopic examination showed a rectal mass with ulceration and circum wall involvement. Biopsy was processed in the suspicious of carcinoma. Morphologically, irregular glands replaced residual colorectal ones, displayed mucin depletion, nuclear stratification and subtile subnuclear vacuoles. The stroma was full of spindle cells with abundant pink cytoplasm and unclear boundary. Due to subjectively interpreting as dysplastic glands in desmoplastic setting, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was firstly raised. Immunohistochemically, CK7, ER and CD10 identified the essence of ectopic endometrium. CK20 and CDX2 highlighted residual glands. In case of misdiagnosis, any pathologists should be aware of intestinal endometriosis for each female’s colorectal biopsy, especially for that morphology not typical for primary adenocarcinoma or endometriosis. Reading slides carefully combined with a panel of immunomarkers would solve the pitfall. PMID:26191316

  12. Human colon tissue in organ culture: calcium and multi-mineral-induced mucosal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dame, Michael K; Veerapaneni, Indiradevi; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Naik, Madhav; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that a multi-mineral extract from the marine red algae, Lithothamnion calcareum, suppresses colon polyp formation and inflammation in mice. In the present study, we used intact human colon tissue in organ culture to compare responses initiated by Ca(2+) supplementation versus the multi-mineral extract. Normal human colon tissue was treated for 2 d in culture with various concentrations of calcium or the mineral-rich extract. The tissue was then prepared for histology/immunohistochemistry, and the culture supernatants were assayed for levels of type I procollagen and type I collagen. At higher Ca(2+) concentrations or with the mineral-rich extract, proliferation of epithelial cells at the base and walls of the mucosal crypts was suppressed, as visualized by reduced Ki67 staining. E-cadherin, a marker of differentiation, was more strongly expressed at the upper third of the crypt and at the luminal surface. Treatment with Ca(2+) or with the multi-mineral extract influenced collagen turnover, with decreased procollagen and increased type I collagen. These data suggest that calcium or mineral-rich extract has the capacity to (1) promote differentiation in human colon tissue in organ culture and (2) modulate stromal function as assessed by increased levels of type I collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that human colon tissue in organ culture (supporting in vivo finding in mice) will provide a valuable model for the preclinical assessment of agents that regulate growth and differentiation in the colonic mucosa.

  13. Varietal differences in phenolic content and antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of onions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Meyers, Katherine J; van der Heide, Jan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-11-03

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk for the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Phytochemicals, including phenolics and flavonoids, are suggested to be the major bioactive compounds contributing to the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. Onions are a major source of dietary flavonoids; however, there may exist varietal differences in composition, concentration, and beneficial activities. To characterize these differences, shallots and 10 onion (Allium cepa L.) varieties commonly available in the United States (Western Yellow, Northern Red, New York Bold, Western White, Peruvian Sweet, Empire Sweet, Mexico, Texas 1015, Imperial Valley Sweet, and Vidalia) were evaluated for total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. Shallots contained the highest total phenolic content (114.7 +/- 10.0 mg/100 g of sample) among the varieties tested, with a 6-fold difference observed when compared to the variety with the lowest phenolic content (Vidalia, p < 0.05). Western Yellow onion variety exhibited the highest total flavonoid content (69.2 +/- 3.7 mg/100 g of onion) of the varieties tested, with an 11-fold difference when compared to the variety with the lowest flavonoid content (Western White, p < 0.05). Shallots exhibited the highest total antioxidant activity (45.5 +/- 2.1 micromol of vitamin C equiv/g of onion), followed by Western Yellow, New York Bold, Northern Red, Mexico, Empire Sweet, Western White, Peruvian Sweet, Texas 1015, Imperial Valley Sweet, and Vidalia. For all varieties, both total phenolic and flavonoid contents were strongly correlated with total antioxidant activity (R (2) = 0.9668, p < 0.05; and R (2) = 0.7033, p < 0.05, respectively). The proliferation of HepG(2) and Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion after exposure to the Western Yellow, shallots, New

  14. Laser processing of phenolic wood substitutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Lusquiños, F.; Penide, J.; Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2013-11-01

    Phenolic resin boards (PRB) are wood substitutes that comprises of a thick core exclusively made of phenolic resin covered by a thin sheet of melamine resin imitating the aspect of natural wood. The use of these materials in furniture and in construction industry has proliferated during last years. Boards made of phenolic resins are dense, hard and very difficult to cut using band saws, disc saws, or milling cutters. Nevertheless, these difficulties can be overcome by means of laser cutting, which is one of the most firmly established techniques for separating materials. This is due to the great advantages of this technique over traditional cutting methods, such as its versatility and flexibility that allow effective cutting. Nevertheless, charring of the cut edge surface caused by laser induced thermal degradation degrades the cut quality under non-optimized processing conditions. In this research work the viability and quality of CO2 laser cutting process of phenolic resin boards and wood particleboard panels has been evaluated. The present work validates the cut of phenolic resin boards by CO2 lasers using a high laser power and elevated cutting speeds. Moreover, this process involves a serious health hazard since the combustion and decomposition of wood may produce fumes and vapors, which can be toxic and carcinogenic according to the International Chemical Safety Cards (ICSC). Therefore, this work was complemented by the assessment of the potential toxicity of the condensed residues formed on the cut edges, and assessment of the chemistry of the generated fumes by chromatography.

  15. Ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, H.; Materna, K.; Urbanski, R.; Szymanowski, J.

    1999-10-15

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration represents a potentially attractive tool for the removal of different contaminants from wastewaters. The ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenol or 4-nitrophenol was studied. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecylrimethyl ammonium sulfate, alkyl polyglucoside Glucopon 215 SC UP, and oxyethylated methyl dodecanoates with the average degree of oxyethylation equal to 5 and 9 were used as surfactants and NaHCO{sub 3} as an electrolyte and alkalizing agent. Filtration and phenol rejection depends on the presence of NaHCO{sub 3} and the type of surfactant. NaHCO{sub 3} depresses to the filtration rate, especially in the case of SDS and hydrophobic oxyethylated methyl dodecanoate. The highest filtration rates are obtained for hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and alkyl polyglucoside micellar solutions. The best separations, both of phenol and 4-nitrophenol (almost 100% rejection), are obtained for CTAB micellar solutions at the pH range from 3 to 11. Nonionic surfactants are not effective enough for the separation of phenol and 4-nitrophenol. SDS solutions permit only the separation of phenol.

  16. A mucosally targeted subunit vaccine candidate eliciting HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking Abs

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Magérus, Aude; Geyer, Brian C.; Zhang, Yunfang; Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Alfsen, Annette; Arntzen, Charles J.; Bomsel, Morgane; Mor, Tsafrir S.

    2004-01-01

    A vaccine that would engage the mucosal immune system against a broad range of HIV-1 subtypes and prevent epithelial transmission is highly desirable. Here we report fusing the mucosal targeting B subunit of cholera toxin to the conserved galactosylceramide-binding domain (including the ELDKWA-neutralizing epitope) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein, which mediates the transcytosis of HIV-1 across the mucosal epithelia. Chimeric protein expressed in bacteria or plants assembled into oligomers that were capable of binding galactosyl-ceramide and GM1 gangliosides. Mucosal (intranasal) administration in mice of the purified chimeric protein followed by an i.p. boost resulted in transcytosis-neutralizing serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses and induced immunological memory. Plant production of mucosally targeted immunogens could be particularly useful for immunization programs in developing countries, where desirable product traits include low cost of manufacture, heat stability, and needle-free delivery. PMID:15347807

  17. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis: the role of mucin secretion and regulation, and the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Daniel; Stringer, Andrea; Butler, Ross

    2013-09-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a severe, dose-limiting, toxic side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Patients with mucositis often have reductions or breaks imposed on cytotoxic therapy, which may lead to reduced survival. Furthermore, there is an increased risk of infection and hospitalization, compounding the cost of treatment. There are currently limited therapeutic options for mucositis, and no effective prevention available. Mucin expression and secretion have been shown to be associated with mucositis. Furthermore, mucins exhibit protective effects on the alimentary tract through reducing mechanical and chemical stress, preventing bacterial overgrowth and penetration, and digestion of the mucosa. Additionally, a number of studies have implicated some key neurotransmitters in both mucositis and mucin secretion, suggesting that the enteric nervous system may also play a key role in the development of mucositis.

  18. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung; Vetráková, Ľubica; Seo, Jiwon; Heger, Dominik; Lee, Changha; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-05-05

    The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at -20°C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25°C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV-vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions.

  19. Betalain profile, phenolic content, and color characterization of different parts and varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Chaalal, Makhlouf; Louaileche, Hayette; Parrado, Juan; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-08-20

    Three different varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica (R, red; Y, yellow; RY, red-yellow) have been considered in this study. Attention was focused on differential tristimulus colorimetry and on the analysis of individual betalains (HPLC-DAD-ESI-ToF-MS) and phenolic content, scarcely previously reported in these kinds of samples. The importance of this research stems from the elucidation of the parts and varieties of cactus pear more optimal for use as natural colorants and sources of phenolics and betalains. Thus, the RY pulp was appropriate to obtain colorants with high color intensity (C*(ab) = 66.5), whereas the whole Y fruit and R pulp reached powerful and stable yellow and red colors, respectively (C*(ab)/h(ab), 57.1/84.7 and 61.1°/81.8°). This choice was also based on the visually appreciable differences (ΔE*(ab) > 5) among samples, mainly quantitative (%Δ(2)L, %Δ(2)C). In addition, seeds of all Opuntia varieties showed significantly (p < 0.05) similar phenolic content (around 23.3 mg/g) and color characteristics.

  20. Olive Oil Phenols as Promising Multi-targeting Agents Against Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rigacci, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the deposition of typically aggregated proteins/peptides in tissues, associated with degeneration and progressive functional impairment. Alzheimer's disease is one of the most studied neurodegenerative amyloid diseases and, in Western countries, a significant cause of dementia in the elderly. The so-called "Mediterranean diet" has been considered for long as the healthier dietary regimen, characterised by a great abundance in vegetables and fruits, extra virgin olive oil as the main source of fat, a moderate consumption of red wine and a reduced intake of proteins from red meat. Recent epidemiological studies support the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet not only against cardiovascular and cancer diseases (as previously demonstrated) but also against the cognitive decline associated with ageing, and several data are highlighting the role played by natural phenols, of which red wine and extra virgin olive oil are rich, in such context. In the meantime, studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro have started to reveal the great potential of the phenolic component of extra virgin olive oil (mainly oleuropein aglycone and oleocanthal) in counteracting amyloid aggregation and toxicity, with a particular emphasis on the pathways involved in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid precursor protein processing, amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and tau aggregation, autophagy impairment, neuroinflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of such research efforts, showing how the action of these phenols goes far beyond their renowned antioxidant activity and revealing their potential as multi-targeting agents against Alzheimer's disease.

  1. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  2. Effects of a novel Hungarian antacid containing Al and Mg (Tisacid) on mucosal prostaglandin generation and oxygen free radicals in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L; Mózsik, G; Vincze, A; Süto G; Hunyady, B; Rinfel, J; Past, T; Jávor, T

    1990-01-01

    A new patented chemical agent (Al-Mg-hydroxy-carbonate; acid-binding capacity greater than 30 mmol/g) was produced by our work-team. After our preliminary pharmacological and some prospective, randomized, multicentre, controlled clinical studies, this antacid was registered (Tisacid tablet and suspension; Alkaloida, Hungary). A cumulative ulcer healing rate of 80-85% was proved by Tisacid monotherapy applied in low doses (from 80 to 160 mmol/day) in patients with duodenal ulcer. The aims of this study were: (i) to determine the role of different antacids on the genesis of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) (PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha) in normal rats; (ii) to evaluate the effects of indomethacin pre-treatment (20 mg/kg b.w.,s.c.) on the Tisacid-induced alterations of gastric mucosal PG-contents; (iii) to analyse the generation of oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation in the rat oxyntic mucosa by the application of different doses of Tisacid (activities of CAT, GSH-px and SOD, contents of MDA and red. GSH). It was found that: Tisacid has a potent gastroproprotective effect in gastric mucosa, via (a) an increase in the mucosal levels of PGs, and (b) a scavenging-like effect in normal rat gastric mucosa. It is concluded that the gastroprotective effect of Tisacid appears because of the following: (i) excellent acid-neutralizing capacity; (ii) mucosal generation of PGs (PGE2 and PGI2); (iii) free radical scavenging; (iv) its possible activity as a Ca-antagonist (Mg-containing compound).

  3. Modulation of ligand-mediated human red cell agglutinability by prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.; Weinstein, R.S.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol induces the transformation of human red cells from bioconcave discs to echinocytes in vitro. In addition, they have observed that ethanol can enhance the agglutination of red cells by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin or poly-L-lysine. Incubation of washed human red cells with 5 and 10% ethanol (v/v) in phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3 at 25/sup 0/C produced a 30% increase in ligand-mediated agglutinability within 12 min. Simultaneous addition of ethanol and one of the following prostaglandin derivatives, PGE/sub 1/, pge/sub 2/, pgf/sub 2/-alpha, or PGl/sub 2/ (10/sup -9/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/ M) prevented the shape-associated increases in red cell agglutinability. Thromboxane-B/sub 2/ had no effect on agglutinability. Prostaglandins did not prevent ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations per se under identical experimental conditions. As intragastric administration of 100% ethanol results in the formation of spiculated red cell thrombi in postcapillary venules of rat gastric mucosa, they postulate that the cytoprotective role of prostanoids in preventing mucosal ulceration may be due in part to their capacity to inhibit intravascular ligand mediated red cell agglutination, hemostasis, and their sequelae, epithelial necrosis. Moreover, the data suggest that ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations and ligand-mediated agglutination represent two distinct and independent biological phenomena.

  4. Extraction and isolation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Gonzalez-Manzano, Susana; Dueñas, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Paramas, Ana M

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic compounds constitute a major class of plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show a large structural diversity. These compounds occur as aglycones or glycosides, as monomers or constituting highly polymerized structures, or as free or matrix-bound compounds. Furthermore, they are not uniformly distributed in the plant and their stability varies significantly. This greatly complicates their extraction and isolation processes, which means that a single standardized procedure cannot be recommended for all phenolics and/or plant materials; procedures have to be optimized depending on the nature of the sample and the target analytes, and also on the object of the study. In this chapter, the main techniques for sample preparation, and extraction and isolation of phenolic compounds have been reviewed-from classical solvent extraction procedures to more modern approaches, such as the use of molecularly imprinted polymers or counter-current chromatography.

  5. Phenolic constituents of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels.

    PubMed

    Maranz, Steven; Wiesman, Zeev; Garti, Nissim

    2003-10-08

    Analysis of the phenolic constituents of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels by LC-MS revealed eight catechin compounds-gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate-as well as quercetin and trans-cinnamic acid. The mean kernel content of the eight catechin compounds was 4000 ppm (0.4% of kernel dry weight), with a 2100-9500 ppm range. Comparison of the profiles of the six major catechins from 40 Vitellaria provenances from 10 African countries showed that the relative proportions of these compounds varied from region to region. Gallic acid was the major phenolic compound, comprising an average of 27% of the measured total phenols and exceeding 70% in some populations. Colorimetric analysis (101 samples) of total polyphenols extracted from shea butter into hexane gave an average of 97 ppm, with the values for different provenances varying between 62 and 135 ppm of total polyphenols.

  6. Fatal Phenol Toxicity Following Attempted Tattoo Removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Huang; Li, Shu-Hua; Byard, Roger W

    2016-07-01

    Tattoo removal is increasingly required as the number of, particularly young, people acquiring tattoos is increasing. A 21-year-old man is reported who underwent attempted removal of large dragon tattoo utilizing a tattoo machine that injected a phenol-containing solution. At the end of the 3-h procedure, he collapsed and died. At autopsy, large areas of white skin discoloration with focal necrosis and sloughing were present overlying areas of previous tattooing. Histological examination showed collections of eosinophilic fluid with a minimal chronic inflammatory infiltrate in better preserved areas, with focal areas of dermal necrosis. Toxicology was positive for phenol in cardiac blood and liver tissue. There were no underlying organic disease or injuries present which could have caused or contributed to death. This idiosyncratic method of tattoo removal involving subcutaneous injection of phenol had resulted in death most likely from cardiotoxicity.

  7. High-Temperature Graphite/Phenolic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Ellis C.; Bodepudi, Venu P.; Biggs, Robert W., Jr.; Cranston, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite-fiber/phenolic-resin composite material retains relatively high strength and modulus of elasticity at temperatures as high as 1,000 degrees F. Costs only 5 to 20 percent as much as refractory materials. Fabrication composite includes curing process in which application of full autoclave pressure delayed until after phenolic resin gels. Curing process allows moisture to escape, so when composite subsequently heated in service, much less expansion of absorbed moisture and much less tendency toward delamination. Developed for nose cone of external fuel tank of Space Shuttle. Other potential aerospace applications for material include leading edges, parts of nozzles, parts of aircraft engines, and heat shields. Terrestrial and aerospace applications include structural firewalls and secondary structures in aircraft, spacecraft, and ships. Modified curing process adapted to composites of phenolic with other fiber reinforcements like glass or quartz. Useful as high-temperature circuit boards and electrical insulators.

  8. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  9. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  10. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P < 0.01). OSA VP mucosal surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P < 0.0001) than healthy VP mucosal surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe

  11. Mucosal Immunization with Liposome-Nucleic Acid Adjuvants Generates Effective Humoral and Cellular Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Angela; Propst, Katie; Kedl, Ross; Dow, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Development of effective new mucosal vaccine adjuvants has become a priority with the increase in emerging viral and bacterial pathogens. We previously reported that cationic liposomes complexed with non-coding plasmid DNA (CLDC) were effective parenteral vaccine adjuvants. However, little is known regarding the ability of liposome-nucleic acid complexes to function as mucosal vaccine adjuvants, or the nature of the mucosal immune responses elicited by mucosal liposome-nucleic acid adjuvants. To address these questions, antibody and T cell responses were assessed in mice following intranasal immunization with CLDC-adjuvanted vaccines. The effects of CLDC adjuvant on antigen uptake, trafficking, and cytokine responses in the airways and draining lymph nodes were also assessed. We found that mucosal immunization with CLDC-adjuvanted vaccines effectively generated potent mucosal IgA antibody responses, as well as systemic IgG responses. Notably, mucosal immunization with CLDC adjuvant was very effective in generating strong and sustained antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the airways of mice. Mucosal administration of CLDC vaccines also induced efficient uptake of antigen by DCs within the mediastinal lymph nodes. Finally, a killed bacterial vaccine adjuvanted with CLDC induced significant protection from lethal pulmonary challenge with Burkholderia pseudomallei. These findings suggest that liposome-nucleic acid adjuvants represent a promising new class of mucosal adjuvants for non-replicating vaccines, with notable efficiency at eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses following intranasal administration. PMID:21600950

  12. Current Trends in the Management of Oral Mucositis Related to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Biswa Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common toxicities observed during radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for cancers. Mucositis results in sore mouth, altered taste sensation, pain and dysphagia leading to malnutrition. Left untreated, oral mucositis leads to ulceration, orodental infection, bleeding and discontinuation of effective radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Frequent hospitalization, enteral or parenteral nutrition, increased demand for analgesics ultimately account for increased cost of healthcare. Quantification of oral mucositis using standardized grading system is important for appropriate evaluation, reporting and management. In the recent past there is a paradigm shift in the pathobiology of cancer therapy related mucositis. Clear understanding of its pathogenesis is essential for the formulation of effective mucositis care. Numerous drug therapies, radiation techniques and oral care protocols have been tried in the past to reduce oral mucositis, None have proven to be consistently effective. Current trends for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis is multi-targeted treatment supplemented by aggressive oral hygiene, reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitors, growth factors and use of specific topical agents to improve treatment of oral mucositis in future. PMID:22570584

  13. Parenteral Vaccination Can Be an Effective Means of Inducing Protective Mucosal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Lucy C.

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm in vaccine development is that nonreplicating vaccines delivered parenterally fail to induce immune responses in mucosal tissues. However, both clinical and experimental data have challenged this concept, and numerous studies have shown that induction of mucosal immune responses after parenteral vaccination is not a rare occurrence and might, in fact, significantly contribute to the protection against mucosal infections afforded by parenteral vaccines. While the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, the realization that parenteral vaccination can be an effective means of inducing protective mucosal responses is paradigm-shifting and has potential to transform the way vaccines are designed and delivered. PMID:27122485

  14. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Jerzy K.

    1971-01-01

    Piotrowski, J. K. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 172-178. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine. Volunteers were exposed to phenol vapour (5 to 25 mg/m3) by inhalation and through the skin, respectively, and the excretion of phenol in urine was examined. The retention of vapour in the lungs decreased from about 80 to 70% in the course of exposure. The absorption of vapour through the whole of the skin was approximately proportional to the concentration of vapour used, the absorption rate being somewhat lower than in the lungs. Almost 100% of the phenol was excreted in the urine within one day. The rate of excretion of phenol in the urine may be used as an exposure test which permits the absorbed dose to be estimated with a precision of about ±2 mg. PMID:5572685

  15. Environmental Phenols And Pubertal Development In Girls

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Mary S.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; McGovern, Kathleen; Pinney, Susan M.; Windham, Gayle C.; Galvez, Maida; Pajak, Ashley; Rybak, Michael; Calafat, Antonia M.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Biro, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposures to many phenols are documented worldwide and exposures can be quite high (>1 micromolar of urine metabolites). Phenols have a range of hormonal activity, but knowledge of effects on child reproductive development is limited, coming mostly from cross-sectional studies. We undertook a prospective study of pubertal development among 1239 girls recruited at three U.S. sites when they were 6–8 years old and were followed annually for 7 years to determine age at first breast or pubic hair development. Ten phenols were measured in urine collected at enrollment (benzophenone-3, enterolactone, bisphenol A, three parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-), 2,5-dichlorophenol, triclosan, genistein, daidzein). We used multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards ratios (HR (95% confidence intervals)) and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses to estimate relative risk of earlier or later age at puberty associated with phenol exposures. For enterolactone and benzophenone-3, girls experienced breast development 5–6 months later, adjusted HR 0.79 (0.64–0.98) and HR 0.80 (0.65–0.98) respectively for the 5th vs 1st quintiles of urinary biomarkers (μg/g-creatinine). Earlier breast development was seen for triclosan and 2,5- dichlorophenol: 4–9 months sooner for 5th vs 1st quintiles of urinary concentrations (HR 1.17 (0.96–1.43) and HR 1.37 (1.09–1.72), respectively). Association of breast development with enterolactone, but not the other three phenols, was mediated by body size. These phenols may be antiadipogens (benzophenone-3 and enterolactone) or thyroid agonists (triclosan and 2,5- dichlorophenol), and their ubiquity and relatively high levels in children would benefit from further investigation to confirm these findings and to establish whether there are certain windows of susceptibility during which exposure can affect pubertal development. PMID:26335517

  16. Biologically active phenols from Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cheng-Qi; Yue, Jian-Min

    2003-03-06

    Sixteen phenolic compounds were isolated from the polar fraction of Saussurea medusa and were structurally elucidated by chemical evidences and spectral methods. These compounds include two new lignan glucosides, namely medusasides A (1) and B (2), and fourteen known phenolic compounds (3-16). One major compound, apigenin 7-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (6) showed remarkable activity to attenuate the scopolamine induced memory deficit of mice. Compound 6 and another major one, quercetin (8) also exhibited moderate cell protecting activities against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced PC12 cell damage.

  17. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.

  18. Profiling of phenolics from Tephrosia cinerea.

    PubMed

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Montoro, Paola; Macchia, Mario; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    An HPLC-ESIMS(n) method, based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray positive ionization multistage ion trap mass spectrometry, has been used to rapidly identify and guide the isolation of phenolic constituents from the methanol extract of the aerial parts of T. cinerea. On the basis of the results of the online screening by HPLC-ESIMS (n), 17 phenolic constituents, including two new compounds, namely demethylapollinin 7- O- β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and cineroside A (17), were isolated, and their structures were unambiguously assigned by the extensive use of 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments.

  19. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  20. Phenol dissociation on pristine and defective graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Hantarto; Oluwoye, Ibukun; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Hamra, A. A. B.; Lim, H. N.; Huang, N. M.; Yin, Chun-Yang; Jiang, Zhong-Tao

    2017-03-01

    Phenol (C6H5O‒H) dissociation on both pristine and defective graphene sheets in terms of associated enthalpic requirements of the reaction channels was investigated. Here, we considered three common types of defective graphene, namely, Stone-Wales, monovacancy and divacancy configurations. Theoretical results demonstrate that, graphene with monovacancy creates C atoms with dangling bond (unpaired valence electron), which remains particularly useful for spontaneous dissociation of phenol into phenoxy (C6H5O) and hydrogen (H) atom. The reactions studied herein appear barrierless with reaction exothermicity as high as 2.2 eV. Our study offers fundamental insights into another potential application of defective graphene sheets.

  1. Alginate-based hybrid aerogel microparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Gurikov, P; Poejo, J; Matias, A A; Heinrich, S; Duarte, C M M; Smirnova, I

    2016-10-01

    The application of biopolymer aerogels as drug delivery systems (DDS) has gained increased interest during the last decade since these structures have large surface area and accessible pores allowing for high drug loadings. Being biocompatible, biodegradable and presenting low toxicity, polysaccharide-based aerogels are an attractive carrier to be applied in pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, some polysaccharides (e.g. alginate and chitosan) present mucoadhesive properties, an important feature for mucosal drug delivery. This feature allows to extend the contact of DDS with biological membranes, thereby increasing the absorption of drugs through the mucosa. Alginate-based hybrid aerogels in the form of microparticles (<50μm) were investigated in this work as carriers for mucosal administration of drugs. Low methoxyl pectin and κ-carrageenan were co-gelled with alginate and further dried with supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Spherical mesoporous aerogel microparticles were obtained for alginate, hybrid alginate/pectin and alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogels, presenting high specific surface area (370-548m(2)g(-1)) and mucoadhesive properties. The microparticles were loaded with ketoprofen via adsorption from its solution in sc-CO2, and with quercetin via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation. Loading of ketoprofen was in the range between 17 and 22wt% whereas quercetin demonstrated loadings of 3.1-5.4wt%. Both the drugs were present in amorphous state. Loading procedure allowed the preservation of antioxidant activity of quercetin. Release of both drugs from alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogel was slightly faster compared to alginate/pectin. The results indicate that alginate-based aerogel microparticles can be viewed as promising matrices for mucosal drug delivery applications.

  2. Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, K; Lowe, T; Meharg, C; Berry, S H; Foley, J; Hold, G L

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS--namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  3. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes.

  4. [Malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Slavícek, A; Astl, J; Válková, D; Betka, J; Petruzelka, L

    2000-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma comparison to cutaneous melanoma of the head and neck are rare and do poorly. Approximately 0.5-2% of all melanomas occur from the mucous membranes of aerodigestive tract. Most common site of the tumor are the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses but melanoma of the oral cavity are described too. Therapy usually consists of surgical resection with or without postoperative radiotherapy and immunochemotherapy eventually. The definite role of a kind of therapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma is not remains to be defined as the small number of cases make prospective study challenging. This article reviews 19 patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery Charles University of Prague since 1980 to 1999. Clinical data were obtained from the patient's charts. Analysis of the metastatic disease, type of therapy and follow-up was retrospectively reviewed. The site of the tumor was the lateral wall of the nasal cavity (five cases), nasal septum (four cases), maxilar cavity (two cases), and ethmoidal cavity, orbitoethmoidal complex, nasopharynx, saccus lacrimalis to ethmoidal sinuses diffused, tonsilla (one case each) and hypopharynx (two cases). Primary treatment was surgical resection in ten cases, in one case with radiation therapy, and in seven cases chemotherapy. In three cases were diagnostic surgery only and one patient was without therapy. Three patients received radical neck dissection more. Four patients were treated radiation therapy and three chemotherapy after surgery. In two cases were surgery after primary radiotherapy. For nine cases of recurrence of the disease were surgery (in five cases) and chemotherapy (in four cases). Overal and disease free interval was from 2 to 22 month, approximately 9.3 month and 3-year survival was 41.18%.

  5. Mucosal Microbiome in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, K.; Lowe, T.; Meharg, C.; Berry, S.H.; Foley, J.; Hold, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  6. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent.

  7. Biodegradation of phenol at high initial concentration by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Wen, Jianping; Bai, Jing; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Zongding

    2007-08-17

    Strain Alcaligenes faecalis was isolated and identified as a member of the genus Alcaligenes by using BIOLOG and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The phenol biodegradation tests showed that the phenol-degrading potential of A. faecalis related greatly to the different physiological phases of inoculum. The maximum phenol degradation occurred at the late phase of the exponential growth stages, where 1600 mg L(-1) phenol was completely degraded within 76 h. A. faecalis secreted and accumulated a vast quantity of phenol hydroxylase in this physiological phase, which ensured that the cells could quickly utilize phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. In addition, the kinetic behavior of A. faecalis in batch cultures was also investigated over a wide range of initial phenol concentrations (0-1600 mg L(-1)) by using Haldane model. It was clear that the Haldane kinetic model adequately described the dynamic behavior of the phenol biodegradation by the strain of A. faecalis.

  8. Supercritical extraction of phenols from organically modified smectite

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Yeo, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Supercritical extraction has been performed in a fixed column to desorb phenol and 4-nitrophenol from organically modified smectite. The experiments were carried out in the sequence of adsorption of hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) to montmorillonite, adsorption of phenols to organoclay in aqueous solutions, desorption of phenols from loaded organoclay using supercritical carbon dioxide, and adsorption of phenols to regenerated organoclay. The desorption characteristics of phenols were investigated at various pressures up to 420 bar; at temperatures of 40, 60, and 70 C, and at low concentrations of a cosolvent. The extraction percentages of phenols reached up to 90% in 3 hours of extraction. The results showed that under the experimental conditions investigated, the activity of HDTMA was intact during the supercritical extraction of phenols, and hence HDTMA-modified montmorillonite exhibited undiminished adsorption power toward phenols after several regeneration cycles.

  9. Thalidomide induces mucosal healing in postoperative Crohn disease endoscopic recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Xinying; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thalidomide has been successful use in patients with refractory Crohn disease (CD) in recent years. Methods: We collected the data of a postoperative CD patient who was prescribed thalidomide to induce remission and reviewed the relevant literatures. Results: A 51-year-old female was diagnosed as CD after an urgent terminal intestinal resection and presented endoscopic recurrence despite the prophylactic treatment with azathioprine (AZA). Fortunately, she achieved mucosal healing (MH) at a low dose of thalidomide for 15 months. Conclusion: Thalidomide is effective to induce MH in the postoperative CD endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27603389

  10. Isoniazid Induced Lupus Presenting as Oral Mucosal Ulcers with Pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ankale, Padmaraj; Sinha, Kanishk; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, T.K

    2016-01-01

    Drug Induced Lupus Erythematous (DILE) is a rare adverse reaction to a large variety of drugs including Isoniazid (INH), with features resembling idiopathic Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Diagnosis require identification of a temporal relationship between drug administered and symptom. It is an idiosyncratic reaction, with no pre-existing lupus. Our case highlights a rare presentation of isoniazid induced lupus with profound pancytopenia and mucosal ulcers, thus posing a diagnostic challenge. The patient was on multidrug treatment for pulmonary and knee joint tuberculosis. DILE was diagnosed on basis of strongly positive Anti Nuclear Antibodies (ANA), anti ds DNA and antihistone antibodies with clinical response to cessation of INH. PMID:27891378

  11. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in grapes by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS on a semimicro separation scale.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Isabella; Bello, Cristiano; De Rossi, Antonella; Corradini, Danilo

    2008-10-08

    occurring in the whole berries of nine red and one white grape of different varieties of Vitis vinifera, comprising some autochthonous varieties of south Italy such as Aglianico, Malvasia Nera, Uva di Troia, Negroamaro, Primitivo, and Susumaniello. Large differences in the content of phenolic compounds was found in the investigated grape varieties. As expected, only glycosilated flavonols were quantified, and the total amount of these compounds was higher in the whole berries of red grapes than in the white Moscato, where the most abundant phenolic compound was quercetin 3-O-glucoside. In almost all samples, the most and least abundant anthocyanins were malvidin 3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, respectively, with the exception of Uva di Troia where the least abundant anthocyanin was delphinidin 3-O-glucoside.

  12. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  13. Red Hill Updates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  14. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a spiked band of red airglow called a 'Red Crown' above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  15. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  16. Egypt and Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A panaramic view of eastern Egypt, The Red Sea and Saudi Arabia beyond (24.0N, 33.0E). In this desert country, where water is life, the high Aswan Dam and the impounded waters of the Nile River in the foreground assure water availability into the next century. The Red Sea beyond, part of the Suez Canal seaway, serves as a commercial link to the world and separates Egypt from Saudi Arabia.

  17. Phenolic antioxidants in some Vigna species of legumes and their distinct inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase activities.

    PubMed

    Sreerama, Yadahally N; Takahashi, Yoko; Yamaki, Kohji

    2012-09-01

    Phenolic extracts of 4 Vigna species of legumes (mung bean, moth bean, and black and red varieties of adzuki beans) were evaluated for phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and inhibitory properties against α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase. Results showed that adzuki bean varieties contain higher phenolic indexes than mung bean and moth beans. Adzuki bean (black) variety was found to be the most active 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion scavenger. However, the hydrogen peroxide scavenging and metal chelating abilities were significantly higher in adzuki bean (red) variety. Mung bean exhibited least antioxidant activities in all the methods tested. Phenolic extracts from these legumes also showed distinct variations in the inhibition of enzymes associated with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Inhibitory activities of all the extracts against lipase were found to be more potent than α-glucosidase. Although, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity was superior in the black variety of adzuki bean (IC(50,) 26.28 mg/mL), both adzuki bean varieties (black and red) along with moth bean showed strong inhibitory activities on lipase with no significant difference in their IC(50) values (7.32 to 9.85 mg/mL). These results suggest that Vigna species of legumes are potential source of antioxidant phenolics and also great sources of strong natural inhibitors for α-glucosidase and lipase activities. This information may help for effective utilization of these legumes as functional food ingredients for promoting health. Practical Application:  Vigna species of legumes are good sources of phenolic antioxidants and strong natural inhibitors of enzymes associated with diabetes and obesity. Therefore, utilization of these legumes in the development of functional foods with increased therapeutic value would be a significant step toward health promotion and wellness.

  18. 40 CFR 721.843 - Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.843 Substituted phenylazophenylazo phenol (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted phenylazophenylazo, phenol (PMN P-00-0420) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5900 - Trisubstituted phenol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trisubstituted phenol (generic name... Substances § 721.5900 Trisubstituted phenol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance trisubstituted phenol (PMN P-85-605) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10456 - Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10456 Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (PMN P-03-104) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10456 - Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10456 Tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... tristyryl phenol alkoxylate salt (PMN P-03-104) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5713 - Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5713 Phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (generic). (a) Chemical... as a phenol - biphenyl polymer condensate (PMN P-00-1220) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  8. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol and phenolic compounds Part I. Adsorption and FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Araña, J; Pulido Melián, E; Rodríguez López, V M; Peña Alonso, A; Doña Rodríguez, J M; González Díaz, O; Pérez Peña, J

    2007-07-31

    With the goal of predicting the photocatalytic behaviour of different phenolic compounds (catechol, resorcinol, phenol, m-cresol and o-cresol), their adsorption and interaction types with the TiO(2) Degussa P-25 surface were studied. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied in the adsorption studies. The obtained results indicated that catechol adsorption is much higher than those of the other phenolics and its interaction occurs preferentially through the formation of a catecholate monodentate. Resorcinol and the cresols interact by means of hydrogen bonds through the hydroxyl group, and their adsorption is much lower than that of catechol. Finally, phenol showed an intermediate behaviour, with a Langmuir adsorption constant, K(L), much lower than that of catechol, but a similar interaction. The interaction of the selected molecules with the catalyst surface was evaluated by means of FTIR experiments, which allowed us to determine the probability of OH radical attack to the aromatic ring.

  9. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds have generated significant interest recently as feed additives that can impart bioactive characteristics such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties to a feed formulation [1-2]. Such natural compounds may offer some preventive benefit to the routine administra...

  10. Phenolic compounds in Ross Sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, Roberta; Barbaro, Elena; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo; Corami, Fabiana; Kehrwald, Natalie; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic compounds are semi-volatile organic compounds produced during biomass burning and lignin degradation in water. In atmospheric and paleoclimatic ice cores studies, these compounds are used as biomarkers of wood combustion and supply information on the type of combusted biomass. Phenolic compounds are therefore indicators of paleoclimatic interest. Recent studies of Antarctic aerosols highlighted that phenolic compounds in Antarctica are not exclusively attributable to biomass burning but also derive from marine sources. In order to study the marine contribution to aerosols we developed an analytical method to determine the concentration of vanillic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, syringic acid, isovanillic acid, homovanillic acid, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone and acetovanillone present in dissolved and particle phases in Sea Ross waters using HPLC-MS/MS. The analytical method was validated and used to quantify phenolic compounds in 28 sea water samples collected during a 2012 Ross Sea R/V cruise. The observed compounds were vanillic acid, vanillin, acetovanillone and p-coumaric acid with concentrations in the ng/L range. Higher concentrations of analytes were present in the dissolved phase than in the particle phase. Sample concentrations were greatest in the coastal, surficial and less saline Ross Sea waters near Victoria Land.

  11. Three new phenolic compounds from Dalbergia odorifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Dong, Wen-Hua; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Hui-Min; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Three new phenolic compounds (1-3) were isolated from the heartwood of Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen. (Leguminosae). Their structures were established based on spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR (HSQC, COSY, HMBC and ROESY). Compound 2 exhibited cytotoxicity against BEL-7402 tumor cell lines.

  12. Extraction of phenolics from pomegranate peels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of different solvents, temperature conditions, solvent-solid ratios and particle sizes on solid-solvent extraction of the total phenolics, proanthocyanidins and flavonoids herein also referred to as antioxidant from pomegranate marc peel (PMP) was studied. Water, methanol, ethanol, aceto...

  13. [Spectrophotometric determination of phenol and sodium tosylchloramide].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, G; Bodiroga, M; Jasminka, O

    1991-01-01

    A possible quantitative analysis of oil injections of phenol and tosylchloramide sodium solution using the spectrophotometric method in the UV field has been examined. The results have been compared with results of official methods, bromometry and iodometry. The proposed spectrophotometric method is suitable due to its speed and simplicity in work giving precise and reproducible results.

  14. [Treatment and prevention of cancer treatment related oral mucositis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esquide, Gonzalo; Nervi, Bruno; Vargas, Alex; Maíz, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    One of the most common and troublesome complications of modern intensive anticancer treatments is oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to summarize current evidence and clinical guidelines regarding its prevention and therapy. The use of keratinocyte growth factor-1, supplementary glutamine and other recently developed treatment modalities are discussed. The injury of the oral mucosa caused by antineoplastic agents promotes the local expression of multiple pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic molecules and eventually leads to the development of ulcers. Such lesions predispose patients to several infectious and nutritional complications. Also, they lead to modification of treatment schedules, potentially affecting overall prognosis. Local cryotherapy with ice chips and phototherapy with low energy laser may be useful as preventive measures. Mouthwashes with allopurinol and phototherapy with low energy laser can be used as treatment. In radiotherapy, special radiation administration techniques should be used to minimize mucosal injury. Pain control should always be optimized, with the use of patient controlled analgesia and topical use of morphine. Supplemental glutamine should not be used outside of research protocols. Lastly, thorough attention should be paid to general care and hygiene measures.

  15. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  16. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia.

  17. The clinical characteristics of benign oral mucosal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ilana; Gal, Gavriel; Chaushu, Gavriel; Allon, Dror M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the clinical characteristics and pre-biopsy provisional diagnoses of benign oral mucosal tumors. Material and Methods: A 10- year retrospective analysis of all benign tumors of the oral mucosa, from a university- affiliated oral and maxillofacial surgery department. Results: 146 benign tumors were included. The mean age was 49.6 years, with an approximately equal gender distribution. The most prevalent tumor types were lipomatous tumors (27.4%), vascular (23.3%), and salivary gland tumors (16.5%). Tongue, labial and buccal mucosa were the most frequently involved sites. The vast majority (98.6%) presented as non-ulcerated masses. Only 2 (1.4%) presented as ulcerated masses. The clinical provisional diagnosis correctly classified lesions as non-malignant in 93.3%. In only 9 (6.7%) suspicion of malignancy was included in the provisional diagnosis. However, benign neoplasia was unsuspected in 42.1% of tumors. These cases were clinically classified as reactive. Conclusions: Benign tumors were most likely to be clinically correctly classified as non-malignant, but even in the setting of experienced oral surgeons, neoplasia was unsuspected in more than 40% of cases. This data strongly supports the need to biopsy every oral mucosal mass, since inaccurate clinical evaluation of the lesion’s biological nature was a frequent event. Key words:Malignant, benign, reactive, ulcerated mass, non-ulcerated mass, clinical diagnosis. PMID:24316705

  18. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  19. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  20. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Škrnjug, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity – a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines. PMID:25295996

  1. A physical identity for the gastric mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    1990-07-16

    An oligolamellar lining which is probably phospholipid has been demonstrated on the gastric mucosal surface of the rat by transmission electron microscopy using fixation procedures specially developed to avoid the destruction of hydrophobic surfaces. This structure is unlikely to be an artefact since the use of two hydrophobic probes in epifluorescence microscopy gave emissions characteristic of oligolamellar phospholipid prepared in vitro. Moreover, lipid solvents almost eliminated both the fluorescence and the hydrophobicity. An oligolamellar lining was seen also on deeper structures, including oxyntic ducts and canaliculi in parietal cells, and it might offer a physical basis for the hitherto elusive gastric mucosal barrier. Parietal cells were also found to contain multilamellar bodies which, in the lung at least, represent phospholipid (surfactant) in a particularly surface-active form and one conducive to its deposition on tissue surfaces. This suggests that the parietal cell could gear the protection (surfactant) to the potential insult (acid) by secreting both together. The demonstration of a simple physical barrier preventing the stomach from digesting itself is discussed in regard to suggesting the use of certain surface-active foods which could be beneficial in preventing gastric ulcers and their recurrence after the acute phase has been treated using conventional therapies.

  2. Contact allergy and respiratory/mucosal complaints from heroin (diacetylmorphine).

    PubMed

    Hogen Esch, A J; van der Heide, S; van den Brink, W; van Ree, J M; Bruynzeel, D P; Coenraads, P J

    2006-01-01

    After the start of heroin (diacetylmorphine)-assisted treatment to a selected group of chronic treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients in the Netherlands, we reported about work-related eczema and positive patch tests to heroin in some nurses and nasal and respiratory complaints. To investigate the prevalence of heroin contact allergy, we started a questionnaire-based study with follow-up by allergological examinations. Of 120 questionnaires sent, 101 (84%) was returned: 67 from nurses and 34 from other employees. Of 101 workers, 38 (38%) had reported work-related complaints: 33 of 67 (49%) nurses and 5 of 34 (15%) other employees. Patch tests to heroin were performed in 24 nurses and were positive in 8 (33%). All the 8 had eyelid or facial eczema and, in 6, accompanied by mucosal or respiratory complaints. The prevalence of heroin contact allergy in this study was 8% (8/101) among all employees and 12% (8/67) among nurses. Respiratory and mucosal complaints could not be ascribed to a contact allergy, and in these cases, serum was analysed for specific immunoglobulin E to heroin. A type 1 allergy to heroin could not be shown. These complaints are possibly due to the histamine-liberating effect of heroin, to atopic constitution, to a combination of these factors or - less likely - to other non-allergic factors.

  3. Epidemiology of the most common oral mucosal diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Rioboo-Crespo, Maria del Rosario; Planells-del Pozo, Paloma; Rioboo-García, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Dentists who treat children must be alert to the possibility of finding diseases of the oral mucosa, especially in younger children. The present study aimed to review the most updated information and the experience of our group in order to yield epidemiological data that assist diagnosis of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa in children. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a wide variability in the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in different regions of the world and have led researchers to draw disparate conclusions. Moreover, studies have not been designed using standard criteria, further explaining the wide variability in the percentage of different groups of children with oral lesions, which ranges from 4.1 to 52.6%. The lesions most frequently considered by authors and that most often appear in the different studies are: recurrent aphthous stomatitis (0.9-10.8%), labial herpes (0.78-5.2%), fissured tongue (1.49-23%), geographic tongue (0.60-9.8%), oral candidiasis (0.01-37%) and traumatic injury (0.09%-22.15%). Dentists must be able to detect any of the numerous possible disorders and perform the correct differential diagnosis, key to the treatment plan. The aim of this paper, based on a review of the different national and international studies, is to contribute data on the most important oral mucosal diseases in the paediatric population in terms of prevalence and differential diagnosis.

  4. Handling and Pathology Reporting of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Mucosal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Owen, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is a non-invasive alternative to surgery that is now frequently used for resection of early lesions in both upper and lower parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. One of the main advantages of these techniques is providing tissue for histopathological examination. Pathological examination of endoscopically resected specimens of GI tract is a crucial component of these procedures and is useful for prediction of both the risk of metastasis and lymph node involvement. As the first step, it is very important for the pathologist to handle the EMR gross specimen in the correct way: it should be oriented, and then the margins should be labeled and inked accurately before fixation. In the second step, the EMR pathological report should include all the detailed information about the diagnosis, grading, depth of invasion (mucosa only or submucosal involvement), status of the margins, and the presence or absence of lymphovascular invasion. The current literature (PubMed and Google Scholar) was searched for the words "endoscopic mucosal resection" to find all relevant publications about this technique with emphasis on the pathologist responsibilities. PMID:28316760

  5. Isolation and identification of plant phenolic compounds in birch leaves: Air pollution stress and leaf phenolics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loponen, Jyrki Mikael

    Chromatographic (analytical and preparative HPLC), chemical (hydrolysis) and spectroscopic (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS) techniques proved to be suitable tools for the structure identification of plant phenolic compounds. More than 30 individual phenolic compounds were detected and quantified. Detailed information of the structures of individual compounds was determined after isolation from birch leaves. Ten flavonoid glycosides were identified. Two of them, myricetin-3-O-α-L-(acetyl)-rhamnopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-α-L-(4/prime'-O-acetyl)- rhamnopyranoside, have been rarely found in birch leaves. Further, some characterized major phenolics with non- flavonoid structures in our study were 1-O-galloyl- β-D-(2-O-acetyl)-glucopyranose, gallic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic, cis- and trans-forms of 3- and 5-p-coumaroylquinic acids. The presence of gallotannin group was evidenced by strong positive correlations between concentrations of these gallotannins (preliminary identified by HPLC and UV spectra) and the protein precipitation capacity of extracts. Content of gallotannins decreased with leaf growth and maturation. It is known that concentrations of phenolic compounds regularly increase in slowly growing stressed plants and therefore, it is natural that they are also sensitive to different forms of air pollution. Total content and the contents of some individual phenolics correlated negatively with the distance from the pollution source in our study area. In addition to comparing absolute concentrations of compounds in question, the within-tree correlations or within-tree variations of the relevant compounds between polluted and control areas were an alternative approach. Differences in pairwise correlations between the investigated leaf phenolic compounds indicated the competition between some gallotannins and p-coumaroylquinic acids on the polluted but not on the control site. Air pollution seems to be a stress factor for birch trees associated with

  6. Influence of pre-harvest red light irradiation on main phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of Chinese kale sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingdan; Qian, Hongmei; Chen, Lili; Sun, Bo; Chang, Jiaqi; Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wang, Qiaomei

    2017-05-01

    The effects of pre-harvest red light irradiation on main healthy phytochemicals as well as antioxidant activity of Chinese kale sprouts during postharvest storage were investigated. 6-day-old sprouts were treated by red light for 24h before harvest and sampled for further analysis of nutritional quality on the first, second and third day after harvest. The results indicated that red light exposure notably postponed the degradation of aliphatic, indole, and total glucosinolates during postharvest storage. The vitamin C level was remarkably higher in red light treated sprouts on the first and second day after harvest when compared with the control. In addition, red light treatment also enhanced the accumulation of total phenolics and maintained higher level of antioxidant activity than the control. All above results suggested that pre-harvest red light treatment might provide a new strategy to maintain the nutritive value of Chinese kale sprouts during postharvest storage.

  7. Effect of phenolic monomers on ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, W S; Akin, D E; VanEseltine, W P

    1986-01-01

    Ruminal bacteria were subjected to a series of phenolic compounds in various concentrations to acquire fundamental information on the influence on growth and the potential limits to forage utilization by phenolic monomers. Ruminococcus albus 7, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens 49, and Lachnospira multiparus D-32 were tested against 1, 5, and 10 mM concentrations of sinapic acid, syringaldehyde, syringic acid, ferulic acid, vanillin, vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and hydrocinnamic acid. Responses were variable and dependent on the phenolic compound and microbial species. Compounds especially toxic (i.e., resulting in poor growth, effect on several species, dose-related response) were p-coumaric acid and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and adaptation to the toxins did not occur after three 24-h periods. Syringic, p-hydroxybenzoic, and hydrocinnamic acids stimulated growth of all four species and also stimulated filter paper degradation by R. flavefaciens. None of the stimulatory compounds supported microbial growth in the absence of carbohydrates. In vitro dry matter digestibility of cellulose (Solka-Floc) was not stimulated by any of the phenolic compounds (10 mM), but the cinnamic acids and benzoic aldehydes (10 mM) reduced (P less than 0.05) digestion by the mixed population in ruminal fluid. Growth of R. flavefaciens in the presence of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (10 mM) or p-coumaric acid (5 mM) resulted in recognizable alterations in cell ultrastructure. Both phenolics caused a reduction in cell size (P less than 0.05), and p-coumaric acid caused a reduction in capsular size (P less than 0.05) and produced occasional pleomorphic cells. Images PMID:3789721

  8. Turnover capacity of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase for phenol and monosubstituted phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, M.D.; Heck, P.E.

    1998-05-01

    Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and other peroxidases are susceptible to mechanism-based inactivation during the oxidation of phenolic substrates. The turnover capacity of CIP was quantified for phenol and 11 monosubstituted phenols under conditions in which enzyme inactivation by mechanisms involving hydrogen peroxide alone were minimized. Turnover capacities varied by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the substituent. On a mass basis, the enzyme consumption corresponding to the lowest turnover capacities is considerable and may influence the economic feasibility of proposed industrial applications of peroxidases. Within a range of substituent electronegativity values, molar turnover capacities correlated well (r{sup 2} = 0.89) with substituent effects quantified by radical {sigma} values and semiquantitatively with homolytic O-H bond dissociation energies of the phenolic substrates, suggesting that phenoxyl radical intermediates are probably involved in the suicide inactivation of CIP. The correlation range in each case did not include phenols with highly electron-withdrawing (nitro and cyano) substituents because they are not oxidized by CIP, nor phenols with highly electron-donating (hydroxy and amino) substituents because they led to virtually complete inactivation of the enzyme with minimal substrate removal.

  9. Oral mucosal immunotherapy using a toothpaste delivery system for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Reisacher, William; Rudner, Shara; Kotik, Viktoriya

    2014-01-01

    Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy is a novel method of delivering allergenic extracts to the tolerogenic oropharyngeal mucosa using a compounded toothpaste vehicle. This article describes three cases where individuals with seasonal allergic rhinitis demonstrated symptom improvement as well as decreased skin reactivity after using Oral Mucosal Immunotherapy in a pre-seasonal and co-seasonal fashion.

  10. Prevention and Management of Mucositis in Patients with Cancer: a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Owlia, Fatemeh; Kazemeini, Seid kazem; Gholami, Neda

    2012-01-01

    After chemo/radiation therapy, mucositis is one of the most common side effects, so timely nursing care and instructed home care, significantly could decrease cost of medical care, and then increase quality of life. This review summarizes preventive and therapeutic intervention of mucositis (localized or systemic), between some of patients with cancer. PMID:25352973

  11. Mucoadhesive propolis gel for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Vladimir R A S; Araujo, Gustavo S; Gomes, Rafael T; Iwanaga, Samara H; Barbosa, Maralice C; Abdo, Evandro N; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Viana Campos, Ana C; Souza, Alexandre A; Abreu, Sheila R L; Santos, Vagner R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this phase II study was to determine the effectiveness of a mucoadhesive propolis gel in the prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Twenty-four patients who were selected to undergo radiation therapy for oral cancer were included in this open-label trial. They were advised to use a mucoadhesive gel containing propolis 5,0% w/v three times a day starting one day before the course of radiation therapy and concluding after 2 weeks of radiation therapy. A weekly follow-up for evaluation of food intake, pain and grading of mucositis was performed. In order to confirm the absence of Candida-related mucositis in patients who developed mucositis, it was performed exfoliative cytology of buccal mucosa, palate and tongue and the material for Candifast(®) Candida species identification. At the end of the study was made the compliance of patients, quality, appreciation and acceptance of product evaluation. Twenty patients did not develop mucositis, two patients developed grade 1 mucositis and two patients developed grade 2 mucositis. None of the patients discontinued food intake and no pain was observed during the study. Candidosis was not detected in any patient. Mucoadhesive propolis gel could be considered as a potential topical medication for preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis. However, comparative phase III study with larger number of patients should be done for confirmation of the efficacy of the product.

  12. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, M A H; Lopez-Lopez, E; te Winkel, M L; Tissing, W; de Rooij, J D E; Gutierrez-Camino, A; Garcia-Orad, A; den Boer, E; Pieters, R; Pluijm, S M F; de Jonge, R; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2015-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treated with four high infusions MTX (HD-MTX: 5 g m(-2)) every other week according to the DCOG-ALL-10 protocol. Mucositis (National Cancer Institute grade ⩾ 3) was the most frequent occurring toxicity during the HD-MTX phase (20%) and occurred especially after the first MTX course. Mucositis was not associated with plasma MTX, plasma folate or plasma homocysteine levels. Patients with mucositis had higher erythrocyte folate levels at the start of protocol M than patients without mucositis (median 1.4 vs 1.2 μmol l(-1), P<0.008), this could reflect an increased MTX uptake in mucosal cells of patients with mucositis. From 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MTX pathway, only patients with the wild-type variant of rs7317112 SNP in the ABCC4 gene had more mucositis (AA (39%) vs AG/GG (15%), P=0.016). We found no evidence that erythrocyte folate levels mediate in the association between the rs7317112 and mucositis.

  13. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  14. Branch pattern of starch internal structure influences the glucogenesis by mucosal Nt-maltase-glucoamylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To produce sufficient amounts of glucose from food starch, both alpha-amylase and mucosal alpha-glucosidases are required. We found previously that the digestion rate of starch is influenced by its susceptibility to mucosal alpha-glucosidases. In the present study, six starches and one glycogen were...

  15. Mucosal immune response in broilers following vaccination with inactivated influenza and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal and systemic immunity were observed in broilers vaccinated with mannosylated chitosan adjuvated (MCA) inactivated A/Turkey/Virginia/158512/2002 (H7N2) and administered with and without recombinant Bacillus subtilis to elicit heterologous influenza strain protection. Previously, mucosal immu...

  16. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Massimo; Rigacci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils) and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i) to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii) to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii) to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv) to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v) to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols. PMID:23765219

  17. Phenylalanine and LED lights enhance phenolic compound production in Tartary buckwheat sprouts.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Min; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Kim, Yeon-Bok; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2015-06-15

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) concentrations and various light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the accumulation of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, vitexin, rutin, quercetin, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside) in Tartary buckwheat sprouts. We found that 5mM was the optimum l-Phe concentration for the synthesis of total and individual phenolic compounds. The highest rutin (53.09 mg/g DW) and chlorogenic acid (5.62 mg/g DW) content was observed with Red+Blue and white lights. Comprehensive differences in total and individual anthocyanin content were observed between different lights; however, the total anthocyanin content (9.12 mg/g DW) was 1.5-fold higher in blue light. The expression levels of regulatory genes, such as FtDFR and FtANS, were 7.1-fold higher with l-Phe treatment. Gene expression results showed that the phenolic compounds in Tartary buckwheat sprouts increased with the use of l-Phe and LED lights.

  18. Development and optimisation of an HPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-ToF method for the determination of phenolic acids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Annalaura; Degano, Ilaria; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2014-01-01

    A method for the HPLC-MS/MS analysis of phenols, including phenolic acids and naphtoquinones, using an amide-embedded phase column was developed and compared to the literature methods based on classical C18 stationary phase columns. RP-Amide is a recently developed polar embedded stationary phase, whose wetting properties mean that up to 100% water can be used as an eluent. The increased retention and selectivity for polar compounds and the possibility of working in 100% water conditions make this column particularly interesting for the HPLC analysis of phenolic acids and derivatives. In this study, the chromatographic separation was optimised on an HPLC-DAD, and was used to separate 13 standard phenolic acids and derivatives. The method was validated on an HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF. The acquisition was performed in negative polarity and MS/MS target mode. Ionisation conditions and acquisition parameters for the Q-ToF detector were investigated by working on collision energies and fragmentor potentials. The performance of the method was fully evaluated on standards. Moreover, several raw materials containing phenols were analysed: walnut, gall, wine, malbec grape, French oak, red henna and propolis. Our method allowed us to characterize the phenolic composition in a wide range of matrices and to highlight possible matrix effects.

  19. Ethanol induces human red cell shape transformations and enhanced ligand-mediated agglutinability

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.S.; McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol concentrations are markedly elevated in rat stomach wall when ulcerogenic doses of 100 % ethanol (2 ml for 5 to 10 minutes) are instilled in rat gastric lumen. The authors observed that red cells in gastric mucosal postcapillary venules become spiculated and interadherent under these conditions. The authors have now studied this phenomenon in vitro using washing human red cells. Concentrations of high grade ethanol ranging from 2 to 10% (v/v) in physiological buffered saline (pH 7.3) without Ca/sup + +/ or Mg/sup + +/ at 25/sup 0/C rapidly transformed human red cells into spiculated forms. 2% ethanol transformed human red cells into disco-echinocytes in 15 min. whereas 10% ethanol transformed red blood cells into echinocytes within 3 min. Washing out of ethanol at 1 hour reverted the echinocytes into discocytes. However, following 3 hours of incubation in 10% ethanol washing out of ethanol produced stomatocytes. The ethanol-induced echinocytic shape transformations were accompanied by a dose-related increase in red cell agglutinability with poly-L-lysine or the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin. The enhanced agglutinability was reversed by restoring the red cell shape changes and alterations in surface properties may play a role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers.

  20. Inhibitory Effects of Red Wine on Lipid Oxidation in Fish Oil Emulsion and Angiogenesis in Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyan; Zhang, Yulin; Shen, Yixiao; Zhu, Yongchao; Wang, Hua; Xu, Zhimin

    2017-03-01

    The capabilities of red wine against lipid oxidation and angiogenesis were evaluated by using a fish oil emulsion system and an in vivo zebrafish embryos model, respectively. The red wine contained 12 different antioxidant phenolics which levels were led by anthocyanins (140.46 mg/L), catechin (55.08 mg/L), and gallic acid (46.76 mg/L). The diversity of the phenolics in red wine was greater than the tea, coffee, or white wine selected as a peer control in this study. The total phenolics concentration of red wine was 305.53 mg/L, although the levels of tea, coffee, and white wine were 85.59, 76.85, and 26.57 mg/L, respectively. The activity of red wine in scavenging DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radicals was approximately 4 times higher than the tea and 8 times than the coffee or white wine. The red wine showed the highest capability in preventing long chain PUFA oxidation in the fish oil emulsion. Because of the outstanding antioxidant activity of red wine, the red wine dried extract was used to monitor its inhibitory effect against angiogenesis by using transgenic zebrafish embryos (Tg[fli1:egfp](y1) ) with fluorescent blood vessels. After incubated in 100 μg/mL of the extract solution for 26 h pf, each of the embryos had a lower number of intersegmental vessel than the control embryo. The inhibition rate of red wine extract against growing of angiogenic blood vessel reached 100%.