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Sample records for phenylacetic acid degradation

  1. Phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids do not affect xylan degradation by Ruminococcus albus.

    PubMed

    Reveneau, Carine; Adams, Sarah E; Cotta, M A; Morrison, M

    2003-11-01

    Since the addition of either ruminal fluid or a combination of phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids (PAA/PPA) has previously been shown to dramatically improve cellulose degradation and growth of Ruminococcus albus, it was of interest to determine the effects of these additives on xylan-grown cultures. Although cell-bound xylanase activity increased when either PAA/PPA or ruminal fluid was added to the growth medium, total xylanase did not change, and neither of these supplements affected the growth or xylan-degrading capacity of R. albus 8. Similarly, neither PAA/PPA nor ruminal fluid affected xylan degradation by multiple strains of R. albus when xylan prepared from oat spelts was used as a carbohydrate source. These results show that the xylanolytic potential of R. albus is not conditional on the availability of PAA/PPA or other components of ruminal fluid.

  2. Phenylacetic and Phenylpropionic Acids Do Not Affect Xylan Degradation by Ruminococcus albus

    PubMed Central

    Reveneau, Carine; Adams, Sarah E.; Cotta, M. A.; Morrison, M.

    2003-01-01

    Since the addition of either ruminal fluid or a combination of phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids (PAA/PPA) has previously been shown to dramatically improve cellulose degradation and growth of Ruminococcus albus, it was of interest to determine the effects of these additives on xylan-grown cultures. Although cell-bound xylanase activity increased when either PAA/PPA or ruminal fluid was added to the growth medium, total xylanase did not change, and neither of these supplements affected the growth or xylan-degrading capacity of R. albus 8. Similarly, neither PAA/PPA nor ruminal fluid affected xylan degradation by multiple strains of R. albus when xylan prepared from oat spelts was used as a carbohydrate source. These results show that the xylanolytic potential of R. albus is not conditional on the availability of PAA/PPA or other components of ruminal fluid. PMID:14602663

  3. Styrene lower catabolic pathway in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST: identification and characterization of genes for phenylacetic acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Ferrara, Silvia; Ronco, Ilaria; Galli, Enrica; Sello, Guido; Papacchini, Maddalena; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    2007-08-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens ST is a styrene degrading microorganism that, by the sequential oxidation of the vinyl side chain, converts styrene to phenylacetic acid. The cluster of styrene upper pathway catabolic genes (sty genes) has been previously localized on a chromosomal region. This report describes the isolation, sequencing and analysis of a new chromosomal fragment deriving from the ST strain genomic bank that contains the styrene lower degradative pathway genes (paa genes), involved in the metabolism of phenylacetic acid. Analysis of the paa gene cluster led to the description of 14 putative genes: a gene encoding a phenylacetyl-CoA ligase (paaF), the enzyme required for the activation of phenylacetic acid; five ORFs encoding the subunits of a ring hydroxylation multienzymatic system (paaGHIJK); the gene paaW encoding a membrane protein of unknown function; five genes for a beta-oxidation-like system (paaABCDE), involved in the steps following the aromatic ring cleavage; a gene encoding a putative permease (paaL) and a gene (paaN) probably involved in the aromatic ring cleavage. The function of some of the isolated genes has been proved by means of biotransformation experiments.

  4. Uptake of phenylacetic acid by two strains of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, S H; Soderblom, T B; Jensen, B; Olsen, J

    1998-11-05

    Uptake of phenylacetic acid, the side-chain precursor of benzylpenicillin, was studied in Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 and in a strain yielding high levels of penicillin. In penicillin fermentations with the high-yielding strain, 100% recovery of phenylacetic acid in benzylpenicillin was found, whereas in the Wisconsin strain only 17% of the supplied phenylacetic acid was incorporated into benzylpenicillin while the rest was metabolized. Accumulation of total phenylacetic acid-derived carbon in the cells was nonsaturable in both strains at high external concentrations of phenylacetic acid (250-3500 microM), and in the high-yielding strain at low phenylacetic acid concentrations (2. 8-100 microM), indicating that phenylacetic acid enters the cells by simple diffusion, as concluded earlier for P. chrysogenum by other authors. However, at low external concentrations of phenylacetic acid saturable accumulation appeared in the Wisconsin strain. HPLC-analyses of cell extracts from the Wisconsin strain showed that phenylacetic acid was metabolized immediately after entry into the cells and different [14C]-labeled metabolites were detected in the cells. Up to approximately 50% of the accumulated phenylacetic acid was metabolized during the transport-assay period, the conversion having an impact on the uptake experiments. Nevertheless, accumulation of free unchanged phenylacetic acid in the cells showed saturation kinetics, suggesting the possible involvement of a high-affinity carrier in uptake of phenylacetic acid in P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255. At high concentrations of phenylacetic acid, contribution to uptake by this carrier is minor in comparison to simple diffusion and therefore, of no importance in the industrial production of penicillin.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; Sanz, Jesús M.; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li2SO4 and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution. PMID:22102047

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Sanz, Jesús M; Hermoso, Juan A

    2011-10-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li(2)SO(4) and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution.

  7. Mechanism of specific inhibition of phototropism by phenylacetic acid in corn seedling

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-05-01

    Using geotropism as a control for phototropism, compounds similar to phenylacetic acid that phototreact with flavins and/or have auxin-like activity were examined for their ability to specifically inhibit phototropism in corn seedlings using geotropism as a control. Results using indole-3-acetic acid, napthalene-1-acetic acid, naphthalene-2-acetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and ..beta..-phenylpyruvic acid suggest that such compounds will specifically inhibit phototropism primarily because of their photoreactivity with flavins and not their auxin activity. In addition, the in vivo concentration of phenylacetic acid required to induce specificity was well below that required to stimulate coleoptile growth. Estimates of the percentage of photoreceptor pigment inactivated by phenylacetic acid (>10%) suggest that phenylacetic acid could be used to photoaffinity label the flavoprotein involved in corn seedling phototropism.

  8. Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation of Alkenes and Reusability Study of the Phenylacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmalek, Emilia; Mizan, Hanis Nabillah; Abdul Rahman, Mohd. Basyaruddin; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Here, we focused on a simple enzymatic epoxidation of alkenes using lipase and phenylacetic acid. The immobilised Candida antarctica lipase B, Novozym 435 was used to catalyse the formation of peroxy acid instantly from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and phenylacetic acid. The peroxy phenylacetic acid generated was then utilised directly for in situ oxidation of alkenes. A variety of alkenes were oxidised with this system, resulting in 75–99% yield of the respective epoxides. On the other hand, the phenylacetic acid was recovered from the reaction media and reused for more epoxidation. Interestingly, the waste phenylacetic acid had the ability to be reused for epoxidation of the 1-nonene to 1-nonene oxide, giving an excellent yield of 90%. PMID:24587751

  9. Phenylacetic acid stimulation of cellulose digestion by Ruminococcus albus 8

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, R.J.; Hungate, R.E.; Opsahl, W.P.

    1983-09-01

    The rate of cellulose digestion by Ruminococcus albus 8 grown on a defined medium could be increased by adding a minimum of 6.6% (vol/vol) rumen fluid. Strain 8 was grown on half this concentration, and the culture medium before and after growth was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine which components of the rumen fluid were used. Phenylacetic acid was identified as the component needed to make the defined medium nutritionally equivalent to one supplemented with rumen fluid. (/sup 14/C)phenylacetic acid fed to cultures of strain 8 was primarily incorporated into protein. Hydrolysis of protein samples and separation of the resulting amino acids showed that only phenylalanine was labeled. The results indicate that cellulose digestion by strain 8 was probably limited by phenylalanine biosynthesis in our previously reported medium. The data obtained on the utilization of other rumen fluid components, as well as on the production of metabolites, illustrate the potential usefulness of this method in formulating defined media to simulate those in nature. 14 references.

  10. Isolation and In Vivo and In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Phenylacetic Acid and Sodium Phenylacetate from Streptomyces humidus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byung Kook; Lim, Song Won; Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Jung Yeop; Moon, Surk Sik

    2001-01-01

    The antifungal substances SH-1 and SH-2 were isolated from Streptomyces humidus strain S5-55 cultures by various purification procedures and identified as phenylacetic acid and sodium phenylacetate, respectively, based on the nuclear magnetic resonance, electron ionization mass spectral, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectral data. SH-1 and SH-2 completely inhibited the growth of Pythium ultimum, Phytophthora capsici, Rhizoctonia solani, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae at concentrations from 10 to 50 μg/ml. The two compounds were as effective as the commercial fungicide metalaxyl in inhibiting spore germination and hyphal growth of P. capsici. However, the in vivo control efficacies of the two antifungal compounds against P. capsici infection on pepper plants were similar to those of H3PO3 and fosetyl-AI but less than that of metalaxyl. PMID:11472958

  11. Isolation and in vivo and in vitro antifungal activity of phenylacetic acid and sodium phenylacetate from Streptomyces humidus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, B K; Lim, S W; Kim, B S; Lee, J Y; Moon, S S

    2001-08-01

    The antifungal substances SH-1 and SH-2 were isolated from Streptomyces humidus strain S5-55 cultures by various purification procedures and identified as phenylacetic acid and sodium phenylacetate, respectively, based on the nuclear magnetic resonance, electron ionization mass spectral, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectral data. SH-1 and SH-2 completely inhibited the growth of Pythium ultimum, Phytophthora capsici, Rhizoctonia solani, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae at concentrations from 10 to 50 microg/ml. The two compounds were as effective as the commercial fungicide metalaxyl in inhibiting spore germination and hyphal growth of P. capsici. However, the in vivo control efficacies of the two antifungal compounds against P. capsici infection on pepper plants were similar to those of H(3)PO(3) and fosetyl-AI but less than that of metalaxyl.

  12. The Physiological Significance of Phenylacetic Acid in Abscising Cotton Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Jeffrey C.; Mansager, Eugene R.

    1986-01-01

    The physiological role of phenylacetic acid (PAA) as an endogenous regulator of cotyledon abscission was examined using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG 102) seedlings. Application of 100 micromolar or more PAA to leafless cotyledon abscission-zone explants resulted in the retardation of petiole abscission and a decrease in the rise of ethylene evolution that normally accompanies aging of these explants in vitro. The partial inhibition of ethylene evolution in these explants by PAA was indirect since application of this compound stimulated short-term (<24 hours) ethylene production. PAA treatment partially suppressed the stimulation of petiole abscission elicited by either ethylene or abscisic acid. Both free and an acid-labile, bound form of PAA were identified in extracts prepared from cotyledons. No discernible pattern of changes in free or bound PAA was found during the course of ethylene-induced cotyledon abscission. Unlike indole-3-acetic acid, transport of PAA in isolated petiole segments was limited and exhibited little polarity. On the whole, these results are not consistent with the direct participation of PAA in the endogenous regulation of cotyledon abscission. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664834

  13. Iodide-catalyzed reductions: development of a synthesis of phenylacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Milne, Jacqueline E; Storz, Thomas; Colyer, John T; Thiel, Oliver R; Dilmeghani Seran, Mina; Larsen, Robert D; Murry, Jerry A

    2011-11-18

    A new convenient and scalable synthesis of phenylacetic acids has been developed via the iodide catalyzed reduction of mandelic acids. The procedure relies on in situ generation of hydroiodic acid from catalytic sodium iodide, employing phosphorus acid as the stoichiometric reductant.

  14. The ABC transporter ABC40 encodes a phenylacetic acid export system in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan S; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is used for the industrial production of β-lactam antibiotics. The pathway for β-lactam biosynthesis has been resolved and involves the enzyme phenylacetic acid CoA ligase that is responsible for the CoA activation of the side chain precursor phenylacetic acid (PAA) that is used for the biosynthesis of penicillin G. To identify ABC transporters related to β-lactam biosynthesis, we analyzed the expression of all 48 ABC transporters present in the genome of P. chryso-genum when grown in the presence and absence of PAA. ABC40 is significantly upregulated when cells are grown or exposed to high levels of PAA. Although deletion of this transporter did not affect β-lactam biosynthesis, it resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity to PAA and other weak acids. It is concluded that ABC40 is involved in weak acid detoxification in P. chrysogenum including resistance to phenylacetic acid.

  15. Hyperargininemia: clinical course and treatment with sodium benzoate and phenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, N; Maehara, M; Hayakawa, C; Kato, T; Watanabe, K; Suzuki, S

    1983-01-01

    In a patient with hyperargininemia, oral administration of sodium benzoate or phenylacetic acid together with an essential amino acid mixture was used to prevent hyperammonemia and to decrease plasma and CSF concentrations of arginine. Sodium benzoate reduced the plasma ammonia levels, which was confirmed by the increase of urinary excretion of hippuric acid. Phenylacetic acid also controlled hyperammonemia, and EEG findings also improved. By these treatments, plasma and CSF concentrations of arginine showed a slight decrease, but were far above the normal range. There was no clinical improvement, and spasticity of the lower and upper extremities was progressive with mental deterioration.

  16. Accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoate from styrene and phenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patrick G; de Roo, Guy; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2005-04-01

    Pseudomonas putida CA-3 is capable of converting the aromatic hydrocarbon styrene, its metabolite phenylacetic acid, and glucose into polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) when a limiting concentration of nitrogen (as sodium ammonium phosphate) is supplied to the growth medium. PHA accumulation occurs to a low level when the nitrogen concentration drops below 26.8 mg/liter and increases rapidly once the nitrogen is no longer detectable in the growth medium. The depletion of nitrogen and the onset of PHA accumulation coincided with a decrease in the rate of substrate utilization and biochemical activity of whole cells grown on styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose. However, the efficiency of carbon conversion to PHA dramatically increased once the nitrogen concentration dropped below 26.8 mg/liter in the growth medium. When supplied with 67 mg of nitrogen/liter, the carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios that result in a maximum yield of PHA (grams of PHA per gram of carbon) for styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose are 28:1, 21:1, and 18:1, respectively. In cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, decreasing the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio below 28:1 and 21:1, respectively, by increasing the nitrogen concentration and using a fixed carbon concentration leads to lower levels of PHA per cell and lower levels of PHA per batch of cells. Increasing the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio above 28:1 and 21:1 for cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, respectively, by decreasing the nitrogen concentration and using a fixed carbon concentration increases the level of PHA per cell but results in a lower level of PHA per batch of cells. Increasing the carbon and nitrogen concentrations but maintaining the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 28:1 and 21:1 for cells grown on styrene and phenylacetic acid, respectively, results in an increase in the total PHA per batch of cells. The maximum yields for PHA from styrene, phenylacetic acid, and glucose are 0.11, 0.17, and 0.22 g of PHA per g of carbon

  17. Conformational equilibrium of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated analogues through theoretical studies, NMR and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandowski, Mariana N.; Rozada, Thiago C.; Melo, Ulisses Z.; Basso, Ernani A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a study on the conformational preferences of phenylacetic acid (PA) and its halogenated analogues (FPA, CPA, BPA). To clarify the effects that rule these molecules' behaviour, theoretical calculations were used, for both the isolated phase and solution, combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Most conformations of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated derivatives are stabilized through the hyperconjugative effect, which rules the conformational preference. NMR analyses showed that even with the variation in medium polarity, there was no significant change in the conformation population. Infrared spectroscopy showed similar results for all compounds under study. In most spectra, two bands were found through the carbonyl deconvolution, which is in accordance with the theoretical data. It was possible to prove that variation in the nature of the substituent in the ortho position had no significant influence on the conformational equilibrium.

  18. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L.; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Schulze, Keith E.; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J.; Lieschke, Graham J.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease. PMID:27506797

  19. Genetic Analysis of the Upper Phenylacetate Catabolic Pathway in the Production of Tropodithietic Acid by Phaeobacter gallaeciensis

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Martine; Brock, Nelson L.; Liesegang, Heiko; Dogs, Marco; Preuth, Ines; Simon, Meinhard; Dickschat, Jeroen S.

    2012-01-01

    Production of the antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA) depends on the central phenylacetate catabolic pathway, specifically on the oxygenase PaaABCDE, which catalyzes epoxidation of phenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our study was focused on genes of the upper part of this pathway leading to phenylacetyl-CoA as precursor for TDA. Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 encodes two genes with homology to phenylacetyl-CoA ligases (paaK1 and paaK2), which were shown to be essential for phenylacetate catabolism but not for TDA biosynthesis and phenylalanine degradation. Thus, in P. gallaeciensis another enzyme must produce phenylacetyl-CoA from phenylalanine. Using random transposon insertion mutagenesis of a paaK1-paaK2 double mutant we identified a gene (ior1) with similarity to iorA and iorB in archaea, encoding an indolepyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (IOR). The ior1 mutant was unable to grow on phenylalanine, and production of TDA was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type level (60%). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic investigations using 13C-labeled phenylalanine isotopomers demonstrated that phenylalanine is transformed into phenylacetyl-CoA by Ior1. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we could show that expression of ior1 depends on the adjacent regulator IorR. Growth on phenylalanine promotes production of TDA, induces expression of ior1 (27-fold) and paaK1 (61-fold), and regulates the production of TDA. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the aerobic type of IOR as found in many roseobacters is common within a number of different phylogenetic groups of aerobic bacteria such as Burkholderia, Cupriavidis, and Rhizobia, where it may also contribute to the degradation of phenylalanine. PMID:22407685

  20. Distinct Characteristics of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid, Two Common Auxins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Satoko; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Keita; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Sakai, Tatsuya; Hanada, Kousuke; Kinoshita-Tsujimura, Kaori; Yu, Hong; Dai, Xinhua; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Takeda-Kamiya, Noriko; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro; Estelle, Mark; Zhao, Yunde; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a central role in many aspects of plant growth and development. IAA is the most studied natural auxin that possesses the property of polar transport in plants. Phenylacetic acid (PAA) has also been recognized as a natural auxin for >40 years, but its role in plant growth and development remains unclear. In this study, we show that IAA and PAA have overlapping regulatory roles but distinct transport characteristics as auxins in plants. PAA is widely distributed in vascular and non-vascular plants. Although the biological activities of PAA are lower than those of IAA, the endogenous levels of PAA are much higher than those of IAA in various plant tissues in Arabidopsis. PAA and IAA can regulate the same set of auxin-responsive genes through the TIR1/AFB pathway in Arabidopsis. IAA actively forms concentration gradients in maize coleoptiles in response to gravitropic stimulation, whereas PAA does not, indicating that PAA is not actively transported in a polar manner. The induction of the YUCCA (YUC) genes increases PAA metabolite levels in Arabidopsis, indicating that YUC flavin-containing monooxygenases may play a role in PAA biosynthesis. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of plant growth and development by different types of auxins. PMID:26076971

  1. New Perspectives on Mechanisms of Decarboxylation in Hydrothermal Fluids from Studies of Substituted Phenylacetic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, C. R.; Gould, I. R.; Lorance, E. D.; Shock, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Decarboxylation reactions are thought to play a crucial role in transforming organic compounds in the deep carbon cycle [1]. Simple decarboxylation, defined as conversion of a carboxylic acid into an alkane and carbon dioxide, can turn substances of little economic value into ones of great value. Rates of decarboxylation of acetic acid and acetate at hydrothermal conditions have been reported [2], but no theory exists to rationalize those data. Without a theoretical model for how decarboxylations occur, it is risky to extrapolate available information to diverse geochemical conditions and molecular structures found in natural systems. We have been studying kinetics of decarboxylation of substituted phenylacetic acids and phenylacetates to gain insights into mechanisms of decarboxylation in water at high temperatures and pressures. These model compounds represent powerful tools for deciphering said mechanisms, as their patterns of reactivity reflect mechanistic details. Results from experiments performed at 300°C and 103 MPa suggest that simple decarboxylation of phenylacetic acids to toluenes follows an electrophilic substitution mechanism, featuring a benzyl anion as the key intermediate. This mechanism is consistent with the observed reactivity order of fluorophenylacetic acids: para (1) < ortho (2.3) < meta (26), where relative rate constants are given in parentheses. Classically, this trend can be understood in terms of resonance and inductive effects on benzyl anion stability [3]. For example, para-fluoro causes a slow rate because it donates electrons that repel the delocalized electrons of the benzyl anion, which destabilizes the anion. However, experiments with methylphenylacetic acids have revealed that factors other than carbanion stability are more important in some cases, as we found that certain methyl substituents, such as meta-methyl, increase rates of decarboxylation. Causes of these unexpected rate enhancements may include steric effects

  2. Phenylacetate synergizes with retinoic acid in inducing the differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidell, N; Wada, R; Han, G; Chang, B; Shack, S; Moore, T; Samid, D

    1995-02-08

    Phenylacetate, a natural metabolite of phenylalanine which was originally described as a plant growth hormone, has recently gained attention as a possible differentiation inducer for a variety of human tumor cell types. This interest prompted us to assess the ability of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) to promote the differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells, both alone and in combination with retinoic acid (RA), a known inducer of neuroblastoma differentiation and maturation. Using the LA-N-5 cell line, we have determined that NaPA can stimulate the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, as evidenced by dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, neurite outgrowth, increased acetylcholinesterase activity and reduction of N-myc expression. Furthermore, NaPA and RA synergized in inducing differentiation, in that combination treatment resulted in cessation of cell growth along with morphologic and biochemical changes indicative of the loss of malignant properties. We have determined that NaPA can markedly enhance mRNA levels of the nuclear RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) in LA-N-5 cells prior to morphologic or other phenotypic changes induced by this compound. This effect appeared to be distinct from the ability of NaPA to alter tumor cell lipid metabolism via inhibition of protein isoprenylation. Thus among its varied effects on LA-N-5 cells, NaPA appears to interact with the RA pathway at the nuclear level by up-regulating RAR beta expression.

  3. The transport of phenylacetic acid across the peroxisomal membrane is mediated by the PaaT protein in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aguado, Marta; Ullán, Ricardo V; Teijeira, Fernando; Rodríguez-Castro, Raquel; Martín, Juan F

    2013-04-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum, an industrial microorganism used worldwide for penicillin production, is an excellent model to study the biochemistry and the cell biology of enzymes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites. The well-known peroxisomal location of the last two steps of penicillin biosynthesis (phenylacetyl-CoA ligase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase) requires the import into the peroxisomes of the intermediate isopenicillin N and the precursors phenylacetic acid and coenzyme A. The mechanisms for the molecular transport of these precursors are still poorly understood. In this work, a search was made, in the genome of P. chrysogenum, in order to find a Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) membrane protein homologous to CefT of Acremonium chrysogenum, which is known to confer resistance to phenylacetic acid. The paaT gene was found to encode a MFS membrane protein containing 12 transmembrane spanners and one Pex19p-binding domain for Pex19-mediated targeting to peroxisomal membranes. RNA interference-mediated silencing of the paaT gene caused a clear reduction of benzylpenicillin secretion and increased the sensitivity of P. chrysogenum to the penicillin precursor phenylacetic acid. The opposite behavior was found when paaT was overexpressed from the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter that increases phenylacetic acid resistance and penicillin production. Localization studies by fluorescent laser scanning microscopy using PaaT-DsRed and EGFP-SKL fluorescent fusion proteins clearly showed that the protein was located in the peroxisomal membrane. The results suggested that PaaT is involved in penicillin production, most likely through the translocation of side-chain precursors (phenylacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid) from the cytosol to the peroxisomal lumen across the peroxisomal membrane of P. chrysogenum.

  4. Transcriptional upregulation of retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) expression by phenylacetate in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidell, N; Chang, B; Yamashiro, J M; Wada, R K

    1998-02-25

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) has been shown to synergize with retinoic acid (RA) in inducing the differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells. Our studies indicated that NaPA can impact on the RA differentiation program by upregulating nuclear retinoic acid receptor-beta (RAR beta) expression. We have found that NaPA does not alter the half-life of RAR beta mRNA; thus, increased stability of mRNA levels does not contribute to NaPA induction. In contrast, NaPA was able to specifically activate a reporter gene construct (delta SV beta RE-CAT) which contains a retinoic acid response element (RARE beta) that is located in the RAR beta promoter. Activation of delta SV beta RE-CAT by NaPA also occurred in neuroblastoma cells cotransfected with a nuclear retinoic acid receptor expression vector, demonstrating the independence of this activation on cellular RAR levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that induction of RAR beta by NaPA is regulated at the level of transcription and mediated through the retinoic acid response element, RARE beta. This effect may account, at least in part, for the strong synergy between NaPA and RA in promoting neuroblastoma differentiation.

  5. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward Phenylacetic Acid Is Mediated by the Energy Taxis Receptor Aer2

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Rita A.; Schneider, Benjamin J.; Ho, Christie C.; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E.; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2013-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway. PMID:23377939

  6. Taxis of Pseudomonas putida F1 toward phenylacetic acid is mediated by the energy taxis receptor Aer2.

    PubMed

    Luu, Rita A; Schneider, Benjamin J; Ho, Christie C; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Ngwesse, Stacy E; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Juanito V; Ditty, Jayna L; Parales, Rebecca E

    2013-04-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is a widely distributed funneling pathway for the catabolism of aromatic compounds, including the environmental pollutants styrene and ethylbenzene. However, bacterial chemotaxis to PAA has not been studied. The chemotactic strain Pseudomonas putida F1 has the ability to utilize PAA as a sole carbon and energy source. We identified a putative PAA degradation gene cluster (paa) in P. putida F1 and demonstrated that PAA serves as a chemoattractant. The chemotactic response was induced during growth with PAA and was dependent on PAA metabolism. A functional cheA gene was required for the response, indicating that PAA is sensed through the conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system. A P. putida F1 mutant lacking the energy taxis receptor Aer2 was deficient in PAA taxis, indicating that Aer2 is responsible for mediating the response to PAA. The requirement for metabolism and the role of Aer2 in the response indicate that P. putida F1 uses energy taxis to detect PAA. We also revealed that PAA is an attractant for Escherichia coli; however, a mutant lacking a functional Aer energy receptor had a wild-type response to PAA in swim plate assays, suggesting that PAA is detected through a different mechanism in E. coli. The role of Aer2 as an energy taxis receptor provides the potential to sense a broad range of aromatic growth substrates as chemoattractants. Since chemotaxis has been shown to enhance the biodegradation of toxic pollutants, the ability to sense PAA gradients may have implications for the bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons that are degraded via the PAA pathway.

  7. Optimization of Lipase-Mediated Synthesis of 1-Nonene Oxide Using Phenylacetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmalek, Emilia; Arumugam, Mahashanon; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Herein, an efficient epoxidation of 1-nonene is described. In a simple epoxidation system, commercially available Novozym 435, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were utilized to facilitate the in situ oxidation of phenylacetic acid to the corresponding peroxy acid which then reacted with 1-nonene to give 1-nonene oxide with high yield and selectivity. The aliphatic terminal alkene was epoxidised efficiently in chloroform to give an excellent yield (97%–99%) under the optimum reaction conditions, including temperature (35 °C), initial H2O2 concentration (30%), H2O2 amount (4.4 mmol), H2O2 addition rate (one step), acid amount (8.8 mmol), and stirring speed (250 rpm). Interestingly, the enzyme was stable under the single-step addition of H2O2 with a catalytic activity of 190.0 Ug−1. The entire epoxidation process was carried out within 12 h using a conventional water bath shaker. PMID:23202943

  8. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David S.; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S.; McAdam, Erin L.; Quittenden, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA. However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  9. Aerobic catabolism of phenylacetic acid in Pseudomonas putida U: biochemical characterization of a specific phenylacetic acid transport system and formal demonstration that phenylacetyl-coenzyme A is a catabolic intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Schleissner, C; Olivera, E R; Fernández-Valverde, M; Luengo, J M

    1994-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid transport system (PATS) of Pseudomonas putida U was studied after this bacterium was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing phenylacetic acid (PA) as the sole carbon source. Kinetic measurement was carried out, in vivo, at 30 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Under these conditions, the uptake rate was linear for at least 3 min and the value of Km was 13 microM. The PATS is an active transport system that is strongly inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol (100%), KCN (97%), 2-nitrophenol (90%), or NaN3 (80%) added at a 1 mM final concentration (each). Glucose or D-lactate (10 mM each) increases the PATS in starved cells (140%), whereas arsenate (20 mM), NaF, or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (1 mM) did not cause any effect. Furthermore, the PATS is insensitive to osmotic shock. These data strongly suggest that the energy for the PATS is derived only from an electron transport system which causes an energy-rich membrane state. The thiol-containing compounds mercaptoethanol, glutathione, and dithiothreitol have no significant effect on the PATS, whereas thiol-modifying reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetate strongly inhibit uptake (100 and 93%, respectively). Molecular analogs of PA with a substitution (i) on the ring or (ii) on the acetyl moiety or those containing (iii) a different ring but keeping the acetyl moiety constant inhibit uptake to different extents. None of the compounds tested significantly increase the PA uptake rate except adipic acid, which greatly stimulates it (163%). The PATS is induced by PA and also, gratuitously, by some phenyl derivatives containing an even number of carbon atoms on the aliphatic moiety (4-phenyl-butyric, 6-phenylhexanoic, and 8-phenyloctanoic acids). However, similar compounds with an odd number of carbon atoms (benzoic, 3-phenylpropionic, 5-phenylvaleric, 7-phenylheptanoic, and 9-phenylnonanoic acids) as well as many other PA derivatives do not induce the system

  10. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  11. Improved plant regeneration from wheat anther and barley microspore culture using phenylacetic acid (PAA).

    PubMed

    Ziauddin, A; Marsolais, A; Simion, E; Kasha, K J

    1992-09-01

    The effect of the auxin phenylacetic acid (PAA) on wheat anther and on barley anther/microspore culture was investigated. With PAA the induction response was not usually significantly different from controls but a significantly higher number of green plants were produced in wheat anther and barley microspore culture. For wheat anther culture 100 mg/L PAA was beneficial. For barley microspore culture the optimum levels were from 1 to 100 mg/L, depending on genotype. In barley anther culture there were no improvements using PAA. In wheat anther culture, 145 green plants/100 anthers were obtained with cultivar Veery'S', while the average response from twelve F1 hybrids in the breeding program was 332 green plants/100 anthers. At least 1000 green plants were obtained using isolated microspores from 100 anthers in barley cv. Igri. With cv. Bruce, regeneration occurred only when 100 mg/L PAA was used. The influence of PAA appears at the embryogenic phase of the culture system. The possible mechanisms by which PAA may improve regeneration are discussed.

  12. Methyl jasmonate stimulates biosynthesis of 2-phenylethylamine, phenylacetic acid and 2-phenylethanol in seedlings of common buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Horbowicz, Marcin; Wiczkowski, Wiesław; Sawicki, Tomasz; Szawara-Nowak, Dorota; Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Mitrus, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate has a strong effect on secondary metabolizm in plants, by stimulating the biosynthesis a number of phenolic compounds and alkaloids. Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) is an important source of biologically active compounds. This research focuses on the detection and quantification of 2-phenylethylamine and its possible metabolites in the cotyledons, hypocotyl and roots of common buckwheat seedlings treated with methyl jasmonate. In cotyledons of buckwheat sprouts, only traces of 2-phenylethylamine were found, while in the hypocotyl and roots its concentration was about 150 and 1000-times higher, respectively. Treatment with methyl jasmonate resulted in a 4-fold increase of the 2-phenylethylamine level in the cotyledons of 7-day buckwheat seedlings, and an 11-fold and 5-fold increase in hypocotyl and roots, respectively. Methyl jasmonate treatment led also to about 4-fold increase of phenylacetic acid content in all examined seedling organs, but did not affect the 2-phenylethanol level in cotyledons, and slightly enhanced in hypocotyl and roots. It has been suggested that 2-phenylethylamine is a substrate for the biosynthesis of phenylacetic acid and 2-phenylethanol, as well as cinnamoyl 2-phenethylamide. In organs of buckwheat seedling treated with methyl jasmonate, higher amounts of aromatic amino acid transaminase mRNA were found. The enzyme can be involved in the synthesis of phenylpyruvic acid, but the presence of this compound could not be confirmed in any of the examined organs of common buckwheat seedling.

  13. Reactions of {4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}acetic acid (phenylacetic acid mustard) with 2'-deoxyribonucleosides.

    PubMed

    Florea-Wang, Diana; Ijäs, Inna; Hakala, Kristo; Mattinen, Jorma; Vilpo, Juhani; Hovinen, Jari

    2007-03-01

    Phenylacetic acid mustard (PAM; 2), a major metabolite of the anticancer agent chlorambucil (CLB; 1), was allowed to react with 2'-deoxyadenosine (dA), 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG), 2'-deoxycytidine (dC), 2'-deoxy-5-methylcytidine (dMeC), and thymidine (T) at physiological pH (cacodylic acid, 50% base). The reactions were followed by HPLC and analyzed by HPLC/MS and/or (1)H-NMR techniques. Although the predominant reaction observed was hydrolysis of PAM, 2 also reacted with various heteroatoms of the nucleosides to give a series of products: compounds 5-31. PAM (2) was found to be hydrolytically slightly more stable than CLB (1). The principal reaction sites of 2 with dA, dG, and with all pyrimidine nucleosides were N(1), N(7), and N(3), resp. Also, several other adducts were detected and characterized. There was no significant difference in the reactivity of 1 and 2 with dG, dA or T, but the N(3) dC-PAM adduct was deaminated easier than the corresponding CLB derivative. The role of PAM-2'-deoxyribonucleoside adducts on the cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of CLB (1) is discussed.

  14. Lovastatin and sodium phenylacetate normalize the levels of very long chain fatty acids in skin fibroblasts of X- adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Pahan, K; Khan, M

    1998-04-24

    The present study underlines the importance of lovastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and the sodium salt of phenylacetic acid (NaPA), an inhibitor of mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase, in normalizing the pathognomonic accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in cultured skin fibroblasts of X-adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) in which the ALD gene is either mutated or deleted. Lovastatin or NaPA alone or in combination stimulated the beta-oxidation of lignoceric acid (C24:0) and normalized the elevated levels of VLCFA in skin fibroblasts of X-ALD. Ability of lovastatin and NaPA to normalize the pathognomonic accumulation of VLCFA in skin fibroblasts of X-ALD may identify these drugs as possible therapeutics for X-ALD.

  15. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Produced by Burkholderia heleia Acts as a Phenylacetic Acid Antagonist to Disrupt Tropolone Biosynthesis in Burkholderia plantarii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengcen; Tachibana, Seiji; Murai, Yuta; Li, Li; Lau, Sharon Yu Ling; Cao, Mengchao; Zhu, Guonian; Hashimoto, Makoto; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia heleia PAK1-2 is a potent biocontrol agent isolated from rice rhizosphere, as it prevents bacterial rice seedling blight disease caused by Burkholderia plantarii. Here, we isolated a non-antibacterial metabolite from the culture fluid of B. heleia PAK1-2 that was able to suppress B. plantarii virulence and subsequently identified as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA suppressed the production of tropolone in B. plantarii in a dose-dependent manner without any antibacterial and quorum quenching activity, suggesting that IAA inhibited steps of tropolone biosynthesis. Consistent with this, supplementing cultures of B. plantarii with either L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine or [ring-2H2~5]phenylacetic acid revealed that phenylacetic acid (PAA), which is the dominant metabolite during the early growth stage, is a direct precursor of tropolone. Exposure of B. plantarii to IAA suppressed production of both PAA and tropolone. These data particularly showed that IAA produced by B. heleia PAK1-2 disrupts tropolone production during bioconversion of PAA to tropolone via the ring-rearrangement on the phenyl group of the precursor to attenuate the virulence of B. plantarii. B. heleia PAK1-2 is thus likely a microbial community coordinating bacterium in rhizosphere ecosystems, which never eliminates phytopathogens but only represses production of phytotoxins or bacteriocidal substances. PMID:26935539

  16. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Urra, Johana; Rosenkranz, Francisca; Kroff, Pablo Araya; Plugge, Caroline M; Lesty, Yves; Chamy, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale municipal WWTP in Santiago de Chile, and fed with either primary or mixed sewage sludge. AD performance was evaluated by volatile fatty acid (VFA) and biogas production monitoring. Archaeal community structure was characterized by 16S rRNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and band sequencing. In the primary sludge digester, a single PAA pulse at 200 mg L(-1) was sufficient to affect AD performance and archaeal community structure, resulting in long-term VFA accumulation, reduced biogas production and community shift from dominant acetoclastic (Methanosaeta concilii) to hydrogenotrophic (Methanospirillum hungatei) methanogens. By contrast, AD performance and archaeal community structure in the mixed sludge digester were stable and resistant to repeated PAA pulses at 200 and 600 mg L(-1). This work demonstrated that the effect of PAA pulses on methanogenic activity and archaeal community structure differed according to AD substrate, and suggests that better insights of the correlations between archaeal population dynamics and functional performance could help to better face toxic shocks in AD.

  17. Functional role of phenylacetic acid from metapleural gland secretions in controlling fungal pathogens in evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Nash, David R.; Higginbotham, Sarah; Estrada, Catalina; van Zweden, Jelle S.; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Wcislo, William T.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungus-farming ant colonies vary four to five orders of magnitude in size. They employ compounds from actinomycete bacteria and exocrine glands as antimicrobial agents. Atta colonies have millions of ants and are particularly relevant for understanding hygienic strategies as they have abandoned their ancestors' prime dependence on antibiotic-based biological control in favour of using metapleural gland (MG) chemical secretions. Atta MGs are unique in synthesizing large quantities of phenylacetic acid (PAA), a known but little investigated antimicrobial agent. We show that particularly the smallest workers greatly reduce germination rates of Escovopsis and Metarhizium spores after actively applying PAA to experimental infection targets in garden fragments and transferring the spores to the ants' infrabuccal cavities. In vitro assays further indicated that Escovopsis strains isolated from evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants are less sensitive to PAA than strains from phylogenetically more basal fungus-farming ants, consistent with the dynamics of an evolutionary arms race between virulence and control for Escovopsis, but not Metarhizium. Atta ants form larger colonies with more extreme caste differentiation relative to other attines, in societies characterized by an almost complete absence of reproductive conflicts. We hypothesize that these changes are associated with unique evolutionary innovations in chemical pest management that appear robust against selection pressure for resistance by specialized mycopathogens. PMID:25925100

  18. Functional role of phenylacetic acid from metapleural gland secretions in controlling fungal pathogens in evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Nash, David R; Higginbotham, Sarah; Estrada, Catalina; van Zweden, Jelle S; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Wcislo, William T; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2015-05-22

    Fungus-farming ant colonies vary four to five orders of magnitude in size. They employ compounds from actinomycete bacteria and exocrine glands as antimicrobial agents. Atta colonies have millions of ants and are particularly relevant for understanding hygienic strategies as they have abandoned their ancestors' prime dependence on antibiotic-based biological control in favour of using metapleural gland (MG) chemical secretions. Atta MGs are unique in synthesizing large quantities of phenylacetic acid (PAA), a known but little investigated antimicrobial agent. We show that particularly the smallest workers greatly reduce germination rates of Escovopsis and Metarhizium spores after actively applying PAA to experimental infection targets in garden fragments and transferring the spores to the ants' infrabuccal cavities. In vitro assays further indicated that Escovopsis strains isolated from evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants are less sensitive to PAA than strains from phylogenetically more basal fungus-farming ants, consistent with the dynamics of an evolutionary arms race between virulence and control for Escovopsis, but not Metarhizium. Atta ants form larger colonies with more extreme caste differentiation relative to other attines, in societies characterized by an almost complete absence of reproductive conflicts. We hypothesize that these changes are associated with unique evolutionary innovations in chemical pest management that appear robust against selection pressure for resistance by specialized mycopathogens. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel insights in transport mechanisms and kinetics of phenylacetic acid and penicillin-G in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Deshmukh, Amit T; de Jonge, Lodewijk P; de Jong, Bouke W; Seifar, Reza M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2012-01-01

    Although penicillin-G (PenG) production by the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is a well-studied process, little is known about the mechanisms of transport of the precursor phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the product PenG over the cell membrane. To obtain more insight in the nature of these mechanisms, in vivo stimulus response experiments were performed with PAA and PenG in chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum at time scales of seconds to minutes. The results indicated that PAA is able to enter the cell by passive diffusion of the undissociated acid at a high rate, but is at the same time actively excreted, possibly by an ATP-binding cassette transporter. This results in a futile cycle, dissipating a significant amount of metabolic energy, which was confirmed by increased rates of substrate and oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production. To estimate the kinetic properties of passive import and active export of PAA over the cell membrane, a dynamic mathematical model was constructed. With this model, a good description of the dynamic data could be obtained. Also, PenG was found to be rapidly taken up by the cells upon extracellular addition, indicating that PenG transport is reversible. The measured concentration gradient of PenG over the cell membrane corresponded well with facilitated transport. Also, for PenG transport, a dynamic model was constructed and validated with experimental data. The outcome of the model simulations was in agreement with the presence of a facilitated transport system for PenG.

  20. Elucidating the role of the phenylacetic acid metabolic complex in the pathogenic activity of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Faith E; Glassbrook, Norman J; Danehower, David A; Cubeta, Marc A

    2012-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani produces phytotoxic phenylacetic acid (PAA) and hydroxy (OH-) and methoxy (MeO-) derivatives of PAA. However, limited information is available on the specific role that these compounds play in the development of Rhizoctonia disease symptoms and concentration(s) required to induce a host response. Reports that PAA inhibits the growth of R. solani conflict with the established ability of the fungus to produce and metabolize PAA. Experiments were conducted to clarify the role of the PAA metabolic complex in Rhizoctonia disease. In this study the concentration of PAA and derivatives required to induce tomato root necrosis and stem canker, in the absence of the fungus, and the concentration that inhibits mycelial growth of R. solani were determined. The effect of exogenous PAA and derivatives of PAA on tomato seedling growth also was investigated. Growth of tomato seedlings in medium containing 0.1-7.5 mM PAA and derivatives induced necrosis of up to 85% of root system. Canker development resulted from injection of tomato seedling stems with 7.5 mM PAA, 3-OH-PAA, or 3-MeO-PAA. PAA in the growth medium reduced R. solani biomass, with 50% reduction observed at 7.5 mM. PAA, and derivatives were quantified from the culture medium of 14 isolates of R. solani belonging to three distinct anastomosis groups by GC-MS. The quantities ranged from below the limit of detection to 678 nM, below the concentrations experimentally determined to be phytotoxic. Correlation analyses revealed that isolates of R. solani that produced high PAA and derivatives in vitro also caused high mortality on tomato seedlings. The results of this investigation add to the body of evidence that the PAA metabolic complex is involved in Rhizoctonia disease development but do not indicate that production of these compounds is the primary or the only determinant of pathogenicity.

  1. Phenylacetic acid co-crystals with acridine, caffeine, isonicotinamide and nicotinamide: Crystal structures, thermal analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2017-07-01

    Co-crystals of phenylacetic acid (PAA) with acridine (ACR), caffeine (CAF), isonicotinamide (INM) and nicotinamide (NAM) have been successfully prepared and characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and Hirshfeld surface analysis. The ACR, INM and NAM co-crystals with PAA exhibit the carboxylic acid-pyridine heterosynthon. Furthermore the amide-amide supramolecular homosynthon is observed in the PAA co-crystals with INM and NAM as well as Nsbnd H⋯O interactions between the acid and the respective base. The CAF co-crystal exhibits hydrogen bonding between the imidazole nitrogen and the COOH group of the PAA. The compounds demonstrate different stoichiometries; for PAA·ACR and PAA·INM a 1:1 ratio is displayed, a 2:1 in 2PAA·CAF and a 2:2 in the case of 2PAA·2NAM.

  2. Antifungal and sprout regulatory bioactivities of phenylacetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and tyrosol isolated from the potato dry rot suppressive bacterium Enterobacter cloacae S11:T:07.

    PubMed

    Slininger, P J; Burkhead, K D; Schisler, D A

    2004-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae S11: T:07 (NRRL B-21050) is a promising biological control agent that has significantly reduced both fungal dry rot disease and sprouting in laboratory and pilot potato storages. The metabolites phenylacetic acid (PAA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and tyrosol (TSL) were isolated from S11:T:07 liquid cultures provided with three different growth media. The bioactivities of these metabolites were investigated via thin-layer chromatography bioautography of antifungal activity, wounded potato assays of dry rot suppressiveness, and cored potato eye assays of sprout inhibition. Relative accumulations of PAA, IAA, and TSL in cultures were nutrient dependent. For the first time, IAA, TSL, and PAA were shown to have antifungal activity against the dry rot causative pathogen Gibberella pulicaris, and to suppress dry rot infection of wounded potatoes. Disease suppression was optimal when all three metabolites were applied in combination. Dosages of IAA that resulted in disease suppression also resulted in sprout inhibition. These results suggest the potential for designing culture production and formulation conditions to achieve a dual purpose biological control agent able to suppress both dry rot and sprouting of stored potatoes.

  3. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of organic compounds on gold. adsorption of chloroacetic and phenylacetic acid, and the effects of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on it

    SciTech Connect

    Horani, G.; Andreev, V.N.; Vazarinov, V.E.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of monochloroacetic and phenylacetic acid (MA and PA, respectively) by the radiotracer technique on gold-plated gold electrodes in acidic solutions. The authors also study the effect of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on these processes. The adsorption of MA was measured as a function of potential of the electrode. Data from these measurements are presented. Data show that cadmium, copper, and silver ions present in the solution have no effect on the adsorption of PA at potentials where they are not adsorbed on the gold surface. It is confirmed that the radiotracer technique will be as effective in adsorption studies on the gold-plated gold electrode as it was in the case of the platinized platinum electrode.

  4. Amplification and disruption of the phenylacetyl-CoA ligase gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding an aryl-capping enzyme that supplies phenylacetic acid to the isopenicillin N-acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Vaca, Inmaculada; Rodríguez, Esther; Casqueiro, Javier; Martín, Juan F

    2006-04-01

    A gene, phl, encoding a phenylacetyl-CoA ligase was cloned from a phage library of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78. The presence of five introns in the phl gene was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The phl gene encoded an aryl-CoA ligase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase. The Phl protein contained most of the amino acids defining the aryl-CoA (4-coumaroyl-CoA) ligase substrate-specificity code and differed from acetyl-CoA ligase and other acyl-CoA ligases. The phl gene was not linked to the penicillin gene cluster. Amplification of phl in an autonomous replicating plasmid led to an 8-fold increase in phenylacetyl-CoA ligase activity and a 35% increase in penicillin production. Transformants containing the amplified phl gene were resistant to high concentrations of phenylacetic acid (more than 2.5 g/l). Disruption of the phl gene resulted in a 40% decrease in penicillin production and a similar reduction of phenylacetyl-CoA ligase activity. The disrupted mutants were highly susceptible to phenylacetic acid. Complementation of the disrupted mutants with the phl gene restored normal levels of penicillin production and resistance to phenylacetic acid. The phenylacetyl-CoA ligase encoded by the phl gene is therefore involved in penicillin production, although a second aryl-CoA ligase appears to contribute partially to phenylacetic acid activation. The Phl protein lacks a peptide-carrier-protein domain and behaves as an aryl-capping enzyme that activates phenylacetic acid and transfers it to the isopenicillin N acyltransferase. The Phl protein contains the peroxisome-targeting sequence that is also present in the isopenicillin N acyltransferase. The peroxisomal co-localization of these two proteins indicates that the last two enzymes of the penicillin pathway form a peroxisomal functional complex.

  5. Modulation of the phenylacetic acid metabolic complex by quinic acid alters the disease-causing activity of Rhizoctonia solani on tomato.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Faith E; Glassbrook, Norman J; Danehower, David A; Cubeta, Marc A

    2013-05-01

    The metabolic control of plant growth regulator production by the plant pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (teleomorph=Thanatephorus cucumeris (A.B. Frank) Donk) and consequences associated with the parasitic and saprobic activity of the fungus were investigated. Fourteen genetically distinct isolates of the fungus belonging to anastomosis groups (AG) AG-3, AG-4, and AG-1-IA were grown on Vogel's minimal medium N with and without the addition of a 25 mM quinic acid (QA) source of carbon. The effect of QA on fungal biomass was determined by measuring the dry wt of mycelia produced under each growth condition. QA stimulated growth of 13 of 14 isolates of R. solani examined. The production of phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the chemically related derivatives 2-hydroxy-PAA, 3-hydroxy-PAA, 4-hydroxy-PAA, and 3-methoxy-PAA on the two different media was compared by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The presence of QA in the growth medium of R. solani altered the PAA production profile, limiting the conversion of PAA to derivative forms. The effect of QA on the ability of R. solani to cause disease was examined by inoculating tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants with 11 isolates of R. solani AG-3 grown on media with and without the addition of 25 mM QA. Mean percent survival of tomato plants inoculated with R. solani was significantly higher when the fungal inoculum was generated on growth medium containing QA. The results of this study support the hypotheses that utilization of QA by R. solani leads to reduced production of the plant growth regulators belonging to the PAA metabolic complex which can suppress plant disease development.

  6. Microbial naphthenic Acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are an important group of trace organic pollutants predominantly comprising saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids. NAs are ubiquitous; occurring naturally in hydrocarbon deposits (petroleum, oil sands, bitumen, and crude oils) and also have widespread industrial uses. Consequently, NAs can enter the environment from both natural and anthropogenic processes. NAs are highly toxic, recalcitrant compounds that persist in the environment for many years, and it is important to develop efficient bioremediation strategies to decrease both their abundance and toxicity in the environment. However, the diversity of microbial communities involved in NA-degradation, and the mechanisms by which NAs are biodegraded, are poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the difficulties in identifying and purifying individual carboxylic acid compounds from complex NA mixtures found in the environment, for microbial biodegradation studies. This paper will present an overview of NAs, their origin and fate in the environment, and their toxicity to the biota. The review describes the microbial degradation of both naturally occurring and chemically synthesized NAs. Proposed pathways for aerobic NA biodegradation, factors affecting NA biodegradation rates, and possible bioremediation strategies are also discussed.

  7. Spectroscopic and theoretical study on alkali metal phenylacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regulska, E.; Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of phenylacetic acid was studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded for studied compounds. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along alkali metal phenylacetates were observed. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of phenylacetates and some alkali metal parameters such as ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy were found. The density functional hybrid method B3LYP with 6-311++G** basis set was used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were calculated as well as the wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra and chemical shifts in NMR spectra. The theoretical parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of alkali metal phenylacetates.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a newly identified impurity in methamphetamine synthesized via reductive amination of 1-phenyl-2-propanone (P2P) made from phenylacetic acid/lead (II) acetate.

    PubMed

    Toske, Steven G; McConnell, Jennifer B; Brown, Jaclyn L; Tuten, Jennifer M; Miller, Erin E; Phillips, Monica Z; Vazquez, Etienne R; Lurie, Ira S; Hays, Patrick A; Guest, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    A trace processing impurity found in certain methamphetamine exhibits was isolated and identified as trans-N-methyl-4-methyl-5-phenyl-4-penten-2-amine hydrochloride (1). It was determined that this impurity was produced via reductive amination of trans-4-methyl-5-phenyl-4-penten-2-one (4), which was one of a cluster of related ketones generated during the synthesis of 1-phenyl-2-propanone (P2P) from phenylacetic acid and lead (II) acetate. This two-step sequence resulted in methamphetamine containing elevated levels of 1. In contrast, methamphetamine produced from P2P made by other methods produced insignificant (ultra-trace or undetectable) amounts of 1. These results confirm that 1 is a synthetic marker compound for the phenylacetic acid and lead (II) acetate method. Analytical data for 1 and 4, and a postulated mechanism for the production of 4, are presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Amplification of an MFS transporter encoding gene penT significantly stimulates penicillin production and enhances the sensitivity of Penicillium chrysogenum to phenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Xu, Xinxin; Liu, Gang

    2012-11-20

    Penicillin is historically important as the first discovered drug against bacterial infections in human. Although the penicillin biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism have been well studied in Penicillium chrysogenum, the compartmentation and molecular transport of penicillin or its precursors are still poorly understood. In search of the genomic database, more than 830 open reading frames (ORFs) were found to encode transmembrane proteins of P. chrysogenum. In order to investigate their roles on penicillin production, one of them (penT) was selected and cloned. The deduced protein of penT belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and contains 12 transmembrane spanning domains (TMS). During fermentation, the transcription of penT was greatly induced by penicillin precursors phenylacetic acid (PAA) and phenoxyacetic acid (POA). Knock-down of penT resulted in significant decrease of penicillin production, while over-expression of penT under the promoter of trpC enhanced the penicillin production. Introduction of an additional penT in the wild-type strain of P. chrysogenum doubled the penicillin production and enhanced the sensitivity of P. chrysogenum to the penicillin precursors PAA or POA. These results indicate that penT stimulates penicillin production probably through enhancing the translocation of penicillin precursors across fungal cellular membrane.

  10. Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Akram, Waheed; Anjum, Tehmina; Ali, Basharat

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

  11. [Treatment of mix gas containing butyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and phenylacetic acid from pharmaceutical factory by bio-trickling filter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun-hui; Tian, Shu-lei; Xie, Wei-min; Zhang, Lan-he

    2005-03-01

    The bio-trickling filter packed with ZX02 stuffing is used to treat the mix gases containing butyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and phenylacetic acid(BBP), which are discharged from Penicillin workshop of Pharmaceutical Factory. The reactor was operated for 110 days to investigate the effect of influent load, retention time and spray water on the removal of BBP and the biodegradation characteristics. The reactor displayed preferential utilization of BBP, when the maximum influent load of BBP were 229.5g/(m3 x h), 275.4 g/(m3 x h) and 42.5g/(m3 x h), the removal efficiencies were 96%, 95% and 100% respectively. The results show that the bio-trickling filter can effectively treat the mix gases and the optimum parameters were as followed: retention time was 31.2 s, the volume of spray water was 4 L/(L x d). The bio- trickling reactor has strong ability to resist shock of high influent load and resistance is maintained at low value, what's more, it doesn't need to carry out back washing frequently. With all these advantages it can be operated steadily for long time.

  12. Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Waheed; Anjum, Tehmina; Ali, Basharat

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses. PMID:27148321

  13. Plasma protein binding of phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate, two novel antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, S; Lush, R M; McCall, N A; Samid, D; Reed, E; Figg, W D

    1996-12-01

    Phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate, two novel inducers of tumor cytostasis and differentiation, are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer in adults. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the plasma protein-binding characteristics of phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate in the plasma of normal volunteers and that of patients with cancer. Drug plasma protein-binding analysis was examined using three separate devices: a micropartition system and two equilibrium dialysis systems, all of which exhibited similar results. Phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both drugs exhibited concentration-dependent binding. Our results showed sodium phenylacetate to have a higher free fraction than sodium phenylbutyrate at corresponding concentrations (> 0.442 +/- 0.008 and > 0.188 +/- 0.001, respectively). Plasma pH did not greatly affect protein binding of either drug. As albumin concentration decreased, an increase in free fraction of both drugs was observed, however alpha 1-acid glyco-protein showed no change in free fraction as its concentration increased. Patients with cancer with lower levels of albumin showed an increase in free fraction with both phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate. When phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate were added together in plasma, the free fraction of phenylacetate increased, whereas the phenylbutyrate free fraction slightly decreased. We conclude that phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate have high free fractions that change with varying albumin levels and when both phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate are present together in plasma.

  14. [Degradation of L-phenylalanine and of aromatic carboxylic acids by chloridazon-degrading bacteria. Combination of side chain degradation and dioxygenase pathway].

    PubMed

    Wegst, W; Lingens, F

    1981-09-01

    Strain N of Chloridazon-degrading bacteria degrades phenylalanine via cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine,2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine aspartate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate [Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 360, 957--969, (1979); Biochem. J. 194, 679--684 (1981)]. cis-2,3-Dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine as well as phenylpyruvate, cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylpyruvate, 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpyruvate, cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate, 2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde are detectable in the medium of strain E during growth on phenylalanine. Incubation with phenylacetate, 3-phenylpropionate or 4-phenylbutyrate leads to the accumulation of the corresponding cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenyl derivatives. These compounds are transformed with dihydrodiol dehydrogenase to 2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate, 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate and 4-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)-butyrate, 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate is attacked by a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and the meta-cleavage product is again cleaved by a hydrolase yielding succinate. In a similar reaction sequence the degradation of 4-phenylbutyrate leads to the formation of glutarate. From the growth medium of strain E on phenylacetate also small amounts of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate were isolated. Resting cells were shown to metabolize 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate via homogentisate and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate. In the culture medium of strain K2AP benzoate could be detected. Pathways for the degradation of phenylalanine and aromatic carboxylic acids in chloridazon degrading bacteria are proposed.

  15. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Andrey M; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-06-12

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism-coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  16. Successful treatment of severe hyperammonemia using sodium phenylacetate powder prepared in hospital pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Koujirou; Sekizuka, Masayuki; Oshima, Yasuo; Nagai, Kazumi; Hashimoto, Gen-ichi; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Tomomasa, Takeshi; Konno, Yuko; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2002-09-01

    In order to treat a hyperammonemic patient with adult-onset type-II citrullinemia (CTLN2), sodium phenylacetate powder was prepared from chemical reagent grade phenylacetic acid in Gunma University Hospital. After purification by recrystalization, phenylacetic acid was neutralized with sodium carbonate and dried at 70 degrees C under reduced pressure. A solution of the prepared powder produced a single peak of m/z=181.0 (M+Na+) in electrospray-ionization-MS spectrogram. The content of phenylacetate was 74% of theoretical value, suggesting the existence of water of crystallization. The content of phenylacetate remained constant for 5 months under dark conditions at room temperature. The prepared sodium phenylacetate powder was orally administered to a 16-year-old patient with CTLN2 at a dosage of 12 g/d. The serum ammonia concentration of the patient, who did not show adequate response to intravenous arginine or oral sodium benzoic acid decreased remarkably to less than 100 microg/dl. Sodium phenylacetate powder should be an essential drug for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by an inborn error of the urea cycle.

  17. Defining a Structural and Kinetic Rationale for Paralogous Copies of Phenylacetate-CoA Ligases from the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Adrienne; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is the sole aerobic route for phenylacetic acid metabolism in bacteria and facilitates degradation of environmental pollutants such as styrene and ethylbenzene. The PAA pathway also is implicated in promoting Burkholderia cenocepacia infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Intriguingly, the first enzyme in the PAA pathway is present in two copies (paaK1 and paaK2), yet each subsequent enzyme is present in only a single copy. Furthermore, sequence divergence indicates that PaaK1 and PaaK2 form a unique subgroup within the adenylate-forming enzyme (AFE) superfamily. To establish a biochemical rationale for the existence of the PaaK paralogs in B. cenocepacia, we present high resolution x-ray crystal structures of a selenomethionine derivative of PaaK1 in complex with ATP and adenylated phenylacetate intermediate complexes of PaaK1 and PaaK2 in distinct conformations. Structural analysis reveals a novel N-terminal microdomain that may serve to recruit subsequent PAA enzymes, whereas a bifunctional role is proposed for the P-loop in stabilizing the C-terminal domain in conformation 2. The potential for different kinetic profiles was suggested by a structurally divergent extension of the aryl substrate pocket in PaaK1 relative to PaaK2. Functional characterization confirmed this prediction, with PaaK1 possessing a lower Km for phenylacetic acid and better able to accommodate 3′ and 4′ substitutions on the phenyl ring. Collectively, these results offer detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of a novel subgroup of the AFE superfamily and provide a clear biochemical rationale for the presence of paralogous copies of PaaK of B. cenocepacia. PMID:21388965

  18. A probing dose of phenylacetate does not affect glucose production and gluconeogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wajngot, A; Chandramouli, V; Schumann, W C; Brunengraber, H; Efendic, S; Landau, B R

    2000-09-01

    Phenylacetate ingestion has been used to probe Krebs cycle metabolism and to augment waste nitrogen excretion in urea cycle disorders. Phenylalkanoic acids, including phenylacetate, have been proposed as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetes. They inhibit gluconeogenesis in the liver in vitro and reduce the blood glucose concentration in diabetic rats. The effect of sodium phenylacetate ingestion on blood glucose and the contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production have now been studied in 7 type 2 diabetic patients. The study was not designed to test whether the changes in glucose metabolism observed in the rat could be reproduced in humans. After an overnight fast, over a period of 1 hour, 4.8 g phenylacetate was ingested, which is the highest dose used to probe Krebs cycle metabolism. Glucose production was measured by tracer kinetics using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose and gluconeogenesis by the labeling of the hydrogens of blood glucose on (2)H20 ingestion. The concentration of phenylacetate in plasma peaked by 2 hours after its ingestion, and about 40% of the dose was excreted in 5 hours. The plasma glucose concentration and production, and the contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production, were unaffected by phenylacetate ingestion at the highest dose used to probe Krebs cycle metabolism.

  19. Possible Phenylacetate Hepatotoxicity During 4-Phenylbutyrate Therapy of Byler Disease.

    PubMed

    Shneider, Benjamin L; Morris, Amy; Vockley, Jerry

    2016-03-01

    In vitro studies have suggested that 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) may rescue missense mutated proteins that underlie some forms of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis. Encouraging preliminary responses to 4-PBA have been reported in liver disease secondary to mutations in ABCB11 and ATP8B1. A 4-year-old boy with Byler disease was treated with 4-PBA in the forms of sodium PBA (5 months) and then glycerol PBA (7 months) as part of expanded access single patient protocols. During this therapy serum total bilirubin fell and his general well-being was reported to be improved, although total serum bile acids were not reduced. Discontinuation of rifampin therapy, which had been used to treat pruritus, resulted in reversible severe acute liver injury that was potentially the result of phenylacetate toxicity. Interactions between 4-PBA and cytochrome P450 enzymes should be considered in the use of this agent with special attention to potential phenylacetate toxicity.

  20. Aqueous thermal degradation of gallic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, J.S.; Crerar, D.A.; Grissom, G.; Key, T.C.

    1988-02-01

    Aqueous thermal degradation experiments show gallic acid, a naturally occurring aromatic carboxylic compound, decomposes rapidly at temperatures between 105/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, with an activation energy of 22.9 or 27.8 kcal/mole, depending on pH of the starting solution. Pyrogallol is the primary product identified, indicating degradation via decarboxylation and a carbanion transition state. Relatively rapid degradation of vanillic, phthalic, ellagic and tannic acids has also been observed,suggesting that these and perhaps other aromatic acids could be short-lived in deep formation waters.

  1. Aqueous thermal degradation of gallic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow Boles, Jennifer; Crerar, David A.; Grissom, Grady; Key, Tonalee C.

    1988-02-01

    Aqueous thermal degradation experiments show gallic acid, a naturally occurring aromatic carboxylic compound, decomposes rapidly at temperatures between 105° and 150°C, with an activation energy of 22.9 or 27.8 kcal/ mole, depending on pH of the starting solution. Pyrogallol is the primary product identified, indicating degradation via decarboxylation and a carbanion transition state. Relatively rapid degradation of vanillic, phthalic, ellagic and tannic acids has also been observed, suggesting that these and perhaps other aromatic acids could be short-lived in deep formation waters.

  2. Dihydroxo-bridged dimeric Cu(II) system containing sandwiched non-coordinating phenylacetate anion: Crystal structure, spectroscopic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and DNA-binding studies of [(phen)(H2O)Cu(OH)2Cu(H2O)(phen)]2L.6H2O: (HL = phenylacetic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shah, Naseer Ali

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA-binding, antibacterial and antifungal studies of a rare dihydroxo-bridged dinuclear copper(II) complex including 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) ligands and phenylacetate (L) anions, [Cu2(Phen)2(OH)2(H2O)2].2L.6H2O. Structural data revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry for each copper(II) atom with the basal plane formed by the two nitrogen atoms of the phenantroline ligand and the oxygen atoms of two bridging hydroxyl groups. The apical positions are filled by the oxygen atom from a water molecule. This forms a centrosymmetric cationic dimer where the uncoordinated phenylacetate ligands serve to balance the electrical charge. The dimers interact by means of hydrogen bonds aided by the coordinated as well as uncoordinated water molecules and phenyl-acetate moieties in the crystal lattice. The binding ability of the complex with salmon sperm DNA was determined using cyclic voltammetry and absorption spectroscopy yielding binding constants 2.426 × 104 M-1 and 1.399 × 104 M-1, respectively. The complex was screened against two Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis) and one Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains exhibiting significant activity against all the three strains. The complex exhibited significant, moderate and no activity against fungal strains Mucor piriformis, Helminthosporium solani and Aspergillus Niger, respectively. These preliminary tests indicate the competence of the complex towards the development of a potent biological drug.

  3. Acid and base degraded products of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Salaris, Margherita; Nieddu, Maria; Rubattu, Nicola; Testa, Cecilia; Luongo, Elvira; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2010-06-05

    The stability of ketorolac tromethamine was investigated in acid (0.5M HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.5M NaOH), using the same procedure reported by Devarajan et al. [2]. The acid and base degradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  4. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  5. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  6. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  7. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  8. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  9. Anaerobic degradation of linoleic oleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Lalman, J.A.; Bagley, D.M.

    1999-07-01

    The anaerobic degradation of linoleic (C18:2) and oleic (C18:1) acids was examined in batch experiments. By-product distribution depended on both the type of long chain fatty acid added and initial substrate concentration. Major by-products were palmitic (C16), myristic (C14) and acetic acids. Trace quantities of palmitoleic (C16:1) and lauric (C12) acids were observed together with larger amounts of palmitic (C16), myristic (C14) and hexanoic (C6) acids in cultures incubated with 100 mg/L linoleic (C18:2) acid. Bio-hydrogenation of C18 fatty acids was not necessary for the {beta}-oxidation mechanism to proceed. Aceticlastic methanogenic inhibition was observed in cultures inoculated with greater than 50 mg/L linoleic (C18:2) acid. In cultures incubated with greater than 50 mg/L oleic (C18:1) acid, aceticlastic methanogenic inhibition was observed for a short time period.

  10. Bacterial phenylalanine and phenylacetate catabolic pathway revealed

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, R.; Mascaraque, V.; Ismail, W.; Voss, M.; Perera, J.; Eisenreich, W.; Haehnel, W.; Fuchs, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic compounds constitute the second most abundant class of organic substrates and environmental pollutants, a substantial part of which (e.g., phenylalanine or styrene) is metabolized by bacteria via phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the bacterial catabolism of phenylalanine and phenylacetate remained an unsolved problem. Although a phenylacetate metabolic gene cluster had been identified, the underlying biochemistry remained largely unknown. Here we elucidate the catabolic pathway functioning in 16% of all bacteria whose genome has been sequenced, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida. This strategy is exceptional in several aspects. Intermediates are processed as CoA thioesters, and the aromatic ring of phenylacetyl-CoA becomes activated to a ring 1,2-epoxide by a distinct multicomponent oxygenase. The reactive nonaromatic epoxide is isomerized to a seven-member O-heterocyclic enol ether, an oxepin. This isomerization is followed by hydrolytic ring cleavage and β-oxidation steps, leading to acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. This widespread paradigm differs significantly from the established chemistry of aerobic aromatic catabolism, thus widening our view of how organisms exploit such inert substrates. It provides insight into the natural remediation of man-made environmental contaminants such as styrene. Furthermore, this pathway occurs in various pathogens, where its reactive early intermediates may contribute to virulence. PMID:20660314

  11. Nanobiocatalytic Degradation of Acid Orange 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Jason

    The catalytic properties of various metal nanoparticles have led to their use in environmental remediation applications. However, these remediation strategies are limited by their ability to deliver catalytic nanoparticles and a suitable electron donor to large treatment zones. Clostridium pasteurianum BC1 cells, loaded with bio-Pd nanoparticles, were used to effectively catalyze the reductive degradation and removal of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), a model azo compound. Hydrogen produced fermentatively by the C. pasteurianum BC1 acted as the electron donor for the process. Pd-free bacterial cultures or control experiments conducted with heat-killed cells showed limited reduction of AO7. Experiments also showed that the in situ biological production of H2 by C. pasteurianum BC1 was essential for the degradation of AO7, which suggests a novel process where the in situ microbial production of hydrogen is directly coupled to the catalytic bio-Pd mediated reduction of AO7. The differences in initial degradation rate for experiments conducted using catalyst concentrations of 1ppm Pd and 5ppm Pd and an azo dye concentration of 100ppm AO7 was 0.39 /hr and 1.94 /hr respectively, demonstrating the importance of higher concentrations of active Pd(0). The degradation of AO7 was quick as demonstrated by complete reductive degradation of 50ppm AO7 in 2 hours in experiments conducted using a catalyst concentration of 5ppm Pd. Dye degradation products were analyzed via Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), UltraViolet-Visible spectrophotometer (UV-Vis) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) spectrometry. The presence of 1-amino 2-naphthol, one of the hypothesized degradation products, was confirmed using mass spectrometry.

  12. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strand, S. E.; Dykes, J.; Chiang, V.

    1984-01-01

    α-Glucoisosaccharinic acid (GISA), a major by-product of kraft paper manufacture, was synthesized from lactose and used as the carbon source for microbial media. Ten strains of aerobic bacteria capable of growth on GISA were isolated from kraft pulp mill environments. The highest growth yields were obtained with Ancylobacter spp. at pH 7.2 to 9.5. GISA was completely degraded by cultures of an Ancylobacter isolate. Ancylobacter cell suspensions consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide in response to GISA addition. A total of 22 laboratory strains of bacteria were tested, and none was capable of growth on GISA. GISA-degrading isolates were not found in forest soils. Images PMID:16346467

  13. Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, R U; Annweiler, E; Michaelis, W; Richnow, H H; Schink, B

    2000-07-01

    Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture was studied by substrate utilization tests and identification of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In substrate utilization tests, the culture was able to oxidize naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-naphthoic acids, phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, and cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylic acid with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Neither hydroxylated 1- or 2-naphthoic acid derivatives and 1- or 2-naphthol nor the monoaromatic compounds ortho-phthalic acid, 2-carboxy-1-phenylacetic acid, and salicylic acid were utilized by the culture within 100 days. 2-Naphthoic acid accumulated in all naphthalene-grown cultures. Reduced 2-naphthoic acid derivatives could be identified by comparison of mass spectra and coelution with commercial reference compounds such as 1,2,3, 4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and chemically synthesized decahydro-2-naphthoic acid. 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and octahydro-2-naphthoic acid were tentatively identified by their mass spectra. The metabolites identified suggest a stepwise reduction of the aromatic ring system before ring cleavage. In degradation experiments with [1-(13)C]naphthalene or deuterated D(8)-naphthalene, all metabolites mentioned derived from the introduced labeled naphthalene. When a [(13)C]bicarbonate-buffered growth medium was used in conjunction with unlabeled naphthalene, (13)C incorporation into the carboxylic group of 2-naphthoic acid was shown, indicating that activation of naphthalene by carboxylation was the initial degradation step. No ring fission products were identified.

  14. Anaerobic Naphthalene Degradation by a Sulfate-Reducing Enrichment Culture†

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Annweiler, Eva; Michaelis, Walter; Richnow, Hans H.; Schink, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture was studied by substrate utilization tests and identification of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In substrate utilization tests, the culture was able to oxidize naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-naphthoic acids, phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, and cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylic acid with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Neither hydroxylated 1- or 2-naphthoic acid derivatives and 1- or 2-naphthol nor the monoaromatic compounds ortho-phthalic acid, 2-carboxy-1-phenylacetic acid, and salicylic acid were utilized by the culture within 100 days. 2-Naphthoic acid accumulated in all naphthalene-grown cultures. Reduced 2-naphthoic acid derivatives could be identified by comparison of mass spectra and coelution with commercial reference compounds such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and chemically synthesized decahydro-2-naphthoic acid. 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and octahydro-2-naphthoic acid were tentatively identified by their mass spectra. The metabolites identified suggest a stepwise reduction of the aromatic ring system before ring cleavage. In degradation experiments with [1-13C]naphthalene or deuterated D8-naphthalene, all metabolites mentioned derived from the introduced labeled naphthalene. When a [13C]bicarbonate-buffered growth medium was used in conjunction with unlabeled naphthalene, 13C incorporation into the carboxylic group of 2-naphthoic acid was shown, indicating that activation of naphthalene by carboxylation was the initial degradation step. No ring fission products were identified. PMID:10877763

  15. Microbial degradation of poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Natural poly(amino acid)s are a group of poly(ionic) molecules (ionomers) with various biological functions and putative technical applications and play, therefore, an important role both in nature and in human life. Because of their biocompatibility and their synthesis from renewable resources, poly(amino acid)s may be employed for many different purposes covering a broad spectrum of medical, pharmaceutical, and personal care applications as well as the domains of agriculture and of environmental applications. Biodegradability is one important advantage of naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s over many synthetic polymers. The intention of this review is to give an overview about the enzyme systems catalyzing the initial steps in poly(amino acid) degradation. The focus is on the naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s cyanophycin, poly(epsilon-L-lysine) and poly(gamma-glutamic acid); but biodegradation of structurally related synthetic polyamides such as poly(aspartic acid) and nylons, which are known from various technical applications, is also included.

  16. Degradation of organic acids by dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, F Z; Abo-Elnaga, I G

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve different strains of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, and Lactobacillus, were examined for the ability to degrade 10 organic acids by detecting gas production, using the conventional Durham tube method. All the strains did not break down succinate, glutarate, 2-oxo-glutarate, and mucate. Malate, citrate, pyruvate, fumarate, tartrate, and gluconate were variably attacked. Streptococcus cremoiris AM2, ML8, and SK11 required glucose to produce gas from citrate, whereas Leuconostoc citrovorum and Streptococcus faecalis did not. Streptococcus cremoris differed from the other streptococci in not producing gas from gluconate. From all lactic acid bacteria examined, only Lactobacillus plantarum formed gas from tartarate. Determination of acetoin and diacetyl proved to be a more reliable evidence for assessing the degradation of pyruvate, compared with detection of gas production. Homofermentative lactobacilli and Leuconostoc citrovorum produced acetoin and diacetyl from pyruvate, whereas beta-bacteria did not, a character that would be of taxonomic value. Streptobacteria degraded pyruvate in the presence of glucose with lactate as the major product together with a mean acetate of 4.1%, ethanol 7.9%, acetoin 1.7%, and diacetyl 2.6% yield on a molar basis after 60 days at 30 degrees C. L. brevis produced acetate and lactate. Formation of diacetyl from pyruvate by lactic acid bacteria may play an important role in flavour development in fermenting dairy products, especially in cheese, where lactic acid bacteria usually predominate, and pyruvate is probably excreted in the breaking down of lactose and in the oxidative deamination of alanine by the accompanying microflora.

  17. Peroxidase-mediated degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Colosi, Lisa M; Pinto, Roger A; Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J

    2009-02-01

    Concentrations of aqueous-phase perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a representative perfluorinated aliphatic (PFA) compound, are shown to be reduced effectively via reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), hydrogen peroxide, and a phenolic cosubstrate (4-methoxyphenol). Reaction rate profiles are pseudo-first order, yielding an apparent best-fit removal rate constant of k1 = 0.003/min (r2 = 0.96, n = 14). Approximately 68% depletion of the parent compound and 98% depletion of its related acute aquatic toxicity are achieved in 6 h. Because no PFOA removal is observed in the absence of cosubstrate and/or following consumption thereof, we conclude that radical intermediate species generated during reaction between HRP and 4-methoxyphenol mediate nonspecific depletion of PFOA and that these intermediates may be sufficiently reactive to sever the extremely stable C-F bonds of PFOA. These results are consistent with measurements of reaction by-products, including fluoride ion and various aliphatic species of shortened chain length. Based on these findings, we conclude that PFA degradation may occur via one of two mechanisms: Kolbe decarboxylation followed by stepwise conversion of -CF2 units to CO2 and fluoride ion, or radical abstraction from a double bond with subsequent fragmentation. Our results indicate that under appropriate conditions, enzymatic degradation may comprise a natural transformation pathway for PFAs. Moreover, we anticipate that appropriately engineered enzymatic processes may hold promise for treatment of PFOA-contaminated waters. This, to the best of our knowledge, is the first report to substantiate the efficacy of HRP-catalyzed reactions for contaminant removal via degradative reactions versus polymerization reactions.

  18. Prostatic acid phosphatase degrades lysophosphatidic acid in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Takanezawa, Yasukazu; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Junken; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2004-07-30

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator with multiple biological activities and is detected in various biological fluids, including human seminal plasma. Due to its cell proliferation stimulatory and anti-apoptotic activities, LPA has been implicated in the progression of some cancers such as ovarian cancer and prostate cancer. Here, we show that prostatic acid phosphatase, which is a non-specific phosphatase and which has been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer, inactivates LPA in human seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma contains both an LPA-synthetic enzyme, lysoPLD, which converts lysophospholipids to LPA and is responsible for LPA production in serum, and its major substrate, lysophosphatidylcholine. In serum, LPA accumulated during incubation at 37 degrees C. However, in seminal plasma, LPA did not accumulate. This discrepancy is explained by the presence of a strong LPA-degrading activity. Incubation of LPA with seminal plasma resulted in the disappearance of LPA and an accompanying accumulation of monoglyceride showing that LPA is degraded by phosphatase activity present in the seminal plasma. When seminal plasma was incubated in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, LPA accumulated, indicating that LPA is produced and degraded in the fluid. Biochemical characterization of the LPA-phosphatase activity identified two phosphatase activities in human seminal plasma. By Western blotting analysis in combination with several column chromatographies, the major activity was revealed to be identical to prostatic acid phosphatase. The present study demonstrates active LPA metabolism in seminal plasma and indicates the possible role of LPA signaling in male sexual organs including prostate cancer.

  19. Degradation of benzoic acid and its derivatives in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Edward; Yang, Yu

    2011-04-15

    In this research, the stability of benzoic acid and three of its derivatives (anthranilic acid, salicylic acid, and syringic acid) under subcritical water conditions was investigated. The stability studies were carried out at temperatures ranging from 50 to 350°C with heating times of 10-630 min. The degradation of the benzoic acid derivatives increased with rising temperature and the acids became less stable with longer heating time. The three benzoic acid derivatives showed very mild degradation at 150°C. Severe degradation of benzoic acid derivatives was observed at 200°C while their complete degradation occurred at 250°C. However, benzoic acid remained stable at temperatures up to 300°C. The degradation products of benzoic acid and the three derivatives were identified and quantified by HPLC and confirmed by GC/MS. Anthranilic acid, salicylic acid, syringic acid, and benzoic acid in high-temperature water underwent decarboxylation to form aniline, phenol, syringol, and benzene, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Degradation of oxytetracycline with ozonation in acetic acid solvent].

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin; Li, Xiao-Rong; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Guo-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Use acetic acid as the media of ozone degradation of oxytetracycline (OTC), and effects of the initial dosing ratio of ozone/OTC, ozone flow, free radical scavenger, metal ions on the removal rate of OTC were investigated respectively. The results showed that acetic acid had a high ozone stability and solubility. OTC had a high removal rate and degradation rate in acetic acid solution. With the increase of OTC dosage, the removal rate of OTC decreased in acetic acid. Removal rate of OTC was increased distinctly when ozone flow increased properly. It was also observed that free radical scavenger had a significantly negative effect on OTC ozonation degradation in acetic acid. Furthermore the main reactions of OTC ozone oxidation were direct oxidation and indirect oxidation in acetic acid. When Fe3+ and Co2+ were existent in acetic acid, the degradation of OTC was inhibited significantly.

  1. Electrochemical degradation of gallic acid on a BDD anode.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Marco; Cerisola, Giacomo

    2009-11-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) has been studied on a boron-doped diamond anode (BDD). Cyclic voltammetries, chronoamperometries and bulk electrolyses were performed to characterise the electrochemical behaviour of gallic acid on diamond-type anode and to study the kinetics of gallic acid degradation. UV spectroscopy, HPLC analysis, COD and TOC measurements were conducted to study the reaction pathway for gallic acid mineralisation. The results showed that both direct and mediated electrochemical processes were involved in the oxidation of gallic acid. The degradation of gallic acid evidenced a pseudo first-order kinetics and the rate constant increased with applied current. Aliphatic acids were the main intermediates formed during the electrolyses and they were finally mineralised to CO(2) and water. The degradation rate on boron-doped diamond was under mass-transport control and was favoured by the increase of the flow rate of the solution into the electrochemical reactor.

  2. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  4. Degradation of hop bitter acids by fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Huszcza, Ewa Bartmanska, Agnieszka; Aniol, Miroslaw; Maczka, Wanda; Zolnierczyk, Anna; Wawrzenczyk, Czeslaw

    2008-07-01

    Nine fungal strains related to: Trametes versicolor, Nigrospora oryzae, Inonotus radiatus, Crumenulopsis sororia, Coryneum betulinum, Cryptosporiopsis radicicola, Fusarium equiseti, Rhodotorula glutinis and Candida parapsilosis were tested for their ability to degrade humulones and lupulones. The best results were obtained for T. versicolor culture, in which humulones and lupulones were fully degraded after 4 days of incubation in the dark or after 36 h in the light. The experiments were performed on a commercial hop extract and on sterilized spent hops.

  5. Degradation of hop bitter acids by fungi.

    PubMed

    Huszcza, Ewa; Bartmańska, Agnieszka; Anioł, Mirosław; Maczka, Wanda; Zołnierczyk, Anna; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2008-01-01

    Nine fungal strains related to: Trametes versicolor, Nigrospora oryzae, Inonotus radiatus, Crumenulopsis sororia, Coryneum betulinum, Cryptosporiopsis radicicola, Fusarium equiseti, Rhodotorula glutinis and Candida parapsilosis were tested for their ability to degrade humulones and lupulones. The best results were obtained for T. versicolor culture, in which humulones and lupulones were fully degraded after 4days of incubation in the dark or after 36h in the light. The experiments were performed on a commercial hop extract and on sterilized spent hops.

  6. Lactic acid polymers: strong, degradable thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Copolymers of lactic and glycolic acids are being developed by researchers at Battelle and elsewhere as renewable-resource plastics. Other uses include matrices for controlled release of drugs and pesticides as well as in prosthetic devices. In contrast to conventional plastics, lactic acid polymers are biodegradable, and after several months exposure to moisture, these materials convert back to natural harmless products. The properties of lactic acid polymers are examined.

  7. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  8. Enzymology of retinoic acid biosynthesis and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2013-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a biologically active derivative of vitamin A that regulates numerous physiological processes. The concentration of retinoic acid in the cells is tightly regulated, but the exact mechanisms responsible for this regulation are not completely understood, largely because the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of retinoic acid have not been fully defined. Recent studies using in vitro and in vivo models suggest that several members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of proteins are essential for retinoic acid biosynthesis and the maintenance of retinoic acid homeostasis. However, the exact roles of some of these recently identified enzymes are yet to be characterized. The properties of the known contributors to retinoid metabolism have now been better defined and allow for more detailed understanding of their interactions with retinoid-binding proteins and other retinoid enzymes. At the same time, further studies are needed to clarify the interactions between the cytoplasmic and membrane-bound proteins involved in the processing of hydrophobic retinoid metabolites. This review summarizes current knowledge about the roles of various biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes in the regulation of retinoic acid homeostasis and outlines the remaining questions in the field. PMID:23630397

  9. Benzoic acid degradation of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, D. S.; Needles, H. L.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The reactions of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers in the presence of benzoic acid have been studied. Polyacrylonitrile fibers oxidize more readily in the presence of benzoic acid than in air at temperatures in the range of 170 C. The product decreased in solubility with extent of reaction. Gel permeation chromatography of the soluble fraction showed change in polydispersity. The insoluble product exhibited differences in weight loss as a function of decomposition temperature compared to PAN fibers. Infrared analyses of the fiber product showed absorption peaks similar to air-oxidized PAN. High-energy photoelectron spectral analysis showed a carbon-rich surface which contained oxygen and nitrogen. An air oxidized sample of fiber contained more oxygen at the surface than a fiber treated first with benzoic acid and then air oxidized.

  10. Bacterial degradation of m-nitrobenzoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, L J; Spain, J C

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS51 grows on m-nitrobenzoate (m-NBA) with stoichiometric release of nitrite. m-NBA-grown cells oxidized m-NBA and protocatechuate but not 3-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, 4-nitrocatechol, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol. Protocatechuate accumulated transiently when succinate-grown cells were transferred to media containing m-NBA. Respirometric experiments indicated that the conversion of m-NBA to protocatechuate required 1 mol of oxygen per mol of substrate. Conversions conducted in the presence of 18O2 showed the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into protocatechuate. Extracts of m-NBA-grown cells cleaved protocatechuate to 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialdehyde. These results provide rigorous proof that m-NBA is initially oxidized by a dioxygenase to produce protocatechuate which is further degraded by a 4,5-dioxygenase. PMID:7574625

  11. Degradation by acetic acid for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Naomi; Hara, Yukiko

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of crystalline Si photovoltaic modules during damp-heat test was studied using some test modules with and without polymer film insertion by observing electrical and electroluminescence properties and by chemical analyses. Acetic acid generated by the hydrolysis decomposition of ethylene vinyl acetate used as an encapsulant is the main origin of degradation. The change in electroluminescence images is explained on the basis of the corrosion of electrodes by acetic acid. On the other hand, little change was observed at the pn junction even after damp-heat test for a long time. Therefore, carrier generation occurs even after degradation; however, such generated carriers cannot be collected owing to corrosion of electrodes. The guiding principle that module structure and module materials without saving acetic acid into the modules was obtained.

  12. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa E. Freiderich; Dean R. Peterman; John R. Klaehn; Philippe Marc; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2014-04-01

    A significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3 all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. In the presence of a small concentration of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  13. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freiderich, Melissa E; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Peterman, D. R.; Marc, Philippe L; Klaehn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. With small amounts of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  14. Microbial Degradation of Chlorogenic Acid by a Sphingomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuping; Wang, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xueling; Zhang, Zhan; Yang, Zongcan; Nie, Cong; Tang, Hongzhi

    2016-08-01

    In order to elucidate the metabolism of chlorogenic acid by environmental microbes, a strain of Sphingomonas sp. isolated from tobacco leaves was cultured under various conditions, and chlorogenic acid degradation and its metabolites were investigated. The strain converting chlorogenic acid was newly isolated and identified as a Sphingomonas sp. strain by 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimal conditions for growth and chlorogenic acid degradation were 37 °C and pH 7.0 with supplementation of 1.5 g/l (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source and 2 g/l chlorogenic acid as the sole carbon source. The maximum chlorogenic acid tolerating capability for the strain was 5 g/l. The main metabolites were identified as caffeic acid, shikimic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The analysis reveals the biotransformation mechanism of chlorogenic acid in microbial cells isolated from the environment.

  15. Glycolic acid modulates the mechanical property and degradation of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Lan; Huang, Wei; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yan; Lu, Xi-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Bao-Feng; Dong, De-Li

    2010-01-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with controllable degradation properties is beneficial for a variety of applications. Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is a promising candidate of biomaterials; so we synthesize a series of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid) (PGSG) with 1:2:0, 1:2:0.2, 1:2:0.4, 1:2:0.6, 1:2:1 mole ratio of glycerol, sebacate, and glycolic acid to elucidate the relation of doped glycolic acid to the degradation rate and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the polymers with different doping of glycolic acid were dissimilar. PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 displayed an integral degree of ordering, different to those with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1, which showed mild phase separation structure. The number, DeltaH(m), and temperature of the PGSG melting peaks tended to decrease with the increasing ratio of doped glycolic acid. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that the degradation rate of PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 was slowest, but in the ratio range of 0, 0.4, and 0.6, the degradation rate increased with the increase of glycolic acid. All PGSG samples displayed good tissue response and anticoagulant effects. Our data suggest that doping glycolic acid can modulate the microstructure and degree of crosslinking of PGS, thereby control the degradation rate of PGS.

  16. Acid-degradable polyurethane particles for protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.; Paramonov, Sergey E.; Dashe, Jesse; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-degradable particles containing a model protein antigen, ovalbumin, were prepared from a polyurethane with acetal moieties embedded throughout the polymer, and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The small molecule degradation by-product of the particles was synthesized and tested in vitro for toxicity indicating an LC50 of 12,500 μg/ml. A new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was developed to monitor the in vitro degradation of these particles. The degradation by-product inside RAW macrophages was at its highest level after 24 hours of culture and was efficiently exocytosed until it was no longer detectable after four days. When tested in vitro, these particles induced a substantial increase in the presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin-derived peptide SIINFEKL in both macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, vaccination with these particles generated a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response that was superior to both free ovalbumin and particles made from an analogous but slower-degrading acid-labile polyurethane polymer. Overall, we present a fully degradable polymer system with non-toxic by-products, which may find use in various biomedical applications including protein-based vaccines. PMID:18710254

  17. Polarography of an acidic degradation product from cephalexin.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Vergara, L J; Squella, J A; Silva, M M

    1982-02-01

    2-Hydroxy-3-phenyl-6-methylpyrazine is identified as the product obtained by acidic degradation of cephalexin in the presence of formaldehyde. In 5M hydrochloric acid this product gives a well-defined reduction wave with a half-wave potential of -0.45 V vs. SCE. The wave is irreversible and diffusion-controlled. The diffusion current shows a linear relation with the cephalexin concentration and can be used for determination of cephalexin in plasma.

  18. Microbial degradation of usnic acid in the reindeer rumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Barboza, Perry S.; Green, Thomas K.; Folkow, Lars P.; Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Mathiesen, Svein D.

    2010-03-01

    Reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus) eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients in winter. Lichens synthesize and accumulate a wide variety of phenolic secondary compounds, such as usnic acid, as a defense against herbivores and to protect against damage by UV-light in solar radiation. We have examined where and to what extent these phenolic compounds are degraded in the digestive tract of the reindeer, with particular focus on usnic acid. Three male reindeer were given ad libitum access to a control diet containing no usnic acid for three weeks and then fed lichens ad libitum (primarily Cladonia stellaris) containing 9.1 mg/g DM usnic acid for 4 weeks. Usnic acid intake in reindeer on the lichen diet was 91-117 mg/kg BM/day. In spite of this, no trace of usnic acid or conjugates of usnic acid was found either in fresh rumen fluid, urine, or feces. This suggests that usnic acid is rapidly degraded by rumen microbes, and that it consequently is not absorbed by the animal. This apparent ability to detoxify lichen phenolic compounds may gain increased importance with future enhanced UV-B radiation expected to cause increased protective usnic acid/phenol production in lichens.

  19. Varying Conditions for Hexanoic Acid Degradation with BioTiger™

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, Koji; Milliken, Charles; Brigmon, Robin

    2016-07-27

    BioTiger™ (BT) is a consortium of 12 bacteria designed for petroleum waste biodegradation. BT is currently being studied and could be considered for bioremediation of the Athabasca oil sands refineries in Canada and elsewhere. The run-off ponds from the petroleum extraction processes, called tailings ponds, are a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthenic acids, hydrocarbons, toxic chemicals like heavy metals, water, and sand. Due to environmental regulations the oil industry would like to separate and degrade the hazardous chemical species from the tailings ponds while recycling the water. It has been shown that BT at 30 C° is able to completely degrade 10 mM hexanoic acid (HA) co-metabolically with 0.2% yeast extract (w/v) in 48 hours when starting at 0.4 OD 600nm. After establishing this stable degradation capability, variations were tested to explore the wider parameters of BT activity in temperature, pH, intermediate degradation, co-metabolic dependence, and transfer stability. Due to the vast differences in temperature at various points in the refineries, a wide range of temperatures were assessed. The results indicate that BT retains the ability to degrade HA, a model surrogate for tailings pond contaminants, at temperatures ranging from 15°C to 35°C. Hexanamide (HAM) was shown to be an intermediate generated during the degradation of HA in an earlier work and HAM is completely degraded after 48 hours, indicating that HAM is not the final product of HA degradation. Various replacements for yeast extract were attempted. Glucose, a carbon source; casein amino acids, a protein source; additional ammonia, mimicking known media; and additional phosphate with Wolffe’s vitamins and minerals all showed no significant degradation of HA compared to control. Decreasing the yeast extract concentration (0.05%) demonstrated limited but significant degradation. Finally, serial inoculations of BT were performed to determine the stability of degradation

  20. Gibberellic acid promoting phytic acid degradation in germinating soybean under calcium lactate treatment.

    PubMed

    Hui, Qianru; Wang, Mian; Wang, Pei; Ma, Ya; Gu, Zhenxin; Yang, Runqiang

    2017-06-30

    Phytic acid as a phosphorus storage vault provides phosphorus for plant development. It is an anti-nutritional factor for humans and some animals. However, its degradation products lower inositol phosphates have positive effects on human health. In this study, the effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on phytic acid degradation under calcium lactate (Ca) existence was investigated. The results showed that Ca + GA treatment promoted the growth status, hormone metabolism and phytic acid degradation in germinating soybean. At the same time, the availability of phosphorus, the activity of phytic acid degradation-associated enzyme and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) increased. However, the relative genes expression of phytic acid degradation-associated enzymes did not vary in accordance with their enzymes activity. The results revealed that GA could mediate the transport and function of calcium and a series of physiological and biochemical changes to regulate phytic acid degradation of soybean sprouts. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. THE REACTIONS OF 2- AND 4-PICOLINE N-OXIDES WITH PHENYLACETIC ANHYDRIDE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    pyridinemethanol phenylacetate (X) and 2-phenylethylpyridine (XI) in the case of 2-picoline N-oxide and of 4 - pyridinemethanol phenylacetate (XIV) and 4 ...The reactions of 2- and 4 -picoline N-oxide with phenylacetic anhydride yield the oxidation-reduction products, benzaldehyde, carbon dioxide...phenylethylpyridine (XV) in the case of 4 -picoline N-oxide. The product composition is unchanged when the reactions are performed in the presence of the radical

  2. Molecular screening of wine lactic acid bacteria degrading hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-01-28

    The potential to produce volatile phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. A PCR assay was developed for the detection of LAB that potentially produce volatile phenols. Synthetic degenerate oligonucleotides for the specific detection of the pdc gene encoding a phenolic acid decarboxylase were designed. The pdc PCR assay amplifies a 321 bp DNA fragment from phenolic acid decarboxylase. The pdc PCR method was applied to 85 strains belonging to the 6 main wine LAB species. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Pediococcus pentosaceus strains produce a positive response in the pdc PCR assay, whereas Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains did not produce the expected PCR product. The production of vinyl and ethyl derivatives from hydroxycinnamic acids in culture media was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A relationship was found between pdc PCR amplification and volatile phenol production, so that the LAB strains that gave a positive pdc PCR response produce volatile phenols, whereas strains that did not produce a PCR amplicon did not produce volatile phenols. The proposed method could be useful for a preliminary identification of LAB strains able to produce volatile phenols in wine.

  3. Degradation of CYANEX 301 in Contact with Nitric Acid Media

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe Marc; Radu Custelcean; Gary S. Groenewold; John R. Klaehn; Dean R. Peterman; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2012-10-01

    The nature of the degradation product obtained upon contacting CYANEX 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) with nitric acid has been elucidated and found to be a disulfide derivative. The first step to the degradation of CYANEX 301 in toluene has been studied using 31P{1H} NMR after being contacted with nitric acid media. The spectrum of the degradation product exhibits a complex multiplet around dP = 80 ppm. A succession of purifications of CYANEX 301 has resulted in single crystals of the acidic form and the corresponding ammonium salt. Unlike the original CYANEX 301, which consists of a complex diastereomeric mixture displaying all possible combinations of chiral orientations at the 2-methyl positions, the purified crystals were shown by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be racemates, containing 50:50 mixtures of the [R;R] and [S;S] diastereomers. The comparison between the 31P {1H} NMR spectra of the degradation products resulting from the diastereomerically pure CYANEX 301 and the original diastereomeric mixture has elucidated the influence of the isomeric composition on the multiplicity of the 31P {1H} NMR peak. These NMR data indicate the initial degradation leads to a disulfide-bridged condensation product displaying multiple resonances due to phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, which is caused by the inequivalence of the two P atoms as a result of their different chirality. A total of nine different NMR resonances, six of which display phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, could be assigned, and the identity of the peaks corresponding to phosphorus atoms coupled to each other was confirmed by 31P {1H} homodecoupled NMR analysis.

  4. Influence of Root Exudates on the Bacterial Degradation of Chlorobenzoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lovecká, Petra; Dražková, Milena; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of chlorobenzoic acids (e.g., products of microbial degradation of PCB) by strains of microorganisms isolated from PCB contaminated soils was assessed. From seven bulk-soil isolates two strains unique in ability to degrade a wider range of chlorobenzoic acids than others were selected, individually and even in a complex mixture of 11 different chlorobenzoic acids. Such a feature is lacking in most tested degraders. To investigate the influence of vegetation on chlorobenzoic acids degraders, root exudates of two plant species known for supporting PCB degradation in soil were tested. While with individual chlorobenzoic acids the presence of plant exudates leads to a decrease of degradation yield, in case of a mixture of chlorobenzoic acids either a change in bacterial degradation specificity, associated with 3- and 4-chlorobenzoic acid, or an extension of the spectrum of degraded chlorobenzoic acids was observed. PMID:24222753

  5. Effect of sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate on brain serotonin turnover in the ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient sparse-fur mouse.

    PubMed

    Batshaw, M L; Hyman, S L; Coyle, J T; Robinson, M B; Qureshi, I A; Mellits, E D; Quaskey, S

    1988-04-01

    Herein we examine the effects of sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate on feeding and central serotonin turnover in a child with citrullinemia and in an animal model of congenital hyperammonemia, the ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient sparse-fur (spf/y) mouse. In the child, when the benzoate/phenylacetate dosage was increased from 200 to 375 mg/kg/day each, feeding decreased. There was an accumulation of benzoate and phenylacetate in blood and cerebrospinal fluid as well as an increased concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, a neurochemical marker for serotonin turnover, in cerebrospinal fluid. In the mouse, sodium benzoate had a biphasic effect on both plasma ammonium levels and brain serotonin turnover. Two percent oral benzoate was associated with an increase in ammonium level, while a 3% dose led to a decrease in ammonium. There was a similar effect on serotonin turnover noted in both the hyperammonemic spf/y and control CD-1/y mice. Sodium phenylacetate did not have a consistent effect on serotonin turnover. The mechanism by which benzoate increases brain serotonin turnover appears to involve competition with tryptophan for albumin binding sites. This results in increased free tryptophan in serum and brain. We speculate that some of the clinical symptoms of benzoate intoxication may be a consequence of altered serotonin turnover in the brain. We suggest that drug levels be monitored during therapy.

  6. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids' being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  7. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-05-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids` being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  8. Efficient degradation of tannic acid by black Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Varga, Janos; van der Gaag, Marijn; Swart, Klaas; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2004-08-01

    A set of aspergillus strains from culture collections and wild-type black aspergilli isolated on non-selective media were used to validate the use of media with 20% tannic acid for exclusive and complete selection of the black aspergilli. The 20% tannic acid medium proved useful for both quantitative and qualitative selection of all different black aspergilli, including all recognized species: A. carbonarius, A. japonicus, A. aculeatus, A foetidus, A. heteromorphus, A. niger, A. tubingensis and A. brasiliensis haplotypes. Even higher concentrations of tannic acid can be utilized by the black aspergilli suggesting a very efficient tannic acid-degrading system. Colour mutants show that the characteristic ability to grow on high tannic acid concentrations is not causally linked to the other typical feature of these aspergilli, i.e. the formation of brown-black pigments. Sequence analysis of the A. niger genome using the A. oryzae tannase gene yielded eleven tannase-like genes, far more than in related species. Therefore, a unique ecological niche in the degradation of tannic acid and connected nitrogen release seems to be reserved for these black-spored cosmopolitans.

  9. Dichloroacetic acid degradation employing hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Cristina S; Labas, Marisol D; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E

    2007-01-01

    The degradation reaction of dichloroacetic acid employing H(2)O(2) and UVC radiation (253.7nm) has been studied in a well mixed reactor operating inside a recycling system. It has been shown that in an aqueous solution no stable reaction intermediates are formed and, at every time during the reaction, two mols of hydrochloric acid are formed for every mol of dichloroacetic acid that is decomposed and, in the same way, there is a paired agreement between the calculated TOC concentration corresponding to the unaltered dichloroacetic acid and the experimental values measured in the solution. On this basis and classical references from the scientific literature for the H(2)O(2) photolysis, a complete reaction scheme, apt for reaction kinetics mathematical modeling and ulterior scale-up is proposed.

  10. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties.

  11. Degradation of 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid by a Bacillus sp

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Ying; Deng, Yinyue; Jia, Jianwen; Hu, Meiying

    2012-01-01

    3-Phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) is of great environmental concern with regards to endocrine disrupting activity and widespread occurrence in water and soil, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. We report here that a new bacterial strain isolated from soil, designated DG-02, was shown to degrade 95.6% of 50 mg·L−1 3-PBA within 72 h in mineral salt medium (MSM). Strain DG-02 was identified as Bacillus sp. based on the morphology, physio-biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. The optimum conditions for 3-PBA degradation were determined to be 30.9°C and pH 7.7 using response surface methodology (RSM). The isolate converted 3-PBA to produce 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy) benzoic acid, protocatechuate, phenol, and 3,4-dihydroxy phenol, and subsequently transformed these compounds with a qmax, Ks and Ki of 0.8615 h−1, 626.7842 mg·L−1 and 6.7586 mg·L−1, respectively. A novel microbial metabolic pathway for 3-PBA was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. Inoculation of strain DG-02 resulted in a higher degradation rate on 3-PBA than that observed in the non-inoculated soil. Moreover, the degradation process followed the first-order kinetics, and the half-life (t1/2) for 3-PBA was greatly reduced as compared to the non-inoculated control. This study highlights an important potential application of strain DG-02 for the in situ bioremediation of 3-PBA contaminated environments. PMID:23226289

  12. Degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid by a Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Ying; Deng, Yinyue; Jia, Jianwen; Hu, Meiying

    2012-01-01

    3-Phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) is of great environmental concern with regards to endocrine disrupting activity and widespread occurrence in water and soil, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. We report here that a new bacterial strain isolated from soil, designated DG-02, was shown to degrade 95.6% of 50 mg·L(-1) 3-PBA within 72 h in mineral salt medium (MSM). Strain DG-02 was identified as Bacillus sp. based on the morphology, physio-biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. The optimum conditions for 3-PBA degradation were determined to be 30.9°C and pH 7.7 using response surface methodology (RSM). The isolate converted 3-PBA to produce 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy) benzoic acid, protocatechuate, phenol, and 3,4-dihydroxy phenol, and subsequently transformed these compounds with a q(max), K(s) and K(i) of 0.8615 h(-1), 626.7842 mg·L(-1) and 6.7586 mg·L(-1), respectively. A novel microbial metabolic pathway for 3-PBA was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. Inoculation of strain DG-02 resulted in a higher degradation rate on 3-PBA than that observed in the non-inoculated soil. Moreover, the degradation process followed the first-order kinetics, and the half-life (t(1/2)) for 3-PBA was greatly reduced as compared to the non-inoculated control. This study highlights an important potential application of strain DG-02 for the in situ bioremediation of 3-PBA contaminated environments.

  13. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  14. A Patient with MSUD: Acute Management with Sodium Phenylacetate/Sodium Benzoate and Sodium Phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Köse, Melis; Canda, Ebru; Kagnici, Mehtap; Uçar, Sema Kalkan; Çoker, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    In treatment of metabolic imbalances caused by maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), peritoneal dialysis, and hemofiltration, pharmacological treatments for elimination of toxic metabolites can be used in addition to basic dietary modifications. Therapy with sodium phenylacetate/benzoate or sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB) in urea-cycle disorder cases has been associated with a reduction in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations when the patients are on adequate dietary protein intake. Moreover, NaPB in treatment of MSUD patients is also associated with reduction of BCAA levels in a limited number of cases. However, there are not enough studies in the literature about application and efficacy of this treatment. Our case report sets an example of an alternative treatment's efficacy when extracorporeal procedures are not available due to technical difficulties during attack period of the disease.

  15. Degradation and Isotope Source Tracking of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Joshi, Sunendra R; Jaisi, Deb P

    2016-01-27

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine], an active ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), have been frequently reported to be present in soils and other environments and thus have heightened public concerns on their potential adverse effects. Understanding the fate of these compounds and differentiating them from other naturally occurring compounds require a toolbox of methods that can go beyond conventional methods. Here, we applied individual isotope labeling technique whereby each compound or mineral involved in the glyphosate and AMPA degradation reaction was either synthesized or chosen to have distinct (18)O/(16)O ratios so that the source of incorporated oxygen in the orthophosphate generated and corresponding isotope effect during C-P bond cleavage could be identified. Furthermore, we measured original isotope signatures of a few commercial glyphosate sources to identify their source-specific isotope signatures. Our degradation kinetics results showed that the rate of glyphosate degradation was higher than that of AMPA in all experimental conditions, and both the rate and extent of degradation were lowest under anoxic conditions. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)OP) of orthophosphate generated from glyphosate and AMPA degradation suggested that one external oxygen atom from ambient water, not from dissolved oxygen or mineral, was incorporated into orthophosphate with the other three oxygen atoms inherited from the parent molecule. Interestingly, δ(18)OP values of all commercial glyphosate products studied were found to be the lightest among all orthophosphates known so far. Furthermore, isotope composition was found to be unaffected due to variable degradation kinetics, light/dark, and oxic/anoxic conditions. These results highlight the importance of phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a nonconventional tool to potentially distinguish glyphosate sources and products from other organophosphorus compounds

  16. Nitrogen incorporation into lignite humic acids during microbial degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L.H.; Yuan, H.L.

    2009-07-01

    Previous study showed that nitrogen content in lignite humic acids (HA) increased significantly during lignite biodegradation. In this paper we evaluated the factors responsible for the increased level of N in HA and the formation of new nitrogen compound following microbial degradation. When the ammonium sulfate concentration in lignite medium was 0.5%, the N-content in HA was higher than that in the crude lignite humic acid (cHA); when the ammonium sulfate concentration was epsilon 0.5%, both the biodegraded humic acid (bHA) N-content and the content of bHA in lignite increased significantly, but at 2.0% no increase was observed. This indicated that HA incorporated N existing in the lignite medium, and more HA can incorporate more N with the increase of bHA amount in lignite during microbial degradation. CP/MAS {sup 15}N NMR analysis showed that the N incorporated into HA during biotransformation was in the form of free or ionized NH{sub 2}-groups in amino acids and sugars, as well as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. We propose nitrogen can be incorporated into HA biotically and abiotically. The high N content bHA has a potential application in agriculture since N is essential for plant growth.

  17. Isolation and characterization of monochloroacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Eiko; Sumiya, Kaori; Takemura, Tetsuo; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Five Burkholderia strains (CL-1, CL-2, CL-3, CL-4, and CL-5) capable of degrading monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were isolated from activated sludge or soil samples gathered from several parts of Japan. All five isolates were able to grow on MCA as the sole source of carbon and energy, and argentometry and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses showed that these five strains consumed MCA completely and released chloride ions stoichiometrically within 25 h. The five isolates also grew on monobromoacetic acid, monoiodoacetic acid, and L-2-monochloropropionic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. In addition, the five isolates could not grow with DCA but dehalogenate single chlorine from DCA. Because PCR analyses revealed that all five isolates have an identical group II dehalogenase gene fragment and no group I deh gene, only strain CL-1 was analyzed further. The partial amino acid sequence of the group II dehalogenase of strain CL-1, named DehCL1, showed 74.6% and 65.2% identities to corresponding regions of the two MCA dehalogenases, DehCI from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS-3 and Hdl IVa from Burkholderia cepacia strain MBA4, respectively. The secondary-structure motifs of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily and the amino acid residues involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and hydrophobic pocket formation were conserved in the partial amino acid sequence of DehCL1.

  18. Efficient sonochemical degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid using periodate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Chen, Meng-Jia; Huang, Chin-Pao; Kuo, Jeff; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and efficient treatment method, using periodate (PI) for sonochemical oxidation of persistent and bioaccumulative perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was developed. With an addition of 45 mM PI, 96.5% of PFOA was decomposed with a defluorination efficiency of 95.7% after 120 min of ultrasound (US). The removals of PFOA were augmented with an increase in PI doses. In all the PI+US experimental runs, decomposition efficiencies were essentially similar to those of defluorination, indicating that PFOA was decomposed and mineralized into fluoride ions. Lower solution pHs resulted in an increase in decomposition and defluorination efficiencies of PFOA due to acid-catalyzation. Dissolved oxygen increased the amount of IO4 radicals produced, which consumed the more effective IO3 radicals. Consequently, presence of oxygen inhibited the destruction of PFOA. The PFOA degradation rates with different gases sparging are in the following order: nitrogen>air>oxygen. Effects of anions follow the Hofmeister effects on PFOA degradation (i.e., Br(-)>none ⩾ Cl(-)>SO4(2)(-)). Br(-) could react with OH to yield radical anion Br2(-) that enhances the PFOA degradation. A reaction pathway was also proposed to describe the PI oxidation of PFOA under US irradiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Degradation Using UV-Persulfate Process: Modeling of the Degradation and Chlorate Formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Yue; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Crittenden, John C

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we investigated the destruction and by-product formation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) using ultraviolet light and persulfate (UV-PS). Additionally, we developed a first-principles kinetic model to simulate both PFOA destruction and by-product and chlorate (ClO3(-)) formation in ultrapure water (UW), surface water (SW), and wastewater (WW). PFOA degradation was significantly suppressed in the presence of chloride and carbonate species and did not occur until all the chloride was converted to ClO3(-) in UW and for low DOC concentrations in SW. The model was able to simulate the PS decay, pH changes, radical concentrations, and ClO3(-) formation for UW and SW. However, our model was unable to simulate PFOA degradation well in WW, possibly from PS activation by NOM, which in turn produced sulfate radicals.

  20. Screening, selection and characterization of phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria from chicken intestine.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Ponnala; Halami, Prakash M

    2009-07-31

    This study was undertaken to screen and select potent phytate degrading lactic acid bacteria and to evaluate their additional characteristic features. Forty lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated from different sources and screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP(6) by cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method, using calcium or sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate. All the forty isolates were able to degrade calcium phytate. However, only two Pediococcus pentosaceus strains (CFR R38 and CFR R35) were found to degrade sodium phytate. These strains showed phytase activity of 213 and 89 U at 50 degrees C, respectively and poor acid phosphatase activity. These strains were further evaluated for additional characteristic features. At pH 2, P. pentosaceus strains CFR R38 and CFR R35 showed 50.7 and 48.5 percentage survivability after 2 h of incubation respectively and they could also withstand 0.3% ox-bile. These cultures exhibited 54.6 and 44.8% of hydrophobicity to xylene, antibacterial activity against food borne pathogens and possessed beta-galactosidase activity. The resistance pattern to several antibiotics was also analyzed. The present study indicates that these strains, having phytate degrading ability and other characteristic features can be exploited as starter cultures in fermented foods to improve the mineral bioavailability.

  1. Acid-degradable and bioerodible modified polyhydroxylated materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.

    2017-05-09

    Compositions and methods of making a modified polyhydroxylated polymer comprising a polyhydroxylated polymer having reversibly modified hydroxyl groups, whereby the hydroxyl groups are modified by an acid-catalyzed reaction between a polydroxylated polymer and a reagent such as acetals, aldehydes, vinyl ethers and ketones such that the modified polyhydroxylated polymers become insoluble in water but freely soluble in common organic solvents allowing for the facile preparation of acid-sensitive materials. Materials made from these polymers can be made to degrade in a pH-dependent manner. Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cargoes were successfully loaded into particles made from the present polymers using single and double emulsion techniques, respectively. Due to its ease of preparation, processability, pH-sensitivity, and biocompatibility, of the present modified polyhydroxylated polymers should find use in numerous drug delivery applications.

  2. Microbial degradation of isosaccharinic acid at high pH

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Naji M; Bryan, Nicholas; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate-level radioactive waste (ILW), which dominates the radioactive waste inventory in the United Kingdom on a volumetric basis, is proposed to be disposed of via a multibarrier deep geological disposal facility (GDF). ILW is a heterogeneous wasteform that contains substantial amounts of cellulosic material encased in concrete. Upon resaturation of the facility with groundwater, alkali conditions will dominate and will lead to the chemical degradation of cellulose, producing a substantial amount of organic co-contaminants, particularly isosaccharinic acid (ISA). ISA can form soluble complexes with radionuclides, thereby mobilising them and posing a potential threat to the surrounding environment or ‘far field'. Alkaliphilic microorganisms sampled from a legacy lime working site, which is an analogue for an ILW-GDF, were able to degrade ISA and couple this degradation to the reduction of electron acceptors that will dominate as the GDF progresses from an aerobic ‘open phase' through nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing conditions post closure. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analyses showed that bacterial diversity declined as the reduction potential of the electron acceptor decreased and that more specialised organisms dominated under anaerobic conditions. These results imply that the microbial attenuation of ISA and comparable organic complexants, initially present or formed in situ, may play a role in reducing the mobility of radionuclides from an ILW-GDF, facilitating the reduction of undue pessimism in the long-term performance assessment of such facilities. PMID:25062127

  3. Radiopotentiation of human brain tumor cells by sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Lu, R M; Hu, L J; Lamborn, K R; Prados, M D; Deen, D F

    1999-08-03

    Phenylacetate (PA) inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and shows promise as a relatively nontoxic agent for cancer treatment. A recent report shows that prolonged exposure of cells to low concentrations of PA can enhance the radiation response of brain tumor cells in vitro, opening up the possibility of using this drug to improve the radiation therapy of brain tumor patients. We investigated the cytotoxicity produced by sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) alone and in combination with X-rays in SF-767 human glioblastoma cells and in two medulloblastoma cell lines, Masden and Daoy. Exposure of all three cell lines to relatively low concentrations of NaPA for up to 5 days did not enhance the subsequent cell killing produced by X-irradiation. However, enhanced cell killing was achieved by exposing either oxic or hypoxic cells to relatively high drug concentrations ( > 50-70 mM) for 1 h immediately before X-irradiation. Because central nervous system toxicity can occur in humans at serum concentrations of approximately 6 mM PA, translation of these results into clinical trials will likely require local drug-delivery strategies to achieve drug concentrations that can enhance the radiation response. The safety of such an approach with this drug has not been demonstrated.

  4. Formation of volatile chemicals from thermal degradation of less volatile coffee components: quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon-Kwan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-05-12

    The less volatile constituents of coffee beans (quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid) were roasted under a stream of nitrogen, air, or helium. The volatile degradation compounds formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeic acid produced the greatest amount of total volatiles. Quinic acid and chlorogenic acid produced a greater number of volatiles under the nitrogen stream than under the air stream. These results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not play an important role in the formation of volatile compounds by the heat degradation of these chemicals. 2,5-Dimethylfuran formed in relatively large amounts (59.8-2231.0 microg/g) in the samples obtained from quinic acid and chlorogenic acid but was not found in the samples from caffeic acid. Furfuryl alcohol was found in the quinic acid (259.9 microg/g) and caffeic acid (174.4 microg/g) samples roasted under a nitrogen stream but not in the chlorogenic sample. The three acids used in the present study do not contain a nitrogen atom, yet nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds, pyridine, pyrrole, and pyrazines, were recovered. Phenol and its derivatives were identified in the largest quantities. The amounts of total phenols ranged from 60.6 microg/g (quinic acid under helium) to 89893.7 microg/g (caffeic acid under helium). It was proposed that phenol was formed mainly from quinic acid and that catechols were formed from caffeic acid. Formation of catechol from caffeic acid under anaerobic condition indicates that the reaction participating in catechol formation was not oxidative degradation.

  5. Bacterial conversion of phenylalanine and aromatic carboxylic acids into dihydrodiols.

    PubMed Central

    Wegst, W; Tittmann, U; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1981-01-01

    Strain E of chloridazon-degrading bacteria, when grown on L-phenylalanine accumulates cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine. In experiments with resting cells and during growth the bacterium converts the aromatic carboxylic acids phenylacetate, phenylpropionate, phenylbutyrate and phenyl-lactate into the corresponding cis-2,3-dihydrodiol compounds. The amino acids L-phenylalanine, N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine and t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanine were also transformed into dihydrodiols. All seven dihydrodiols, thus obtained, were characterized both by conventional analytical techniques and by the ability to serve as substrates for a cis-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. PMID:7306016

  6. Bacterial conversion of phenylalanine and aromatic carboxylic acids into dihydrodiols.

    PubMed

    Wegst, W; Tittmann, U; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1981-03-15

    Strain E of chloridazon-degrading bacteria, when grown on L-phenylalanine accumulates cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine. In experiments with resting cells and during growth the bacterium converts the aromatic carboxylic acids phenylacetate, phenylpropionate, phenylbutyrate and phenyl-lactate into the corresponding cis-2,3-dihydrodiol compounds. The amino acids L-phenylalanine, N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine and t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanine were also transformed into dihydrodiols. All seven dihydrodiols, thus obtained, were characterized both by conventional analytical techniques and by the ability to serve as substrates for a cis-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase.

  7. Poly(Aspartic Acid) Degradation by a Sphingomonas sp. Isolated from Freshwater

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Kenji; Kasuya, Ken-Ichi; Abe, Hideki; Masuda, Kozue; Doi, Yoshiharu

    1999-01-01

    A poly(aspartic acid) degrading bacterium (strain KT-1 [JCM10459]) was isolated from river water and identified as a member of the genus Sphingomonas. The isolate degraded only poly(aspartic acid)s of low molecular masses (<5 kDa), while the cell extract hydrolyzed high-molecular-mass poly(aspartic acid)s of 5 to 150 kDa to yield aspartic acid monomer. PMID:10473451

  8. Degradation and compatibility behaviors of poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luzhong; Dou, Sufeng; Li, Yan; Yuan, Ying; Ji, Yawei; Wang, Yaling; Yang, Yumin

    2013-07-01

    The films of poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan were prepared without using a catalyst to improve the degradable property of chitosan. The films were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The degradation of the poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan films were investigated in the lysozyme solution. In vitro degradation tests revealed that the degradation rate of poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan films increased dramatically compared with chitosan. The degradation rate of poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan films gradually increased with the increasing of the molar ratio of glycolic acid to chitosan. Additionally, the poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan films have good biocompatibility, as demonstrated by in vitro cytotoxicity of the extraction fluids. The biocompatible and biodegradable poly(glycolic acid) grafted chitosan would be an effective material with controllable degradation rate to meet the diverse needs in biomedical fields.

  9. Molecular products from the thermal degradation of glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Kibet, Joshua K; Khachatryan, Lavrent; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-08-14

    The thermal behavior of glutamic acid was investigated in N2 and 4% O2 in N2 under flow reactor conditions at a constant residence time of 0.2 s, within a total pyrolysis time of 3 min at 1 atm. The identification of the main pyrolysis products has been reported. Accordingly, the principal products for pyrolysis in order of decreasing abundance were succinimide, pyrrole, acetonitrile, and 2-pyrrolidone. For oxidative pyrolysis, the main products were succinimide, propiolactone, ethanol, and hydrogen cyanide. Whereas benzene, toluene, and a few low molecular weight hydrocarbons (propene, propane, 1-butene, and 2-butene) were detected during pyrolysis, no polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected. Oxidative pyrolysis yielded low molecular weight hydrocarbon products in trace amounts. The mechanistic channels describing the formation of the major product succinimide have been explored. The detection of succinimide (major product) and maleimide (minor product) from the thermal decomposition of glutamic acid has been reported for the first time in this study. Toxicological implications of some reaction products (HCN, acetonitrile, and acyrolnitrile), which are believed to form during heat treatment of food, tobacco burning, and drug processing, have been discussed in relation to the thermal degradation of glutamic acid.

  10. Enzymatic oxalic acid regulation correlated with wood degradation in four brown-rot fungi

    Treesearch

    Anne Christine Steenkjær Hastrup; Frederick Green III; Patricia K. Lebow; Bo Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a key component in the initiation of brown-rot decay and it has been suggested that it plays multiple roles during the degradation process. Oxalic acid is accumulated to varying degrees among brown-rot fungi; however, details on active regulation are scarce. The accumulation of oxalic acid was measured in this study from wood degraded by the four brown-...

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid ester degradation measured by FTIR-ATR with correlation spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Highly unsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid and linolenic acid are prone to oxidation with a resulting loss of bioactivity and generation of malodorous degradation compounds. Degradation proceeds by formation of the corresponding hydroperoxyl free radical with subsequent oxidative cl...

  12. Aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid using activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Cheng, Ka Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid (SA) by an acclimatized activated sludge. The sludge was enriched for over three months with SA (>500 mg/L) as the sole carbon and energy source and dissolved oxygen (DO, >5mg/L) as the primary electron acceptor. Effects of aeration rate (0-1.74 L/min), DO concentration (0-7 mg/L) and initial SA concentration (104-1085 mg/L) on SA biodegradation were quantified. A modified Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to obtain kinetic parameters of SA biodegradation and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Positive linear correlations were obtained between OUR and SA degradation rate (R(2)≥ 0.91). Over time, the culture consumed more oxygen per SA degraded, signifying a gradual improvement in SA mineralization (mass ratio of O(2): SA at day 30, 60 and 120 were 0.44, 0.51 and 0.78, respectively). The concomitant release of near stoichiometric quantity of sulphate (3.2 mmol SO(4)(2-) released from 3.3 mmol SA) and the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy (97.1%) indicated that the enriched microbial consortia could drive the overall SA oxidation close to a complete mineralization. In contrast to other pure-culture systems, the ammonium released from the SA oxidation was predominately converted into nitrate, revealing the presence of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the mixed culture. No apparent inhibitory effect of SA on the nitrification was noted. This work also indicates that aerobic SA biodegradation could be monitored by real-time DO measurement.

  13. [Degradation and biosynthesis of L-phenylalanine by chloridazon-degrading bacteria].

    PubMed

    Buck, R; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1979-07-01

    Incubating chloridazon-degrading bacteria with L-phenylalanine leads to the accumulation of L-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine, o-tyrosine and m-tyrosine in the medium. Incubating the bacteria with N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine leads to N-acetyl-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine. Using phenylacetic acid as substrate leads to the accumulation of malonic acid. The products are isolated by gel chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. 2,3-Dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine is attacked by a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in the presence of Fe2. An unstable yellow compound is formed in this reaction. This meta-cleavage-product is again cleaved by a hydrolase, leading to aspartic acid and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovaleric acid. Both products were isolated fromthe reaction buffer by amino acid analysis and high performance liquid chromatography. The dioxygenase and hydrolase were partially purified and characterized. A new degradation pathway for phenylalanine is discussed and compared with known pathways. The enzymes chorismate mutase, prephenate dehydratase and prephenate dehydrogenase are characterized and inhibition as well as repression are investigated. Only prephenate dehydrogenase is inhibited by phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophane. Chorismate mutase is repressed by phenylalanine, prephenate dehydrogenase by phenylalanine and tyrosine. Prephenate dehydratase is not repressed by aromatic amino acids. Regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in connection with phenylalanine degradation is discussed.

  14. Screening of Oxalate Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria of Food Origin.

    PubMed

    Murru, Nicoletta; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Peruzy, Maria Francesca; Santonicola, Serena; Mercogliano, Raffaelina; Aponte, Maria

    2017-04-13

    A screening for oxalate degrading abilities was initially carried on within Lactic Acid Bacteria cultures of different food origin. Seventy-nine strains were drop-inoculated onto MRS agar plates containing calcium oxalate. By comparing colonies diameters, 31 strains were used to inoculate, in parallel, MRS and MRS modified by sodium oxalate addition. Differences in the strains' growth were assessed by colony forming unit counts. For two strains, the growth in oxalate enriched medium was significantly higher; while, for eleven strains an opposite behaviour was recorded. Two strains - probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus LbGG and Enterococcus faecalis 59 - were chosen. The first strain appeared to be able to metabolize oxalate more efficiently than the other tested cultures, while strain 59 appeared unable to gather advantage by oxalates and, indeed, appeared to be inhibited by the salt presence in the medium. Outcomes revealed that higher glucose concentrations may favour oxalates utilization. In MRS with oxalate, but without glucose, citrate was completely metabolized. Evaluation along time confirmed that the oxalate degradation is more significant in presence of glucose. Outcomes may represent a good start for the development of a safe and even probiotic culture able to lower the oxalates content of food.

  15. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Screening and functional properties of cholesterol-degrading lactic acid bacteria from Jiangshui].

    PubMed

    Li, Xueping; Li, Jianhong; Li, Minquan; Meng, Xiangang

    2015-08-04

    We intended to obtain and characterize lactic acid bacteria with high capacity of cholesterol-degrading. We chose Jiangshui as the experimental material, screened lactic acid bacteria by the culture medium with high cholesterol, and studied other features of lactic acid bacteria like salt-tolerant, acid resistance, then identified the species of lactic acid bacteria by combining physiological and biochemical methods and 16S rDNA sequence. All lactic acid bacteria isolated had the capacity of cholesterol-degrading to some extent. There were 4 strains had high cholesterol-degrading rate (> 75%). Four strains were Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, two were Brevibacterium casei, and one was Lactococcus raffinolactis. Cholesterol-degrading lactic acid bacteria were screened from Jiangshui, with application potential for cholesterol degradation.

  17. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy after chemotherapy. Survival after treatment with sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, M; Werlin, S L; Lauer, S J

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old boy had hyperammonemia and encephalopathy develop after high-dose chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He was treated successfully with the ammonia-trapping agents sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

  18. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss.

  19. Identification of metabolites from the degradation of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, I; Freeman, J P; Evans, F E; Cerniglia, C E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1, previously shown to extensively mineralize high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure culture and in sediments, degrades fluoranthene to 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, 10 other fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of the culture medium by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. On the basis of comparisons with authentic compounds by UV spectrophotometry and thin-layer chromatography as well as gas chromatography-mass spectral and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, the metabolites were identified as 8-hydroxy-7-methoxyfluoranthene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, 1-acenaphthenone, 9-hydroxy-1-fluorenecarboxylic acid, phthalic acid, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, and adipic acid. Authentic 9-hydroxyfluorene and 9-fluorenone were metabolized by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. A pathway for the catabolism of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 is proposed. PMID:8481006

  20. Reduced Function of a Phenylacetate-Oxidizing Cytochrome P450 Caused Strong Genetic Improvement in Early Phylogeny of Penicillin-Producing Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sáiz, M.; Barredo, J. L.; Moreno, M. A.; Fernández-Cañón, J. M.; Peñalva, M. A.; Díez, B.

    2001-01-01

    The single-copy pahA gene from Penicillium chrysogenum encodes a phenylacetate 2-hydroxylase that catalyzes the first step of phenylacetate catabolism, an oxidative route that decreases the precursor availability for penicillin G biosynthesis. PahA protein is homologous to cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in the detoxification of xenobiotic compounds, with 84% identity to the Aspergillus nidulans homologue PhacA. Expression level of pahA displays an inverse correlation with the penicillin productivity of the strain and is subject to induction by phenylacetic acid. Gene expression studies have revealed a reduced oxidative activity of the protein encoded by pahA genes from penicillin-overproducing strains of P. chrysogenum compared to the activity conferred by phacA of A. nidulans. Sequencing and expression of wild-type pahA from P. chrysogenum NRRL 1951 revealed that an L181F mutation was responsible for the reduced function in present industrial strains. The mutation has been tracked down to Wisconsin 49–133, a mutant obtained at the Department of Botany of the University of Wisconsin in 1949, at the beginning of the development of the Wisconsin family of strains. PMID:11544206

  1. Growth inhibition, tumor maturation, and extended survival in experimental brain tumors in rats treated with phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ram, Z; Samid, D; Walbridge, S; Oshiro, E M; Viola, J J; Tao-Cheng, J H; Shack, S; Thibault, A; Myers, C E; Oldfield, E H

    1994-06-01

    Phenylacetate is a naturally occurring plasma component that suppresses the growth of tumor cells and induces differentiation in vitro. To evaluate the in vivo potential and preventive and therapeutic antitumor efficacy of sodium phenylacetate against malignant brain tumors, Fischer 344 rats (n = 50) bearing cerebral 9L gliosarcomas received phenylacetate by continuous s.c. release starting on the day of tumor inoculation (n = 10) using s.c. osmotic minipumps (550 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Rats with established brain tumors (n = 12) received continuous s.c. phenylacetate supplemented with additional daily i.p. dose (300 mg/kg). Control rats (n = 25) were treated in a similar way with saline. Rats were sacrificed during treatment for electron microscopic studies of their tumors, in vivo proliferation assays, and measurement of phenylacetate levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with phenylacetate extended survival when started on the day of tumor inoculation (P < 0.01) or 7 days after inoculation (P < 0.03) without any associated adverse effects. In the latter group, phenylacetate levels in pooled serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples after 7 days of treatment were in the therapeutic range as determined in vitro (2.45 mM in serum and 3.1 mM in cerebrospinal fluid). Electron microscopy of treated tumors demonstrated marked hypertrophy and organization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, indicating cell differentiation, in contrast to the scant and randomly distributed endoplasmic reticulum in tumors from untreated animals. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the rate of tumor proliferation and restoration of anchorage dependency, a marker of phenotypic reversion. Phenylacetate, used at clinically achievable concentrations, prolongs survival of rats with malignant brain tumors through induction of tumor differentiation. Its role in the treatment of brain tumors and other cancers should be explored further.

  2. Formation of catechols via removal of acid side chains from ibuprofen and related aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Robert W; Hay, Anthony G

    2005-10-01

    Although ibuprofen [2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-propionic acid] is one of the most widely consumed drugs in the world, little is known regarding its degradation by environmental bacteria. Sphingomonas sp. strain Ibu-2 was isolated from a wastewater treatment plant based on its ability to use ibuprofen as a sole carbon and energy source. A slight preference toward the R enantiomer was observed, though both ibuprofen enantiomers were metabolized. A yellow color, indicative of meta-cleavage, accumulated transiently in the culture supernatant when Ibu-2 was grown on ibuprofen. When and only when 3-flurocatechol was used to poison the meta-cleavage system, isobutylcatechol was identified in the culture supernatant via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Ibuprofen-induced washed-cell suspensions also metabolized phenylacetic acid and 2-phenylpropionic acid to catechol, while 3- and 4-tolylacetic acids and 2-(4-tolyl)-propionic acid were metabolized to the corresponding methyl catechols before ring cleavage. These data suggest that, in contrast to the widely distributed coenzyme A ligase, homogentisate, or homoprotocatechuate pathway for metabolism of phenylacetic acid and similar compounds, Ibu-2 removes the acidic side chain of ibuprofen and related compounds prior to ring cleavage.

  3. Acid attack on hydrated cement — Effect of mineral acids on the degradation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gutberlet, T.; Hilbig, H.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2015-08-15

    During acid attack on concrete structural components, a degraded layer develops whose properties as a protective barrier are decisive for durability. {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy and {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy were used with XRD to investigate the degraded layer on hardened cement paste exposed to HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The layer comprises an amorphous silica gel with framework silicates, geminate and single silanol groups in which Si is substituted by Al. Amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} and Fe(OH){sub 3} are present. The gel forms by polycondensation and cross-linking of C-A-S-H chains at AlO{sub 4} bridging tetrahedra. In the transition zone between the degraded layer and the undamaged material, portlandite dissolves and Ca is removed from the C-A-S-H phases maintaining their polymer structure at first. With HCl, monosulphate in the transition zone is converted into Friedel's salt and ettringite. With H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, gypsum precipitates near the degradation front reducing the thickness of the transition zone and the rate of degradation.

  4. Effect of scrubbing operating conditions on adipic acid degradation. Final report February-August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.

    1981-02-01

    The report gives results of adipic acid degradation tests at EPA's IERL-RTP limestone SO2 scrubber, to investigate the effects of operating variables on unaccountable adipic acid loss. It was found that: (1) adipic acid degradation could not be totally quenched by only lowering the pH below 5.0; (2) pH change did significantly affect unaccountable adipic acid loss (other factors may increase the adipic acid degradation rate at both high and low pH); (3) an appreciable amount of adipic acid loss was caused by coprecipitation with calcium sulfite; and (4) forced oxidation could aggravate the adipic acid degradation loss even at pH below 5.0. Adipic acid loss could be reduced: at high sulfite concentrations (the adipic acid degradation rate could be decreased by lowering the destructive free radical concentrations by high total sulfite); in the presence of manganous ion at low pH (the metal ion might act as an inhibitor to the oxidative degradation reaction at low pH); and with high natural oxidation (the adipic acid coprecipitation loss might be reduced with the high natural oxidation). Adipic acid degradation (loss) data were compared from four different test facilities. Most of the data also support these conclusions.

  5. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of gallic acid under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Quici, Natalia; Litter, Marta I

    2009-07-01

    UV/TiO(2)-heterogeneous photocatalysis was tested as a process to degrade gallic acid (Gal) in oxygenated solutions at pH 3. In the absence of oxidants other than oxygen, decay followed a zero order rate at different concentrations and was slow at concentrations higher than 0.5 mM. Addition of Fe(3+), H(2)O(2) and the combination Fe(3+)/H(2)O(2) improved Gal degradation. In the absence of H(2)O(2), an optimal Fe : Gal molar ratio of 0.33 : 1 was found for the photocatalytic decay, beyond which addition of Fe(3+) was detrimental and even worse in comparison with the system in the absence of Fe(3+). TiO(2) addition was beneficial compared with the same system in the absence of the photocatalyst if Fe(3+) was added at low concentration (0.33 : 1 Fe : Gal molar ratio), while at high concentration (1 : 1 Fe : Gal molar ratio) TiO(2) did not exert any significant effect. H(2)O(2) addition (1 : 0.33 Gal : H(2)O(2) molar ratio, absence of Fe(iii)) also enhanced the heterogeneous photocatalytic reaction. Simultaneous addition of Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) was more effective than the addition of the separate oxidants. This system was compared with Fenton and photo-Fenton systems. At low H(2)O(2) concentration (0.33 : 1 : 0.2 Fe : Gal : H(2)O(2) molar ratio), the presence of TiO(2) also enhanced the reaction. The influence of the thermal charge transfer reaction between Gal and Fe(iii), which leads to an important Gal depletion in the dark with formation of quinones, was analysed. The mechanisms taking place in these complex systems are proposed, paying particular attention to the important charge transfer reaction of the Fe(iii)-Gal complex operative in dark conditions.

  6. Phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria in tef-injera fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Maren M; Egli, Ines M; Aeberli, Isabelle; Hurrell, Richard F; Meile, Leo

    2014-11-03

    Ethiopian injera, a soft pancake, baked from fermented batter, is preferentially prepared from tef (Eragrostis tef) flour. The phytic acid (PA) content of tef is high and is only partly degraded during the fermentation step. PA chelates with iron and zinc in the human digestive tract and strongly inhibits their absorption. With the aim to formulate a starter culture that would substantially degrade PA during injera preparation, we assessed the potential of microorganisms isolated from Ethiopian household-tef fermentations to degrade PA. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were found to be among the dominating microorganisms. Seventy-six isolates from thirteen different tef fermentations were analyzed for phytase activity and thirteen different isolates of seven different species were detected to be positive in a phytase screening assay. In 20-mL model tef fermentations, out of these thirteen isolates, the use of Lactobacillus (L.) buchneri strain MF58 and Pediococcus pentosaceus strain MF35 resulted in lowest PA contents in the fermented tef of 41% and 42%, respectively of its initial content. In comparison 59% of PA remained when spontaneously fermented. Full scale tef fermentation (0.6L) and injera production using L. buchneri MF58 as culture additive decreased PA in cooked injera from 1.05 to 0.34±0.02 g/100 g, representing a degradation of 68% compared to 42% in injera from non-inoculated traditional fermentation. The visual appearance of the pancakes was similar. The final molar ratios of PA to iron of 4 and to zinc of 12 achieved with L. buchneri MF58 were decreased by ca. 50% compared to the traditional fermentation. In conclusion, selected LAB strains in tef fermentations can degrade PA, with L. buchneri MF58 displaying the highest PA degrading potential. The 68% PA degradation achieved by the application of L. buchneri MF58 would be expected to improve human zinc absorption from tef-injera, but further PA degradation is probably necessary if iron absorption has to

  7. Effects of phenylacetate on cells from patients with B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Call, T G; Stenson, M J; Witzig, T E

    1994-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 11 patients with untreated B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were exposed to sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) in culture to assess its ability to induce differentiation. We found no evidence of cellular differentiation or induction of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity, as seen when B-CLL cells were treated with phorbol ester. We observed a striking decrease in the viability of the B-CLL cells in a time and dose dependent fashion when exposed to NaPA. After six days of culture, control cells from the 11 patients studied had a median viability of 90%, whereas cells exposed to NaPA at 5 and 10 mM concentrations had median viabilities of 39 and 16%, respectively. The cells treated with NaPA developed prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles. NaPA binds and depletes glutamine which is an important amino acid for lymphocyte metabolism. Although the mechanism of the cytocidal effects demonstrated in this study are unknown, they may relate at least partially to glutamine deprivation.

  8. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  9. Characterization of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading fungi in Vietnamese soils.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Morishita, Shigeyuki; Chida, Masateru; Suyama, Kousuke

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-nine fungal strains were isolated countrywide from 10 Vietnamese soils, in areas both with and without a history of exposure to Agent Orange, and their degrading activities on the phenoxy acid herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), as well as related compounds, were examined. Among taxonomically various fungi, 45, 12 and 4% of the isolates degraded phenoxyacetic acid (PA), 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, respectively. While the PA-degrading fungi were distributed to all sites and among many genera, the 2,4-D-degraders were found only in order Eurotiales in class Eurotiomycetes. All of the 2,4,5-T-degrading fungal strains were phylogenetically close to Eupenicillium spp. and were isolated from southern Vietnam. As a degradation intermediate, the corresponding phenol compounds were detected in some strains. The degradation substrate spectrum for 26 compounds of Eupenicillium spp. strains including 2,4,5-T-degraders and -non-degraders seemed to be related to phylogenetic similarity and soil sampling location of the isolates. These results suggest that the heavily contaminated environments enhanced the adaptation of the phylogenetic group of Eupenicillium spp. toward to obtain the ability to degrade 2,4,5-T. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  11. Degradation of 2-methylbenzoic acid by Pseudomonas cepacia MB2

    SciTech Connect

    Higson, F.K.; Focht, D.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the isolation of Pseudomonas cepacia MB2, believed to be the first microorganism to utilize 2-methylbenzoic acid as the sole carbon source. Its growth range included all mono- and dimethylbenzoates (with the exception of 2,5- and 2,6-dimethylbenzoates) and 3-chloro-2-methylbenzoate (but not 4- or 5-chloro-2-methylbenzoate) but not chlorobenzoates lacking a methyl group. 2-Chlorobenzoate, 3-chlorobenzoate, and 2,3-, 2,4-, and 3,4-dichlorobenzoates inhibited growth of MB2 on 2-methylbenzoate as a result of cometabolism to the corresponding chlorinated catechols which blocked the key enzyme catechol 2,3-dioxygenase. A metapyrocatechase-negative mutant, MB2-G5, showed accumulation of dimethylcatechols from 2,3- and 3,4-dimethylbenzoates, and phenols were detected in resting-cell transformation extracts bearing the same substitution pattern as the original substrate, presumably following thermal degradation of the intermediate dihydrodiol. 2-Methylphenol was also found in extracts of the mutant cells with 2-methylbenzoate. These observations suggested a major route of methylbenzoate metabolism to be dioxygenation to a carboxy-hydrodiol which then forms a catechol derivative. In addition, the methyl group of 2-methylbenzoate was oxidized to isobenzofuranone (by cells of MB2-G5) and to phthalate (by cells of a separate mutant that could not utilize phthalate, MB2-D2). This pathway also generated a chlorinated isobenzofuranone from 3-chloro-2-methylbenzoate.

  12. Polysorbate 20 Degradation in Biopharmaceutical Formulations: Quantification of Free Fatty Acids, Characterization of Particulates, and Insights into the Degradation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Anthony; Demeule, Barthélemy; Lin, Baiwei; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20), a commonly used surfactant in biopharmaceuticals, showed degradation upon long-term (∼18-36 months) storage of two monoclonal antibody (mAb, mAb-A, and mAb-B) drug products at 2-8 °C. The PS20 degradation resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids (FFA), which ultimately precipitated to form particles upon long-term storage. This study documents the development, qualification, and application of a method for FFA quantification in soluble and insoluble fraction of protein formulation. The method was applied to the quantification of capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic/oleic acid, and stearic acid in placebo as well as active protein formulations on stability. Quantification of FFA in both the soluble and insoluble fraction of mAb-A and mAb-B provided a better mechanistic understanding of PS20 degradation and the dynamics of subsequent fatty acid particle formation. Additionally, the use of this method for monitoring and quantitation of the FFA on real time storage stability appears to aid in identifying batches with higher probability for particulate formation upon extended storage at 5 °C.

  13. [Catalytic ozonation by ceramic honeycomb for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Comparative experiments for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution were carried out in the three processes of ozonation alone, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ceramic honeycomb adsorption. The results show that the degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, ozonation alone and ceramic honeycomb adsorption systems are 37.6%, 2.2% and 0.4%, and the presence of ceramic honeycomb catalyst significantly improves the degradation rate of oxalic acid compared to the results from non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption. With the addition of tert-butanol, the degradation rates of oxalic acid in catalytic ozonation system decrease by 24.1%, 29.0% and 30.1%, respectively, at the concentration of 5, 10 and 15 mg x L(-1). This phenomenon indicates that ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution follows the mechanism of *OH oxidation, namely the heterogeneous surface of catalyst enhances the initiation of *OH. The results of TOC analysis demonstrate that the process of ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation can achieve the complete mineralization level without the formation of intermediary degradation products. The experimental results suggest that the reaction temperature has positive relationship with the degradation rate of oxalic acid. The degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation system are 16.4%, 37.6%, 61.3% and 68.2%, at the respective reaction temperature of 10, 20, 30 and 40 degrees C.

  14. Thermal degradation kinetics of polylactic acid/acid fabricated cellulose nanocrystal based bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Monika; Dhar, Prodyut; Katiyar, Vimal

    2017-11-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are fabricated from filter paper (as cellulosic source) by acid hydrolysis using different acids such as sulphuric (H2SO4), phosphoric (H3PO4), hydrochloric (HCl) and nitric (HNO3) acid. The resulting acid derived CNC are melt mixed with Polylactic acid (PLA) using extruder at 180°C. Thermogravimetric (TGA) result shows that increase in 10% and 50% weight loss (T10, T50) temperature for PLA-CNC film fabricated with HNO3, H3PO4 and HCl derived CNC have improved thermal stability in comparison to H2SO4-CNC. Nonisothermal kinetic studies are carried out with modified-Coats-Redfern (C-R), Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) and Kissinger method to predict the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Subsequently prediction of these parameter leads to the proposal of thermal induced degradation mechanism of nanocomposites using Criado method. The distribution of Ea calculated from OFW model are (PLA-H3PO4-CNC: 125-139 kJmol(-1)), (PLA-HNO3-CNC: 126-145 kJmol(-1)), (PLA-H2SO4-CNC: 102-123 kJmol(-1)) and (PLA-HCl-CNC: 140-182 kJmol(-1)). This difference among Ea for the decomposition of PLA-CNC bionanocomposite is probably due to various acids used in this study. The Ea calculated by these two methods are found in consonance with that observed from Kissinger method. Further, hyphenated TG-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) result shows that gaseous products such as CO2, CO, lactide, aldehydes and other compounds are given off during the thermal degradation of PLA-CNC nanocomposite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential malic acid degradation by selected strains of Saccharomyces during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Redzepovic, S; Orlic, S; Majdak, A; Kozina, B; Volschenk, H; Viljoen-Bloom, M

    2003-05-25

    To produce a high-quality wine, it is important to obtain a fine balance between the various chemical constituents, especially between the sugar and acid content. The latter is more difficult to achieve in wines that have high acidity due to excess malic acid, since wine yeast in general cannot effectively degrade malic acid during alcoholic fermentation. An indigenous Saccharomyces paradoxus strain RO88 was able to degrade 38% of the malic acid in Chardonnay must and produced a wine of good quality. In comparison, Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain F effectively removed 90% of the malic acid, but did not produce a good-quality wine. Although commercially promoted as a malic-acid-degrading wine yeast strain, only 18% of the malic acid was degraded by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lalvin strain 71B. Preliminary studies on the transcriptional regulation of the malic enzyme gene from three Saccharomyces strains, i.e. S. paradoxus RO88, S. cerevisiae 71B and Saccharomyces bayanus EC1118, were undertaken to elucidate the differences in their ability to degrade malic acid. Expression of the malic enzyme gene from S. paradoxus RO88 and S. cerevisiae 71B increased towards the end of fermentation once glucose was depleted, whereas no increase in transcription was observed for S. bayanus EC1118 which was also unable to effectively degrade malic acid.

  16. Separation and recovery of nucleic acids with improved biological activity by acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2010-05-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in studying biomacromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids and proteins) and their complexes in a biological system is isolating them in their structurally and functionally intact forms. Electrophoresis offers convenient and efficient separation and analysis of biomacromolecules but recovery of separated biomacromolecules is a significant challenge. In this study, DNAs of various sizes were separated by electrophoresis in an acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel. Almost 100% of the nucleic acids were recovered after the identified gel bands were hydrolyzed under a mildly acidic condition and purified using anion exchange resin. Further concentration by centrifugal filtration and a second purification using ion exchange column chromatography yielded 44-84% of DNA. The second conventional (non-degradable) gel electrophoresis confirmed that the nucleic acids recovered from acid-degradable gel bands preserved their electrophoretic properties through acidic gel hydrolysis, purification, and concentration processes. The plasmid DNA recovered from acid-degradable gel transfected cells significantly more efficiently than the starting plasmid DNA (i.e. improved biological activity via acid-degradable PAGE). Separation of other types of nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA using this convenient and efficient technique was also demonstrated.

  17. Bioenergetics and pathway of acid blue 113 degradation by Staphylococcus lentus.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Sudharshan; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan; Shanmugam, Bhuvanesh Kumar; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-01-01

    Bioreaction calorimetric studies of degradation of the dye acid blue 113 by Staphylococcus lentus are reported for the first time. The heat released during the dye degradation process can be successfully measured using reaction calorimeter. Power time and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profile followed each other suggesting that heat profiles could monitor the progress of the dye degradation in biocalorimetry. The shifts observed in power-time profile indicated three distinct phases of the bioprocess indicating simultaneous utilization of glucose (primary) and dye (secondary carbon source). Secretion of azoreductase enzyme enhanced the degradation process. Optimization of aeration and agitation rates was observed to be vital to efficient dye degradation. The degradative pathway for acid blue 113 by S. lentus was delineated via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. Interestingly the products of degradation were found to have low toxicity, as per cytotoxicity measurements.

  18. Investigation of sorbic acid volatile degradation products in pharmaceutical formulations using static headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yarramraju, Sitaramaraju; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2007-06-28

    An analytical method that allows simultaneous analysis of sorbic acid and its degradation products was developed using static headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). AT-Aquawax-DA, the capillary column used, showed good selectivity and separation towards sorbic acid and its degradation products. Sorbic acid degradation was investigated in both acidic and aqueous media at room and elevated temperatures. In total 12 sorbic acid degradation products were found, 8 of which could be characterized. The method was investigated for its accuracy towards estimation of degradation products. Using the HS-GC method different batches of pharmaceutical preparations such as cold cream, cetomacrogol cream and vaseline were investigated for sorbic acid degradation products which were estimated by applying the standard addition method. Acetaldehyde was found to be the major degradation product. The other identified degradation products were: acetone; 2-methylfuran; crotonaldehyde; alfa-angelicalactone; 2-acetyl, 5-methylfuran; toluene and 2,5-dimethylfuran. Both mass spectrometeric (MS) and flame ionization detection (FID) were used. The qualitative investigation was done on HS-GC-MS and the quantitative work on HS-GC-FID.

  19. Ultraviolet-induced oxidation of ascorbic acid in a model juice system: identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Tikekar, Rohan V; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Elias, Ryan J; LaBorde, Luke F

    2011-08-10

    Degradation products of ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) treated ascorbic acid (AA) are reported. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS) conducted in a 0.5% malic acid model juice system (pH 3.3) demonstrated increased degradation of AA above untreated controls with concomitant increases in dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and 2,3-diketogulonic acid (DKGA) levels. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy studies, conducted in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) to increase detection sensitivity, demonstrated that ascorbyl radical (AA•) formation occurs simultaneously with AA degradation. Consistent with a previous study in which UV treatments were shown to accelerate dark storage degradation, AA• radicals continued to form for up to 200 min after an initial UV treatment. Results from this study suggest that the mechanism for UV-induced degradation is the same as the general mechanism for metal-catalyzed oxidation of AA in juice.

  20. Microbiological degradation of bile acids. Nitrogenous hexahydroindane derivatives formed from cholic acid by Streptomyces rubescens.

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, S; Hashimoto, S; Onaka, T

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of cholic acid (I) by Streptomyces rubescens was investigated. This organism effected ring A cleavage, side-chain shortening and amide bond formation and gave the following metabolites: (4R)-4-[4alpha-(2-carboxyethyl)-3aalpha-hexahydro-7abeta-methyl-5-oxoindan-1 beta-yl]valeric acid (IIa) and its mono-amide (valeramide) (IIb); and 2,3,4,6, 6abeta,7,8,9,9aalpha,9bbeta-decahydro-6abeta-methyl-1H-cyclopenta[f]quinoline-3,7-dione(IIIe)and its homologues with the beta-oriented side chains, valeric acid, valeramide, butanone and propionic acid, in the place of the oxo group at C-7, i.e.compounds (IIIa), (IIIb), (IIIc) and (IIId) respectively. All the nitrogenous metabolites were new compounds, and their structures were established by partial synthesis except for the metabolite (IIIc). The mechanism of formation of these metabolites is considered. A degradative pathway of cholic acid (I) into the metabolites is also tentatively proposed. PMID:1016253

  1. Growth inhibition of MCF-7 tumor cell line by phenylacetate linked to functionalized dextran.

    PubMed

    Frank, L; Avramoglou, T; Sainte-Catherine, O; Jozefonvicz, J; Kraemer, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the antiproliferative effect of phenylacetate covalently linked to dextran derivatives (DMCBPA conjugates) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We show that free sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) inhibits the cell growth (IC50 = 14 mM), while an important inhibitory effect is observed for DMCBPA conjugates. The IC50 dose of these conjugates is as low as 1.0 mg/ml, corresponding to 1.3 mM of phenylacetate. The precursors, dextran substituted with methylcarboxylate and benzylamide groups, did not affect the growth of MCF-7 tumor cells. We have observed that MCF-7 cell growth inhibition depends on amount of phenylacetate linked to the conjugate. The data indicated that an optimum antiproliferative effect is more significant when the amount of phenylacetate groups present on the dextran backbone is high. Analysis of doubling time by growth kinetics study shows that conjugates have more time-sustained effect than free NaPA. It is noteworthy that the inhibitory effect is observed at non-toxic concentration. Theses conjugates could be considered as acceptable derivatives to prevent tumor progression.

  2. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J. [Oakland, CA; Standley, Stephany M [Evanston, IL; Jain, Rachna [Milpitas, CA; Lee, Cameron C [Cambridge, MA

    2012-03-20

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  3. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  4. Inherently antioxidant and antimicrobial tannic acid release from poly(tannic acid) nanoparticles with controllable degradability.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Sagbas, Selin; Aktas, Nahit; Silan, Coskun

    2016-06-01

    From a natural polyphenol, Tannic acid (TA), poly(TA) nanoparticles were readily prepared using a single step approach with three different biocompatible crosslinkers; trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether (TMPGDE), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGGE), and trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). P(TA) particles were obtained with controllable diameters between 400 to 800nm with -25mV surface charge. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as the emulsion medium, pH values of TA solution, and the type of crosslinker, on the shape, size, dispersity, yield, and degradability of poly(Tannic Acid) (p(TA)) nanoparticles was systematically investigated. The hydrolytic degradation amount in physiological pH conditions of 5.4, 7.4, and 9.0 at 37.5°C were found to be in the order TMPGDEdegradation amounts of TA from p(TA) nanoparticles can be controlled by the appropriate choice of crosslinker, and the pH of releasing media. The highest TA release, 600mg/g, was obtained for TMPGDE-crosslinked p(TA) particles in intestinal pH conditions (pH 9) over 3 days; whereas, a slow and linear TA release profile over almost 30 days was obtained by using PEGGE-crosslinked p(TA) in body fluid pH conditions (pH 7.4). The total phenol content of p(TA) particles was calculated as 70±1μgmL(-1) for 170μgmL(-1) p(TA), and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity was found to be 2027±104mM trolox equivalent g(-1). Moreover, p(TA) nanoparticles demonstrated strong antimicrobial effects against common bacterial strains. More interestingly, with a higher concentration of p(TA) particles, higher blood clotting indices were obtained.

  5. Amine degradation by 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal in model systems.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Gallardo, Emerenciana; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2006-03-22

    The reactions of 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal with octylamine, benzylamine, and 2-phenylglycine methyl ester were studied to investigate if amines may suffer a Strecker type degradation by epoxyalkenals analogously to amino acids. In addition to other reactions, the studied amines were converted into their corresponding Strecker aldehydes (octanal, benzaldehyde, and methyl 2-oxo-2-phenylacetate, respectively) to an extent that depended on the pH, the temperature, the amount of epoxyalkenal, and the amine involved. Each amine exhibited an optimum pH for the reaction, but the corresponding Strecker aldehydes were produced to a significant extent within a broad pH range. In addition, the temperature mostly influenced the reaction rate, which was increased between 6.5 and 9.5 times when the reaction was carried out at 60 degrees C than when it took place at 37 degrees C. Furthermore, Strecker aldehyde formation was linearly correlated with the amount of the epoxyalkenal present in the reaction mixture. Nevertheless, the reaction yield mostly depended on the amine involved. Thus, octylamine only produced trace amounts of octanal, benzylamine was converted into benzaldehyde with a yield of 4.3%, and 2-phenylglycine methyl ester was converted into methyl 2-oxo-2-phenylacetate with a reaction yield of 49%. All of these results suggest that suitable amines can be degraded by epoxyalkenals to their corresponding Strecker aldehydes to a significant extent.

  6. Studies on the sonic degradation of deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    FREIFELDER, D; DAVISON, P F

    1962-05-01

    T7 DNA was partially degraded by x-rays, DNAase, and sonic irradiation. The molecular weight distributions were calculated from sedimentation velocity studies on the resulting preparations. Comparison with the theoretical curve derived by Montroll and Simha showed that the first two degradative methods act grossly at random, whereas sonication is a non-random process resulting in the preferential halving of the DNA molecules in solution.

  7. Studies on the Sonic Degradation of Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, David; Davison, Peter F.

    1962-01-01

    T7 DNA was partially degraded by x-rays, DNAase, and sonic irradiation. The molecular weight distributions were calculated from sedimentation velocity studies on the resulting preparations. Comparison with the theoretical curve derived by Montroll and Simha showed that the first two degradative methods act grossly at random, whereas sonication is a non-random process resulting in the preferential halving of the DNA molecules in solution. PMID:13894963

  8. Thermal degradation of Lewis acid complexed LDPE films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreelatha, K.; Predeep, P.

    2017-06-01

    The study highlights the thermal behavior of the semiconducting LDPE films synthesized by SbCl5 doping. The structural peculiarities and the responses of the structure to energetic modifications are studied. TGA and DTG curves are used to determine the thermal stability of the material. Degradation kinetics is elucidated. Activation energy and the entropy of activation for the degradation of the samples are calculated using Coats-Redfern plots and the samples show appreciable thermal stability.

  9. Acid catalysed degradation of some spiramycin derivatives found in the antibiotic bitespiramycin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo; Zhang, Shuqiu; Fawcett, J Paul; Zhong, Dafang

    2004-11-15

    Bitespiramycin is a novel antibiotic containing a number of 4''-acylated spiramycin derivatives (isovalerylspiramycins I-III, butanoylspiramycin III, propanoylspiramycin III and acetylspiramycin III) as major components. These spiramycin derivatives are susceptible to degradation in acid solution. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS(n)) was used to study the degradation of these spiramycin derivatives in simulated gastric fluid at 37 degrees C. All derivatives degraded by first-order reactions for which rate constants (k) and half-lives (t(1/2)) were calculated. Acyl groups at position 3 had less effect on acid-stability of spiramycin derivatives than acyl groups at position 4''. The introduction of 4''-acyl groups enhanced the acid-stability of spiramycin derivatives and altered the degradation pathway in simulated gastric fluid such that loss of forosamine rather than loss of mycarose becomes the major degradation pathway.

  10. Malonic acid suppresses mucin-type O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Goso, Yukinobu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrazine treatment is frequently used for releasing mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) from glycoproteins because the method provides O-glycans that retain a reducible GalNAc at their reducing end, which is available for fluorescent labeling. However, many O-glycans are degraded by "peeling" during this treatment. In the current study, it was found that malonic acid suppressed O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of bovine fetuin or porcine gastric mucin in both the gas and liquid phases. This is paradoxical because the release of O-glycans from glycoproteins occurs under alkaline conditions. However, malonic acid seems to prevent the degradation through its acidic property given that other weak acids also prevented the degradation. Accordingly, disodium malonate did not suppress O-glycan degradation. Application of this method to rat gastric mucin demonstrated that the majority of the major O-glycans obtained in the presence of malonic acid were intact, whereas those obtained in the absence of malonic acid were degraded. These results suggest that hydrazine treatment in the presence of malonic acid would allow glycomic analysis of native mucin glycoproteins.

  11. Degradation of substituted naphthalenesulfonic acids by Sphingomonas xenophaga BN6.

    PubMed

    Stolz, A

    1999-10-01

    Sphingomonas xenophaga BN6 was isolated from the river Elbe as a member of a multispecies bacterial culture which mineralized 6-aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate. Pure cultures of strain BN6 converted a wide range of amino- and hydroxynaphthalene-2-sulfonates via a catabolic pathway similar to that described for the metabolism of naphthalene to salicylate by Pseudomonas putida NAH7 or Pseudomonas sp NCIB 9816. In contrast to the naphthalene-degrading pseudomonads, S. xenophaga BN6 only partially degraded the naphthalenesulfonates and excreted the resulting amino- and hydroxysalicylates in almost stoichiometric amounts. Enzymes that take part in the degradative pathway of the naphthalenesulfonates by strain BN6 were purified, characterized and compared with the isofunctional enzymes from the naphthalene-degrading pseudomonads. According to the enzyme structures and the catalytic constants, no fundamental differences were found between the 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase or the 2'-hydroxybenzalpyruvate aldolase from strain BN6 and the isofunctional enzymes from the naphthalene-degrading pseudomonads. The limited available sequence information about the enzymes from strain BN6 suggests that they show about 40-60% sequence identity to the isofunctional enzymes from the pseudomonads. In addition to the gene for the 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase, the genes for two other extradiol dioxygenases were cloned and sequenced from strain BN6 and the corresponding gene products were studied. S. xenophaga BN6 has also been used as a model organism to study the mechanism of the non-specific reduction of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions and to establish combined anaerobic/aerobic treatment systems for the degradation of sulfonated azo dyes. Furthermore, the degradation of substituted naphthalenesulfonates by mixed cultures containing strain BN6 was studied in continuous cultures and was described by mathematical models.

  12. From labdanes to drimanes. Degradation of the side chain of dihydrozamoranic acid.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Jesús M L; Díez, D; Urones, J G; Rocha, Pedro M

    2004-04-30

    A new route for the degradation of the saturated side chain of dihydrozamoranic acid has been devised, giving an advanced intermediate, compound 14, useful for the synthesis of insect antifeedants such as warburganal and polygodial.

  13. The importance of lactic acid bacteria for phytate degradation during cereal dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Konietzny, Ursula; Coppola, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Elena; Greiner, Ralf

    2007-04-18

    Lactic acid fermentation of cereal flours resulted in a 100 (rye), 95-100 (wheat), and 39-47% (oat) reduction in phytate content within 24 h. The extent of phytate degradation was shown to be independent from the lactic acid bacteria strain used for fermentation. However, phytate degradation during cereal dough fermentation was positively correlated with endogenous plant phytase activity (rye, 6750 mU g(-1); wheat, 2930 mU g(-1); and oat, 23 mU g(-1)), and heat inactivation of the endogenous cereal phytases prior to lactic acid fermentation resulted in a complete loss of phytate degradation. Phytate degradation was restored after addition of a purified phytase to the liquid dough. Incubation of the cereal flours in buffered solutions resulted in a pH-dependent phytate degradation. The optimum of phytate degradation was shown to be around pH 5.5. Studies on phytase production of 50 lactic acid bacteria strains, previously isolated from sourdoughs, did not result in a significant production of intra- as well as extracellular phytase activity. Therefore, lactic acid bacteria do not participate directly in phytate degradation but provide favorable conditions for the endogenous cereal phytase activity by lowering the pH value.

  14. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of phenylbutyrate, phenylacetate benzoate and their corresponding metabolites phenylacetylglutamine and hippurate in blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Maurice D; Herebian, Diran; Meissner, Thomas; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2010-12-01

    Inborn errors of urea metabolism result in hyperammonemia. Treatment of urea cycle disorders can effectively lower plasma ammonium levels and results in survival in the majority of patients. Available medications for treating urea cycle disorders include sodium benzoate (BA), sodium phenylacetate (PAA), and sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) and are given to provide alternate routes for disposition of waste nitrogen excretion. In this study, we develop and validate a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, phenylbutyric acid, phenylacetylglutamine, and hippuric acid in plasma and urine from children with inborn errors of urea synthesis. Plasma extracts and diluted urine samples were injected on a reverse-phase column and identified and quantified by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in negative ion mode. Deuterated analogues served as internal standards. Analysis time was 7 min. Assay precision, accuracy, and linearity and sample stability were determined using enriched samples. Quantification limits of the method were 100 ng/ml (0.3-0.8 μmol/L) for all analytes, and recoveries were >90%. Inter- and intraday relative standard deviations were <10%. Our newly developed LC-MS/MS represents a robust, sensitive, and rapid method that allows simultaneous determination of the five compounds in plasma and urine.

  15. [Screening and identification of hemicellulose degrading microorganisms in acid soil].

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenjie; Xu, Youquan; Xu, Peizhi; Xie, Kaizhi; Lu, Yusheng; Tang, Shuanhu; Zhang, Fabao

    2012-10-04

    The aim of this study was to screen hemicellulose degrading microorganisms. The methods used to screen the effective strains included hydrolysis spot diameter measurement of hemicellulose plate and extracellular enzyme activity. The methods used to identify the strains included culture characteristics, morphological, physiological-biochemical characteristics and molecular biological methods. We isolated 4 actinomycetes (NA9, NA10, NA12 and NA13), 2 fungi (NF1 and NF7) with hemicellulose degrading ability and no antagonistic effect among them. The hemicellulose degrading activity of 4 actinomyces (NA9, NA10, NA12 and NA13) was 217.6, 229.8, 221.1 and 211.8 U/mL. The hemicellulose degrading activity of 2 fungi (NF1 and NF7) was 217.7 and 244.2 U/mL. The hemicellulose degrading activity of complex microbial system was 299.0 U/mL. NA9, NA10, NA12 and NA13 were Streptomyces costaricanus; NF1 was Aspergillus candidus and NF7 was Tarlaromyces flavus. the 4 actinomyces and 2 fungi screened have high hemicelluloses enzyme activity. These strains have good application value and more research value.

  16. Ca(2+) influxes and transmembrane transport are essential for phytic acid degradation in mung bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Wang, Pei; Yang, Runqiang; Wang, Xinyue; Gu, Zhenxin

    2017-09-19

    Phytic acid is considered as an antinutrient. Ca(2+) addition during germination has been proved to be an effective method for reducing phytic acid content in seeds. In this study, mung bean sprouts were treated with LaCl3 (La), verapamil (VP), ruthenium red (RR) and CaCl2 to explore the effect of Ca(2+) influxes on phytic acid degradation. 6 mM CaCl2 significantly improved extracellular and intracellular calcium precipitates and calcium content, elevated phytase and acid phosphatase activity and further enhanced phytic acid degradation. Conversely, La, VP or RR induced the opposite results. Among them, RR exhibited the most significant inhibitory effect. Decreased PA, PAP, MIPP and ALP gene expression after VP or RR treatment was also observed. Enhanced or weakened extracellular Ca(2+) influx or intracellular Ca(2+) efflux was detected with increased or decreased calcium precipitates distributed in different compartments. However, CaCl2 addition differentially reversed the inhibitory effects of all channel blockers. CaCl2 enhanced Ca(2+) influxes and accumulation in cells, which contributed to the regulation of phytic acid degradation. This study demonstrated that calcium channels played an essential role in mediating phytic acid degradation in mung bean sprouts and both extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) -regulation were involved in phytic acid degradation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic degradation of propanidid by various tissues. Short communication.

    PubMed

    Porsius, A J; van Zwieten, P A

    1976-01-01

    The very short anaesthetic action of 3-methoxy-4-(N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-methoxy)-phenylacetic acid propylester (propanidid, Epantol) is due to its rapid hydrolysis in vivo. In this study, the rates of degradation of this drug under the influence of various isolated tissues have been established. The drug was hydrolysed much more rapidly by liver homogenate than by whole blood or serum. It is concluded that inactivation of propanidid in vivo occurs mainly by the liver, whereas blood esterases play an insignificant part in hydrolyzing the ester. Moreover, it was demonstrated that cardiac tissue is able to hydrolyze the drug as well. It is postulated that the inactivation of propanidid by heart muscle might partly compensate for the severe cardiodepressive action of the anaesthetic agent. A gaschromatographic determination of propanidid has been developed.

  18. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-08

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy.

  19. Antioxidant activities of fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation and acidic hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Choi, Jong-il; Park, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight fucoidan, prepared by radical degradation using gamma ray was investigated for its antioxidant activities with different assay methods. As the molecular weight of fucoidan decreased with a higher absorbed dose, ferric-reducing antioxidant power values increased, but β-carotene bleaching inhibition did not change significantly. The antioxidant activity of acid-degraded fucoidan was also examined to investigate the effect of different degradation methods. At the same molecular weight, fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation showed higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than that observed with the acidic method. This result reveals that in addition to molecular weight, the degradation method affects the antioxidant activity of fucoidan.

  20. Influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Emi

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent. Oxalic acid formed at initial stage within 30 min significantly suppresses the reduction of ferric ion, thus terminating degradation reaction. The yield of oxalic acid is dependent on the amount of ferrous ion dosed since the minimal amount of oxalic acid is formed after the degradation reaction terminates. Mineralization of phenol by Fenton reagent stagnates after 120 min under the conditions used in this study. The reason why the mineralization stagnated can be assumed to be following two mechanisms other than the depletion of H(2)O(2). In the case where a small amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the reduction of ferric ions is minimal by oxalic acid formed. In the case where a large amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the amount of degradable organic compounds is insufficient owing to preferential conversion to oxalic acid. The mineralization can be enhanced by the intermittent dosing of ferrous ions, which facilitates the suppression of oxalic acid formation during the degradation by Fenton reagent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress degradation studies and stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method of glycyrrhetic acid.

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Kanwal, Nayab; Arfeen, Qamar Ul

    2013-01-17

    Glycyrrhetic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, possesses a broad range of pharmacological activities and serves as template to synthesize many bioactive drugs. This paper describes a simple, accurate, and sensitive stability-indicating TLC densitometric method for the determination of glycyrrhetic acid and its degradation product as per the ICH guidelines. Separation was carried out on TLC aluminium sheet pre-coated with silica gel 60F254 using chloroform, methanol and formic acid (9:0.9:0.1, v/v). Compact spot for glycyrrhetic acid was found at Rf value of 0.42 ± 0.03. Densitometric analysis was carried out in the absorbance mode at λmax 254 nm. Glycyrrhetic acid was found to be stable to the exposure of base, neutral, oxidation, dry heating treatment and wet heating treatment, but showed degradation under acidic and photochemical conditions. Moreover, fragmentation pattern of glycyrrhetic acid was developed by using a positive ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS) hybrid instrument. A photo-degraded product was characterized through comparison of mass spectrometric studies with glycyrrhetic acid. The developed stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method can be applied for routine analysis of glycyrrhetic acid in the presence of its degradation products.

  2. Stress degradation studies and stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method of glycyrrhetic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhetic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, possesses a broad range of pharmacological activities and serves as template to synthesize many bioactive drugs. This paper describes a simple, accurate, and sensitive stability-indicating TLC densitometric method for the determination of glycyrrhetic acid and its degradation product as per the ICH guidelines. Results Separation was carried out on TLC aluminium sheet pre-coated with silica gel 60F254 using chloroform, methanol and formic acid (9:0.9:0.1, v/v). Compact spot for glycyrrhetic acid was found at Rf value of 0.42 ± 0.03. Densitometric analysis was carried out in the absorbance mode at λmax 254 nm. Glycyrrhetic acid was found to be stable to the exposure of base, neutral, oxidation, dry heating treatment and wet heating treatment, but showed degradation under acidic and photochemical conditions. Moreover, fragmentation pattern of glycyrrhetic acid was developed by using a positive ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS) hybrid instrument. A photo-degraded product was characterized through comparison of mass spectrometric studies with glycyrrhetic acid. Conclusion The developed stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method can be applied for routine analysis of glycyrrhetic acid in the presence of its degradation products. PMID:23327365

  3. Influence of Fenton's reagent doses on the degradation and mineralization of H-acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Chen, Quanyuan; Yu, Yang; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang

    2013-12-15

    The recalcitrant H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution was oxidized by Fenton process, focusing on the relation of Fenton's reagent doses and degradation products. The experimental results showed that COD and TOC removals and biodegradability (BOD/COD ratio) of the solution increased with increasing Fenton's reagent doses. Over 80% COD can be removed and the biodegradability was improved significantly. It was found that major SO3H and NH2 groups in H-acid molecules were mineralized to SO4(2-) and NH4(+) ions during Fenton oxidation processes. H-acid degradation intermediates with benzene structures substituted by hydroxyl and/or carboxyl groups were identified by GC-MS. It was also found that short-chain fatty acids primarily oxalic acid were degradation products of H-acid by Fenton oxidation. Oxalic acid accumulated could account for approximately 60% of the residual TOC. The degradation pathway of H-acid was proposed based on above analyses in this work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Degradation of Acid Orange 7 with Persulfate Activated by Silver Loaded Granular Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-ming; Huang, Tian-yin; Chen, Jia-bin; Li, Wen-wei; Zhang, Li-ming

    2015-11-01

    Granular activated carbon with silver loaded as activator (Ag/GAC) was prepared using impregnation method. N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were adopted to characterize the Ag/GAC, showing that silver was successfully loaded on granular activated carbon. The oxidation degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) by the Ag/GAC activated by persulfate (PS) was investigated at ambient temperature. The influences of factors such as Ag loading, PS or Ag/GAC dosages and initial pH on the degradation of AO7 were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the degradation rate of AO7 could reach more than 95.0% after 180 min when the Ag loading content, PS/AO7 molar ratio, the Ag/GAC dosage were 12.7 mg x g(-1), 120: 1, 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. The initial pH had significant effect on the AO7 degradation, with pH 5.0 as the optimal pH for the degradation of AO7. The possible degradation pathway was proposed for the AO7 degradation by using UV-visible spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GG/MS). The azo bond and naphthalene ring in the AO7 were destroyed during the degradation, with phthalic acid and acetophenone as the main degradation products.

  5. Evaluation of non-thermal effects of electricity on ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation in acerola pulp during ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Débora Pez; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini

    2016-05-15

    The effect of electric field on ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation in acerola pulp during ohmic heating was evaluated. Ascorbic acid kinetic degradation was evaluated at 80, 85, 90 and 95°C during 60 min of thermal treatment by ohmic and conventional heating. Carotenoid degradation was evaluated at 90 and 95°C after 50 min of treatment. The different temperatures evaluated showed the same effect on degradation rates. To investigate the influence of oxygen concentration on the degradation process, ohmic heating was also carried out under rich and poor oxygen modified atmospheres at 90°C. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation was higher under a rich oxygen atmosphere, indicating that oxygen is the limiting reagent of the degradation reaction. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation was similar for both heating technologies, demonstrating that the presence of the oscillating electric field did not influence the mechanisms and rates of reactions associated with the degradation process.

  6. Retinoic acid induces proteasome-dependent degradation of retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) and oncogenic RARα fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Gianni, Maurizio; Kopf, Eliezer; Honoré, Nicole; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira; Koken, Marcel; Quignon, Frédérique; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; de Thé, Hugues

    1999-01-01

    Analyzing the pathways by which retinoic acid (RA) induces promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor α (PML/RARα) catabolism in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we found that, in addition to caspase-mediated PML/RARα cleavage, RA triggers degradation of both PML/RARα and RARα. Similarly, in non-APL cells, RA directly targeted RARα and RARα fusions to the proteasome degradation pathway. Activation of either RARα or RXRα by specific agonists induced degradation of both proteins. Conversely, a mutation in RARα that abolishes heterodimer formation and DNA binding, blocked both RARα and RXRα degradation. Mutations in the RARα DNA-binding domain or AF-2 transcriptional activation region also impaired RARα catabolism. Hence, our results link transcriptional activation to receptor catabolism and suggest that transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear receptors by their ligands may be a feedback mechanism allowing sustained target-gene activation. PMID:10611294

  7. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  8. Liquid chromatographic assay of diatrizoic acid and its diiodo degradation products in radio-opaque solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the analysis of diatrizoic acid (2,4,6-triiodo-3,5-diacetamidobenzoic acid) and its 2,4- and 2,6-diiodo degradation products in radio-opaque injection solutions. The method is accurate, precise, and linear at a concentration range of 5-50 ppm. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Selective microbial degradation of saturated methyl branched chain fatty acid isomers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three strains of Pseudomonas bacteria were screened for their capabilities of degrading chemically synthesized saturated branched-chain fatty acids (sbc-FAs). Mixtures of sbc-FAs with the methyl-branch located at various locales along the fatty acid were used as a carbon feedstock in shake-flask cu...

  10. A study on degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) during cooking.

    PubMed

    Nisha, P; Singhal, Rekha S; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of ascorbic acid degradation in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) as well as in pure ascorbic acid solutions at initial concentrations present in amla over a temperature range of 50-120 degrees C (steady-state temperature) has been studied. The ascorbic acid degradation followed first-order reaction kinetics where the rate constant increased with an increase in temperature. The temperature dependence of degradation was adequately modeled by the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were found to be 4.09 kcal/mole for amla and 4.49 kcal/mole for pure vitamin solution. The degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid was also evaluated in normal open pan cooking, pressure-cooking and a newly developed and patented fuel-efficient EcoCooker (unsteady state heating process). A mathematical model was developed using the steady-state kinetic parameters obtained to predict the losses of ascorbic acid from the time-temperature data of the unsteady state heating processing method. The results obtained indicate the ascorbic acid degradation is of a similar order of magnitude in all the methods of cooking.

  11. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  12. Selective activity of phenylacetate against malignant gliomas: resemblance to fetal brain damage in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Samid, D; Ram, Z; Hudgins, W R; Shack, S; Liu, L; Walbridge, S; Oldfield, E H; Myers, C E

    1994-02-15

    Phenylacetate, a deaminated metabolite of phenylalanine, has been implicated in damage to immature brain in phenylketonuria. Because primary brain tumors are highly reminiscent of the immature central nervous system, these neoplasms should be equally vulnerable. We show here that sodium phenylacetate can induce cytostasis and reversal of malignant properties of cultured human glioblastoma cells, when used at pharmacological concentrations that are well tolerated by children and adults. Treated tumor cells exhibited biochemical alterations similar to those observed in phenylketonuria-like conditions, including selective decline in de novo cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate. Because gliomas, but not mature normal brain cells, are highly dependent on mevalonate for production of sterols and isoprenoids vital for cell growth, sodium phenylacetate would be expected to affect tumor growth in vivo while sparing normal tissues. Systemic treatment of rats bearing intracranial gliomas resulted in significant tumor suppression with no apparent toxicity to the host. The data indicate that phenylacetate, acting through inhibition of protein prenylation and other mechanisms, may offer a safe and effective novel approach to treatment of malignant gliomas and perhaps other neoplasms as well.

  13. Electrochemical assisted photocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid with highly ordered TiO2 nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Jinwei; Wang, Ying; Feng, Jiangtao; Yan, Wei; Xu, Hao

    2014-07-01

    To explore the kinetics of photoelectrocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid, one of the important PPCPs, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were prepared by the electrochemical anodization and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The effect of TiO2 NTs properties, bias potential, initial salicylic acid concentration and solution pH on the degradation efficiency was studied and carefully analyzed. The results revealed that the salicylic acid degradation follows quasi-first order kinetics in the photoelectrocatalytic process, and the fastest decay kinetics was achieved in acidic environment (pH 2). The result was further interpreted through the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is confirmed that the electrochemical assisted photocatalysis is a synergetic approach to combat stable organic substances with improved efficiency.

  14. Anaerobic degradation of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether and guaiacoxyacetic acid by mixed rumen bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Supanwong, K; Ohmiya, K; Shimizu, S; Kawakami, H

    1985-01-01

    Veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether (0.2 g/liter), a lignin model compound, was found to be degraded by mixed rumen bacteria in a yeast extract medium under strictly anaerobic conditions to the extent of 19% within 24 h. Guaiacoxyacetic acid, 2-(o-methoxyphenoxy)ethanol, vanillic acid, and vanillin were detected as degradation products of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether by thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Guaiacoxyacetic acid (0.25 g/liter), when added into the medium as a substrate, was entirely degraded within 36 h, resulting in the formation of phenoxyacetic acid, guaiacol, and phenol. These results suggest that the beta-arylether bond, an important intermonomer linkage in lignin, can be cleaved completely by these rumen anaerobes. PMID:3841472

  15. Photo-degradation of clofibric acid by ultraviolet light irradiation at 185 nm.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhen; Lu, Shuguang; Chen, Nuo; Gu, Xiaogang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Fan, Ji; Lin, Kuangfei

    2009-01-01

    As a metabolite of lipid regulators, clofibric acid (CA) was investigated in this study for its ultraviolet (UV) degradation at monochromatic wavelength of 185 nm using Milli-Q water and sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. The effects of CA initial concentration, solution pH, humic acid (HA), nitrate and bicarbonate anions on CA degradation performances were evaluated. All CA degradation patterns well fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The results showed that OH generated from water photolysis by UV185 irradiation was involved, resulting in indirect CA photolysis but contributed less to the whole CA removal when compared to the main direct photolysis process. Acid condition favored slightly to CA degradation and other constituents in solution, such as HA (5.0-100.0 mg L(-1)), nitrate and bicarbonate anions (1.0x10(-3) mol L(-1) and 0.1 mol L(-1)), had negative effects on CA degradation. When using real STP effluent CA degradation could reach 97.4% (without filtration) and 99.3% (with filtration) after 1 hr irradiation, showing its potential mean in pharmaceuticals removal in UV disinfection unit. Mineralization tests showed that rapid chloride ion release happened, resulting in no chlorinated intermediates accumulation, and those non-chlorinated intermediate products could further be nearly completely degraded to CO2 and H2O after 6 hrs.

  16. Processing barley grain with lactic acid and tannic acid ameliorates rumen microbial fermentation and degradation of dietary fibre in vitro.

    PubMed

    Deckardt, Kathrin; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-15

    Cereal grains are important ingredients of ruminant diets, but their rapid degradation seriously impairs rumen fermentation and the host's health. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether processing of barley grain with 1 or 5% lactic acid (LA) and 1 or 5% tannic acid (TA), without or with an additional heat treatment (1% LAH or 1% TAH), may affect microbial ruminal abundance, fermentation profile, and nutrient degradation in vitro. Processing with LA lowered (P < 0.05) the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), proportions of branched-chain SCFA, and the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Treatment with 1% TAH and 1% LAH lowered (P < 0.05) gene copy numbers of total protozoa, rumen lipopolysaccharide, and degradation of crude protein, and tended (P = 0.08) to lower the proportion of the genus Prevotella. Treatment of barley grain with 1% LA or 1% LAH stimulated Clostridium cluster XIV. Degradation of fibre was enhanced (P < 0.05) by all LA and TA treatments. Chemical and heat treatment of barley grain modulated the ruminal fermentation profile and enhanced fibre degradation; however, processing of grain with LA seems to be superior because this effect was not associated with a concomitant depression in ruminal degradation of organic matter. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Synthesis of four stereoisomers of 1-azabiocyclo[2.2.2]OCT-3-YL-{alpha}-fluoroalkyl-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe): Potential imaging ligands for the muscarinic-cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Earlier studies with the racemic 1-azabiocyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-fluoroalkyl-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe) mixture had demonstrated high in vitro binding affinity for the muscarinic-cholinergic receptor (m-AChR). Pre-treatment of rats with this new agent significantly blocked receptor localization of subsequently injected [I-131]-Z-(-,-)-IQNP, which is an established high affinity m-AChR ligand. Syntheses and characterization of the four FQNPe stereoisomers: (-)(-) FQNPe, (-)(+) FQNPe, (+)(-) FQNPe, and (+)(+) FQNPe will be presented. The interesting NMR spectra of the diastereomeric salts formed in the resolution of racemic {alpha}-(1-chloropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy {alpha}-phenylacetic acid will also be discussed.

  18. Determination of the Acid-Base Dissociation Constant of Acid-Degradable Hexamethylenetetramine by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshio; Shimakami, Natsumi; Kurashina, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Yabutani, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The acid-base equilibrium of hexamethylenetetramine (hexamine) was analyzed with its effective electrophoretic mobility by capillary zone electrophoresis. Although hexamine is degradable in a weakly acidic aqueous solution, and the degraded products of ammonia and formaldehyde can be formed, the effective electrophoretic mobility of hexamine was measured in the pH range between 2.8 and 6.9. An acid-base dissociation equilibrium of the protonated hexamine was analyzed based on the mobility change, and an acid dissociation constant of pKa = 4.93 ± 0.01 (mean ± standard error, ionic strength: 0.020 mol dm(-3)) was determined. The monoprotic acid-base equilibrium of hexamine was confirmed through comparisons of its electrophoretic mobility with the N-ethylquinolinium ion and with the monocationic N-ethyl derivative of hexamine, as well as a slope analysis of the dissociation equilibrium.

  19. Citric Acid Fuctionalized Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dye.

    PubMed

    Mahto, Triveni Kumar; Roy, Anurag; Sahoo, Banalata; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this study different magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFe2O4, where M = Fe, Mn, Zn) were synthesized through an aqueous coprecipitation method and then functionalized with citric acid for the degradation of azo dye present in industrial waste water. Here we evaluated the role of citric acid for photocatalytic application. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the catalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO) was evaluated. The rate of MO degradation in different magnetic systems was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of active parameters (pH, initial MO concentration and effect of sunlight) on degradation performance was investigated. For the first time, citric acid chemistry is successfully exploited to develop a photocatalyst that can successfully degrade the dyes. This citric acid functionalized magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are very much effective for photocalytic degradation of dye and also these can be recollected with the help of permanent magnet for successive uses.

  20. Rapid Degradation of Auxin/Indoleacetic Acid Proteins Requires Conserved Amino Acids of Domain II and Is Proteasome Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jason A.; Zenser, Nathan; Leyser, Ottoline; Callis, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Auxin rapidly induces auxin/indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcription. The proteins encoded are short-lived nucleus-localized transcriptional regulators that share four conserved domains. In a transient assay measuring protein accumulation, an Aux/IAA 13–amino acid domain II consensus sequence was sufficient to target firefly luciferase (LUC) for low protein accumulation equivalent to that observed previously for full-length PSIAA6. Single amino acid substitutions in these 13 amino acids, corresponding to known auxin response mutants, resulted in a sixfold to 20-fold increase in protein accumulation. Naturally occurring variant amino acids had no effect. Residues identified as essential by single alanine substitutions were not sufficient when all flanking amino acids were alanine, indicating the importance of flanking regions. Using direct protein degradation measurements in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings, full-length IAA1, PSIAA6, and the N-terminal 73 PSIAA6 amino acids targeted LUC for rapid degradation with 8-min half-lives. The C-terminal 109 amino acids did not affect LUC half-life. Smaller regions containing domain II also targeted LUC for rapid degradation, but the rates were not equivalent to those of the full-length protein. A single domain II substitution in the context of full-length PSIAA6 increased half-life 30-fold. Proteasome inhibitors affected Aux/IAA::LUC fusion protein accumulation, demonstrating the involvement of the proteasome. PMID:11595806

  1. Kinetic effect of humic acid on alachlor degradation by anodic Fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiquan; Lemley, Ann T

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of water often results from the heavy use of agricultural chemicals, and the disposal of aqueous pesticide waste is a concern. Anodic Fenton treatment (AFT) has been shown to be a successful remediation method for pesticides in solution, but the effect of soil on the degradation kinetics of pesticides using this method has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of humic acid, as a soil surrogate, on the degradation kinetics of alachlor [2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl-N-(methoxymethyl) acetamide], a heavily used herbicide that has been studied in pure aqueous solution by AFT. The AFT consists of a controlled constant delivery of Fenton reagents, using an electrochemical half-cell to deliver ferrous iron. Alachlor was quickly degraded by AFT, and the kinetics were found to obey the previously developed AFT model well. Degradation of alachlor by AFT in humic acid slurry showed that when the amount of humic acid was increased, alachlor degradation was significantly slowed down and the degradation kinetics were shifted from the AFT model to a first-order model. Further experimentation indicated that humic acid not only competes with alachlor for hydroxyl radicals, reducing the degradation rate of the target compound, but also buffers the slurry at near neutral pH, blocking regeneration of ferrous ion from ferric ion and subsequently shifting the kinetics to first order. Degradation of several other pesticides in humic acid slurry also followed first-order kinetics. These results imply that higher concentrations of Fenton reagents will be required for soil remediation.

  2. Characterization of bacterial diversity in an atrazine degrading enrichment culture and degradation of atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret in industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Vasudevan, Venugopal; Nain, Lata; Singh, Neera

    2016-01-01

    An enrichment culture was used to study atrazine degradation in mineral salt medium (MSM) (T1), MSM+soil extract (1:1, v/v) (T2) and soil extract (T3). Results suggested that enrichment culture required soil extract to degrade atrazine, as after second sequential transfer only partial atrazine degradation was observed in T1 treatment while atrazine was completely degraded in T2 and T3 treatments even after fourth transfer. Culture independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique confirmed selective enrichment of genus Bacillus along with Pseudomonas and Burkholderia. Degradation of atrazine/metabolites in the industrial wastewater was studied at different initial concentrations of the contaminants [wastewater-water (v/v) ratio: T1, 1:9; T2, 2:8; T3, 3:7; T4, 5:5 and T5, undiluted effluent]. The initial concentrations of atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret ranged between 5.32 and 53.92 µg mL(-1), 265.6 and 1805.2 µg mL(-1) and 1.85 and 16.12 µg mL(-1), respectively. The enrichment culture was able to completely degrade atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret up to T4 treatment, while no appreciable degradation of contaminants was observed in the undiluted effluent (T5). Inability of enrichment culture to degrade atrazine/metabolites might be due to high concentrations of cyanuric acid. Therefore, a separate study on cyanuric acid degradation suggested: (i) no appreciable cyanuric acid degradation with accumulation of an unidentified metabolite in the medium where cyanuric acid was supplemented as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen; (ii) partial cyanuric acid degradation with accumulation of unidentified metabolite in the medium containing additional nitrogen source; and (iii) complete cyanuric acid degradation in the medium supplemented with an additional carbon source. This unidentified metabolite observed during cyanuric acid degradation and also detected in the enrichment culture inoculated wastewater samples

  3. SiRNA-mediated in vivo gene knockdown by acid-degradable cationic nanohydrogel particles.

    PubMed

    Leber, Nadine; Kaps, Leonard; Aslam, Misbah; Schupp, Jonathan; Brose, Alexander; Schäffel, David; Fischer, Karl; Diken, Mustafa; Strand, Dennis; Koynov, Kaloian; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Nuhn, Lutz; Zentel, Rudolf; Schuppan, Detlef

    2017-02-28

    Cationic nanohydrogel particles have become an attractive tool for systemic siRNA delivery, but improvement of their in vivo tolerance is desirable, especially to prevent potential long term side effects by tissue and cellular accumulation. Here, we designed novel ketal cross-linked cationic nanohydrogel particles that were assessed for reduced tissue accumulation and robust siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. An oligo-amine cross-linker equipped with a ketal moiety in its core was synthesized and applied to nanohydrogel cross-linking of self-assembled reactive ester block copolymers in DMSO. The resulting acid-sensitive cationic nanoparticles spontaneously disassembled over time in acidic milieu, as investigated by dynamic light scattering. Fluorescent correlation spectroscopy showed effective complexation with siRNA as well as its release upon particle degradation at endosomal pH. These properties resulted in an enhanced in vitro gene knockdown for the acid-degradable cationic nanoparticles compared to their non-degradable spermine analogues. In a murine liver fibrosis model enhanced carrier and payload accumulation in the fibrotic tissue facilitated sequence-specific gene knockdown and prevented fibrosis progression. Long-term monitoring of the carrier in the body showed an enhanced clearance for the acid-degradable carrier, even after multiple dosing. Therefore, these acid-degradable cationic nanohydrogel particles can be considered as promising siRNA carriers for in vivo purposes towards therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pinocytosis and intracellular degradation of exogenous protein: modulation by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular degradation of exogenous (serum) proteins provides a source of amino acids for cellular protein synthesis. Pinocytosis serves as the mechanism for delivering exogenous protein to the lysosomes, the major site of intracellular degradation of exogenous protein. To determine whether the availability of extracellular free amino acids altered pinocytic function, we incubated monolayers of pulmonary alveolar macrophages with the fluid-phase marker, [14C]sucrose, and we dissected the pinocytic process by kinetic analysis. Additionally, intracellular degradation of endogenous and exogenous protein was monitored by measuring phenylalanine released from the cell monolayers in the presence of cycloheximide. Results revealed that in response to a subphysiological level of essential amino acids or to amino acid deprivation, (a) the rate of fluid-phase pinocytosis increased in such a manner as to preferentially increase both delivery to and size of an intracellular compartment believed to be the lysosomes, (b) the degradation of exogenously supplied albumin increased, and (c) the fraction of phenylalanine derived from degradation of exogenous albumin and reutilized for de novo protein synthesis increased. Thus, modulation of the pinosome-lysosome pathway may represent a homeostatic mechanism sensitive to the availability of extracellular free amino acids. PMID:6853596

  5. [Degradation of urea and ethyl carbamate in Chinese Rice wine by recombinant acid urease].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianli; Kang, Zhen; Liu, Qingtao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC) as a potential carcinogen commonly exists in traditional fermented foods. It is important eliminate urea that is the precursors of EC in many fermented foods, including Chinese Rice wine. On the basis of achieving high-level overexpression of food-grade ethanol-resistant acid urease, we studied the hydrolysis of urea and EC with the recombinant acid urease. Recombinant acid urease showed degraded urea in both the simulated system with ethanol and Chinese Rice wine (60 mg/L of urea was completely degraded within 25 h), indicating that the recombinant enzyme is suitable for the elimination of urea in Chinese Rice wine. Although recombinant acid urease also has degradation catalytic activity on EC, no obvious degradation of EC was observed. Further investigation results showed that the Km value for urea and EC of the recombinant acid urease was 0.7147 mmol/L and 41.32 mmol/L, respectively. The results provided theoretical foundation for realizing simultaneous degradation of urea and EC.

  6. The contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Bensalah, Nasr; Dbira, Sondos; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes was investigated in different electrolytes. A complete mineralization of cyanuric acid was obtained in NaCl; however lower degrees of mineralization of 70% and 40% were obtained in Na2SO4 and NaClO4, respectively. This can be explained by the nature of the oxidants electrogenerated in each electrolyte. It is clear that the contribution of active chlorine (Cl2, HClO, ClO(-)) electrogenerated from oxidation of chlorides on BDD is much more important in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid than the persulfate and hydroxyl radicals produced by electro-oxidation of sulfate and water on BDD anodes. This could be explained by the high affinity of active chlorine towards nitrogen compounds. No organic intermediates were detected during the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid in any the electrolytes, which can be explained by their immediate depletion by hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Nitrates and ammonium were the final products of electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid on BDD anodes in all electrolytes. In addition, small amounts of chloramines were formed in the chloride medium. Low current density (≤10mA/cm(2)) and neutral medium (pH in the range 6-9) should be used for high efficiency electrolytic degradation and negligible formation of hazardous chlorate and perchlorate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Degradability of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics in naturally acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the titratable acidity and effect of naturally acidic agents on the surface microhardness, elemental composition, and surface morphology of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics. One hundred and ten ceramic disks (IPS d.SIGN), 12.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm in thickness, were fabricated. Before immersion, the baseline data of Vickers microhardness and elemental composition were recorded. Four groups were immersed in acidic agents (citrate buffer solution, green mango juice, and pineapple juice) and deionized water (control) at 37ºC for 168 hours, whereas one group was immersed in 4% acetic acid at 80ºC for 168 hours. After immersion, specimens were evaluated and data were analyzed using one-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Microhardness values significantly decreased after immersion (p<0.05). In terms of elemental composition, the weight percentages of silicon, potassium, aluminum, and sodium also decreased after immersion (p<0.05). Results of this study showed that fluorapatite-leucite ceramics were affected by long-term immersion in acidic agents.

  8. Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Degradation in Escherichia coli During Inhibition of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Pato, Martin L.; Bennett, Peter M.; Von Meyenburg, Kaspar

    1973-01-01

    Various aspects of the coupling between the movement of ribosomes along messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) and the synthesis and degradation of mRNA have been investigated. Decreasing the rate of movement of ribosomes along an mRNA does not affect the rate of movement of some, and possibly most, of the RNA polymerases transcribing the gene coding for that mRNA. Inhibiting translation with antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, tetracycline, or fusidic acid protects extant mRNA from degradation, presumably by immobilizing ribosomes, whereas puromycin exposes mRNA to more rapid degradation than normal. The promoter distal (3′) portion of mRNA, synthesized after ribosomes have been immobilized by chloramphenicol on the promoter proximal (5′) portion of the mRNA, is subsequently degraded. PMID:4583248

  9. Modeling the degradation of Portland cement pastes by biogenic organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Devillers, Philippe

    2010-08-15

    Reactive transport models can be used to assess the long-term performance of cement-based materials subjected to biodegradation. A bioleaching test (with Aspergillus niger fungi) applied to ordinary Portland cement pastes during 15 months is modeled with HYTEC. Modeling indicates that the biogenic organic acids (acetic, butyric, lactic and oxalic) strongly accelerate hydrate dissolution by acidic hydrolysis whilst their complexation of aluminum has an effect on the secondary gel stability only. The deepest degradation front corresponds to portlandite dissolution and decalcification of calcium silicate hydrates. A complex pattern of sulfate phases dissolution and precipitation takes place in an intermediate zone. The outermost degraded zone consists of alumina and silica gels. The modeling accurateness of calcium leaching, pH evolution and degradation thickness is consistently enhanced whilst considering increase of diffusivity in the degraded zones. Precipitation of calcium oxalate is predicted by modeling but was hindered in the bioleaching reactor.

  10. Degradation pathway of persistent branched fatty acids in natural anaerobic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Sin, S N; Chua, H

    2000-07-01

    Branched fatty acids (BAFs) in industrial effluents are often persistent in biological wastewater treatment systems and end up as organic contaminants in the water environment. In this study, degradation of eight characteristic BAFs in a natural anaerobic ecosystem of an eutrophic river sediment was studied in vitro by enrichment culture techniques. The anaerobic consortium, comprising of BFA-degrading and methane-producing genera, degraded BFAs with a tertiary carbon through beta-oxidation followed by methanogenesis mechanisms. The consortium could not degrade BFAs with a quaternary carbon. The degree of branching at the alpha or beta position along the carbon chain interfered with the beta-oxidation mechanisms, and hence affected the degradability of the compound.

  11. The earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa stimulates abundance and activity of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicide degraders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Drake, Harold L; Horn, Marcus A

    2011-01-01

    2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) is a widely used phenoxyalkanoic acid (PAA) herbicide. Earthworms represent the dominant macrofauna and enhance microbial activities in many soils. Thus, the effect of the model earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) on microbial MCPA degradation was assessed in soil columns with agricultural soil. MCPA degradation was quicker in soil with earthworms than without earthworms. Quantitative PCR was inhibition-corrected per nucleic acid extract and indicated that copy numbers of tfdA-like and cadA genes (both encoding oxygenases initiating aerobic PAA degradation) in soil with earthworms were up to three and four times higher than without earthworms, respectively. tfdA-like and 16S rRNA gene transcript copy numbers in soil with earthworms were two and six times higher than without earthworms, respectively. Most probable numbers (MPNs) of MCPA degraders approximated 4 × 105 gdw−1 in soil before incubation and in soil treated without earthworms, whereas MPNs of earthworm-treated soils were approximately 150 × higher. The aerobic capacity of soil to degrade MCPA was higher in earthworm-treated soils than in earthworm-untreated soils. Burrow walls and 0–5 cm depth bulk soil displayed higher capacities to degrade MCPA than did soil from 5–10 cm depth bulk soil, expression of tfdA-like genes in burrow walls was five times higher than in bulk soil and MCPA degraders were abundant in burrow walls (MPNs of 5 × 107 gdw−1). The collective data indicate that earthworms stimulate abundance and activity of MCPA degraders endogenous to soil by their burrowing activities and might thus be advantageous for enhancing PAA degradation in soil. PMID:20740027

  12. Correlation of hydrolytic degradation with structure for copolyesters produced from glycolic and adipic acids.

    PubMed

    Simitzis, J; Triantou, D; Soulis, S; Triantou, K; Simitzis, Ch; Zoumpoulakis, L

    2010-04-01

    Copolyesters based on glycolic acid (G) combined with adipic acid (A) and ethylene glycol (E) were synthesized in different percentage of molar ratios (A: 100-50% and G: 100%) and their hydrolytic degradation was studied and correlated with their structures. According to the DSC, the production of polyesters leads to the formation of copolyesters and not to mixtures of homopolyesters. The crystallites in the copolyesters mainly consist of continuous sequences of ethylene adipate structural units. The hydrolytic degradation of the polyesters was followed by their weight loss during hydrolysis and by the FTIR spectra of the initial polyesters compared with that of the degraded polyesters at equilibrium. The region between 1142 and 800 cm(-1) can be utilized to evaluate the extent of degradation of polyesters after their hydrolysis. The absorption bands at 1142, 1077 and 850 cm(-1) due to the amorphous region decrease after hydrolysis, whereas those at 972, 901 and 806 cm(-1) due to the crystalline region increase. The experimental data of the hydrolytic degradation were fitted with exponential rise to maximum type functions using two-parameter model, which describes very well mainly the initial part of the degradation, and four-parameter model (containing two exponential terms), which is appropriate for fitting the hydrolytic degradation on the entire time period (including the equilibrium). Furthermore, the kinetics of the hydrolytic degradation of the polyesters for the initial time period based on both models results to similar values of the rate constant, k. The synthesized copolyesters of glycolic acid combined with adipic acid and ethylene glycol are soluble in many common organic solvents opposite to PGA, leading to modified biodegradable polyesters and therefore they can be easily processed.

  13. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system. II. Distribution and degradation in the plant.

    PubMed

    Forczek, S T; Uhlírová, H; Gryndler, M; Albrechtová, J; Fuksová, K; Vágner, M; Schröder, P; Matucha, M

    2004-07-01

    Independently from its origin, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) as a phytotoxic substance affects coniferous trees. Its uptake, distribution and degradation were thus investigated in the Norway spruce/soil-system using 14C labeling. TCA is distributed in the tree mainly by the transpiration stream. As in soil, TCA seems to be degraded microbially, presumably by phyllosphere microorganisms in spruce needles. Indication of TCA biodegradation in trees is shown using both antibiotics and axenic plants.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of hydrolytically degradable copolyester biomaterials based on glycolic acid, sebacic acid and ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Simitzis, J; Soulis, S; Triantou, D; Zoumpoulakis, L; Zotali, P

    2011-12-01

    Copolyesters of glycolic acid (G) combined with sebacic acid (S) and ethylene glycol were synthesized in different molar ratios (G: 0-100% and S: 100-0%) and their hydrolytic degradation was studied and correlated with their structures. Based on the FTIR spectra of the homopolyesters and copolyesters and the normalized peak intensity of the I(2918), I(2848) and I(1087) for the corresponding wavenumbers, it is concluded that the I(2918) and the I(2848) are in accordance with the mean number degree of polymerization of ethylene sebacate units and the I(1087) is in accordance with the mean number degree of polymerization of glycolate units. Based on the XRD diffractograms, poly(ethylene sebacate) and poly(glycolic acid) belong to the monoclinic and the orthorhombic crystal system, respectively and both have higher crystallinity than the copolyesters. The experimental data of the hydrolytic degradation were fitted with exponential rise to maximum type functions using two-parameter model and four-parameter model. Three regions can been distinguished for the hydrolytic degradation by decreasing the molar feed ratio of sebacic acid, which are correlated with the changes of crystallinity. Two copolyesters are proposed: first the copolyester with high amount of glycolate units (S10G90) having higher hydrolytic degradation than G100 and second the copolyester with equal amount of glycolate and ethylene sebacate units (S50G50), having lower hydrolytic degradation than G100. These hydrolytically degradable copolyesters are soluble in common organic solvents, opposite to poly(glycolic acid) and could have perspectives for biomedical applications.

  15. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  16. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, March 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney M.J.

    1995-06-23

    Factors affecting the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Cocultures of a syntrophic benzoate degrader, strain SB, with a hydrogen/formate-using sulfate reducer degraded benzoate to a threshold that depended on the amount of substrate and acetate present. The benzoate threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather, a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. A sensitive assay to detect low formate concentrations was developed to measure the formate levels when the benzoate threshold was reached. We showed that increased acetate concentrations, even when hydrogen and formate levels are low, affects the extent of benzoate degradation, implicating the importance of interspecies acetate transfer. In addition to benzoate, various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, 2-methylbutyrate, and methyl esters of fatty acids supported growth in coculture with a hydrogen-using partner. SB is the only syntrophic bacterium known to use both benzoate and fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SB clustered with sulfate reducers in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. SB grew well in coculture with Desulfoarculus baarsii, a sulfate reducer that uses formate but not hydrogen. This unequivocally shows that SB can grow by interspecies formate transfer.

  17. Effects of ultrasonic processing on degradation of salvianolic acid B in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y X; Zhang, L; Lu, L; Liu, E H; Shi, C Z

    2016-09-10

    To evaluate the stability of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) under ultrasound-assisted extraction in the pharmaceutical industry, degradation of Sal B under ultrasonic irradiation was investigated as the function of buffer concentration, pH, and temperature. With regard to Sal-B concentration, a first-order degradation process was determined, with 10% change in assay from its initial concentration as t90=4.81h, under maximum stability acidic conditions (pH 2.0) and at 25°C. The logkpH-pH profile described by specific acid-base catalysis and water molecules supported the experimental results. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses revealed 7 major degradation products whose structures were characterized by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. A primary degradation pathway involved cleavage of the ester bond and ring-opening of benzofuran in Sal B was proposed. The complete degradation pathway of Sal B was also proposed. Results showed that ultrasonic irradiation leads to degradation of Sal B in aqueous solution.

  18. Bioaugmentation of bromoamine acid degradation with Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY and DNA fingerprint analysis of augmented systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Song, Zhiyong; Xing, Linlin; Fu, Xiang

    2006-02-01

    One high-effective bromoamine acid (1-amino-4-bromoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid, BAA) degrading strain was isolated previously with the ability to use BAA as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. It was identified as Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and physio-biochemical tests. In this study, bioaugmentation of BAA degradation with suspended and immobilized cells of strain QYY was investigated. The optimal degradation conditions were as follows: temperature 30 degrees C, pH 6.0-7.0, 150 rev min(-1) and the immobilized cells maintained degradation activity to BAA after 60 days storage at 4 degrees C. The structure of BAA was evidently changed according to the analysis of total organic carbon removal of BAA (about 50%) and the UV-VIS spectra changes during the biodegradation. Bioaugmented systems exhibited stronger abilities degrading BAA than the non-bioaugmented control ones. And microbial community dynamics of augmented systems was revealed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), a modern DNA fingerprint technique. The results indicated that the microbial community dynamics was substantially changed throughout the augmentation process. This study suggests that it is feasible and potentially useful to enhance BAA degradation using bioaugmentation with the immobilized cells of BAA-degrading bacterium.

  19. Amino acid biogeochemistry and organic matter degradation state across the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewiele, Sandra; Cowie, Greg; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2009-03-01

    To assess whether the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) across the Pakistan Margin causes differences in the lability of sedimentary organic matter, sediments were collected in the core of the OMZ, in the upper and lower transition zones and below the OMZ. Sediment samples were analysed for total nitrogen (TN) and organic carbon (OC) contents, mineral surface area (SA), and total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and enzymatically hydrolysable amino acids (EHAA). OC contents and organic carbon per unit of mineral surface area (OC/SA) values were clearly elevated in the core and lower OMZ transition zone. These sediments also contained more labile sedimentary organic matter, as discerned by higher concentrations of THAA and the contribution of N in THAA to TN. A protein amino acid-based degradation index revealed that all sedimentary organic matter has undergone significant degradation, but sediments in the upper OMZ transition zone and below the OMZ are more degraded than inside the OMZ. Changes in amino acid composition during diagenesis are attributed to a combination of factors: (1) selective preservation in which amino acids in cell walls are better preserved than amino acids in cell plasma, (2) formation and accumulation of bacterially derived organic matter; there were relatively more living bacteria in the core of the OMZ and an accumulation of peptidoglycan-derived amino acids in degraded sediments in the upper OMZ transition zone and below the OMZ, and (3) bacterial transformation, as the molar percentages of bacterial transformation products β-alanine (Bala), γ-amino butyric acid (Gaba), and ornithine (Orn), increased with increasing degradation.

  20. Inhibition by all-trans retinoic acid of collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Hongyan; Orita, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shinya; Wada, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yoshikuni; Nishida, Teruo; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts. Rabbit corneal fibroblasts were cultured with or without all-trans retinoic acid in a three-dimensional collagen gel, and the extent of collagen degradation was determined by measurement of hydroxyproline in acid hydrolysates of culture supernatants. Matrix metalloproteinase expression was examined by immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography. The abundance and phosphorylation state of the endogenous nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor IκB-α were examined by immunoblot analysis. Corneal ulceration was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide into the central corneal stroma of rabbits and was assessed by observation with a slitlamp microscope. All-trans retinoic acid inhibited interleukin-1β-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. It also attenuated the release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α induced by interleukin-1β in these cells. Topical application of all-trans retinoic acid suppressed corneal ulceration induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide into the corneal stroma. All-trans retinoic acid inhibited collagen degradation mediated by corneal fibroblasts exposed to interleukin-1β, with this effect being accompanied by suppression of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling as well as of matrix metalloproteinase release and activation in these cells. All-trans retinoic acid also attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced corneal ulceration in vivo. Our results therefore suggest that all-trans retinoic acid might prove effective for the treatment of patients with corneal ulceration. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  1. Kinetics of Maleic Acid and Aluminum Chloride Catalyzed Dehydration and Degradation of Glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ximing; Hewetson, Barron B.; Mosier, Nathan S.

    2015-04-16

    We report the positive effect of maleic acid, a dicarboxylic acid, on the selectivity of hexose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethyfurfural (HMF) and subsequent hydrolysis to levulinic and formic acids. We also describe the kinetic analysis of a Lewis acid (AlCl3) alone and in combination with HCl or maleic acid to catalyze the isomerization of glucose to fructose, dehydration of fructose to HMF, hydration of HMF to levulinic and formic acids, and degradation of these compounds to humins. The results show that AlCl3 significantly enhances the rate of glucose conversion to HMF and levulinic acid in the presence of both maleic acid and HCl. In addition, the degradation of HMF to humins, rather than levulinic and formic acids, is reduced by 50% in the presence of maleic acid and AlCl3 compared to HCl combined with AlCl3. The results suggest different reaction mechanisms for the dehydration of glucose and rehydration of HMF between maleic acid and HCl.

  2. Glycerol-plasticised silk membranes made using formic acid are ductile, transparent and degradation-resistant.

    PubMed

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Redmond, Sharon L; Atlas, Marcus D; Wang, Xungai

    2017-11-01

    Regenerated silk fibroin membranes tend to be brittle when dry. The use of plasticisers such as glycerol improve membrane ductility, but, when combined with aqueous processing, can lead to a higher degradation rate than solvent-annealed membranes. This study investigated the use of formic acid as the solvent with glycerol to make deformable yet degradation-resistant silk membranes. Here we show that membranes cast using formic acid had low light scattering, with a diffuse transmittance of less than 5% over the visible wavelengths, significantly lower than the 20% transmittance of aqueous derived silk/glycerol membranes. They had 64% β-sheet content and lost just 30% of the initial silk weight over 6h when tested with an accelerated enzymatic degradation assay, in comparison the aqueous membranes completely degraded within this timeframe. The addition of glycerol also improved the maximum elongation of formic acid derived membranes from under 3% to over 100%. They also showed good cytocompatibility and supported the adhesion and migration of human tympanic membrane keratinocytes. Formic acid based, silk/glycerol membranes may be of great use in medical applications such as repair of tympanic membrane perforation or ocular applications where transparency and resistance to enzymatic degradation are important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid facilitated by acetate under methanogenic condition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Xu, Xiaohui; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Rongbo

    2017-05-01

    Acetate can be used as an electron donor to stimulate 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), which has not been determined under methanogenic condition. This study applied high-throughput sequencing and methanogenic inhibition approaches to investigate the 2,4-D degradation process using the enrichments obtained from paddy soil. Acetate addition significantly promoted 2,4-D degradation, which was 5-fold higher than in the acetate-unsupplemented enrichments in terms of the 2,4-D degradation rate constant. Dechloromonas and Pseudomonas were the dominant 2,4-D degraders. Methanogenic inhibition experiments indicated that the 2,4-D degradation was independent of methanogenesis. It was proposed that the accelerated 2,4-D degradation in the acetate-supplemented enrichment involved an unusual interaction, where members of the acetate oxidizers primarily oxidized acetate and produced H2. H2 was utilized by the 2,4-D degraders to degrade 2,4-D, but also partially consumed by the hydrogenotrophic methanogens to produce methane. The findings presented here provide a new strategy for the remediation of 2,4-D-polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial degradation of lignin-derived compounds under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Colberg, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant form of organic carbon in the biosphere. Recent laboratory studies indicate that a large fraction of polymeric lignin is incompletely degraded by aerobic lignolytic microorganisms and is subsequently released as lignin fragments of reduced molecular size. If such lignin-derived compounds become available in the anaerobic environment, they may serve as potential sources of organic carbon for organisms which release methane precursors. The methanogenic bacteria, in turn, serve as terminal members of the anaerobic food chain, and thus, limit the accumulation of organic carbon in anaerobic sinks. This thesis presents evidence to suggest that lignin-derived compounds which have molecular sizes greater than those of single-ring aromatic compounds (MW > 200) are anaerobically biodegradable to methane. This research involved development of selective enrichment cultures capable of utilizing oligolignols as sole carbon sources. Radiolabeled water-soluble catabolites, released during aerobic lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were subjected to anaerobic degradation. The second phase of work involved capillary gas chromatographic analyses of enrichment cultures fed a /sup 14/C-labeled, lignin-derived substrate of average molecular weight 600. 2-Bromoethanesulfonic acid was used to inhibit methane formation and enhance buildup of metabolic intermediates, resulting in the accumulation of volatile fatty acids, phenylacetate, benzoate, catechol, 3-phenyl-propionate, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. A conceptual model for the anaerobic degradation of two- and three-ring lignin fragments is proposed which overlaps both the ferulate and benzoate degradation pathways at the level of single-ring aromatic compounds.

  5. Comparative Genomics of Syntrophic Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    The syntrophic degradation of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) such as 2-methylbutyrate and isobutyrate is an essential step in the production of methane from proteins/amino acids in anaerobic ecosystems. While a few syntrophic BCFA-degrading bacteria have been isolated, their metabolic pathways in BCFA and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) degradation as well as energy conservation systems remain unclear. In an attempt to identify these pathways, we herein performed comparative genomics of three syntrophic bacteria: 2-methylbutyrate-degrading “Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. methylbutyratica” strain JCM 14075T (=4J5T), isobutyrate-degrading Syntrophothermus lipocalidus strain TGB-C1T, and non-BCFA-metabolizing S. wolfei subsp. wolfei strain GöttingenT. We demonstrated that 4J5 and TGB-C1 both encode multiple genes/gene clusters involved in β-oxidation, as observed in the Göttingen genome, which has multiple copies of genes associated with butyrate degradation. The 4J5 genome possesses phylogenetically distinct β-oxidation genes, which may be involved in 2-methylbutyrate degradation. In addition, these Syntrophomonadaceae strains harbor various hydrogen/formate generation systems (i.e., electron-bifurcating hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, and membrane-bound hydrogenase) and energy-conserving electron transport systems, including electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF)-linked acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ETF-linked iron-sulfur binding reductase, ETF dehydrogenase (FixABCX), and flavin oxidoreductase-heterodisulfide reductase (Flox-Hdr). Unexpectedly, the TGB-C1 genome encodes a nitrogenase complex, which may function as an alternative H2 generation mechanism. These results suggest that the BCFA-degrading syntrophic strains 4J5 and TGB-C1 possess specific β-oxidation-related enzymes for BCFA oxidation as well as appropriate energy conservation systems to perform thermodynamically unfavorable syntrophic metabolism. PMID:27431485

  6. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  7. Adsorption and degradation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Paszko, Tadeusz; Muszyński, Paweł; Materska, Małgorzata; Bojanowska, Monika; Kostecka, Małgorzata; Jackowska, Izabella

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the present review on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D), 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), (2R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop-P), (2R)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (mecoprop-P), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid (2,4-DB), and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) butanoic acid (MCPB)-was to compare the extent of their adsorption in soils and degradation rates to assess their potential for groundwater contamination. The authors found that adsorption decreased in the sequence of 2,4-DB > 2,4-D > MCPA > dichlorprop-P > mecoprop-P. Herbicides are predominantly adsorbed as anions-on organic matter and through a water-bridging mechanism with adsorbed Fe cations-and their neutral forms are adsorbed mainly on organic matter. Adsorption of anions of 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop-P, and mecoprop-P is inversely correlated with their lipophilicity values, and modeling of adsorption of the compounds based on this relationship is possible. The predominant dissipation mechanism of herbicides in soils is bacterial degradation. The contribution of other mechanisms, such as degradation by fungi, photodegradation, or volatilization from soils, is much smaller. The rate of bacterial degradation decreased in the following order: 2,4-D > MCPA > mecoprop-P > dichlorprop-P. It was found that 2,4-D and MCPA have the lowest potential for leaching into groundwater and that mecoprop-P and dichlorprop-P have slightly higher potential. Because of limited data on adsorption and degradation of 2,4-DB and MCPB, estimation of their leaching potential was not possible.

  8. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  9. Epoxy ceriporic acid produced by selective lignin-degrading fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Setogawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Takahito; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora is a selective white rot basidiomycete which degrades lignin in wood at a distance far from enzymes. Low molecular mass metabolites play a central role in the oxidative degradation of lignin. To understand the unique wood-decaying mechanism, we surveyed the oxidized derivatives of ceriporic acids (alk(en)ylitaconic acids) produced by C. subvermispora using high-resolution liquid chromatography multiple-stage mass spectrometry (HR-LC/MS(n)). The analysis of the precursor and product ions from the extract suggested that an epoxidized derivative of ceriporic acid is produced by the fungus. To identify the new metabolite, an authentic compound of ceriporic acid epoxide was synthesized in vitro by reacting (R)-3-[(Z)-hexadec-7-enyl]-itaconic acid (ceriporic acid C) with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. The precursor and product ions from the natural metabolite and authentic epoxide were identical and distinguishable from those of hydroxy and hydroperoxy derivatives after reduction with NaBD(4). Feeding experiments with [U-(13)C]-glucose, 99% and the subsequent analyses of the first and second generation product ions demonstrated that the oxidized ceriporic acid was (R)-3-(7,8-epoxy-hexadecyl)-itaconic acid. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report that natural alkylitaconic acid bears an epoxy group on its side chain.

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of L-acid by TiO2 supported on the activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Lian-Jun; Peng, Pan-Ying

    2006-01-01

    TiO2 sol was prepared by sol-gel technique with tetrabutyl titanate as precursor. Supported TiO2 catalysts on activated carbon were prepared by soak and sintering method. The aggregation of nano-TiO2 particles can be effectively suppressed by added polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a surface modifier. The average particle diameter of TiO2, specific surface area and absorbability of catalyst can be modified. Based on characteristics of the TiO2 photocatalyst with XRD, specific surface area, adsorption valves of methylene blue and the amount of TiO2 supported on the activated carbon, the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid was studied. The effect of the factors, such as pH of the solution, the initial concentration of L-acid on the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid, were studied also. It was found that when the pH of the solution is 1.95, the amount of photocatalyst is 0.5 g, the concentration of the L-acid solution is 1.34 x 10(-3) mol/L and the illumination time is 7 h, the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of L-acid can reach 89.88%. The catalyst was reused 6 times and its degradation efficiency hardly changed.

  11. [Photocatalytic Degradation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid by Pd-TiO2 Photocatalyst].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Yu, Ze-bin; Zhang, Rui-han; Li, Ming-jie; Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Kuang, Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhu, You-hui

    2015-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a new persistent organic pollutant which has got global concern for its wide distribution, high bioaccumulation and strong biological toxicity. In present study, the photocatalytic degradation of PFOA using palladium doped TiO2 (Pd-TiO2) prepared by chemical reduction method was investigated. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, FESEM and UV-vis DRS and were used for PFOA degradation under 365 nm UV irradiation. The results indicated that the grain size of TiO2 was smaller while the specific surface area increased and the absorption of ultraviolet light also enhanced after using chemical reduction method, but all these changes had no influence on PFOA degradation. However, the degradation was significantly enhanced because of the deposition of Pd, the fluoride concentration of PFOA was 6.62 mg x L(-1) after 7 h irradiation which was 7.3 times higher than that of TiO2 (P25). Experiments with the addition of trapping agent and nitrogen indicated that *OH played an important role in PFOA degradation while the presence of O2 accelerated the degradation. The main intermediate products of photocatalytic degradation of PFOA were authenticated by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry systems (UPLC-QTOF-MS). The probable photocatalytic degradation mechanism involves h+ attacking the carboxyl of PFOA and resulting in decarboxylation. The produced *CnF(2n +1) was oxidized by *OH underwent defluorinetion to form shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids. The significant enhancement of PFOA degradation can be ascribed to the palladium deposits, acting as electron traps on the Pd-TiO2 surface, which facilitated the transfer of photogenerated electrons and retarded the accumulation of electrons.

  12. In Vitro Degradation of Pure Magnesium―The Effects of Glucose and/or Amino Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Cui, Lan-Yue; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zou, Yu-Hong; Han, En-Hou

    2017-01-01

    The influences of glucose and amino acid (L-cysteine) on the degradation of pure magnesium have been investigated using SEM, XRD, Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and immersion tests. The results demonstrate that both amino acid and glucose inhibit the corrosion of pure magnesium in saline solution, whereas the presence of both amino acid and glucose accelerates the corrosion rate of pure magnesium. This may be due to the formation of -C=N- bonding (a functional group of Schiff bases) between amino acid and glucose, which restricts the formation of the protective Mg(OH)2 precipitates. PMID:28773085

  13. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extract s, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O 2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  14. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    DOE PAGES

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation inmore » complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extract s, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O 2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.« less

  15. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  16. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  17. Characterization of the Complete Uric Acid Degradation Pathway in the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I. Russel; Yang, Liting; Sebetso, Gaseene; Allen, Rebecca; Doan, Thi H. N.; Blundell, Ross; Lui, Edmund Y. L.; Morrow, Carl A.; Fraser, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of purines to uric acid is generally conserved among organisms, however, the end product of uric acid degradation varies from species to species depending on the presence of active catabolic enzymes. In humans, most higher primates and birds, the urate oxidase gene is non-functional and hence uric acid is not further broken down. Uric acid in human blood plasma serves as an antioxidant and an immune enhancer; conversely, excessive amounts cause the common affliction gout. In contrast, uric acid is completely degraded to ammonia in most fungi. Currently, relatively little is known about uric acid catabolism in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans even though this yeast is commonly isolated from uric acid-rich pigeon guano. In addition, uric acid utilization enhances the production of the cryptococcal virulence factors capsule and urease, and may potentially modulate the host immune response during infection. Based on these important observations, we employed both Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis and bioinformatics to predict all the uric acid catabolic enzyme-encoding genes in the H99 genome. The candidate C. neoformans uric acid catabolic genes identified were named: URO1 (urate oxidase), URO2 (HIU hydrolase), URO3 (OHCU decarboxylase), DAL1 (allantoinase), DAL2,3,3 (allantoicase-ureidoglycolate hydrolase fusion protein), and URE1 (urease). All six ORFs were then deleted via homologous recombination; assaying of the deletion mutants' ability to assimilate uric acid and its pathway intermediates as the sole nitrogen source validated their enzymatic functions. While Uro1, Uro2, Uro3, Dal1 and Dal2,3,3 were demonstrated to be dispensable for virulence, the significance of using a modified animal model system of cryptococcosis for improved mimicking of human pathogenicity is discussed. PMID:23667704

  18. Research on Controllable Degradation of Novel Sulfonylurea Herbicides in Acidic and Alkaline Soils.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaa; Hua, Xue-Wen; Wei, Wei; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jing-Huo; Chen, Ming-Gui; Xie, Yong-Tao; Zhou, Sha; Meng, Xiang-De; Zhang, Yan; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Bao-Lei; Song, Hai-Bin; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2017-09-06

    The degradation issue of sulfonylurea (SU) has become one of the biggest challenges that hamper the development and application of this class of herbicides, especially in the alkaline soils of northern China. On the basis of the previous discovery that some substituents on the fifth position of the benzene ring in Chlorsulfuron could hasten its degradation rate, apparently in acidic soil, this work on Metsulfuron-methyl showed more convincing results. Two novel compounds (I-1 and I-2) were designed and synthesized, and they still retained potent herbicidal activity in tests against both dicotyledons and monocotyledons. The half-lives of degradation (DT50) assay revealed that I-1 showed an accelerated degradation rate in acidic soil (pH 5.59). Moreover, we delighted to find that the degradation rate of I-1 was 9-10-fold faster than that of Metsulfuron-methyl and Chlorsulfuron when in alkaline soil (pH 8.46), which has more practical value. This research suggests that a modified structure that has potent herbicidal activity as well as accelerated degradation rate could be realized and this approach may provide a way to improve the residue problem of SUs in farmlands with alkaline soil.

  19. Biostimulation of PAH degradation with plants containing high concentrations of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haakrho; Crowley, David E

    2007-06-15

    Many plant species enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but there is little understanding of the mechanisms by which this occurs. This research identified phytochemicals that stimulate pyrene degradation using crushed roottissues from 43 plants that were screened in soil spiked with 100 ppm pyrene. Among the plants tested, root tissues from Apium graveolens (celery), Raphanus sativus (radish), Solanum tuberosum (potato), and Daucus carota (carrot) were most effective for promoting disappearance of pyrene within 40 days. Experiments with A. graveolens showed that plant culture in soil contaminated with pyrene or benzo[a]pyrene was as effective as addition of crushed root tissues. Comparison of the chemical compositions of the effective plants suggested that linoleic acid was the major substance that stimulated PAH degradation. This hypothesis was supported in experiments examining degradation of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in soil amended with linoleate, whereas linolenic and palmitic acids did not stimulate degradation within a 20 day period. Antibiotic inhibitor studies implicated gram positive bacteria as a predominant group responding to linoleic acid. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms by which plants enhance degradation of PAHs, and have practical application for remediation of PAH contaminated soils.

  20. Iridium nanoparticles with high catalytic activity in degradation of acid red-26: an oxidative approach.

    PubMed

    Goel, Anjali; Lasyal, Rajni

    2016-12-01

    Nanocatalysis using metal nanoparticles constitutes one of the emerging technologies for destructive oxidation of organics such as dyes. This paper deals with the degradation of acid red-26 (AR-26), an azo dye by hexacyanoferrate (abbreviated as HCF) (III) using iridium nanoparticles. UV-vis spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the details of the oxidative degradation of the selected dye. The effect of various operational parameters such as HCF(III) concentration, pH, initial dye concentration, catalyst and temperature was investigated systematically at the λmax, 507 nm, of the reaction mixture. Degradation kinetics follows the first order kinetic model with respect to AR-26 and Ir nano concentrations, while with respect to the HCF(III) concentration reaction it follows first order kinetics at lower concentrations, tending towards zero order at higher concentrations. Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated by studying the reaction rate at four different temperatures. The UV-vis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of degradation products showed the formation of carboxylic acid and substituted carboxylic acids as major degradation products, which are simple and less hazardous compounds. The big advantage of the present method is the recovery and reuse of iridium nanoparticles. Moreover, turnover frequencies for each catalytic cycle have been determined, indicating the long life span of Ir nanoparticles. Thus, the finding is a novel and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes, and extendable for other contaminants as well.

  1. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Modeling the oxidation kinetics of sono-activated persulfate's process on the degradation of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Songlin, Wang; Ning, Zhou; Si, Wu; Qi, Zhang; Zhi, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound degradation of humic acid has been investigated in the presence of persulfate anions at ultrasonic frequency of 40 kHz. The effects of persulfate anion concentration, ultrasonic power input, humic acid concentration, reaction time, solution pH and temperature on humic acid removal efficiency were studied. It is found that up to 90% humic acid removal efficiency was achieved after 2 h reaction. In this system, sulfate radicals (SO₄⁻·) were considered to be the mainly oxidant to mineralize humic acid while persulfate anion can hardly react with humic acid directly. A novel kinetic model based on sulfate radicals (SO₄⁻·) oxidation was established to describe the humic acid mineralization process mathematically and chemically in sono-activated persulfate system. According to the new model, ultrasound power, persulfate dosage, solution pH and reaction temperature have great influence on humic acid degradation. Different initial concentration of persulfate anions and humic acid, ultrasonic power, initial pH and reaction temperature have been discussed to valid the effectiveness of the model, and the simulated data showed new model had good agreement with the experiments data.

  3. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of p-toluenesulfonic acid using concentrated solar radiation in slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Sanjay P; Sawant, Sudhir B; Pangarkar, Vishwas G

    2007-02-09

    In this work, the photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA) in batch reactor using concentrated solar radiation was investigated. The effect of the various operating parameters such as initial concentration of substrate, catalyst loading, solution pH and types of ions on photocatalytic degradation has been studied in a batch reactor to derive the optimum conditions. The rate of photocatalytic degradation was found to be maximum at the self pH (pH 3.34) of p-TSA. It was also observed that in the presence of anions and cations, the rate of PCD decreases drastically. The kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of p-TSA was studied. The PCD of p-TSA was also carried at these optimized conditions in a bench scale slurry bubble column reactor using concentrated solar radiation.

  4. Poly(aspartic acid)-based degradable assemblies for highly efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing-Jun; Dou, Xue-Bo; Hu, Hao; Yu, Bingran; Chen, Da-Fu; Wang, Ren-Xian; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-01-14

    Due to its good properties such as low cytotoxicity, degradability, and biocompatibility, poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) is a good candidate for the development of new drug delivery systems. In this work, a series of new PAsp-based degradable supramolecular assemblies were prepared for effective gene therapy via the host-guest interactions between the cyclodextrin (CD)-cored PAsp-based polycations and the pendant benzene group-containing PAsp backbones. Such supramolecular assemblies exhibited good degradability, enhanced pDNA condensation ability, and low cytotoxicity. More importantly, the gene transfection efficiencies of supramolecular assemblies were much higher than those of CD-cored PAsp-based counterparts at various N/P ratios. In addition, the effective antitumor ability of assemblies was demonstrated with a suicide gene therapy system. The present study would provide a new means to produce degradable supramolecular drug delivery systems.

  5. Degradation of Fe/N/C catalysts upon high polarization in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Goellner, Vincent; Baldizzone, Claudio; Schuppert, Anna; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Mayrhofer, Karl; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2014-09-14

    A comprehensive study of the degradation of a highly active Fe/N/C catalyst in acid medium is reported. An accelerated aging protocol was applied in the temperature range of 20 to 80 °C. From fundamental rotating-disc electrode studies and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell investigations combined with identical-location electron microscopy and Mößbauer spectroscopy at various stages of degradation, important insights into the structural and chemical changes of the catalyst were obtained. Most importantly, the degradation is strongly enhanced at elevated temperature, which is correlated to (i) increased carbon-corrosion rate and (ii) parallel non-preferential dissolution of the FeNx-based active sites. The degradation not only leads to a decreased ORR kinetics over time but also induces significant charge- and mass-transport resistances due to the collapse of the electrode structure.

  6. Glycosaminoglycan degradation-inhibitory lactic acid bacteria ameliorate 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bomi; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Hye-Sung; Bae, Eun-Ah; Huh, Chul-Sung; Ahn, Young-Tae; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), we measured the inhibitory effect of several LAB isolated from intestinal microflora and commercial probiotics against the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degradation by intestinal bacteria. Bifidobacterium longum HY8004 and Lactobacillus plantarum AK8-4 exhibited the most potent inhibition. These LAB inhibited colon shortening and myeloperoxidase production in 2,4,6- trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitic mice. These LAB also blocked the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, as well as of COX-2, in the colon. LAB also blocked activation of the transcription factor, NF-kappaB, and expression of TLR-4 induced by TNBS. In addition, LAB reduced the TNBS-induced bacterial degradation activities of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid. These findings suggest that GAG degradation-inhibitory LAB may improve colitis by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine expression via TLR-4-linked NF-kB activation and by inhibiting intestinal bacterial GAG degradation.

  7. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Microbial community changes during the degradation of straw using phospholipid fatty acid analysis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Chen, Yao-Ning; Yu, Hong-Yan; Huang, Dan-Lian; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2007-11-01

    Solid-state fermentation system of rice straw was established with the inoculation of soil microorganism and Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Microbial biomass and community structure were investigated using the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) technique, and the changes of lignocellulose's degradation rate were also detected during the process. The experimental results show that lignocellulose degradation rate reaches 44% after fermentation. When the total amount of phospholipid fatty acid is separated into indicator phospholipid fatty acids for different groups of microorganisms, these groups show different patterns during the process. Contents of PLFA in gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative and fungi reach their peak value on the sixth day. Gram-positive bacteria have lower contents. The PLFA content ratio of fungi and bacteria is 0.2 - 0.5, so fungi are the main community decomposing lignocellulose. Principal component analysis of the PLFA data show that 18 carbon unsaturated fatty acids are the major fatty acids at the end of the process, which is consistent with the results of indicator phospholipid fatty acids and lignocellulose's degradation rates, so PLFA technique is able to fairly well detect the changes of microbial biomass and community structure in solid-state fermentation system of rice straw.

  9. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  10. Lipid metabolism as a target for brain cancer therapy: synergistic activity of lovastatin and sodium phenylacetate against human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, P; Thibault, A; Liu, L; Samid, D

    1996-02-01

    Malignant gliomas, the most common form of primary brain tumors, are highly dependent on the mevalonate (MVA) pathway for the synthesis of lipid moieties critical to cell replication. Human glioblastoma cells were found to be uniquely vulnerable to growth arrest by lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme regulating MVA synthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. The sodium salt of phenylacetic acid (NaPA), an inhibitor of MVA-pyrophosphate decarboxylase, the enzyme that controls MVA use, acted synergistically with lovastatin to suppress malignant growth. When used at pharmacologically attainable concentrations, the two compounds induced profound cytostasis and loss of malignant properties such as invasiveness and expression of the transforming growth factor-beta 2 gene, coding for a potent immunosuppressive cytokine. Supplementation with exogenous ubiquinone, an end product of the MVA pathway, failed to rescue the cells, suggesting that decreased synthesis of intermediary products are responsible for the antitumor effects observed. In addition to blocking the MVA pathway, lovastatin alone and in combination with NaPA increased the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, a transcription factor implicated in the control of lipid metabolism, cell growth, and differentiation. Our results indicate that targeting lipid metabolism with lovastatin, used alone or in combination with the aromatic fatty acid NaPA, may offer a novel approach to the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  11. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the curre...

  12. A new phenylacetate-bisphosphonate inhibits breast cancer cell growth by proapoptotic and antiangiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Sebbah-Louriki, Malika; Colombo, Bruno M; el Manouni, Driss; Martin, Antoine; Salzmann, Jean-Loup; Leroux, Yves; Perret, Gérard Y; Crépin, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) and some bisphosphonates demonstrated antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties against cancer. We have previously shown that NaPa inhibited cell proliferation of MCF7-ras tumor breast cells both in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, bisphosphonate activities have only been demonstrated in vitro. Here we evaluated the antitumor effects of a new bisphosphonate, the phenylacetate-bisphosphonate (PaBp), on human breast cancer MCF7 and MCF7-ras cell lines, both in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating the use of a bisphosphonate derivative as a powerful cytostatic and cytotoxic agent, with proapoptotic and antiangiogenic properties on human breast cancer cells lines, with no animal toxicity.

  13. Effects of acid extrusion on the degradability of maize distillers dried grain with solubles in pigs.

    PubMed

    de Vries, S; Pustjens, A M; van Rooijen, C; Kabel, M A; Hendriks, W H; Gerrits, W J J

    2014-12-01

    Commonly used feed processing technologies are not sufficient to affect recalcitrant nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) such as arabinoxylans present in maize distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS). Instead, hydrothermal treatments combined with acid catalysts might be more effective to modify these NSP. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of hydrothermal maleic acid treatment (acid extrusion) on the degradability of maize DDGS in growing pigs. It was hypothesized that acid extrusion modifies DDGS cell wall architecture and thereby increases fermentability of NSP. Two diets, containing either 40% (wt/wt) unprocessed or acid-extruded DDGS, were restrictedly fed to groups of gilts (n=11, with 4 pigs per group; initial mean BW: 20.8±0.2 kg) for 18 d and performance and digestibility were analyzed. Acid extrusion tended to decrease apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP (approximately 3 percentage units [% units]); P=0.063) and starch (approximately 1% unit; P=0.096). Apparent digestibility of CP and starch measured at the mid colon (2% units, P=0.030, for CP and 0.3% units, P<0.01, for starch) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD; 3% units, P<0.01, for CP and 0.2% units, P=0.024, for starch) were lower for the acid-extruded diet compared with the control diet. Hindgut disappearance was, however, not different between diets, indicating that reduced CP and starch digestibility were mainly due to decreased AID. Acid extrusion tended to increase AID of NSP (6% units; P=0.092) and increased digestibility of NSP measured at the mid colon (6% units; P<0.01), whereas hindgut disappearance and ATTD of NSP did not differ between diets. Greater NSP digestibility was mainly due to greater digestibility of arabinosyl, xylosyl, and glucosyl residues, indicating that both arabinoxylan and cellulose degradability were affected by acid extrusion. In conclusion, these results show that acid extrusion did not improve degradation of DDGS for

  14. Cathepsin B-sensitive polymers for compartment-specific degradation and nucleic acid release

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Johnson, Russell N.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2011-01-01

    Degradable cationic polymers are desirable for in vivo nucleic acid delivery because they offer significantly decreased toxicity over non-degradable counterparts. Peptide linkers provide chemical stability and high specificity for particular endopeptidases but have not been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications. In this work, enzymatically degradable peptide-HPMA copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization of HPMA with methacrylated peptide macromonomers, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and near quantitative incorporation of peptides. Three peptide-HPMA copolymers were evaluated: (i) pHCathK10, containing peptides composed of the linker phe-lys-phe-leu (FKFL), a substrate of the endosomal/lysosomal endopeptidase cathepsin B, connected to oligo-(l)-lysine for nucleic acid binding, (ii) pHCath(d)K10, containing the FKFL linker with oligo-(d)-lysine, and (iii) pH(d)Cath(d)K10, containing all (d) amino acids. Cathepsin B degraded copolymers pHCathK10 and pHCath(d)K10 within one hour while no degradation of pH(d)Cath(d)K10 was observed. Polyplexes formed with pHCathK10 copolymers show DNA release by 4 hrs of treatment with cathepsin B; comparatively, polyplexes formed with pHCath(d)K10 and pH(d)Cath(d)K10 show no DNA release within 8 hrs. Transfection efficiency in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells were comparable between the copolymers but pHCathK10 was less toxic. This work demonstrates the successful application of peptide linkers for degradable cationic polymers and DNA release. PMID:22036879

  15. Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

  16. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  17. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  18. Expression of transcription factors during sodium phenylacetate induced erythroid differentiation in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, A V; Schmahl, G E; Niemeyer, C M

    1997-01-01

    During 15 days of treatment of K562 cells with sodium phenylacetate, we observed an increase in the cellular hemoglobin concentration with a similar increase in the expression of gamma-globin mRNA. Morphological studies demonstrated characteristic features of erythroid differentiation and maturation. At the same time there was no change in the level of expression of the cell surface antigenes CD33, CD34, CD45, CD71 and glycophorin A. Likewise, the level of expression of the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1, GATA-2, NF-E2, SCL and RBTN2, all expressed in untreated K562 cells, did not increase during sodium phenylacetate induced erythroid differentiation. The expression of the nuclear factors Evi-1 and c-myb, known to inhibit erythroid differentiation, did not decrease. We conclude that sodium phenylacetate treatment of K562 cells increases gamma-globin mRNA and induces cell maturation as judged by morphology without affecting the expression of the erythroid transcription factors, some of which are known to be involved in the regulation of beta-like globin genes.

  19. Coordinated Regulation of Species-Specific Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation and Siderophore Biosynthesis Pathways in Agrobacterium fabrum

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Jessica; Vial, Ludovic; Villard, Camille; Campillo, Tony; Lavire, Céline; Nesme, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rhizosphere-inhabiting species Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to degrade hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs), especially ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, via the novel A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway. Gene expression profiles of A. fabrum strain C58 were investigated in the presence of HCAs, using a C58 whole-genome oligoarray. Both ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid caused variations in the expression of more than 10% of the C58 genes. Genes of the A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway, together with the genes involved in iron acquisition, were among the most highly induced in the presence of HCAs. Two operons coding for the biosynthesis of a particular siderophore, as well as genes of the A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway, have been described as being specific to the species. We demonstrate here their coordinated expression, emphasizing the interdependence between the iron concentration in the growth medium and the rate at which ferulic acid is degraded by cells. The coordinated expression of these functions may be advantageous in HCA-rich but iron-starved environments in which microorganisms have to compete for both iron and carbon sources, such as in plant roots. The present results confirm that there is cooperation between the A. fabrum-specific genes, defining a particular ecological niche. IMPORTANCE We previously identified seven genomic regions in Agrobacterium fabrum that were specifically present in all of the members of this species only. Here we demonstrated that two of these regions, encoding the hydroxycinnamic acid degradation pathway and the iron acquisition pathway, were regulated in a coordinated manner. The coexpression of these functions may be advantageous in hydroxycinnamic acid-rich but iron-starved environments in which microorganisms have to compete for both iron and carbon sources, such as in plant roots. These data support the view that bacterial genomic species

  20. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene reductive degradation by alkaline ascorbic acid - Reaction mechanisms, degradation pathways and reagent optimization.

    PubMed

    Ciou, Chiya; Liang, Chenju

    2017-01-01

    Nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) such as 1,3-dinitrobenzene (1,3-DNB) contain the nitrogroup (-NO2), in which the N with a +III oxidation state accepts electrons. Water soluble ascorbic acid (AsA) at elevated pH produces electron transfer and governs the electron-donating pathway. The influence of the NaOH/AsA molar ratio on the degradation of 1,3-DNB was investigated. Using 0.21-2 M NaOH and 20-100 mM AsA, nearly complete 1,3-DNB removals (90-100%) were achieved within 0.5 h. On the basis of intermediates identified using GC/MS, the reduction pathways of 1,3-DNB can be categorized into step-by-step electron transfer, and condensation routes. A higher NaOH/AsA molar ratio would result in relatively higher AsA decomposition, promote the condensation route into the formation of azo- and azoxy-compounds, and ultimately reduce 1,3-DNB to 1,3-phenylenediamine. Contaminated soil flushing using 500 mM NaOH/100 mM AsA revealed that 1,3-DNB was completely degraded within 2 h. Based on these test results, the alkaline AsA treatment method is a potential remediation process for NACs contaminated soils.

  1. Cellular Site in Bacillus subtilis of a Nuclease Which Preferentially Degrades Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Birnboim, H. C.

    1966-01-01

    Birnboim, H. C. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, N.Y.). Cellular site in Bacillus subtilis of a nuclease which preferentially degrades single-stranded nucleic acids. J. Bacteriol. 91:1004–1011. 1966.—A nuclease, identified by a marked preference for single-stranded nucleic acids, has been demonstrated in extracts of Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was associated with the cell wall-membrane fraction of mechanically disrupted cells and was released from cells which had been converted to protoplasts by lysozyme. The nuclease activity prepared by the latter procedure was found to be activated and solubilized by treatment with trypsin. The enzyme had about 2% activity on native deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as compared with denatured DNA. By use of CsCl analytical density gradient ultracentrifugation, this preparation was shown to degrade denatured DNA selectively in mixtures of native and denatured DNA. PMID:4956329

  2. Degradation of triclosan in the presence of p-aminobenzoic acid under simulated sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Pingping; Chen, Xuan; Dong, Wenbo; Li, Hongjing; Chovelon, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of triclosan (TCS) in the presence of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) under simulated sunlight irradiation (λ ≥ 290 nm). The effect of PABA concentration, pH, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and DOM-hydrolytic Fe(III) species complexes on the photodegradation of TCS in the presence of PABA (TCS-PABA) was also studied. The photolysis of TCS-PABA obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics well, and the degradation of TCS-PABA enhanced with increasing solution pH (from 3.0 to 11.0). The presence of PABA inhibited the degradation of TCS-PABA, and the weakest inhibitory effect was observed while the concentration of PABA was 5 mg L(-1). The addition of DOM (Suwannee River fulvic acid standard I [SRFA], Suwannee River HA standard II [SRHA], and Suwannee River natural organic matter [SRNOM]) showed different inhibition effects on TCS-PABA degradation. However, higher Fe(III) concentration at the DOM concentration of 5 mg L(-1) could favor the formation of DOM-hydrolytic Fe(III) species complexes, further accelerating the degradation of TCS-PABA. In comparison with deionized water (DI water), TCS-PABA could be better photodegraded in river water nearby the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. This study provides useful information for understanding the natural behavior of TCS in the presence of other organic contaminants.

  3. Efficiency of uronic acid uptake in marine alginate-degrading fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, K.; Weide, G.

    1995-03-01

    Despite the fact that many marine fungi, including phycomycetes, yeasts, ascomycetes and hyphomycetes, have been recorded from living and/or dead phaeophytes, only a few of these have been shown to be capable of degrading alginic acid or alginates. The degradation is achieved by the action of an exoenzyme complex, comprising alginate lyase, as well as alginate hydrolase activities. The latter was detected only recently by the authors. In this study, the growth of two marine sodiumalginate-degrading deuteromycetes, Asteromyces cruciatus and Dendryphiella salina, was investigated, and the assimilation efficiency of sodiumalginate and its uronic acid degradation products, respectively, was estimated from the economic coefficient (E). E is calculated from the mycelial dry weight, divided by the weight of substrate consumed for this production. The economic coefficient for A. cruciatus was 48.6%, and that of D. salina 38.9%. This indicates that the former species uses the alginate degradation products more efficiently than the latter. The observed E-values for the marine deuteromycetes agree with those from other fungi, e.g. terrestrial species. In general, it is concluded that the marine fungi appear to play a more important role in kelp-based ecosystems than was realized previously.

  4. In vitro and in vivo effects of easily administered, low-toxic retinoid and phenylacetate compounds on human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidell, N; Pasquali, M; Malkapuram, S; Barua, A B; Wanichkul, T; Wada, R K

    2003-07-21

    We have investigated the effects of the low-toxic retinoid, all-trans retinoyl beta-glucuronide (RAG) alone and in combination with the phenylacetate (PA) derivative 4-chloro-phenylacetate (4-CPA) on the human neuroblastoma cell line, LA-N-5. In vitro studies demonstrated that RAG and 4-CPA treatments alone showed differentiation-inducing activity on LA-N-5 cells, with 4-CPA found to be about three-fold more potent than the PA parent compound in inducing morphologic differentiation and growth inhibition. As previously reported for retinoic acid (RA) and PA, RAG and 4-CPA were significantly more effective in their antiproliferative effects on the cells than either agent alone. Pharmacologic studies of 4-CPA in mice demonstrated that blood plasma levels reached peak concentrations 4 h after bolus administration of the compound and showed slow clearance characteristics with an apparent half-life of 4-8 h. As opposed to PA, 4-CPA was found to be essentially odourless and readily consumed in drinking water, giving rise to steady-state blood plasma levels of 4-CPA in the near mM range. Continuous consumption of 4-CPA in this manner for up to 5 months demonstrated no apparent adverse effects on the mice. Long-term RAG- and/or 4-CPA-treatment of nude mice injected with LA-N-5 cells demonstrated that both compounds alone exhibit potent antitumour activity. Together, RAG plus 4-CPA was the most effective treatment for inhibiting established tumour growth. In contrast, 4-CPA alone was equally as effective as the combination for preventing tumour development. The potent in vivo antitumour effects of 4-CPA could not be accounted for by the known ability of PA compounds to induce expression of the RA nuclear receptor beta (RARbeta) suppressor gene. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the possibility that RAG and/or 4-CPA may serve as effective, less-toxic alternatives to 13-cis RA, which is presently being utilised for nb therapy.

  5. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  6. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals. PMID:28289220

  7. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  8. Metabolism of Styrene Oxide and 2-Phenylethanol in the Styrene-Degrading Xanthobacter Strain 124X

    PubMed Central

    Hartmans, S.; Smits, J. P.; van der Werf, M. J.; Volkering, F.; de Bont, J. A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Styrene oxide and 2-phenylethanol metabolism in the styrene-degrading Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X was shown to proceed via phenylacetaldehyde and phenylacetic acid. In cell extracts 2-phenylethanol was oxidized by a phenazine methosulfate-dependent enzyme, probably a pyrroloquinoline quinone enzyme. Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X also contains a novel enzymatic activity designated as styrene oxide isomerase. Styrene oxide isomerase catalyzes the isomerization of styrene oxide to phenylacetaldehyde. The enzyme was partially purified and shown to have a very high substrate specificity. Of the epoxides tested, styrene oxide was the only substrate transformed. The initial step in styrene metabolism in Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X is oxygen dependent and probably involves oxidation of the aromatic nucleus. PMID:16348047

  9. Bacterial degradation of styrene involving a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmans, S; van der Werf, M J; de Bont, J A

    1990-01-01

    By using styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy in concentrations of 10 to 500 microM, 14 strains of aerobic bacteria and two strains of fungi were isolated from various soil and water samples. In cell extracts of 11 of the bacterial isolates, a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-requiring styrene monooxygenase activity that oxidized styrene to styrene oxide (phenyl oxirane) was detected. In one bacterial strain (S5), styrene metabolism was studied in more detail. In addition to styrene monooxygenase, cell extracts from strain S5 contained styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. A pathway for styrene degradation via styrene oxide and phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetic acid is proposed. PMID:2339888

  10. Degradation of 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid in biological treated effluent by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-02-01

    Gamma irradiation-induced degradation of a chlorinated aromatic compound, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (CHBA) in biological treated effluent was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in deionized water. Gamma irradiation led to a complete decomposition of CHBA and a partial mineralization in the treated effluent. The removal of CHBA followed the pseudo first-order reaction kinetic model and the rate constant in the treated effluent was 1.7-3.5 times lower than that in deionized water. The CHBA degradation rate was higher at acidic condition than at neutral and alkaline conditions. The radiolytic yield, G-value for CHBA degradation was lower in the treated effluent, which decreased with increase in absorbed doses and increased with increase in initial concentrations of CHBA. The degradation mechanism of CHBA using gamma irradiation was proposed through the oxidation by -OH and reduction by eaq- and H- radicals. As exposed to gamma irradiation, dechlorination takes place rapidly and combines with the oxidation and cleavage of the aromatic ring, producing chloride ions, small carboxylic acids, acetaldehyde and other intermediates into the solution.

  11. Degradation of ascorbic acid and potassium sorbate by different Lactobacillus species isolated from packed green olives.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Alfredo; Sánchez, Antonio Higinio; Casado, Francisco Javier; Beato, Víctor Manuel; de Castro, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research was to ascertain the lactic acid bacteria responsible for the degradation of ascorbic acid and/or potassium sorbate, isolated from packed green olives where these additives had diminished. A total of 14 isolates were recovered from samples of different green olive containers. According to partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA coding gene, Lactobacillus parafarraginis, Lactobacillus rapi, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paracollinoides, and Pediococcus ethanolidurans were identified. With the exception of L. pentosus and L. paracollinoides, the other species had not been mentioned in table olives before this study. Only three of the 14 isolates metabolized ascorbic acid in MRS broth, and the products from ascorbic acid in modified MRS broth without carbon sources were acetic and lactic acids. Except for the two L. rapi and the two P. ethanolidurans strains, the remaining 10 isolates depleted potassium sorbate added into MRS broth to some extent. The product generated by three of these strains was confirmed to be trans-4-hexenoic acid. The degradation of ascorbate or sorbate by lactic acid bacteria should be taken into account when these additives are used in food products where this group of bacteria may be present. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Degradation characteristics of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in electro-biological system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingli; Cao, Zhanping; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Lianmei; Sun, Xudong; Mei, Feng

    2013-11-15

    The reductive degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in an electro-biological system, a biological system and an electric catalytic system, respectively. Electrochemical characteristics were monitored by cyclic voltammetry and the intermediate products of 2,4-D degradation were determined by high speed liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that all 2,4-D degradations in the three systems conformed to the kinetics characteristics of one-order reaction, and the degradation kinetics constants were 28.74 × 10(-2) h(-1), 19.73 × 10(-2) h(-1) and 3.54 × 10(-2) h(-1), respectively. The kinetics constant in the electro-biological system was higher than the sum in the other two systems by 19%. The electrochemical assistance provided the electrons and accelerated the electron transfer rate in the microbial degradation of 2,4-D. The degradation resulted from the microbial reduction strengthened by the electrochemical assistance. The electron transfer existed between the electrode, cytochrome, NAD and the pollutants. A long-range electron transfer process could be achieved on the multi-phase interfaces between the electrode, bacteria and the pollutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanomechanical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid film during degradation.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Reyhaneh Neghabat; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Erxleben, Andrea; Rochev, Yury; McHugh, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Despite the potential applications of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) coatings in medical devices, the mechanical properties of this material during degradation are poorly understood. In the present work, the nanomechanical properties and degradation of PLGA film were investigated. Hydrolysis of solvent-cast PLGA film was studied in buffer solution at 37 °C. The mass loss, water uptake, molecular weight, crystallinity and surface morphology of the film were tracked during degradation over 20 days. Characterization of the surface hardness and Young's modulus was performed using the nanoindentation technique for different indentation loads. The initially amorphous films were found to remain amorphous during degradation. The molecular weight of the film decreased quickly during the initial days of degradation. Diffusion of water into the film resulted in a reduction in surface hardness during the first few days, followed by an increase that was due to the surface roughness. There was a significant delay between the decrease in the mechanical properties of the film and the decrease in the molecular weight. A sudden decline in mechanical properties indicated that significant bulk degradation had occurred.

  14. Degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanocomposite in simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Liuyun, Jiang; Chengdong, Xiong; Lixin, Jiang; Lijuan, Xu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we initiated a systematic study to investigate the effect of HA on thermal properties, inner structure, reduction of mechanical strength, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite with respect to the soaking time. The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite, which can accelerate the degradation of n-HA/PLGA composite and endow it with bioactivity, after n-HA was detached from PLGA during the degradation, so that n-HA/PLGA composite may have a more promising prospect of the clinical application than pure PLGA as bone fracture internal fixation materials, and the results would be of reference significance to predict the in vivo degradation and biological properties. - Highlights: • Effect of n-HA on degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite was investigated. • Degradation behaviors of n-HA/PLGA and PLGA were carried out in SBF for 6 months. • Viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure and bending strength were tested. • n-HA can accelerate the degradation and endows it with bioactivity. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite(HA) on the degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (HA/PLGA) nanocomposite, the degradation experiment of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA were carried out by soaking in simulated body fluid(SBF) at 37 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 6 months. The change of intrinsic viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure, bending strength reduction, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA with respect to the soaking time were investigated by means of UbbeloHde Viscometer, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), scanning electron microscope(SEM), electromechanical universal tester, a conventional camera and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n

  15. Phytate degrading activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Ema; Ratisiwi, Febiyani Ndaru; Istiqomah, Lusty; Sembiring, Langkah; Febrisiantosa, Andi

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential of LAB with phytate degrading activity from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different sources of traditional fermented food from Gunungkidul Yogyakarta Indonesia such as gembus tempeh (tofu waste), soybean tempeh, lamtoro tempeh (Leucaena bean) and kara tempeh. Isolation of LAB was performed using Total Plate Count (TPC) on de Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA) medium supplemented with CaCO3. They were screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP6 by using qualitative streak platemethod with modified de Man Rogosa-MorpholinoPropanesulfonic Acid Sharpe (MRS-MOPS) medium contained sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate and cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method. The selected isolates were further assayed for phytase activities using quantitative method with spectrophotometer and the two selected isolates growth were optimized. Furthermore, thhe isolates that shown the highest phytase activity was characterized and identified using API 50 CH kitand 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed that there were 18 LAB isolates obtained from samplesand 13 isolates were able to degrade sodium phytate based on qualitative screening. According to quantitative assay, the highest phytate degrading activities were found in TG-2(23.562 U/mL) and TG-1 (19.641 U/mL) isolated from gembus tempeh. The phytate activity of TG-2 was optimum at 37 °C with agitation, while the phytate activity of TG-1 was optimum at 45 °C without agitation. Characterization and identification of TG-2 isolate with the highest phytate degrading activity using API 50 CH and 16S rRNA showed that TG-2had homology with Lactobacillus fermentum. It could be concluded that LAB from from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based produced the extracellular phytase. Keywords: lactic acid bacteria, tempeh, phytatedegrading activity

  16. In vitro degradation of biodegradable polylactic acid/magnesium composites: Relevance of Mg particle shape.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, S C; Gavilán, R; Lieblich, M; Benavente, R; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-03-01

    Absorbable medical devices must be developed in order to have an appropriate degradation rate in agreement with the healing rate of bone in the implantation site. In this work, biodegradable composites formed by a polylactic acid matrix reinforced with 10%wt. magnesium microparticles were processed and their in vitro degradation investigated during 28 days. A joint analysis of the amount of H2 released, the changes in pH in buffered (PBS) and non-buffered media (distilled water), the variations in mass, microstructure and the mechanical performance of the specimens was developed. The main aim was to elucidate the relevance of Mg particles shape on tailoring the degradation kinetics of these novel composites. The results show that the shape of the Mg reinforcing particles plays a crucial role in the degradation rate of PLA/Mg composites, with spherical particles promoting a lower degradation rate than irregular particles. This fact is only partially due to the smaller surface area to volume ratio of the spherical particles. Irregular particles promote a faster formation of cracks and, therefore, an increasingly faster degradation of the polymeric matrix. In every case, the amount of H2 released by the composites was well below that released by monolithic Mg. The pH of PBS during degradation remained always within 7.2 and 7.4. PLA/Mg reinforced with spherical particles retains more than 90% of its mechanical properties after 7 days of immersion and more than 60% after 28 days. The increasing demand for temporary orthopaedic implants is the driving force to seek new strategies to decrease costs and simultaneously improve patients comfort as well as simplify surgical procedures. Resorbable medical devices must be developed in order to have an appropriate degradation rate in agreement with the healing rate of bone. We are presenting for the first time results of the degradation kinetics of a new material based on polylactic acid reinforced with 10%wt. Mg microparticles

  17. Study on degradation kinetics of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid in aqueous solutions and identification of its major degradation product by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qili; Guan, Jiao; Rong, Rong; Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Zhiguo

    2015-08-10

    A RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the degradation kinetic study of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid (HPABA), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, which would provide a basis for further studies on HPABA. The effects of pH, temperature, buffer concentration and ionic strength on the degradation kinetics of HPABA were discussed. Experimental parameters such as degradation rate constants (k), activation energy (Ea), acid and alkali catalytic constants (k(ac), k(al)), shelf life (t1/2) and temperature coefficient (Q10) were calculated. The results indicated that degradation kinetics of HPABA followed zero-order reaction kinetics; degradation rate constants (k) of HPABA at different pH values demonstrated that HPABA was more stable in neutral and near-neutral conditions; the function of temperature on k obeyed the Arrhenius equation (r = 0.9933) and HPABA was more stable at lower temperature; with the increase of ionic strength and buffer concentration, the stability of HPABA was decreased. The major unknown degradation product of HPABA was identified by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS with positive electrospray ionization. Results demonstrated that the hydrolysis product was the primary degradation product of HPABA and it was deduced as anthranilic acid.

  18. Protective effect of hop beta-acids on microbial degradation of thick juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Justé, A; Krause, M S; Lievens, B; Klingeberg, M; Michiels, K A

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the value of a commercial alkaline solution of hop beta-acids (HBA) for prevention of microbial degradation of thick juice, a concentrated intermediate product in the production of beet sugar. The antimicrobial effect of different concentrations of HBA against microbial degradation of thick juice was tested in a pilot-scale storage experiment. Chemical, biochemical and microbial parameters were monitored during thick juice storage. Thick juice degradation, indicated as a decrease in pH, was generally accompanied by an increase in the count of fastidious bacteria (FB) on Columbia Agar with Sheep Blood (CAwSB), which were mainly identified as Tetragenococcus halophilus. Addition of HBA delayed juice acidification and the development of FB in a concentration-dependent manner. The susceptibility of FB to HBA was determined by plating degraded thick juice (FB > 10(5) CFU ml(-1) on CAwSB plates with different concentrations of HBA (0-160 ppm). None of the HBA concentrations tested reduced the number of FB colonies formed, but increasing HBA concentrations extended the lag time of colony formation. HBA produce no measurable bactericidal effect, but retard the development of FB in thick juice. Moreover, HBA do not prevent the thick juice from deteriorating, but significantly delay its degradation. These results indicate that adding a commercially available HBA formulation can prolong the storage life of thick juice in the sugar industry, although degradation cannot be eliminated. Future research will focus on the detailed characterization of FB consistently isolated from degraded thick juice and on determining their role in thick juice degradation.

  19. Involvement of ligninolytic enzymes and Fenton-like reaction in humic acid degradation by Trametes sp.

    PubMed

    Grinhut, Tzafrir; Salame, Tomer Meir; Chen, Yona; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2011-08-01

    Trametes sp. M23, isolated from biosolids compost was found to decompose humic acids (HA). A low N (LN) medium (C/N, 53) provided suitable conditions for HA degradation, whereas in a high N (HN) medium (C/N, 10), HA was not degraded. In the absence of Mn(2+), HA degradation was similar to that in Mn(2+)-containing medium. In contrast, MnP activity was significantly affected by Mn(2+). Laccase activity exhibited a negative correlation to HA degradation, while LiP activity was not detected. Thus, ligninolytic enzymes activity could provide only a partial explanation for the HA-degradation mechanism. The decolorization of two dyes, Orange II and Brilliant Blue R250, was also determined. Similar to HA degradation, under LN conditions, decolorization occurred independently of the presence of Mn(2+). We investigated the possible involvement of a Fenton-like reaction in HA degradation. The addition of DMSO, an OH-radical scavenger, to LN media resulted in a significant decrease in HA bleaching. The rate of extracellular Fe(3+) reduction was much higher in the LN vs. HN medium. In addition, the rate of reduction was even higher in the presence of HA in the medium. In vitro HA bleaching in non-inoculated media was observed with H(2)O(2) amendment to a final concentration of 200 mM (obtained by 50 mM amendments for 4 days) and Fe(2+) (36 mM). After 4 days of incubation, HA decolorization was similar to the biological treatment. These results support our hypothesis that a Fenton-like reaction is involved in HA degradation by Trametes sp. M23.

  20. Mechanism of Calcium Lactate Facilitating Phytic Acid Degradation in Soybean during Germination.

    PubMed

    Hui, Qianru; Yang, Runqiang; Shen, Chang; Zhou, Yulin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-07-13

    Calcium lactate facilitates the growth and phytic acid degradation of soybean sprouts, but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, calcium lactate (Ca) and calcium lactate with lanthanum chloride (Ca+La) were used to treat soybean sprouts to reveal the relevant mechanism. Results showed that the phytic acid content decreased and the availability of phosphorus increased under Ca treatment. This must be due to the enhancement of enzyme activity related to phytic acid degradation. In addition, the energy metabolism was accelerated by Ca treatment. The energy status and energy metabolism-associated enzyme activity also increased. However, the transmembrane transport of calcium was inhibited by La(3+) and concentrated in intercellular space or between the cell wall and cell membrane; thus, Ca+La treatment showed reverse results compared with those of Ca treatment. Interestingly, gene expression did not vary in accordance with their enzyme activity. These results demonstrated that calcium lactate increased the rate of phytic acid degradation by enhancing growth, phosphorus metabolism, and energy metabolism.

  1. The role of nanoparticulate agglomerates in TiO2 photocatalysis: degradation of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Irina; Mendive, Cecilia B.; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous bimodal study of the photocatalytic oxalic acid degradation by aqueous TiO2 suspensions revealed that particular systems possess the capacity to protect a certain amount of oxalic acid from oxidation, thus hindering, to some extent, the photocatalytic reaction. While measurements of the oxalic acid concentration in the bulk liquid phase indicated full photocatalytic degradation; in situ pH-stat measurements allowed the quantification of the amount of oxalic acid remaining in the part of the nanoparticulate agglomerates where light could apparently not access. An explanation for this phenomenon takes into account the possibility of the formation of TiO2 agglomerates in which these molecules are hidden from the effect of the light, thus being protected from photocatalytic degradation. Studies of different TiO2 materials with different particle sizes allowed a deeper exploration of this phenomenon. In addition, because this property of encapsulating pollutant molecules by photocatalytic systems is found to be a reversible phenomenon, P25 appears to be more convenient and advantageous as compared to the use of large surface area photocatalysts.

  2. Influence of humic acid addition on the degradation of pharmaceuticals by biofilms in effluent wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Escola Casas, Monica; Ooi, Gordon T H; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Bester, Kai; Andersen, Henrik R

    2017-05-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment is suspected to depend on co-degradation i.e. be dependent on concentrations of substrate. This complicates predicting and modelling their fate. The effect of humic acid, as a model for complex organic substrate, was investigated in relation to the biodegradation of pharmaceuticals by suspended biofilm carriers adapted to polishing effluent water from a tertiary sewage treatment plant. Twelve out of 22 investigated pharmaceuticals were significantly biodegradable. The biodegradation rate constants of ten of those compounds were increasing with increased humic acid concentrations. At the highest humic acid concentration (30mgC/L), the biodegradation rate constants were four times higher than the biodegradation rate constants without added humic acid. This shows that the presence of complex substrate stimulates degradation via a co-metabolism-like mechanism and competitive inhibition does not occur. Increases of rate constant per mgC/L are tentatively calculated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue-gas desulfurization. Final report, June 1984-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.J.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    This report gives results of a study of organic acid-degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic-acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation-rate times the ratio of the concentrations of dissolved S(IV) and organic acid. It is not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen in the absence of Mn or Fe. However, k12 is increased by certain transition metals such as Fe, Co, and Ni and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnifies these effects. A free-radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide (the major product), smaller dicarboxylic acids, monocarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  4. Oxidative degradation of organic acid conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization: products, kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.J.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1987-03-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant k/sub 12/ is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times the ratio of the concentration of dissolved S(IV) and organic acid. It is not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Fe, Co, and Ni and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnifies these effects. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately 3 times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids, while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude factor. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product - smaller dicarboxylic acids, monocarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons. 30 references, 7 figures, 7 tables.

  5. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  6. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  7. Photooxidation of dicarboxylic acids—Part I: Effects of inorganic ions on degradation of azelaic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liming; Ray, Madhumita B.; Yu, Liya E.

    In this paper, the first of a two-part series, effects of chloride, sulfate, and nitrate ions and pH on photooxidation of azelaic acid were investigated in an aqueous system. Nitrate ions play the major role in accelerating photooxidation of azelaic acid by increasing rad OH concentration, while chloride ions consume rad OH concentration and retard photooxidation rates. In inorganic mixtures, a nitrate-to-chloride molar ratio of >1.5 accelerated photooxidation of azelaic acid indicating the dominant role of nitrate. Substantial inhibition effects of chloride on photooxidation of azelaic acid were demonstrated at a nitrate-to-chloride molar ratio <0.3. Nitrate and chloride are interrelated in affecting photooxidation of azelaic acid as photolysis of nitrate would significantly consume H +, retarding reaction of HOCl - with H +, and consequently decreasing rad OH-chloride reaction. pH affects photooxidation of C 2-C 9 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) in two ways: C 2-C 4 dicarboxylates exhibit substantially higher degradation rates than their parent DCAs, while C 5-C 9 dicarboxylates demonstrate degradation rates similar to their parent DCAs.

  8. Potential of wine-associated lactic acid bacteria to degrade biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Almudena; González-Rompinelli, Eva M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2011-08-02

    Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fermented foods have been proven to degrade biogenic amines through the production of amine oxidase enzymes. Since little is known about this in relation to wine micro-organisms, this work examined the ability of LAB strains (n=85) isolated from wines and other related enological sources, as well as commercial malolactic starter cultures (n=3) and type strains (n=2), to degrade histamine, tyramine and putrescine. The biogenic amine-degrading ability of the strains was evaluated by RP-HPLC in culture media and wine malolactic fermentation laboratory experiments. Although at different extent, 25% of the LAB isolates were able to degrade histamine, 18% tyramine and 18% putrescine, whereas none of the commercial malolactic starter cultures or type strains were able to degrade any of the tested amines. The greatest biogenic amine-degrading ability was exhibited by 9 strains belonging to the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus groups, and most of them were able to simultaneously degrade at least two of the three studied biogenic amines. Further experiments with one of the strains that showed high biogenic amine-degrading ability (L. casei IFI-CA 52) revealed that cell-free extracts maintained this ability in comparison to the cell suspensions at pH 4.6, indicating that amine-degrading enzymes were effectively extracted from the cells and their action was optimal in the degradation of biogenic amines. In addition, it was confirmed that wine components such as ethanol (12%) and polyphenols (75 mg/L), and wine additives such as SO(2) (30 mg/L), reduced the histamine-degrading ability of L. casei IFI-CA 52 at pH 4.6 by 80%, 85% and 11%, respectively, in cell suspensions, whereas the reduction was 91%, 67% and 50%, respectively, in cell-free extracts. In spite of this adverse influence of the wine matrix, our results proved the potential of wine-associated LAB as a promising strategy to reduce biogenic amines in wine.

  9. Cullin 3 mediates SRC-3 ubiquitination and degradation to control the retinoic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Christine; Gaouar, Samia; Fischer, Benoit; Boeglin, Marcel; Paul, Nicodeme; Samarut, Eric; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Pankotai-Bodo, Gabriella; Brino, Laurent; Rochette-Egly, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    SRC-3 is an important coactivator of nuclear receptors including the retinoic acid (RA) receptor α. Most of SRC-3 functions are facilitated by changes in the posttranslational code of the protein that involves mainly phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We recently reported that SRC-3 is degraded by the proteasome in response to RA. Here, by using an RNAi E3-ubiquitin ligase entry screen, we identified CUL-3 and RBX1 as components of the E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the RA-induced ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SRC-3. We also show that the RA-induced ubiquitination of SRC-3 depends on its prior phosphorylation at serine 860 that promotes binding of the CUL-3–based E3 ligase in the nucleus. Finally, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of SRC-3 cooperate to control the dynamics of transcription. In all, this process participates to the antiproliferative effect of RA. PMID:22147914

  10. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joseph A; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L(-1) resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L(-1) supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  11. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joseph A.; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L-1 resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L-1 supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of commercially sourced naphthenic acids by TiO2-graphene composite nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; Wang, Lin; Tang, Jingchun; Ma, Jianli

    2016-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a major contributor to the toxicity in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), which is produced by hot water extraction of bitumen. NAs are extremely difficult to be degraded due to its complex ring and side chain structure. Photocatalysis is recognized as a promising technology in the removal of refractory organic pollutants. In this work, TiO2-graphene (P25-GR) composites were synthesized by means of solvothermal method. The results showed that P25-GR composite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than pure P25. The removal efficiency of naphthenic acids in acid solution was higher than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. It was the first report ever known on the photodegradation of NAs based on graphene, and this process achieved a higher removal rate than other photocatalysis degradation of NAs in a shorter reaction time. LC/MS analysis showed that macromolecular NAs (carbon number 17-22, z value -2) were easy to be degraded than the micromolecular ones (carbon number 11-16, z value -2). Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species that play the main role in the photocatalysis system were studied. It was found that holes and ·OH were the main reactive species in the UV/P25-GR photocatalysis system. Given the high removal efficiency of refractory organic pollutants and the short degradation time, photodegradation based on composite catalysts has a broad and practical prospect. The study on the photodegradation of commercially sourced NAs may provide a guidance for the degradation of OSPW NAs by this method.

  13. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  14. Synthesis and degradation characteristics of salicylic acid-derived poly(anhydride-esters).

    PubMed

    Erdmann, L; Uhrich, K E

    2000-10-01

    A biodegradable poly(anhydride-ester) was synthesized by melt condensation polymerization of the acetylated monomer to yield a novel polymeric prodrug. The polymer we have synthesized is composed of alkyl chains linked by ester bonds to aromatic moieties, specifically salicylic acid--the active component of aspirin. With the medicinal properties attributed to salicylic acid and the ease of metabolism, the incorporation of this compound into a polymer backbone yields a polymeric prodrug that may have potential in a variety of applications (i.e., inflammatory bowel disease). For these reasons, we have designed a synthetic scheme that yields the desired poly(anhydride-ester). The in vitro hydrolytic degradation of these polymers has been performed and results indicate that the polymer degradation rate is pH-dependent.

  15. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  16. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  17. Oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by ionizing radiation: degradation, detoxification and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Robert; Solar, Sonja

    2003-02-01

    The gamma-radiation-induced degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in aerated (A) and in during irradiation air saturated (AS) solutions. Whereas the decomposition rates were not influenced by AS, chloride elimination, detoxification as well as mineralization were significantly enhanced. In the range 50-500 μmol dm -3 2,4-D, degradation showed proportionality to concentration, while chloride formation was successively retarded. The ratios of the pseudo first-order rate constants for degradation and chloride formation, kde/ kCl, increase in AS solutions from 1.4 (50 μmol dm -3) to 2.7 (500 μmol dm -3) and in A solutions from 1.4 to 3.3. In AS for total chloride release 0.7 kGy (50 μmol dm -3) to 10 kGy (500 μmol dm -3) were required, the reduction of organic carbon at 10 kGy was 95% (50 μmol dm -3) and 50% (500 μmol dm -3). Increase and decrease of toxicity during irradiation correlated well with formation and degradation of intermediate phenolic products. The doses for detoxification corresponded to those of total dehalogenation. The oxygen uptake was ˜1.1 ppm 100 Gy -1. The presence of the inorganic components of Vienna drinking water affect the degradation parameters insignificantly.

  18. Plasmid as a measure of microbial degradation capacity for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Chong, Nyuk-Min; Chang, Hung-Wei

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to pursuit the quantification of microbial degradation capacity for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by detecting and quantifying a prominent 2,4-D degradation encoding plasmid. Batch reactor acclimation, de-acclimation, and re-acclimation tests were conducted during which periods the courses of 2,4-D dissipation and plasmid evolution were quantitatively measured. Pure cultures of bacterial strains were detected to give rise to a plasmid approximately the size of 90 kb after acclimation. The 90 kb plasmid content of Arthrobacter sp. increased when degradation occurred after acclimation, with a rate that corresponded closely to the degradation rate. During de-acclimation, plasmid content declined exponentially at a half-life of approximately 3.5 days. Re-acclimation saw a renewed induction of plasmid, but substrate consumption limited the rise of plasmid to a level much lower than after the first acclimation. This research recommends a method for measuring the microbial degradation capability for a xenobiotic.

  19. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria.

  20. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  1. Degradation of oxolinic acid and flumequine in aquaculture pond waters and sediments.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hong-Thih; Lin, Jing-Ju

    2009-04-01

    Oxolinic acid (OA) and flumequine (FLU) are two of the quinolone antibiotics (QAs) that are widely used in aquaculture. The purpose of this study was to understand the fates of OA and FLU in waters and sediment slurries from aquaculture ponds in a laboratory experiment. Waters and sediments were sampled from an eel (Anguilla japonica) pond and a shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) pond. The effects of light, microbial activities, and temperature on the degradation of these two QAs were elucidated. Results indicated that light plays a major role in the degradation of OA and FLU in waters and sediment slurries. Under illuminated and non-sterile conditions, the half-lives (t(1/2)) of OA were 2.3-4.8 and 9.5-15.0 days in the waters and sediment slurries, respectively. For FLU, under the same conditions, t(1/2) values were 1.9-2.3 and 3.6-6.4 days, respectively. Photodegradation of OA and FLU was much faster in water than in sediment slurry. In both environments, degradation became very slow or would plateau after only minimal change in the dark. Besides the effect of light, biodegradation had very minor effects on the degradation of the two QAs in the sediment slurries. The only independent biodegradation was found when OA was placed in shrimp pond sediment slurry, but at a much lower rate (t(1/2) of 98.7 days) than in light. Biodegradation of FLU was also found in the eel pond sediment slurry but only through an additional connection with light. Also, re-addition enhanced the degradation of OA in shrimp pond sediment slurry, but slowed the degradation of FLU in the eel pond sediment slurry in the dark. The temperature experiment in this study showed no significant effects on degradation of the two QAs in either pond waters or sediment slurries.

  2. Chemical nature and immunotoxicological properties of arachidonic acid degradation products formed by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Friedman, M.; Hanley, N.; Siegler, E.; Quay, J.; Becker, S.; Devlin, R.; Koren, H.S. )

    1993-06-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure in vivo has been reported to degrade arachidonic acid (AA) in the lungs of rodents. The O3-degraded AA products may play a role in the responses to this toxicant. To study the chemical nature and biological activity of O3-exposed AA, we exposed AA in a cell-free, aqueous environment to air, 0.1 ppm O3, or 1.0 ppm O3 for 30-120 min. AA exposed to air was not degraded. All O3 exposures degraded > 98% of the AA to more polar products, which were predominantly aldehydic substances (as determined by reactivity with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and subsequent separation by HPLC) and hydrogen peroxide. The type and amount of aldehydic substances formed depended on the O3 concentration and exposure duration. A human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B, S6 subclone) exposed in vitro to either 0.1 ppm or 1.0 ppm O3 for 1 hr produced AA-derived aldehydic substances, some of which eluted with similar retention times as the aldehydic substances derived from O3 degradation of AA in the cell-free system. In vitro, O3-degraded AA induced an increase in human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) polarization, decreased human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and decreased human peripheral blood natural killer cell lysis of K562 target cells. The aldehydic substances, but not hydrogen peroxide, appeared to be the principal active agents responsible for the observed effects. O3-degraded AA may play a role in the PMN influx into lungs and in decreased T-lymphocyte mitogenesis and natural killer cell activity observed in humans and rodents exposed to O3.

  3. Chemical nature and immunotoxicological properties of arachidonic acid degradation products formed by exposure to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Madden, M C; Friedman, M; Hanley, N; Siegler, E; Quay, J; Becker, S; Devlin, R; Koren, H S

    1993-01-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure in vivo has been reported to degrade arachidonic acid (AA) in the lungs of rodents. The O3-degraded AA products may play a role in the responses to this toxicant. To study the chemical nature and biological activity of O3-exposed AA, we exposed AA in a cell-free, aqueous environment to air, 0.1 ppm O3, or 1.0 ppm O3 for 30-120 min. AA exposed to air was not degraded. All O3 exposures degraded > 98% of the AA to more polar products, which were predominantly aldehydic substances (as determined by reactivity with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and subsequent separation by HPLC) and hydrogen peroxide. The type and amount of aldehydic substances formed depended on the O3 concentration and exposure duration. A human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B, S6 subclone) exposed in vitro to either 0.1 ppm or 1.0 ppm O3 for 1 hr produced AA-derived aldehydic substances, some of which eluted with similar retention times as the aldehydic substances derived from O3 degradation of AA in the cell-free system. In vitro, O3-degraded AA induced an increase in human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) polarization, decreased human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and decreased human peripheral blood natural killer cell lysis of K562 target cells. The aldehydic substances, but not hydrogen peroxide, appeared to be the principal active agents responsible for the observed effects. O3-degraded AA may play a role in the PMN influx into lungs and in decreased T-lymphocyte mitogenesis and natural killer cell activity observed in humans and rodents exposed to O3. PMID:8354202

  4. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments.

  5. 2('),3(')-didehydro-2('),3(')-dideoxynucleosides are degraded to furfuryl alcohol under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junxing; Ray, Adrian S; Mathew, Judy S; Anderson, Karen S; Chu, Chung K; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-05-03

    2('),3(')-Didehydro-2('),3(')-dideoxynucleosides are clinically relevant antiviral agents. These nucleosides could be degraded under acidic conditions. Acidic stability studies showed the D4N had the following increasing stability order: D4Gacidic cleavage of D4-nucleosides. The cleavage products were characterized as furfuryl alcohol and the corresponding nucleobase. Furfuryl alcohol is an agent found in many everyday food products. The biological results demonstrated that furfuryl alcohol had neither anti-HIV activity nor cytotoxicity in vitro, suggesting the acid instability of D4-nucleosides is unlikely to have an impact on the toxicity of these nucleoside analogs in humans.

  6. Bone substitute biomedical material of multi-(amino acid) copolymer: in vitro degradation and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Wei, Jie; Ma, Jian; Gong, Min; Luo, Xiaoman; Zhang, Yunfei

    2011-11-01

    Degradable polymers with good mechanical strength as bone repair biomaterials have been paid more attention in biomedical application. In this study, a multi-(amino acid) copolymer consisting of 6-aminocaproic acid and five natural amino acids was prepared by a reaction of acid-catalyzed condensation. The results revealed that the copolymer could be slowly degradable in Tris-HCl solution, and lost its initial weight of 31.9 wt% after immersion for 12 weeks, and the changes of pH value of Tris-HCl solution were in range from 6.9 to 7.4 during soaking. The compressive strength of the copolymer decreased from 107 to 68 MPa after immersion for 12 weeks. The proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells on the copolymer significantly increased with time, and the cells with normal phenotype extended and spread well on the copolymer surfaces. When the copolymer was implanted in muscle and bone defects of femoral cortex of dogs for 12 weeks, the histological evaluation confirmed that the copolymer exhibited excellent biocompatibility and more effective osteogenesis in vivo. When implanted into cortical bone defects of dogs, the copolymer could be combined directly with the natural bone without fibrous capsule tissue between implants and host bone. The results indicated that the multi-(amino acid) copolymer with sufficient strength, good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity had clinical potential for load-bearing bone repair or substitution.

  7. Aspergillus protein degradation pathways with different secreted protease sets at neutral and acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Sriranganadane, Dev; Waridel, Patrice; Salamin, Karine; Reichard, Utz; Grouzmann, Eric; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Quadroni, Manfredo; Monod, Michel

    2010-07-02

    Aspergillus fumigatus grows well at neutral and acidic pH in a medium containing protein as the sole nitrogen source by secreting two different sets of proteases. Neutral pH favors the secretion of neutral and alkaline endoproteases, leucine aminopeptidases (Laps) which are nonspecific monoaminopeptidases, and an X-prolyl dipeptidase (DppIV). Acidic pH environment promotes the secretion of an aspartic endoprotease of pepsin family (Pep1) and tripeptidyl-peptidases of the sedolisin family (SedB and SedD). A novel prolyl peptidase, AfuS28, was found to be secreted in both alkaline and acidic conditions. In previous studies, Laps were shown to degrade peptides from their N-terminus until an X-Pro sequence acts as a stop signal. X-Pro sequences can be then removed by DppIV, which allows Laps access to the following residues. We have shown that at acidic pH Seds degrade large peptides from their N-terminus into tripeptides until Pro in P1 or P'1 position acts as a stop for these exopeptidases. However, X-X-Pro and X-X-X-Pro sequences can be removed by AfuS28 thus allowing Seds further sequential proteolysis. In conclusion, both alkaline and acidic sets of proteases contain exoprotease activity capable of cleaving after proline residues that cannot be removed during sequential digestion by nonspecific exopeptidases.

  8. Enhanced degradation of Herbicide Isoproturon in wheat rhizosphere by salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Miao, Shan Shan; Jiang, Chen; Huang, Meng Tian; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-14

    This study investigated the herbicide isoproturon (IPU) residues in soil, where wheat was cultivated and sprayed with salicylic acid (SA). Provision of SA led to a lower level of IPU residues in rhizosphere soil compared to IPU treatment alone. Root exudation of tartaric acid, malic acid, and oxalic acids was enhanced in rhizosphere soil with SA-treated wheat. We examined the microbial population (e.g., biomass and phospholipid fatty acid), microbial structure, and soil enzyme (catalase, phenol oxidase, and dehydrogenase) activities, all of which are associated with soil activity and were activated in rhizosphere soil of SA-treated wheat roots. We further assessed the correlation matrix and principal component to figure out the association between the IPU degradation and soil activity. Finally, six IPU degraded products (derivatives) in rhizosphere soil were characterized using ultraperformance liquid chromatography with a quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS). A relatively higher level of IPU derivatives was identified in soil with SA-treated wheat than in soil without SA-treated wheat plants.

  9. Optimized photocatalytic degradation of caffeic acid by sol-gel TiO₂.

    PubMed

    García-Montelongo, Xiomara L; Martínez-de la Cruz, Azael; Contreras, David; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2015-01-01

    TiO₂anatase powder was prepared by means of the sol-gel method with titanium(IV) butoxide as precursor. The formation of a tetragonal crystal structure of TiO₂anatase at 500 °C was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO₂anatase powder was evaluated in the degradation of caffeic acid in aqueous solution under ultraviolet radiation. A central composite circumscribed design was used to assess the weight of the experimental variables, pH and amount of catalyst in the percentage of caffeic acid degraded and the optimal conditions. The optimized conditions were found to be pH = 5.2 and a load of TiO₂of 1.1 g L⁻¹. Under these conditions more than 90% of caffeic acid degradation was achieved after 30 min of lamp irradiation. At this time the mineralization reached was almost 60%.

  10. Degradation of vanillic acid and production of guaiacol by microorganisms isolated from cork samples.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Belloch, Carmela; Villa, Mercedes; Uruburu, Federico; Larriba, Germán; Coque, Juan José R

    2003-03-14

    The presence of guaiacol in cork stoppers is responsible for some cases of cork taint causing unpleasant alterations to wine. We have performed a characterization of the cork-associated microbiota by isolating 55 different microorganisms: eight yeast, 14 filamentous fungi or molds, 13 actinomycetes and 20 non-filamentous bacteria. A screening for degradation of vanillic acid and guaiacol production showed that none of the filamentous fungi could achieve any of these processes. By contrast, five of the eight yeast strains isolated were able to degrade vanillic acid, although it was not converted to guaiacol. Guaiacol production was only detected in four bacterial strains: one isolate of Bacillus subtilis and three actinomycetes, Streptomyces sp. A3, Streptomyces sp. A5 and Streptomyces sp. A13, were able to accumulate this compound in both liquid media and cultures over cork. These results suggest that guaiacol-mediated cork taint should be attributed to the degradative action of vanillic acid by bacterial strains growing on cork.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis spherical TiO2 and its photo-degradation property on salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenlu; Liu, Xiaolin; Huo, Pengwei; Gao, Xun; Wu, Di; Lu, Ziyang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2012-07-01

    Anatase TiO2 spheres have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis. The prepared spheres were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS). The TiO2 consisted of well-defined spheres with size of 3-5 μm. The photocatalytic activity of spherical TiO2 was determined by degradation of salicylic acid under visible light irradiation. It was revealed that the degradation rate of the spherical TiO2 which was processed at 150 °C for 48 h could reach 81.758%. And the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation obeyed first-order kinetic, which the rate constant value was 0.01716 S-1 of the salicylic acid onto TiO2 (temperature: 150, time: 48 h). The kinetics of adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model and the rate constant was 1.2695 g mg-1 of the salicylic acid onto TiO2 (temperature: 150, time: 48 h).

  12. Free fatty acids degradation in grease trap purification using ozone bubbling and sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotr Kwiatkowski, Michal; Satoh, Saburoh; Fukuda, Shogo; Yamabe, Chobei; Ihara, Satoshi; Nieda, Masanori

    2013-02-01

    The oil and fat were treated at first by only ozone bubbling and it was confirmed that the collection efficiency of them became 98.4% when the aeration was used. It showed that the aeration method in a grease trap cleared the standard value of 90% and there was no worry on the oil and fat outflow from a grease trap. The characteristics of sonication process were studied for free fatty acids degradation. The free saturated fatty acids are the most hard-degradable compounds of the fats, oils and greases (FOGs) in the grease trap. The influence of various parameters such as immersion level of an ultrasound probe in the liquid and bubbling of various gases (Ar, O2, air, O3) on the sonochemical and energy efficiency of the sonication process was investigated. The most effective degradation treatment method for saturated free fatty acids was the combination of sonication and low flow rate argon bubbling. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  13. Effect of the Electric Field Frequency on Ascorbic Acid Degradation during Thermal Treatment by Ohmic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Schwartz, Steven; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Tessaro, Isabel Cristina; Sastry, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the influence of the electric field frequency and solids content on the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid during ohmic heating of acerola pulp and acerola serum was investigated. The degradation percentage of ascorbic acid in the pulp after 120 min of heating varied between 12 and 17%. For the serum, the degradation percentage was in the range of 13 and 18%. The results were fitted to the first-order model, and the kinetic rate constants ranged from 1.1 to 1.6 × 10−3 min−1 and from 1.1 to 1.5 × 10−3 min−1 for pulp and serum, respectively. D values ranged between 1480 and 2145 min for the pulp and between 1524 and 1951 min for the serum. A distinct behavior between the kinetic parameters of the pulp and serum in electric field frequencies ranging from 10 to 1000 Hz indicates that the presence of distinct amounts and types of solids might affect the rate of the electron transfer in electrochemical reactions. These variables may also affect the polarization process stimulated by the oscillating electric field. The non-achievement of the equilibrium of the polarization process may have an influence on oxidation reactions, affecting the predisposition to hydrogen donation from the ascorbic acid molecule. PMID:24892902

  14. Effect of the electric field frequency on ascorbic acid degradation during thermal treatment by ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Schwartz, Steven; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Tessaro, Isabel Cristina; Sastry, Sudhir

    2014-06-25

    In this work, the influence of the electric field frequency and solids content on the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid during ohmic heating of acerola pulp and acerola serum was investigated. The degradation percentage of ascorbic acid in the pulp after 120 min of heating varied between 12 and 17%. For the serum, the degradation percentage was in the range of 13 and 18%. The results were fitted to the first-order model, and the kinetic rate constants ranged from 1.1 to 1.6×10(-3) min(-1) and from 1.1 to 1.5×10(-3) min(-1) for pulp and serum, respectively. D values ranged between 1480 and 2145 min for the pulp and between 1524 and 1951 min for the serum. A distinct behavior between the kinetic parameters of the pulp and serum in electric field frequencies ranging from 10 to 1000 Hz indicates that the presence of distinct amounts and types of solids might affect the rate of the electron transfer in electrochemical reactions. These variables may also affect the polarization process stimulated by the oscillating electric field. The non-achievement of the equilibrium of the polarization process may have an influence on oxidation reactions, affecting the predisposition to hydrogen donation from the ascorbic acid molecule.

  15. Petroleum and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation and naphthalene metabolism in Streptomyces sp. (ERI-CPDA-1) isolated from oil contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, C; Duraipandiyan, V; Balakrishna, K; Ignacimuthu, S

    2012-05-01

    Petroleum and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degrading Streptomyces sp. isolate ERI-CPDA-1 was recovered from oil contaminated soil in Chennai, India. The degradation efficiencies were examined by GC-FID and the results showed that the isolate could remove 98.25% diesel oil, 99.14% naphthalene and 17.5% phenanthrene in 7 days at 30°C (0.1%). ERI-CPDA-1 was able to degrade naphthalene, phenanthrene and diesel oil and grow on petrol, diesel, kerosene, benzene, pyridine, methanol, ethanol, cyclohexane, tween-80, xylene, DMSO and toluene using them as sole carbon source. Effects of environmental condition on degradation of hydrocarbons (diesel oil, naphthalene and phenanthrene) were also studied at different pH, NaCl, temperature, concentration and incubation time. Degradation pathway for naphthalene has been proposed. Degradation metabolites were identified using GC-MS analysis of ethyl acetate extract of the cell free culture. The degradation products detected were benzaldehyde, catechol, phenylacetic acid and protocatechuic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of Lithospermic Acid under Low Oxygen Condition Using Quantitative 1H NMR with HPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianyang; Gong, Xingchu; Qu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    A novel quantitative 1H NMR (Q-NMR) combined with HPLC-MS method has been proposed for investigating the degradation process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) components. Through this method, in-situ monitoring of dynamics degradation process of lithospermic acid (LA), one of the popular polyphenolic acids in TCM, was realized under low oxygen condition. Additionally, this methodology was proved to be simple, rapid and specific. Degradation kinetic runs have been carried out to systematically investigate the effects of two key environmental factors, initial pH values and temperatures. Eight main degradation products of LA were detected, seven of which were tentatively structural elucidated with the help of both NMR and LC-MS in this work and salvianolic acid A (Sal A) was the primary degradation product of LA. A possible degradation pathway of LA was proposed, subsequently. The results showed that the degradation of LA followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent degradation kinetic constants increased as the initial pH value of the phosphate buffer increased. Under the given conditions, the rate constants of overall degradation as a function of temperature obeyed the Arrhenius equation. Our results proved that the Q-NMR combined with HPLC-MS method can be one of the most promising techniques for investigating degradation process of active components in TCM. PMID:27776128

  17. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  18. Biodegradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by novel identified co-metabolizing degrader Achromobacter sp. f1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Fang; Ning, Li-Qun; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Yang, Zong-Zheng; Cao, Jing-Guo; Sheng, Hong-Jie; Jiang, Xin

    2017-02-02

    Several bacteria have been isolated to degrade 4-chloronitrobenzene. Degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene by Cupriavidus sp. D4 produces 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid as a dead-end by-product, a potential pollutant. To date, no bacterium that degrades 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid has been reported. Strain f1, isolated from a soil polluted by 4-chloronitrobenzene, was able to co-metabolize 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid in the presence of ethanol or other appropriate carbon sources. The strain was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on its physiological, biochemical characteristics, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The organism completely degraded 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1) of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid within 48, 60, and 72 h, respectively. During the degradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid, Cl(-) was released. The initial metabolic product of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid was identified as 6-hydroxy-5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by LC-MS and NMR. Using a mixed culture of Achromobacter sp. f1 and Cupriavidus sp. D4 for degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzen, 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid did not accumulate. Results infer that Achromobacter sp. f1 can be used for complete biodegradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene in remedial applications.

  19. Impact of folic acid supplementation on single- and double-stranded RNA degradation in human colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Ljiljana; Bjelakovic, Bojko; Jevtoci-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Langerholc, Tomaz; Jonovic, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Sufficient intake of folic acid is necessary for normal embryogenesis, fetal, and neonatal development. Folic acid facilitates nucleic acid internalization, and protects cellular DNA from nuclease degradation. Human milk contains enzymes, antimicrobial proteins, and antibodies, along with macrophages, that protect against infections and allergies. However, little to no information is available on the effects of folic acid supplementation on degradation of nucleic acids in human milk. In the present study, we aimed to determine the RNase activity (free and inhibitor-bound) in colostrum and mature milk, following folic acid supplementation. The study design included a total of 59 women, 27 of whom received 400 μg of folic acid daily periconceptionally and after. Folic acid supplementation increased the free RNase and polyadenylase activity following lactation. However, the increased RNase activity was not due to de novo enzyme synthesis, as the inhibitor-bound (latent) RNase activity was significantly lower and disappeared after one month. Folic acid reduced RNase activity by using double-stranded RNA as substrate. Data suggests that folic acid supplementation may improve viral RNAs degradation and mRNA degradation, but not dsRNA degradation, preserving in this way the antiviral defense.

  20. Thermal- and photo-induced degradation of perfluorinated carboxylic acids: Kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaoqin; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Zunyao; Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Sharma, Virender K

    2017-09-06

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) of different carbon chain lengths are chemicals of concern to human health and their removal, using conventional remediation technologies, is challenging. The present paper pursuits thermal and photo-induced degradation of PFCAs (F(CF2)nCOOH, n = 1-9) under various concentrations of four different acids (HNO3, H2SO4, HCl, and H3PO4) covering a range of strong acidic to basic pH. For thermal-induced experiments, the temperature was set at 40 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C at acid strengths of 0.04-18.4 M. Photo-induced experiments were conducted at pH 0.5, 7.0, and 13.0 under a light intensity of (150 ± 10) × 100 μW/cm(2). The degradation first-order rate constant (k1, h(-1)) as a function of [H(+)] was modeled by considering equilibrium of nondissociated (F(CF2)nCOOH, HX) and dissociated (F(CF2)nCOO(-), X(-)) species of PFCAs (HX ⇌ X(-) + H(+), pKa = -0.1). Species-specific rate constants, k1(HX), reasonably described the trend of thermal and photo decay of PFCAs, where k1(HX) increased with acidity of solution and the carbon chain length of PFCAs. Mechanism of degradation of PFCAs (e.g. perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)) involved homolytic breakage of CC bond between alkyl and carboxyl groups, which produced radicals and subsequently decarboxylation to perfluoroheptene-1. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations supported the mechanism. The calculations indicated that a breaking of CC bond is more feasible with nondissociated HX than dissociated X(-) species of PFCAs and also with increase in chain length. The potential of a combination of thermal- and photo-induced processes under acidic conditions to enhance degradation of PFOA in water is presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Three cases of intravenous sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate toxicity occurring in the treatment of acute hyperammonaemia.

    PubMed

    Praphanphoj, V; Boyadjiev, S A; Waber, L J; Brusilow, S W; Geraghty, M T

    2000-03-01

    Intravenous sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate have been used successfully in the treatment of acute hyperammonaemia in patients with urea cycle disorders. They provide alternative pathways for waste nitrogen disposal and help maintain nitrogen homeostasis. However, we report three patients with hyperammonaemia who received inappropriate doses of intravenous sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate that resulted in severe complications. Ambiguous medical prescriptions and inadequate cross-checking of drug dosage by physicians, nurses and pharmacists were the main causes of these incidents. All the patients presented with alteration in mental status, Kussmaul respiration and a partially compensated metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap. Two patients developed cerebral oedema and hypotension and died. The third survived after haemodialysis. Plasma levels of benzoate and phenylacetate were excessively high. The possible mechanisms of toxicity, management and safety measures are discussed.

  2. Changes in fatty acid composition of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 during co-metabolic degradation of monochlorophenols.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Agnieszka; Greń, Izabela; Mrozik, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    The changes in the cellular fatty acid composition of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 during co-metabolic degradation of monochlorophenols in the presence of phenol as well as its adaptive mechanisms to these compounds were studied. It was found that bacteria were capable of degrading 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) completely in the presence of phenol, while 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) they degraded partially. The analysis of the fatty acid profiles indicated that adaptive mechanisms of bacteria depended on earlier exposure to phenol, which isomer they degraded, and on incubation time. In bacteria unexposed to phenol the permeability and structure of their membranes could be modified through the increase of hydroxylated and cyclopropane fatty acids, and straight-chain and hydroxylated fatty acids under 2-CP, 3-CP and 4-CP exposure, respectively. In the exposed cells, regardless of the isomer they degraded, the most important changes were connected with the increase of the contribution of branched fatty acid on day 4 and the content of hydroxylated fatty acids on day 7. The changes, particularly in the proportion of branched fatty acids, could be a good indicator for assessing the progress of the degradation of monochlorophenols by S. maltophilia KB2. In comparison, in phenol-degrading cells the increase of cyclopropane and straight-chain fatty acid content was established. These findings indicated the degradative potential of the tested strain towards the co-metabolic degradation of persistent chlorophenols, and extended the current knowledge about the adaptive mechanisms of these bacteria to such chemicals.

  3. In vitro degradation of porous poly(L-lactic acid) foams.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Peter, S J; Lyman, M D; Lai, H L; Leite, S M; Tamada, J A; Vacanti, J P; Langer, R; Mikos, A G

    2000-08-01

    This study investigated the in vitro degradation of porous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) foams during a 46-week period in pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered saline at 37 degrees C. Four types of PLLA foams were fabricated using a solvent-casting, particulate-leaching technique. The three types had initial salt weight fraction of 70, 80, and 90%, and a salt particle size of 106-150 microm, while the fourth type had 90% initial weight fraction of salt in the size range 0-53 microm. The porosities of the resulting foams were 0.67, 0.79, 0.91, and 0.84, respectively. The corresponding median pore diameters were 33, 52, 91, and 34 microm. The macroscopic degradation of PLLA foams was independent of pore morphology with insignificant variation in foam weight, thickness, pore distribution, compressive creep behavior, and morphology during degradation. However, decrease in melting temperature and slight increase in crystallinity were observed at the end of degradation. The foam half-lives based on the weight average molecular weight were 11.6+/-0.7 (70%, 106-150 microm), 15.8+/-1.2 (80%, 106-150 microm), 21.5+/-1.5 (90%, 106-150 microm), and 43.0+/-2.7 (90%, 0-53 microm) weeks. The thicker pore walls of foams prepared with 70 or 80% salt weight fraction as compared to those with 90% salt weight fraction contributed to an autocatalytic effect resulting in faster foam degradation. Also, the increased pore surface/volume ratio of foams prepared with salt in the range 0-53 microm enhanced the release of degradation products thus diminishing the autocatalytic effect and resulting in slower foam degradation compared to those with salt in the range 106-150 microm. Formation and release of crystalline PLLA particulates occurred for foams fabricated with 90% salt weight fraction at early stages of degradation. These results suggest that the degradation rate of porous foams can be engineered by varying the pore wall thickness and pore surface/volume ratio.

  4. Raman spectroscopy and capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of degradation processes in commercial effervescent tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Sabine; Jooß, Kevin; Flottmann, Dirk; Scriba, Gerhard; Neusüß, Christian

    2017-02-05

    In order to ensure the stability of pharmaceutical products appropriate manufacturing and storage conditions are required. In general, the degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and subsequent formation of degradation products affect the pharmaceutical quality. Thus, a fast and effective detection and characterization of these substances is mandatory. Here, the applicability of Raman spectroscopy and CZE for the characterization of the degradation of effervescent tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and ascorbic acid (AA) was evaluated. Therefore, a degradation study was performed analyzing tablets from two different manufacturers at varying conditions (relative humidity (RH) 33%, 52% and 75% at 30°C). Raman spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis could be successfully applied for the fast and easy discrimination of non-degraded and degraded effervescent tablets after a storage period of approximately 24h (RH 52%). Nevertheless, a clear identification or quantification of APIs and degradation products within the analyzed tablets was not possible, i.a. due to missing reference materials. CZE-UV enabled the quantification of the APIs (ASA, AA) and related degradation products (salicylic acid (SA); semi-quantitative also mono- and diacetylated AA) within the complex tablet mixtures. The higher the RH, the faster the degradation of ASA and AA as well as the formation of the degradation products. Mono- and diacetylated AA are major primary degradation products of AA for the applied effervescent tablets. A significant degradation of the APIs was detected earlier by CZE (6-12h, RH 52%) than by Raman spectroscopy. Summarized, Raman spectroscopy is well-suited as quick test to detect degradation of these tablets and CZE can be utilized for further detailed characterization and quantification of specific APIs and related degradation products.

  5. Novel extracellular PHB depolymerase from Streptomyces ascomycinicus: PHB copolymers degradation in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Hidalgo, Javier; Hormigo, Daniel; Arroyo, Miguel; de la Mata, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycin-producer strain Streptomyces ascomycinicus has been proven to be an extracellular poly(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) degrader. The fkbU gene, encoding a PHB depolymerase (PhaZ Sa ), has been cloned in E. coli and Rhodococcus sp. T104 strains for gene expression. Gram-positive host Rhodococcus sp. T104 was able to produce and secrete to the extracellular medium an active protein form. PhaZ Sa was purified by two hydrophobic interaction chromatographic steps, and afterwards was biochemically as well as structurally characterized. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 48.4 kDa, and displayed highest activity at 45°C and pH 6, thus being the first PHB depolymerase from a gram-positive bacterium presenting an acidic pH optimum. The PHB depolymerase activity of PhaZ Sa was increased in the presence of divalent cations due to non-essential activation, and also in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and PEG 3350. Protein structure was analyzed, revealing a globular shape with an alpha-beta hydrolase fold. The amino acids comprising the catalytic triad, Ser(131)-Asp(209)-His(269), were identified by multiple sequence alignment, chemical modification of amino acids and site-directed mutagenesis. These structural results supported the proposal of a three-dimensional model for this depolymerase. PhaZ Sa was able to degrade PHB, but also demonstrated its ability to degrade films made of PHB, PHBV copolymers and a blend of PHB and starch (7∶3 proportion wt/wt). The features shown by PhaZ Sa make it an interesting candidate for industrial applications involving PHB degradation.

  6. Effect of ultrasonic degradation of hyaluronic acid extracted from rooster comb on antioxidant and antiglycation activities.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Jawhar; Chaouch, Mohamed Aymen; Charfeddine, Bassem; Rihouey, Christophe; Limem, Khalifa; Le Cerf, Didier; Rouatbi, Sonia; Majdoub, Hatem

    2017-12-01

    Recently, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA) has been reported to have novel features, such as free radical scavenging activities, antioxidant activities and dietary supplements. In this study, hyaluronic acid (HA) was extracted from rooster comb and LMWHA was obtained by ultrasonic degradation in order to assess their antioxidant and antiglycation activities. Molecular weight (Mw) and the content of glucuronic acid (GlcA) were used as the index for comparison of the effect of ultrasonic treatment. The effects on the structure were determined by ultraviolet (UV) spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The antioxidant activity was determined by three analytical assays (DPPH, NO and TBARS), and the inhibitory effect against glycated-BSA was also assessed. The GlcA content of HA and LMWHA was estimated at about 48.6% and 47.3%, respectively. The results demonstrate that ultrasonic irradiation decreases the Mw (1090-181 kDa) and intrinsic viscosity (1550-473 mL/g), which indicate the cleavage of the glycosidic bonds. The FTIR and UV spectra did not significantly change before and after degradation. The IC50 value of HA and LWMHA was 1.43, 0.76 and 0.36 mg/mL and 1.20, 0.89 and 0.17 mg/mL toward DPPH, NO and TBARS, respectively. Likewise LMWHA exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the AGEs formation than HA. The results demonstrated that the ultrasonic irradiation did not damage and change the chemical structure of HA after degradation; furthermore, decreasing Mw and viscosity of LMWHA after degradation may enhance the antioxidant and antiglycation activity.

  7. Novel Extracellular PHB Depolymerase from Streptomyces ascomycinicus: PHB Copolymers Degradation in Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    García-Hidalgo, Javier; Hormigo, Daniel; Arroyo, Miguel; de la Mata, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycin-producer strain Streptomyces ascomycinicus has been proven to be an extracellular poly(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) degrader. The fkbU gene, encoding a PHB depolymerase (PhaZSa), has been cloned in E. coli and Rhodococcus sp. T104 strains for gene expression. Gram-positive host Rhodococcus sp. T104 was able to produce and secrete to the extracellular medium an active protein form. PhaZSa was purified by two hydrophobic interaction chromatographic steps, and afterwards was biochemically as well as structurally characterized. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 48.4 kDa, and displayed highest activity at 45°C and pH 6, thus being the first PHB depolymerase from a gram-positive bacterium presenting an acidic pH optimum. The PHB depolymerase activity of PhaZSa was increased in the presence of divalent cations due to non-essential activation, and also in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and PEG 3350. Protein structure was analyzed, revealing a globular shape with an alpha-beta hydrolase fold. The amino acids comprising the catalytic triad, Ser131-Asp209-His269, were identified by multiple sequence alignment, chemical modification of amino acids and site-directed mutagenesis. These structural results supported the proposal of a three-dimensional model for this depolymerase. PhaZSa was able to degrade PHB, but also demonstrated its ability to degrade films made of PHB, PHBV copolymers and a blend of PHB and starch (7∶3 proportion wt/wt). The features shown by PhaZSa make it an interesting candidate for industrial applications involving PHB degradation. PMID:23951224

  8. Evaluate the role of organic acids in the protection of ligands from radiolytic degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Anneka Miller; Stehpen Mezyk; Dean Peterman

    2016-08-01

    In the Advanced TALSPEAK process, the bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) extractant used in the traditional TALSPEAK process is replaced by the extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]). In addition, the aqueous phase complexant and buffer used in traditional TALSPEAK is replaced with the combination of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N’,N’-triacetic acid (HEDTA) and citric acid. In order to evaluate the possible impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the Advanced TALSPEAK flowsheet, aqueous and organic phases corresponding to the extraction section of the proposed flowsheet were irradiated in the INL test loop under an ambient atmosphere. The results of these studies conducted at INL, led INL researchers to conclude that the scarcity of values of rate constants for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the components of the Advanced TALSPEAK process chemistry was severely limiting the interpretation of the results of radiolysis studies performed at the INL. In this work, the rate of reaction of hydroxyl radical with citric acid at several pH values was measured using a competitive pulse radiolysis technique. This report describes those results and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-16IN030102028, the goal of which was to evaluate the role of organic acids in the protection of ligands from radiolytic degradation. The results reported here demonstrate the importance of obtaining hydroxyl radical reaction rate data for the conditions that closely resemble actual solution conditions expected to be used in an actual solvent extraction process. This report describes those results and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-16IN030102028, the goal of which was to evaluate the role of organic acids in the protection of ligands from radiolytic degradation.

  9. Degradation of herbicide 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid by advanced electrochemical oxidation methods.

    PubMed

    Boye, Birame; Dieng, Momar M; Brillas, Enric

    2002-07-01

    The herbicide 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA) has been degraded in aqueous medium by advanced electrochemical oxidation processes such as electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton with UV light, using an undivided cell containing a Pt anode. In these environmentally clean methods, the main oxidant is the hydroxyl radical produced from Fenton's reaction between Fe2+ added to the medium and H2O2 electrogenerated from an 02-diffusion cathode. Solutions of a 4-CPA concentration <400 ppm within the pH range of 2.0-6.0 at 35 degrees C can be completely mineralized at low current by photoelectro-Fenton, while electro-Fenton leads to ca. 80% of mineralization. 4-CPA is much more slowly degraded by anodic oxidation in the absence and presence of electrogenerated H2O2. 4-Chlorophenol, 4-chlorocatechol, and hydroquinone are identified as aromatic intermediates by CG-MS and quantified by reverse-phase chromatography. Further oxidation of these chloroderivatives yields stable chloride ions. Generated carboxylic acids such as glycolic, glyoxylic, formic, malic, maleic, fumaric, and oxalic are followed by ion exclusion chromatography. The highest mineralization rate found for photoelectro-Fenton is accounted for by the fast photodecomposition of complexes of Fe3+ with such short-chain acids, mainly oxalic acid, under the action of UV light.

  10. Decomposition of phenylarsonic acid by AOP processes: degradation rate constants and by-products.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, K; Czaplicka, M; Bratek, Ł

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents results of the studies photodegradation, photooxidation, and oxidation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in aquatic solution. The water solutions, which consist of 2.7 g dm(-3) phenylarsonic acid, were subjected to advance oxidation process (AOP) in UV, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, H2O2, and O3 systems under two pH conditions. Kinetic rate constants and half-life of phenylarsonic acid decomposition reaction are presented. The results from the study indicate that at pH 2 and 7, PAA degradation processes takes place in accordance with the pseudo first order kinetic reaction. The highest rate constants (10.45 × 10(-3) and 20.12 × 10(-3)) and degradation efficiencies at pH 2 and 7 were obtained at UV/O3 processes. In solution, after processes, benzene, phenol, acetophenone, o-hydroxybiphenyl, p-hydroxybiphenyl, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and biphenyl were identified.

  11. Isolation of a 2-picolinic acid-assimilating bacterium and its proposed degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunli; Wang, Qiaorui; Ning, Yanli; Fan, Yurui; Feng, Shanshan; He, Chi; Zhang, Tian C; Shen, Zhenxing

    2017-09-06

    Burkholderia sp. ZD1, aerobically utilizes 2-picolinic acid as a source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, was isolated. ZD1 completely degraded 2-picolinic acid when the initial concentrations ranged from 25 to 300mg/L. Specific growth rate (μ) and specific consumption rate (q) increased continually in the concentration range of 25-100mg/L, and then declined. Based on the Haldane model and Andrew's model, μmax and qmax were calculated as 3.9 and 16.5h(-1), respectively. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) was used to determine the main intermediates in the degradation pathway. Moreover, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was innovatively used to deduce the ring cleavage mechanism of N-heterocycle of 2-picolinic acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report on not only the utilization of 2-picolinic acid by a Burkholderia sp., but also applying FT-ICR-MS and ATR-FTIR for exploring the biodegradation pathway of organic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of volatile fatty acid concentration stability on anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Okada, Dagoberto Y; Delforno, Tiago P; Esteves, Andressa S; Polizel, Juliana; Hirasawa, Julia S; Duarte, Iolanda C S; Varesche, Maria B A

    2013-10-15

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is an anionic surfactant used in cleaning products, which is usually found in wastewaters. Despite the greater LAS removal rate related to a lower concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA), the influence of different ranges of VFA on LAS degradation is not known. LAS degradation was evaluated in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors at different ranges of VFA concentrations. The reactors were fed with a synthetic wastewater containing LAS (14 mg/L). A greater LAS removal rate (40-80%) was related to the lower and narrower range of acetic acid concentration (1-22 mg/L) in the EGSB reactor. In the UASB reactor, the acetic acid concentrations presented a wider range (2-45 mg/L), and some low LAS removal rates (around 20-25%) were observed even at low acetic acid concentrations (<10 mg/L). The high recirculation rate in the EGSB reactor improved substrate-biomass contact, which resulted in a narrower range of VFA and greater LAS removal rate.

  13. Degradation of the herbicide 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) dimethylamine salt by gamma radiation from cobalt-60 in aqueous solution containing humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Sandro X.; Vieira, Eny M.; Cordeiro, Paulo J. M.; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson; Murgu, Michael

    2003-12-01

    In this study, gamma radiation from cobalt-60 was used to degrade the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) dimethylamine salt in water in the presence of humic acid. The 2,4-D dimethylamine salt 1.13×10 -4 mol dm -3 solution was irradiated with different doses. HPLC was used as an analytical technique to determine the degradation rate of herbicide studied. The results showed that the herbicide was completely degraded at an absorbed dose of 3 kGy. Degradation decreased when humic acid was added to all the doses. ESI/MS and MS/MS were used to identify the radiolytic degradation products. A fragmentation path for production of 4.6-dichlororesorcinol, is suggested. The radiolytic yields ( G) were calculated.

  14. Spectroscopic monitoring of photocatalytic degradation of the insecticide acetamiprid and its degradation product 6-chloronicotinic acid on TiO₂ catalyst.

    PubMed

    Guzsvány, Valéria; Rajić, Ljiljana; Jović, Branislav; Orčić, Dejan; Csanádi, János; Lazić, Sanja; Abramović, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Two spectroscopic methods, (1)H NMR and FTIR, were developed for the monitoring of the photocatalytic degradation of acetamiprid, a widely used pyridine-based neonicotinoid insecticide, in UV-irradiated aqueous suspensions of O(2)/TiO(2). The (1)H NMR method allowed also the identification of the intermediates such as 6-chloronicotinic and formic acids, as well as separate monitoring of the kinetics of degradation of acyclic and aromatic moieties based on the different chemical shifts of the protons belonging to the methyl group of the acyclic and selected proton of the heterocyclic aromatic moiety. The FTIR procedure enabled the monitoring of the kinetics of degradation of the cyano group of the compound. The obtained results are in good agreement with the comparative HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS measurements, which also enabled the identification of certain intermediates. To get a deeper insight into the complex photocatalytic process, the photocatalytic degradation of 6-chloronicotinic acid, a stable degradation intermediate of acetamiprid, was also investigated by (1)H NMR and HPLC-DAD methods. Based on the obtained data, a tentative reaction mechanism was proposed for the photocatalytic degradation of acetamiprid.

  15. Induction of functional cytochrome P450 and its involvement in degradation of benzoic acid by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ning, Daliang; Wang, Hui; Zhuang, Yuan

    2010-04-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the largest cytochrome P450 contingent known to date in fungi, but the study on the function of these P450s is limited. In this study, induction of functional P450 in P. chrysosporium was first shown and P450-mediate degradation of benzoic acid was demonstrated in this fungus. Carbon monoxide difference spectra indicated significant induction of P450 by benzoic acid, m-chlorobenzoic acid, p-chlorobenzoic acid and n-hexane, and showed the effect of inducer concentration and nutrient condition on the induction of P450. The high contents of P450 in the microsomal fractions facilitated the study on the function of P450. While the n-hexane-induced P450 could not interact with benzoic acid, the microsomal P450 induced by benzoic acid produced type I substrate binding spectra upon the addition of benzoic acid. The benzoic acid degradation by the microsomal P450 was NADPH-dependent at a specific rate of 194 +/- 14 min(-1), and significantly inhibited by piperonyl butoxide (a P450 inhibitor). However, inhibition of benzoic acid degradation by piperonyl butoxide was slight or not detectable in the cultures of this fungus, suggesting presumable involvement of other enzyme in benzoic acid degradation. The extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, lignin peroxidase and manganese-dependent peroxidase, were not involved in initial metabolism of benzoic acid under the test conditions.

  16. Amyloid Plaque-Associated Oxidative Degradation of Uniformly Radiolabeled Arachidonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Furman, Ran; Murray, Ian V J; Schall, Hayley E; Liu, Qiwei; Ghiwot, Yonatan; Axelsen, Paul H

    2016-03-16

    Oxidative stress is a frequently observed feature of Alzheimer's disease, but its pathological significance is not understood. To explore the relationship between oxidative stress and amyloid plaques, uniformly radiolabeled arachidonate was introduced into transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease via intracerebroventricular injection. Uniform labeling with carbon-14 is used here for the first time, and made possible meaningful quantification of arachidonate oxidative degradation products. The injected arachidonate entered a fatty acid pool that was subject to oxidative degradation in both transgenic and wild-type animals. However, the extent of its degradation was markedly greater in the hippocampus of transgenic animals where amyloid plaques were abundant. In human Alzheimer's brain, plaque-associated proteins were post-translationally modified by hydroxynonenal, a well-known oxidative degradation product of arachidonate. These results suggest that several recurring themes in Alzheimer's pathogenesis, amyloid β proteins, transition metal ions, oxidative stress, and apolipoprotein isoforms, may be involved in a common mechanism that has the potential to explain both neuronal loss and fibril formation in this disease.

  17. Effect of surfactants on the degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by ultrasonic (US) treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jo-Chen; Hu, Ching-Yao; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (C7F15COOH, PFOA) is an aqueous anionic surfactant and a persistent organic pollutant. It can be easily adsorbed onto the bubble-water interface and both mineralized and degraded by ultrasonic (US) cavitation at room temperature. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the effect of US on the degradation of PFOA in solution can be enhanced by the addition of surfactant. To achieve this aim, we first investigated the addition of a cationic (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, CTAB), a nonionic (octyl phenol ethoxylate, TritonX-100), and an anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant. We found the addition of CTAB to have increased the degradation rate the most, followed by TritonX-100. SDS inhibited the degradation rate. We then conducted further experiments characterizing the removal efficiency of CTAB at varying surfactant concentrations and solution pHs. The removal efficiency of PFOA increased with CTAB concentration, with the efficiency reaching 79% after 120 min at 25°C with a 0.12 mM CTAB dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polymer Film-Based Screening and Isolation of Polylactic Acid (PLA)-Degrading Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Changman; Moon, Jungheun; Heo, Jinhee; Jung, Sokhee P; Kim, Jung Rae

    2017-02-28

    Polylactic acid (PLA) has been highlighted as an alternative renewable polymer for the replacement of petroleum-based plastic materials, and is considered to be biodegradable. On the other hand, the biodegradation of PLA by terminal degraders, such as microorganisms, requires a lengthy period in the natural environment, and its mechanism is not completely understood. PLA biodegradation studies have been conducted using mainly undefined mixed cultures, but only a few bacterial strains have been isolated and examined. For further characterization of PLA biodegradation, in this study, the PLA-degrading bacteria from digester sludge were isolated and identified using a polymer film-based screening method. The enrichment of sludge on PLA granules was conducted with the serial transference of a subculture into fresh media for 40 days, and the attached biofilm was inoculated on a PLA film on an agar plate. 3D optical microscopy showed that the isolates physically degraded the PLA film due to bacterial degradation. 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified the microbial colonies to be Pseudomonas sp. MYK1 and Bacillus sp. MYK2. The two isolates exhibited significantly higher specific gas production rates from PLA biodegradation compared with that of the initial sludge inoculum.

  19. Evidence for Interspecies Gene Transfer in the Evolution of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degraders

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Catherine; Fulthorpe, Roberta; Wright, Alice; Tiedje, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) from 20 phenotypically distinct strains of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria was partially sequenced, yielding 18 unique strains belonging to members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subgroups of the class Proteobacteria. To understand the origin of 2,4-D degradation in this diverse collection, the first gene in the 2,4-D pathway, tfdA, was sequenced. The sequences fell into three unique classes found in various members of the beta and gamma subgroups of Proteobacteria. None of the α-Proteobacteria yielded tfdA PCR products. A comparison of the dendrogram of the tfdA genes with that of the SSU rDNA genes demonstrated incongruency in phylogenies, and hence 2,4-D degradation must have originated from gene transfer between species. Only those strains with tfdA sequences highly similar to the tfdA sequence of strain JMP134 (tfdA class I) transferred all the 2,4-D genes and conferred the 2,4-D degradation phenotype to a Burkholderia cepacia recipient. PMID:9758850

  20. Acceleration of the herbicide isoproturon degradation in wheat by glycosyltransferases and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Isoproturon (IPU) is a herbicide widely used to prevent weeds in cereal production. Due to its extensive use in agriculture, residues of IPU are often detected in soils and crops. Overload of IPU to crops is associated with human health risks. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop an approach to mitigate its accumulation in crops. In this study, the IPU residues and its degradation products in wheat were characterized using ultra performance liquid chromatography-time of fight tandem-mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer (UPLC-TOF-MS/MS). Most detected IPU-derivatives were sugar-conjugated. Degradation and glycosylation of IPU-derivatives could be enhanced by applying salicylic acid (SA). While more sugar-conjugated IPU-derivatives were identified in wheat with SA application, lower levels of IPU were detected, indicating that SA is able to accelerate intracellular IPU catabolism. All structures of IPU-derivatives and sugar-conjugated products were characterized. Comparative data were provided with specific activities and gene expression of certain glucosyltransferases. A pathway with IPU degradation and glucosylation was discussed. Our work indicates that SA-accelerated degradation is practically useful for wheat crops growing in IPU-contaminated soils because such crops with SA application can potentially lower or minimize IPU accumulation in levels below the threshold for adverse effects.

  1. Oxidative degradation of nalidixic acid by nano-magnetite via Fe2+/O2-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Sandy G; Nélieu, Sylvie; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Delarue, Ghislaine; Brest, Jessica; Pironin, Elsa; Morin, Guillaume

    2015-04-07

    Organic pollution has become a critical issue worldwide due to the increasing input and persistence of organic compounds in the environment. Iron minerals are potentially able to degrade efficiently organic pollutants sorbed to their surfaces via oxidative or reductive transformation processes. Here, we explored the oxidative capacity of nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) having ∼ 12 nm particle size, to promote heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for the removal of nalidixic acid (NAL), a recalcitrant quinolone antibacterial agent. Results show that NAL was adsorbed at the surface of magnetite and was efficiently degraded under oxic conditions. Nearly 60% of this organic contaminant was eliminated after 30 min exposure to air bubbling in solution in the presence of an excess of nano-magnetite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed a partial oxidation of magnetite to maghemite during the reaction, and four byproducts of NAL were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UHPLC-MS/MS). We also provide evidence that hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) were involved in the oxidative degradation of NAL, as indicated by the quenching of the degradation reaction in the presence of ethanol. This study points out the promising potentialities of mixed valence iron oxides for the treatment of soils and wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  2. [Enzymatic formation of a cis,cis-muconic acid derivative using pyrazon-degrading bacteria (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blobel, F; Eberspächer, J; Haug, S; Lingens, F

    1976-01-01

    The cis,cis-muconic acid derivative of pyrazon, which was formerly isolated from the medium of pyrazon-degrading bacteria, was formed enzymatically by incubation of the catechol derivative of pyrazon with partially purified ortho pyrocatechase from pyrazon-degrading bacteria.

  3. Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas wittichii DP58, the First Reported Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid-Degrading Strain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiwei; Shen, Xuemei; Wang, Wei; Peng, Huasong; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Xuehong

    2012-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii DP58 (CCTCC M 2012027), the first reported phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA)-degrading strain, was isolated from pimiento rhizosphere soils. Here we present a 5.6-Mb assembly of its genome. This sequence would contribute to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of PCA degradation to improve the antifungal's effectiveness or remove superfluous PCA. PMID:22689229

  4. Effect of acidic solutions on the surface degradation of a micro-hybrid composite resin.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia A; Machado, Raissa M M; Ramos, Tatiana S; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval A; Zanchi, Cesar H

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins may undergo wear by the action of chemical substances (e.g., saliva, alcohol, bacterial acids) of the oral environment, which may affect the material's structure and surface properties. This study evaluated the effect of acidic substances on the surface properties of a micro-hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z-250). Eighty specimens were prepared, and baseline hardness and surface roughness (KMN0 and Ra0, respectively) were measured. The specimens were subjected to sorption (SO) and solubility (SL) tests according to ISO 4049:2009, but using different storage solutions: deionized water; 75/25 vol% ethanol/water solution; lactic acid; propionic acid; and acetic acid. The acids were used in two concentrations: PA and 0.02 N. pH was measured for all solutions and final hardness (KMN1) and surface roughness (Ra1) were measured. Data were analyzed with paired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=5%). All solutions decreased hardness and increased the Ra values, except for the specimens stored in water and 0.02 N lactic acid, which maintained the hardness. All solutions produced similar SO and SL phenomena, except for the 0.02 N lactic acid, which caused lower solubility than the other solutions. Ethanol showed the highest pH (6.6) and the 0.02 N lactic acid the lowest one (2.5). The solutions affected negatively the surface properties of the composite resin; in addition, an acidic pH did not seem to be a significant factor that intensifies the surface degradation phenomena.

  5. Glycolic acid-catalyzed deamidation of asparagine residues in degrading PLGA matrices: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriyoshi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-03-31

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a strong candidate for being a drug carrier in drug delivery systems because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, in degrading PLGA matrices, the encapsulated peptide and protein drugs can undergo various degradation reactions, including deamidation at asparagine (Asn) residues to give a succinimide species, which may affect their potency and/or safety. Here, we show computationally that glycolic acid (GA) in its undissociated form, which can exist in high concentration in degrading PLGA matrices, can catalyze the succinimide formation from Asn residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. A two-step mechanism was studied by quantum-chemical calculations using Ace-Asn-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHCH3) as a model compound. The first step is cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a tetrahedral intermediate, and the second step is elimination of ammonia from the intermediate. Both steps involve an extensive bond reorganization mediated by a GA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The present findings are expected to be useful in the design of more effective and safe PLGA devices.

  6. Detection of chlorodifluoroacetic acid in precipitation: A possible product of fluorocarbon degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.W.; Franklin, J.; Hanson, M.L.; Solomon, K.R.; Mabury, S.A.; Ellis, D.A.; Scott, B.F.; Muri, D.C.G.

    2000-01-15

    Chlorodiffluoroacetic acid (CDFA) was detected in rain and snow samples from various regions of Canada. Routine quantitative analysis was performed using an in-situ derivatization technique that allowed for the determination of CDFA by GC-MS of the anilide derivative. Validation of environmental CDFA was provided by strong anionic exchange chromatography and detection by {sup 19}F NMR. CDFA concentrations ranges from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations ranged from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations in rain event samples showed a seasonal trend between June and November 1998, peaking in late summer and decreasing in the fall for Guelph and Toronto sites. Preliminary toxicity tests with the aquatic macrophytes Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum suggest that CDFA does not represent a risk of acute toxicity to these aquatic macrophytes at current environmental concentrations. A degradation study suggests that CDFA is recalcitrant to biotic and abiotic degradation relative to dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and may accumulate in the aquatic environment. On the basis of existing experimental data, the authors postulate that CDFA is a degradation product of CFC-113 and, to a lesser extent, HCFC-142b. If CFC-113 is a source, its ozone depletion potential may be lower than previously assumed. Further work is required to identify alternative atmospheric and terrestrial sources of CDFA.

  7. The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

    1992-10-01

    The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound`s binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

  8. The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

    1992-10-01

    The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound's binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

  9. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 in an Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma-Solution System (Gliding Discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NI, Mingjiang; YANG, Huan; CHEN, Tong; ZHANG, Hao; WU, Angjian; DU, Changming; LI, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a plasma-solution system was applied to the degradation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7). The effects of initial concentration and type of feed gases (air, oxygen, nitrogen or argon) were studied. As the initial concentration increased from 100 mg/L to 160 mg/L, the discolouration rate of AO7 decreased from 99.3% to 95.9%, whereas the COD removal rate decreased from 37.9% to 22.6%. Air provided the best discolouration and COD removal rates (99.3% and 37.9%, respectively). In the presence of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) catalyst, the AO7 COD removal rate increased to 76.4%. The degradation products were analysed by a GC-MS, revealing that the degradation of the dye molecule was initiated through the cleavage of the -N=N- bond before finally being converted to organic acids. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 50908237, 51076142) and the Open Foundation of the State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization of China (No. ZJUCEU2009008)

  10. Synthesis and degradation of nucleobases and nucleic acids by formamide in the presence of montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciambecchini, Umberto; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Costanzo, Giovanna; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2004-11-05

    We describe the role of formamide, a product of the hydrolysis of hydrogen cyanide, as precursor of several components of nucleic acids under prebiotic conditions. When formamide is heated in the presence of montmorillonites, the efficient one-pot synthesis of purine, adenine, cytosine, and uracil is obtained. Along with these nucleobases, several components of the inosine pathway are obtained: 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-formamidoimidazole-4-carboxamide and hypoxanthine. This almost complete catalogue of nucleic acid precursors is accompanied by N(9)-formylpurine, which, containing a masked glycosidic bond in its formyl moiety, is a plausible precursor of purine acyclonucleosides. In addition, montmorillonites differentially affect the rate of degradation of nucleobases when embedded in 2'-deoxyoligonucleotides; namely, montmorillonites protect adenine and guanine from the degradative action of formamide, while thymine degradation is enhanced. The oligonucleotide backbone reactivity to formamide is also affected; this shows that the interaction with montmorillonites modifies the rate of abstraction of the Halpha and Hbeta protons on the sugar moieties.

  11. Influence of phytic acid and its metal complexes on the activity of pectin degrading polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Uzma; Rehman, Haneef Ur; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Maqsood, Zahida Tasneem

    2013-06-05

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important requirements of different microorganism to cause pathogenicity and spoilage of fruits and vegetables that involved in degradation of pectin during plant tissue infections. In current study, 20 mM phytic acid inhibited 70% activity of polygalacturonase. The effect of different concentration of metal ions such as Cu(+2), Al(+3) and V(+4) were studied separately and it was found that the 20 mM of these metal ions inhibited 37.2%, 79%, and 53% activity of polygalacturonase, respectively. Finally, the complexes of phytic acid and these metals ions were prepared and 1:1 ratio of phytic acid and metal ions complexes showed maximum inhibitory activity of enzyme as compared to complexes having 1:2 and 1:3 ratio except phytate-copper complexes which showed no inhibitory effect on the activity of polygalacturonase.

  12. Effect of Boric Acid on Volatile Products of Thermooxidative Degradation of Epoxy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Bukhareva, P. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The polymeric materials are characterized by high flammability. The use of flame retardants in order to reduce the flammability of polymers can lead to the formation of toxic gaseous products under fire conditions. In this work we studied the effect of boric acid on the volatile products of thermooxidative degradation of epoxy polymers. The comparative investigations were carried out on the samples of the unfilled epoxy resin and epoxy resin filled with a boric acid at percentage 10 wt. %. The analysis of the volatile decomposition products and thermal stability of the samples under heating in an oxidizing medium was performed using a thermal mass-spectrometric analysis. It is found that the incorporation of boric acid into the polymer matrix increases the thermal stability of epoxy composites and leads to a reduction in the 2-2.7 times of toxic gaseous products

  13. α-Amino acid containing degradable polymers as functional biomaterials: rational design, synthetic pathway, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanli; Meng, Fenghua; Dias, Aylvin A; Hendriks, Marc; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2011-06-13

    Currently, biomedical engineering is rapidly expanding, especially in the areas of drug delivery, gene transfer, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. A prerequisite for further development is the design and synthesis of novel multifunctional biomaterials that are biocompatible and biologically active, are biodegradable with a controlled degradation rate, and have tunable mechanical properties. In the past decades, different types of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers have been actively developed with the aim to obtain biomimicking functional biomaterials. The use of α-amino acids as building units for degradable polymers may offer several advantages: (i) imparting chemical functionality, such as hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, and thiol groups, which not only results in improved hydrophilicity and possible interactions with proteins and genes, but also facilitates further modification with bioactive molecules (e.g., drugs or biological cues); (ii) possibly improving materials biological properties, including cell-materials interactions (e.g., cell adhesion, migration) and degradability; (iii) enhancing thermal and mechanical properties; and (iv) providing metabolizable building units/blocks. In this paper, recent developments in the field of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers are reviewed. First, synthetic approaches to prepare α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers will be discussed. Subsequently, the biomedical applications of these polymers in areas such as drug delivery, gene delivery and tissue engineering will be reviewed. Finally, the future perspectives of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers will be evaluated.

  14. Sodium phenylacetate inhibits the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway to induce reduction of the c-Raf-1 protein in human and canine breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Manabu; Miyajima, Nozomi; Igarashi, Maki; Endo, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Sugano, Sumio

    2009-11-01

    An aromatic fatty acid, phenylacetate (PA), has been shown to have cytostatic, antitumor and cell differentiation-inducing effects on various kinds of tumors. Previously, we have demonstrated cell growth inhibition, malignant phenotype reduction and cell differentiation effects of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) treatment in a canine mammary tumor cell line. To clarify the molecular mechanism of these effects, we examined the expression of Ras/MAPK signaling pathway-related molecules in human and canine breast cancer cell lines, and found that the level of c-Raf-1 protein was reduced by 5, 10 and 20 mM of NaPA treatments, though Ras activation was maintained. Dephosphorylation of c-Raf-1 at Serine (Ser) 259, Ser 338, and Ser 621 were also seen in NaPA-treated cells. Downstream factors in the pathway, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 and ERK1/2, showed decreased activity, and accordingly, expressions of cyclinD1, c-myc, and inactivation of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), which are MAPK targets, were reduced. We also observed the reduction of cell-cycle-promoted molecules, such as cdc1/cdk2, cdk4, PCNA cyclin A, and cyclin B, and the increased expression of p27kip1. Furthermore, expression of an epithelial marker, E-cadherin, was increased by NaPA treatment. These results suggest that one of the molecular targets of NaPA treatment was the reduction of c-Raf-1 protein, and that its reduction results in the decrease of malignant characteristics of tumor cells through blockage of the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway.

  15. Ornithine phenylacetate targets alterations in the expression and activity of glutamine synthase and glutaminase to reduce ammonia levels in bile duct ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Jover-Cobos, M; Noiret, L; Lee, K; Sharma, V; Habtesion, A; Romero-Gomez, M; Davies, N; Jalan, R

    2014-03-01

    In liver failure, ammonia homeostasis is dependent upon the function of the ammonia metabolising enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutaminase (GA) but data about their protein expression and activity are lacking. The aims of this study were to determine the protein expression and activity of GS and GA in individual organs in a rat model of chronic liver disease and to test whether the treatment with the ammonia-lowering agent ornithine phenylacetate (OP) modulates their activities. 49 SD rats were studied 35 days after sham-operation or bile duct ligation (BDL). The BDL group received: L-ornithine (0.6 mg/kg/day), Phenylacetate (0.6 mg/kg/day), OP (0.6 mg/kg/day) or placebo (saline) for 5 days prior to sacrifice. Arterial ammonia, amino acids and liver biochemistry were measured. Expressions of GS and GA were determined by Western-blotting and activities by end-point methods in liver, muscle, gut, kidney, lung, and frontal cortex. In BDL rats, hepatic GS enzyme activity was reduced by more than 80% compared to sham rats. Further, in BDL rats GA activity was reduced in liver but increased in the gut, muscle and frontal cortex compared to sham rats. OP treatment resulted in a reduction in hyperammonemia in BDL rats, associated with increased GS activity in the muscle and reduced gut GA activity. In a rat model of chronic liver failure, hyperammonemia is associated with inadequate compensation by liver and muscle GS activity and increased gut GA activity. OP reduces plasma ammonia by increasing GS in the muscle and reducing GA activity in the gut providing additional insights into its mechanism of its action. GS and GA may serve as important future therapeutic targets for hyperammonemia in liver failure. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Valproic Acid Causes Proteasomal Degradation of DICER and Influences miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Convertini, Paolo; Shen, Manli; Xu, Xiu; Lemoine, Frédéric; de la Grange, Pierre; Andres, Douglas A.; Stamm, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorders. Known properties of VPA are inhibitions of histone deacetylases and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK), which cannot fully explain VPA’s clinical features. We found that VPA induces the proteasomal degradation of DICER, a key protein in the generation of micro RNAs. Unexpectedly, the concentration of several micro RNAs increases after VPA treatment, which is caused by the upregulation of their hosting genes prior to DICER degradation. The data suggest that a loss of DICER protein and changes in micro RNA concentration contributes to the clinical properties of VPA. VPA can be used experimentally to down regulate DICER protein levels, which likely reflects a natural regulation of DICER. PMID:24358235

  17. Anaerobic Degradation of Cyanuric Acid, Cysteine, and Atrazine by a Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jessee, J. A.; Benoit, R. E.; Hendricks, A. C.; Allen, G. C.; Neal, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacterium that rapidly degrades cyanuric acid (CA) was isolated from the sediment of a stream that received industrial wastewater effluent. CA decomposition was measured throughout the growth cycle by using a high-performance liquid chromatography assay, and the concomitant production of ammonia was also measured. The bacterium used CA or cysteine as a major, if not the sole, carbon and energy source under anaerobic, but not aerobic, conditions in a defined medium. The cell yield was greatly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of cysteine and CA in the medium. Cysteine was preferentially used rather than CA early in the growth cycle, but all of the CA was used without an apparent lag after the cysteine was metabolized. Atrazine was also degraded by this bacterium under anaerobic conditions in a defined medium. PMID:16346187

  18. Isolation and characterization of haloacetic acid-degrading Afipia spp. from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Hozalski, Raymond M; Leach, Lynne H; Camper, Anne K; Goslan, Emma H; Parsons, Simon A; Xie, Yuefeng F; LaPara, Timothy M

    2009-08-01

    Haloacetic acids are a class of disinfection byproducts formed during the chlorination and chloramination of drinking water that have been linked to several human health risks. In this study, we isolated numerous strains of haloacetic acid-degrading Afipia spp. from tap water, the wall of a water distribution pipe, and a granular activated carbon filter treating prechlorinated water. These Afipia spp. harbored two phylogenetically distinct groups of alpha-halocarboxylic acid dehalogenase genes that clustered with genes previously detected only by cultivation-independent methods or were novel and did not conclusively cluster with the previously defined phylogenetic subdivisions of these genes. Four of these Afipia spp. simultaneously harbored both the known classes of alpha-halocarboxylic acid dehalogenase genes (dehI and dehII), which is potentially of importance because these bacteria were also capable of biodegrading the greatest number of different haloacetic acids. Our results suggest that Afipia spp. have a beneficial role in suppressing the concentrations of haloacetic acids in tap water, which contrasts the historical (albeit erroneous) association of Afipia sp. (specifically Afipia felis) as the causative agent of cat scratch disease.

  19. Application of microchip-CE electrophoresis to follow the degradation of phenolic acids by aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongsheng; Garcia, Carlos D

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the separation and detection of six phenolic acids using an electrophoretic microchip with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD). The selected phenolic acids are particularly important because of their biological activity. The analysis of these compounds is typically performed by chromatography or standard CE coupled with a wide variety of detection modes. However, these methods are slow, labor intensive, involve a multistep solvent extraction, require skilled personnel, or use bulky and expensive instrumentation. In contrast, microchip CE offers the possibility of performing simpler, less expensive, and faster analysis. In addition, integrated devices can be custom-fabricated and incorporated with portable computers to perform on-site analysis. In the present report, the effect of the separation potential, buffer pH and composition, injection time and PAD parameters were studied in an effort to optimize both the separation and detection of these phenolic acids. Using the optimized conditions, the analysis can be performed in less than 3 min, with detection limits ranging from 0.73 microM (0.10 microg/mL) for 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to 2.12 microM (0.29 microg/mL) for salicylic acid. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the device, the degradation of a mixture of these acids by two aquatic plants was followed using the optimized conditions.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Directly Shunts β-Oxidation Degradation Intermediates into De Novo Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Leeds, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    We identified the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) initiation enzyme in Pseudomonas aeruginosa as FabY, a β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain-containing enzyme that condenses acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) to make the FAS primer β-acetoacetyl-ACP in the accompanying article (Y. Yuan, M. Sachdeva, J. A. Leeds, and T. C. Meredith, J. Bacteriol. 194:5171-5184, 2012). Herein, we show that growth defects stemming from deletion of fabY can be suppressed by supplementation of the growth media with exogenous decanoate fatty acid, suggesting a compensatory mechanism. Fatty acids eight carbons or longer rescue growth by generating acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioester β-oxidation degradation intermediates that are shunted into FAS downstream of FabY. Using a set of perdeuterated fatty acid feeding experiments, we show that the open reading frame PA3286 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 intercepts C8-CoA by condensation with malonyl-ACP to make the FAS intermediate β-keto decanoyl-ACP. This key intermediate can then be extended to supply all of the cellular fatty acid needs, including both unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, along with the 3-hydroxyl fatty acid acyl groups of lipopolysaccharide. Heterologous PA3286 expression in Escherichia coli likewise established the fatty acid shunt, and characterization of recombinant β-keto acyl synthase enzyme activity confirmed in vitro substrate specificity for medium-chain-length acyl CoA thioester acceptors. The potential for the PA3286 shunt in P. aeruginosa to curtail the efficacy of inhibitors targeting FabY, an enzyme required for FAS initiation in the absence of exogenous fatty acids, is discussed. PMID:22753057

  1. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic aerosols (BA), for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8) that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  2. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic (BA) aerosols, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2), malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols, whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8), which showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids controls their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  3. [Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in TiO2 dispersion and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Jie; Yu, Ze-Bin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yu-Xin; He, Li-Li

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is of prime importance since it is recognized as a persistent organic pollutant and is widespread in the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA by TiO2 (P25) was investigated under 254 nm UV light. Experimental conditions including initial pH, TiO2 content and PFOA concentration, were varied to demonstrate their effects on the decomposition of PFOA. It was observed that the photocatalytic degradation kinetics of PFOA could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. The pH played a determinant role in the decomposition of PFOA and the presence of O2 increased the degradation rate. Optimal conditions for a complete removal were obtained using 1.5 g x L(-1) TiO2 at pH 3 in air atmosphere, with a rate constant of 0.420 6 h(-1). The contribution experiments of various reactive species produced during the photocatalysis were also investigated with the addition of different scavengers and it was found that photogenerated holes (h+) was the major reactive species which was responsible for 66.1% of the degradation rate, and the *OH was involved in PFOA degradation as well. In addition, the photocatalytic experiment with the addition of NaF indicated that the adsorption of PFOA was of primary importance for the photocatalytic decomposition. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length as intermediates and products were identified with UPLC-QTOF/MS, and a possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid with beta-Ga2O3 in anoxic aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoxiu; Lv, Mou; Zhou, Li

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a new-found hazardous persistent organic pollutant, and it is resistant to decomposition by hydroxyl radical (HO*) due to its stable chemical structure and the high electronegativity of fluorine. Photocatalytic reduction of PFOA with beta-Ga2O3 in anoxic aqueous solution was investigated for the first time, and the results showed that the photoinduced electron (e(cb-)) coming from the beta-Ga2O3 conduction band was the major degradation substance for PFOA, and shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs, CnF2n+i1COOH, 1 < or = n < or = 6) were the dominant products. Furthermore, the concentration of F- was measured by the IC technique and defluorination efficiency was calculated. After 3 hr, the photocatalytic degradation efficiency was 98.8% and defluorination efficiency was 31.6% in the presence of thiosulfate and bubbling N2. The degradation reaction followed first-order kinetics (k = 0.0239 min(-1), t1/2 = 0.48 hr). PFCAs (CnF2n+1COOH, 1 < or = n < or = 7) were detected and measured by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS methods. It was deduced that the probable photocatalytic degradation mechanism involves e(cb-) attacking the carboxyl of CnF2n+1COOH, resulting in decarboxylation and the generation of CnF2n+1*. The produced CnF2n+1* reacted with H2O, forming CnF2n+1OH, then CnF2n+1OH underwent HF loss and hydrolysis to form CnF2n+1COOH.

  5. Growth suppression by ursodeoxycholic acid involves caveolin-1 enhanced degradation of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Rebecca; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to prevent colon tumorigenesis in animal models and in humans. In vitro work indicates that this bile acid can suppress cell growth and mitogenic signaling suggesting that UDCA may be an anti-proliferative agent. However, the mechanism by which UDCA functions is unclear. Previously we showed that bile acids may alter cellular signaling by acting at the plasma membrane. Here we utilized EGFR as a model membrane receptor and examined the effects that UDCA has on its functioning. We found that UDCA promoted an interaction between EGFR and caveolin-1 and this interaction enhanced UDCA-mediated suppression of MAP kinase activity and cell growth . Importantly, UDCA treatment led to recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase, c-Cbl, to the membrane, ubiquitination of EGFR, and increased receptor degradation. Moreover, suppression of c-Cbl activity abrogated UDCA's growth suppression activities suggesting that receptor ubiquitination plays an important role in UDCA's biological activities. Taken together these results suggest that UDCA may act to suppress cell growth by inhibiting the mitogenic activity of receptor tyrosine kinases such as EGFR through increased receptor degradation. PMID:19446582

  6. Electrochemical monitoring of methylparathion degradation in an acid aqueous medium in presence of Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-Cano, José A; Barceló-Quintal, Manuel H; Reyes-Salas, Eugenio O

    2004-05-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the effect of Cu(II) in degradation of methylparathion (o,o-dimethyl o,4-nitrophenyl phosphoriotioate) in acid medium. Initial electrochemical characterization of Cu(II) and methylparathion was done in an aqueous medium at a pH range of 2-7. Cu(II) was studied in the presence of different anions and it was observed that its electroactivity depends on pH and is independent of the anion used. Methylparathion had two reduction signals at pH < or = 6 and only one at pH > 6. The pesticide's transformation kinetic was then studied in the presence of Cu(II) in acid buffered aqueous medium at pH values of 2, 4, and 7. Paranitrophenol appeared as the only electroactive product at all three pH values. The reaction was first order and had k values of 5.2 x 10(-3) s(-1) at pH 2, 5.5 x 10(-3) s(-1) at pH 4 and 9.0 x 10(-3) s(-1) at pH 7. It is concluded that the principal degradation pathway of methylparathion in acid medium is a Cu(II) catalyzed hydrolysis reaction.

  7. Chlorophenol Hydroxylases Encoded by Plasmid pJP4 Differentially Contribute to Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ledger, T.; Pieper, D. H.; González, B.

    2006-01-01

    Phenoxyalkanoic compounds are used worldwide as herbicides. Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) catabolizes 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA), using tfd functions carried on plasmid pJP4. TfdA cleaves the ether bonds of these herbicides to produce 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (MCP), respectively. These intermediates can be degraded by two chlorophenol hydroxylases encoded by the tfdBI and tfdBII genes to produce the respective chlorocatechols. We studied the specific contribution of each of the TfdB enzymes to the 2,4-D/MCPA degradation pathway. To accomplish this, the tfdBI and tfdBII genes were independently inactivated, and growth on each chlorophenoxyacetate and total chlorophenol hydroxylase activity were measured for the mutant strains. The phenotype of these mutants shows that both TfdB enzymes are used for growth on 2,4-D or MCPA but that TfdBI contributes to a significantly higher extent than TfdBII. Both enzymes showed similar specificity profiles, with 2,4-DCP, MCP, and 4-chlorophenol being the best substrates. An accumulation of chlorophenol was found to inhibit chlorophenoxyacetate degradation, and inactivation of the tfdB genes enhanced the toxic effect of 2,4-DCP on C. necator cells. Furthermore, increased chlorophenol production by overexpression of TfdA also had a negative effect on 2,4-D degradation by C. necator JMP134 and by a different host, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, harboring plasmid pJP4. The results of this work indicate that codification and expression of the two tfdB genes in pJP4 are important to avoid toxic accumulations of chlorophenols during phenoxyacetic acid degradation and that a balance between chlorophenol-producing and chlorophenol-consuming reactions is necessary for growth on these compounds. PMID:16597983

  8. Bacterial populations and environmental factors controlling cellulose degradation in an acidic Sphagnum peat.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Timofey A; Ivanova, Anastasia O; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Liesack, Werner

    2011-07-01

    Northern peatlands represent a major global carbon store harbouring approximately one-third of the global reserves of soil organic carbon. A large proportion of these peatlands consists of acidic Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic bogs, which are characterized by extremely low rates of plant debris decomposition. The degradation of cellulose, the major component of Sphagnum-derived litter, was monitored in long-term incubation experiments with acidic (pH 4.0) peat extracts. This process was almost undetectable at 10°C and occurred at low rates at 20°C, while it was significantly accelerated at both temperature regimes by the addition of available nitrogen. Cellulose breakdown was only partially inhibited in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that bacteria participated in this process. We aimed to identify these bacteria by a combination of molecular and cultivation approaches and to determine the factors that limit their activity in situ. The indigenous bacterial community in peat was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The addition of cellulose induced a clear shift in the community structure towards an increase in the relative abundance of the Bacteroidetes. Increasing temperature and nitrogen availability resulted in a selective development of bacteria phylogenetically related to Cytophaga hutchinsonii (94-95% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), which densely colonized microfibrils of cellulose. Among isolates obtained from this community only some subdivision 1 Acidobacteria were capable of degrading cellulose, albeit at a very slow rate. These Acidobacteria represent indigenous cellulolytic members of the microbial community in acidic peat and are easily out-competed by Cytophaga-like bacteria under conditions of increased nitrogen availability. Members of the phylum Firmicutes, known to be key players in cellulose degradation in neutral habitats, were not detected in the cellulolytic community enriched at low pH.

  9. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  10. Degradation of carbendazim and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by immobilized consortium on loofa sponge.

    PubMed

    Pattanasupong, Anchana; Nagase, Hiroyasu; Sugimoto, Eiko; Hori, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Kazumasa; Tani, Katsuji; Nasu, Masao; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    A fungicide, carbendazim (methyl-2-benzimidazole carbamate; MBC), and a herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), could be simultaneously degraded by a microbial consortium obtained from several soil samples in Japanese paddy fields with enrichment continuous culture. The degradation ability of the consortium was increased by immobilization on loofa (Luffa cylindrica) sponge in comparison with that of free-living consortium. MBC and 2,4-D were completely degraded within 5.5 d and 1.5 d, respectively. The toxicity of these pesticides in culture medium to Daphnia magna was reduced by treatment with the consortium corresponding to their degradation. The degradation ability of the immobilized consortium at pHs in the range from 6 to 9, at temperatures from 15 degrees C to 37 degrees C, and at low NH(4)(+)-N concentrations (1-10 mg/l) was not very different from that under the basal condition (pH 7, 30 degrees C, 424 mg/l NH(4)(+)-N and 472 mg/l PO(4)(3)(-)-P). At low pHs 4 and 5, the ability was significantly lower than that of the basal condition. Moreover, incubation at low PO(4)(3)(-)-P concentrations (1-10 mg/l) caused a decrease in pH at which the degradation ability also became lower. However, the ability in this culture completely recovered when pH was adjusted to 7 or the phosphate concentration was increased to the basal level. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed the whole population of the consortium became faint at low pH or low phosphate concentrations but became distinct again as much as those under the basal conditions, indicating that the decrease in the degradation ability caused by low pH was due to that whole population of the consortium underwent serious damage but could survive and recover. These results suggest the immobilized consortium on loofa sponge is a promising material for bioremediation of polluted water with these pesticides in paddy fields.

  11. Composition, assimilation and degradation of Phaeocystis globosa-derived fatty acids in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Christian E.; Rousseau, Veronique

    2003-12-01

    The fate of a Phaeocystis globosa bloom in the southern North Sea off Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany in May 1995 was investigated during a cruise with RV 'Belgica'. We used fatty acids as biomarkers to follow the fate of Phaeocystis-derived biomass of a Phaeocystis-dominated spring bloom. The bloom, in which up to >99% of the biomass was contributed by Phaeocystis, showed a fatty acid composition with a characteristically high abundance of polyunsaturated C 18-fatty acids, which increased in concentration with number of double bonds up to 18:5 (n-3), and high concentrations of 20:5 (n-3) and 22:6 (n-3). In contrast to most previous studies, fatty acid analysis of the mesozooplankton community (mainly calanoid copepods) and meroplankton ( Carcinus maenas megalope) indicated that P. globosa was a major component (ca. 70% and 50%, respectively) in the diet of these organisms. Massive accumulations of amorphous grey aggregates, in which Phaeocystis colonies were major components, were dominated by saturated fatty acids and contained only few of the polyunsaturated C 18-fatty acids. A hydrophobic surface slick that covered the water surface during the bloom showed very similar patterns. Foam patches contained few Phaeocystis-typical fatty acids, but increased amounts of diatom-typical compounds such as 16:1 (n-7) and 20:5 (n-3), and 38% fatty alcohols, indicating that wax esters dominated the lipid fraction in the foam with ca. 76% (w/w). The fatty acid compositions of surface sediment showed that no sedimentation of fresh Phaeocystis occurred during the study. The results indicate that Phaeocystis-derived organic matter degraded while floating or in suspension, and had not reached the sediment in substantial amounts.

  12. In vitro and in vivo degradation of porous poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Peter, S J; Lyman, M D; Lai, H L; Leite, S M; Tamada, J A; Uyama, S; Vacanti, J P; Langer, R; Mikos, A G

    2000-09-01

    This study investigated the in vitro degradation of porous poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams during a 20-week period in pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37 degrees C and their in vivo degradation following implantation in rat mesentery for up to 8 weeks. Three types of PLGA 85 : 15 and three types of 50 : 50 foams were fabricated using a solvent-casting, particulate-leaching technique. The two types had initial salt weight fraction of 80 and 90%, and a salt particle size of 106-150 microm, while the third type had 90% initial weight fraction of salt in the size range 0-53 microm. The porosities of the resulting foams were 0.82, 0.89, and 0.85 for PLGA 85 : 15, and 0.73, 0.87, and 0.84 for PLGA 50 : 50 foams, respectively. The corresponding median pore diameters were 30, 50, and 17 microm for PLGA 85: 15, and 19, 17, and 17 microm for PLGA 50 : 50. The in vitro and in vivo degradation kinetics of PLGA 85: 15 foams were independent of pore morphology with insignificant variation in foam weight, thickness, pore distribution, compressive creep behavior, and morphology during degradation. The in vitro foam half-lives based on the weight average molecular weight were 11.1 +/- 1.8 (80%, 106-150 microm), 12.0 +/- 2.0 (90%, 106-150 microm), and 11.6 +/- 1.3 (90%, 0-53 microm) weeks, similar to the corresponding values of 9.4 +/- 2.2, 14.3 +/- 1.5, and 13.7 +/- 3.3 weeks for in vivo degradation. In contrast, all PLGA 50 : 50 foams exhibited significant change in foam weight, water absorption, and pore distribution after 6-8 weeks of incubation with PBS. The in vitro foam half-lives were 3.3 +/- 0.3 (80%, 106-150 microm), 3.0 +/- 0.3 (90%, 106-150 microm), and 3.2 +/- 0.1 (90%, 0-53 microm) weeks, and the corresponding in vivo half-lives were 1.9 micro 0.1, 2.2 +/- 0.2, and 2.4 +/- 0.2 weeks. The significantly shorter half-lives of PLGA 50: 50 compared to 85: 15 foams indicated their faster degradation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, PLGA 50: 50

  13. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products.

  14. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  15. The adsorption and photo-degradation of oxalic acid at the TiO2 surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendive, Cecilia; Blesa, Miguel; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    Oxalic acid is the simplest model compound to study the heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of pollutants on TiO2 containing more than one carboxylate group. We have carried out a study of a system of an oxalic acid solution in contact with a thin film of TiO2 particles employing ATR - FTIR in combination with quantum chemical calculations. Thus, possible adsorption structures have been identified and molecular dynamic simulations have been used to compare their predictions with the experimental data. It was found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on TiO2 in the dark can be explained in terms of two surface complexation modes for the anatase phase and only one surface complexation mode for the rutile phase. We have found that under illumination one of the complexes on the anatase phase preferably undergoes photo-degradation. At the same time water molecules are desorbed from the TiO2 surface by a thermal mechanism induced by the absorption of photons. Both processes favor the adsorption of more molecules of oxalic acid at the TiO2 surface which is thus enriched in the second complexation mode. A similar mechanism was found to occur on the rutile phase. The only complexation mode appears not to be photo-sensitive but the TiO2 surface is enriched in oxalic acid under illumination due to the replacement of photo-desorbed water molecules.

  16. Isolation of Soil Bacteria Adapted To Degrade Humic Acid-Sorbed Phenanthrene

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, D. J.; Bleam, W. F.; Hickey, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to determine how sorption by humic acids affected the bioavailability of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to PAH-degrading microbes. Micellar solutions of humic acid were used as sorbents, and phenanthrene was used as a model PAH. Enrichments from PAH-contaminated soils established with nonsorbed phenanthrene yielded a total of 25 different isolates representing a diversity of bacterial phylotypes. In contrast, only three strains of Burkholderia spp. and one strain each of Delftia sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were isolated from enrichments with humic acid-sorbed phenanthrene (HASP). Using [14C]phenanthrene as a radiotracer, we verified that only HASP isolates were capable of mineralizing HASP, a phenotype hence termed “competence.” Competence was an all-or-nothing phenotype: noncompetent strains showed no detectable phenanthrene mineralization in HASP cultures, but levels of phenanthrene mineralization effected by competent strains in HASP and NSP cultures were not significantly different. Levels and rates of phenanthrene mineralization exceeded those predicted to be supported solely by the metabolism of phenanthrene in the aqueous phase of HASP cultures. Thus, competent strains were able to directly access phenanthrene sorbed by the humic acids and did not rely on desorption for substrate uptake. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of (i) a selective interaction between aerobic bacteria and humic acid molecules and (ii) differential bioavailability to bacteria of PAHs sorbed to a natural biogeopolymer. PMID:16000791

  17. Microbiological degradation of organic components in oil shale retort water: organic acids.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J E; Riley, R G; Li, S W; Mann, D C; Wildung, R E

    1981-11-01

    The losses of benzoic acid and a homologous series of both mono- and dibasic aliphatic acids in oil shale retort water were monitored with time (21 days) in liquid culture (4% retort water, vol/vol) inoculated with soil. The organic acids constituted approximately 12% of the dissolved organic carbon in retort water, which served as the sole source of carbon and energy in these studies. The levels of the acids in solution were reduced by 80 to 90% within 9 days of incubation. From mass balance calculations, the decrease in dissolved organic carbon with time of incubation was equal to the formation of CO(2) and bacterial cell carbon. The decrease in the level of the acid components, either from degradation to CO(2) or incorporation into bacteria, would account for approximately 70% of the loss in dissolved organic carbon within the first 9 days of incubation and would account for approximately 50% of the loss over the entire 21-day incubation period.

  18. Role of degradation products of chlorogenic acid in the antioxidant activity of roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Masumi; Moon, Joon-Kwan; Jang, Hae Won; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2015-02-25

    Antioxidant activities of brewed coffees prepared from six commercial brands ranged from 63.13 ± 1.01 to 96.80 ± 1.68% at the highest levels tested. Generally, the degree of antioxidant activity of the brewed coffee was inversely proportional to the total chlorogenic acid concentration. A sample obtained from the major chlorogenic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), heated at 250 °C exhibited potent antioxidant activity (79.12 ± 2.49%) at the level of 10 μg/mL, whereas unheated 5-CQA showed only moderate antioxidant activity (44.41 ± 0.27%) at the level of 100 μg/mL. Heat produced relatively high levels of pyrocatechol (2,809.3 μg/g) and 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (46.4 μg/g) from 5-CQA, and their antioxidant activity levels were 76.57 ± 3.00 and 98.63 ± 0.01%, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that roasting degrades chlorogenic acids to form potent antioxidants and thus plays an important role in the preparation of high-antioxidant low-acid coffee.

  19. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  20. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters.

  1. Electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous media: influence of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Díez-García, M I; Sàez, V; Bonete, P; González-García, José

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in water has been analysed through voltammetric studies with a rotating disc electrode and controlled-potential bulk electrolyses. The influence of the mass-transport conditions and initial concentration of TCAA for titanium, stainless steel and carbon electrodes has been studied. It is shown that the electrochemical reduction of TCAA takes place prior to the massive hydrogen evolution in the potential window for all electrode materials studied. The current efficiency is high (> 18%) compared with those normally reported in the literature, and the fractional conversion is above 50% for all the electrodes studied. Only dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloride anions were routinely detected as reduction products for any of the electrodes, and reasonable values of mass balance error were obtained. Of the three materials studied, the titanium cathode gave the best results.

  2. Kinetic modeling of the photocatalytic degradation of clofibric acid in a slurry reactor.

    PubMed

    Manassero, Agustina; Satuf, María Lucila; Alfano, Orlando Mario

    2015-01-01

    A kinetic study of the photocatalytic degradation of the pharmaceutical clofibric acid is presented. Experiments were carried out under UV radiation employing titanium dioxide in water suspension. The main reaction intermediates were identified and quantified. Intrinsic expressions to represent the kinetics of clofibric acid and the main intermediates were derived. The modeling of the radiation field in the reactor was carried out by Monte Carlo simulation. Experimental runs were performed by varying the catalyst concentration and the incident radiation. Kinetic parameters were estimated from the experiments by applying a non-linear regression procedure. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental data, with an error of 5.9 % in the estimations of the primary pollutant concentration.

  3. Microwave activated electrochemical degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid at boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junxia; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Wei; Li, Dongming

    2009-04-01

    A method for improving the oxidation ability of the electrode is proposed by using microwave activation in electrochemical oxidation. The electrochemical degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with microwave radiation (MW-EC) was carried out in a continuous flow system under atmospheric pressure. In 3 h the removal of COD, ACE (average current efficiency) and Cl(-) concentration was 1.63, 2.25 and 1.67 times as that without microwave radiation, respectively. The high degradation ability was resulted from the more active centers at the electrode surface due to the microwave radiation. The decay kinetics of 2,4-D followed a pseudo first-order reaction. The rate constant was increased to 2.16x10(-4) s(-1) with the microwave radiation, while it was 8.52x10(-5) s(-1) with electrochemical treatment only (EC). Under both conditions, the main intermediates were identified and quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The formation rate of intermediate products and further degradation rate were increased by about 50-120% with the microwave radiation. The activation of electrochemical oxidation by microwave was discussed from the diffusion process, adsorption and the temperature at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode.

  4. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid using Au doped TiO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Mohite, V S; Mahadik, M A; Kumbhar, S S; Hunge, Y M; Kim, J H; Moholkar, A V; Rajpure, K Y; Bhosale, C H

    2015-01-01

    Highly transparent pure and Au doped TiO2 thin films are successfully deposited by using simple chemical spray pyrolysis technique. The effect of Au doping onto the structural and physicochemical properties has been investigated. The PEC study shows that, both short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are (Isc=1.81mA and Voc=890mV) relatively higher at 3at.% Au doping percentage. XRD study shows that the films are nanocrystalline in nature with tetragonal crystal structure. FESEM images show that the film surface covered with a smooth, uniform, compact and rice shaped nanoparticles. The Au doped thin films exhibit indirect band gap, decreases from 3.23 to 3.09eV with increase in Au doping. The chemical composition and valence states of pure and Au doped TiO2 films are studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic degradation effect is 49% higher in case 3at.% Au doped TiO2 than the pure TiO2 thin film photoelectrodes in the degradation of benzoic acid. It is revealed that Au doped TiO2 can be reused for five cycles of experiments without a requirement of post-treatment while the degradation efficiency was retained.

  5. Effect of dietary starch level and its rumen degradability on lamb meat fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria A; Alves, Susana P; Santos-Silva, José; Bessa, Rui J B

    2017-01-01

    Forty lambs were fed one of four diets supplemented with a linseed and sunflower oil blend but differing in starch level (mid, ≈35 vs. high, ≈50%) and starch rumen degradability (mid, ≈70 vs. high, ≈80%). The effects of diet on growth, carcass traits and meat fatty acid (FA) composition, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates were evaluated. Lambs stayed on trial for 5weeks until slaughter. Treatment had no effect on animal performance and carcass traits. High-degradability diets decreased (P=0.04) meat shear force compared with mid-degradability diets. Lipid content of meat was unaffected by the diet. Mid-starch diets increased (P<0.05) the saturated FA and cis-MUFA but decreased (P<0.05) the trans-MUFA, particularly the t10-18:1, when compared with high-starch diets. The t11-18:1 (0.7% of total FA) and c9,t11-18:2 (<0.3%) remained low and the 18:3n-3 remained high (1.74%) and unaffected by diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation, cell compatibility and degradability of collagen-modified poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Cui, Miaomiao; Liu, Leili; Guo, Ning; Su, Ruixia; Ma, Feng

    2015-01-05

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was modified using collagen through a grafting method to improve its biocompatibility and degradability. The carboxylic group at the open end of PLA was transferred into the reactive acylchlorided group by a reaction with phosphorus pentachloride. Then, collagen-modified PLA (collagen-PLA) was prepared by the reaction between the reactive acylchlorided group and amino/hydroxyl groups on collagen. Subsequently, the structure of collagen-PLA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and DSC analyses. Finally, some properties of collagen-PLA, such as hydrophilicity, cell compatibility and degradability were characterized. Results showed that collagen had been grafted onto the PLA with 5% graft ratio. Water contact angle and water absorption behavior tests indicated that the hydrophilicity of collagen-PLA was significantly higher than that of PLA. The cell compatibility of collagen-PLA with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (3T3) was also significantly better than PLA in terms of cell morphology and cell proliferation, and the degradability of PLA was also improved after introducing collagen. Results suggested that collagen-PLA was a promising candidate for biomedical applications.

  7. Effect of hydrion evolution by polylactic-co-glycolic acid coating on degradation rate of pure iron.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingyao; Lu, Xi; Tan, Lili; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    For biodegradable iron coronary stents, the major problem is the low degradation rate in body environment. In this study, a new strategy was proposed to increase the degradation rate of iron in vitro. The hydrion evolution was intended to be introduced into the degradation system to increase the degradation rate. To realize this strategy, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) was coated onto the surface of pure iron. The degradation process and mechanism of pure iron coated with PLGA were investigated. The results showed that iron coated with PLGA exhibited higher degradation rate in the static immersion test all along. With the degradation of PLGA, the oligomers of PLGA could release abundant H(+) which could dissolve the ferrous oxide to make the electrolyte and oxygen to reach the surface of iron again and simultaneity trigger the hydrion evolution at the middle stage of the degradation. The study also revealed that the solution ions failed to permeate the PLGA coating and the deposition of calcium and phosphorus in the degradation layer was inhibited which further enhanced the degradation.

  8. The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids derived from the degradation of petroleum contaminants in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Baedecker, Mary Jo; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Goerlitz, Donald F.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids in groundwater downgradient from a crude-oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was studied over a five year period (1986-1990). The organic acids are metabolic intermediates of the degradation of components of the crude oil and are structurally related to hydrocarbon precursors. The concentrations of organic acids, particularly aliphatic acids, increase as the microbial alteration of hydrocarbons progresses. The organic-acid pool changes in composition and concentration over time and in space as the degradation processes shift from Fe(III) reduction to methanogenesis. Over time, the aquifer system evolves into one in which the groundwater contains more oxidized products of hydrocarbon degradation and the reduced forms of iron, manganese, and nitrogen. Laboratory microcosm experiments with aquifer material support the hypothesis that organic acids observed in the groundwater originate from the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions. The geochemistry of two other shallow aquifers in coastal plain sediments, one contaminated with creosote waste and the other with gasoline, were compared to the Bemidji site. The geochemical evolution of the low-molecular-weight organic acid pool in these systems is controlled, in part, by the presence of electron acceptors available for microbially mediated electron-transfer reactions. The depletion of electron acceptors in aquifers leads to the accumulation of aliphatic organic acids in anoxic groundwater.

  9. The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids derived from the degradation of petroleum contaminants in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Baedecker, M.J.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids in groundwater downgradient from a crude-oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was studied over a five year period (1986-1990). The organic acids are metabolic intermediates of the degradation of components of the crude oil and are structurally related to hydrocarbon precursors. The concentrations of organic acids, particularly aliphatic acids, increase as the microbial alteration of hydrocarbons progresses. The organic-acid pool changes in composition and concentration over time and in space as the degradation processes shift from Fe(III) reduction to methanogenesis. Over time, the aquifer system evolves into one in which the groundwater contains more oxidized products of hydrocarbon degradation and the reduced forms of iron, manganese, and nitrogen. Laboratory microcosm experiments with aquifer material support the hypothesis that organic acids observed in the groundwater originate from the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions. The geochemistry of two other shallow aquifers in coastal plain sediments, one contaminated with creosote waste and the other with gasoline, were compared to the Bemidji site. The geochemical evolution of the low-molecular-weight organic acid pool in these systems is controlled, in part, by the presence of electron acceptors available for microbially mediated electron-transfer reactions. The depletion of electron acceptors in aquifers leads to the accumulation of aliphatic organic acids in anoxic groundwater. ?? 1994.

  10. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  11. Characterization of sericin powder prepared from citric acid-degraded sericin polypeptides of the silkworm, Bombyx Mori.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Akira; Kurioka, Fujie; Yamazaki, Masayoshi

    2004-04-01

    Acid-degraded sericin powder (AC-SP) was prepared from aqueous solution containing citric acid-degraded sericin polypeptides of Bombyx mori. The morphological and biochemical properties of AC-SP were compared with those of alkali-degraded sericin powder (AL-SP) and hot-water degraded sericin powder (HW-SP). Based on an SEM analysis, AC-SP showed a thin film structure of 10-100 microm with good dispersity while AL-SP and HW-SP had a much larger thin film structure (<500 microm). The extract of AC-SP showed stronger trypsin inhibitor activity due to cocoon shell trypsin inhibitor (CSTI-IV) than that of HW-SP. The extract of AL-SP showed no CSTI-IV activity. It was found that AC-SP was a trypsin inhibitor complex powder and that the release of CSTI-IV from AC-SP depended on pH and ion strength. Similar powder materials were obtained when such organic acids as tartaric acid and succinic acid were used. These results suggest that the acid-degraded sericin polypeptides work as a protein matrix to which CSTI-IV may bind ionically.

  12. Analysis of hydroxycinnamic acid degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum reveals a coenzyme A-dependent, beta-oxidative deacetylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Nesme, Xavier; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl-CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)-CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials.

  13. Pristine environments harbor a new group of oligotrophic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kamagata, Y; Fulthorpe, R R; Tamura, K; Takami, H; Forney, L J; Tiedje, J M

    1997-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria were isolated from pristine environments which had no history of 2,4-D exposure. By using 2,4-D dye indicator medium or 14C-labeled 2,4-D medium, six strains were isolated from eight enrichment cultures capable of degrading 2,4-D. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing and physiological properties revealed that one isolate from Hawaiian volcanic soil could be classified in the genus Variovorax (a member of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria) and that the other five isolates from Hawaiian volcanic soils, Saskatchewan forest soil, and Chilean forest soil have 16S rDNAs with high degrees of similarity to those of the Bradyrhizobium group (a member of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria). All the isolates grow slowly on either nutrient media (0.1 x Bacto Peptone-tryptone-yeast extract-glucose [PTYG] or 0.1 x Luria broth [LB] medium) or 2,4-D medium, with mean generation times of 16 to 30 h, which are significantly slower than previously known 2,4-D degraders. Nutrient-rich media such as full-strength PTYG and LB medium did not allow their growth. PCR amplification using internal consensus sequences of tfdA (a gene encoding an enzyme for the first step of 2,4-D mineralization, found in pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and some other 2,4-D-degrading bacteria) as primers and Southern hybridization with pJP4-tfdA as a probe revealed that the isolate belonging to the genus Variovorax carried the tfdA gene. This gene was transmissible to A. eutrophus JMP228 carrying a plasmid with a mutant tfdA gene. The other five isolates did not appear to carry tfdA, and 2,4-D-specific alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase activity could not be detected in cell lysates. These results indicate that 2,4-D-degrading bacteria in pristine environments are slow-growing bacteria and that most of their phylogenies and catabolic genes differ from those of 2,4-D degraders

  14. Electrochemical degradation applied to the metabolites of Acid Orange 7 anaerobic biotreatment.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, C; Fernandes, A; Lopes, A; Pinheiro, H; Gonçalves, I

    2007-04-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of the biotic degradation products of the textile dye C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) was achieved using a boron doped diamond electrode (BDD). Tests were performed with model solutions of the biotic degradation products, sulphanilic acid (SA) and 1-amino-2-naphthol (AN), and also with real effluents obtained in experiments carried out in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, fed with a simulated textile effluent containing AO7, working in mesophilic or thermophilic conditions. Bulk electrolysis was studied using two different supporting electrolytes - NaCl and Na(2)SO(4). The influence of initial metabolite concentration and current density on the electrodegradation rates of the biotic products was investigated. For the UASB effluents, oxidation tests were carried out for different electrolytes and at different current densities. Samples were collected at pre-selected intervals and absorbance measurements, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) tests and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were performed. Results have shown an almost complete elimination of the persistent pollutants and a COD removal higher than 70% for both AN and SA. For the UASB effluents, COD removals between 45% and 90% and TOC removals varying from 19% to 41% were obtained.

  15. Enhanced propionic acid degradation (EPAD) system: proof of principle and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingxing; Carballa, Marta; Van De Caveye, Pieter; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-07-01

    Full-scale anaerobic single-phase digesters can be confronted with process instabilities, which often result in the accumulation of propionic acid (HPr). As a solution, an enhanced propionic acid degradation (EPAD) system has been conceptually designed and experimentally tested at lab-scale. The system consisted of two components: a liquid/solid separator containing a microfiltration membrane and an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor specialized in HPr degradation. Two lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were used, i.e. the CSTR(control) and the CSTR(treatment). Firstly, the CSTRs were stressed by organic overloading to obtain high HPr levels. During the recovery period, besides stop feeding, no actions were taken to decrease the residual HPr concentration in the CSTR(control), while the CSTR(treatment) was connected to EPAD system in order to accelerate its recovery. By the end of the experiment, the CSTR(treatment) completely recovered from HPr accumulation, while no significant decrease of the HPr level in the CSTR(control) was observed. Based on the experimental results, the up-scaling of EPAD system was evaluated and it would only account for about 2% of the volume of the full-scale digester, thus suggesting that the implementation of a mobile EPAD system in full-scale practice should be feasible.

  16. Solar photocatalytic degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Wong, Timothy; Linley, Stuart; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Gu, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Bitumen mining in the Canadian oil sands creates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), the toxicity of which is due in part to naphthenic acids (NAs) and other acid extractable organics (AEO). The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of solar photocatalysis over TiO2 to remove AEO from OSPW. One day of photocatalytic treatment under natural sunlight (25 MJ/m(2) over ∼14 h daylight) eradicated AEO from raw OSPW, and acute toxicity of the OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was eliminated. Nearly complete mineralization of organic carbon was achieved within 1-7 day equivalents of sunlight exposure, and degradation was shown to proceed through a superoxide-mediated oxidation pathway. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis of oxidized intermediate compounds indicated preferential degradation of the heavier and more cyclic NAs (higher number of double bond equivalents), which are the most environmentally persistent fractions. The photocatalyst was shown to be recyclable for multiple uses, and thus solar photocatalysis may be a promising "green" advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abscisic acid promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of the transcription coactivator NPR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yezhang; Dommel, Matthew; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-04-01

    Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcription coactivator NPR1 is pivotal for efficient activation of the broad-spectrum plant immune responses known as localized acquired resistance (LAR) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in adjacent and systemic tissues, respectively, and requires the CUL3-based E3 ligase and its adaptor proteins, NPR3 and NPR4, which are receptors for the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA). It has been shown that SA prevents NPR1 turnover under non-inducing and LAR/SAR-inducing conditions, but how cellular NPR1 homeostasis is maintained remains unclear. Here, we show that the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and SA antagonistically influence cellular NPR1 protein levels. ABA promotes NPR1 degradation via the CUL3(NPR) (3/) (NPR) (4) complex-mediated proteasome pathway, whereas SA may protect NPR1 from ABA-promoted degradation through phosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the timing and strength of SA and ABA signaling are critical in modulating NPR1 accumulation and target gene expression. Perturbing ABA or SA signaling in adjacent tissues alters the temporal dynamic pattern of NPR1 accumulation and target gene transcription. Finally, we show that sequential SA and ABA treatment leads to dynamic changes in NPR1 protein levels and target gene expression. Our results revealed a tight correlation between sequential SA and ABA signaling and dynamic changes in NPR1 protein levels and NPR1-dependent transcription in plant immune responses. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Homogeneous and heterogeneous degradation of caffeic acid using photocatalysis driven by UVA and solar light.

    PubMed

    Yáñez, Eliana; Santander, Paola; Contreras, David; Yáñez, Jorge; Cornejo, Lorena; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2016-01-01

    Waste water from the wine industry is characterized by a high concentration of dissolved organic matter and the presence of natural phenolic compounds with low biodegradability. High concentrations of phenolic compounds may cause environmental pollution and risks to human health. In this article caffeic acid (CA) was used as a model compound of wine effluent because it is refractory to the conventional wastewater treatments. The oxidation of caffeic acid in water solution (0.01 g L(-1)) by heterogeneous photocatalysis and photo-Fenton reaction was studied using UVA. The optimal conditions for each treatment were performed by multivariate experimental design. The optimal conditions for heterogeneous photocatalysis were pH 5.3 and 0.9 g L(-1) TiO2. In the case of photo-Fenton treatment, optimized variable were 82.4 μmol L(-1) of Fe(2+) and 558.6 μmol L(-1) of H2O2. The degradation profiles of CA were monitored by UV-Vis, HPLC, TOC and COD. To reach 90% of CA removal, 40 and 2 min of reaction, respectively, were required by heterogeneous and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. For comparison purposes, the reactions were also performed under solar light. The use of solar light does not change the efficiency of the photo-Fenton reaction, yet the performance of the heterogeneous process was significantly improved, reaching 90% of degradation in 15 min.

  19. Removal of nalidixic acid and its degradation products by an integrated MBR-ozonation system.

    PubMed

    Pollice, A; Laera, G; Cassano, D; Diomede, S; Pinto, A; Lopez, A; Mascolo, G

    2012-02-15

    Chemical-biological degradation of a widely spread antibacterial (nalidixic acid) was successfully obtained by an integrated membrane bioreactor (MBR)-ozonation process. The composition of the treated solution simulated the wastewater from the production of the target pharmaceutical, featuring high salinity and a relevant concentration of sodium acetate. Aim of treatment integration was to exploit the synergistic effects of chemical oxidation and bioprocesses, by adopting the latter to remove most of the COD and the ozonation biodegradable products. Integration was achieved by placing ozonation in the recirculation stream of the bioreactor effluent. The recirculation flow rate was three-fold the MBR feed, and the performance of the integrated system was compared to the standard polishing configuration (single ozonation step after the MBR). Results showed that the introduction of the ozonation step did not cause relevant drawbacks to both biological and filtration processes. nalidixic acid passed undegraded through the MBR and was completely removed in the ozonation step. Complete degradation of most of the detected ozonation products was better achieved with the integrated MBR-ozonation process than using the sequential treatment configuration, i.e. ozone polishing after MBR, given the same ozone dosage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. LC/MS/MS identification of some folic acid degradation products after E-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marchioni, E.; Zhao, M.; Kuntz, F.; Di Pascoli, T.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Bergaentzle, M.

    2012-08-01

    Folates belong to the B vitamin group based on the parental compound folic acid (FA). They are involved in important biochemical processes like DNA synthesis and repair. FA is composed of a pteridine ring, p-aminobenzoic acid and glutamate moieties. The human metabolism is not able to synthesize folates and therefore obtain them from diet. FA, a synthetic vitamin, is used as a food fortificant because of its low price, relative stability and increased bioavailability compared to natural folate forms. FA is known to be a sensitive compound easily degradable in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible light towards various by-products. Irradiation is a process for preservation of foods that uses accelerated electrons, gamma rays or X-rays. Irradiation is proposed for the treatment of various food products, eliminating or reducing pathogens and insects, increasing the storage time and replacing chemical fumigants. This study concerns the identification of degradation products of FA after E-beam irradiation. FA aqueous solutions were irradiated with a Van de Graaff electrons beam accelerator (2 MeV, 100 μA current, 20 cm scan width, dose rate about 2 kGy/s). Applied doses were between 0 (control) and 10.0 kGy. Absorbed doses were monitored with FWT 60.00 radiochromic dosimeters.

  1. A C-Terminal Acidic Domain Regulates Degradation of the Transcriptional Coactivator Bob1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Christina S. F.; Möller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Bob1 (Obf-1 or OCA-B) is a 34-kDa transcriptional coactivator encoded by the Pou2af1 gene that is essential for normal B-cell development and immune responses in mice. During lymphocyte activation, Bob1 protein levels dramatically increase independently of mRNA levels, suggesting that the stability of Bob1 is regulated. We used a fluorescent protein-based reporter system to analyze protein stability in response to genetic and physiological perturbations and show that, while Bob1 degradation is proteasome mediated, it does not require ubiquitination of Bob1. Furthermore, degradation of Bob1 in B cells appears to be largely independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah. We propose a novel mechanism of Bob1 turnover in B cells, whereby an acidic region in the C terminus of Bob1 regulates the activity of degron signals elsewhere in the protein. Changes that make the C terminus more acidic, including tyrosine phosphorylation-mimetic mutations, stabilize the instable murine Bob1 protein, indicating that B cells may regulate Bob1 stability and activity via signaling pathways. Finally, we show that expressing a stable Bob1 mutant in B cells suppresses cell proliferation and induces changes in surface marker expression commonly seen during B-cell differentiation. PMID:24061476

  2. Multilayer Capsules of Bovine Serum Albumin and Tannic Acid for Controlled Release by Enzymatic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Lomova, Maria V; Brichkina, Anna I; Kiryukhin, Maxim V; Vasina, Elena N; Pavlov, Anton M; Gorin, Dmitry A; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Antipina, Maria N

    2015-06-10

    With the purpose to replace expensive and significantly cytotoxic positively charged polypeptides in biodegradable capsules formed via Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly, multilayers of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tannic acid (TA) are obtained and employed for encapsulation and release of model drugs with different solubility in water: hydrophilic-tetramethylrhodamine-isothiocyanate-labeled BSA (TRITC-BSA) and hydrophobic 3,4,9,10-tetra-(hectoxy-carbonyl)-perylene (THCP). Hydrogen bonding is proposed to be predominant within thus formed BSA/TA films. The TRITC-BSA-loaded capsules comprising 6 bilayers of the protein and polyphenol are benchmarked against the shells composed of dextran sulfate (DS) and poly-l-arginine (PARG) on degradability by two proteolytic enzymes with different cleavage site specificity (i.e., α-chymotrypsin and trypsin) and toxicity for murine RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Capsules of both types possess low cytotoxicity taken at concentrations equal or below 50 capsules per cell, and evident susceptibility to α-chymotrypsin resulted in release of TRITC-BSA. While the BSA/TA-based capsules clearly display resistance to treatment with trypsin, the assemblies of DS/PARG extensively degrade. Successful encapsulation of THCP in the TRITC-BSA/TA/BSA multilayer is confirmed, and the release of the model drug is observed in response to treatment with α-chymotrypsin. The thickness, surface morphology, and enzyme-catalyzed degradation process of the BSA/TA-based films are investigated on a planar multilayer comprising 40 bilayers of the protein and polyphenol deposited on a silicon wafer. The developed BSA/TA-based capsules with a protease-specific degradation mechanism are proposed to find applications in personal care, pharmacology, and the development of drug delivery systems including those intravenous injectable and having site-specific release capability.

  3. Use of an acidic Fe/O{sub 2} cell for wastewater treatment: Degradation of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Brillas, E.; Sauleda, R.; Casado, J.

    1999-12-01

    Solutions containing 0.50 mol dm{sup {minus}3} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and aniline concentrations between 129 and 1,000 ppm have been decontaminated using an acidic Fe/O{sub 2} cell with an Fe anode and a carbon-poly(tetrafluoroethylene) O{sub 2}-fed cathode. This system produces spontaneously strong oxidizing radicals, such as OH{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}} and HO{sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}, which react with pollutants. Decontamination is more efficient for solutions with pH > 3 where intermediates coagulate with the Fe(OH){sub 3} precipitate formed. A 95% degradation is reached after 1 h of treatment of 129 ppm of aniline at initial pH 4 and at 35 C. For higher substrate levels, pollutants are quickly destroyed if the pH is regulated between 4 and 5. After 2 h, solutions up to 500 ppm of aniline are almost completely degraded, whereas 81% of the degradation is reached for 1,000 ppm of substrate. Benzoquinone and nitrobenzene are detected as intermediates. An insignificant accumulation of these products is found in the treatment of 1,000 ppm of substrate, suggesting the formation of polymers that coagulate with the Fe(OH){sub 3} precipitate. Low concentrations of ammonium and nitrate ions have been determined in treated solutions. The major part of the initial carbon and nitrogen is retained in the precipitate, indicating that coagulation of intermediates predominates over their mineralization. A reaction pathway for the degradation of aniline involving all intermediates detected is proposed.

  4. Laboratory study on OH-initiated degradation kinetics of dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chengyue; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2015-04-28

    Dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a specific organic tracer for the pyrolysis of conifer resin. To understand its atmospheric stability, the degradation behavior of particulate DHAA in the presence of hydroxyl radicals (OH) was investigated under different environmental conditions using a stainless steel reactor with volume of 30 cm(3), in the dark. At 25 °C and 40% relative humidity (RH), the second-order rate constant (k2) of pure DHAA with OH was measured to be 5.72 ± 0.87 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of temperature, RH and mixing state on the degradation kinetics of DHAA were also investigated. At 40% RH, k2 of pure DHAA increases with increasing temperature and follows the Arrhenius equation k2 = (8.9 ± 1.9) × 10(-10) exp[-(1508.2 ± 64.2)/T], while RH does not have significant impact on k2 at 25 °C. At 25 °C and 40% RH, compared with pure DHAA, the corresponding k2 for DHAA mixed with (NH4)2SO4 decreased to 4.58 ± 0.95 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), while the value was 3.30 ± 0.79 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) when mixed with soot. The atmospheric lifetime of DHAA varied from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 4.4 ± 0.8 days under different environmental conditions. This study indicates that degradation of DHAA by OH radicals is appreciable, and a significant error in source apportionment should be introduced if the contribution of degradation to DHAA concentration is not considered during air mass aging.

  5. The role of UV-irradiation pretreatment on the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovskaya, O; Sokolova, I; Mayer, G V; Karetnikova, E; Lipatnikova, E; Kuzmina, S; Volostnov, D

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in water by the combination process of UV-irradiation, humic acids and activated sludge treatment has been studied. The photoreaction rate of all irradiated samples was lowest for the sample irradiated at 308 nm (the XeCl excilamp) in the absence and in the presence of humic acids, and highest for the sample irradiated at 222 nm (the KrCl excilamp). Photolysis of 2,4-D has been shown to enhance the subsequent microbial degradation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Degradation of the Herbicide Mecoprop [2-(2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxy)Propionic Acid] by a Synergistic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Lappin, Hilary M.; Greaves, Michael P.; Slater, J. Howard

    1985-01-01

    A microbial community isolated from wheat root systems was capable of growth on mecoprop as the sole carbon and energy source. When exposed to fresh herbicide additions, the community was able to shorten the lag phase from 30 days to less than 24 h. The community comprised two Pseudomonas species, an Alcaligenes species, a Flavobacterium species, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. None of the pure cultures was capable of growing on mecoprop. Certain combinations of two or more community constituents were required before growth commenced. The mecoprop-degrading community could also degrade 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid but not 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid. PMID:16346731

  7. Malic acid or orthophosphoric acid-heat treatments for protecting sunflower (Helianthus annuus) meal proteins against ruminal degradation and increasing intestinal amino acid supply.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J M; González, J; Ouarti, M; Silván, J M; Ruiz del Castillo, M L; de la Peña Moreno, F

    2013-02-01

    The protection of sunflower meal (SFM) proteins by treatments with solutions of malic acid (1 M) or orthophosphoric acid (0.67 M) and heat was studied in a 3 × 3 Latin-square design using three diets and three rumen and duodenum cannulated wethers. Acid solutions were applied to SFM at a rate of 400 ml/kg under continuous mixing. Subsequently, treated meals were dried in an oven at 150°C for 6 h. Diets (ingested at 75 g/kg BW0.75) were isoproteic and included 40% Italian ryegrass hay and 60% concentrate. The ratio of untreated to treated SFM in the concentrate was 100 : 0 in the control diet and around 40 : 60 in diets including acid-treated meals. The use of acid-treated meals did not alter either ruminal fermentation or composition of rumen contents and led to moderate reductions of the rumen outflow rates of untreated SFM particles, whereas it did not affect their comminution and mixing rate. In situ effective estimates of by-pass (BP) and its intestinal effective digestibility (IED) of dry matter (DM), CP and amino acids (AAs) were obtained considering both rates and correcting the particle microbial contamination in the rumen using 15N infusion techniques. Estimates of BP and IED decreased applying microbial correction, but these variations were low in agreement with the small contamination level. Protective treatments increased on average the BP of DM (48.5%) and CP (267%), mainly decreasing both the soluble fraction and the degradation rate but also increasing the undegradable fraction, which was higher using orthophosphoric acid. Protective treatments increased the IED of DM (108%) and CP, but this increase was lower using orthophosphoric acid (11.8%) than malic acid (20.7%). Concentrations of AA were similar among all meals, except for a reduction in lysine concentrations using malic acid (16.3%) or orthophosphoric acid (20.5%). Protective treatments also increased on average the BP of all AA, as well as the IED of most of them. Evidence of higher

  8. Quantitative TOF-SIMS analysis of oligomeric degradation products at the surface of biodegradable poly(alpha-hydroxy acid)s.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Woon; Gardella, Joseph A

    2002-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method for quantification of the hydrolytic surface degradation kinetics of biodegradable poly(alpha-hydroxy acid)s using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). We report results from static SIMS spectra of a series of poly(alpha-hydroxy acid)s including poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid), and random poly(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) hydrolyzed in various buffer systems. The distribution of the most intense peak intensities of ions generated in high mass range of the spectrum reflects the intact degradation products (oligomeric hydrolysis products) of each biodegradable polymer. First, a detailed analysis of the oligomeric ions is given based on rearrangement of the intact hydrolysis products. The pattern of ions can distinguish both degradation-generated intact oligomers and their fragment ion peaks with a variety of combinations of each repeat unit. Then, the integration and summation of the area of all ion peaks with the same number of repeat units is proposed as a measurement that provides a more accurate MW average than the typically used method which counts only the most intense peak. The multiple ion summation method described in this paper would be practical in the improvement of quantitative TOF-SIMS studies as a better data reduction method, especially in the surface degradation kinetics of biodegradable polymers.

  9. Degradation and Mineralization of Benzohydroxamic Acid by Synthesized Mesoporous La/TiO₂.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianping; Wang, Junyu; Wang, Chunying; Zhu, Sipin; Li, Zhihui; Tang, Xuekun; Wu, Min

    2016-10-10

    Rare earth element La-doped TiO₂ (La/TiO₂) was synthesized by the sol-gel method. Benzohydroxamic acid was used as the objective pollutant to investigate the photocatalytic activity of La/TiO₂. The physicochemical properties of the prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, specific surface area and porosity, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the doping of La could inhibit the crystal growth of TiO₂, increase its specific surface area and expand its response to visible light, thus improving its photocatalytic activity. La/TiO₂ with the doping ratio of 0.75% calcined at 500 °C, showing the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade benzohydroxamic acid under the irradiation of 300 W mercury lamp. About 94.1% of benzohydroxamic acid with the original concentration at 30 mg·L(-1) was removed after 120 min in a solution of pH 4.4 with an La/TiO₂ amount of 0.5 g·L(-1). Furthermore, 88.5% of the total organic carbon was eliminated after 120 min irradiation. In addition, after four recycling runs, La/TiO₂ still kept high photocatalytic activity on the photodegradation of benzohydroxamic acid. The interfacial charge transfer processes were also hypothesized.

  10. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of operating conditions on acid loss

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Hideaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1 MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY conducted by NEDO, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, PAFC-TRA and PAFC manufacturers. The acid loss into exhaust gases is one of life limiting factors in PAFCs. To design the cells of long-life, it is important to estimate the phosphoric acid loss and to contrive ideas eliminating it. With the objective of obtaining basic data for simulating the acid loss in the large size cells, the effect of the operating conditions on the acid loss into exhaust gases has been studied experimentally by using a single cell with an active electrode area of 100 cm{sup 2}.

  11. Electrochemical destruction of trans-cinnamic acid by advanced oxidation processes: kinetics, mineralization, and degradation route.

    PubMed

    Flores, Nelly; Thiam, Abdoulaye; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi

    2017-03-01

    Acidic solutions of trans-cinnamic acid at pH 3.0 have been comparatively treated by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The electrolytic experiments were carried out with a boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The substrate was very slowly abated by AO-H2O2 because of its low reaction rate with oxidizing (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. In contrast, its removal was very rapid and at similar rate by EF and PEF due to the additional oxidation by (•)OH in the bulk, formed from Fenton's reaction between cathodically generated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The AO-H2O2 treatment yielded the lowest mineralization. The EF process led to persistent final products like Fe(III) complexes, which were quickly photolyzed upon UVA irradiation in PEF to give an almost total mineralization with 98 % total organic carbon removal. The effect of current density and substrate concentration on all the mineralization processes was examined. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of electrolyzed solutions allowed identifying five primary aromatics and one heteroaromatic molecule, whereas final carboxylic acids like fumaric, acetic, and oxalic were quantified by ion exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). From all the products detected, a degradation route for trans-cinnamic acid is proposed.

  12. Degradation and Mineralization of Benzohydroxamic Acid by Synthesized Mesoporous La/TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xianping; Wang, Junyu; Wang, Chunying; Zhu, Sipin; Li, Zhihui; Tang, Xuekun; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth element La-doped TiO2 (La/TiO2) was synthesized by the sol-gel method. Benzohydroxamic acid was used as the objective pollutant to investigate the photocatalytic activity of La/TiO2. The physicochemical properties of the prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, specific surface area and porosity, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the doping of La could inhibit the crystal growth of TiO2, increase its specific surface area and expand its response to visible light, thus improving its photocatalytic activity. La/TiO2 with the doping ratio of 0.75% calcined at 500 °C, showing the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade benzohydroxamic acid under the irradiation of 300 W mercury lamp. About 94.1% of benzohydroxamic acid with the original concentration at 30 mg·L−1 was removed after 120 min in a solution of pH 4.4 with an La/TiO2 amount of 0.5 g·L−1. Furthermore, 88.5% of the total organic carbon was eliminated after 120 min irradiation. In addition, after four recycling runs, La/TiO2 still kept high photocatalytic activity on the photodegradation of benzohydroxamic acid. The interfacial charge transfer processes were also hypothesized. PMID:27735877

  13. Degradation of acetic acid with sulfate radical generated by persulfate ions photolysis.

    PubMed

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2009-09-01

    The photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) was studied for the removal of acetic acid in aqueous solution and compared with the H(2)O(2)/UV system. The SO(4)(-) radicals generated from the UV irradiation of S(2)O(8)(2-) ions yield a greater mineralization of acetic acid than the ()OH radicals. Acetic acid is oxidized by SO(4)(-) radicals without significant formation of intermediate by-products. Increasing system pH results in the formation of ()OH radicals from SO(4)(-) radicals. Maximum acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. The results suggest that above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of the solute with SO(4)(-) and also ()OH radicals. Scavenging effects of two naturally occurring ions were tested; in contrast to HCO(3)(-) ions, the presence of Cl(-) ions enhances the efficiency of the S(2)O(8)(2-)/UV process towards the acetate removal. It is attributed to the formation of the Cl() radical and its great reactivity towards acetate.

  14. Anodic oxidation of salicylic acid on BDD electrode: variable effects and mechanisms of degradation.

    PubMed

    Rabaaoui, Nejmeddine; Allagui, Mohamed Salah

    2012-12-01

    The degradation of 100mL of solution with salicylic acid (SA) in the pH range 3.0-10.0 has been studied by anodic oxidation in a cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode, both of 3 cm(2) area, by applying a current of 100, 300 and 450 mA at 25°C. Completed mineralization is always achieved due to the great concentration of hydroxyl radical (OH) generated at the BDD surface. The mineralization rate increases with increasing applied current, but decreases when drug concentration rises from 200 mg L(-1). Nevertheless, the pH effect was not significant. During oxidation it was observed that catechol, 2,5-dihydroxylated benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylated benzoic acid and hydroquinone were formed as aromatic intermediates. In addition, ion-exclusion chromatography allowed the detection of fumaric, maleic, oxalic and formic as the ultimate carboxylic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid by a filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae M-4 strain with self-protection transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanting; Li, Jianlong; Yao, Kai; Zhao, Nan; Zhou, Kang; Hu, Xinjie; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Liu, Aiping; Liu, Shuliang

    2016-11-01

    A novel filamentous fungus M-4 strain was isolated from soy sauce koji and identified as Aspergillus oryzae (Collection number: CGMCC 11645) on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer sequence. M-4 could degrade 80.62 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) within 5 days. 3-PBA degradation occurred in accordance with first-order kinetics. The degradation metabolites of 3-PBA were identified through high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated, which indicated that M-4 could effectively degrade the intermediates of 3-PBA. Base on analysis of these metabolites, a novel biochemical pathway for the degradation of 3-PBA was proposed. There exists a mutual transformation between 3-phenoxy-benzyl alcohol and 3-PBA, which was firstly reported about the degradation of 3-PBA and may be attributed to self-protection transformation of M-4; subsequently, 3-PBA was gradually transformed into phenol, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, protocatechuic acid and gallic acid. The safety of M-4 was evaluated via an acute toxicity test in vivo. The biodegradation ability of M-4 without toxic effects reveals that this fungus may be likely to be used for eliminating 3-PBA from contaminated environment or fermented foods.

  16. In vitro degradation and erosion of degradable, segmented polyurethanes containing an amino acid-based chain extender.

    PubMed

    Skarja, G A; Woodhouse, K A

    2001-01-01

    In vitro degradation and erosion of novel, degradable segmented polyurethanes containing a phenylalanine diester chain extender were investigated by exposing the polymers to buffer. chymotrypsin, and trypsin solutions for up to 28 days. Polyurethane degradation and erosion were monitored by gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and compared to a control polyurethane. Polyurethanes were synthesized using two different soft segments (polycaprolactone diol and polyethylene oxide) of variable molecular weight. Inclusion of the phenylalanine-based chain extender resulted in an increased susceptibility to enzyme-mediated, but not buffer-mediated, erosion in comparison to the control polyurethane. SEM analysis indicated that enzyme-mediated erosion proceeded via a surface-limited mechanism resulting in a progressive removal of material from the surface inwards with time. The magnitude of degradation and erosion was highly variable and was dependent on soft segment type and molecular weight. The range of degradation rates, as well as physicochemical properties, makes these polyurethanes potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications.

  17. Characterization of Wall Teichoic Acid Degradation by the Bacteriophage ϕ29 Appendage Protein GP12 Using Synthetic Substrate Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Cullen L.; Ireland, Ronald G.; Garrett, Teresa A.; Brown, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The genetics and enzymology of the biosynthesis of wall teichoic acid have been the extensively studied, however, comparatively little is known regarding the enzymatic degradation of this biological polymer. The GP12 protein from the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage ϕ29 has been implicated as a wall teichoic acid hydrolase. We have studied the wall teichoic acid hydrolase activity of pure, recombinant GP12 using chemically defined wall teichoic acid analogs. The GP12 protein had potent wall teichoic acid hydrolytic activity in vitro and demonstrated ∼13-fold kinetic preference for glycosylated poly(glycerol phosphate) teichoic acid compared with non-glycosylated. Product distribution patterns suggested that the degradation of glycosylated polymers proceeded from the hydroxyl terminus of the polymer, whereas hydrolysis occurred at random sites in the non-glycosylated polymer. In addition, we present evidence that the GP12 protein possesses both phosphodiesterase and phosphomonoesterase activities. PMID:26085106

  18. Characterization of Wall Teichoic Acid Degradation by the Bacteriophage ϕ29 Appendage Protein GP12 Using Synthetic Substrate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Myers, Cullen L; Ireland, Ronald G; Garrett, Teresa A; Brown, Eric D

    2015-07-31

    The genetics and enzymology of the biosynthesis of wall teichoic acid have been the extensively studied, however, comparatively little is known regarding the enzymatic degradation of this biological polymer. The GP12 protein from the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage ϕ29 has been implicated as a wall teichoic acid hydrolase. We have studied the wall teichoic acid hydrolase activity of pure, recombinant GP12 using chemically defined wall teichoic acid analogs. The GP12 protein had potent wall teichoic acid hydrolytic activity in vitro and demonstrated ∼13-fold kinetic preference for glycosylated poly(glycerol phosphate) teichoic acid compared with non-glycosylated. Product distribution patterns suggested that the degradation of glycosylated polymers proceeded from the hydroxyl terminus of the polymer, whereas hydrolysis occurred at random sites in the non-glycosylated polymer. In addition, we present evidence that the GP12 protein possesses both phosphodiesterase and phosphomonoesterase activities.

  19. Degradation of sunscreen agent p-aminobenzoic acid using a combination system of UV irradiation, persulphate and iron(II).

    PubMed

    Xue, Yicen; Dong, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaoning; Bi, Wenlong; Zhai, Pingping; Li, Hongjing; Nie, Minghua

    2016-03-01

    Increased usage and discharge of sunscreens have led to ecological safety crisis, and people are developing the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to treat them. The present study aimed to determine the degradation efficiency and mechanism of the sunscreen agent p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) using the UV/Fe(2+)/persulphate (PS) method. A series of irradiation experiments were conducted to optimise the system conditions and to study the impacts of the natural anion. Free radicals and degradation products were identified in order to clarify the degradation mechanism. Initial PS and Fe(2+) concentrations showed significant impacts on PABA degradation. Natural anions, such as Cl(-), NO3 (-), H2PO4 (-) and HCO3 (-), impeded PABA degradation because of ion (Fe(2+)) capture, radical scavenging or pH effects. Hydroxyl (HO·) and sulphate (SO4 (·-)) radicals were two main radicals observed in the UV/Fe(2+)/PS system; of these, SO4 (·-) showed greater effects on PABA degradation. Over 99 % of the available PABA was completely degraded into carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) by the UV/Fe(2+)/PS system, and the remaining PABA participated in complex radical reactions. By-products were identified by total ion chromatography and mass spectrometry. Our research provides a treatment process for PABA with high degradation efficiency and environmental safety and introduces a new strategy for sunscreen degradation.

  20. Chlorophenol hydroxylases encoded by plasmid pJP4 differentially contribute to chlorophenoxyacetic acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Ledger, T; Pieper, D H; González, B

    2006-04-01

    Phenoxyalkanoic compounds are used worldwide as herbicides. Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) catabolizes 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA), using tfd functions carried on plasmid pJP4. TfdA cleaves the ether bonds of these herbicides to produce 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (MCP), respectively. These intermediates can be degraded by two chlorophenol hydroxylases encoded by the tfdB(I) and tfdB(II) genes to produce the respective chlorocatechols. We studied the specific contribution of each of the TfdB enzymes to the 2,4-D/MCPA degradation pathway. To accomplish this, the tfdB(I) and tfdB(II) genes were independently inactivated, and growth on each chlorophenoxyacetate and total chlorophenol hydroxylase activity were measured for the mutant strains. The phenotype of these mutants shows that both TfdB enzymes are used for growth on 2,4-D or MCPA but that TfdB(I) contributes to a significantly higher extent than TfdB(II). Both enzymes showed similar specificity profiles, with 2,4-DCP, MCP, and 4-chlorophenol being the best substrates. An accumulation of chlorophenol was found to inhibit chlorophenoxyacetate degradation, and inactivation of the tfdB genes enhanced the toxic effect of 2,4-DCP on C. necator cells. Furthermore, increased chlorophenol production by overexpression of TfdA also had a negative effect on 2,4-D degradation by C. necator JMP134 and by a different host, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, harboring plasmid pJP4. The results of this work indicate that codification and expression of the two tfdB genes in pJP4 are important to avoid toxic accumulations of chlorophenols during phenoxyacetic acid degradation and that a balance between chlorophenol-producing and chlorophenol-consuming reactions is necessary for growth on these compounds.

  1. DENTINE CARIES: ACID-TOLERANT MICROORGANISMS AND ASPECTS ON COLLAGEN DEGRADATION.

    PubMed

    Lager, Anders Hedenbjörk

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is a common disease all over the world, despite the fact that it can be both effectively prevented and treated. It is driven by acids produced by oral microorganisms as a consequence of their metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. Given enough acid challenge, eventually the tooth enamel barrier will be broken down, and the carious lesion will extend into underlying hard tissue, forming a macroscopic cavity in the dentine. In comparison to biofilm on enamel, a dentine carious lesion provides a vastly different environment for the residing microorganisms. The environment influences the types and numbers of microorganisms that can colonize the dentine caries lesion. The overall aims for this thesis are to enumerate and further study microorganisms found in established dentine caries lesions and also to illuminate how host-derived proteolytic enzymes might contribute to this degradation, not only to better understand the caries process in dentine but also to find incitements for new methods to influence the natural progression of caries lesions. In Paper I, the numbers of remaining viable microorganisms after completed excavation using two excavation methods were investigated. Samples of carious dentine tissue were collected before and after excavation and cultivated on different agar media in different atmospheres. Analysis was performed by counting the number of colony-forming units (CFUs). Key findings: The number of remaining microorganisms after excavation was low for both methods, but some microorganisms always remained in the cavity floors even when the cavities were judged as caries free using normal clinical criteria. In Paper II, the acid tolerant microbiota in established dentine caries lesions was investigated. Samples were taken as in Paper I, but on three levels (superficial, center of lesion, floor of lesion after completed excavation). The samples were cultivated in anaerobic conditions on solid pH-selective agar media of different acidity

  2. Modification of Chemical Reactivity via Inclusion Complex Formation: Photochemistry of Dibenzyl Ketones and Benzyl Phenylacetates,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    8217 cage effect," % Dibenzyl Ketone a-CD) 1:1.3 99 1 3-CD 1:1 263 91 9 ).-CD 1:1 81 19 DCA 1:6 155 99 0 Dianin’s compdi 1:45 169 95 5 p- Methylbenzyl Benzyl...Ketone zT-CD 1:1.4 229 1 86 1.5 12 95 DCA 1:8 1710 1.5 97 1.5 0 94 Dianin’s compd 1:22 166-167 98 2 100 a- Methylbenzyl Benzy) Ketone 3-CD 1:1 251 1.6...Photolyses of Benzyl Phenylacetates in Various Host Media in Solid State guest~hoet % productsi’ host ratio complex mp. *C AA AB BB p- Methylbenzyl

  3. Induction of myogenic differentiation in a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line by phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, J; Cinatl, J; Herneiz, P; Rabenau, H; Hovak, M; Benda, R; Gümbel, H O; Kornhuber, B; Doerr, H W

    1994-04-01

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) at concentrations ranging from 2 to 10 mM promoted myogenic differentiation of the human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cell line KFR. These concentrations inhibited DNA synthesis of the cells in a dose-dependent manner without significant effect on cell viability. The morphological differentiation of small mononuclear elements to terminal, elongated multinuclear structures resembling myotubes was accompanied by the expression of skeletal muscle myosin. The proportion of differentiated myosin-positive cells which was around 0.8-1.7% in control cultures 12 days after seeding was increased by NaPA treatment up to 47%. In the cytoplasm of differentiated cells, features of sarcomerogenesis were observed. These results suggest that NaPA is an effective inducer of rhabdomyosarcoma cell differentiation at concentrations that have been achieved in humans with no significant adverse effects.

  4. Phenylacetate and benzoate clearance in a hyperammonemic infant on sequential hemodialysis and hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Bunchman, Timothy E; Barletta, Gina-Marie; Winters, John W; Gardner, John J; Crumb, Teri L; McBryde, Kevin D

    2007-07-01

    An infant with a suspected inborn metabolism error was treated with a metabolic cocktail of intravenous sodium phenylacetate (NaPh) and sodium benzoate (NaBz) for hyperammonemia. Sequential hemodialysis (HD) then hemofiltration (HF) was performed due to hyperammonemia. Dialytic and convective clearance (K; ml/min) of ammonia, NaPh, and NaBz was measured. The K of ammonia was 57 and 37 for HD and HF, respectively. The K of NaBz was 37 and 12 for HD and HF, respectively. The K of NaPh was 38 and 14 ml/min for HD and HF, respectively. Despite high clearance of both NaPh and NaBz by HD and HF, the hyperammonemia was corrected.

  5. In vitro differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells induced by sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, J; Cinatl, J; Mainke, M; Weissflog, A; Rabenau, H; Kornhuber, B; Doerr, H W

    1993-06-15

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) at concentrations ranging from 2 to 6 mM stimulated morphological differentiation of two human neuroblastoma cell lines IMR-32 and UKF-NB-3. These concentrations inhibited growth and DNA synthesis of the cells in a dose dependent manner without significant effect on cell viability. The differentiated cells showed pseudoganglia formation and extension of cellular processes. The morphological differentiation in both cell lines was accompanied by decreased expression of N-myc oncoprotein. These results suggest that NaPA at concentrations, which have been achieved in humans with no significant adverse effects, promotes differentiation of cultured human neuroblastoma cells in association with the reduced expression of the malignant phenotype.

  6. Thermal degradation behaviour of nanoamphiphilic chitosan dispersed poly (lactic acid) bionanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Pal, Akhilesh Kumar; Katiyar, Vimal

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, nano-amphiphilic chitosan termed as chitosan-grafted-oligo l-lactic acid (CH-g-OLLA), is synthesized by microwave initiated insitu condensation polymerization. The synthesized CH-g-OLLA becomes hydrophobic in nature due to chemical bond formation between chitosan backbone and OLLA chains. Further, CH-g-OLLA (30%) bionanocomposite is used as a nanofiller in poly (lactic acid)/chitosan-grafted-oligo l-lactic acid (PLA/CH-g-OLLA) bionanocomposite films. Surface morphology shows a homogeneous dispersion of CH-g-OLLA in the form of spherical aggregates, which vary in the range of ∼20 to 150nm. Non-isothermal degradation kinetics, proposed by Kissinger, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Augis & Bennett models, are utilized to estimate the activation energies (Ea) for PLA, which are 254.1, 260.2, 257.0 and 259.1kJmol(-1) respectively. The reduction in Ea values of bionanocomposite films may be elucidated by intermolecular distance and enrichment in chain mobility. The evolved gaseous products like hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and cyclic oligomers are successfully identified with TG-FTIR analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cathepsin D-mediated yolk protein degradation is blocked by acid phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Eliane; Nakamura, Angelica; Juliano, Luiz; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2005-04-15

    Vitellin (VT) is a lipoglycophosphoprotein stored inside the eggs of every oviparous organism during oogenesis. In the blood-sucking bug Rhodnius prolixus, VT is deposited inside growing oocytes together with two acid hydrolases: acid phosphatase (AP) and cathepsin D (CD). Egg fertilization triggers AP activity and VT proteolysis in vivo [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2002 (32) 847]. Here, we show that CD is the main protease targeting VT proteolysis during egg development. CD activity in total egg homogenates is blocked by the classical aspartyl protease inhibitor, pepstatin A. Surprisingly, AP inhibitors such as NaF, Na+/K+ tartrate, and inorganic phosphate also block VT proteolysis, whereas this effect is not observed when tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors such as vanadate and phenylarsine oxide or an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatases such as levamisole are used in a VT proteolysis assay. NaF concentrations that block isolated AP activity do not affect the activity of partially purified CD. Therefore, a specific repressor of VT proteolysis must be dephosphorylated by AP in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that acid hydrolases act cooperatively to promote yolk degradation during egg development in arthropods.

  8. Degradation of Humic Acids by the Litter-Decomposing Basidiomycete Collybia dryophila

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Kari Timo; Hatakka, Annele; Hofrichter, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The basidiomycete Collybia dryophila K209, which colonizes forest soil, was found to decompose a natural humic acid isolated from pine-forest litter (LHA) and a synthetic 14C-labeled humic acid (14C-HA) prepared from [U-14C]catechol in liquid culture. Degradation resulted in the formation of polar, lower-molecular-mass fulvic acid (FA) and carbon dioxide. HA decomposition was considerably enhanced in the presence of Mn2+ (200 μM), leading to 75% conversion of LHA and 50% mineralization of 14C-HA (compared to 60% and 20%, respectively, in the absence of Mn2+). There was a strong indication that manganese peroxidase (MnP), the production of which was noticeably increased in Mn2+-supplemented cultures, was responsible for this effect. The enzyme was produced as a single protein with a pI of 4.7 and a molecular mass of 44 kDa. During solid-state cultivation, C. dryophila released substantial amounts of water-soluble FA (predominantly of 0.9 kDa molecular mass) from insoluble litter material. The results indicate that basidiomycetes such as C. dryophila which colonize forest litter and soil are involved in humus turnover by their recycling of high-molecular-mass humic substances. Extracellular MnP seems to be a key enzyme in the conversion process. PMID:12089026

  9. Mechanisms of photocatalytical degradation of monomethylarsonic and dimethylarsinic acids using nanocrystalline titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhonghou; Jing, Chuanyong; Li, Fasheng; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-04-01

    Photodegradation mechanisms of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) with nanocrystalline titanium dioxide under UV irradiation were investigated. In the presence of UV irradiation and 0.02 g/L TiO2, 93% MMA (initial concentration is 10 mg-As/L) was transformed into inorganic arsenate, [As(V)], after 72 h of a batch reaction. The mineralization of DMA to As(V) occurred in two steps with MMA as an intermediate product. The photodegradation rate of MMA and DMA could be described using first-order kinetics, where the apparent rate constant is 0.033/h and 0.013/h for MMA and DMA, respectively. Radical scavengers, including superoxide dimutase (SOD), sodium bicarbonate, tert-butanol, and sodium azide, were used to study the photodegradation mechanisms of MMA and DMA. The results showed that hydroxyl radicals (HO*) was the primary reactive oxygen species for the photodegradation of MMA and DMA. The methyl groups in MMA and DMAweretransformed into organic carbon, including formic acid and possibly methanol, also through photochemical reactions. The results showed that nanocrystalline TiO2 can be used for the photocatalytical degradation of MMA and DMA and subsequent removal of the converted As(V), since the high adsorption capacity of the material for inorganic arsenic species has been demonstrated in previous studies.

  10. Sonocatalytic degradation of humic acid by N-doped TiO2 nano-particle in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Hossein; Nasseri, Simin; Khoobi, Mehdi; Nabizadeh Nodehi, Ramin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Un-doped and N-doped TiO2 nano-particles with different nitrogen contents were successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel method, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra techniques. Then enhancement of sonocatalytic degradation of humic acid by un-doped and N-doped TiO2 nano-particles in aqueous environment was investigated. The effects of various parameters such as initial concentration of humic acid, N-doping, and the degradation kinetics were investigated. The results of characterization techniques affirmed that the synthesis of un-doped and N-doped TiO2 nano-particles was successful. Degradation of humic acid by using different nano-particles obeyed the first-order kinetic. Among various nano-particles, N-doped TiO2 with molar doping ratio of 6 % and band gap of 2.92 eV, exhibited the highest sonocatalytic degradation with an apparent-first-order rate constant of 1.56 × 10(-2) min(-1). The high degradation rate was associated with the lower band gap energy and well-formed anatase phase. The addition of nano-catalysts could enhance the degradation efficiency of humic acid as well as N-doped TiO2 with a molar ratio of 6 %N/Ti was found the best nano-catalyst among the investigated catalysts. The sonocatalytic degradation with nitrogen doped semiconductors could be a suitable oxidation process for removal of refractory pollutants such as humic acid from aqueous solution.

  11. Degradation of cyanuric acid in soil by Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 using bioremediation with self-immobilization system.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naofumi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Nakai, Hiroaki; Fujita, Tomoko; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Katoh, Shigeo

    2006-09-01

    The rates of degradation of cyanuric acid, a key intermediate in a metabolic pathway of s-triazine herbicides, were measured for Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227. The rate of degradation was affected by the rate of cyanuric acid transport through cell membranes and the activity of cyanuric acid amidohydrolase inside the cells. At low concentrations of cyanuric acid, the acclimation of cells to cyanuric acid and/or added nutrients effectively enhanced the degradation rate. The strain was also applied to bioremediation using a Bioremediation with Self-Immobilization System (BSIS), in which Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 cells were co-immobilized with Bacillus subtilis, the latter of which secretes a viscous polymer, in a shallow layer of soil packed in a column. More than 70% of the Pseudomonas sp. NRRL B-12227 cells were co-immobilized with the B. subtilis in a 7.5 cm layer of the packed soil by self-aggregation. More than 60% of the 1 mM cyanuric acid supplied to the packed soil was degraded in this layer during a 72 h period.

  12. Identification of microbial populations driving biopolymer degradation in acidic peatlands by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia A; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2016-10-01

    Northern peatlands play a crucial role in the global carbon balance, serving as a persistent sink for atmospheric CO2 and a global carbon store. Their most extensive type, Sphagnum-dominated acidic peatlands, is inhabited by microorganisms with poorly understood degradation capabilities. Here, we applied a combination of barcoded pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes and Illumina RNA-Seq of total RNA (metatranscriptomics) to identify microbial populations and enzymes involved in degrading the major components of Sphagnum-derived litter and exoskeletons of peat-inhabiting arthropods: cellulose, xylan, pectin and chitin. Biopolymer addition to peat induced a threefold to fivefold increase in bacterial cell numbers. Functional community profiles of assembled mRNA differed between experimental treatments. In particular, pectin and xylan triggered increased transcript abundance of genes involved in energy metabolism and central carbon metabolism, such as glycolysis and TCA cycle. Concurrently, the substrate-induced activity of bacteria on these two biopolymers stimulated grazing of peat-inhabiting protozoa. Alveolata (ciliates) was the most responsive protozoa group as confirmed by analysis of both SSU rRNA genes and SSU rRNA. A stimulation of alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs on pectin was consistently shown by rRNA and mRNA data. Most likely, their significant enrichment was due to the utilization of methanol released during the degradation of pectin. Analysis of SSU rRNA and total mRNA revealed a specific response of Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria to chitin and pectin, respectively. Relatives of Telmatobacter bradus were most responsive among the Acidobacteria, while the actinobacterial response was primarily affiliated with Frankiales and Propionibacteriales. The expression of a wide repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) corresponded well to the detection of a highly diverse peat-inhabiting microbial community, which is dominated by yet uncultivated

  13. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone.

  14. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lactic acid nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels for restoring the vaginal microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sujata Sundara; Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Singh, Yashveer; Chikindas, Michael L.; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) display reduced vaginal acidity, which make them susceptible to associated infections such as HIV. In the current study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels were developed for the controlled release of lactic acid in the vagina of BV-infected women. PEG-lactic acid (PEG-LA) nanocarriers were prepared by covalently attaching lactic acid to 8-arm PEG-SH via cleavable thioester bonds. PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4 copies of lactic acid per molecule provided controlled release of lactic acid with a maximum release of 23% and 47% bound lactic acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) and acetate buffer (AB, pH 4.3), respectively. The PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels were formed by cross-linking the PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4-arm PEG-NHS via degradable thioester bonds. The nanocarrier-based hydrogels formed within 20 min under ambient conditions and exhibited an elastic modulus that was 100-fold higher than the viscous modulus. The nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels provided controlled release of lactic acid for several hours; however, a maximum release of only 10%–14% bound lactic acid was observed possibly due to steric hindrance of the polymer chains in the cross-linked hydrogel. In contrast, hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed burst release with complete release within 30 min. Lactic acid showed antimicrobial activity against the primary BV pathogen Gardnerella vaginalis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.6 mg/ml. In addition, the hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed retained antimicrobial activity with complete inhibition G. vaginalis growth within 48 h. The results of the current study collectively demonstrate the potential of PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels for vaginal administration of lactic acid for preventing and treating BV. PMID:25223229

  15. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lactic acid nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels for restoring the vaginal microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sundara Rajan, Sujata; Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Singh, Yashveer; Chikindas, Michael L; Sinko, Patrick J

    2014-11-28

    Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) display reduced vaginal acidity, which make them susceptible to associated infections such as HIV. In the current study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels were developed for the controlled release of lactic acid in the vagina of BV-infected women. PEG-lactic acid (PEG-LA) nanocarriers were prepared by covalently attaching lactic acid to 8-arm PEG-SH via cleavable thioester bonds. PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4 copies of lactic acid per molecule provided controlled release of lactic acid with a maximum release of 23% and 47% bound lactic acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH7.4) and acetate buffer (AB, pH4.3), respectively. The PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels were formed by cross-linking the PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4-arm PEG-NHS via degradable thioester bonds. The nanocarrier-based hydrogels formed within 20 min under ambient conditions and exhibited an elastic modulus that was 100-fold higher than the viscous modulus. The nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels provided controlled release of lactic acid for several hours; however, a maximum release of only 10%-14% bound lactic acid was observed possibly due to steric hindrance of the polymer chains in the cross-linked hydrogel. In contrast, hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed burst release with complete release within 30 min. Lactic acid showed antimicrobial activity against the primary BV pathogen Gardnerella vaginalis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.6 mg/ml. In addition, the hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed retained antimicrobial activity with complete inhibition G. vaginalis growth within 48 h. The results of the current study collectively demonstrate the potential of PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels for vaginal administration of lactic acid for preventing and treating BV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    McGary, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of {sup 125}I-hyaluronic acid ({sup 125}I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound {sup 125}I-HA was rapid, with a half time of {approx}31 min and a K{sub off} of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/sec. A large reversible increase in {sup 125}I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of {sup 125}I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined.

  17. Liver-targeting of primaquine-(poly-γ-glutamic acid) and its degradation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tomiya, Noboru; Jardim, Juliette G; Hou, Jennifer; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Lee, Yuan C

    2013-09-01

    We have synthesized poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) modified with a synthetic trivalent glyco-ligand (TriGalNAc) for the hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R). We investigated in vivo distribution of unmodified PGA and TriGalNAc-modified PGA (TriGalNAc-PGA) in mice after intravenous injection. Most of unmodified PGA administered was transported to the bladder over 20-80min, suggesting a rapid excretion of unmodified PGA into urine. In contrast, TriGalNAc-PGA was found exclusively in the liver over the same period of time. We further synthesized TriGalNAc-PGA-primaquine conjugate (TriGalNAc-PGA-PQ), and investigated binding, uptake, and catabolism of the conjugate by rat hepatocytes. Our studies indicated that approximately 250ng per million cells of the conjugate bound to one million rat hepatocytes at 0°C, and approximately 2μg per million cells of the conjugate was taken up over 7h incubation at 37°C. Furthermore, our results suggested that TriGalNAc-PGA-PQ was almost completely degraded over 24h, and small degradation products were secreted into cell culture medium. The results described in this report suggest that the TriGalNAc ligand can serve as an excellent targeting device for delivery of PGA-conjugates to the liver hepatocytes, and rat hepatocytes possess sufficient capacity to digest PGA even modified with other substituents. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. LEACHING AND DEGRADATION OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXIACETIC ACID, IN COLOMBIA RICE FLOODED SOIL.

    PubMed

    Huertas, J; Guerrero, J A; Martinez-Cordon, M J

    2015-01-01

    Rice is mostly cultivated on soil held under flooded conditions. Under these conditions pesticides undergo reductive transformations which are characteristic to rice fields and other anaerobic systems. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mobility and persistence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) under laboratory conditions for the rice crop in Espinal, Colombia. A displacement study was performed on a hand packed soil column 30 cm length. After leaching experiment, the soil from column was sliced into six successive sections (5 cm). Methanol acidified (H3PO4 0.25%) extraction was used to determine the herbicide residues in each section. 2,4-D experimental breakthrough curve was analyzed using Stanmod program (inverse problem) to obtain transport parameters. The non-equilibrium physical model fitted well the experimental breakthrough curve. The recovery percent of 2,4-D in leachates was 36.44% after 3.4 pore volumes, and retardation factor was 2.1, indicating low adsorption in that conditions. 2,4-D was rapidly degraded, with DT50 = 11.4 days. The results suggest that 2,4-D under flooded conditions have a high potential for leaching through the soil profile, although the elevated rate of degradation reduced the ground water contamination risk.

  19. Degradation pattern of gibberellic acid during the whole process of tea production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongping; Liu, Xin; Yang, Dan; Yin, Peng

    2013-06-01

    The residues of gibberellic acid (GA(3)) in tea shoots, made tea, and tea infusion were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass (UPLC-MS/MS) to study its degradation pattern during tea planting, processing, and brewing. The dissipation rate of GA(3) was described using first-order kinetics. Its half-life ranged from 1.67 to 2.01 days in tea shoots. Degradation and concentration during green tea processing had equally important functions on GA(3) residues in product intermediates and made tea. Except for water content, little GA(3) residue difference was found in tea shoots and made tea. GA(3) dissipated rapidly in the baking stage during processing. The transfer coefficient of GA(3) residues from made tea to infusion was from 26.23% to 54.55%. GA(3) extraction efficiency varied with different infusion times and concentrations of GA(3) in made tea. This research revealed that GA(3) may be safe when applied in tea gardens at suitable doses and picking intervals. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional electrospun poly (lactic acid) scaffolds for biomedical applications: experimental conditions, degradation and biocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Idalba A; Sojot, Felipe; Arvelo, Francisco; Sabino, Marcos A

    2013-06-01

    The electrospinning technique is a method used to produce nano and microfibers using the influence of electrostatic forces. Porous three dimensional networks of continuous and interconnected fibers as scaffolds were obtained from a poly (lactic acid) solution. The concentration of the polymeric solution, 12.5% m/w, as well as the conditions of voltage (V = 11kV) and tip-metallic collector distance (H = 13cm) were established to develop these scaffolds through the electrospinning process. The characteristics of the scaffolds, such as fiber diameter, sintering and the biomimetics of the characteristics of a native extra cellular matrix were verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The orientation induced in the material as a consequence of the electrospinning forces was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).The same techniques were used to study the hydrolytic degradation of samples in a ringer solution (pH = 7-7.4 at 37 degrees C) for 12 weeks and showed evidences of superficial degradation on the microfibers. The suitability of these scaffolds for tissue engineering was studied through the primary cell culture of chondrocytes, by observing adhesion and cellular proliferation developed during 14 days of assay.

  1. Degradable poly(anhydride ester) implants: effects of localized salicylic acid release on bone.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, L; Macedo, B; Uhrich, K E

    2000-12-01

    Degradable poly(anhydride ester) implants in which the polymer backbone breaks down into salicylic acid (SA) were investigated. In this preliminary work, local release of SA from the poly(anhydride esters), thus classified as 'active polymers', on healthy bone and tissue was evaluated in vivo using a mouse model. Degradable polyanhydrides that break down into inactive by-products were used as control membranes because of their chemical similarity to the active polymers. Small polymer squares were inserted over the exposed palatal bone adjacent to the maxillary first molars. Active polymer membranes were placed on one side of the mouth, control polymers placed on the contra lateral side. Intraoral clinical examination showed that active polymer sites were less swollen and inflamed than control polymer sites. Histopathological examination at day 1 showed essentially no difference between control and active polymers. After 4 days, active polymer sites showed epithelial proliferation to a greater extent than the polyanhydride controls. After 20 days, active polymer sites showed greater thickness of new palatal bone and no resorptive areas, while control polymer sites showed less bone thickness as well as resorption including lacunae involving cementum and dentine. From these preliminary studies, we conclude that active polymers, namely poly(anhydride esters), stimulated new bone formation.

  2. Bioactivity and cytocompatibility of dicalcium phosphate/poly (amino acid) biocomposite with degradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Shan, Wenpeng; Li, Xiangde; Wei, Jie; Li, Hong; Ma, Jian; Yan, Yonggang

    2012-01-01

    A bioactive composite of dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and poly (amino acid) (PAA) was fabricated, and the in vitro bioactivity, degradability, and cellular responses to the DCP/PAA composite (DPC) were investigated as compared to PAA. Apatite formation on DPC surfaces occurred after immersion into simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days, but not on the surface of PAA. The weight loss ratio of DPC could reach 18.6 ± 0.3 wt% after soaking into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 2 months, which was higher than PAA (11.0 ± 0.2 wt%). Cell attachment and proliferation of MG-63 cells on DPC was obviously higher than on PAA. Moreover, the cells spread and formed confluent layer on the DPC surfaces. The alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of the cells on DPC was significantly greater than PAA at day 5 and day 7. The results suggested that introducing DCP into PAA makes the composite bioactive and more degradable, and meanwhile enhances osteoblast-like cells attach, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation.

  3. Degradation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluoroctane Sulfonate by Enzyme Catalyzed Oxidative Humification Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are alkyl based chemicals having multiple or all hydrogens replaced by fluorine atoms, and thus exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and other unusual characteristics. PFASs have been widely used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer products, and tend to be environmentally persistent. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are two representative PFASs that have drawn particular attention because of their ubiquitous presence in the environment, resistance to degradation and toxicity to animals. This study examined the decomposition of PFOA and PFOS in enzyme catalyzed oxidative humification reactions (ECOHR), a class of reactions that are ubiquitous in the environment involved in natural organic humification. Reaction rates and influential factors were examined, and high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify possible products. Fluorides and partially fluorinated compounds were identified as likely products from PFOA and PFOS degradation, which were possibly formed via a combination of free radical decomposition, rearrangements and coupling processes. The findings suggest that PFOA and PFOS may be transformed during humification, and ECOHR can potentially be used for the remediation of these chemicals.

  4. Performance of Fluidized bed Fenton process in Degrading Acid Blue 113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, M. M.; Raman, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    The performance of a fluidized bed Fenton process in degrading Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) was investigated. Fluidized bed Fenton process is a modification of conventional Fenton oxidation, aimed at reducing sludge generation and improving process performance. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of operational parameter on the color removal from the dye. Dimensionless factors, Dye/Fe2+, H2O2/Fe2+ and pH were used as the independent variables in Box-Behnken Design (BDD). Reduced quadratic model was developed to predict the color removal. The process could remove up to 99 % of the initial color. The most significant factor for color removal was found to be Dye/Fe2+, followed by H2O2/Fe2+. Unlike conventional Fenton, the initial pH of the solution does not have a significant effect on the color removal.

  5. Application of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia on biotreatment process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Shen, Shu-Min; Shu, Chi-Min

    2015-10-01

    Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), the effluent of secondary biotreatment units, can be properly biodegraded by Burkholderia cepacia. Through batch degradation of EDTA, the raw wastewater of EDTA was controlled at 50 mg/L, and then nutrients was added in diluted wastewater to cultivate activated sludge, which the ratio of composition is depicted as "COD:N:P:Fe = 100:5:1:0.5". After 27 days, the removal efficiency of Fe-EDTA and COD was 100% and 92.0%, correspondingly. At the continuous process, the raw wastewater of EDTA was dictated at 166 mg/L before adding nutrients to cultivate activated sludge, in which the ratio of composition did also follow with batch process. After 22 days, the removal efficiency of Fe-EDTA and COD for experimental group was 71.46% and 62.58%, correspondingly. The results showed that the batch process was more suited for EDTA biodegradation.

  6. Edible fungus degrade bisphenol A with no harmful effect on its fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingzhu; Chen, Xiaoyan; Li, Mingchun

    2015-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is ubiquitous in the environment because of its broad industrial use. The authors report that the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world (i.e., white-rot fungus, Pleurotus ostreatus) efficiently degraded 10mg/L of BPA in 7 days. Extracellular laccase was identified as the enzyme responsible for this activity. LC-MS analysis of the metabolites revealed the presence of both low- and high-molecular-weight products obtained via oxidative cleavage and coupling reactions, respectively. In particular, an analysis of the fatty acid composition and chemical structure of the fungal mycelium demonstrated that exposure to BPA resulted in no harmful effects on this edible fungus. The results provide a better understanding of the environmental fate of BPA and its potential impact on food crops.

  7. Enzymatic and acidic degradation effect on intracellular polysaccharide of Flammulina velutipes SF-08.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xia; Cui, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Jia, Mengshi; Jia, Shouhua; Jia, Le

    2015-02-01

    The intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) from Flammulina velutipes SF-08 mycelia was isolated and degraded by enzyme and acid. IPS and its derivative were purified by DEAE-52 cellulose chromatography, and five fractions were obtained. The structural features and antioxidant activities in vitro of the isolated fractions were evaluated. On the basis of chemical composition and antioxidant ability analyses, rhamnose as the main monosaccharide might contribute to the strongest antioxidant capacity. The in vivo results showed that IPS significantly enhanced the activities of anti-aging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and reduced the content of lipid peroxidantion (LPO). These results suggested that IPS should be a potent natural polymer and can be developed to be novel functional food. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of material thickness and processing method on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) degradation and mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Reyhaneh Neghabat; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Ronan, William; Erxleben, Andrea; Rochev, Yury; McHugh, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of material thickness and processing method on the degradation rate and the changes in the mechanical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material during simulated physiological degradation were investigated. Two types of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) materials were considered: 0.12 mm solvent-cast films and 1 mm compression-moulded plates. The experimental results presented in this study were compared to the experimental results of Shirazi et al. (Acta Biomaterialia 10(11):4695-703, 2014) for 0.25 mm solvent-cast films. These experimental observations were used to validate the computational modelling predictions of Shirazi et al. (J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 54: 48-59, 2016) on critical diffusion length scale and also to refine the model parameters. The specific material processing methods considered here did not have a significant effect on the degradation rate and the changes in mechanical properties during degradation; however, they influenced the initial molecular weight and they determined the stiffness and hardness of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) material. The experimental observations strongly supported the computational modelling predictions that showed no significant difference in the degradation rate and the changes in the elastic modulus of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for thicknesses larger than 100 μm.

  9. Strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from sour doughs degrade phytic acid and improve calcium and magnesium solubility from whole wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H W; Ouvry, A; Bervas, E; Guy, C; Messager, A; Demigne, C; Remesy, C

    2000-06-01

    Five strains of lactic bacteria have been isolated from sour doughs and examined for their ability to degrade phytic acid. In white flour medium in which phytic acid was the only source of phosphorus, the disappearance of phytate and an elevation of inorganic phosphate were observed after only 2 h of incubation in all strains tested (-30 and +60%, respectively). Both phenomena correspond to phytate breakdown. No difference was observed in the levels of phytic acid hydrolysis among strains, suggesting that phytase enzymes are similar among these bacteria. Using whole wheat flour medium naturally rich in phytic acid in the presence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain 38, a 9 h fermentation established that the degradation of PA and the production of lactic acid lead to greater Ca and Mg solubility than in control medium.

  10. Normal phase LC-MS determination of retinoic acid degradation products.

    PubMed

    Bempong, D K; Honigberg, I L; Meltzer, N M

    1995-03-01

    The degradation products formed when 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA) and all-trans RA were exposed to fluorescent light and air were investigated. These retinoids are known to undergo Z-E isomerization (due to the existence of four unsaturated double bonds) and oxidation when exposed to light and air. Analysis by LC was carried out on a 25 cm x 4.6 mm Zorbax Rx-SIL (5 microns) with a mobile phase (1.4 ml min-1) of heptane-THF-acetic acid (96.5:3.5:0.015) and an in-line UV (365 nm) detector. The LC eluate was coupled through a Vestec universal interface to a Finnigan 4023 mass spectrometer. EI-mass spectra were obtained at 77 eV from m/z 200 to 350 with multiplier voltage of 1200 V. Solid samples of 13-cis RA and all-trans RA exposed to light and air and also solutions of these retinoids in the mobile phase exposed to the same conditions were used for the analysis. Tentative identities of the degradation products from the mass spectra suggest the isomerization of the retinoids (Z-E isomerism) and the formation of the 5,6-epoxides of these isomers. Identities of the 5,6-epoxides were confirmed with chromatographic and mass spectral data from synthetic samples of the epoxides. Isomerization occurred more readily in solution than in the solid form and the 13-cis RA isomer oxidized more readily than the all-trans isomer.

  11. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  12. Structural Characterization of the Degradation Products of a Minor Natural Sweet Diterpene Glycoside Rebaudioside M under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Indra; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of rebaudioside M, a minor sweet component of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, under conditions that simulated extreme pH and temperature conditions has been studied. Thus, rebaudioside M was treated with 0.1 M phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.0) and 80 °C temperature for 24 h. Experimental results indicated that rebaudioside M under low pH and higher temperature yielded three minor degradation compounds, whose structural characterization was performed on the basis of 1D (1H-, 13C-) & 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR, HRMS, MS/MS spectral data as well as enzymatic and acid hydrolysis studies. PMID:24424316

  13. Structural characterization of the degradation products of a minor natural sweet diterpene glycoside Rebaudioside M under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Indra; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-14

    Degradation of rebaudioside M, a minor sweet component of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, under conditions that simulated extreme pH and temperature conditions has been studied. Thus, rebaudioside M was treated with 0.1 M phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.0) and 80 °C temperature for 24 h. Experimental results indicated that rebaudioside M under low pH and higher temperature yielded three minor degradation compounds, whose structural characterization was performed on the basis of 1D (1H-, 13C-) & 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR, HRMS, MS/MS spectral data as well as enzymatic and acid hydrolysis studies.

  14. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of formic acid using a porous TiO[sub 2] thin-film electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Anderson, M.A. )

    1994-03-01

    The degradation of formic acid (HCOOH) using titanium dioxide (TiO[sub 2]) in photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic reactions was investigated in order to determine whether electrical biasing could improve the efficiency of photocatalytic reactions. This study addressed the effects of film thickness, biasing potential, presence of oxygen, and added inorganic electrolytes on the photocatalytic degradation of HCOOH. The results of these experiments showed that the degradation of HCOOH in this system was due only to the photocatalytic as opposed to homogeneous photolysis reactions. Degradation efficiency of the photocatalytic reaction was roughly proportional to the TiO[sub 2] film thickness. In the photoelectrocatalytic reaction, positive potentials (vs saturated calomel electrode, SCE) improved the degradation efficiency and +0.0 V (vs SCE) was enough to obtain a maximum efficiency. The supply of oxygen was essential in the photocatalytic reaction, while the photoelectrocatalytic reaction was not significantly affected by the removal of oxygen. The presence of inorganic electrolytes lowered the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of HCOOH. However, the efficiency of photoelectrocatalytic degradation was not affected by inorganic electrolytes. Overall, when used with the bias, the system showed efficient degradation over a wide range of conditions. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Rumen Degradability and Small Intestinal Digestibility of the Amino Acids in Four Protein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Jin, L.; Wen, Q. N.; Kopparapu, N. K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Y. G.

    2016-01-01

    The supplementation of livestock feed with animal protein is a present cause for public concern, and plant protein shortages have become increasingly prominent in China. This conflict may be resolved by fully utilizing currently available sources of plant protein. We estimated the rumen degradability and the small intestinal digestibility of the amino acids (AA) in rapeseed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SBM), sunflower seed meal (SFM) and sesame meal (SSM) using the mobile nylon bag method to determine the absorbable AA content of these protein supplements as a guide towards dietary formulations for the dairy industry. Overall, this study aimed to utilize protein supplements effectively to guide dietary formulations to increase milk yield and save plant protein resources. To this end, we studied four cows with a permanent rumen fistula and duodenal T-shape fistula in a 4×4 Latin square experimental design. The results showed that the total small intestine absorbable amino acids and small intestine absorbable essential amino acids were higher in the SBM (26.34% and 13.11% dry matter [DM], respectively) than in the SFM (13.97% and 6.89% DM, respectively). The small intestine absorbable Lys contents of the SFM, SSM, RSM and SBM were 0.86%, 0.88%, 1.43%, and 2.12% (DM basis), respectively, and the absorbable Met contents of these meals were 0.28%, 1.03%, 0.52%, and 0.47% (DM basis), respectively. Among the examined food sources, the milk protein score of the SBM (0.181) was highest followed by those of the RSM (0.136), SSM (0.108) and SFM (0.106). The absorbable amino acid contents of the protein supplements accurately reflected protein availability, which is an important indicator of the balance of feed formulation. Therefore, a database detailing the absorbable AA should be established. PMID:26732449

  16. Efficient treatment of perfluorohexanoic acid by nanofiltration followed by electrochemical degradation of the NF concentrate.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Álvaro; Gorri, Daniel; Urtiaga, Ane

    2017-04-01

    The present study was aimed at the development of a strategy for removing and degrading perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) from industrial process waters at concentrations in the range 60-200 mg L(-1). The treatment train consisted of nanofiltration (NF) separation followed by electrochemical degradation of the NF concentrate. Using a laboratory-scale system and working in the total recirculation mode, the DowFilm NF270 membrane provided PFHxA rejections that varied in the range 96.6-99.4% as the operating pressure was increased from 2.5 to 20 bar. The NF operation in concentration mode enabled a volume reduction factor of 5 and increased the PFHxA concentration in the retentate to 870 mg L(-1). Results showed that the increase in PFHxA concentration and the presence of calcium sulfate salts did not induce irreversible membrane fouling. The NF retentate was treated in a commercial undivided electrochemical cell provided with two parallel flow-by compartments separated by bipolar boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode, BDD counter anode, and counter cathode. Current densities ranging from 20 to 100 A m(-2) were examined. The electrochemical degradation rate of PFHxA reached 98% and was accompanied by its efficient mineralization, as the reduction of total organic carbon was higher than 95%. Energy consumption, which was 15.2 kWh m(-3) of treated NF concentrate, was minimized by selecting operation at 50 A m(-2). While most of the previous research on the treatment of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) focused on the removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), these compounds have been phased out by chemical manufacturers. Our findings are relevant for the treatment of PFHxA, which appears to be one of the present alternatives to long-chain PFASs thanks to its lower bioaccumulative potential than PFOA and PFOS. However, PFHxA also behaves as a persistent pollutant. Moreover, our results highlight the potential of combining

  17. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  18. Degradation of dissolved organic monomers and short-chain fatty acids in sandy marine sediment by fermentation and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The decay of a wide range of organic monomers (short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA's), amino acids, glucose and a pyrimidine) was studied in marine sediments using experimental plug flow-through reactors. The reactions were followed in the presence and absence of 10 mM SO 42-. Degradation stoichiometry of individual monomers (inflow concentration of 6 mM organic C) was traced by measuring organic (VFA's, amino acids) and inorganic (CO 2, NH 4+, SO 42-) compounds in the outflow. Fermentation of amino acids was efficient and complete during passage through anoxic sediment reactors. Aliphatic amino acids (alanine, serine and glutamate) were primarily recovered as CO 2 (24-34%), formate (3-22%) and acetate (41-83%), whereas only ˜1/3 of the aromatic amino acid (tyrosine) was recovered as CO 2 (13%) and acetate (20%). Fermentation of glucose and cytosine was also efficient (78-86%) with CO 2 (30-35%), formate (3%) and acetate (28-33%) as the primary products. Fermentation of VFA's (acetate, propionate and butyrate), on the other hand, appeared to be product inhibited. The presence of SO 42- markedly stimulated VFA degradation (29-45% efficiency), and these compounds were recovered as CO 2 (17% for butyrate to 100% for acetate) and acetate (51% and 82% for propionate and butyrate, respectively). When reaction stoichiometry during fermentation is compared with compound depletion during sulfate reduction, the higher proportion CO 2 recovery is consistent with lower acetate and formate accumulation. Our results therefore suggest that fermentation reactions mediate the initial degradation of added organic compounds, even during active sulfate reduction. Fermentative degradation stoichiometry also suggested significant H 2 production, and >50% of sulfate reduction appeared to be fuelled by H 2. Furthermore, our results suggest that fermentation was the primary deamination step during degradation of the amino acids and cytosine.

  19. Prediction of the ageing of commercial lager beer during storage based on the degradation of iso-α-acids.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Carlos A; Nimubona, Dieudonné; Caballero, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Iso-α-acids and their chemically modified variants are responsible for the bitterness of beer and play a disproportionately large role in the final quality of beer. The current study was undertaken to predict the degradation of commercial lager beers related to changes in the concentration of trans-iso-α-acids during storage by using high-pressure liquid chromatography. In the analysed beers the concentration of isohumulone (average concentration 28 mg L(-1)) was greater than that of isocohumulone (20 mg L(-1)) and isoadhumulone (10 mg L(-1)). The kinetic parameters, activation energy and rate constant, of the trans-iso-α-acids were calculated. In the case of dark beers, the activation energy for the degradation of trans-isocohumulones was found to be higher than for trans-isohumulones and trans-isoadhumulones, whereas in pale and alcohol-free beers activation energies for the degradation of the three trans isomers were similar. The loss of iso-α-acids can be calculated using the activation energy of the degradation of trans-iso-α-acids and the temperature profile of the accelerated ageing. The results obtained in the investigation can be used in the beer industry to predict the alteration of the bitterness of beer during storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Introducing saccharic acid as an efficient iron chelate to enhance photo-Fenton degradation of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Madras, Giridhar

    2016-11-01

    The identification of iron chelates that can enhance photo-Fenton degradation is of great interest in the field of advanced oxidation process. Saccharic acid (SA) is a polyhydroxy carboxylic acid and completely non-toxic. Importantly, it can effectively bind Fe(III) as well as induce photoreduction of Fe(III). Despite having these interesting properties, the effect of SA on photo-Fenton degradation has not been studied. Herein, we demonstrate the first assessment of SA as an iron chelate in photo-Fenton process using methylene blue (MB) as a model organic contaminant. Our results demonstrate that SA has the ability to (i) enhance the photo-Fenton degradation of MB by about 11 times at pH 4.5 (ii) intensify photochemical reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by about 17 times and (iii) accelerate the rate of consumption of H2O2 in photo-Fenton process by about 5 times (iv) increase the TOC reduction by about 2 times and (v) improve the photo-Fenton degradation of MB in the presence of a variety of common inorganic ions and organic matter. The influential properties of SA on photo-Fenton degradation is attributed to the efficient photochemical reduction of Fe(III) via LMCT (ligand to metal charge transfer reaction) to Fe(II), which then activated H2O2 to generate OH and accelerated photo-Fenton degradation efficiency. Moreover, the effect of operational parameters such as oxidant: contaminant (H2O2: MB) ratio, catalyst: contaminant (Fe(III)SA: MB) ratio, Fe(III): SA stoichiometry and pH on the degradation of MB by photo-Fenton in the presence of SA is demonstrated. Importantly, SA assisted photo-Fenton caused effective degradation of MB and 4-Chlorophenol under natural sunlight irradiation in natural water matrix. The findings strongly support SA as a deserving iron chelate to enhance photo-Fenton degradation.

  1. Contact Sensitizers Induce Skin Inflammation via ROS Production and Hyaluronic Acid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Philipp R.; Wölfle, Ute; Dürr, Christoph; von Loewenich, Friederike D.; Schempp, Christoph M.; Freudenberg, Marina A.; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) represents a severe health problem with increasing worldwide prevalence. It is a T cell-mediated skin disease induced by protein-reactive organic and inorganic chemicals. A key feature of contact allergens is their ability to trigger an innate immune response that leads to skin inflammation. Previous evidence from the mouse contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model suggests a role for endogenous activators of innate immune signaling. Here, we analyzed the role of contact sensitizer induced ROS production and concomitant changes in hyaluronic acid metabolism on CHS responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed in vitr