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Sample records for phex transgene corrects

  1. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  2. Expression and inactivation of osteopontin-degrading PHEX enzyme in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neves, Raquel L; Chiarantin, Gabrielly M D; Nascimento, Fábio D; Pesquero, João B; Nader, Helena B; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; McKee, Marc D; Carmona, Adriana K; Barros, Nilana M T

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic enzymes mediate the activation or inactivation of many physiologic and pathologic processes. The PHEX gene (Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidase on the X chromosome) encodes a metallopeptidase, which is mutated in patients with a prevalent form (1:20,000) of inherited rickets-X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). XLH shows growth retardation, hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and defective renal phosphate reabsorption and metabolism of vitamin D. Most PHEX studies have focused on bone, and recently we identified osteopontin (OPN) as the first protein substrate for PHEX, demonstrating in the murine model of XLH (Hyp mice) an increase in OPN that contributes to the osteomalacia. Besides its role in bone mineralization, OPN is expressed in many tissues, and therein has different functions. In tumor biology, OPN is known to be associated with metastasis. Here, we extend our PHEX-OPN studies to investigate PHEX expression in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line and its possible involvement in modulating OPN function. Real-time PCR showed PHEX-OPN co-expression in SCC cells, with sequencing of the 22 exons showing no mutation of the PHEX gene. Although recombinant PHEX hydrolyze SCC-OPN fragments, unlike in bone cells, SCC-PHEX protein was not predominantly at the plasma membrane. Enzymatic activity assays, FACs and immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that membrane PHEX is degraded by cysteine proteases and the decreased PHEX activity could contribute to inappropriate OPN regulation. These results highlight for the first time PHEX in tumor biology.

  3. The Chicken or the Egg: PHEX, FGF23 & SIBLINGs unscrambled

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2012-01-01

    The eggshell is an ancient innovation that helped the vertebrates’ transition from the oceans and gain dominion over the land. Coincident with this conquest several new eggshell and noncollagenous bone-matrix proteins (NCPs) emerged. The protein ovocleidin-116 is one of these proteins with an ancestry stretching back to the Triassic. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called Small Integrin-Binding Ligand Interacting Glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). The genes for these NCPs are all clustered on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of the SIBLING proteins is an Acidic Serine Aspartate Rich MEPE associated motif (ASARM). The ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide play roles in mineralization, bone turnover, mechanotransduction, phosphate regulation and energy metabolism. ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX, a Zn metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing SIBLING protein, Dentin Matrix Protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone-renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both XLH and ARHR increased FGF23 expression occurs and activating mutations in FGF23 cause autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR). ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. This review will discuss the evidence for a new integrative pathway involved in bone formation, bone-renal mineralization, renal phosphate homeostasis and energy metabolism in disease and health. PMID:22573484

  4. A de novo mosaic mutation of PHEX in a boy with hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen; Chen, Jiao; Sun, Li; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Feng, Xue; Sun, Jun-Hui; Lu, Ling-Ping; Yu, Ping; Qi, Ming

    2016-03-01

    X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR), is characterized mainly by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, short stature and abnormal bone mineralization. PHEX, located at Xp22.1-p22.2, is the gene causing XLHR. We aim to characterize the pathogenesis of a Chinese boy who is apparently 'heterozygous' in PHEX gene. Direct sequencing showed two peaks: one was a wild-type 'G' and the other was one base substitution to 'A', though the patient was a male. TA clone assay clearly showed each sequences and the ratios. The mutation effect was predicted via bioinformatics and validated by exon-trapping assay. Real-time PCR was applied to determine the copy number of PHEX. TA clone assay showed the frequency of normal (G) to mutant allele (A) as 19:13. Normal karyotype and real-time PCR results indicate the normal copy number of PHEX. This splice site mutation leads to 4 bp of exon 18 skipping out causing frame shift p.Gly590Glufs*28 that ends up with a loss of active site and Zn(2+)-binding site of PHEX, which probably interfere with renal phosphate reabsorption and bone mineralization. In conclusion, mutation at conserved splice acceptor site resulted in aberrant splicing, ending up with a damaged protein product. This novel mutation is de novo in mosaic pattern that may be induced during early postzygotic period. Taking mosaic somatic mutation of PHEX into consideration is strongly suggested in genetic counseling and etiology research for XLHR.

  5. Correction of murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII by a human. beta. -glucuronidase transgene

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, J.W.; Vogler, C.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Sly, W.S. ); Birkenmeier, E.H.; Gwynn, B. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors recently described a murine model for mucopolysaccharidosis VII in mice that have an inherited deficiency of {beta}-glucuronidase. Affected mice, of genotype gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps}, present clinical manifestations similar to those of humans with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly syndrome) and are shown here to have secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The mucopolysaccharidosis VII phenotype in both species includes dwarfism, skeletal deformities, and premature death. Lysosome storage is visualized within enlarged vesicles and correlates biochemically with accumulation of undegraded and partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. In this report they describe the consequences of introducing the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene, GUSB, into gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice that produce virtually no murine {beta}-glucuronidase. Transgenic mice homozygous for the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mutation expressed high levels of human {beta}-glucuronidase activity in all tissues examined and were phenotypically normal. Biochemically, both the intralysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and the secondary elevation of other acid hydrolases were corrected. These findings demonstrate that the GUSB transgene is expressed in gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice and that human {beta}-glucuronidase corrects the murine mucopolysaccharidosis storage disease.

  6. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qing-lin; Xu, Jia; Zhang, Zeng; He, Jin-wei; Lu, Lian-song; Fu, Wen-zhen; Zhang, Zhen-lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  7. Seven novel and six de novo PHEX gene mutations in patients with hypophosphatemic rickets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan-Shan; Gu, Jie-Mei; Yu, Wei-Jia; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidase on the X chromosome (PHEX) have been identified as a cause of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH; OMIM 307800). In the present study, we enrolled 43 patients from 18 unrelated families clinically diagnosed with hypophosphatemic rickets and 250 healthy controls. For each available individual, all 22 exons with their exon-intron boundaries of the PHEX gene were directly sequenced. The levels of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) were measured as well. Sequencing analysis detected 17 different PHEX gene mutations, and 7 of these were identified as novel: 3 missense mutations, including c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg) in exon 3, c.229T>C (p.Cys77Arg) in exon 3 and c.824T>C (p.Leu275Pro) in exon 7; 2 deletion mutations, including c.528delT (p.Glu177LysfsX44) in exon 5 and c.1234delA (p.Ser412ValfsX12) in exon 11; and 2 alternative splicing mutations, including c.436_436+1delAG in intron 4 at splicing donor sites and c.1483-1G>C in intron 13 at splicing acceptor sites. Moreover, 6 mutations were proven to be de novo in 6 sporadic cases and the probands were all females. No mutations were found in the 250 healthy controls. The serum levels of FGF23 varied widely among the patients with XLH, and no significant difference was found when compared with those of the healthy controls. On the whole, the findings of this study provide new insight into the spectrum of PHEX mutations and provide potential evidence of a critical domain in PHEX protein. In addition, the finding of an overlap of the serum FGF23 levels between the patients with XLH and the healthy controls indicates its limited diagnostic value in XLH. PMID:27840894

  8. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  9. Phex cDNA cloning from rat bone and studies on phex mRNA expression: tissue-specificity, age-dependency, and regulation by insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zoidis, E; Zapf, J; Schmid, C

    2000-10-25

    Phosphate regulating gene with homology to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (Phex) inactivating mutations cause X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). The disorder is characterized by decreased renal phosphate (Pi) reabsorption in both humans and mice, in the latter shown to be due to a reduction in mRNA and protein of type II sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter (NadPi-II). To gain insight into the physiological role of Phex, we cloned the rat cDNA and examined tissue-specific and age-dependent mRNA expression. The rat full-length cDNA (2247 nucleotides) shares 96 and 90% identity with the mouse and human cDNA, respectively. We found 6.6 kb Phex transcripts in calvarial bone and lungs, and a weaker signal in liver of newborn rats. In adult animals, Phex mRNA signals were weaker in bone and lungs and absent in liver. Phex mRNA expression in bones and NadPi-I and -II cotransporter mRNA expression in kidney were also determined in hypophysectomized rats. These rats, which lack GH and IGF I, stop growing and exhibit decreased serum Pi levels. Treatment during 6 days with IGF I stimulated growth and increased serum Pi. Phex and NadPi-II cotransporter mRNA levels were higher in IGF I than in vehicle-treated animals, while mRNA expression of NadPi-I, 1alpha-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase and serum levels of calcitriol remained unaffected. Age-dependency of Phex expression suggests a role for Phex in Pi retention during growth. Moreover, our findings indicate that an increase in Phex expression in bones under the influence of IGF I may contribute to increased serum Pi by enhancing renal phosphate reabsorption. Because IGF I treatment increased NadPi-II mRNA expression and serum Pi, IGF I appears to act at least partially at pretranslational levels to increase NadPi-II mediated renal Pi retention in growing rats.

  10. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice.

  11. Negative regulation in correct tissue-specific expression of mouse mammary tumor virus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S R; Hsu, C L; Choi, Y; Mok, E; Dudley, J P

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an endogenous murine retrovirus that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the mammary and salivary glands, lungs, kidneys, and seminal vesicles and in the lymphoid cells of the spleen and thymus. Several studies have shown that the long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus can direct the expression of reporter genes to the same tissues in transgenic mice. To determine whether multiple regulatory elements within the LTR are involved in this tissue-specific expression, we have established lines of transgenic mice containing transgenes that have deletions in the MMTV LTR. Deletions of all LTR sequences upstream of -364 or of LTR sequences from -165 to -665 both result in the expression of linked reporter genes such as the simian virus 40 early region or the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in novel sites, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle; expression of endogenous MMTV and transgenes containing the full-length LTR is not detected in these organs. Negative regulation appears to involve more than one region, since deletion of sequences between either -201 and -471 or -201 and -344, as well as sequences upstream of -364, results in inappropriate expression in heart, brain, and skeletal muscle. Therefore, a negative regulatory element(s) in the MMTV LTR can suppress transcription from the viral promoter in several different organs. This represents the first example of generalized negative regulatory elements that act in many different tissues in transgenic mice to prevent inappropriate expression of a gene. Images PMID:1700274

  12. Growth in PHEX-associated X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets: the importance of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Catherine; Guegan, Katie; Offiah, Amaka; Neill, Richard O'; Hiorns, Melanie P; Ellard, Sian; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hoff, William Van't; Waters, Aoife M

    2012-04-01

    Inactivating mutations in phosphate-regulating endopeptidase (PHEX) cause X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) characterized by phosphaturia, hypophosphatemia, bony deformities, and growth retardation. We assessed the efficacy of combined calcitriol and orally administered phosphate (Pi) therapy on longitudinal growth in relation to age at treatment onset in a retrospective, single-center review of children with XLHR and documented PHEX mutations. Growth was compared in those who started treatment before (G1; N = 10; six boys) and after (G2; N = 13; five boys) 1 year old. Median height standard deviation score (HSDS) at treatment onset was normal in G1: 0.1 [interquartile range (IR) -1.3 to 0.4) and significantly (p = 0.004) lower in G2 (IR -2.1 (-2.8 to -1.4). Treatment duration was similar [G1 8.5 (4.0-15.2) vs G2 11.9 (6.2-14.3) years; p = 0.56], as were prescribed phosphate and calcitriol doses. Recent HSDS was significantly (p = 0.009) better in G1 [-0.7 (-1.5 to 0.3)] vs G2 [-2.0 (-2.3 to -1.0)]. No effects of gender or genotype on growth could be identified. Children with PHEX-associated XLHR benefit from early treatment and can achieve normal growth. Minimal catchup growth was seen in those who started treatment later. Our findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis to allow treatment before growth has been compromised.

  13. Correct targeting of proinsulin in protein storage vacuoles of transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, N B; Araújo, A C G; Leite, A; Murad, A M; Vianna, G R; Rech, E L

    2010-06-22

    Soybean plants are promising bioreactors for the expression of biochemically complex proteins that cannot be produced in a safe and/or economically viable way in microorganisms, eukaryotic culture cells or secreted by transgenic animal glands. Soybeans present many desirable agronomic characteristics for high scale protein production, such as high productivity, short reproductive cycle, photoperiod sensitivity, and natural organs destined for protein accumulation in the seeds. The significant similarities between plant and human cells in terms of protein synthesis processes, folding, assembly, and post-translational processing are important for efficient accumulation of recombinant proteins. We obtained two transgenic lines using biolystics, incorporating the human proinsulin gene under control of the monocot tissue-specific promoter from sorghum gamma-kafirin seed storage protein gene and the alpha-coixin cotyledonary vacuolar signal peptide from Coix lacryma-jobi (Poaceae). Transgenic plants expressed the proinsulin gene and accumulated the polypeptide in mature seeds. Protein targeting to cotyledonary protein storage vacuoles was successfully achieved and confirmed with immunocytochemistry assays. The combination of different regulatory sequences was apparently responsible for high stability in protein accumulation, since human proinsulin was detected after seven years under room temperature storage conditions.

  14. Correct processing of the kiwifruit protease actinidin in transgenic tobacco requires the presence of the C-terminal propeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, W; Amiss, J; Try, R; Praekelt, U; Scott, R; Smith, H

    1995-01-01

    A 355 cauliflower mosaic virus promoter and a tapetum-specific promoter were used to direct the synthesis in tobacco of preproactinidin and a derivative that lacked a C-terminal extension. Preproactinidin was processed into a form that migrated identically on protein gels with mature actinidin extracted from kiwifruit. This protein was proteolytically active in vitro, and high-level accumulation of this protein appeared to be detrimental to plant growth. Plants expressing an actinidin cDNA construct that lacked the sequence encoding the C-terminal propeptide were phenotypically normal but accumulated N-proactinidin, which was proteolytically active in vitro but did not self-cleave to mature actinidin. In transgenic tobacco, the C-terminal extension of actinidin is therefore required for correct processing. PMID:7784505

  15. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  16. Regulation of bone-renal mineral and energy metabolism: the PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM pathway.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced 500

  17. Regulation of Bone–Renal Mineral and Energy Metabolism: The PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing the SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced

  18. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway involving FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aline; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Li, Hua; Karydis, Anastasios; Feng, Jian Q.; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblastic growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating phosphaturic hormone. Inactivating mutations of the endopeptidase PHEX or the SIBLING protein DMP1 result in equivalent intrinsic bone mineralization defects and increased Fgf23 expression in osteocytes. The mechanisms whereby PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 expression are unknown. We examined the possibility that PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 through a common pathway by analyzing the phenotype of compound Phex and Dmp1 mutant mice (Hyp/Dmp1−/−). Compared to single-mutant littermates, compound-mutant Hyp/Dmp1−/− mice displayed nonadditive elevations of serum FGF23 (1912 ± 183, 1715 ± 178, and 1799 ± 181 pg/ml), hypophosphatemia (Pi: 6.0 ± 0.3, 5.8 ± 0.2, and 5.4 ± 0.1 mg/dl), and severity of rickets/osteomalacia (bone mineral density: −36, −36, and −30%). Microarray analysis of long bones identified gene expression profiles implicating common activation of the FGFR pathway in all the mutant groups. Furthermore, inhibiting FGFR signaling using SU5402 in Hyp- and Dmp1−/−-derived bone marrow stromal cells prevented the increase in Fgf23 mRNA expression (129- and 124-fold increase in Hyp and Dmp1−/− vs. 1.3-fold in Hyp+SU5402 and 2.5-fold in Dmp1−/−+SU5402, P<0.05). For all analyses, samples collected from nonmutant wild-type littermates served as controls. These findings indicate that PHEX and DMP1 control a common pathway regulating bone mineralization and FGF23 production, the latter involving activation of the FGFR signaling in osteocytes.—Martin, A., Liu, S., David, V., Li, H., Karydis, A., Feng, J. Q., Quarles, L. D. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway. PMID:21507898

  19. Corrections.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Lai Y-S, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, et al. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 2015; published online May 22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3—Figure 1 of this Article should have contained a box stating ‘100 references added’ with an arrow pointing inwards, rather than a box stating ‘199 records excluded’, and an asterisk should have been added after ‘1473 records extracted into GNTD’. Additionally, the positioning of the ‘§ and ‘†’ footnotes has been corrected in table 1. These corrections have been made to the online version as of June 4, 2015.

  20. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error.

  1. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  2. Correction of Murine Rag2 Severe Combined Immunodeficiency by Lentiviral Gene Therapy Using a Codon-optimized RAG2 Therapeutic Transgene

    PubMed Central

    van Til, Niek P; de Boer, Helen; Mashamba, Nomusa; Wabik, Agnieszka; Huston, Marshall; Visser, Trudi P; Fontana, Elena; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cassani, Barbara; Zhang, Fang; Thrasher, Adrian J; Villa, Anna; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2) deficiency results in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with complete lack of T and B lymphocytes. Initial gammaretroviral gene therapy trials for other types of SCID proved effective, but also revealed the necessity of safe vector design. We report the development of lentiviral vectors with the spleen focus forming virus (SF) promoter driving codon-optimized human RAG2 (RAG2co), which improved phenotype amelioration compared to native RAG2 in Rag2−/− mice. With the RAG2co therapeutic transgene, T-cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin repertoire, T-cell mitogen responses, plasma immunoglobulin levels and T-cell dependent and independent specific antibody responses were restored. However, the thymus double positive T-cell population remained subnormal, possibly due to the SF virus derived element being sensitive to methylation/silencing in the thymus, which was prevented by replacing the SF promoter by the previously reported silencing resistant element (ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE)), and also improved B-cell reconstitution to eventually near normal levels. Weak cellular promoters were effective in T-cell reconstitution, but deficient in B-cell reconstitution. We conclude that immune functions are corrected in Rag2−/− mice by genetic modification of stem cells using the UCOE driven codon-optimized RAG2, providing a valid optional vector for clinical implementation. PMID:22692499

  3. Genetic diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets in a cohort study: Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels are associated with PHEX mutation type

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic Hypophosphatemic Rickets (HR) is a group of diseases characterized by renal phosphate wasting with inappropriately low or normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) serum levels. The most common form of HR is X-linked dominant HR (XLHR) which is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. The purpose of this study was to perform genetic diagnosis in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnosis of HR, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients and to compare our data with other HR cohort studies. Methods Forty three affected individuals from 36 non related families were analyzed. For the genetic analysis, the PHEX gene was sequenced in all of the patients and in 13 cases the study was complemented by mRNA sequencing and Multiple Ligation Probe Assay. For the genotype-phenotype correlation study, the clinical and biochemical phenotype of the patients was compared with the type of mutation, which was grouped into clearly deleterious or likely causative, using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test. Results Mutations in the PHEX gene were identified in all the patients thus confirming an XLHR. Thirty four different mutations were found distributed throughout the gene with higher density at the 3' end. The majority of the mutations were novel (69.4%), most of them resulted in a truncated PHEX protein (83.3%) and were family specific (88.9%). Tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels were significantly lower in patients carrying clearly deleterious mutations than in patients carrying likely causative ones (61.39 ± 19.76 vs. 80.14 ± 8.80%, p = 0.028 and 40.93 ± 30.73 vs. 78.46 ± 36.27 pg/ml, p = 0.013). Conclusions PHEX gene mutations were found in all the HR cases analyzed, which was in contrast with other cohort studies. Patients with clearly deleterious PHEX mutations had lower TRP and 1,25(OH)2D levels suggesting that the PHEX type of mutation might predict the XLHR phenotype severity. PMID

  4. A 3,387 bp 5'-flanking sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene provides correct tissue-specific expression of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serova, Irina A; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Andreeva, Ludmila E; Burkov, Ivan A; Dias, Luciene P B; Battulin, Nariman R; Smirnov, Alexander V; Serov, Oleg L

    2012-06-01

    A new expression vector containing the 1,944 bp 5'-flanking regulatory region together with exon 1 and intron 1 of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene (CSN1S1), the full-sized human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene (hGCSF) and the 3'-flanking sequence of the bovine CSN1S1, was created. The vector DNA was used for generation of four mouse transgenic lines. The transgene was integrated into chromosomes 8 and 12 of two founders as 2 and 5 copies, respectively. Tissue-specific secretion of hG-CSF into the milk of transgenic mice was in the range of 19-40 μg/ml. RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of the transgenic mice demonstrated that expression of hGCSF was detected in only the mammary gland in the progeny of all founders. Moreover, cells were shown to be positive for hG-CSF by immunofluorescent analysis in the mammary glands but not in any other tissues. There were no signs of mosaic expression in the mammary gland. Trace amounts of hG-CSF were detected in the serum of females of two transgenic lines during lactation only. However, no transgenic mice showed any changes in hematopoiesis based on the number of granulocytes in blood. Immunoblotting of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic mice revealed two forms, presumably the glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms. The hematopoietic activity of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic females is comparable to that of recombinant G-CSF. In general, the data obtained in this study show that the new expression vector is able to provide correct tissue-specific expression of hG-CSF with high biological activity in transgenic mice.

  5. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  6. [Detection of transgenic crop with gene chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Sun, Chun-Yun; Feng, Hong; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Yin, Hai-Bin

    2003-05-01

    Some selected available sequences of reporter genes,resistant genes, promoters and terminators are amplified by PCR for the probes of transgenic crop detection gene chip. These probes are arrayed at definite density and printed on the surface of amino-slides by bioRobot MicroGrid II. Results showed that gene chip worked quickly and correctly, when transgenic rice, pawpaw,maize and soybean were applied.

  7. Neuroanatomy and transgenic technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a short review that introduces recent advances of neuroanatomy and transgenic technologies. The anatomical complexity of the nervous system remains a subject of tremendous fascination among neuroscientists. In order to tackle this extraordinary complexity, powerful transgenic technologies a...

  8. Weeding with transgenes.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2003-05-01

    Transgenes promise to reduce insecticide and fungicide use but relatively little has been done to significantly reduce herbicide use through genetic engineering. Recently, three strategies for transgene utilization have been developed that have the potential to change this. These are the improvement of weed-specific biocontrol agents, enhancement of crop competition or allelopathic traits, and production of cover crops that will self-destruct near the time of planting. Failsafe risk mitigation technologies are needed for most of these strategies.

  9. [Inheritance and expression stability of transgene in transgenic animals].

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing-Ran; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2011-05-01

    Transgenic technology is one of the most hotspots in biology. In the past decade, the progress in animal cloning has provided an alternative method to improve transgenic efficiency. Many kinds of transgenic animals have been successfully produced via the combination of transfection and nuclear transfer. However, the ultimate aim of transgenesis is not to produce several transgenic animals, but to service for the needs of human. In animal production, transgenic technology has been used to breed new livestock, which has received a lot of attention in China. It has been evidenced that inheritance and expression instability of transgene in transgenic animals is still the major limitation, which is attributed to position effect, epigenetic modification, and hereditary efficiency of transgene. In this review, we discussed the three points for promoting the industrialization of animal transgenic breeding.

  10. BRCA1 deficient embryonic stem cells display a decreased homologous recombination frequency and an increased frequency of non-homologous recombination that is corrected by expression of a brca1 transgene.

    PubMed

    Snouwaert, J N; Gowen, L C; Latour, A M; Mohn, A R; Xiao, A; DiBiase, L; Koller, B H

    1999-12-20

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that has been classified as a tumor suppressor based on the fact that women carrying a mutated copy of the BRCA1 gene are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The association of BRCA1 with RAD51 has led to the hypothesis that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. We describe here the generation and analysis of murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines in which both copies of the murine homologue of the human BRCA1 gene have been disrupted by gene targeting. We show that exogenous DNA introduced into these BRCA1 deficient cells by electroporation is randomly integrated into the genome at a significantly higher rate than in wild type ES cells. In contrast, integration of exogenous DNA by homologous recombination occurs in BRCA1 deficient cells at a significantly lower rate than in wild type controls. When BRCA1 expression is re-established at 5-10% of normal levels by introduction of a Brca1 transgene into BRCA1 deficient ES cells, the frequency of random integration is reduced to wild type levels, although the frequency of homologous recombination is not significantly improved. These results suggest that BRCA1 plays a role in determining the response of cells to double stranded DNA breaks.

  11. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  12. Transgenic mammals and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Westphal, H

    1989-02-01

    Biotechnology has begun to realize the enormous potential of transgenic technology: mice with human genes that produce human proteins of therapeutic value in their milk, pigs that express bovine genes that help them gain weight and lose backfat, animals with engineered gene defects that mimic human genetic diseases.

  13. [Progress on transgenic mosquitoes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pin

    2011-04-30

    The genetically modified mosquitoes have been developed aiming to control mosquito-borne diseases by either reducing population sizes or replacing existing populations with vectors unable to transmit the disease. introduces some progress on the generation of transgenic mosquitoes and their fitness in wild population. This paper

  14. Transgenic Farm Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled scientists to isolate single genes, analyze and modify their nucleotide structure(s), make copies of these isolated genes, and insert copies of these genes into the genome of plants and animals. The transgenic technology of adding genes to li...

  15. Transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Houdebine, L M

    2000-01-01

    The production of recombinant proteins is one of the major successes of biotechnology. Animal cells are required to synthesize proteins with the appropriate post-translational modifications. Transgenic animals are being used for this purpose. Milk, egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma and silk worm cocoon from transgenic animals are candidates to be the source of recombinant proteins at an industrial scale. Although the first recombinant protein produced by transgenic animals is expected to be in the market in 2000, a certain number of technical problems remain to be solved before the various systems are optimized. Although the generation of transgenic farm animals has become recently easier mainly with the technique of animal cloning using transfected somatic cells as nuclear donor, this point remains a limitation as far as cost is concerned. Numerous experiments carried out for the last 15 years have shown that the expression of the transgene is predictable only to a limited extent. This is clearly due to the fact that the expression vectors are not constructed in an appropriate manner. This undoubtedly comes from the fact that all the signals contained in genes have not yet been identified. Gene constructions thus result sometime in poorly functional expression vectors. One possibility consists in using long genomic DNA fragments contained in YAC or BAC vectors. The other relies on the identification of the major important elements required to obtain a satisfactory transgene expression. These elements include essentially gene insulators, chromatin openers, matrix attached regions, enhancers and introns. A certain number of proteins having complex structures (formed by several subunits, being glycosylated, cleaved, carboxylated...) have been obtained at levels sufficient for an industrial exploitation. In other cases, the mammary cellular machinery seems insufficient to promote all the post-translational modifications. The addition of genes coding for enzymes

  16. Relative transgene expression frequencies in homozygous versus hemizygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Opsahl, Margaret L; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2013-12-01

    We have used a simple binomial model of stochastic transgene inactivation at the level of the chromosome or transgene, rather than the cellular level, for the analysis of two mouse transgenic lines that show variegated patterns of expression. This predicts the percentages of cells that express one, both or neither alleles of the transgene in homozygotes from the observed percentages of cells, which express the transgene in hemizygotes. It adequately explained the relationship between the numbers of cells expressing the transgene in hemizygous and homozygous mosaic 21OH/LacZ mouse adrenals and mosaic BLG/7 mouse mammary glands. The binomial model also predicted that a small proportion of cells in mosaic mammary glands of BLG/7 homozygotes would express both BLG/7 alleles but published data indicated that all cells expressing the transgene showed monoallelic expression. Although it didn't fit all of the BLG/7 data as precisely as a more complex model, which used several ad hoc assumptions to explain these results, the simple binomial model was able to explain the relationship in observed transgene expression frequencies between hemizygous and homozygous mosaic tissues for both 21OH/LacZ and BLG/7 mice. It may prove to be a useful general model for analysing other transgenic animals showing mosaic transgene expression.

  17. Transgenes for tea?

    PubMed

    Heritage, John

    2005-01-01

    So far, no compelling scientific evidence has been found to suggest that the consumption of transgenic or genetically modified (GM) plants by animals or humans is more likely to cause harm than is the consumption of their conventional counterparts. Despite this lack of scientific evidence, the economic prospects for GM plants are probably limited in the short term and there is public opposition to the technology. Now is a good time to address several issues concerning GM plants, including the potential for transgenes to migrate from GM plants to gut microbes or to animal or human tissues, the consequences of consuming GM crops, either as fresh plants or as silage, and the problems caused by current legislation on GM labelling and beyond.

  18. Transgenics in crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Wu, Y. H.; McAvoy, R.; Duan, H.

    2001-01-01

    With rapid world population growth and declining availability of fresh water and arable land, a new technology is urgently needed to enhance agricultural productivity. Recent discoveries in the field of crop transgenics clearly demonstrate the great potential of this technology for increasing food production and improving food quality while preserving the environment for future generations. In this review, we briefly discuss some of the recent achievements in crop improvement that have been made using gene transfer technology.

  19. Gene therapy: X-SCID transgene leukaemogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Candotti, Fabio; Otsu, Makoto; Sorrentino, Brian; Scobie, Linda; Cameron, Ewan; Blyth, Karen; Neil, Jim; Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain

    2006-09-21

    Gene therapy has been remarkably effective for the immunological reconstitution of patients with severe combined immune deficiency, but the occurrence of leukaemia in a few patients has stimulated debate about the safety of the procedure and the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis. Woods et al. forced high expression of the corrective therapeutic gene IL2RG, which encodes the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, in a mouse model of the disease and found that tumours appeared in a proportion of cases. Here we show that transgenic IL2RG does not necessarily have potent intrinsic oncogenic properties, and argue that the interpretation of this observation with respect to human trials is overstated.

  20. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  1. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  2. Transgenic horticultural crops in Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern biotechnology applications, including genetic engineering, are a powerful tool to complement the conventional methods of crop improvement. Asia currently has three countries cultivating biotech/transgenic crops – China, India, and the Philippines, but only China commercially grows a transgen...

  3. [Transgenics without Manichaeism].

    PubMed

    Valle, S

    2000-01-01

    We live in an era characterized by the hegemony of science and technology, an era fraught with questions awaiting answers which would enable a safe and sustainable future for humankind. The development of agro-industrial processes - food products in particular - through recombinant DNA technology has enhanced the profit prospects of the few big biotechnology companies and of large-scale farmers who have access to the latest technological developments. We thus oppose a moratorium on recombinant DNA technology. Moreover, hasty statements about risk-free transgenics may be misleading in the absence of extensive safety tests. There is a pressing need for the establishment of biosafety policy in this country involving the organized civil society and every government agency responsible for monitoring such matters. There is also the need to put in place a bio-surveillance and a code of ethics regarding genetic manipulation.

  4. Oat Phytochrome Is Biologically Active in Transgenic Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Boylan, M. T.; Quail, P. H.

    1989-08-01

    To determine the functional homology between phytochromes from evolutionarily divergent species, we used the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to express a monocot (oat) phytochrome cDNA in a dicot plant (tomato). Immunoblot analysis shows that more than 50% of the transgenic tomato plants synthesize the full-length oat phytochrome polypeptide. Moreover, leaves of light-grown transgenic plants contain appreciably less oat phytochrome than leaves from dark-adapted plants, and etiolated R1 transgenic seedlings have higher levels of spectrally active phytochrome than wild-type tomato seedlings in direct proportion to the level of immunochemically detectable oat polypeptide present. These data suggest that the heterologous oat polypeptide carries a functional chromophore, allowing reversible photoconversion between the two forms of the molecule, and that the far-red absorbing form (Pfr) is recognized and selectively degraded by the Pfr-specific degradative machinery in the dicot cell. The overexpression of oat phytochrome has pleiotropic, phenotypic consequences at all major phases of the life cycle. Adult transgenic tomato plants expressing high levels of the oat protein tend to be dwarfed, with dark green foliage and fruits. R1 transgenic seedlings have short hypocotyls with elevated anthocyanin contents. We conclude that a monocot phytochrome can be synthesized and correctly processed to a biologically active form in a dicot cell, and that the transduction pathway components that interact with the photoreceptor are evolutionarily conserved.

  5. Transgenic Rescue of the LARGEmyd Mouse: A LARGE Therapeutic Window?

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, J. C. W.; Lacey, E.; Booler, H.; Hopkinson, M.; Wells, D. J.; Brown, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    LARGE is a glycosyltransferase involved in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG). Absence of this protein in the LARGEmyd mouse results in α-DG hypoglycosylation, and is associated with central nervous system abnormalities and progressive muscular dystrophy. Up-regulation of LARGE has previously been proposed as a therapy for the secondary dystroglycanopathies: overexpression in cells compensates for defects in multiple dystroglycanopathy genes. Counterintuitively, LARGE overexpression in an FKRP-deficient mouse exacerbates pathology, suggesting that modulation of α-DG glycosylation requires further investigation. Here we demonstrate that transgenic expression of human LARGE (LARGE-LV5) in the LARGEmyd mouse restores α-DG glycosylation (with marked hyperglycosylation in muscle) and that this corrects both the muscle pathology and brain architecture. By quantitative analyses of LARGE transcripts we also here show that levels of transgenic and endogenous LARGE in the brains of transgenic animals are comparable, but that the transgene is markedly overexpressed in heart and particularly skeletal muscle (20–100 fold over endogenous). Our data suggest LARGE overexpression may only be deleterious under a forced regenerative context, such as that resulting from a reduction in FKRP: in the absence of such a defect we show that systemic expression of LARGE can indeed act therapeutically, and that even dramatic LARGE overexpression is well-tolerated in heart and skeletal muscle. Moreover, correction of LARGEmyd brain pathology with only moderate, near-physiological LARGE expression suggests a generous therapeutic window. PMID:27467128

  6. Corrective work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Leslie A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some general principles for planning corrective instruction and exercises in English as a second language, and follows with examples from the areas of phonemics, phonology, lexicon, idioms, morphology, and syntax. (IFS/WGA)

  7. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  8. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  9. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a green, sustainable and promising solution to problems of environmental contamination. It entails the use of plants for uptake, sequestration, detoxification or volatilization of inorganic and organic pollutants from soils, water, sediments and possibly air. Phytoremediation was born from the observation that plants possessed physiological properties useful for environmental remediation. This was shortly followed by the application of breeding techniques and artificial selection to genetically improve some of the more promising and interesting species. Now, after nearly 20 years of research, transgenic plants for phytoremediation have been produced, but none have reached commercial existence. Three main approaches have been developed: (1) transformation with genes from other organisms (mammals, bacteria, etc.); (2) transformation with genes from other plant species; and (3) overexpression of genes from the same plant species. Many encouraging results have been reported, even though in some instances results have been contrary to expectations. This review will illustrate the main examples with a critical discussion of what we have learnt from them.

  10. Jitter Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

  11. Metabolite fingerprinting in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Lee C; Linforth, Robert; Taylor, Andrew J; Lowe, Kenneth C; Power, J Brian; Davey, Michael R

    2005-03-01

    Metabolite fingerprinting has been achieved using direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) and linked gas chromatography (GC-APCI/EI-MS) for transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Evola) plants expressing an IPT gene under the control of the senescence-specific SAG12 promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana (P(SAG12)-IPT). Mature heads of transgenic lettuce and their azygous controls were maintained under defined conditions to assess their shelf life. Transgenic lettuce plants exhibited delayed senescence and significant increases (up to a maximum of threefold) in the concentrations of three volatile organic compounds (VOCs), corresponding to molecular masses of 45, 47 and 63, when compared with heads from azygous plants. These VOCs were identified as acetaldehyde (45), ethanol (47) and dimethyl sulphide (63). The increase in dimethyl sulphide was paralleled by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the heads of transgenic plants. These results demonstrate the applicability of metabolic fingerprinting techniques to elucidate the underlying pleiotropic responses of plants to transgene expression.

  12. Expression specificity of GFAP transgenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Mu; Hu, Huimin; Lee, Youngjin; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein found predominantly in astrocytes. This specificity has recommended the GFAP gene promoter for targeting transgene expression to astrocytes. Although both we [Brenner et al. J. Neurosci. 14:1030-1037, (1994)] and others [Mucke et al. New Biol. 3:465-474, (1991)] have reported astrocyte specificity for GFAP promoters, we demonstrate here that these DNA sequences can also direct activity in neurons. The pattern of neuronal activity varied with both the nature of the expressed sequence and the transgene insertion site. Specifically, neuronal expression was very high for a protective protein/cathepsin A minigene, moderate for lacZ and undetectable for GFP. These findings, coupled with a survey of the literature, recommend that investigators using GFAP-driven transgenes verify specificity for each line studied, using a detection system whose sensitivity is sufficient to detect a compromising level of misexpression.

  13. Fructan biosynthesis in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Data from plants transformed to accumulate fructan are assessed in the context of natural concentrations of reserve carbohydrates and natural fluxes of carbon in primary metabolism: Transgenic fructan accumulation is universally reported as an instantaneous endpoint concentration. In exceptional cases, concentrations of 60-160 mg g(-1) fresh mass were reported and compare favourably with naturally occurring maximal starch and fructan content in leaves and storage organs. Generally, values were less than 20 mg g(-1) for plants transformed with bacterial genes and <9 mg g(-1) for plant-plant transformants. Superficially, the results indicate a marked modification of carbon partitioning. However, transgenic fructan accumulation was generally constitutive and involved accumulation over time-scales of weeks or months. When calculated as a function of accumulation period, fluxes into the transgenic product were low, in the range 0.00002-0.03 nkat g(-1). By comparison with an estimated minimum daily carbohydrate flux in leaves for a natural fructan-accumulating plant in field conditions (37 nkat g(-1)), transgenic fructan accumulation was only 0.00005-0.08% of primary carbohydrate flux and does not indicate radical modification of carbon partitioning, but rather, a quantitatively minor leakage into transgenic fructan. Possible mechanisms for this low fructan accumulation in the transformants are considered and include: (i) rare codon usage in bacterial genes compared with eukaryotes, (ii) low transgene mRNA concentrations caused by low expression and/or high turnover, (iii) resultant low expression of enzyme protein, (iv) resultant low total enzyme activity, (v) inappropriate kinetic properties of the gene products with respect to substrate concentrations in the host, (vi) in situ product hydrolysis, and (vii) levan toxicity. Transformants expressing bacterial fructan synthesis exhibited a number of aberrant phenotypes such as stunting, leaf bleaching, necrosis, reduced

  14. How To Produce and Characterize Transgenic Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savka, Michael A.; Wang, Shu-Yi; Wilson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process of establishing transgenic plants which is a very important tool in plant biology and modern agriculture. Produces transgenic plants with the ability to synthesize opines. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  15. Human health and transgenic crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under the joint auspices of the Agrochemical and the Agricultural and Food Chemistry Divisions of the American Chemical Society, we organized a short symposium on “Human Health and Transgenic Crops” at the 244th ACS national meeting, held August 19-23, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA, to examine an array o...

  16. [Analysis of transgenic and non-transgenic rice leaves using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-chao; Cheng, Fang

    2012-02-01

    Visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy was investigated for the fast discrimination of rice leaves with different genes and the determination of chlorophyll content. Least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM) was employed to discriminate transgenic rice leaves from non-transgenic ones. The classification accuracy of calibration samples reached to 100%. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was proposed to select effective wavelengths. SPA-LS-SVM discrimination model was performed, and the result indicated that an 87.27% recognition ratio was achieved using only 0.3% of total variables. The optimal performance of each quantification model was achieved after orthogonal signal correction (OSA). Performances treated by SPA were better than that of full-spectrum PLS, which indicated that SPA is a powerful way for effective wavelength selection. The best performance of quantification was obtained by SPA-LS-SVM model; with correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) being 0.902 2 and 1.312 1, respectively. Excellent classification and prediction precision were achieved. The overall results indicated that the new proposed SPA-LS-SVM is a powerful method for varieties recognition and SPAD prediction. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of Vis/NIR spectroscopy in on-field classification and monitoring.

  17. A CORRECTION.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D

    1940-03-22

    IN a recently published volume on "The Origin of Submarine Canyons" the writer inadvertently credited to A. C. Veatch an excerpt from a submarine chart actually contoured by P. A. Smith, of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The chart in question is Chart IVB of Special Paper No. 7 of the Geological Society of America entitled "Atlantic Submarine Valleys of the United States and the Congo Submarine Valley, by A. C. Veatch and P. A. Smith," and the excerpt appears as Plate III of the volume fist cited above. In view of the heavy labor involved in contouring the charts accompanying the paper by Veatch and Smith and the beauty of the finished product, it would be unfair to Mr. Smith to permit the error to go uncorrected. Excerpts from two other charts are correctly ascribed to Dr. Veatch.

  18. Accuracy of nonmolecular identification of growth-hormone- transgenic coho salmon after simulated escape.

    PubMed

    SundströM, L F; Lõhmus, M; Devlin, R H

    2015-09-01

    Concerns with transgenic animals include the potential ecological risks associated with release or escape to the natural environment, and a critical requirement for assessment of ecological effects is the ability to distinguish transgenic animals from wild type. Here, we explore geometric morphometrics (GeoM) and human expertise to distinguish growth-hormone-transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) specimens from wild type. First, we simulated an escape of 3-month-old hatchery-reared wild-type and transgenic fish to an artificial stream, and recaptured them at the time of seaward migration at an age of 13 months. Second, we reared fish in the stream from first-feeding fry until an age of 13 months, thereby simulating fish arising from a successful spawn in the wild of an escaped hatchery-reared transgenic fish. All fish were then assessed from 'photographs by visual identification (VID) by local staff and by GeoM based on 13 morphological landmarks. A leave-one-out discriminant analysis of GeoM data had on average 86% (72-100% for individual groups) accuracy in assigning the correct genotypes, whereas the human experts were correct, on average, in only 49% of cases (range of 18-100% for individual fish groups). However, serious errors (i.e., classifying transgenic specimens as wild type) occurred for 7% (GeoM) and 67% (VID) of transgenic fish, and all of these incorrect assignments arose with fish reared in the stream from the first-feeding stage. The results show that we presently lack the skills of visually distinguishing transgenic coho salmon from wild type with a high level of accuracy, but that further development-of GeoM methods could be useful in identifying second-generation,fish from nature as a nonmolecular approach.

  19. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 171 RIN 3150-AJ16 Technical Corrections; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... corrections, including updating the street address for the Region I office, correcting authority citations and... rule. DATES: The correction is effective on December 5, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  20. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  1. Transgene expression systems in the Triticeae cereals.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Götz; Himmelbach, Axel; Chen, Wanxin; Douchkov, Dimitar K; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The control of transgene expression is vital both for the elucidation of gene function and for the engineering of transgenic crops. Given the dominance of the Triticeae cereals in the agricultural economy of the temperate world, the development of well-performing transgene expression systems of known functionality is of primary importance. Transgenes can be expressed either transiently or stably. Transient expression systems based on direct or virus-mediated gene transfer are particularly useful in situations where the need is to rapidly screen large numbers of genes. However, an unequivocal understanding of gene function generally requires that a transgene functions throughout the plant's life and is transmitted through the sexual cycle, since this alone allows its effect to be decoupled from the plant's response to the generally stressful gene transfer event. Temporal, spatial and quantitative control of a transgene's expression depends on its regulatory environment, which includes both its promoter and certain associated untranslated region sequences. While many transgenic approaches aim to manipulate plant phenotype via ectopic gene expression, a transgene sequence can be also configured to down-regulate the expression of its endogenous counterpart, a strategy which exploits the natural gene silencing machinery of plants. In this review, current technical opportunities for controlling transgene expression in the Triticeae species are described. Apart from protocols for transient and stable gene transfer, the choice of promoters and other untranslated regulatory elements, we also consider signal peptides, as they too govern the abundance and particularly the sub-cellular localization of transgene products.

  2. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Laguna, Ricardo; Fernández-Gonzalez, Raúl; Sanjuanbenito, Belén Pintado; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes.

  3. 78 FR 75449 - Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ..., 50, 52, and 70 RIN 3150-AJ23 Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... final rule in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013, to make miscellaneous corrections to its regulations... miscellaneous corrections to its regulations in chapter I of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10...

  4. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  5. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Human Lysozyme from Eggs of Transgenic Chickens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Liu, Tongxin; Zhao, Jianmin; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic chickens as bioreactors have several advantages, such as the simple establishment procedure, correct glycosylation profile of expressed proteins, etc. Lysozyme is widely used in food industry, livestock farming, and medical field as a replacement of antibiotics because of its antibacterial and complement system-modulating activity. In this study, we used RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence to detect the expression of recombinant human lysozyme (rhLY) in the transgenic chicken. We demonstrated that the transgene of rhLY was genetically stable across different generations. We next optimized the purification procedure of rhLY from the transgenic eggs by utilizing two steps of cation-exchange chromatography and one gel-filtration chromatography. About 6 mg rhLY with the purity exceeding 90% was obtained from ten eggs, and the purification efficiency was about 75%. The purified rhLY had similar physicochemical and biological properties in molecular mass and antibacterial activity compared to the commercial human lysozyme. Additionally, both of them exhibited thermal stability at 60°C and tolerated an extensive pH range of 2 to 11. In conclusion, our study proved that the transgenic chickens we have previously generated were genetically stable and suitable for the production of active rhLY. We also provided a pipeline for purifying the recombinant proteins from transgenic eggs, which could be useful for other studies.

  6. Optimization of Biofuel Production From Transgenic Microalgae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-27

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0145 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Richard Sayre Donald Danforth...Technical 20080815 to 20120630 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE FA9550-08-1-0451 Richard Sayre Donald Danforth Plant...BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-08-1-0451 Reporting Period: Final Report Abstract: We have compared the

  7. Xenopus transgenics: methods using transposons.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Clair M; Yergeau, Donald A; Zhu, Haiqing; Kuliyev, Emin; Mead, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    The generation of transgenic animals is an essential tool for many genetic strategies. DNA "cut-and-paste" transposon systems can be used to efficiently modify the Xenopus genome. The DNA transposon substrate, harbored on a circularized plasmid, is co-injected into fertilized Xenopus embryos at the one-cell stage together with mRNA encoding the cognate transposase enzyme. The cellular machinery rapidly translates the exogenous mRNA to produce active transposase enzyme that catalyzes excision of the transposon substrate from the plasmid and stable integration into the genomic DNA.

  8. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2017-02-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  9. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars. PMID:28241060

  10. Transgenic Biofuel Feedstocks and Strategies for Biocontainment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several reasons to believe that transgenic plant feedstocks will be required to realize the full economic and environmental benefits of cellulosic and other biofuels. Much of the commercialization potential for the use of transgenic plant cellulosic feedstocks may be impacted by regulatio...

  11. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  12. An affinity-based genome walking method to find transgene integration loci in transgenic genome.

    PubMed

    Thirulogachandar, V; Pandey, Prachi; Vaishnavi, C S; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2011-09-15

    Identifying a good transgenic event from the pool of putative transgenics is crucial for further characterization. In transgenic plants, the transgene can integrate in either single or multiple locations by disrupting the endogenes and/or in heterochromatin regions causing the positional effect. Apart from this, to protect the unauthorized use of transgenic plants, the signature of transgene integration for every commercial transgenic event needs to be characterized. Here we show an affinity-based genome walking method, named locus-finding (LF) PCR (polymerase chain reaction), to determine the transgene flanking sequences of rice plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. LF PCR includes a primary PCR by a degenerated primer and transfer DNA (T-DNA)-specific primer, a nested PCR, and a method of enriching the desired amplicons by using a biotin-tagged primer that is complementary to the T-DNA. This enrichment technique separates the single strands of desired amplicons from the off-target amplicons, reducing the template complexity by several orders of magnitude. We analyzed eight transgenic rice plants and found the transgene integration loci in three different chromosomes. The characteristic illegitimate recombination of the Agrobacterium sp. was also observed from the sequenced integration loci. We believe that the LF PCR should be an indispensable technique in transgenic analysis.

  13. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TF<1) at all levels of metal treatment. Among the 4 transgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  14. Genetically stable expression of functional miraculin, a new type of alternative sweetener, in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    Miraculin is a taste-modifying protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a shrub native to West Africa. Miraculin by itself is not sweet, but it is able to turn a sour taste into a sweet taste. This unique property has led to increasing interest in this protein. In this article, we report the high-yield production of miraculin in transgenic tomato plants. High and genetically stable expression of miraculin was confirmed by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant miraculin accumulated to high levels in leaves and fruits, up to 102.5 and 90.7 microg/g fresh weight, respectively. Purified recombinant miraculin expressed in transgenic tomato plants showed strong sweetness-inducing activity, similar to that of native miraculin. These results demonstrate that recombinant miraculin was correctly processed in transgenic tomato plants, and that this production system could be a good alternative to production from the native plant.

  15. 77 FR 2435 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ...- Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of Preferences and for Other Purposes Correction In... following correction: On page 407, the date following the proclamation number should read ``December...

  16. 78 FR 2193 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement and for Other Purposes Correction In Presidential document... correction: On page 66507, the proclamation identification heading on line one should read...

  17. Production of recombinant albumin by a herd of cloned transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Echelard, Yann; Williams, Jennifer L; Destrempes, Margaret M; Koster, Julie A; Overton, Susan A; Pollock, Daniel P; Rapiejko, Karen T; Behboodi, Esmail; Masiello, Nicholas C; Gavin, William G; Pommer, Jerry; Van Patten, Scott M; Faber, David C; Cibelli, Jose B; Meade, Harry M

    2009-06-01

    Purified plasma derived human albumin has been available as a therapeutic product since World War II. However, cost effective recombinant production of albumin has been challenging due to the amount needed and the complex folding pattern of the protein. In an effort to provide an abundant source of recombinant albumin, a herd of transgenic cows expressing high levels of rhA in their milk was generated. Expression cassettes efficiently targeting the secretion of human albumin to the lactating mammary gland were obtained and tested in transgenic mice. A high expressing transgene was transfected in primary bovine cell lines to produce karyoplasts for use in a somatic cell nuclear transfer program. Founder transgenic cows were produced from four independent cell lines. Expression levels varying from 1-2 g/l to more than 40 g/l of correctly folded albumin were observed. The animals expressing the highest levels of rhA exhibited shortened lactation whereas cows yielding 1-2 g/l had normal milk production. This herd of transgenic cattle is an easily scalable and well characterized source of rhA for biomedical uses.

  18. A Retinoic Acid Responsive Hoxa3 Transgene Expressed in Embryonic Pharyngeal Endoderm, Cardiac Neural Crest and a Subdomain of the Second Heart Field

    PubMed Central

    Diman, Nata Y. S.-G.; Remacle, Sophie; Bertrand, Nicolas; Picard, Jacques J.; Zaffran, Stéphane; Rezsohazy, René

    2011-01-01

    A transgenic mouse line harbouring a β-galacdosidase reporter gene controlled by the proximal 2 kb promoter of Hoxa3 was previously generated to investigate the regulatory cues governing Hoxa3 expression in the mouse. Examination of transgenic embryos from embryonic day (E) 8.0 to E15.5 revealed regionally restricted reporter activity in the developing heart. Indeed, transgene expression specifically delineated cells from three distinct lineages: a subpopulation of the second heart field contributing to outflow tract myocardium, the cardiac neural crest cells and the pharyngeal endoderm. Manipulation of the Retinoic Acid (RA) signaling pathway showed that RA is required for correct expression of the transgene. Therefore, this transgenic line may serve as a cardiosensor line of particular interest for further analysis of outflow tract development. PMID:22110697

  19. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    EPA Science Inventory

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  20. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  1. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  2. TPX correction coil studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.D.

    1994-11-03

    Error correction coils are planned for the TPX (Tokamak Plasma Experiment) in order to avoid error field induced locked modes and disruption. The FT (Fix Tokamak) code is used to evaluate the ability of these correction coils to remove islands caused by symmetry breaking magnetic field errors. The proposed correction coils are capable of correcting a variety of error fields.

  3. Transgene integration and chromosome alterations in two transgenic lines of tritordeum.

    PubMed

    Barro, F; Martín, A; Cabrera, A

    2003-01-01

    Plants from two transgenic lines of tritordeum (an amphiploid between Triticum turgidum cv. durum and Hordeumn chilense) have been analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize the transgene integration sites and chromosome rearrangements. Transgenic lines were transformed in two different events with the genes encoding for the high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), 1Ax1 and/or 1Dx5. Three integration sites and four translocations were detected. All three integration sites were located on chromosome segments of Hordeum chilense translocated into wheat chromosomes. No translocations from wheat into H. chilense chromosomes were observed. Both HMW-GS transgenes were expressed at high levels in the endosperm of transgenic plants. The analysis by FISH of transgenic plants allowed the early detection of homozygous and heterozygous plants. The consequences and implications of translocations on breeding are discussed.

  4. Relative fitness of transgenic vs. non-transgenic maize x teosinte hybrids: a field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guadagnuolo, R; Clegg, J; Ellstrand, N C

    2006-10-01

    Concern has been often expressed regarding the impact and persistence of transgenes that enter wild populations via gene flow. The impact of a transgene and its persistence are largely determined by the relative fitness of transgenic hybrids and hybrid derivatives compared to non-transgenic plants. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed this question experimentally in the field. Despite the economic importance of maize, and the fact that it naturally hybridizes with the teosinte taxon Zea mays ssp. mexicana, sometimes known as "chalco teosinte," the question has received little experimental attention in this system. Using a glyphosate-tolerant maize cultivar and chalco teosinte as parental lines, we carried out a field experiment testing (1) the relative fitness of maize x teosinte hybrids, compared to their parental taxa, as well as (2) the relative fitness of transgenic hybrids compared to non-transgenic hybrids created from the same parental stock. In order to evaluate the influence of the transgenic construct in different genetic backgrounds, our study included transgenic and non-transgenic pure maize progeny from the cultivar as well. We measured both vegetative and reproductive parameters. Our results demonstrated that hybrids have greater vigor and produced more seeds than the wild parent. However, in the absence of selective pressure from glyphosate herbicide, we did not observe any direct positive or negative impact of the transgene on the fitness or vigor of either the hybrids or pure maize progeny. We discuss our results in terms of the potential for spontaneous transgene flow and introgression from transgenic maize into sympatric teosinte.

  5. Transgenic plants with enhanced growth characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-09-06

    The invention relates to transgenic plants exhibiting dramatically enhanced growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, more efficient nitrogen utilization, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields. In one embodiment, transgenic plants engineered to over-express both glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) are provided. The GPT+GS double-transgenic plants of the invention consistently exhibit enhanced growth characteristics, with T0 generation lines showing an increase in biomass over wild type counterparts of between 50% and 300%. Generations that result from sexual crosses and/or selfing typically perform even better, with some of the double-transgenic plants achieving an astounding four-fold biomass increase over wild type plants.

  6. AN APPROACH TO TRANSGENIC CROP MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing by aerial or satellite images may provide a method of identifying transgenic pesticidal crop distribution in the landscape. Genetically engineered crops containing bacterial gene(s) that express an insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are regulated...

  7. Phenotyping transgenic wheat for drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Carolina; Crossa, José L; Bonnett, David; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Reynolds, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    Realistic experimental protocols to screen for drought adaptation in controlled conditions are crucial if high throughput phenotyping is to be used for the identification of high performance lines, and is especially important in the evaluation of transgenes where stringent biosecurity measures restrict the frequency of open field trials. Transgenic DREB1A-wheat events were selected under greenhouse conditions by evaluating survival and recovery under severe drought (SURV) as well as for water use efficiency (WUE). Greenhouse experiments confirmed the advantages of transgenic events in recovery after severe water stress. Under field conditions, the group of transgenic lines did not generally outperform the controls in terms of grain yield under water deficit. However, the events selected for WUE were identified as lines that combine an acceptable yield-even higher yield (WUE-11) under well irrigated conditions-and stable performance across the different environments generated by the experimental treatments.

  8. Transgenic animals resistant to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Tiley, L

    2016-04-01

    The list of transgenic animals developed to test ways of producing livestock resistant to infectious disease continues to grow. Although the basic techniques for generating transgenic animals have not changed very much in the ten years since they were last reviewed for the World Organisation for Animal Health, one recent fundamental technological advance stands to revolutionise genome engineering. The advent of technically simple and efficient site-specific gene targeting has profound implications for genetically modifying livestock species.

  9. Transgenic Wheat, Barley and Oats: Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunwell, Jim M.

    Following the success of transgenic maize and rice, methods have now been developed for the efficient introduction of genes into wheat, barley and oats. This review summarizes the present position in relation to these three species, and also uses information from field trial databases and the patent literature to assess the future trends in the exploitation of transgenic material. This analysis includes agronomic traits and also discusses opportunities in expanding areas such as biofuels and biopharming.

  10. Transgene flow: Facts, speculations and possible countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Ryffel, Gerhart U

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence has accumulated that unintended transgene escape occurs in oilseed rape, maize, cotton and creeping bentgrass. The escaped transgenes are found in variant cultivars, in wild type plants as well as in hybrids of sexually compatible species. The fact that in some cases stacked events are present that have not been planted commercially, implies unintended recombination of transgenic traits. As the consequences of this continuous transgene escape for the ecosystem cannot be reliably predicted, I propose to use more sophisticated approaches of gene technology in future. If possible GM plants should be constructed using either site-directed mutagenesis or cisgenic strategies to avoid the problem of transgene escape. In cases where a transgenic trait is needed, efficient containment should be the standard approach. Various strategies available or in development are discussed. Such a cautious approach in developing novel types of GM crops will enhance the sustainable potential of GM crops and thus increase the public trust in green gene technology. PMID:25523171

  11. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of sFAT-1 Transgenic Pigs by Visual Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chenyu; Yang, Yalan; Li, Xunbi; Zheng, Xinmin; Ren, Hongyan; Li, Kui; Zhou, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) livestock have the potential to contribute to improving the environment and human health, with consumption of fewer resources and reduced waste production. However, the transgene process also poses risks. The safety assessment and control of transgenic animal products have drawn wide attention, and the relevant regulations and technology are being developed. Quick testing technology plays a significant role in on-site and customs sampling. Nowadays, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was widely applied in nucleic acid analysis because of its simplicity, rapidity, high efficiency and specificity. In this study, a specific, sensitive detection system for detecting sFAT-1 transgenic pigs was designed. A set of six primers including two loop primers was designed for the target sequence. The DNA samples were amplified in less than 1 h at the optimized temperature and detecting by both Nephelometer LA-320c and unaided eyes directly adding calcein. The detection limit of sFAT-1 LAMP was as low as 1.26 ng/μL. Furthermore, blind tests of transgenic and non-transgenic DNA samples were all correctly detected. Hence, the results in this study demonstrated that LAMP is a very useful tool for transgenic detection.

  12. qPCR for quantification of transgene expression and determination of transgene copy number.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a mature technology that can be used to accurately quantify the number of copies of a target nucleic acid in a sample. Here, we describe a method for using this technology to determine the copy number of a transgene stably integrated into a plant's genome and to ascertain the level of transgene expression.

  13. 75 FR 18747 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2010 Correction In Presidential... correction: On page 15601, the first line of the heading should read ``Proclamation 8485 of March 24,...

  14. 77 FR 45469 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor Correction In Presidential document 2012-17703 beginning on page 42415 in the issue of Wednesday, July 18, 2012, make the following correction: On...

  15. 78 FR 7255 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... Unobligated Funds Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Correction In Presidential document... correction: On page 70883, the document identification heading on line one should read ``Notice of...

  16. 75 FR 68413 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Correction In Presidential document 2010-27676 beginning on page 67019 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page 67019, the Presidential Determination number should...

  17. 75 FR 1013 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Correction In Presidential document E9-31418 beginning on page 707 in the issue of Tuesday, January 5, 2010, make the following correction: On page 731, the date line below the President's signature should...

  18. 75 FR 68409 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Migration Needs Resulting From Flooding In Pakistan Correction In Presidential document 2010-27673 beginning on page 67015 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page...

  19. 78 FR 73377 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...--Continuation of U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance to the Government of Colombia Correction In Presidential... correction: On page 51647, the heading of the document was omitted and should read ``Continuation of...

  20. 77 FR 60037 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Commit, Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism Correction In Presidential document 2012-22710 beginning on page 56519 in the issue of Wednesday, September 12, 2012, make the following correction: On...

  1. 75 FR 68407 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Migration Needs Resulting from Violence in Kyrgyzstan Correction In Presidential document 2010-27672 beginning on page 67013 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On...

  2. Virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic plants: transgene silencing and reactivation associate with two patterns of transgene body methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingmin; San León, David; Delgadillo, Ma Otilia; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    We used bisulfite sequencing to study the methylation of a viral transgene whose expression was silenced upon plum pox virus infection of the transgenic plant and its subsequent recovery as a consequence of so-called virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS was associated with a general increase in the accumulation of small RNAs corresponding to the coding region of the viral transgene. After VIGS, the transgene promoter was not methylated and the coding region showed uneven methylation, with the 5' end being mostly unmethylated in the recovered tissue or mainly methylated at CG sites in regenerated silenced plants. The methylation increased towards the 3' end, which showed dense methylation in all three contexts (CG, CHG and CHH). This methylation pattern and the corresponding silenced status were maintained after plant regeneration from recovered silenced tissue and did not spread into the promoter region, but were not inherited in the sexual offspring. Instead, a new pattern of methylation was observed in the progeny plants consisting of disappearance of the CHH methylation, similar CHG methylation at the 3' end, and an overall increase in CG methylation in the 5' end. The latter epigenetic state was inherited over several generations and did not correlate with transgene silencing and hence virus resistance. These results suggest that the widespread CG methylation pattern found in body gene bodies located in euchromatic regions of plant genomes may reflect an older silencing event, and most likely these genes are no longer silenced.

  3. A Primer for Using Transgenic Insecticidal Cotton in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Ann M.; Heuberger, Shannon; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Many developing countries face the decision of whether to approve the testing and commercial use of insecticidal transgenic cotton and the task of developing adequate regulations for its use. In this review, we outline concepts and provide information to assist farmers, regulators and scientists in making decisions concerning this technology. We address seven critical topics: 1) molecular and breeding techniques used for the development of transgenic cotton cultivars, 2) properties of transgenic cotton cultivars and their efficacy against major insect pests, 3) agronomic performance of transgenic cotton in developing countries, 4) factors affecting transgene expression, 5) impact of gene flow between transgenic and non-transgenic cotton, 6) non-target effects of transgenic cotton, and 7) management of pest resistance to transgenic cotton. PMID:19613464

  4. Transgene and mitochondrial DNA are indicators of efficient composting of transgenic pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dave; Meidinger, Roy G; Golovan, Serguei P; Phillips, John P; O'Halloran, Ivan P; Fan, Ming Z; Hacker, Roger R; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2007-07-01

    Composting is an environmentally sound method for the disposal of on-farm livestock mortalities that generates material suitable for use as fertilizer; however, this method is not generally permitted for disposal of transgenic livestock mortalities during the research and development phase. This study has explored the application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a method for assessing the persistence of transgene and mitochondrial DNA markers during the composting of euthanized transgenic pig. There was at least a 10(7) fold reduction of genetic material to a level that not either transgene or mitochondrion markers were detectable. At the end of the composting period, only bone fragments that were completely demineralised and chalky were detected. Chemically the compost was similar to that from pig litter and poultry mortalities, except the copper content was lower. Based on these data, composting appears to be an appropriate method for the disposal of transgenic animals.

  5. Generation of stable Xenopus laevis transgenic lines expressing a transgene controlled by weak promoters.

    PubMed

    L'hostis-Guidet, Anne; Recher, Gaëlle; Guillet, Brigitte; Al-Mohammad, Abdulrahim; Coumailleau, Pascal; Tiaho, François; Boujard, Daniel; Madigou, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    Combining two existing protocols of trangenesis, namely the REMI and the I-SceI meganuclease methods, we generated Xenopus leavis expressing a transgene under the control of a promoter that presented a restricted pattern of activity and a low level of expression. This was realized by co-incubating sperm nuclei, the I-SceI enzyme and the transgene prior to transplantation into unfertilized eggs. The addition of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element in our constructs further enhanced the expression of the transgene without affecting the tissue-specificity of the promoter activity. Using this combination of methods we produced high rates of fully transgenic animals that stably transmitted the transgene to the next generations with a transmission rate of 50% indicating a single integration event.

  6. Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

  7. Effects of transgenic rootstocks on growth and development of non-transgenic scion cultivars in apple.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Anders; Li, Xue-Yuan; Heikelt, Catrin; Welander, Margareta; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Although cultivation of genetic modified (GM) annual crops has been steadily increasing in the recent 10 years, the commercial cultivation of GM fruit tree is still very limited and reports of field trials on GM fruit trees are rare. This is probably because development and evaluation of GM fruit trees require a long period of time due to long life cycles of trees. In this study, we report results from a field trial on three rolB transgenic dwarfing apple rootstocks of M26 and M9 together with non-transgenic controls grafted with five non-transgenic scion cultivars. We intended to investigate the effects of transgenic rootstock on non-transgenic scion cultivars under natural conditions as well as to evaluate the potential value of using the rolB gene to modify difficult-to-root rootstocks of fruit trees. The results showed that all rolB transgenic rootstocks significantly reduced vegetative growth including tree height regardless of scion cultivar, compared with the non-transgenic rootstocks. Flowering and fruiting were also decreased for cultivars grown on the transgenic rootstocks in most cases, but the fruit quality was not clearly affected by the transgenic rootstocks. Cutting experiment and RT-PCR analysis showed that the rolB gene was stably expressed under field conditions. PCR and RT-PCR analyses displayed that the rolB gene or its mRNA were not detectable in the scion cultivars, indicating no translocation of the transgene or its mRNA from rootstock to scion. Our results suggest that rolB modified rootstocks should be used in combination with vigorous scion cultivars in order to obtain sufficient vegetative growth and good yield. Alternatively, the rolB gene could be used to dwarf vigorous rootstocks of fruit trees or produce bonzai plants as it can significantly reduce the vegetative growth of plants.

  8. Research advances on transgenic plant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Su, Tao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; An, Zhi-Gang

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of genetics molecular biology and plant biotechnology, the vaccination (e.g. genetic engineering subunit vaccine, living vector vaccine, nucleic acid vaccine) programs are taking on a prosperous evolvement. In particular, the technology of the use of transgenic plants to produce human or animal therapeutic vaccines receives increasing attention. Expressing vaccine candidates in vegetables and fruits open up a new avenue for producing oral/edible vaccines. Transgenic plant vaccine disquisitions exhibit a tempting latent exploiting foreground. There are a lot of advantages for transgenic plant vaccines, such as low cost, easiness of storage, and convenient immune-inoculation. Some productions converged in edible tissues, so they can be consumed directly without isolation and purification. Up to now, many transgenic plant vaccine productions have been investigated and developed. In this review, recent advances on plant-derived recombinant protein expression systems, infectious targets, and delivery systems are presented. Some issues of high concern such as biosafety and public health are also discussed. Special attention is given to the prospects and limitations on transgenic plant vaccines.

  9. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  10. Possible ecological risks of transgenic organism release when transgenes affect mating success: Sexual selection and the Trojan gene hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William M.; Howard, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Widespread interest in producing transgenic organisms is balanced by concern over ecological hazards, such as species extinction if such organisms were to be released into nature. An ecological risk associated with the introduction of a transgenic organism is that the transgene, though rare, can spread in a natural population. An increase in transgene frequency is often assumed to be unlikely because transgenic organisms typically have some viability disadvantage. Reduced viability is assumed to be common because transgenic individuals are best viewed as macromutants that lack any history of selection that could reduce negative fitness effects. However, these arguments ignore the potential advantageous effects of transgenes on some aspect of fitness such as mating success. Here, we examine the risk to a natural population after release of a few transgenic individuals when the transgene trait simultaneously increases transgenic male mating success and lowers the viability of transgenic offspring. We obtained relevant life history data by using the small cyprinodont fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model. Our deterministic equations predict that a transgene introduced into a natural population by a small number of transgenic fish will spread as a result of enhanced mating advantage, but the reduced viability of offspring will cause eventual local extinction of both populations. Such risks should be evaluated with each new transgenic animal before release. PMID:10570162

  11. Cloning flanking sequence by single-primer PCR in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, Y P; Ren, S; Zhang, Z; Lu, S; Wang, P W

    2014-10-20

    The insertion position of exogenous genes in plant genomes is usually identified by adapter ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and restriction site extension PCR in transgenic plant research. However, these methods have various limitations, such as the complexity of designing primers and time-consuming and multiple-step procedures. The goal of this study was to establish an easier, more rapid, and more accurate method to clone flanking sequence using single-primer PCR in transgenic plants. Unknown flanking genome sequences in transgenic plants, including those in tobacco, soybean, rice, and maize, were cloned using the single-primer PCR method established in this study, with the Bar gene as the anchor gene. The primer 1 (P1), P2, and P3 PCRs obtained 4 sequences, and the completely correct flanking sequence of 508 bp that was obtained in the P3 PCR was verified by sequencing analysis. The single-primer PCR is more rapid and accurate than conventional methods, justifying its application widely in cloning flanking sequences in transgenic plants.

  12. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki

    2009-04-01

    Herbicides are economically important, but the non-point pollution that they cause may disrupt the surrounding environment. Phytoremediation of herbicides has been well studied using conventional plants. Transgenic plants produced for metabolizing herbicides and long-persisting pollutants can be used for phytoremediation of foreign chemicals in contaminated soil and water. The genes involved in the metabolism of chemical compounds can be isolated from various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, and these genes are then introduced into candidate plants. Transgenic plants expressing mammalian P450s and the other enzymes showed tolerance and phytoremediation activity toward target herbicides. Transgenic plants can also enhance the absorption and detoxification of pollutants, thereby aiding the phytoremediation of contaminated environments.

  13. Toxins for transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P; Bonning, Bryony C

    2012-06-01

    The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera), which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  14. Edible transgenic plant vaccines for different diseases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aakanchha; Saini, Vinay; Kohli, Dharm Veer

    2013-01-01

    Edible plant vaccines are immunogenic preparations containing antigenic proteins rather than pathogens, therefore, they sanctify situation where there is a possibility of resurgence of disease when the antigenic preparation contains the organism in any form whatsoever. Expression of antigens as vaccines and of antibodies against antigens of pathogens in transgenic plants is a convenient and inexpensive source for various bacterial, viral, helminths, protozoan and autoimmune diseases with lower capital costs. This review describes various diseases along with the production of edible transgenic plant vaccines/proteins for the same. Thus, substituting and improvising conventional immunization methods.

  15. Generation of BAC transgenic epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Schwank, Gerald; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Sasaki, Nobuo; Clevers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Under previously developed culture conditions, mouse and human intestinal epithelia can be cultured and expanded over long periods. These so-called organoids recapitulate the three-dimensional architecture of the gut epithelium, and consist of all major intestinal cell types. One key advantage of these ex vivo cultures is their accessibility to live imaging. So far the establishment of transgenic fluorescent reporter organoids has required the generation of transgenic mice, a laborious and time-consuming process, which cannot be extended to human cultures. Here we present a transfection protocol that enables the generation of recombinant mouse and human reporter organoids using BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) technology.

  16. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  17. Production of homozygous transgenic rainbow trout with enhanced disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed that transgenic medaka expressing cecropin B transgenes exhibited resistant characteristic to fish bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Vibrio anguillarum. To confirm whether antimicrobial peptide gene will also exhibit antibacterial an...

  18. Evaluation of haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jurcik, R; Suvegova, K; Hanusova, E; Massanyi, P; Ryban, L; Chrenek, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the hFVIII mRNA expression in different organs, pathological changes and selected haematological and biochemical blood parameters between transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits from F3 generation. Selected physiological parameters of 3- to 4-month-old transgenic rabbits from F3 generation carrying human factor VIII gene (hFVIII) were analysed and compared with those of non-transgenic ones. Before slaughtering, the blood for haematological and biochemical analysis was taken from the central ear artery. Pathological and histological examination of vital organs and RT-PCR analysis of several tissue organs of transgenic and non-transgenic animals were performed after slaughtering. Except for the mammary gland tissue, slight hfVIII mRNA expression in the spleen, lung and brain and none expression in the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle and heart of rabbits were recorded. pathological examination of vital organs showed some pathological changes in both transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits which were confirmed by histological qualitative evaluations. Statistically significant lower values of blood haemoglobin in blood of transgenic (11.86+/-0.86) animals compared with non-transgenic (12.41+/-1.02, P<0.05) ones and lower parameters of HCT (39.22+/-2.44 versus 40.89+/-2.26, P<0.01) in blood of transgenic rabbits were observed. Parameters of WBC, RBC and PLT showed no significant differences between the analysed groups. All biochemical serum parameters of transgenic rabbits were higher in comparison with non-transgenic ones. Significant differences were found in the concentration of the urea, AST and GMT between transgenic and non-transgenic animals (P<0.001) and in the total protein content, the difference was significant at P<0.05. In conclusion, our results showed that no considerable impact on the general health was found in transgenic rabbits.

  19. Request for Correction 10003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Jeff Rush requesting rescinding and correction online and printed information regarding alleged greenhouse gas emissions reductions resulting from beneficial use of coal combustion waste products.

  20. 78 FR 55169 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Commodities and Services From Any Agency of the United States Government to the Syrian Opposition Coalition (SOC) and the Syrian Opposition's Supreme Military Council (SMC) Correction In Presidential...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF ESCAPED TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS IN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    When transgenic plants are cultivated near wild species that are sexually compatible with the crop, gene flow between the crop and wild plants is possible. A resultant concern is that transgene flow and transgene introgression within wild populations could have unintended ecologi...

  2. Benefits of transgenic insect resistance in Brassica hybrids under selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials of transgenic crops have occasionally resulted in unintentional transgene flow to closely related species. Hybridization between transgenic cultivars and close relatives may create novel forms with potential negative outcomes for wild and weedy plant populations. We report here the outc...

  3. Transgenic plants protected from insect attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaeck, Mark; Reynaerts, Arlette; Höfte, Herman; Jansens, Stefan; de Beuckeleer, Marc; Dean, Caroline; Zabeau, Marc; Montagu, Marc Van; Leemans, Jan

    1987-07-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces proteins which are specifically toxic to a variety of insect species. Modified genes have been derived from bt2, a toxin gene cloned from one Bacillus strain. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these genes synthesize insecticidal proteins which protect them from feeding damage by larvae of the tobacco hornworm.

  4. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  5. Viable transgenic goats derived from skin cells.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Esmail; Memili, Erdogan; Melican, David T; Destrempes, Margaret M; Overton, Susan A; Williams, Jennifer L; Flanagan, Peter A; Butler, Robin E; Liem, Hetty; Chen, Li How; Meade, Harry M; Gavin, William G; Echelard, Yann

    2004-06-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of expanding transgenic goat herds by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) using transgenic goat cells as nucleus donors. Skin cells from adult, transgenic goats were first synchronized at quiescent stage (G0) by serum starvation and then induced to exit G0 and proceed into G1. Oocytes collected from superovulated donors were enucleated, karyoplast-cytoplast couplets were constructed, and then fused and activated simultaneously by a single electrical pulse. Fused couplets were either co-cultured with oviductal cells in TCM-199 medium (in vitro culture) or transferred to intermediate recipient goat oviducts (in vivo culture) until final transfer. The resulting morulae and blastocysts were transferred to the final recipients. Pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography 25-30 days after embryo transfer. In vitro cultured NT embryos developed to morulae and blastocyst stages but did not produce any pregnancies while 30% (6/20) of the in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts produced pregnancies. Two of these pregnancies were resorbed early in gestation. Of the four recipients that maintained pregnancies to term, two delivered dead fetuses 2-3 days after their due dates, and two recipients gave birth to healthy kids at term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed that both kids were transgenic and had integration sites consistent with those observed in the adult cell line.

  6. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  7. Assessing the value of transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Hugh

    2002-10-01

    In the current controversy about the value of transgenic crops, matters open to empirical inquiry are centrally at issue. One such matter is a key premise in a common argument (that I summarize) that transgenic crops should be considered to have universal value. The premise is that there are no alternative forms of agriculture available to enable the production of sufficient food to feed the world. The proponents of agroecology challenge it, claiming that agroecology provides an alternative, and they deny the claim that it is well founded on empirical evidence. It is, therefore, a matter of both social and scientific importance that this premise and the criticisms of it be investigated rigorously and empirically, so that the benefits and disadvantages of transgenic-intensive agriculture and agroecology can be compared in a reliable way. Conducting adequate investigation about the potential contribution of agroecology requires that the cultural conditions of its practice (and, thus, of the practices and movements of small-scale farmers in the "third world") be strengthened--and this puts the interests of investigation into tension with the socio-economic interests driving the development of transgenics. General issues about relationship between ethical argument and empirical (scientific) investigation are raised throughout the article.

  8. Monitoring transgenic plants using in vivo markers

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.N. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The gene coding for green fluorecent protein (GFP), isolated and cloned from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, is an ideal transgene for the monitoring of any plant species. It has the ability to fluoresce without added substrate, enzyme, or cofactor; it does not introduce morphological or sexual aberrations when expressed. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard Brian; Summers, Anne O.; Rugh, Clayton L.

    1999-10-12

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  10. The substantive equivalence of transgenic (Bt and Chi) and non-transgenic cotton based on metabolite profiles.

    PubMed

    Modirroosta, Bentol Hoda; Tohidfar, Masoud; Saba, Jalal; Moradi, Foad

    2014-03-01

    Compositional studies comparing transgenic with non-transgenic counterpart plants are almost universally required by governmental regulatory bodies. In the present study, two T(2) transgenic cotton lines containing chitinase (Line 11/57) and Bt lines (Line 61) were compared with non-transgenic counterpart. To do this, biochemical characteristics of leaves and seeds, including amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, anions, and cations contents of the studied lines were analyzed using GC/MS, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and ion chromatography (IC) analyzers, respectively. polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analyses confirmed the presence and expression of Chi and Bt genes in the studied transgenic lines. Although, compositional analysis of leaves contents confirmed no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic counterpart lines, but it was shown that glucose content of chitinase lines, fructose content of transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) and asparagine and glutamine of chitinase lines were significantly higher than the non-transgenic counterpart plants. Both the transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) showed significant decrease in the amounts of sodium in comparison to the non-transgenic counterpart plants. The experiments on the seeds showed that histidine, isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine contents of all transgenic and non-transgenic lines were the same, whereas other amino acids were significantly increased in the transgenic lines. Surprisingly, it was observed that the concentrations of stearic acid, myristic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid in the chitinase line were significantly different than those of non-transgenic counterpart plants, but these components were the same in both Bt line and its non-transgenic counterpart. It seems that more changes observed in the seed contents than leaves is via this point that seeds are known as metabolites storage organs, so they show greater changes in the

  11. Growth and endocrine effects of recombinant bovine growth hormone treatment in non-transgenic and growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Raven, P A; Sakhrani, D; Beckman, B; Neregård, L; Sundström, L F; Björnsson, B Th; Devlin, R H

    2012-05-15

    To examine the relative growth, endocrine, and gene expression effects of growth hormone (GH) transgenesis vs. GH protein treatment, wild-type non-transgenic and GH transgenic coho salmon were treated with a sustained-release formulation of recombinant bovine GH (bGH; Posilac). Fish size, specific growth rate (SGR), and condition factor (CF) were monitored for 14 weeks, after which endocrine parameters were measured. Transgenic fish had much higher growth, SGR and CF than non-transgenic fish, and bGH injection significantly increased weight and SGR in non-transgenic but not transgenic fish. Plasma salmon GH concentrations decreased with bGH treatment in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish where levels were similar to controls. Higher GH mRNA levels were detected in transgenic muscle and liver but no differences were observed in GH receptor (GHR) mRNA levels. In non-transgenic pituitary, GH and GHR mRNA levels per mg pituitary decreased with bGH dose to levels seen in transgenic salmon. Plasma IGF-I was elevated with bGH dose only in non-transgenic fish, while transgenic fish maintained an elevated level of IGF-I with or without bGH treatment. A similar trend was seen for liver IGF-I mRNA levels. Thus, bGH treatment increased fish growth and influenced feedback on endocrine parameters in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish. A lack of further growth stimulation of GH transgenic fish suggests that these fish are experiencing maximal growth stimulation via GH pathways.

  12. Hyper sausage neuron: Recognition of transgenic sugar-beet based on terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Zhi; Hu, Fangrong; Chen, Tao; Du, Yong; Xin, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for identification of terahertz (THz) spectral of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) based on Hyper Sausage Neuron (HSN), and THz transmittance spectra of some typical transgenic sugar-beet samples are investigated to demonstrate its feasibility. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to extract features of the spectrum data, and instead of the original spectrum data, the feature signals are fed into the HSN pattern recognition, a new multiple weights neural network (MWNN). The experimental result shows that the HSN model not only can correctly classify different types of transgenic sugar-beets, but also can reject identity non similar samples in the same type. The proposed approach provides a new effective method for detection and identification of GMOs by using THz spectroscopy.

  13. Identification of Transgenic Organisms Based on Terahertz Spectroscopy and Hyper Sausage Neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Li, Zh.; Hu, F.; Chen, T.; Du, Y.; Xin, H.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for identifi cation of terahertz (THz) spectra of genetically modifi ed organisms (GMOs) based on hyper sausage neuron (HSN), and THz transmittance spectra of some typical transgenic sugarbeet samples are investigated to demonstrate its feasibility. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to extract features of the spectrum data, and instead of the original spectrum data, the feature signals are fed into the HSN pattern recognition, a new multiple weights neural network (MWNN). The experimental result shows that the HSN model not only can correctly classify different types of transgenic sugar-beets, but also can reject nonsimilar samples of the same type. The proposed approach provides a new effective method for detection and identification of genetically modified organisms by using THz spectroscopy.

  14. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward L.; O’Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Prather, Randall S.; Wells, Kevin D.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin–proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology. PMID:23550158

  16. Transgenic studies on homeobox genes in nervous system development: spina bifida in Isl1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kappen, Claudia; Yaworsky, Paul J; Muller, Yunhua L; Salbaum, J Michael

    2013-04-01

    To develop in vivo assays for homeobox gene function in neural development, we generated transgenic mice in which the expression of a homeobox gene is altered only within the nervous system, in neurons or neuronal precursor cells. Transgenic expression of Hoxc8 did not result in gross abnormalities, while a Hoxd4 transgene caused death shortly after birth. In neural progenitor cells, the motorneuron-specific homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 induced early developmental defects, including absence of anterior neural structures, profound defects in the neuroepithelium and defective neural tube closure. A fraction of Isl1 transgenic mice exhibited spina bifida. Isl1 transgene expression was also associated with decreased proliferation and increased Pbx1 expression in the ventral neural tube. Our results suggest a function for some homeobox genes in development of the nervous system, and that cell-type- and region-specific transgenic models will be useful to identify the cellular and molecular targets of homeobox transcription factors in nervous system development.

  17. Improved production of genetically modified fetuses with homogeneous transgene expression after transgene integration site analysis and recloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; Dos Santos Miranda, Moyses; Perecin, Felipe; De Bem, Tiago Henrique; Pereira, Flavia Thomaz Verechia; Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Alves, Daiani; Strauss, Bryan; Bajgelman, Marcio; Krieger, José Eduardo; Binelli, Mario; Meirelles, Flavio Vieira

    2011-02-01

    Animal cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) has made the production of transgenic animals using genetically modified donor cells possible and ensures the presence of the gene construct in the offspring. The identification of transgene insertion sites in donor cells before cloning may avoid the production of animals that carry undesirable characteristics due to positional effects. This article compares blastocyst development and competence to establish pregnancies of bovine cloned embryos reconstructed with lentivirus-mediated transgenic fibroblasts containing either random integration of a transgene (random integration group) or nuclear transfer derived transgenic fibroblasts with known transgene insertion sites submitted to recloning (recloned group). In the random integration group, eGFP-expressing bovine fetal fibroblasts were selected by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and used as nuclei donor cells for NT. In the recloned group, a fibroblast cell line derived from a transgenic cloned fetus was characterized regarding transgene insertion and submitted to recloning. The recloned group had higher blastocyst production (25.38 vs. 14.42%) and higher percentage of 30-day pregnancies (14.29 vs. 2.56%) when compared to the random integration group. Relative eGFP expression analysis in fibroblasts derived from each cloned embryo revealed more homogeneous expression in the recloned group. In conclusion, the use of cell lines recovered from transgenic fetuses after identification of the transgene integration site allowed for the production of cells and fetuses with stable transgene expression, and recloning may improve transgenic animal yields.

  18. Diversity of arthropod community in transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Lu, Z Y; Liu, J X; Li, C L; Yang, M S

    2015-12-02

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of plain cotton fields in China. Here, we performed a systematic survey of the diversity and population of arthropod communities in four different combination of poplar-cotton eco-systems, including I) non-transgenic poplar and non-transgenic cotton fields; II) non-transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton]; III) Bt transgenic poplar (high insect resistant strain Pb29) and non-transgenic cotton; and IV) transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields, over a period of 3 years. Based on the statistical methods used to investigate community ecology, the effects of transgenic ecosystems on the whole structure of the arthropod community, on the structure of arthropods in the nutritive layer, and on the similarity of arthropod communities were evaluated. The main results were as follows: the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem has a stronger inhibitory effect on insect pests and has no impact on the structure of the arthropod community, and therefore, maintains the diversity of the arthropod community. The character index of the community indicated that the structure of the arthropod community of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was better than that of the poplar-cotton ecosystem, and that system IV had the best structure. As for the abundance of nutritional classes, the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was also better than that of the non-transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem. The cluster analysis and similarity of arthropod communities between the four different transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems illustrated that the structure of the arthropod community excelled in the small sample of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

  19. Efficient Generation of Mice with Consistent Transgene Expression by FEEST

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Jiang, Yonghua; Mu, Libing; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Aiqun; Tang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Luo, Minmin; Yu, Lei; Gao, Shaorong; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models are widely used in biomedical research; however, current techniques for producing transgenic mice are limited due to the unpredictable nature of transgene expression. Here, we report a novel, highly efficient technique for the generation of transgenic mice with single-copy integration of the transgene and guaranteed expression of the gene-of-interest (GOI). We refer to this technique as functionally enriched ES cell transgenics, or FEEST. ES cells harboring an inducible Cre gene enabled the efficient selection of transgenic ES cell clones using hygromycin before Cre-mediated recombination. Expression of the GOI was confirmed by assaying for the GFP after Cre recombination. As a proof-of-principle, we produced a transgenic mouse line containing Cre-activatable tTA (cl-tTA6). This tTA mouse model was able to induce tumor formation when crossed with a transgenic mouse line containing a doxycycline-inducible oncogene. We also showed that the cl-tTA6 mouse is a valuable tool for faithfully recapitulating the clinical course of tumor development. We showed that FEEST can be easily adapted for other genes by preparing a transgenic mouse model of conditionally activatable EGFR L858R. Thus, FEEST is a technique with the potential to generate transgenic mouse models at a genome-wide scale. PMID:26573149

  20. Glucose metabolic gene expression in growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Fournier, Jeanne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonids are generally known to be glucose intolerant. However, previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon display modified nutritional regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis compared to non-transgenic fish, suggesting the potential for better use of glucose in GH transgenic fish. To examine this in detail, GH transgenic and non-transgenic coho salmon were subjected to glucose tolerance test and subsequent metabolic assessments. After intra-peritoneal injection of 250mg/kg glucose, we analysed post-injection kinetics of glycaemia and expression of several key target genes highly involved in glucose homeostasis in muscle and liver tissues. Our data show no significant differences in plasma glucose levels during peak hyperglycaemia (3-6h after injection), demonstrating a similar glucose tolerance between transgenic and non transgenic. However, and unrelated to the hyperglycaemic episode, GH transgenic fish return to a slightly lower basal glycaemia values 24h after injection. Correspondingly, GH transgenic fish exhibited higher mRNA levels of glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in liver, and glucose transporter (GLUT4) in muscle. These data suggest that these metabolic actors may be involved in different glucose use in GH transgenic fish, which would be expected to influence the glucose challenge response. Overall, our data demonstrate that GH transgenic coho salmon may be a pertinent animal model for further study of glucose metabolism in carnivorous fish.

  1. Trait stacking in transgenic crops: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Que, Qiudeng; Chilton, Mary-Dell M; de Fontes, Cheryl M; He, Chengkun; Nuccio, Michael; Zhu, Tong; Wu, Yuexuan; Chen, Jeng S; Shi, Liang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid increase in the planting of transgenic crops with stacked traits. Most of these products have been formed by conventional breeding, i.e. the crossing of transgenic plant (event) containing individual transgenes with other event(s) containing single or double transgenic traits. Many biotech companies are developing stacked trait products with increasing numbers of insect and herbicide tolerance genes for controlling a broad range of insect pests and weeds. There has also been an increase in development of technologies for molecular stacking of multiple traits in a single transgene locus. In this review we look at the status of stacked trait products, crop trait stacking technologies and the technical challenges we are facing. We also review recent progress in developing technology for assembling large transgene arrays in vitro (molecular stacks), their delivery to crop plants and issues they pose for transgene expression.

  2. Laser correcting mirror

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    An improved laser correction mirror (10) for correcting aberrations in a laser beam wavefront having a rectangular mirror body (12) with a plurality of legs (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28) arranged into opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) along the long sides (30, 32) of the mirror body (12). Vector force pairs (49, 50, 52, 54) are applied by adjustment mechanisms (42, 44, 46, 48) between members of the opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) for bending a reflective surface 13 of the mirror body 12 into a shape defining a function which can be used to correct for comatic aberrations.

  3. Assessment of peanut quality and compositional characteristics among transgenic sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic susceptible cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiahuai; Telenko, Darcy E P; Phipps, Patrick M; Grabau, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-06

    This study presents the results of a comparison that includes an analysis of variance and a canonical discriminant analysis to determine compositional equivalence and similarity between transgenic, sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic, susceptible cultivars of peanut in 3 years of field trials. Three Virginia-type cultivars (NC 7, Wilson, and Perry) and their corresponding transgenic lines (N70, W73, and P39) with a barley oxalate oxidase gene were analyzed for differences in key mineral nutrients, fatty acid components, hay constituents, and grade characteristics. Results from both analyses demonstrated that transgenic lines were compositionally similar to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in all factors as well as market-grade characteristics and nutritional value. Transgenic lines expressing oxalate oxidase for resistance to sclerotinia blight were substantially equivalent to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in quality and compositional characteristics.

  4. Correcting Hubble Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, John M.; Sheahen, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the theory behind the workings of the Hubble Space Telescope, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror that caused a reduction in image quality, and the corrective device that compensated for the error. (JRH)

  5. Corrected Age for Preemies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Corrected Age For Preemies Page Content Article Body If your ...

  6. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  7. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  8. [Transgenic plants as medicine production systems].

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1997-10-01

    Transgenic plants are emerging as an important system for the expression of many recombinant proteins, especially those intended for therapeutic purpose. The production of foreign proteins in plants has several advantages. In terms of required equipment and cost, mass production in plants is far easier to achieve than techniques involving animal cells. Successful production of several proteins in plants, including human serum albumin, haemoglobin, monoclonal antibodies, viral antigens (vaccines), enkephalin, and trichosanthin, has been reported. Particularly, the demonstration that vaccine antigens can be produced in plants in their native, immunogenic forms opens exciting possibilities for the "bio-farming" of vaccines. If the antigens are orally active, food-based "edible vaccines" could allow economical production. In this review, I will discuss the progress that has been made by several groups in what is now an expanding area of medicine research that utilizes transgenic plants.

  9. Optimization of Biofuel Production from Transgenic Microalgae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-31

    gene . We observed that Chlorella was resistant to a number of antibiotics that other algae were sensitive too. This necessitated a screen for the...best antibiotic resistance genes to use for transformation selectable markers. Using the Chlamydomonas ss-rbcl and psaD promoters we have obtained...transgenic Chlorella cells at high frequency that have been confirmed by PCR analysis. We also have now completed the genome sequence of the actin gene

  10. Transgenic Animal Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chan, Anthony W S

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that currently has no cure. In order to develop effective treatment, an understanding of HD pathogenesis and the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of novel medications with the aid of animal models are critical steps. Transgenic animals sharing similar genetic defects that lead to HD have provided important discoveries in HD mechanisms that cell models are not able to replicate, which include psychiatric impairment, cognitive behavioral impact, and motor functions. Although transgenic HD rodent models have been widely used in HD research, it is clear that an animal model with comparable physiology to man, similar genetic defects that lead to HD, and the ability to develop similar cognitive and behavioral impairments is critical for explaining HD pathogenesis and the development of cures. Compared to HD rodents, HD transgenic nonhuman primates have not only developed comparable neuropathology but also present HD clinical features such as rigidity, seizure, dystonia, bradykinesia, and chorea that no other animal model has been able to replicate. Distinctive degenerating neurons and the accumulation of neuropil aggregates observed in HD monkey brain strongly support the hypothesis that the unique neuropathogenic events seen in HD monkey brain recapitulate HD in man. The latest development of transgenic HD primates has opened a new era of animal modeling that better represents human genetic disorders such as HD, which will accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and identifying novel biomarkers through longitudinal studies including gene expression and metabolite profiling, and noninvasive imaging. Furthermore, novel treatments with predictable efficacy in human patients can be developed using HD monkeys because of comparable neuropathology and clinical features.

  11. Transgene mobilization and regulatory uncertainty for non-GE fruit products of transgenic rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-10-31

    Genetically engineered (GE) rootstocks may offer some advantages for biotechnology applications especially in woody perennial crops such as grape or walnut. Transgrafting combines horticultural grafting practices with modern GE methods for crop improvement. Here, a non-GE conventional scion (upper stem portion) is grafted onto a transgenic GE rootstock. Thus, the scion does not contain the genetic modification present in the rootstock genome. We examined transgene presence in walnut and tomato GE rootstocks and non-GE fruit-bearing scions. Mobilization of transgene DNA, protein, and mRNA across the graft was not detected. Though transgenic siRNA mobilization was not observed in grafted tomatoes or walnut scions, transgenic siRNA signal was detected in walnut kernels. Prospective benefits from transgrafted plants include minimized risk of GE pollen flow (Lev-Yadun and Sederoff, 2001), possible use of more than one scion per approved GE rootstock which could help curb the estimated US$136 million (CropLife International, 2011) cost to bring a GE crop to international markets, as well as potential for improved consumer and market acceptance since the consumable product is not itself GE. Thus, transgrafting provides an alternative option for agricultural industries wishing to expand their biotechnology portfolio.

  12. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-01-01

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal. PMID:12831482

  13. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-06-29

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal.

  14. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    PubMed

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J D; Butler, L G; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-12-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, from induction of somatic embryogenesis to rooting of regenerated plantlets. One in about every 350 embryos produced embryogenic tissues that survived bialaphos treatment; six transformed callus lines were obtained from three of the eight sorghum cultivars used in this research. Transgenic (T0) plants were obtained from cultivar P898012 (two independent transformation events). The presence of the bar and uidA genes in the T0 plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity was detected in extracts of the T0 plants. These plants were resistant to local application of the herbicide Ignite/Basta, and the resistance was inherited in T1 plants as a single dominant locus.

  15. Safety Evaluation of Transgenic Tilapia with Accelerated Growth.

    PubMed

    Guillén; Berlanga; Valenzuela; Morales; Toledo; Estrada; Puentes; Hayes; de la Fuente J

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in modern marine biotechnology have permitted the generation of new strains of economically important fish species through the transfer of growth hormone genes. These transgenic fish strains show improved growth performance and therefore constitute a better alternative for aquaculture programs. Recently, we have obtained a transgenic tilapia line with accelerated growth. However, before introducing this line into Cuban aquaculture, environmental and food safety assessment was required by national authorities. Experiments were performed to evaluate the behavior of transgenic tilapia in comparison to wild tilapia as a way to assess the environmental impact of introducing transgenic tilapia into Cuban aquaculture. Studies were also conducted to evaluate, according to the principle of substantial equivalence, the safety of consuming transgenic tilapia as food. Behavior studies showed that transgenic tilapia had a lower feeding motivation and dominance status than controls. Food safety assessment indicated that tilapia growth hormone has no biological activity when administered to nonhuman primates. Furthermore, no effects were detected in human healthy volunteers after the consumption of transgenic tilapia. These results showed, at least under the conditions found in Cuba, no environmental implications for the introduction of this transgenic tilapia line and the safety in the consumption of tiGH-transgenic tilapia as an alternative feeding source for humans. These results support the culture and consumption of these transgenic tilapia.

  16. Geological Corrections in Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, J.; Marušiak, I.

    2015-12-01

    Applying corrections for the known geology to gravity data can be traced back into the first quarter of the 20th century. Later on, mostly in areas with sedimentary cover, at local and regional scales, the correction known as gravity stripping has been in use since the mid 1960s, provided that there was enough geological information. Stripping at regional to global scales became possible after releasing the CRUST 2.0 and later CRUST 1.0 models in the years 2000 and 2013, respectively. Especially the later model provides quite a new view on the relevant geometries and on the topographic and crustal densities as well as on the crust/mantle density contrast. Thus, the isostatic corrections, which have been often used in the past, can now be replaced by procedures working with an independent information interpreted primarily from seismic studies. We have developed software for performing geological corrections in space domain, based on a-priori geometry and density grids which can be of either rectangular or spherical/ellipsoidal types with cells of the shapes of rectangles, tesseroids or triangles. It enables us to calculate the required gravitational effects not only in the form of surface maps or profiles but, for instance, also along vertical lines, which can shed some additional light on the nature of the geological correction. The software can work at a variety of scales and considers the input information to an optional distance from the calculation point up to the antipodes. Our main objective is to treat geological correction as an alternative to accounting for the topography with varying densities since the bottoms of the topographic masses, namely the geoid or ellipsoid, generally do not represent geological boundaries. As well we would like to call attention to the possible distortions of the corrected gravity anomalies. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract APVV-0827-12.

  17. Inheritance and expression of transgenes through anther culture of transgenic hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Kuk, Yong In; Kim, Kyung-Moon

    2007-01-01

    Anther cultures have been developed from transgenic donor peppers carrying HPT/J1-1. Eight out of sixteen plants produced from an anther culture set pepper fruits. Southern blot analysis of donors revealed two independent plants with a single copy of the integrated transgene. PCR and RT-PCR results showed the inheritance of HPT/J1-1 and expression of J1-1 in A1. All A1 progeny derived from transgenic anthers had resistance to hygromycin. They grew normally and showed similar phenotypes to the wild-type. Therefore, the use of an anther culture system coupled with genetic transformation in breeding programs will greatly facilitate the genetic improvement of pepper plants.

  18. A human YAC transgene rescues craniofacial and neural tube development in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and uncovers a role for PDGFRalpha in prenatal lung growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Jayatilake, D; Afink, G B; Ataliotis, P; Nistér, M; Richardson, W D; Smith, H K

    2000-11-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor (PDGFRalpha) plays a vital role in the development of vertebrate embryos, since mice lacking PDGFRalpha die in mid-gestation. PDGFRalpha is expressed in several types of migratory progenitor cells in the embryo including cranial neural crest cells, lung smooth muscle progenitors and oligodendrocyte progenitors. To study PDGFRalpha gene regulation and function during development, we generated transgenic mice by pronuclear injection of a 380 kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing the human PDGFRalpha gene. The YAC transgene was expressed in neural crest cells, rescued the profound craniofacial abnormalities and spina bifida observed in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and prolonged survival until birth. The ultimate cause of death was respiratory failure due to a defect in lung growth, stemming from failure of the transgene to be expressed correctly in lung smooth muscle progenitors. However, the YAC transgene was expressed faithfully in oligodendrocyte progenitors, which was not previously observed with plasmid-based transgenes containing only upstream PDGFRalpha control sequences. Our data illustrate the complexity of PDGFRalpha genetic control, provide clues to the location of critical regulatory elements and reveal a requirement for PDGF signalling in prenatal lung growth, which is distinct from the known requirement in postnatal alveogenesis. In addition, we found that the YAC transgene did not prolong survival of Patch mutant mice, indicating that genetic defects outside the PDGFRalpha locus contribute to the early embryonic lethality of Patch mice.

  19. Target Mass Corrections Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; F. Steffens

    2006-03-07

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x {yields} 1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  20. Corrective midfoot osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, John J; DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Zgonis, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Corrective midfoot osteotomies involve complete separation of the forefoot and hindfoot through the level of the midfoot, followed by uni-, bi-, or triplanar realignment and arthrodesis. This technique can be performed through various approaches; however, in the high-risk patient, percutaneous and minimum incision techniques are necessary to limit the potential of developing soft tissue injury. These master level techniques require extensive surgical experience and detailed knowledge of lower extremity biomechanics. The authors discuss preoperative clinical and radiographic evaluation, specific operative techniques used, and postoperative management for the high-risk patient undergoing corrective midfoot osteotomy.

  1. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    PubMed

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  2. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  3. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  4. [Effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xie, Ming; Peng, De-Liang

    2013-09-01

    The worldwide cultivation of transgenic crops not only provides tremendous economic benefits, but also induces the concern about the potential risks of transgenic crops on soil ecosystem in which microorganisms are involved. The potential effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms include the direct effects of the transgenic proteins on non-target soil microorganisms, and the indirect effects of the unintentional changes in the chemical compositions of root exudates induced by the introduction of the exogenous transgenic proteins. Most of the studies on transgenic crops suggested that transgenic crops could affect the quantity and structure of soil microbial populations. However, the perceivable effects on the soil microorganisms are inconsistent, with some in significant and others in non-significant, or some with persistent and others with non-persistent. This paper summarized the effects of different transgenic crops on soil microorganisms, and discussed the factors affecting the assessment reliability, including the species of transgenic crops and the experimental technologies and principles. Some issues needed to be paid special attention to in the future studies were put forward.

  5. Auto-reactive B cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    In order to understand how the natural occurrence of autoreactive B cells is controlled in normal individuals, and how self reactive B cells can escape this control during diverse clinical situations, many different transgenic mice have been generated expressing self reactive antibodies. In this review, we focus our attention on disease-associated self reactive transgenic models which show the variety of the tolerization mechanisms. The same transgenic lines are also used to analyse the effects of the autoimmune genetic background on the self reactive B cell fate, as well as to study the influence of infectious agents on the behaviour of the auto-reactive transgenic B cells.

  6. Issues in Correctional Training and Casework. Correctional Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolford, Bruce I., Ed.; Lawrenz, Pam, Ed.

    The eight papers contained in this monograph were drawn from two national meetings on correctional training and casework. Titles and authors are: "The Challenge of Professionalism in Correctional Training" (Michael J. Gilbert); "A New Perspective in Correctional Training" (Jack Lewis); "Reasonable Expectations in Correctional Officer Training:…

  7. Rethinking Correctional Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David C.

    There have been enduring conflicts in correctional institutions between personnel charged with rehabilitative duties and those who oversee authority. It is only within the past few years that realistic communication between these groups has been tolerated. The same period of time has been characterized by the infusion of training and staff…

  8. Thermodynamically Correct Bioavailability Estimations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-30

    6448 I 1. SWPPUMENTA* NOTIS lIa. OISTUAMJTiOAVAILAIILTY STATIMENT 121 OT REbT ostwosCo z I Approved for public release; distribution unlimited... research is to develop thermodynamically correct bioavailability estimations using chromatographic stationary phases as a model of the "interphase

  9. Errors and Their Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    "Our primary concern is not that the child learns to do something without mistakes. Our real concern is that the child does what he needs, with interest." The reaction of so many adults to the mistakes of children is to correct, immediately and directly, says Joosten. To truly aid the child in development, we must learn to control our…

  10. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  11. New Directions in Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.

    A picture of the American prison situation in the past and in its present changing form is presented. The object of the correctional community is becoming more and more that of successfully reintegrating the ex-offender into the social community from which he has been separated. It is predicted that within the next five years: (1) Every state will…

  12. Transgene detection by digital droplet PCR.

    PubMed

    Moser, Dirk A; Braga, Luca; Raso, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro; Simon, Perikles

    2014-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of severe diseases. Because of its abuse potential for performance enhancement in sports, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) included the term 'gene doping' in the official list of banned substances and methods in 2004. Several nested PCR or qPCR-based strategies have been proposed that aim at detecting long-term presence of transgene in blood, but these strategies are hampered by technical limitations. We developed a digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) protocol for Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) detection and demonstrated its applicability monitoring 6 mice injected into skeletal muscle with AAV9-IGF1 elements and 2 controls over a 33-day period. A duplex ddPCR protocol for simultaneous detection of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) and Erythropoietin (EPO) transgenic elements was created. A new DNA extraction procedure with target-orientated usage of restriction enzymes including on-column DNA-digestion was established. In vivo data revealed that IGF1 transgenic elements could be reliably detected for a 33-day period in DNA extracted from whole blood. In vitro data indicated feasibility of IGF1 and EPO detection by duplex ddPCR with high reliability and sensitivity. On-column DNA-digestion allowed for significantly improved target detection in downstream PCR-based approaches. As ddPCR provides absolute quantification, it ensures excellent day-to-day reproducibility. Therefore, we expect this technique to be used in diagnosing and monitoring of viral and bacterial infection, in detecting mutated DNA sequences as well as profiling for the presence of foreign genetic material in elite athletes in the future.

  13. Perspectives on the state of insect transgenics.

    PubMed

    O'Brochta, David A; Handler, Alfred M

    2008-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a critical component to the fundamental genetic analysis of insect species and holds great promise for establishing strains that improve population control and behavior for practical application. This is especially so for insects that are disease vectors, many of which are currently subject to genomic sequence analysis, and intensive population control measures that must be improved for better efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Transposon-mediated germ-line transformation has been the ultimate goal for most fundamental and practical studies, and impressive strides have been made in recent development of transgene vector and marker systems for several mosquito species. This has resulted in rapid advances in functional genomic sequence analysis and new strategies for biological control based on conditional lethality. Importantly, advances have also been made in our ability to use these systems more effectively in terms of enhanced stability and targeting to specific genomic loci. Nevertheless, not all insects are currently amenable to germ-line transformation techniques, and thus advances in transient somatic expression and paratransgenesis have also been critical, if not preferable for some applications. Of particular importance is how this technology will be used for practical application. Early ideas for population replacement of indigenous pests with innocuous transgenic siblings by transposon-vector spread, may require reevaluation in terms of our current knowledge of the behavior of transposons currently available for transformation. The effective implementation of any control program using released transgenics, will also benefit from broadening the perspective of these control measures as being more mainstream than exotic.

  14. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations.

  15. Effect of the cauliflower Or transgene on carotenoid accumulation and chromoplast formation in transgenic potato tubers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plants have facilitated our understanding of the functional roles of genes and the metabolic processes affected in plants. Recently, we isolated the Or gene from an orange cauliflower mutant and showed that the Or gene could serve as a novel genetic tool to enrich carotenoid content in tr...

  16. Comparative Proteomics of Leaves from Phytase-Transgenic Maize and Its Non-transgenic Isogenic Variety

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yanhua; Yi, Xiaoping; Wang, Limin; Peng, Cunzhi; Sun, Yong; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Jiaming; Guo, Anping; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate unintended effects in genetically modified crops (GMCs), a comparative proteomic analysis between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic plants was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 57 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were successfully identified, which represents 44 unique proteins. Functional classification of the identified proteins showed that these DEPs were predominantly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism category, followed by post-translational modification. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that most of the DEPs participated in carbon fixation in photosynthesis. Among them, 15 proteins were found to show protein-protein interactions with each other, and these proteins were mainly participated in glycolysis and carbon fixation. Comparison of the changes in the protein and tanscript levels of the identified proteins showed that most proteins had a similar pattern of changes between proteins and transcripts. Our results suggested that although some significant differences were observed, the proteomic patterns were not substantially different between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic isogenic type. Moreover, none of the DEPs was identified as a new toxic protein or an allergenic protein. The differences between the leaf proteome might be attributed to both genetic modification and hybrid influence. PMID:27582747

  17. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations. PMID:28085955

  18. Transgenic Phytoremediation Blasts onto the Scene

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Skeen, R S.

    1999-05-01

    The EPA National Priority List contains 22 ammunition production and processing sites that are laden with explosive and propellant wastes. With levels of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) contamination as high as 200 g/kg of solids, some of these sites are literally on the verge of exploding. They also present serious exposure risks to humans and wildlife, as many of these contaminants are also strong toxins and mutagens. In this issue, French et al. describe a new option for cleaning up this dangerous mixture: the use of transgenic plants. They engineered plants to express a bacterial enzyme that can completely denitrify TNT and trinitroglycerin (GTN) into harmless compounds.

  19. Characterization of a Maize Wip1 Promoter in Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Lian, Yun; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yunjun; Wang, Guoying

    2013-01-01

    The Maize Wip1 gene encodes a wound-induced Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) protein which is a type of serine protease inhibitor, and its expression is induced by wounding or infection, conferring resistance against pathogens and pests. In this study, the maize Wip1 promoter was isolated and its function was analyzed. Different truncated Wip1 promoters were fused upstream of the GUS reporter gene and transformed into Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice plants. We found that (1) several truncated maize Wip1 promoters led to strong GUS activities in both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves, whereas low GUS activity was detected in transgenic rice leaves; (2) the Wip1 promoter was not wound-induced in transgenic tobacco leaves, but was induced by wounding in transgenic rice leaves; (3) the truncated Wip1 promoter had different activity in different organs of transgenic tobacco plants; (4) the transgenic plant leaves containing different truncated Wip1 promoters had low GUS transcripts, even though high GUS protein level and GUS activities were observed; (5) there was one transcription start site of Wip1 gene in maize and two transcription start sites of GUS in Wip1::GUS transgenic lines; (6) the adjacent 35S promoter which is present in the transformation vectors enhanced the activity of the truncated Wip1 promoters in transgenic tobacco leaves, but did not influence the disability of truncated Wip1231 promoter to respond to wounding signals. We speculate that an ACAAAA hexamer, several CAA trimers and several elements similar to ACAATTAC octamer in the 5′-untranslated region might contribute to the strong GUS activity in Wip1231 transgenic lines, meanwhile, compared to the 5′-untranslated region from Wip1231 transgenic lines, the additional upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′-untranslated region from Wip1737 transgenic lines might contribute to the lower level of GUS transcript and GUS activity. PMID:24322445

  20. Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a MAR element in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Burkov, I A; Serova, I A; Battulin, N R; Smirnov, A V; Babkin, I V; Andreeva, L E; Dvoryanchikov, G A; Serov, O L

    2013-10-01

    Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under the control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a matrix attachment region (MAR) element from the Drosophila histone 1 gene was studied in four and eight transgenic mouse lines, respectively. Of the four transgenic lines carrying the transgene without MAR, three had correct tissues-specific expression of the hGM-CSF gene in the mammary gland only and no signs of cell mosaicism. The concentration of hGM-CSF in the milk of transgenic females varied from 1.9 to 14 μg/ml. One line presented hGM-CSF in the blood serum, indicating ectopic expression. The values of secretion of hGM-CSF in milk of 6 transgenic lines carrying the transgene with MAR varied from 0.05 to 0.7 μg/ml, and two of these did not express hGM-CSF. Three of the four examined animals from lines of this group showed ectopic expression of the hGM-CSF gene, as determined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses, as well as the presence of hGM-CSF in the blood serum. Mosaic expression of the hGM-CSF gene in mammary epithelial cells was specific to all examined transgenic mice carrying the transgene with MAR but was never observed in the transgenic mice without MAR. The mosaic expression was not dependent on transgene copy number. Thus, the expected "protective or enhancer effect" from the MAR element on the hGM-CSF gene expression was not observed.

  1. Craniosynostosis in transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinli; Kuroda, Shun’ichi; Carpenter, Dale; Nishimura, Ichiro; Soo, Chia; Moats, Rex; Iida, Keisuke; Wisner, Eric; Hu, Fei-Ya; Miao, Steve; Beanes, Steve; Dang, Catherine; Vastardis, Heleni; Longaker, Michael; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kanayama, Norihiro; Saito, Naoaki; Ting, Kang

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we reported NELL-1 as a novel molecule overexpressed during premature cranial suture closure in patients with craniosynostosis (CS), one of the most common congenital craniofacial deformities. Here we describe the creation and analysis of transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1. Nell-1 transgenic animals exhibited CS-like phenotypes that ranged from simple to compound synostoses. Histologically, the osteogenic fronts of abnormally closing/closed sutures in these animals revealed calvarial overgrowth and overlap along with increased osteoblast differentiation and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, anomalies were restricted to calvarial bone, despite generalized, non-tissue-specific overexpression of Nell-1. In vitro, Nell-1 overexpression accelerated calvarial osteoblast differentiation and mineralization under normal culture conditions. Moreover, Nell-1 overexpression in osteoblasts was sufficient to promote alkaline phosphatase expression and micronodule formation. Conversely, downregulation of Nell-1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro. In summary, Nell-1 overexpression induced calvarial overgrowth resulting in premature suture closure in a rodent model. Nell-1, therefore, has a novel role in CS development, perhaps as part of a complex chain of events resulting in premature suture closure. On a cellular level, Nell-1 expression may modulate and be both sufficient and required for osteoblast differentiation. PMID:12235118

  2. [Biofuels, food security and transgenic crops].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Orlando; Chaparro-Giraldo, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Soaring global food prices are threatening to push more poor people back below the poverty line; this will probably become aggravated by the serious challenge that increasing population and climate changes are posing for food security. There is growing evidence that human activities involving fossil fuel consumption and land use are contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and consequently changing the climate worldwide. The finite nature of fossil fuel reserves is causing concern about energy security and there is a growing interest in the use of renewable energy sources such as biofuels. There is growing concern regarding the fact that biofuels are currently produced from food crops, thereby leading to an undesirable competition for their use as food and feed. Nevertheless, biofuels can be produced from other feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose from perennial grasses, forestry and vegetable waste. Biofuel energy content should not be exceeded by that of the fossil fuel invested in its production to ensure that it is energetically sustainable; however, biofuels must also be economically competitive and environmentally acceptable. Climate change and biofuels are challenging FAO efforts aimed at eradicating hunger worldwide by the next decade. Given that current crops used in biofuel production have not been domesticated for this purpose, transgenic technology can offer an enormous contribution towards improving biofuel crops' environmental and economic performance. The present paper critically presents some relevant relationships between biofuels, food security and transgenic plant technology.

  3. Investigations into the hypothesis of transgenic cannabis.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Fidelia

    2012-05-01

    The unusual concentration of cannabinoids recently found in marijuana samples submitted to the forensic laboratory for chemical analysis prompted an investigation into whether genetic modifications have been made to the DNA of Cannabis sativa L. to increase its potency. Traditional methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) were used to analyze herbal cannabis preparations. Our analyses support the hypothesis that marijuana samples submitted to forensic laboratories and characterized by an abnormal level of Δ(9)-THC are the product of breeding selection rather than of transgenic modifications. Further, this research has shown a risk of false positive results associated with the poor quality of the seized samples and probably due to the contamination by other transgenic vegetable products. On the other hand, based on these data, a conclusive distinction between the hypothesis of GMO plant contamination and the other of genetic modification of cannabis cannot be made requiring further studies on comparative chemical and genetic analyses to find out an explanation for the recently detected increased potency of cannabis.

  4. Hydrogen fuel production by transgenic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2007-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the state-of-art in the field of green algal H2-production and examines physiological and genetic engineering approaches by which to improve the hydrogen metabolism characteristics of these microalgae. Included in this chapter are emerging topics pertaining to the application of sulfur-nutrient deprivation to attenuate O2-evolution and to promote H2-production, as well as the genetic engineering of sulfate uptake through manipulation of a newly reported sulfate permease in the chloroplast of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Application of the green algal hydrogenase assembly genes is examined in efforts to confer H2-production capacity to other commercially significant unicellular green algae. Engineering a solution to the O2 sensitivity of the green algal hydrogenase is discussed as an alternative approach to sulfur nutrient deprivation, along with starch accumulation in microalgae for enhanced H2-production. Lastly, current efforts aiming to optimize light utilization in transgenic microalgae for enhanced H2-production under mass culture conditions are presented. It is evident that application of genetic engineering technologies and the use of transgenic green algae will improve prospects for commercial exploitation of these photosynthetic micro-organisms in the generation of H2, a clean and renewable fuel.

  5. Voltage correction power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rajicic, D.; Ackovski, R.; Taleski, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    A method for power flow solution of weakly meshed distribution and transmission networks is presented. It is based on oriented ordering of network elements. That allows an efficient construction of the loop impedance matrix and rational organization of the processes such as: power summation (backward sweep), current summation (backward sweep) and node voltage calculation (forward sweep). The first step of the algorithm is calculation of node voltages on the radial part of the network. The second step is calculation of the breakpoint currents. Then, the procedure continues with the first step, which is preceded by voltage correction. It is illustrated that using voltage correction approach, the iterative process of weakly meshed network voltage calculation is faster and more reliable.

  6. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  7. Expression systems and species used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Sihai; Bai, Liang; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm cocoon), the mammary glands of transgenic animals have enormous potential. Compared with other mammalian species (pig, goat, sheep, and cow) that are currently being studied as bioreactors, rabbits offer many advantages: high fertility, easy generation of transgenic founders and offspring, insensitivity to prion diseases, relatively high milk production, and no transmission of severe diseases to humans. Noticeably, for a small- or medium-sized facility, the rabbit system is ideal to produce up to 50 kg of protein per year, considering both economical and hygienic aspects; rabbits are attractive candidates for the mammary-gland-specific expression of recombinant proteins. We also reviewed recombinant proteins that have been produced by targeted expression in the mammary glands of rabbits and discussed the limitations of transgenic animal bioreactors.

  8. Transgenic Crops and Sustainable Agriculture in the European Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    The rapid adoption of transgenic crops in the United States, Argentina, and Canada stands in strong contrast to the situation in the European Union (EU), where a de facto moratorium has been in place since 1998. This article reviews recent scientific literature relevant to the problematic introduction of transgenic crops in the EU to assess if…

  9. Overview of the investigation of transgenic plums in Romania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 and PT3 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natural i...

  10. Overview on the investigations of transgenic plums in Romania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, PT3 and PT5 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natu...

  11. Effects of Transgenic Glyphosate-Resistant Crops on Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) is a highly effective, non-selective herbicide. Herbicide-resistant crop (HRC) has been the most successful trait used in transgenic crops throughout the world. Transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops (GRCs) have been commercialized and grown extensively in the...

  12. 2013 North Dakota Transgenic Barley Research and FHB Nursery Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research continues to develop and test new transgenic plants using genes provided by collaborators. As lines are developed in Golden Promise, they are crossed to Conlon for field testing. Transgenic lines developed in Conlon are being crossed to resistant lines developed by the breeding programs. ...

  13. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  14. Correcting Duporcq's theorem☆

    PubMed Central

    Nawratil, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In 1898, Ernest Duporcq stated a famous theorem about rigid-body motions with spherical trajectories, without giving a rigorous proof. Today, this theorem is again of interest, as it is strongly connected with the topic of self-motions of planar Stewart–Gough platforms. We discuss Duporcq's theorem from this point of view and demonstrate that it is not correct. Moreover, we also present a revised version of this theorem. PMID:25540467

  15. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  16. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops.

    PubMed

    Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2009-11-02

    Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider the unique attributes of a given biofeedstock crop and its environmental release. For currently envisioned biofeedstock crops, particular emphasis in risk assessment will be given to characterization of altered metabolic profiles and their implications relative to non-target environmental effects and food safety; weediness and invasiveness when plants are modified for abiotic stress tolerance or are domesticated; and aggregate risk when plants are platforms for multi-product production. Robust risk assessments for transgenic biofeedstock crops are case-specific, initiated through problem formulation, and use tiered approaches for risk characterization.

  17. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops

    PubMed Central

    Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider the unique attributes of a given biofeedstock crop and its environmental release. For currently envisioned biofeedstock crops, particular emphasis in risk assessment will be given to characterization of altered metabolic profiles and their implications relative to non-target environmental effects and food safety; weediness and invasiveness when plants are modified for abiotic stress tolerance or are domesticated; and aggregate risk when plants are platforms for multi-product production. Robust risk assessments for transgenic biofeedstock crops are case-specific, initiated through problem formulation, and use tiered approaches for risk characterization. PMID:19883509

  18. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition.

  19. Illegal gene flow from transgenic creeping bentgrass: the saga continues.

    PubMed

    Snow, Allison A

    2012-10-01

    Ecologists have paid close attention to environmental effects that fitness-enhancing transgenes might have following crop-to-wild gene flow (e.g. Snow et al. 2003). For some crops, gene flow also can lead to legal problems,especially when government agencies have not approved transgenic events for unrestricted environmental release.Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), a common turf grass used in golf courses, is the focus of both areas of concern. In 2002, prior to expected deregulation (still pending), The Scotts Company planted creeping bentgrass with transgenic resistance to the herbicide glyphosate,also known as RoundUp, on 162 ha in a designated control area in central Oregon (Fig. 1).Despite efforts to restrict gene flow, wind-dispersed pollen carried transgenes to florets of local A. stolonifera and A. gigantea as far as 14 km away, and to sentinel plants placed as far as 21 km away (Watrud et al. 2004).Then, in August 2003, a strong wind event moved transgenic seeds from wind rows of cut bentgrass into nearby areas. The company’s efforts to kill all transgenic survivors in the area failed: feral glyphosate-resistant populations of A. stolonifera were found by Reichman et al.(2006), and 62% of 585 bentgrass plants had the telltale CP4 EPSPS transgene in 2006 (Zapiola et al. 2008; Fig. 2).Now, in this issue, the story gets even more interesting as Zapiola & Mallory-Smith (2012) describe a transgenic,intergeneric hybrid produced on a feral, transgenic creeping bentgrass plant that received pollen from Polypogon monspeliensis (rabbitfoot grass). Their finding raises a host of new questions about the prevalence and fitness of intergeneric hybrids, as well as how to evaluate the full extent of gene flow from transgenic crops.

  20. Minute Pirate Bug (Orius Insidiosus Say) populations on transgenic and non-transgenic maize using different sampling techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the populations of minute pirate bug [Orius insidiosus (Say)] using visual, sticky cards, and destructive sampling techniques in transgenic and non-transgenic maize in three locations in Nebraska (Mead, Clay Center, and Concord), United States of America,...

  1. A transgenic mouse model with inducible Tyrosinase gene expression using the tetracycline (Tet-on) system allows regulated rescue of abnormal chiasmatic projections found in albinism.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Lavado, Alfonso; Giraldo, Patricia; Cozar, Patricia; Jeffery, Glen; Montoliu, Lluís

    2004-08-01

    Congenital defects in retinal pigmentation, as in oculocutaneous albinism Type I (OCA1), where tyrosinase is defective, result in visual abnormalities affecting the retina and pathways into the brain. Transgenic animals expressing a functional tyrosinase gene on an albino genetic background display a correction of all these abnormalities, implicating a functional role for tyrosinase in normal retinal development. To address the function of tyrosinase in the development of the mammalian visual system, we have generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of the tyrosinase gene using the tetracycline (TET-ON) system. We have produced two types of transgenic mice: first, mice expressing the transactivator rtTA chimeric protein under the control of mouse tyrosinase promoter and its locus control region (LCR), and; second, transgenic mice expressing a mouse tyrosinase cDNA construct driven by a minimal promoter inducible by rtTA in the presence of doxycycline. Inducible experiments have been carried out with selected double transgenic mouse lines. Tyrosinase expression has been induced from early embryo development and its impact assessed with histological and biochemical methods in heterozygous and homozygous double transgenic individuals. We have found an increase of tyrosinase activity in the eyes of induced animals, compared with littermate controls. However, there was significant variability in the activation of this gene, as reported in analogous experiments. In spite of this, we could observe corrected uncrossed chiasmatic pathways, decreased in albinism, in animals induced from their first gestational week. These mice could be instrumental in revealing the role of tyrosinase in mammalian visual development.

  2. An Efficient Method for Generation of Transgenic Rats Avoiding Embryo Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Bhola Shankar; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2016-03-08

    Although rats are preferred over mice as an animal model, transgenic animals are generated predominantly using mouse embryos. There are limitations in the generation of transgenic rat by embryo manipulation. Unlike mouse embryos, most of the rat embryos do not survive after male pronuclear DNA injection which reduces the efficiency of generation of transgenic rat by this method. More importantly, this method requires hundreds of eggs collected by killing several females for insertion of transgene to generate transgenic rat. To this end, we developed a noninvasive and deathless technique for generation of transgenic rats by integrating transgene into the genome of the spermatogonial cells by testicular injection of DNA followed by electroporation. After standardization of this technique using EGFP as a transgene, a transgenic disease model displaying alpha thalassemia was successfully generated using rats. This efficient method will ease the generation of transgenic rats without killing the lives of rats while simultaneously reducing the number of rats used for generation of transgenic animal.

  3. Biasing errors and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of laser velocimeter measurement rate on flow velocity is discussed. Investigations outlining that any dependence is purely statistical, and is nonstationary both spatially and temporally, are described. Main conclusions drawn are that the times between successive particle arrivals should be routinely measured and the calculation of the velocity data rate correlation coefficient should be performed to determine if a dependency exists. If none is found, accept the data ensemble as an independent sample of the flow. If a dependency is found, the data should be modified to obtain an independent sample. Universal correcting procedures should never be applied because their underlying assumptions are not valid.

  4. WP1: transgenic opto-animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    UŻarowska, E.; Czajkowski, Rafał; Konopka, W.

    2014-11-01

    We aim to create a set of genetic tools where permanent opsin expression (ChR or NpHR) is precisely limited to the population of neurons that express immediate early gene c-fos during a specific temporal window of behavioral training. Since the c-fos gene is only expressed in neurons that form experience-dependent ensemble, this approach will result in specific labeling of a small subset of cells that create memory trace for the learned behavior. To this end we employ two alternative inducible gene expression systems: Tet Expression System and Cre/lox System. In both cases, the temporal window for opsin induction is controlled pharmacologically, by doxycycline or tamoxifen, respectively. Both systems will be used for creating lines of transgenic animals.

  5. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  6. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  7. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  8. Transgenic maize plants by tissue electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    D'Halluin, K; Bonne, E; Bossut, M; De Beuckeleer, M; Leemans, J

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the transformation of regenerable maize tissues by electroporation. In many maize lines, immature zygotic embryos can give rise to embryogenic callus cultures from which plants can be regenerated. Immature zygotic embryos or embryogenic type I calli were wounded either enzymatically or mechanically and subsequently electroporated with a chimeric gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase (neo). Transformed embryogenic calli were selected from electroporated tissues on kanamycin-containing media and fertile transgenic maize plants were regenerated. The neo gene was transmitted to the progeny of kanamycin-resistant transformants in a Mendelian fashion. This showed that all transformants were nonchimeric, suggesting that transformation and regeneration are a single-cell event. The maize transformation procedure presented here does not require the establishment of genotype-dependent embryogenic type II callus or cell suspension cultures and facilitates the engineering of new traits into agronomically relevant maize inbred lines. PMID:1334743

  9. Magnetic biomineralisation in Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhum, W.; Hautot, D.; Dobson, J.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2005-01-01

    The concentration levels of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles in transgenic R6/2 Huntington's disease (HD) mice have been investigated, using seven control and seven HD mice each from an 8 week-old litter and from a 12 week-old litter. Hysteresis and isothermal remnant magnetisation data were collected on a SQUID magnetometer, and analysed using a model comprising dia/paramagnetic, ferrimagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions, to extract the magnetite and ferritin concentrations present. It was found that magnetite was present in both superparamagnetic and blocked states. A larger spread and higher concentration of magnetite levels was found in the diseased mice for both the 8 week-old and 12 week-old batches, compared to the controls.

  10. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  11. High-value products from transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Shaista; Ramessar, Koreen; Farré, Gemma; Sabalza, Maite; Miralpeix, Bruna; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Maize (also known as corn) is a domesticated cereal grain that has been grown as food and animal feed for tens of thousands of years. It is currently the most widely grown crop in the world, and is used not only for food/feed but also to produce ethanol, industrial starches and oils. Maize is now at the beginning of a new agricultural revolution, where the grains are used as factories to synthesize high-value molecules. In this article we look at the diversity of high-value products from maize, recent technological advances in the field and the emerging regulatory framework that governs how transgenic maize plants and their products are grown, used and traded.

  12. Temporal expression of a V(H) promoter-Cmu transgene linked to the IgH HS1,2 enhancer.

    PubMed

    Andersson, T; Furebring, C; Borrebaeck, C A; Pettersson, S

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene expression is guided by cis-regulatory elements which direct correct temporal and spatial expression in B lineage cells. One of these cis-acting elements is the IgH HS1,2 enhancer and previous studies in transgenic mice have revealed a temporally restricted activity of an HS1,2 enhancer-linked human beta-globin reporter gene in B lineage cells. To assess whether this enhancer can impose strict temporal regulation onto a V(H)-promoter-Cmu reporter gene, transgenic mice were generated. These mice expressed high serum levels of protein from the transgene. Moreover, high levels of transgene expression were observed in spleen and thymus, while lower expression was found in heart and kidney and no expression was detected in liver and brain. Interestingly, transgene expression was confined to large, activated B cells and peritoneal B cells but not observed in small, resting splenic B cells or activated T cells. However, upon mitogenic stimulation of resting B cells with LPS, high levels of transgene expression was induced. Our data demonstrate that the HS1,2 enhancer can interact with a natural V(H) promoter in a strict temporal fashion and when provided with an appropriate activation signal, this V(H) promoter/enhancer construct can induce transgene expression in resting B, but not T lineage cells. Our data are compatible with a model whereby the regulation of IgH gene expression may be subject to regulation by distinct subsets of cis-regulatory elements acting at different stages of B lymphocyte development. Thus, Ig gene expression may be regulated via an interaction between the V(H) promoter and 3' enhancer elements (here typified by the HS1,2 enhancer) in terminally differentiated B lineage cells.

  13. Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

    2009-01-01

    Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

  14. Mental Health in Corrections: An Overview for Correctional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowers, Wesley; Thompson, Kenneth; Mullins, Stephen

    This volume is designed to provide corrections practitioners with basic staff training on the needs of those with mental illness and impairments in our correctional systems. Chapter titles are: (1) "Mental Illness in the Correctional Setting"; (2) "Substance Use Disorders"; (3) "Problems with Mood"; (4) "Problems…

  15. Inheritance of transgenes in transgenic Bt lines resistance to Helicoerpa armigera in upland cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baolong; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Six transgenic Bt cotton cultivars (lines) including GKsu12, GK19, MR1, GK5, 109B, and SGK1 are highly resistant to bollworm from the seedling to boll-setting stages in bioassays with detached cotton leaves, though there are differences in resistant level and Bt toxin content in these transgenic cottons. Genetics analysis reveals that the resistance to Helicoverpa armigera in these six transgenic Bt cotton cultivars (lines) are controlled by one pair of dominant genes. Allelic tests further demonstrate some populations are in Mendel segregation for two nonallelic genes, i.e., the inserted Bt gene in GKsu12 is nonallelic to that of SGK1, GK5, 109B, and GK19 and Bt genes in GK19 and SGK1 are likely inserted in the same or in close proximity (genetically closely linked), while some F(2) produce abnormal segregation patterns, with a segregation of resistance to Helicoerpa armigera vary between 15:1 and 3:1, though their Bt segregation fit into 15:1 by PCR analysis, suggesting Bt gene silence in these populations. Two genes silence may occur in these populations due to the homologous sequence by crossing since the silenced individuals accounted for 1/16 of the F(2) populations for allelic test. To those silenced populations, one of their parents all showed high resistance to bollworm.

  16. Transgenic Studies with a Keratin Promoter-Driven Growth Hormone Transgene: Prospects for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zinkel, Sandra; Polonsky, Kenneth; Fuchs, Elaine

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocytes are potentially appealing vehicles for the delivery of secreted gene products because they can be transferred to human skin by the relatively simple procedure of grafting. Adult human keratinocytes can be efficiently propagated in culture with sufficient proliferative capacity to produce enough epidermis to cover the body surface of an average adult. However, the feasibility of delivering secreted proteins through skin grafting rests upon (i) the strength of the promoter in keratinocytes and (ii) the efficiency of protein transport through the basement membrane of the stratified epithelium and into the bloodstream. In this paper, we use transgenic technology to demonstrate that the activity of the human keratin 14 promoter remains high in adult skin and that keratinocyte-derived human growth hormone (hGH) can be produced, secreted, and transported to the bloodstream of mice with efficiency that is sufficient to exceed by an order of magnitude the circulating hGH concentration in growing children. Transgenic skin grafts from these adults continue to produce and secrete hGH stably, at ≈ 1/10 physiological levels in the bloodstream of nontransgenic recipient mice. These studies underscore the utility of the keratin 14 promoter for expressing foreign transgenes in keratinocytes and demonstrate that keratinocytes can be used as effective vehicles for transporting factors to the bloodstream and for eliciting metabolic changes. These findings have important implications for considering the keratinocyte as a possible vehicle for gene therapy.

  17. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Igα/β in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained.

  18. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  19. Smooth eigenvalue correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-12-01

    Second-order statistics play an important role in data modeling. Nowadays, there is a tendency toward measuring more signals with higher resolution (e.g., high-resolution video), causing a rapid increase of dimensionality of the measured samples, while the number of samples remains more or less the same. As a result the eigenvalue estimates are significantly biased as described by the Marčenko Pastur equation for the limit of both the number of samples and their dimensionality going to infinity. By introducing a smoothness factor, we show that the Marčenko Pastur equation can be used in practical situations where both the number of samples and their dimensionality remain finite. Based on this result we derive methods, one already known and one new to our knowledge, to estimate the sample eigenvalues when the population eigenvalues are known. However, usually the sample eigenvalues are known and the population eigenvalues are required. We therefore applied one of the these methods in a feedback loop, resulting in an eigenvalue bias correction method. We compare this eigenvalue correction method with the state-of-the-art methods and show that our method outperforms other methods particularly in real-life situations often encountered in biometrics: underdetermined configurations, high-dimensional configurations, and configurations where the eigenvalues are exponentially distributed.

  20. [Effect of transgenic insect-resistant rice on biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    Rice is the most important food crops in maintaining food security in China. The loss of China's annual rice production caused by pests is over ten million tons. Present studies showed that the transgenic insect-resistant rice can substantially reduce the application amount of chemical pesticides. In the case of no pesticide use, the pest density in transgenic rice field is significantly lower than that in non-transgenic field, and the neutral insects and natural enemies of pests increased significantly, indicating that the ecological environment and biodiversity toward the positive direction. The gene flow frequency from transgenic rice is dramatically reduced with the distance increases, reaching less than 0.01% at the distance of 6.2 m. Application of transgenic insect-resistant rice in China has an important significance for ensuring food security, maintaining sustainable agricultural development, and protecting the ecological environment and biodiversity. This review summarized the research progress in transgenic insect-resistant rice and its effect on biodiversity. The research directions and development trends of crop pest controlling in future are discussed. These help to promote better use of transgenic insect-resistant rice.

  1. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Contact Lenses Sections Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Proper ... to Know About Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  2. Acute acetaminophen toxicity in transgenic mice with elevated hepatic glutathione.

    PubMed

    Rzucidlo, S J; Bounous, D I; Jones, D P; Brackett, B G

    2000-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that elevation of hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentrations protect against acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity in mice. Employing transgenic mice overexpressing glutathione synthetase, this study was conducted to determine if sustained elevation of hepatic GSH concentrations could ameliorate or prevent APAP toxicity. International Cancer Research transgenic mouse males and matched (ie same strain, sex, and age) control nontransgenic mice were pretreated ip with GSH synthetase substrate gamma-glutamylcysteinyl ethyl ester (gamma-GCE) or with saline. After a 16-h fast, mice received a single dose of 500 mg APAP/kg bw in saline ip and were sacrificed 4 h later. Other mice similarly pretreated were killed without APAP challenge. The elevated GSH concentrations in transgenic mice livers did not lessen APAP hepatotoxicity. Instead higher degrees of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were observed in transgenic mice than in controls as indicated by higher serum alanine aminotransferase activity and more severe histopathological lesions in transgenic mice livers and kidneys. Pretreatment with gamma-GCE did not affect either initial or post-APAP treatment tissue GSH concentrations or observed degrees of toxicity. Detection of a higher level of serum APAP in transgenic mice and the histopathological lesions found in transgenic mice kidneys together with no observable nephrotoxicity in control mice indicated early kidney damage in transgenic mice. Our findings suggest that high levels of GSH-APAP conjugates resulting from increased GSH concentrations in the livers of transgenic mice caused rapid kidney damage. Compromised excretory ability may have caused retention of APAP, which, in effect, elicited higher hepatotoxicity than that observed in nontransgenic mice.

  3. Transgenic fish systems and their application in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Okhyun; Green, Jon M; Tyler, Charles R

    2015-02-01

    The use of transgenics in fish is a relatively recent development for advancing understanding of genetic mechanisms and developmental processes, improving aquaculture, and for pharmaceutical discovery. Transgenic fish have also been applied in ecotoxicology where they have the potential to provide more advanced and integrated systems for assessing health impacts of chemicals. The zebrafish (Daniorerio) is the most popular fish for transgenic models, for reasons including their high fecundity, transparency of their embryos, rapid organogenesis and availability of extensive genetic resources. The most commonly used technique for producing transgenic zebrafish is via microinjection of transgenes into fertilized eggs. Transposon and meganuclease have become the most reliable methods for insertion of the genetic construct in the production of stable transgenic fish lines. The GAL4-UAS system, where GAL4 is placed under the control of a desired promoter and UAS is fused with a fluorescent marker, has greatly enhanced model development for studies in ecotoxicology. Transgenic fish have been developed to study for the effects of heavy metal toxicity (via heat-shock protein genes), oxidative stress (via an electrophile-responsive element), for various organic chemicals acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, thyroid and glucocorticoid response pathways, and estrogenicity. These models vary in their sensitivity with only very few able to detect responses for environmentally relevant exposures. Nevertheless, the potential of these systems for analyses of chemical effects in real time and across multiple targets in intact organisms is considerable. Here we illustrate the techniques used for generating transgenic zebrafish and assess progress in the development and application of transgenic fish (principally zebrafish) for studies in environmental toxicology. We further provide a viewpoint on future development opportunities.

  4. 75 FR 16516 - Dates Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Office of the Federal Register Dates Correction Correction In the Notices section beginning on page 15401 in the issue of March 29th, 2010, make the following correction: On pages...

  5. Yearbook of Correctional Education 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duguid, Stephen, Ed.

    This yearbook contains conference papers, commissioned papers, reprints of earlier works, and research-in-progress. They offer a retrospective view as well as address the mission and perspective of correctional education, its international dimension, correctional education in action, and current research. Papers include "Correctional Education and…

  6. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  7. Characterization of Fluorescent Eye Markers for Mammalian Transgenic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, Jonathan C.; Landrette, Sean F.; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Genotyping mice by DNA based methods is both laborious and costly. As an alternative, we systematically examined fluorescent proteins expressed in the lens as transgenic markers for mice. A set of eye markers has been selected such that double and triple transgenic animals can be visually identified and that fluorescence intensity in the eyes can be used to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous mice. Taken together, these eye markers dramatically reduce the time and cost of genotyping transgenics and empower analysis of genetic interaction. PMID:22216292

  8. Generation of transgenic dogs that conditionally express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Kim, Teoan; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Ko, Chemyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-06-01

    We report the creation of a transgenic dog that conditionally expresses eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) under the regulation of doxycycline. Briefly, fetal fibroblasts infected with a Tet-on eGFP vector were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently reconstructed oocytes were transferred to recipients. Three clones having transgenes were born and one dog was alive. The dog showed all features of inducible expression of eGFP upon doxycycline administration, and successful breeding resulted in eGFP-positive puppies, confirming stable insertion of the transgene into the genome. This inducible dog model will be useful for a variety of medical research studies.

  9. Down with DON: Strategies for precise transgene delivery and rnai-based suppression of fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic strategies can effectively supplement other methods for controlling Fusarium head blight (FHB). Impediments to deploying FHB-resistant transgenic barley include a long time-frame for creating and testing transgenes in barley, imprecise transgene insertions that lead to unstable gene expre...

  10. Anomaly corrected heterotic horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanella, A.; Gutowski, J. B.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an {s}{l}(2,{R}) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating α' corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in α' for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  11. Updating and correction.

    PubMed

    1994-09-09

    The current editions of two books edited by William T. Golden, Science Advice to the President and Science and Technology Advice to the President, Congress, and Judiciary, published this year by AAAS Press, are now being distributed by Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, at the prices $22.95 and $27.95 (paper), respectively, and are no longer available from AAAS. A related work, Golden's 1991 compilation Worldwide Science and Technology Advice to the Highest Levels of Government, originally published by Pergamon Press, is also being distributed by Transaction Publishers, at $25.95. For more information about the books see Science 1 July, p. 127. In the review of K. S. Thorne's Black Holes and Time Warps (13 May, p. 999-1000), the captions and illustrations on p. 1000 were mismatched. The correct order of the captions is (i) "A heavy rock..."; (ii) "Cosmic radio waves..."; and (iii) "The trajectories in space...."

  12. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the

  13. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  14. Integrative Analysis of Transgenic Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Suggests New Metabolic Control Mechanisms for Monolignol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun; Chen, Fang; Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2011-01-01

    The entanglement of lignin polymers with cellulose and hemicellulose in plant cell walls is a major biological barrier to the economically viable production of biofuels from woody biomass. Recent efforts of reducing this recalcitrance with transgenic techniques have been showing promise for ameliorating or even obviating the need for costly pretreatments that are otherwise required to remove lignin from cellulose and hemicelluloses. At the same time, genetic manipulations of lignin biosynthetic enzymes have sometimes yielded unforeseen consequences on lignin composition, thus raising the question of whether the current understanding of the pathway is indeed correct. To address this question systemically, we developed and applied a novel modeling approach that, instead of analyzing the pathway within a single target context, permits a comprehensive, simultaneous investigation of different datasets in wild type and transgenic plants. Specifically, the proposed approach combines static flux-based analysis with a Monte Carlo simulation in which very many randomly chosen sets of parameter values are evaluated against kinetic models of lignin biosynthesis in different stem internodes of wild type and lignin-modified alfalfa plants. In addition to four new postulates that address the reversibility of some key reactions, the modeling effort led to two novel postulates regarding the control of the lignin biosynthetic pathway. The first posits functionally independent pathways toward the synthesis of different lignin monomers, while the second postulate proposes a novel feedforward regulatory mechanism. Subsequent laboratory experiments have identified the signaling molecule salicylic acid as a potential mediator of the postulated control mechanism. Overall, the results demonstrate that mathematical modeling can be a valuable complement to conventional transgenic approaches and that it can provide biological insights that are otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:21625579

  15. Unstable expression of transgene is associated with the methylation of CAG promoter in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Qin-Kai; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Deng-Gao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Wei; Pan, Qing-Jie

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic animals have been established for studying gene function, improving animals' production traits, and providing organ models for the exploration of human diseases. However, the stability of inheritance and transgene expression in transgenic animals has gained extensive attention. The unstable expression of transgene through DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) targeting to the methylation of transgenic DNA such as CAG promoter and Egfp coding region in homozygous transgenic animals is still unknown. In the present study, the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice carrying ubiquitously expressed enhanced green fluorescence protein driven by CMV early enhancer/chicken β-actin (CAG) promoter was observed to have unstable expression of transgene Egfp, quantitative PCR, western blot and bisulfite sequencing were conducted to quantify the expressional characteristics and methylation levels in various tissues. The correlation between transgene expression and methylation was analyzed. We have found that transgene expression is dependent on the methylation of CAG promoter, but not Egfp coding region. We have also characterized the correlation between the methylation of CAG promoter and DNMT, and found that only Dnmt3b expression is correlated with the methylation of CAG promoter. In conclusion, Dnmt3b-related methylation of CAG promoter can inhibit the transgene expression and may result in the unstable expression of transgene in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

  16. Polycythemia in transgenic mice expressing the human erythropoietin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Semenza, G.L.; Traystman, M.D.; Gearhart, J.D.; Antonarakis, S.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycoprotein hormone that regulates mammalian erythropoiesis. To study the expression of the human erythropoietin gene, EPO, 4 kilobases of DNA encompassing the gene with 0.4 kilobase of 5{prime} flanking sequence and 0.7 kilobase of 3{prime} flanking sequence was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. Transgenic mice were generated that are polycythemic, with increased erythrocytic indices in peripheral blood, increased numbers of erythroid precursors in hematopoietic tissue, and increased serum erythropoietin levels. Transgenic homozygotes show a greater degree of polycythemia than do heterozygotes as well as striking extramedullary erythropoiesis. Human erythropoietin RNA was found not only in fetal liver, adult liver, and kidney but also in all other transgenic tissues analyzed. Anemia induced increased human erythropoietin RNA levels in liver but not kidney. These transgenic mice represent a unique model of polycythemia due to increased erythropoietin levels.

  17. [Effects of agricultural activities and transgenic crops on agricultural biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Tao; Luo, Hong-Bing; Li, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Hai; Liu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural biodiversity is a key part of the ecosystem biodiversity, but it receives little concern. The monoculture, environmental pollution and habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural activities have threatened agricultural biodiversity over the past 50 years. To optimize agricultural management measures for crop production and environmental protection, we reviewed the effects of agricultural activities, including cultivation patterns, plastic mulching, chemical additions and the cultivation of transgenic crops, on agricultural biodiversity. The results showed that chemical pesticides and fertilizers had the most serious influence and the effects of transgenic crops varied with other factors like the specific transgene inserted in crops. The environmental risk of transgenic crops should be assessed widely through case-by-case methods, particularly its potential impacts on agricultural biodiversity. It is important to consider the protection of agricultural biodiversity before taking certain agricultural practices, which could improve agricultural production and simultaneously reduce the environmental impacts.

  18. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  19. OPTIMAL BAND SELECTION OF HYPERSPECTRAL DATA FOR TRANSGENIC CORN IDENTIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance development by insect pests to the insecticidal proteins expressed in transgenic crops would increase reliance on broad spectrum chemical insecticides subsequently reducing environmental quality and increasing worker exposure to toxic chemicals. An important component ...

  20. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  1. Strategies for metabolic pathway engineering with multiple transgenes.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2013-09-01

    The engineering of metabolic pathways in plants often requires the concerted expression of more than one gene. While with traditional transgenic approaches, the expression of multiple transgenes has been challenging, recent progress has greatly expanded our repertoire of powerful techniques making this possible. New technological options include large-scale co-transformation of the nuclear genome, also referred to as combinatorial transformation, and transformation of the chloroplast genome with synthetic operon constructs. This review describes the state of the art in multigene genetic engineering of plants. It focuses on the methods currently available for the introduction of multiple transgenes into plants and the molecular mechanisms underlying successful transgene expression. Selected examples of metabolic pathway engineering are used to illustrate the attractions and limitations of each method and to highlight key factors that influence the experimenter's choice of the best strategy for multigene engineering.

  2. Transgenic cloned sheep overexpressing ovine toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Li, Guiguan; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Cui, Maosheng; Guo, Yong; Liu, Guoshi; Li, Guangpeng; Feng, Jianzhong; Lian, Zhengxing

    2013-07-01

    An ovine fetal fibroblast cell line highly expressing TLR4 was established by inserting TLR4 into a reconstructive p3S-LoxP plasmid. Transgenic sheep overexpressing TLR4 were produced by transferring TLR4-transfected fetal fibroblasts into metaphase (M)II-stage enucleated oocytes (using SCNT). Because reconstructed embryos derived from MII-stage enucleated oocytes matured in vivo using a delayed-activated method had a higher pregnancy rate (18.52%) than that from MII-stage enucleated oocytes matured in vitro, the former procedure was used. Nine TLR4-transgenic live births were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Increased expression of TLR4 at mRNA and protein levels in ear tissues of transgenic lambs were verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. More toll-like receptor 4 protein was expressed by peripheral blood monocytes and/or macrophages collected from 3-month-old TLR4-transgenic than nontransgenic lambs at 0, 1, and 4 hours after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Furthermore, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor α secreted by monocytes and/or macrophages of TLR4-transgenic lambs were significantly higher at 1 hour. Therefore, lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses from monocytes and/or macrophages occurred sooner in TLR4-transgenic lambs, consistent with an enhanced host immune response. In conclusion, transgenic sheep overexpressing TLR4 are a primary model to investigate the role of transgenic animals in disease resistance and have potential for breeding sheep with disease resistance.

  3. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  4. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  5. [Research progress of transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Ji, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. Drosophila has been regard as one of the ideal models for Alzheimer because of its unique advantage on genetic manipulation. AD transgenic drosophila models not only help to elucidate the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, but also provide potential screening models for drugs to treat the disease. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress using AD transgenic drosophila.

  6. Dihydrofolate Reductase and Thymidylate Synthase Transgenes Resistant to Methotrexate Interact to Permit Novel Transgene Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Mathews, Amber; Alpert, Amir; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-folate that inhibits de novo purine and thymidine nucleotide synthesis. MTX induces death in rapidly replicating cells and is used in the treatment of multiple cancers. MTX inhibits thymidine synthesis by targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS). The use of MTX to treat cancer also causes bone marrow suppression and inhibits the immune system. This has led to the development of an MTX-resistant DHFR, DHFR L22F, F31S (DHFRFS), to rescue healthy cells. 5-Fluorouracil-resistant TYMS T51S, G52S (TYMSSS) is resistant to MTX and improves MTX resistance of DHFRFS in primary T cells. Here we find that a known mechanism of MTX-induced increase in DHFR expression persists with DHFRFS and cis-expressed transgenes. We also find that TYMSSS expression of cis-expressed transgenes is similarly decreased in an MTX-inducible manner. MTX-inducible changes in DHFRFS and TYMSSS expression changes are lost when both genes are expressed together. In fact, expression of the DHFRFS and TYMSSS cis-expressed transgenes becomes correlated. These findings provide the basis for an unrecognized post-transcriptional mechanism that functionally links expression of DHFR and TYMS. These findings were made in genetically modified primary human T cells and have a clear potential for use in clinical applications where gene expression needs to be regulated by drug or maintained at a specific expression level. We demonstrate a potential application of this system in the controlled expression of systemically toxic cytokine IL-12. PMID:26242737

  7. [Obtaining transgenic rice plants and their progenies using Agrobacterium tumefaciens].

    PubMed

    Yin, Z C; Yang, F; Xu, Y; Li, B J

    1998-12-01

    Rice (Oriza sativa L.) suspension cells of Taipei 309 were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens stran EHA101 harbouring binary vector pBYT2 for 3 days in the presence of vir inducer, 100 mumol/L acetosyringone (AS). After 2 months of continuous selection, 17 stable hygromycin-resistant, GUS-positive calli were recovered from 364 suspension cell clusters co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens. 10 putative transgenic R0 plants obtained from 8 tansformed calli and their progenies were analyzed for the integration and expression of foreign genes. Southern blot analysis of R0 and R1 generations indicated that foreign genes had been stably integrated in the genome of transgenic rice and sexually transmitted. One of the transgenic lines showed 5 copies of T-DNA integration, while the others had only one copy. Histochemical staining observation and fluorometric assay of GUS activity in transgenic rice cells and plants showed ubiquitin promoter from maize was highly effective in driving the expression of gus reporter gene in transgenic rice cells. GUS protein and its activity were also investigated through ndPAGE-X-Gluc staining assay, and it was found that the GUS protein in transgenic rice cells was smaller in size than the standard GUS protein (Sigma Co. G0786) but as large as that from E.coli HB101 (pBI121). This study suggested that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plant is an efficient and reliable method to introduce foreign genes into rice.

  8. Enhanced malignant tumorigenesis in Cdk4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-03-11

    In a previous study, we reported that overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (CDK4) in mouse epidermis results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy and severe dermal fibrosis. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibility to skin tumor formation by forced expression of CDK4. Skin tumors from transgenic mice showed a dramatic increase in the rate of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in an initiation-promotion protocol. Histopathological analysis of papillomas from transgenic mice showed an elevated number of premalignant lesions characterized by dysplasia and marked atypia. Interestingly, transgenic mice also developed tumors in initiated but not promoted skin, demonstrating that CDK4 replaced the action of tumor promoters. These results suggest that expression of cyclin D1 upon ras activation synergizes with CDK4 overexpression. However, cyclin D1 transgenic mice and double transgenic mice for cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not show increased malignant progression in comparison to CDK4 transgenic mice. Biochemical analysis of tumors showed that CDK4 sequesters the CDK2 inhibitors p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, suggesting that indirect activation of CDK2 plays an important role in tumor development. These results indicate that, contrary to the general assumption, the catalytic subunit, CDK4, has higher oncogenic activity than cyclin D1, revealing a potential use of CDK4 as therapeutic target.

  9. Neurologic and motor dysfunctions in APP transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Robert; Fukuchi, Ken-ichiro; Strazielle, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of gene mutations underlying autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease has enabled researchers to reproduce several hallmarks of this disorder in transgenic mice, notably the formation of Aβ plaques in brain and cognitive deficits. APP transgenic mutants have also been investigated with respect to survival rates, neurologic functions, and motor coordination, which are all susceptible to alteration in Alzheimer dementia. Several transgenic lines expressing human mutated or wild-type APP had higher mortality rates than non-transgenic controls with or without the presence of Aβ plaques. Mortality rates were also elevated in APP transgenic mice with vascular amyloid accumulation, thereby implicating cerebrovascular factors in the precocious death observed in all APP transgenic models. In addition, myoclonic jumping has been described in APP mutants, together with seizure activity, abnormal limb-flexion and paw-clasping reflexes, and motor coordination deficits. The neurologic signs resemble the myoclonic movements, epileptic seizures, pathological reflexes, and gait problems observed in late-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23089603

  10. Transgenic crops coping with water scarcity.

    PubMed

    Cominelli, Eleonora; Tonelli, Chiara

    2010-11-30

    Water scarcity is a serious problem that will be exacerbated by global climate change. Massive quantities of water are used in agriculture, and abiotic stresses, especially drought and increased salinity, are primary causes of crop loss worldwide. Various approaches may be adopted to consume less water in agriculture, one of them being the development of plants that use less water yet maintain high yields in conditions of water scarcity. In recent years several molecular networks concerned with stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated. Consequently, engineering some of the genes involved in these mechanisms promises to enhance plant tolerance to stresses and in particular increase their water use efficiency. Here we review the various approaches used so far to produce transgenic plants having improved tolerance to abiotic stresses, and discuss criteria for choosing which genes to work on (functional and regulatory genes) and which gene expression promoters (constitutive, inducible, and cell-specific) have been used to obtain successful results.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Intronic Transgenes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Osabe, Kenji; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Saori; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Defense mechanisms of plant genomes can epigenetically inactivate repetitive sequences and exogenous transgenes. Loss of mutant phenotypes in intronic T-DNA insertion lines by interaction with another T-DNA locus, termed T-DNA suppression, has been observed in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the molecular basis of establishment and maintenance of T-DNA suppression is poorly understood. Here we show that maintenance of T-DNA suppression requires heterochromatinisation of T-DNA sequences and the nuclear proteins, INCREASED IN BONSAI METHYLATION 2 (IBM2) and ENHANCED DOWNY MILDEW 2 (EDM2), which prevent ectopic 3′ end processing of mRNA in atypically long introns containing T-DNA sequences. Initiation of T-DNA suppression is mediated by the canonical RdDM pathway after hybridisation of two T-DNA strains, accompanied by DNA hypermethylation of T-DNA sequences in the F1 generation. Our results reveal the presence of a genome surveillance mechanism through genome hybridisation that masks repetitive DNAs intruding into transcription units. PMID:28338020

  12. Evaluating cerebellar functions using optogenetic transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, John P.; Turecek, Josef; Turner, Eric E.

    2013-03-01

    We employed a transgenic mouse having conditional expression of ChR2(H134R) in neurons of the inferior olive to facilitate understanding of the role of electrical coupling and oscillation in central nervous system function. Two-photon excitation of ChR2-expressing neurons using 64 laser beams restricted to single inferior olive cell bodies depolarized neurons and evoked voltage deflections in neighboring neurons demonstrating electrical coupling. Broader illumination of neuronal ensembles using blue light induced an optical clamp of endogenous electrical rhythms in the inferior olive of acutely-prepared brain slices, which when applied in vivo directly modulated the local field potential activity and induced tremor. The experiments demonstrate novel methods to optically manipulate electrically coupled potentials and rhythmogenesis within a neuronal ensemble. From a functional perspective, the experiments shed light on the cellular and circuitry mechanisms of essential tremor, a prevalent neurological condition, by indicating time- and frequencydependence of tremor upon varying rhythms of inferior olive stimulation. The experiments indicate analog control of a brain rhythm that may be used to enhance our understanding of the functional consequences of central rhythmogenesis.

  13. AMPK: Lessons from transgenic and knockout animals

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Athea, Yoni; Mounier, Remi; Guigas, Bruno; Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Horman, Sandrine; Lantier, Louise; Hebrard, Sophie; Devin-Leclerc, Jocelyne; Beauloye, Christophe; Foretz, Marc; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Ventura-Clapier, Renee; Bertrand, Luc

    2009-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, has been proposed to function as a ‘fuel gauge’ to monitor cellular energy status in response to nutritional environmental variations. AMPK system is a regulator of energy balance that, once activated by low energy status, switches on ATP-producing catabolic pathways (such as fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis), and switches off ATP-consuming anabolic pathways (such as lipogenesis), both by short-term effect on phosphorylation of regulatory proteins and by long-term effect on gene expression. Numerous observations obtained with pharmacological activators and agents that deplete intracellular ATP have been supportive of AMPK playing a role in the control of energy metabolism but none of these studies have provided conclusive evidence. Relatively recent developments in our understanding of precisely how AMPK complexes might operate to control energy metabolism is due in part to the development of transgenic and knockout mouse models. Although there are inevitable caveats with genetic models, some important findings have emerged. In the present review, we discuss recent findings obtained from animal models with inhibition or activation of AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:19273052

  14. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  15. Comparative study of transgenic and non-transgenic maize (Zea mays) flours commercialized in Brazil, focussing on proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Nádia; Barbosa, Herbert; Jacob, Silvana; Arruda, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modified foods are a major concern around the world due to the lack of information concerning their safety and health effects. This work evaluates differences, at the proteomic level, between two types of crop samples: transgenic (MON810 event with the Cry1Ab gene, which confers resistance to insects) and non-transgenic maize flour commercialized in Brazil. The 2-D DIGE technique revealed 99 differentially expressed spots, which were collected in 2-D PAGE gels and identified via mass spectrometry (nESI-QTOF MS/MS). The abundance of protein differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic samples could arise from genetic modification or as a result of an environmental influence pertaining to the commercial sample. The major functional category of proteins identified was related to disease/defense and, although differences were observed between samples, no toxins or allergenic proteins were found.

  16. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, XuDong; Yang, DongShan; Ao, XuDong; Wu, Xia; Li, GuangPeng; Wang, LingLing; Bao, Ming-Tao; Xue, Lian; Bou, ShorGan

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P>0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly expressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo ( r ) genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive transgenic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  17. Efficient generation of marker-free transgenic rice plants using an improved transposon-mediated transgene reintegration strategy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong; Qu, Shaohong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops.

  18. Cardioprotective effects of 70-kDa heat shock protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, N B; Fina, M; Benjamin, I J; Moreadith, R W; Graves, K H; Zhao, P; Gavva, S; Wiethoff, A; Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Williams, R S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are proposed to limit injury resulting from diverse environmental stresses, but direct metabolic evidence for such a cytoprotective function in vertebrates has been largely limited to studies of cultured cells. We generated lines of transgenic mice to express human 70-kDa heat shock protein constitutively in the myocardium. Hearts isolated from these animals demonstrated enhanced recovery of high energy phosphate stores and correction of metabolic acidosis following brief periods of global ischemia sufficient to induce sustained abnormalities of these variables in hearts from nontransgenic littermates. These data demonstrate a direct cardioprotective effect of 70-kDa heat shock protein to enhance postischemic recovery of the intact heart. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8637874

  19. Gravitational correction to vacuum polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  20. A pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars based on fluorescence in situ hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Bou, Gerelchimeg; Sun, Mingju; Lv, Ming; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Hui; Wang, Juan; Li, Lu; Liu, Zhongfeng; Zheng, Zhong; He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-08-01

    For efficient transgenic herd expansion, only the transgenic animals that possess the ability to transmit transgene into next generation are considered for breeding. However, for transgenic pig, practically lacking a pre-breeding screening program, time, labor and money is always wasted to maintain non-transgenic pigs, low or null transgenic transmission pigs and the related fruitless gestations. Developing a pre-breeding screening program would make the transgenic herd expansion more economical and efficient. In this technical report, we proposed a three-step pre-breeding screening program for transgenic boars simply through combining the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay with the common pre-breeding screening workflow. In the first step of screening, combined with general transgenic phenotype analysis, FISH is used to identify transgenic boars. In the second step of screening, combined with conventional semen test, FISH is used to detect transgenic sperm, thus to identify the individuals producing high quality semen and transgenic sperm. In the third step of screening, FISH is used to assess the in vitro fertilization embryos, thus finally to identify the individuals with the ability to produce transgenic embryos. By this three-step screening, the non-transgenic boars and boars with no ability to produce transgenic sperm or transgenic embryos would be eliminated; therefore only those boars could produce transgenic offspring are maintained and used for breeding and herd expansion. It is the first time a systematic pre-breeding screening program is proposed for transgenic pigs. This program might also be applied in other transgenic large animals, and provide an economical and efficient strategy for herd expansion.

  1. Processor register error correction management

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  2. Testis hormone-sensitive lipase expression in spermatids is governed by a short promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Blaise, R; Guillaudeux, T; Tavernier, G; Daegelen, D; Evrard, B; Mairal, A; Holm, C; Jégou, B; Langin, D

    2001-02-16

    A testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL(tes)), a triacylglycerol lipase, and cholesterol esterase, is expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis showed HSL(tes) mRNA expression in early spermatids. Immunolocalization of the protein in human and rodent seminiferous tubules indicated that the highest level of expression occurred in elongated spermatids. We have previously shown that 0.5 kilobase pairs of the human HSL(tes) promoter directs testis-specific expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in transgenic mice and determined regions binding nuclear proteins expressed in testis but not in liver (Blaise, R., Grober, J., Rouet, P., Tavernier, G., Daegelen, D., and Langin, D. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 9327-9334). Mutation of a SRY/Sox-binding site in one of the regions did not impair in vivo testis-specific expression of the reporter gene. Further transgenic analyses established that 95 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site were sufficient for correct testis expression. In gel retardation assays using early spermatid nuclear extracts, a germ cell-specific DNA-protein interaction was mapped between -46 and -29 base pairs. The DNA binding nuclear protein showed properties of zinc finger transcription factors. Mutation of the region abolished reporter gene activity in transgenic mice, showing that it is necessary for testis expression of HSL(tes).

  3. Expression of a Self-Incompatibility Glycoprotein (S2-Ribonuclease) from Nicotiana alata in Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Murfett, J; Cornish, EC; Ebert, PR; Bonig, I; McClure, BA; Clarke, AE

    1992-01-01

    In Nicotiana alata, self-incompatibility is controlled by a single locus, designated the S-locus, with multiple alleles. Stylar products of these alleles are ribonucleases that are secreted mainly in the transmitting tract tissues. N. tabacum plants were transformed with constructs containing the S2-cDNA and genomic S2-sequences from N. alata that were linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Unlike other genes controlled by this promoter, the genes were expressed most highly in mature floral organs. This pattern of expression was observed at both the protein and RNA levels. The S2-glycoprotein was detected in the stylar transmitting tract tissues of the transgenic plants. The transgene product was secreted, had ribonuclease activity, and was glycosylated with the correct number of glycan chains. However, the maximum level of S2-glycoprotein in styles of the transgenic plants was approximately 100-fold lower than that found in N. alata styles carrying the S2-allele. Perhaps because of this lower protein level, the plants showed no changes in the incompatibility phenotype. PMID:12297668

  4. Expression of the Brazil nut methionine-rich protein and mutants with increased methionine in transgenic potato.

    PubMed

    Tu, H M; Godfrey, L W; Sun, S S

    1998-07-01

    A cDNA encoding the methionine-rich (19 mol% Met) protein in Brazil nut was placed under the regulation of CaMV 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator and introduced into the potato cultivar Russet Burbank via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To further enhance the Met content in the transgenic plants, chimeric genes containing four mutant constructs, BoxIa (with 5 additional Met), BoxIIa (2 additional Met), BoxIaIIa (7 additional Met), and BoxIIa2 (7 additional Met), were also generated by sequence modifications of the cDNA and transferred into potato. Analysis of the microtubers and leaves of the transgenic potato plants revealed, in general, with the exception of the BoxIIa2, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the expected size and the correctly processed Met-rich 9 kDa subunit polypeptides. The expression levels in the leaves among the various constructs and individual transgenic plants varied between <0.01% and 0.2% of total protein. The corresponding expression in the tubers was usually 2- to 4-fold lower than in leaves. In the case of BoxIIa2, which contains two tandem repeats of the BoxIIa mutant sequence, a larger (10.5-11 kDa) polypeptide was detected. These findings demonstrated that it is feasible to exploit the variable region of the Brazil Nut 2S protein for enhanced Met contents and perhaps for other desirable properties.

  5. Effects of corn silage derived from a genetically modified variety containing two transgenes on feed intake, milk production, and composition, and the absence of detectable transgenic deoxyribonucleic acid in milk in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Calsamiglia, S; Hernandez, B; Hartnell, G F; Phipps, R

    2007-10-01

    The objectives were to compare the chemical composition, nutritive value, feed intake, milk production and composition, and presence in milk of transgenic DNA and the encoded protein Cry1Ab when corn silages containing 2 transgenes (2GM: herbicide tolerance: mepsps and insect resistance: cry1Ab) were fed as part of a standard total mixed ration (TMR) compared with a near isogenic corn silage (C) to 8 multiparous lactating Holstein dairy cows in a single reversal design study. Cows were fed a TMR ration ad libitum and milked twice daily. Diets contained [dry matter (DM) basis] 45% corn silage, 10% alfalfa hay, and 45% concentrate (1.66 Mcal of net energy for lactation/kg of DM, 15.8% crude protein, 35% neutral detergent fiber, and 4.1% fat). Each period was 28-d long. During the last 4 d of each period, feed intake and milk production data were recorded and milk samples taken for compositional analysis, including the presence of transgenic DNA and Cry1Ab protein. There was no significant difference in the chemical composition between C and 2GM silages, and both were within the expected range (37.6% DM, 1.51 Mcal of net energy for lactation/kg, 8.6% crude protein, 40% neutral detergent fiber, 19.6% acid detergent fiber, pH 3.76, and 62% in vitro DM digestibility). Cows fed the 2GM silage produced milk with slightly higher protein (3.09 vs. 3.00%), lactose (4.83 vs. 4.72%) and solids-not-fat (8.60 vs. 8.40%) compared with C. However, the yield (kg/d) of milk (36.5), 3.5% fat-corrected milk (34.4), fat (1.151), protein (1.106), lactose (1.738), and solids-not-fat (3.094), somatic cell count (log10: 2.11), change in body weight (+7.8 kg), and condition score (+0.09) were not affected by type of silage, indicating no overall production difference. All milk samples were negative for the presence of transgenic DNA from either trait or the Cry1Ab protein. Results indicate that the 2GM silage modified with 2 transgenes did not affect nutrient composition of the silages and

  6. Monitoring of Venus transgenic cell migration during pregnancy in non-transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lipták, N; Hoffmann, O I; Kerekes, A; Iski, G; Ernszt, D; Kvell, K; Hiripi, L; Bősze, Z

    2017-04-01

    Cell transfer between mother and fetus were demonstrated previously in several species which possess haemochorial placenta (e.g. in humans, mice, rats, etc.). Here we report the assessment of fetal and maternal microchimerism in non-transgenic (non-TG) New Zealand white rabbits which were pregnant with transgenic (TG) fetuses and in non-TG newborns of TG does. The TG construct, including the Venus fluorophore cDNA driven by a ubiquitous cytomegalovirus enhancer, chicken ß-actin promoter (CAGGS), was previously integrated into the rabbit genome by Sleeping Beauty transposon system. Three different methods [fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)] were employed to search for TG cells and gene products in blood and other tissues of non-TG rabbits. Venus positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were not detected in the blood of non-TG littermates or non-TG does by flow cytometry. Tissue samples (liver, kidney, skeletal and heart muscle) also proved to be Venus negative examined with fluorescence microscopy, while histology sections and PBMCs of TG rabbits showed robust Venus protein expression. In case of genomic DNA (gDNA) sourced from tissue samples of non-TG rabbits, CAGGS promoter-specific fragments could not be amplified by QPCR. Our data showed the lack of detectable cell transfer between TG and non-TG rabbits during gestation.

  7. Survival of skin graft between transgenic cloned dogs and non-transgenic cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Lim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Byung Il; Kang, Sung Keun; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    Whereas it has been assumed that genetically modified tissues or cells derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be accepted by a host of the same species, their immune compatibility has not been extensively explored. To identify acceptance of SCNT-derived cells or tissues, skin grafts were performed between cloned dogs that were identical except for their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and foreign gene. We showed here that differences in mtDNA haplotypes and genetic modification did not elicit immune responses in these dogs: 1) skin tissues from genetically-modified cloned dogs were successfully transplanted into genetically-modified cloned dogs with different mtDNA haplotype under three successive grafts over 63 days; and 2) non-transgenic cloned tissues were accepted into transgenic cloned syngeneic recipients with different mtDNA haplotypes and vice versa under two successive grafts over 63 days. In addition, expression of the inserted gene was maintained, being functional without eliciting graft rejection. In conclusion, these results show that transplanting genetically-modified tissues into normal, syngeneic or genetically-modified recipient dogs with different mtDNA haplotypes do not elicit skin graft rejection or affect expression of the inserted gene. Therefore, therapeutically valuable tissue derived from SCNT with genetic modification might be used safely in clinical applications for patients with diseased tissues.

  8. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  9. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  10. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  11. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  12. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic banana plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G B Sunil; Ganapathi, T R; Revathi, C J; Srinivas, L; Bapat, V A

    2005-10-01

    Embryogenic cells of bananan cv. Rasthali (AAB) have been transformed with the 's' gene of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Four different expression cassettes (pHBS, pHER, pEFEHBS and pEFEHER) were utilized to optimize the expression of HBsAg in banana. The transgenic nature of the plants and expression of the antigen was confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The expression levels of the antigen in the plants grown under in vitro conditions as well as the green house hardened plants were estimated by ELISA for all the four constructs. Maximum expression level of 38 ng/g F.W. of leaves was noted in plants transformed with pEFEHBS grown under in vitro conditions, whereas pHER transformed plants grown in the green house showed the maximum expression level of 19.92 ng/g F.W. of leaves. Higher monoclonal antibody binding of 67.87% of the antigen was observed when it was expressed with a C-terminal ER retention signal. The buoyant density in CsCl of HBsAg derived from transgenic banana leaves was determined and found to be 1.146 g/ml. HBsAg obtained from transgenic banana plants is similar to human serum derived one in buoyant density properties. The transgenic plants were grown up to maturity in the green house and the expression of HBsAg in the fruits was confirmed by RT-PCR. These transgenic plants were multiplied under in vitro using floral apex cultures. Attempts were also made to enhance the expression of HBsAg in the leaves of transgenic banana plants by wounding and/or treatment with plant growth regulators. This is the first report on the expression of HBsAg in transgenic banana fruits.

  13. Transgenic, inducible RNAi in megakaryocytes and platelets in mice

    PubMed Central

    TAKIGUCHI, M.; JAMES, C.; JOSEFSSON, E. C.; CARMICHAEL, C. L.; PREMSRIRUT, P. K.; LOWE, S. W.; HAMILTON, J. R.; HUANG, D. C. S.; KILE, B. T.; DICKINS, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene function. The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system has recently been adapted to allow inducible RNAi in mice, however its efficiency in a particular cell type in vivo depends on a transgenic tet transactivator expression pattern and is often highly variable. Objective We aimed to establish a transgenic strategy that allows efficient and inducible gene knockdown in particular hematopoietic lineages in mice. Methods and results Using a tet-regulated reporter gene strategy, we found that transgenic mice expressing the rtTA (tet-on) transactivator under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (CMV-rtTA mice) display inducible reporter gene expression with unusual and near-complete efficiency in megakaryocytes and platelets. To test whether the CMV-rtTA transgene can drive inducible and efficient gene knockdown within this lineage, we generated a novel mouse strain harboring a tet-regulated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Bcl-xL, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member known to be essential for maintaining platelet survival. Doxycycline treatment of adult mice carrying both transgenes induces shRNA expression, depletes Bcl-xL in megakaryocytes and triggers severe thrombocytopenia, whereas doxycycline withdrawal shuts off shRNA expression, normalizes Bcl-xL levels and restores platelet numbers. These effects are akin to those observed with drugs that target Bcl-xL, clearly demonstrating that this transgenic system allows efficient and inducible inhibition of genes in megakaryocytes and platelets. Conclusions We have established a novel transgenic strategy for inducible gene knockdown inmegakaryocytes and platelets that will be useful for characterizing genes involved in platelet production and function in adult mice. PMID:21138522

  14. Striatal neurochemical changes in transgenic models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ariano, Marjorie A; Aronin, Neil; Difiglia, Marian; Tagle, Danilo A; Sibley, David R; Leavitt, Blair R; Hayden, Michael R; Levine, Michael S

    2002-06-15

    Transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD) were examined following the onset of overt behavioral symptoms. The HD transgenic mice demonstrated profound striatal losses in D1, D2, and D3 dopamine (DA) receptor proteins in comparison with their nonsymptomatic, age-matched littermate controls. In parallel, a robust increase in the striatal D5 DA receptor subtype occurred in the transgenic compared with the wild-type control mice. This receptor elevation was accompanied by heightened cyclic AMP levels, which may be induced by the adenylyl cyclase-linked D5 receptor. This is a unique result; normal striatal D5 protein levels are modest and not thought to contribute substantially to cyclic AMP-mediated DA signaling mechanisms. Simple compensatory up-regulation of D5 DA receptors in response to D1 receptor subtype loss does not explain our findings, because genetic inactivation of the D1 DA receptor does not alter levels of D5 DA receptor expression. Immunofluorescent detection of tyrosine hydroxylase showed that nigrostriatal DA containing terminals were reduced, further supporting that disturbances in DA signaling occurred in HD transgenic models. The substance P-containing striatal efferent pathway was more resistant to the HD mutation than met-enkephalin-producing striatal projection neurons in the transgenics, based on neuropeptide immunofluorescent staining. Analogous findings in multiple transgenic models suggest that these changes are due to the presence of the transgene and are not dependent on its composition, promotor elements, or mouse strain background. These findings suggest modifications in the striatal DA system and that its downstream signaling through cyclic AMP mechanisms is disrupted severely in HD following onset of motor symptoms.

  15. Gene–environment interactions influence ecological consequences of transgenic animals

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, L. F.; Lõhmus, M.; Tymchuk, W. E.; Devlin, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Production of transgenic animals has raised concern regarding their potential ecological impact should they escape or be released to the natural environment. This concern has arisen mainly from research on laboratory-reared animals and theoretical modeling exercises. In this study, we used biocontained naturalized stream environments and conventional hatchery environments to show that differences in phenotype between transgenic and wild genotypes depend on rearing conditions and, critically, that such genotype-by-environment interactions may influence subsequent ecological effects in nature. Genetically wild and growth hormone transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were reared from the fry stage under either standard hatchery conditions or under naturalized stream conditions. When reared under standard hatchery conditions, the transgenic fish grew almost three times longer than wild conspecifics and had (under simulated natural conditions) stronger predation effects on prey than wild genotypes (even after compensation for size differences). In contrast, when fish were reared under naturalized stream conditions, transgenic fish were only 20% longer than the wild fish, and the magnitude of difference in relative predation effects was much reduced. These data show that genotype-by-environment interactions can influence the relative phenotype of transgenic and wild-type organisms and that extrapolations of ecological consequences from phenotypes developed in the unnatural laboratory environment may lead to an overestimation or underestimation of ecological risk. Thus, for transgenic organisms that may not be released to nature, the establishment of a range of highly naturalized environments will be critical for acquiring reliable experimental data to be used in risk assessments. PMID:17360448

  16. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the

  17. Containment and competition: transgenic animals in the One Health agenda.

    PubMed

    Lezaun, Javier; Porter, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    The development of the One World, One Health agenda coincides in time with the appearance of a different model for the management of human-animal relations: the genetic manipulation of animal species in order to curtail their ability as carriers of human pathogens. In this paper we examine two examples of this emergent transgenic approach to disease control: the development of transgenic chickens incapable of shedding avian flu viruses, and the creation of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to dengue or malaria infection. Our analysis elaborates three distinctions between the One World, One Health agenda and its transgenic counterpoint. The first concerns the conceptualization of outbreaks and the forms of surveillance that support disease control efforts. The second addresses the nature of the interspecies interface, and the relative role of humans and animals in preventing pathogen transmission. The third axis of comparison considers the proprietary dimensions of transgenic animals and their implications for the assumed public health ethos of One Health programs. We argue that the fundamental difference between these two approaches to infectious disease control can be summarized as one between strategies of containment and strategies of competition. While One World, One Health programs seek to establish an equilibrium in the human-animal interface in order to contain the circulation of pathogens across species, transgenic strategies deliberately trigger a new ecological dynamic by introducing novel animal varieties designed to out-compete pathogen-carrying hosts and vectors. In other words, while One World, One Health policies focus on introducing measures of inter-species containment, transgenic approaches derive their prophylactic benefit from provoking new cycles of intra-species competition between GM animals and their wild-type counterparts. The coexistence of these divergent health protection strategies, we suggest, helps to elucidate enduring tensions and

  18. Generation of domestic transgenic cloned kittens using lentivirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, Charles Earle; Kutner, Robert H; Ricks, David M; Lyons, Leslie A; Ruhe, Mark T; Dumas, Cherie; Lyons, Justine; Dresser, Betsy L; Reiser, Jakob

    2009-03-01

    The efficient use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), in conjunction with genetic modification of donor cells provides a general means to add or inactivate genes in mammals. This strategy has substantially improved the efficacy of producing genetically identical animals carrying mutant genes corresponding to specific human disorders. Lentiviral (LV) vectors have been shown to be well suited for introducing transgenes into cells to be used as donor nuclei for SCNT. In the present study, we established an LV vector-based transgene delivery approach for producing live transgenic domestic cats by SCNT. We have demonstrated that cat fetal fibroblasts can be transduced with EGFP-encoding LV vectors bearing various promoters including the human cytomegalovirus immediate early (hCMV-IE) promoter, the human translation elongation factor 1alpha (hEF-1alpha) promoter and the human ubiquitin C (hUbC) promoter. Among the promoters tested, embryos reconstructed with donor cells transduced with a LV-vector bearing the hUbC promoter displayed sustained transgene expression at the blastocyst stage while embryos reconstructed with LV vector-transduced cells containing hCMV-IE-EGFP or hEF-1alpha-EGFP cassettes did not. After transfer of 291 transgenic cloned embryos into the oviducts of eight recipient domestic cats (mean =36.5 +/- 10.1), three (37.5%) were diagnosed to be pregnant, and a total of six embryos (2.1%) implanted. One live male offspring was delivered by Cesarean section on day 64 of gestation, and two kittens were born dead after premature delivery on day 55. In summary, we report the birth of transgenic cloned kittens produced by LV vector-mediated transduction of donor cells and confirm that cloned kittens express the EGFP reporter transgene in all body tissues.

  19. Challenges in predicting the evolutionary maintenance of a phage transgene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In prior work, a phage engineered with a biofilm-degrading enzyme (dispersin B) cleared artificial, short-term biofilms more fully than the phage lacking the enzyme. An unresolved question is whether the transgene will be lost or maintained during phage growth – its loss would limit the utility of the engineering. Broadly supported evolutionary theory suggests that transgenes will be lost through a ‘tragedy of the commons’ mechanism unless the ecology of growth in biofilms meets specific requirements. We test that theory here. Results Functional properties of the transgenic phage were identified. Consistent with the previous study, the dispersin phage was superior to unmodified phage at clearing short term biofilms grown in broth, shown here to be an effect attributable to free enzyme. However, the dispersin phage was only marginally better than control phages on short term biofilms in minimal media and was no better than control phages in clearing long term biofilms. There was little empirical support for the tragedy of the commons framework despite a strong theoretical foundation for its supposed relevance. The framework requires that the transgene imposes an intrinsic cost, yet the transgene was intrinsically neutral or beneficial when expressed from one part of the phage genome. Expressed from a different part of the genome, the transgene did behave as if intrinsically costly, but its maintenance did not benefit from spatially structured growth per se – violating the tragedy framework. Conclusions Overall, the transgene was beneficial under many conditions, but no insight to its maintenance was attributable to the established evolutionary framework. The failure likely resides in system details that would be used to parameterize the models. Our study cautions against naive applications of evolutionary theory to synthetic biology, even qualitatively. PMID:25126112

  20. Transgene produces massive overexpression of human beta -glucuronidase in mice, lysosomal storage of enzyme, and strain-dependent tumors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Carole; Galvin, Nancy; Levy, Beth; Grubb, Jeffery; Jiang, Jinxing; Zhou, Xiao Yan; Sly, William S

    2003-03-04

    beta-Glucuronidase (GUSB) is a lysosomal enzyme important in the normal step-wise degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Deficiency of GUSB causes the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII, Sly disease). Affected patients have widespread progressive accumulation of beta-glucuronide-containing glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes. Enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation, and gene therapy can correct lysosomal storage in the MPS VII mouse model. Gene therapy in MPS VII patients and animals may result in massive overexpression of GUSB in individual tissues, and the toxicity of such overexpression is incompletely investigated. To gain insight into the effect of massive overexpression of GUSB, we established 19 transgenic mouse lines, two of which expressed very high levels of human GUSB in many tissues. The founder overexpressing mice had from >100- to several thousand-fold increases in tissue and serum GUSB. The enzyme expression in most tissues decreased in subsequent generations in one line, and expression in liver and marrow fell in subsequent generations of the other. Both lines had morphologically similar widespread lysosomal storage of GUSB and secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes, a finding characteristic of lysosomal storage disease. One line developed tumors, and one did not. These transgenic models show that massive overexpression of a lysosomal enzyme can be associated with dramatic morphological alterations, which, at least in one of the two lines, had little clinical consequence. For the other transgenic line, the high frequency of tumor development in F(2) FVB progeny suggests that the vector used to generate the transgenic lines has an integration site-dependent potential to be oncogenic, at least in this strain background.

  1. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15

  2. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  3. 75 FR 70951 - Notice, Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY (NCD) Sunshine Act Meetings Notice, Correction Type: Quarterly Meeting. Summary: NCD published a...., Suite 850, Washington, DC 20004; 202-272-2004 (voice), 202-272-2074 TTY; 202-272-2022 Fax. Correction...

  4. Error Correction, Revision, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John; Hsu, Angela Yi-ping

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that corrective feedback on an assignment helps learners reduce their errors on that assignment during the revision process. Does this finding constitute evidence that learning resulted from the feedback? Differing answers play an important role in the ongoing debate over the effectiveness of error correction,…

  5. Feature Referenced Error Correction Apparatus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A feature referenced error correction apparatus utilizing the multiple images of the interstage level image format to compensate for positional...images and by the generation of an error correction signal in response to the sub-frame registration errors. (Author)

  6. Diamagnetic Corrections and Pascal's Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Gordon A.; Berry, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Measured magnetic susceptibilities of paramagnetic substances must typically be corrected for their underlying diamagnetism. This correction is often accomplished by using tabulated values for the diamagnetism of atoms, ions, or whole molecules. These tabulated values can be problematic since many sources contain incomplete and conflicting data.…

  7. Barometric and Earth Tide Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Toll, Nathaniel J.

    2005-11-10

    BETCO corrects for barometric and earth tide effects in long-term water level records. A regression deconvolution method is used ot solve a series of linear equations to determine an impulse response function for the well pressure head. Using the response function, a pressure head correction is calculated and applied.

  8. Corrections Education Evaluation System Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    The purpose of this project was to develop an evaluation system for the competency-based vocational program developed by Wisconsin's Division of Corrections, Department of Public Instruction (DPI), and the Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education System (VTAE). Site visits were conducted at five correctional institutions in March and April of…

  9. Neutralizing antibodies against rotavirus produced in transgenically labelled purple tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Paloma; Presa, Silvia; Espí, Joaquín; Pineda, Benito; Antón, María T; Moreno, Vicente; Buesa, Javier; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2012-04-01

    Edible fruits are inexpensive biofactories for human health-promoting molecules that can be ingested as crude extracts or partially purified formulations. We show here the production of a model human antibody for passive protection against the enteric pathogen rotavirus in transgenically labelled tomato fruits. Transgenic tomato plants expressing a recombinant human immunoglobulin A (hIgA_2A1) selected against the VP8* peptide of rotavirus SA11 strain were obtained. The amount of hIgA_2A1 protein reached 3.6 ± 0.8% of the total soluble protein in the fruit of the transformed plants. Minimally processed fruit-derived products suitable for oral intake showed anti-VP8* binding activity and strongly inhibited virus infection in an in vitro virus neutralization assay. In order to make tomatoes expressing hIgA_2A1 easily distinguishable from wild-type tomatoes, lines expressing hIgA_2A1 transgenes were sexually crossed with a transgenic tomato line expressing the genes encoding Antirrhinum majus Rosea1 and Delila transcription factors, which confer purple colour to the fruit. Consequently, transgenically labelled purple tomato fruits expressing hIgA_2A1 have been developed. The resulting purple-coloured extracts from these fruits contain high levels of recombinant anti-rotavirus neutralizing human IgA in combination with increased amounts of health-promoting anthocyanins.

  10. Transgenic Expression of Dentin Phosphoprotein Inhibits Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Wang, S.; Liu, C.; Jani, P.; Lu, Y.; Qin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  11. Generation of transgenic marmosets expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Zhang, Xian Feng; Choi, Sang-Ho; Okahara, Junko; Sasaki, Erika; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of neuronal activity in the living brain with optical imaging techniques became feasible owing to the continued development of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). Here we report for the first time the successful generation of transgenic marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), an important nonhuman primate model in neurophysiological research, which were engineered to express the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based family of GECIs, GCaMP, under control of either the CMV or the hSyn promoter. High titer lentiviral vectors were produced, and injected into embryos collected from donor females. The infected embryos were then transferred to recipient females. Eight transgenic animals were born and shown to have stable and functional GCaMP expression in several different tissues. Germline transmission of the transgene was confirmed in embryos generated from two of the founder transgenic marmosets that reached sexual maturity. These embryos were implanted into six recipient females, three of which became pregnant and are in advanced stages of gestation. We believe these transgenic marmosets will be invaluable non-human primate models in neuroscience, allowing chronic in vivo monitoring of neural activity with functional confocal and multi-photon optical microscopy imaging of intracellular calcium dynamics. PMID:27725685

  12. Developing transgenic Anopheles mosquitoes for the sterile insect technique.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Tony; Papathanos, Philippos; Windbichler, Nikolai; Magnusson, Kalle; Benton, Jason; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Crisanti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In the last 10 years the availability of the genome sequence of Anopheles gambiae and the development of a transgenic technology for several species of Anopheles mosquitoes have, in combination, helped in enabling us to gain several insights into the biology of these mosquitoes that is relevant to their capacity as vectors of the malaria parasite. While this information is anticipated to inform many novel vector control strategies, the technique most likely to benefit in the near future from the availability of a reliable transgenic technology is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which relies on releasing large numbers of sterile insects to compete for mates in the wild, leading to population suppression. Although SIT has been proven to work reliably for many insects, the construction of suitable strains, and induction of sterility, has until now been a laborious process, combining classical genetics with radiation-induced sterility. Using transgenesis to create strains of Anopheles suitable for SIT could potentially offer several advantages over current approaches, in that the basic design of transgenic constructs designed for other insects should be rapidly transferable to mosquitoes, and induction of sterility as a product of the transgenic modification could obviate the requirement for radiation and its associated deleterious effects. In this paper the progress of different transgenic approaches in constructing tools for SIT will be reviewed.

  13. Identification and quantification of anthocyanins in transgenic purple tomato.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyu; Xu, Jianteng; Rhodes, Davina; Shen, Yanting; Song, Weixing; Katz, Benjamin; Tomich, John; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-07-01

    Anthocyanins are natural pigments derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Most tomatoes produce little anthocyanins, but the transgenic purple tomato biosynthesizes a high level of anthocyanins due to expression of two transcription factors (Del and Ros1). This study was to identify and quantify anthocyanins in this transgenic tomato line. Seven anthocyanins, including two new anthocyanins [malvidin-3-(p-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside and malvidin-3-(feruloyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside], were identified by LC-MS/MS. Petunidin-3-(trans-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside and delphinidin-3-(trans-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside were the most abundant anthocyanins, making up 86% of the total anthocyanins. Compared to undetectable anthocyanins in the wild type, the contents of anthocyanins in the whole fruit, peel, and flesh of the Del/Ros1-transgenic tomato were 5.2±0.5, 5.1±0.5, and 5.8±0.3g/kg dry matter, respectively. Anthocyanins were undetectable in the seeds of both wide-type and transgenic tomato lines. Such novel and high levels of anthocyanins obtained in this transgenic tomato may provide unique functional products with potential health benefits.

  14. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  15. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from transgenic provitamin A biofortified sorghum.

    PubMed

    Lipkie, Tristan E; De Moura, Fabiana F; Zhao, Zuo-Yu; Albertsen, Marc C; Che, Ping; Glassman, Kimberly; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2013-06-19

    Biofortified sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) lines are being developed to target vitamin A deficiency in Sub-Saharan Africa, but the delivery of provitamin A carotenoids from such diverse germplasms has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to screen vectors and independent transgenic events for the bioaccessibility of provitamin A carotenoids using an in vitro digestion model. The germplasm background and transgenic sorghum contained 1.0-1.5 and 3.3-14.0 μg/g β-carotene equivalents on a dry weight basis (DW), respectively. Test porridges made from milled transgenic sorghum contained up to 250 μg of β-carotene equivalents per 100 g of porridge on a fresh weight basis (FW). Micellarization efficiency of all-trans-β-carotene was lower (p < 0.05) from transgenic sorghum (1-5%) than from null/nontransgenic sorghum (6-11%) but not different between vector constructs. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was significantly improved (p < 0.05) by increasing the amount of coformulated lipid in test porridges from 5% w/w to 10% w/w. Transgenic sorghum event Homo188-A contained the greatest bioaccessible β-carotene content, with a 4-8-fold increase from null/nontransgenic sorghum. While the bioavailability and bioconversion of provitamin A carotenoids from these grains must be confirmed in vivo, these data support the notion that biofortification of sorghum can enhance total and bioaccessible provitamin A carotenoid levels.

  16. Generation of Transgenic Monkeys with Human Inherited Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W.S; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2009-01-01

    Modeling human diseases using nonhuman primates including chimpanzee, rhesus, cynomolgus, marmoset and squirrel monkeys has been reported in the past decades. Due to the high similarity between nonhuman primates and humans, including genome constitution, cognitive behavioral functions, anatomical structure, metabolic, reproductive, and brain functions; nonhuman primates have played an important role in understanding physiological functions of the human body, clarifying the underlying mechanism of human diseases, and the development of novel treatments for human diseases. However, nonhuman primate research has been restricted to cognitive, behavioral, biochemical and pharmacological approaches of human diseases due to the limitation of gene transfer technology in nonhuman primates. The recent advancement in transgenic technology that has led to the generation of the first transgenic monkey in 2001 and a transgenic monkey model of Huntington's disease (HD) in 2008 has changed that focus. The creation of transgenic HD monkeys that replicate key pathological features of human HD patients further suggests the crucial role of nonhuman primates in the future development of biomedicine. These successes have opened the door to genetic manipulation in nonhuman primates and a new era in modeling human inherited genetic disorders. We focused on the procedures in creating transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys, but our work can be applied to transgenesis in other nonhuman primate species. PMID:19467335

  17. Design rules for efficient transgene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark A; Sternes, Peter R; Mudge, Stephen R; Graham, Michael W; Birch, Robert G

    2014-09-01

    Sustained expression of transgenes in specified developmental patterns is commonly needed in plant biotechnology, but obstructed by transgene silencing. Here, we present a set of gene design rules, tested on the silencing-susceptible beetle luc and bacterial ims genes, expressed in sugarcane. Designs tested independently or in combination included removal of rare codons, removal of RNA instability sequences, blocking of likely endogenous sRNA binding sites and randomization of non-rare codons. Stable transgene expression analyses, on multiple independent lines per construct, showed greatest improvement from the removal of RNA instability sequences, accompanied by greatly reduced transcript degradation evident in northern blot analysis. We provide a set of motifs that readily can be eliminated concurrently with rare codons and undesired structural features such as repeat sequences, using Gene Designer 2.0 software. These design rules yielded 935- and 5-fold increased expression in transgenic callus, relative to the native luc and ims sequences; and gave sustained expression under the control of sugarcane and heterologous promoters over several years in greenhouse and field trials. The rules can be applied easily with codon usage tables from any plant species, providing a simple and effective means to achieve sustained expression of otherwise silencing-prone transgenes in plants.

  18. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington's disease transgenic sheep model.

    PubMed

    Handley, Renee R; Reid, Suzanne J; Patassini, Stefano; Rudiger, Skye R; Obolonkin, Vladimir; McLaughlan, Clive J; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Waldvogel, Henry J; Bawden, C Simon; Faull, Richard L M; Snell, Russell G

    2016-02-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of HD but has circadian rhythm alterations and molecular changes characteristic of the early phase disease. Quantitative metabolite profiles were generated from the motor cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and liver tissue of 5 year old transgenic sheep and matched controls by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differentially abundant metabolites were evident in the cerebellum and liver. There was striking tissue-specificity, with predominantly amino acids affected in the transgenic cerebellum and fatty acids in the transgenic liver, which together may indicate a hyper-metabolic state. Furthermore, there were more strong pair-wise correlations of metabolite abundance in transgenic than in wild-type cerebellum and liver, suggesting altered metabolic constraints. Together these differences indicate a metabolic disruption in the sheep model of HD and could provide insight into the presymptomatic human disease.

  19. Nutritional composition analysis of meat from human lactoferrin transgenic bulls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Xu, Jianxiang; Wang, Jianwu; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic technology has many potential advantages in food production. However, the transgenic technology process may influence the composition of food products derived from genetically engineered (GE) animals, which may be adverse to human health. Therefore, it is very important to research the compositions of GE animal products. Here, we analyzed the compositions of meat from the offspring of human lactoferrin (hLF) transgenic cows, which can express human lactoferrin proteins in their mammary gland. Six hLF transgenic bulls and three wide-type (WT) bulls, 10 months of age, were slaughtered for meat composition analysis. To determine the comparative health of hLF bulls for meat analysis, hematological analyses, organ/body weight analyses and pathology analyses were conducted. Results of the meat analysis show that there were no significant differences in the hematological parameters, organ/body weight ratios of hLF and WT bulls (P>0.05), and histopathological examination of the main organs of hLF bulls revealed no abnormalities. Nutrient parameters of meat compositions of hLF and WT bulls did not show any significant differences (P>0.05). All of these results suggest that the hLF transgene did not have an impact on the meat nutrient compositions of hLF bulls.

  20. Accelerated hepatocellular carcinoma development in CUL4B transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jupeng; Jiang, Baichun; Zhang, Aizhen; Qian, Yanyan; Tan, Haining; Gao, Jiangang; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2015-06-20

    Cullin 4B (CUL4B) is a component of the Cullin 4B-Ring E3 ligase (CRL4B) complex that functions in proteolysis and in epigenetic regulation. CUL4B possesses tumor-promoting properties and is markedly upregulated in many types of human cancers. To determine the role of CUL4B in liver tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed human CUL4B in livers and other tissues and evaluated the development of spontaneous and chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. We observed that CUL4B transgenic mice spontaneously developed liver tumors at a high incidence at old ages and exhibited enhanced DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. There was a high proliferation rate in the livers of CUL4B transgenic mice that was accompanied by increased levels of Cdk1, Cdk4 and cyclin D1 and decreased level of p16. The transgenic mice also exhibited increased compensatory proliferation after DEN-induced liver injury, which was accompanied by activation of Akt, Erk, p38 and NF-κB. We also found that Prdx3 was downregulated and that DEN induced a higher level of reactive oxygen species in the livers of transgenic mice. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role of CUL4B in hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

  1. Fitness of anopheline mosquitoes expressing transgenes that inhibit Plasmodium development.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciano A; Wang, Jing; Collins, Frank H; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2004-03-01

    One potential strategy for the control of malaria and other vector-borne diseases is the introduction into wild vector populations of genetic constructs that reduce vectorial capacity. An important caveat of this approach is that the genetic construct should have minimal fitness cost to the transformed vector. Previously, we produced transgenic Anopheles stephensi expressing either of two effector genes, a tetramer of the SM1 dodecapeptide or the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2) from honeybee venom. Mosquitoes carrying either of these transgenes were impaired for Plasmodium berghei transmission. We have investigated the role of two effector genes for malaria parasite blockage in terms of the fitness imposed to the mosquito vector that expresses either molecule. By measuring mosquito survival, fecundity, fertility, and by running population cage experiments, we found that mosquitoes transformed with the SM1 construct showed no significant reduction in these fitness parameters relative to nontransgenic controls. The PLA2 transgenics, however, had reduced fitness that seemed to be independent of the insertion site of the transgene. We conclude that the fitness load imposed by refractory gene(s)-expressing mosquitoes depends on the effect of the transgenic protein produced in that mosquito. These results have important implications for implementation of malaria control via genetic modification of mosquitoes.

  2. Digital gene expression analysis of mature seeds of transgenic maize overexpressing Aspergillus niger phyA2 and its non-transgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jun; Yang, Litao; Wang, Congmao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The next generation sequencing technologies have been recently used for transcriptome analysis in many organisms because of the decreased sequencing cost and increased sequence output. In this study, we used digital gene expression (DGE) technique to compare the transcriptomic changes in mature seeds between transgenic maize overexpressing Aspergillus niger phyA2 and its non-transgenic counterpart. Deep sequencing of DGE libraries of the transgenic and its non-transgenic counterpart seeds generated 3,783,500 and 3,790,500 reads of 21-nucleotide, respectively, with frequencies spanning over four orders of magnitude. In transgenic maize, 53.97% of the unambiguous signature tags were mapped to the maize B73 reference genome, and 46.47% of genes were detected by at least two reads; in non-transgenic maize, the corresponding numbers were 51.38% and 47.39%. Compared with non-transgenic counterpart, about 12% of detected genes were differentially expressed in the transcriptome of transgenic maize seeds. Among these differentially expressed genes, there were 23 transcription factors in 14 families and no allergen genes. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 21 pathways were significantly affected by the transgenic event, in which the pathway involved in protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum was the most significantly affected. Results from this study indicated that both intended and unintended transcriptomic changes occurred in the transgenic maize, thus emphasizing the importance of transcriptome profiling in risk assessment of transgenic events.

  3. Limited Fitness Advantages of Crop-Weed Hybrid Progeny Containing Insect-Resistant Transgenes (Bt/CpTI) in Transgenic Rice Field

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background The spread of insect-resistance transgenes from genetically engineered (GE) rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea) populations via gene flow creates a major concern for commercial GE rice cultivation. Transgene flow to weedy rice seems unavoidable. Therefore, characterization of potential fitness effect brought by the transgenes is essential to assess environmental consequences caused by crop-weed transgene flow. Methodology/Principal Findings Field performance of fitness-related traits was assessed in advanced hybrid progeny of F4 generation derived from a cross between an insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI) rice line and a weedy strain. The performance of transgene-positive hybrid progeny was compared with the transgene-negative progeny and weedy parent in pure and mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants under environmental conditions with natural vs. low insect pressure. Results showed that under natural insect pressure the insect-resistant transgenes could effectively suppress target insects and bring significantly increased fitness to transgenic plants in pure planting, compared with nontransgenic plants (including weedy parent). In contrast, no significant differences in fitness were detected under low insect pressure. However, such increase in fitness was not detected in the mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants due to significantly reduced insect pressure. Conclusions/Significance Insect-resistance transgenes may have limited fitness advantages to hybrid progeny resulted from crop-weed transgene flow owning to the significantly reduced ambient target insect pressure when an insect-resistant GE crop is grown. Given that the extensive cultivation of an insect-resistant GE crop will ultimately reduce the target insect pressure, the rapid spread of insect-resistance transgenes in weedy populations in commercial GE crop fields may be not likely to happen. PMID:22815975

  4. Overexpression of an endo-1,4-β-glucanase V gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei leads to the accumulation of cellulase activity in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, F; Hu, Y F; Xia, M; Cheng, B J; Zhu, S W; Ma, Q

    2015-12-21

    The ectopic expression of cellulase in biomass can reduce the cost of biofuel conversion. This trait modification technique is highly beneficial for biofuel production. In this study, we isolated an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase gene (EGV) from Trichoderma reesei and inserted this gene downstream of a fragment encoding the signal peptide Apo-SP in a modified pCAMBIA1301 vector to obtain an Apo-SP and AsRed fusion protein. Transient expression of this fusion protein in onion epidermal cells showed that the Apo-SP signal was localized to the plastids. EGV transgenic rice plants that did not carry screening marker genes were obtained through overexpression of the pDTB double T-DNA vector. Western blotting showed that EGV was expressed in the dry straw of T0 generation transgenic rice plants and in fresh leaves of the T1 generation. More importantly, our results also showed that the peptide product of EGV in the transgenic plants folded correctly and was capable of digesting the cellulase substrate CMC. Additionally, cellulase activity remained stable in the straw that had been dried at room temperature for three months. This study presents an important technical approach for the development of transgenic rice straw that has stable cellulase activity and can be used for biofuel conversion.

  5. Application of a high-speed breeding technology to apple (Malus × domestica) based on transgenic early flowering plants and marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Flachowsky, Henryk; Le Roux, Pierre-Marie; Peil, Andreas; Patocchi, Andrea; Richter, Klaus; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2011-10-01

    Breeding of apple (Malus × domestica) remains a slow process because of protracted generation cycles. Shortening the juvenile phase to achieve the introgression of traits from wild species into prebreeding material within a reasonable time frame is a great challenge. In this study, we evaluated early flowering transgenic apple lines overexpressing the BpMADS4 gene of silver birch with regard to tree morphology in glasshouse conditions. Based on the results obtained, line T1190 was selected for further analysis and application to fast breeding. The DNA sequences flanking the T-DNA were isolated and the T-DNA integration site was mapped on linkage group 4. The inheritance and correctness of the T-DNA integration were confirmed after meiosis. A crossbred breeding programme was initiated by crossing T1190 with the fire blight-resistant wild species Malus fusca. Transgenic early flowering F(1) seedlings were selected and backcrossed with 'Regia' and 98/6-10 in order to introgress the apple scab Rvi2, Rvi4 and powdery mildew Pl-1, Pl-2 resistance genes and the fire blight resistance quantitative trait locus FB-F7 present in 'Regia'. Three transgenic BC'1 seedlings pyramiding Rvi2, Rvi4 and FB-F7, as well as three other BC'1 seedlings combining Pl-1 and Pl-2, were identified. Thus, the first transgenic early flowering-based apple breeding programme combined with marker-assisted selection was established.

  6. Enhanced phytoremediation of volatile environmental pollutants with transgenic trees

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; James, C. Andrew; Moore, Allison L.; Vajzovic, Azra; Singleton, Glenda L.; Ma, Caiping; Khan, Zareen; Xin, Gang; Kang, Jun Won; Park, Jin Young; Meilan, Richard; Strauss, Steven H.; Wilkerson, Jasmine; Farin, Federico; Strand, Stuart E.

    2007-01-01

    Small, volatile hydrocarbons, including trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and chloroform, are common environmental pollutants that pose serious health effects. We have developed transgenic poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) plants with greatly increased rates of metabolism and removal of these pollutants through the overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1, a key enzyme in the metabolism of a variety of halogenated compounds. The transgenic poplar plants exhibited increased removal rates of these pollutants from hydroponic solution. When the plants were exposed to gaseous trichloroethylene, chloroform, and benzene, they also demonstrated superior removal of the pollutants from the air. In view of their large size and extensive root systems, these transgenic poplars may provide the means to effectively remediate sites contaminated with a variety of pollutants at much faster rates and at lower costs than can be achieved with current conventional techniques. PMID:17940038

  7. Transgenic cells with increased plastoquinone levels and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard T.; Subramanian, Sowmya; Cahoon, Edgar

    2016-12-27

    Disclosed herein are transgenic cells expressing a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a deoxyxylulose phosphate synthase (DXS) protein, or a combination of two or more thereof. In particular examples, the disclosed transgenic cells have increased plastoquinone levels. Also disclosed are methods of increasing cell growth rates or production of biomass by cultivating transgenic cells expressing a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a PDH protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding an HST protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a DXS protein, or a combination of two or more thereof under conditions sufficient to produce cell growth or biomass.

  8. Identification of transgenic foods using NIR spectroscopy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alishahi, A.; Farahmand, H.; Prieto, N.; Cozzolino, D.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of chemometric methods in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of feeds, foods, medicine and so on has been accompanied with the great evolution in the progress and in the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Hence, recently the application of NIR spectroscopy has extended on the context of genetics and transgenic products. The aim of this review was to investigate the application of NIR spectroscopy to identificate transgenic products and to compare it with the traditional methods. The results of copious researches showed that the application of NIRS technology was successful to distinguish transgenic foods and it has advantages such as fast, avoiding time-consuming, non-destructive and low cost in relation to the antecedent methods such as PCR and ELISA.

  9. Primary demyelination in transgenic mice expressing interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Mcgavern, Dorian B.; Rodriguez, Moses; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Ever since the use of interferon-γ to treat patients with multiple sclerosis resulted in enhanced disease, the role of IFN-γ in demyelinatlon has been under question. To address this issue directly, transgenic mice were generated that expressed the cDNA of murlne IFN-γ in the central nervous system by using an oligodendrocyte-specific promoter. Expression of the transgene occurred after 8 weeks of age, at which time the murlne immune and central nervous systems are both fully developed. Directly associated with transgene expression, primary demyelination occurred and was accompanied by clinical abnormalities consistent with CNS disorders. Additionally, multiple hallmarks of immune-mediated CNS disease were observed including upregulation of MHC molecules, gliosis and lymphocytlc infiltration. These results demonstrate a direct role for IFN-γ as an Inducer of CNS demyellnatlon leading to disease and provide new opportunities for dissecting the mechanism of demyelinatlon. PMID:9288735

  10. Transcriptional dysregulation in a transgenic model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoubian, Talene A; Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ippolita; Bouzou, Bérengère; Asteris, Georgios; McLean, Pamela J; Hyman, Bradley T; Standaert, David G

    2008-03-01

    Alpha-synuclein has been implicated in Parkinson disease, yet the mechanism by which alpha-synuclein causes cell injury is not understood. Using a transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of alpha-synuclein overexpression on gene expression in the substantia nigra. Nigral mRNA from wild type and alpha-synuclein transgenic mice was analyzed using Affymetrix gene arrays. At 3 months, before pathological changes are apparent, we observed modest alterations in gene expression. However, nearly 200 genes were altered in expression at 9 months, when degenerative changes are more apparent. Functional genomic analysis revealed that the genes altered at 9 months were predominantly involved in gene transcription. As in human Parkinson disease, gene expression changes in the transgenic model were also modulated by gender. These data demonstrate that alterations of gene expression are widespread in this animal model, and suggest that transcriptional dysregulation may be a disease mechanism that can be targeted therapeutically.

  11. [PCR detection of transgenic elements in feed raw material].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yu, Dao-Jian; Kang, Lin; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Jin, Xian-Zhong; Yang, Wei-Dong; Huang, Pei-Qing; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Cheng, Ying-Hui

    2002-05-01

    Based on the heterogeneous genes usually used in transgenic crops, the PCR technique was performed with primers derived from CaMV 35S promoter (35S-promoter,originated from cauliflower mosaic virus), NOS terminator (nopaline synthase-terminator,derived from Agrobacterium tumefaciens), EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene, and CryIA(b) (delta-endotoxin,evolved from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki) gene to detect transgenic agents from feed raw materials of soybean dregs and corn gluten meal, respectively. Endogenous corn Zein (a protein extracted from corn gluten) gene, soybean Lectin (chitin-binding protein) gene and negative, positive control were applied for avoiding false results. The method established here has been successfully applied in detecting transgenic elements in imported feed raw material.

  12. Transgenic animal models of neurodegeneration based on human genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Christopher T.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Airavaara, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genes linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has led to the development of animal models for studying mechanism and evaluating potential therapies. None of the transgenic models developed based on disease-associated genes have been able to fully recapitulate the behavioral and pathological features of the corresponding disease. However, there has been enormous progress made in identifying potential therapeutic targets and understanding some of the common mechanisms of neurodegeneration. In this review, we will discuss transgenic animal models for AD, ALS, HD and PD that are based on human genetic studies. All of the diseases discussed have active or complete clinical trials for experimental treatments that benefited from transgenic models of the disease. PMID:20931247

  13. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  14. Robust generation of transgenic mice by simple hypotonic solution mediated delivery of transgene in testicular germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Abul; Ganguli, Nirmalya; Jain, Subodh K; Ganguli, Nilanjana; Sarkar, Rajesh Kumar; Choubey, Mayank; Shukla, Mansi; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to decipher gene sequences has increased enormously with the advent of modern sequencing tools, but the ability to divulge functions of new genes have not increased correspondingly. This has caused a remarkable delay in functional interpretation of several newly found genes in tissue and age specific manner, limiting the pace of biological research. This is mainly due to lack of advancements in methodological tools for transgenesis. Predominantly practiced method of transgenesis by pronuclear DNA-microinjection is time consuming, tedious, and requires highly skilled persons for embryo-manipulation. Testicular electroporation mediated transgenesis requires use of electric current to testis. To this end, we have now developed an innovative technique for making transgenic mice by giving hypotonic shock to male germ cells for the gene delivery. Desired transgene was suspended in hypotonic Tris-HCl solution (pH 7.0) and simply injected in testis. This resulted in internalization of the transgene in dividing germ-cells residing at basal compartment of tubules leading to its integration in native genome of mice. Such males generated transgenic progeny by natural mating. Several transgenic animals can be generated with minimum skill within short span of time by this easily adaptable novel technique. PMID:27933305

  15. [Distribution of Bt protein in transgenic cotton soils].

    PubMed

    Fu, Qing-Ling; Chen, Su-Wan; Hu, Hong-Qing; Li, Zhen; Han, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Pu

    2011-06-01

    A pot experiment with red soil, yellow brown soil, and yellow cinnamon soil was conducted to detect the Bt protein content in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils at different growth stages of transgenic Bt cotton and common cotton by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). With the planting of transgenic Bt cotton, the Bt protein content in rhizosphere soil was significantly higher than that in non-rhizosphere soil; while in common cotton soils, there was no significant difference in the Bt protein content between rhizosphere soil and non-rhizosphere soil. At bud stage of transgenic Bt cotton, the Bt protein content in rhizosphere soil was in the order of yellow cinnamon soil > yellow brown soil > red soil, being 144% 121%, and 238% of that in common cotton rhizosphere soil; at florescence stage of transgenic Bt cotton, the Bt protein content in rhizosphere soil was in the order of yellow brown soil > yellow cinnamon soil > red soil, being 156% , 116% , and 197% of that in common cotton rhizosphere soil, respectively. Regardless of planting Bt cotton or common cotton, the Bt protein content in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils had an initial increase with the growth of cotton, peaked at florescence stage, and then decreased. Throughout the whole cotton growth period, the Bt protein content in transgenic Bt cotton rhizosphere soil was higher than that in Bt cotton non-rhizosphere soil, and also, higher than that in common cotton rhizosphere soil, indicating that transgenic Bt cotton could release its Bt protein to rhizosphere soil.

  16. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  17. Skeletal defects in Osterix-Cre transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2015-02-01

    Cre/loxP recombination is a powerful strategy widely used for in vivo conditional gene targeting. This technique has made possible many important discoveries of gene function in normal and disease biology. However, due to the transgenic nature of most Cre mouse strains undesired phenotypes occasionally occur in Cre mice. Here we report skeletal defects in Osterix-Cre (Osx-Cre) transgenic mice including delayed calvarial ossification and fracture calluses at multiple skeletal sites. These data suggest that Osx-Cre containing controls should be used for both in vivo and in vitro skeletal analyses of conditional knockout mice generated with this Osx-Cre mouse strain.

  18. [Generation of sugar beet transgenic plants expressing bar gene].

    PubMed

    Mishutkina, Ia V; Kamionskaia, A M; Skriabin, K G

    2010-01-01

    The parameters of transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA 105 for 5 domestic sorts and lines of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera (Alef) Krass) were optimized. The system of transgenic tissue selection based on resistance to phosphinothricin, allowing to avoid the appearing of chimeric shoots among initial transformants was developed. The transgenic plants of sugar beet sorts Ramonskaya single seed 47, L'govskaya single seed 52 and RMS 73, and LBO 17 and LBO 19 lines expressing the gene of phosphinothricin acetyl transferase bar have been obtained. The resistance of these sorts and lines to the effect of phosphinothricin in vitro has been shown.

  19. Transgenic mouse model for the fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, R.F.; Reyniers, E.; De Boulle, K.

    1996-08-09

    Transgenic fragile X knockout mice have been constructed to provide an animal model to study the physiologic function of the fragile X gene (FMR1) and to gain more insight into the clinical phenotype caused by the absence of the fragile X protein. Initial experiments suggested that the knockout mice show macroorchidism and cognitive and behavioral deficits, abnormalities comparable to those of human fragile X patients. In the present study, we have extended our experiments, and conclude that the Fmr1 knockout mouse is a reliable transgenic model to study the fragile X syndrome. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS (AGROSTIS STOLONIFERA L.) IN NON-AGRONOMIC HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about genetically modified crops include transgene flow to compatible wild species and potential unintended ecological consequences associated with transgene introgression. To date, there has been little empirical documentation of the relative frequency of establishment...

  1. Migratory beekeeping practices contribute insignificantly to transgenic pollen flow among fields of alfalfa produced for seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased use of genetically engineered crops in agriculture has raised concerns over pollinator-mediated gene flow between transgenic and conventional agricultural varieties. This study evaluated whether contracted migratory beekeeping practices influence transgenic pollen flow among spatially iso...

  2. 2012 Technical Corrections Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Final Rule: 2012 Technical Corrections, Clarifying and Other Amendments to theGreenhouse Gas Reporting Rule, and Confidentiality Determinations for Certain DataElements of the Fluorinated Gas Source Category

  3. Correction of the crooked nose.

    PubMed

    Potter, Jason K

    2012-02-01

    Correction of the deviated nose is one of the most difficult tasks in rhinoplasty surgery and should be approached in a systematic manner to ensure a satisfied patient and surgeon. Correction of the deviated nose is unique in that the patient's complaints frequently include aesthetic and functional characteristics. Equal importance should be given to the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative aspects of the patient's treatment to ensure a favorable outcome.

  4. Glyphosate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus) to nontransgenic B. napus and B. rapa.

    PubMed

    Londo, Jason P; Bollman, Michael A; Sagers, Cynthia L; Lee, E Henry; Watrud, Lidia S

    2011-08-01

    Transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, but the escape of transgenes is an environmental concern. In this study we tested the hypothesis that glyphosate drift and herbivory selective pressures can change the rate of transgene flow between the crop Brassica napus (canola), and weedy species and contribute to the potential for increased transgene escape risk and persistence outside of cultivation. • We constructed plant communities containing single transgenic B. napus genotypes expressing glyphosate herbicide resistance (CP4 EPSPS), lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac), or both traits ('stacked'), plus nontransgenic B. napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra. Two different selective pressures, a sublethal glyphosate dose and lepidopteran herbivores (Plutella xylostella), were applied and rates of transgene flow and transgenic seed production were measured. • Selective treatments differed in the degree in which they affected gene flow and production of transgenic hybrid seed. Most notably, glyphosate-drift increased the incidence of transgenic seeds on nontransgenic B. napus by altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. • The findings of this study indicate that transgenic traits may be transmitted to wild populations and may increase in frequency in weedy populations through the direct and indirect effects of selection pressures on gene flow.

  5. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaolin; Jia, Junshuang; Qin, Yujuan; Lin, Xia; Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-11-17

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study.

  6. Highly Efficient Generation of Transgenic Sheep by Lentivirus Accompanying the Alteration of Methylation Status

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenxi; Wang, Liqin; Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Tian, Yongzhi; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Chen, Tong; Huang, Juncheng; Liu, Mingjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Low efficiency of gene transfer and silence of transgene expression are the critical factors hampering the development of transgenic livestock. Recently, transfer of recombinant lentivirus has been demonstrated to be an efficient transgene delivery method in various animals. However, the lentiviral transgenesis and the methylation status of transgene in sheep have not been well addressed. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFP transgenic sheep were generated by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygotes. Of the 13 lambs born, 8 carried the EGFP transgene, and its chromosomal integration was identified in all tested tissues. Western blotting showed that GFP was expressed in all transgenic founders and their various tissues. Analysis of CpG methylation status of CMV promoter by bisulfate sequencing unraveled remarkable variation of methylation levels in transgenic sheep. The average methylation levels ranged from 37.6% to 79.1% in the transgenic individuals and 34.7% to 83% in the tested tissues. Correlative analysis of methylation status with GFP expression revealed that the GFP expression level was inversely correlated with methylation density. The similar phenomenon was also observed in tested tissues. Transgene integration determined by Southern blotting presented multiple integrants ranging from 2 to 6 copies in the genome of transgenic sheep. Conclusions/Significance Injection of lentiviral transgene into zygotes could be a promising efficient gene delivery system to generate transgenic sheep and achieved widespread transgene expression. The promoter of integrants transferred by lentiviral vector was subjected to dramatic alteration of methylation status and the transgene expression level was inversely correlative with promoter methylation density. Our work illustrated for the first time that generation of transgenic sheep by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygote could be an efficient tool to improve sheep performance by genetic modification

  7. Quantum error correction for beginners.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Simon J; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-07-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) and fault-tolerant quantum computation represent one of the most vital theoretical aspects of quantum information processing. It was well known from the early developments of this exciting field that the fragility of coherent quantum systems would be a catastrophic obstacle to the development of large-scale quantum computers. The introduction of quantum error correction in 1995 showed that active techniques could be employed to mitigate this fatal problem. However, quantum error correction and fault-tolerant computation is now a much larger field and many new codes, techniques, and methodologies have been developed to implement error correction for large-scale quantum algorithms. In response, we have attempted to summarize the basic aspects of quantum error correction and fault-tolerance, not as a detailed guide, but rather as a basic introduction. The development in this area has been so pronounced that many in the field of quantum information, specifically researchers who are new to quantum information or people focused on the many other important issues in quantum computation, have found it difficult to keep up with the general formalisms and methodologies employed in this area. Rather than introducing these concepts from a rigorous mathematical and computer science framework, we instead examine error correction and fault-tolerance largely through detailed examples, which are more relevant to experimentalists today and in the near future.

  8. [Transposition of the maize transposable element dSpm in transgenic sugar beets].

    PubMed

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic sugar beet plants carrying maize Spmn/dSpm transposable elements system have been constructed. Heterologous system of maize transposable elements Spm/dSpm was active in transgenic sugar beets that permits transposon-based gene tagging and obtaining of marker-free transgenic sugar beet.

  9. The distribution of cotransformed transgenes in particle bombardment-mediated transformed wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although particle bombardment is the predominant method of foreign DNA direct transfer, whether transgene is integrated randomly into the genome has not been determined. In this study, we identified the distribution of transgene loci in 45 transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) lines containing c...

  10. Crossing the divide: gene flow produces intergeneric hybrid in feral transgenic creeping bentgrass population.

    PubMed

    Zapiola, María L; Mallory-Smith, Carol A

    2012-10-01

    Gene flow is the most frequently expressed public concern related to the deregulation of transgenic events (Snow 2002; Ellstrand 2003). However, assessing the potential for transgene escape is complex because it depends on the opportunities for unintended gene flow, and establishment and persistence of the transgene in the environment (Warwick et al. 2008). Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), a turfgrass species widely used on golf courses, has been genetically engineered to be resistant to glyphosate, a nonselective herbicide. Outcrossing species, such as creeping bentgrass (CB), which have several compatible species, have greater chances for gene escape and spontaneous hybridization (i.e. natural, unassisted sexual reproduction between taxa in the field), which challenges transgene containment. Several authors have emphasized the need for evidence of spontaneous hybridization to infer the potential for gene flow (Armstrong et al. 2005). Here we report that a transgenic intergeneric hybrid has been produced as result of spontaneous hybridization of a feral-regulated transgenic pollen receptor (CB) and a nontransgenic pollen donor (rabbitfoot grass, RF, Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.). We identified an off-type transgenic seedling and confirmed it to be CB × RF intergeneric hybrid. This first report of a transgenic intergeneric hybrid produced in situ with a regulated transgenic event demonstrates the importance of considering all possible avenues for transgene spread at the landscape level before planting a regulated transgenic crop in the field. Spontaneous hybridization adds a level of complexity to transgene monitoring, containment, mitigation and remediation programmes.

  11. Evaluating the potential ecological effects of transgene escape and persistence in constructed plant communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, published studies with herbicide tolerant transgenic crops have failed to demonstrate that transgene escape to wild relatives results in more competitive hybrids. However, it is important to consider transgene escape in the context of the types of traits, which will lik...

  12. Generation and characterization of transgenic plum lines expressing gafp-1 with the bul409 promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gastrodia anti fungal protein (GAFP-1) is a mannose-binding lectin that can confer increased disease resistance in transgenic tobacco and plum. In all previously-generated transgenic lines, the gene was under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter. In this study, transgenic plum lines were create...

  13. Non-transgenic RNAi technology to control insects on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research demonstrated a non-transgenic delivery method for ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, that reduced fitness as measured in increased mortality over time, of two insect pests of citrus, ie. psyllids and leafhoppers. The Asian citrus psyllid transmits a deadly plant-infecting bacterium o...

  14. Generation of cloned transgenic cats expressing red fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi Jun; Lee, Hyo Sang; Yu, Xian Feng; Choi, Eugene; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun; Lee, Young S; Cho, Su Jin; Jin, Guang Zhen; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kong, Il Keun

    2008-03-01

    A method for engineering and producing genetically modified cats is important for generating biomedical models of human diseases. Here we describe the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce cloned transgenic cats that systemically express red fluorescent protein. Immature oocytes were collected from superovulating cat ovaries. Donor fibroblasts were obtained from an ear skin biopsy of a white male Turkish Angora cat, cultured for one to two passages, and subjected to transduction with a retrovirus vector designed to transfer and express the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. A total of 176 RFP cloned embryos were transferred into 11 surrogate mothers (mean = 16 +/- 7.5 per recipient). Three surrogate mothers were successfully impregnated (27.3%) and delivered two liveborn and one stillborn kitten at 65 to 66 days of gestation. Analysis of nine feline-specific microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned cats were genetically identical to the donor cat. Presence of the RFP gene in the transgenic cat genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Whole-body red fluorescence was detected 60 days after birth in the liveborn transgenic (TG) cat but not in the surrogate mother cat. Red fluorescence was detected in tissue samples, including hair, muscle, brain, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, bronchus, lung, stomach, intestine, tongue, and even excrement of the stillborn TG cat. These results suggest that this nuclear transfer procedure using genetically modified somatic cells could be useful for the efficient production of transgenic cats.

  15. Transgene expression in the basidiomycete root pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toward development of a genetic transformation system for Armillaria mellea, we used particle bombardment to identify promoters for driving transgene expression. The plasmid tested was pYES-hph-004iGFP, on which the green fluorescence protein gene, gfp, is linked to the Agaricus bisporus gpdII promo...

  16. APPLICATION OF SPECTRAL IMAGING TO TRANSGENIC CORN MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transgenic crops containing pesticidal traits are regulated by EPA under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. The EPA has declared crops engineered to contain a bacterial gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to be in the public good, due to their potential to...

  17. Hypotension and reduced catecholamines in neuropeptide Y transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Michalkiewicz, Mieczyslaw; Knestaut, Kriss M; Bytchkova, Elena Yu; Michalkiewicz, Teresa

    2003-05-01

    The neurons that control blood pressure express neuropeptide Y. Administered centrally, this neuropeptide reduces blood pressure and anxiety, together with lowering sympathetic outflow. The generation of neuropeptide Y transgenic rats overexpressing this peptide, under its natural promoter, has allowed us to examine the role of endogenous neuropeptide Y in the long-term control of blood pressure by the sympathetic nervous system. This study tested a hypothesis that endogenous neuropeptide Y acts to reduce blood pressure and catecholamine release. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry in conscious male transgenic and nontransgenic littermates (control). Novel cage with cold water and forced swimming were used as stressors. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hour urine (baseline) and plasma (cold water stress) by a radioenzymatic assay. Blood pressures in baseline and during the stresses were significantly reduced in the transgenic rats. The lower blood pressure was associated with reduced catecholamines, lower decrease in pressure after autonomic ganglionic blockade, and increased longevity. Data obtained through the use of this transgenic rat model support and extend the evidence for the previously postulated sympatholytic and hypotensive effects of neuropeptide Y and provide novel evidence for an important physiological role of endogenous peptide in blood pressure regulation. As indicated by the increased longevity of these rats, in long-term regulation, these buffering actions of neuropeptide Y may have important cardiovascular protective effects against sympathetic hyperexcitation.

  18. Expression of a fungal glucoamylase in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Huang, Jinming; Fang, Jun; Lin, Chaoyang; Cheng, Jiaan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2008-10-01

    Glucoamylase, which catalyses the hydrolysis of the alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds of starch, is an important industrial enzyme used in starch enzymatic saccharification. In this study, a glucoamylase gene from Aspergillus awamori, under the control of the promoter of seed storage protein Gt1, was introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Significant glucoamylase activity was detected specifically in the seeds but not other tissues of the transgenic rice lines. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the transgenic line Bg17-2, which was estimated to have about 500 units per gram of seeds (one unit is defined as the amount of enzyme that produces 1 micromol of reducing sugar in 1 min at 60 degrees C using soluble starch as substrate). The optimum pH for the activity of the rice produced enzyme is 5.0-5.5, and the optimum temperature is around 60 degrees C. One part of this transgenic glucoamylase rice seed flour fully converted 25 parts of corn starch pre-liquefied by an alpha-amylase also produced by a transgenic rice into glucose in 16 h incubation. This study suggests that this hydrolysis enzyme may substitute commercial fermentation enzymes for industrial starch conversion.

  19. TRANSGENE ESCAPE MONITORING, POPULATION GENETICS, AND THE LAW

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been little discussion about how to apply population genetics methods to monitor the spread of transgenes that are detected outside the agricultural populations where they are deployed. Population geneticists have developed tools for analyzing the genetic makeup of indi...

  20. Transgenic Herbicide-resistant Crops and Environmental Impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic glufosinate- and glyphosate-resistant crops are currently commercialized, and bromoxynil-resistant crops have been removed from the market for economic reasons. Glyphosate-resistant cotton and soybean have become dominant in those countries where they can be grown. Potential effects of gl...

  1. Environmental Impacts of Transgenic Herbicide-Resistant Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic glufosinate- and glyphosate-resistant crops are currently commercialized, and bromoxynil-resistant crops have been removed from the market for economic reasons. Glyphosate-resistant cotton and soybean have become dominant in those countries where they can be grown. Potential effects of gl...

  2. Transgenic plants: from first successes to future applications.

    PubMed

    Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Angenon, Geert; De Block, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This dialogue was held between the Guest Editors of the Special Issue on "Plant Transgenesis" of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. and Marc De Block. He was one of the first scientists worldwide to obtain transgenic plants transformed with the chimeric selectable marker genes encoding neomycin phosphotransferase and bialaphos that confer resistance against the antibiotic kanamycin and the herbicide Basta®/glufosinate, respectively at the Department of Genetics of Ghent University and, later on, at the spin-off company, Plant Genetic Systems. Today, these two genes are still the most frequently utilized markers in transgene technology. Marc De Block chose to work on the improvement of crops in an industrial environment to help realize the production of superior seeds or products. He was part of the team that developed the male sterility/restorer system in canola (Brassica napus var. napus) that led to the first hybrid lines to be commercialized as successful products of transgene technology. In more than 30 years of research, he developed transformation procedures for numerous crops, designed histochemical, biochemical and physiological assays to monitor plant performance, and made original and innovative contributions to plant biology. Presently, he considers transgenic research part of the toolbox for plant improvement and essential for basic plant research.

  3. Recombinant Human Factor IX Produced from Transgenic Porcine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Hwan; Lin, Yin-Shen; Tu, Ching-Fu; Yen, Chon-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa). The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX). The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk. PMID:24955355

  4. Inheritance of plum pox virus resistance in transgenic plums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the heritability of the virus transgene engineered in 'HoneySweet' plum through different cross-hybridization with two commercial cultivars of Prunus domestica (Prunier d’Ente 303 and Quetsche 2906) and one wild species, P. spinosa 2862, rootstock using 'HoneySweet' plum as the polle...

  5. Transgenic perennial biofuel feedstocks and strategies for bioconfinement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of transgenic tools for the improvement of plant feedstocks will be required to realize the full economic and environmental benefits of cellulosic and other biofuels, particularly from perennial plants. Traits that are targets for improvement of biofuels crops include he...

  6. Dispersal of Transgenes through Maize Seed Systems in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, George A.; Serratos-Hernández, J. Antonio; Perales, Hugo R.; Gepts, Paul; Piñeyro-Nelson, Alma; Chávez, Angeles; Salinas-Arreortua, Noé; Yúnez-Naude, Antonio; Taylor, J. Edward; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Current models of transgene dispersal focus on gene flow via pollen while neglecting seed, a vital vehicle for gene flow in centers of crop origin and diversity. We analyze the dispersal of maize transgenes via seeds in Mexico, the crop's cradle. Methods We use immunoassays (ELISA) to screen for the activity of recombinant proteins in a nationwide sample of farmer seed stocks. We estimate critical parameters of seed population dynamics using household survey data and combine these estimates with analytical results to examine presumed sources and mechanisms of dispersal. Results Recombinant proteins Cry1Ab/Ac and CP4/EPSPS were found in 3.1% and 1.8% of samples, respectively. They are most abundant in southeast Mexico but also present in the west-central region. Diffusion of seed and grain imported from the United States might explain the frequency and distribution of transgenes in west-central Mexico but not in the southeast. Conclusions Understanding the potential for transgene survival and dispersal should help design methods to regulate the diffusion of germplasm into local seed stocks. Further research is needed on the interactions between formal and informal seed systems and grain markets in centers of crop origin and diversification. PMID:19503610

  7. Investigating Transgenic Corn Hybrids as a Method for Mycotoxin Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic Bt corn hybrids have been available for more than 10 years and are known to control specific insects. More recently, so-called “stacked-gene” hybrids, have been released with multiple insect resistance genes and genes for herbicide resistance, resulting in up to 6 traits per plant. Beca...

  8. Pollen viability and transgene expression following storage in honey.

    PubMed

    Eady, C; Twell, D; Lindsey, K

    1995-07-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco and Arabidopsis that produce genetically marked pollen, expressing the reporter gene uidA (gusA), were generated to determine whether pollen proteins can be expressed and stable in honey, a potential route by which foreign proteins might enter the wider environment. Hydrated tobacco pollen was found to lose viability rapidly in honey, while pollen in the natural dehydrated form remained viable for at least several days and in some cases several weeks, as determined by FDA staining activity and germinability. Dehydrated pollen was found to be capable of transient foreign gene expression, following microprojectile bombardment, after incubation in honey for at least 120 h. PCR amplification of transgene sequences in pollen of transgenic plants revealed that pollen DNA can remain relatively intact after 7 weeks in honey. GUS enzyme activity analysis and SDS-PAGE of pollen proteins revealed that foreign and native pollen proteins are stable in pollen incubated in honey for at least 6 weeks. We conclude that pollen may represent an ecologically important vector for transgenic protein products.

  9. The role of transgenic crops in sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Raymond Park, Julian; McFarlane, Ian; Hartley Phipps, Richard; Ceddia, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development forms the basis for a wide variety of international and national policy making. World population continues to expand at about 80 M people per year, while the demand for natural resources continues to escalate. Important policies, treaties and goals underpin the notion of sustainable development. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a range of scientific literature pertaining to the use of transgenic crops in meeting sustainable development goals. It is concluded that a considerable body of evidence has accrued since the first commercial growing of transgenic crops, which suggests that they can contribute in all three traditional pillars of sustainability, i.e. economically, environmentally and socially. Management of herbicide-tolerant and insect-resistant transgenic crops to minimize the risk of weeds and pests developing resistance is discussed, together with the associated concern about the risk of loss of biodiversity. As the world population continues to rise, the evidence reviewed here suggests it would be unwise to ignore transgenic crops as one of the tools that can help meet aspirations for increasingly sustainable global development.

  10. Transgenic Crops in Argentina: The Ecological and Social Debt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pengue, Walter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is no doubt that soybean is the most important crop for Argentina, with a planted surface that rose 11,000,000 hectares and a production of around 35,000,000 metric tons. During the 1990s, there was a significant agriculture transformation in the country, motorize by the adoption of transgenic crops (soy-bean, maize, and cotton) under the…

  11. Early Parkinson's disease symptoms in α-synuclein transgenic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yuyu; Guo, Xiangyu; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Chuan-En; Gao, Jinquan; Yang, Weili; Kang, Yu; Si, Wei; Wang, Hong; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Li, Shihua; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that can be caused by genetic mutations in α-synuclein (α-syn) or duplication of wild-type α-syn; PD is characterized by the deposition of α-syn aggregates, indicating a gain of toxicity from accumulation of α-syn. Although the major neuropathologic feature of PD is the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra, non-motor symptoms including anxiety, cognitive defect and sleep disorder precede the onset of motor impairment, and many clinical symptoms of PD are not caused by degeneration of DA neurons. Non-human primate models of PD are important for revealing the early pathology in PD and identifying effective treatments. We established transgenic PD rhesus monkeys that express mutant α-syn (A53T). Six transgenic A53T monkeys were produced via lentiviral vector expressing A53T in fertilized monkey eggs and subsequent embryo transfer to surrogates. Transgenic A53T is expressed in the monkey brain and causes age-dependent non-motor symptoms, including cognitive defects and anxiety phenotype, without detectable sleeping disorders. The transgenic α-syn monkeys demonstrate the specific early symptoms caused by mutant α-syn and provide insight into treatment of early PD. PMID:25552648

  12. Enhancer-promoter interference and its prevention in transgenic plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional enhancer elements have been shown to override the specificity of nearby promoters in a position- and orientation-independent manner. This is problematic when multiple enhancers/promoters co-exist within a single transgenic construct as it has the potential to cause the mis-expressio...

  13. Spi-1/PU.1 transgenic mice develop multistep erythroleukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau-Gachelin, F; Wendling, F; Molina, T; Denis, N; Titeux, M; Grimber, G; Briand, P; Vainchenker, W; Tavitian, A

    1996-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of the spi-1 gene is associated with the emergence of malignant proerythroblasts during Friend virus-induced acute erythroleukemia. To determine the role of spi-1/PU.1 in the genesis of leukemia, we generated spi-1 transgenic mice. In one founder line the transgene was overexpressed as an unexpected-size transcript in various mouse tissues. Homozygous transgenic animals gave rise to live-born offspring, but 50% of the animals developed a multistep erythroleukemia within 1.5 to 6 months of birth whereas the remainder survived without evidence of disease. At the onset of the disease, mice became severely anemic. Their hematopoietic tissues were massively invaded with nontumorigenic proerythroblasts that express a high level of Spi-1 protein. These transgenic proerythroblasts are partially blocked in differentiation and strictly dependent on erythropoietin for their proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. A complete but transient regression of the disease was observed after erythrocyte transfusion, suggesting that the constitutive expression of spi-1 is related to the block of the differentiation of erythroid precursors. At relapse, erythropoietin-independent malignant proerythroblasts arose. Growth factor autonomy could be partially explained by the autocrine secretion of erythropoietin; however, other genetic events appear to be necessary to confer the full malignant phenotype. These results reveal that overexpression of spi-1 is essential for malignant erythropoiesis and does not alter other hematopoietic lineages. PMID:8628313

  14. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Halter, Roman; Kock, Michael A; Niemann, Heiner; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Paul, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF), the anticomplementary protein in cobra venom, activates the alternative complement pathway, eventually leading to complement consumption. Here, we describe the development of a transgenic mouse model for CVF. We generated a DNA construct containing the full-length cDNA for single-chain pre-pro-CVF. Expression of CVF was controlled by the alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter to achieve liver-specific expression. Linearized DNA was microinjected into murine ovary cells (strain CD(2)F(1) (BALB/cxDBA/2J)) and the newborn mice were analyzed for stable integration of CVF DNA. After establishing the transgene, mice were propagated in a BALB/c background. The CVF mRNA was detected in the liver and, in some animals, in the kidney. CVF protein was detected in small amounts in the serum. Serum complement hemolytic activity in CVF-transgenic mice was virtually absent. The concentration of plasma C3 was significantly reduced. The CVF-transgenic animals show no unusual phenotype. They provide an animal model to study the effect of long-term complement depletion by continued activation, as well as the role of complement in host immune response and pathogenesis of disease.

  15. Transgenic Crops to Address Third World Hunger? A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosset, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Industry and mainstream research and policy institutions often suggest that transgenic crop varieties can raise the productivity of poor third world farmers, feed the hungry, and reduce poverty. These claims are critically evaluated by examining global-hunger data, the constraints that affect the productivity of small farmers in the third world,…

  16. Transgenic Plants as Sensors of Environmental Pollution Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Rapid technological development is inevitably associated with many environmental problems which primarily include pollution of soil, water and air. In many cases, the presence of contamination is difficult to assess. It is even more difficult to evaluate its potential danger to the environment and humans. Despite the existence of several whole organism-based and cell-based models of sensing pollution and evaluation of toxicity and mutagenicity, there is no ideal system that allows one to make a quick and cheap assessment. In this respect, transgenic organisms that can be intentionally altered to be more sensitive to particular pollutants are especially promising. Transgenic plants represent an ideal system, since they can be grown at the site of pollution or potentially dangerous sites. Plants are ethically more acceptable and esthetically more appealing than animals as sensors of environmental pollution. In this review, we will discuss various transgenic plant-based models that have been successfully used for biomonitoring genotoxic pollutants. We will also discuss the benefits and potential drawbacks of these systems and describe some novel ideas for the future generation of efficient transgenic phytosensors. PMID:27879779

  17. Transgenic cotton age effects on lepidopteran larvae mortality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves from plants containing various transgenic traits (Non-Bt, Bollgard, Bollgard II, and WideStrike)were assayed for bioactivity in the laboratory against bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), beet armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner). About 5...

  18. Developing Transgenic Citrus for Resistance to Huanglongbing and Citrus Canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) and Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC) are serious threats to citrus production, and resistant transgenic citrus is desirable. Genes for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with diverse promoters have been used to generate thousands of rootstock and scion transformants. D35S::D4E1 transfor...

  19. Conditional overexpression of transgenes in megakaryocytes and platelets in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hao G.; Yu, Guangyao; Makitalo, Maria; Yang, Dan; Xie, Hou-Xiang; Jones, Matthew R.; Ravid, Katya

    2005-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK)–specific transgene expression has proved valuable in studying thrombotic and hemostatic processes. Constitutive expression of genes, however, could result in altered phenotypes due to compensatory mechanisms or lethality. To circumvent these limitations, we used the tetracycline/doxycycline (Tet)–off system to conditionally over-express genes in megakaryocytes and platelets in vivo. We generated 3 transactivator transgenic lines expressing the Tet transactivator element (tTA), under the control of the MK-specific platelet factor 4 promoter (PF4-tTA-VP16). Responder lines were simultaneously generated, each with a bidirectional minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV)–tTA responsive promoter driving prokaryotic β-galactosidase gene, as a cellular reporter, and a gene of interest (in this case, the mitotic regulator Aurora-B). A transactivator founder line that strongly expressed PF4-driven tTA–viral protein 16 (VP16) was crossbred to a responder line. The homozygous double-transgenic mouse line exhibited doxycycline-dependent transgene overexpression in MKs and platelets. Using this line, platelets were conveniently indicated at sites of induced stress by β-galactosidase staining. In addition, we confirmed our earlier report on effects of constitutive expression of Aurora-B, indicating a tight regulation at protein level and a modest effect on MK ploidy. Hence, we generated a new line, PF4-tTA-VP16, that is available for conditionally overexpressing genes of interest in the MK/platelet lineage in vivo. PMID:15890684

  20. Host status of three transgenic plum lines to Mesocriconema xenoplax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrodianin anti-fungal protein (GAFP) increases tolerance against Phytophthora root rot and root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in transgenic plum lines. However, nothing is known about the potential of GAFP lectin to confer resistance to the ring nematode Mesocriconema xenoplax. Three t...

  1. 75 FR 9100 - Proxy Disclosure Enhancements; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 249 RIN 3235-AK28 Proxy Disclosure Enhancements; Correction AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: We are making technical corrections to..., we are making three corrections to Form 8-K. We are correcting Form 8-K to add an instruction,...

  2. Correction of the sickle cell mutation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Judy C; Ye, Lin; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2006-01-24

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common genetic diseases worldwide. Patients often suffer from anemia, painful crises, infections, strokes, and cardiopulmonary complications. Although current management has improved the quality of life and survival of patients, cure can be achieved only with bone marrow transplantation when histocompatible donors are available. The ES cell technology suggests that a therapeutic cloning approach may be feasible for treatment of this disease. Using a transgenic/knockout sickle cell anemia mouse model, which harbors 240 kb of human DNA sequences containing the beta(S)-globin gene, we prepared ES cells from blastocysts that had the sickle cells anemia genotype and carried out homologous recombination with DNA constructs that contained the beta(A)-globin gene. We obtained ES cells in which the beta(S) was corrected to the beta(A) sequence. Hematopoietic cells differentiated from these ES cells produced both hemoglobin A and hemoglobin S. This approach can be applied to human ES cells to correct the sickle mutation as well as beta-thalassemia mutations.

  3. Postmortem findings in cloned and transgenic piglets dead before weaning.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Winther, K D; Secher, J O; Callesen, H

    2015-10-01

    Important factors contributing to the well-known high mortality of piglets produced by SCNT are gross malformations of vital organs. The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe malformations found in cloned piglets, transgenic or not, dying or culled before weaning on Day 28. Large White (LW) embryos were transferred to 78 LW recipients, while 72 recipients received Göttingen embryos (67 transgenic and five not transgenic) and 56 received Yucatan embryos (43 transgenic and 13 not transgenic). Overall pregnancy rate was 76%, and there were more abortions in recipients with minipig embryos than in those with LW embryos (26% and 24% vs. 6%). Piglets (n = 815) were born from 128 sows with 6.5 ± 0.4 full-born piglets per litter. The overall rate of stillborn piglets was 21% of all born with the number of stillborn piglets ranging from one to nine in a litter. The mortality of the surviving piglets during the first month was 48%. Thus, altogether 58% of the full-born piglets died before weaning. In 87 of the 128 litters (68%), one to 12 of the piglets showed major or minor malformations. Malformations were found in 232 piglets (29.5% of all born). A single malformation was registered in 152 piglets, but several piglets showed two (n = 58) or more (n = 23) malformations (7.4% and 2.8% of all born, respectively). A significantly higher malformation rate was found in transgenic Göttingen and Yucatan piglets (32% and 46% of all born, respectively) than in nontransgenic LW (17%). There was a gender difference in the transgenic minipigs because male piglets had a higher rate of malformations (49.1%) than females (29.7%). The most common defects in the cloned piglets were in the digestive (12.2%), circulatory (9.4%), reproductive (11.3%), and musculoskeletal (9.1%) systems. Malformations of the musculoskeletal system were most frequent in Göttingen (16.3% vs. approximately 5.5% in the two other breeds), whereas abnormal cardiopulmonary systems were most

  4. Germline transmission in transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Sean; Chi, Tim; Prucha, Melinda S.; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Connor-Stroud, Fawn; Jean, Sherrie; Gould, Kenneth; Chan, Anthony W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic nonhuman primate models are increasingly popular model for neurological and neurodegenerative disease because their brain functions and neural anatomies closely resemble those of humans [1–6]. Transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys (HD monkeys) developed clinical features similar to those seen in HD patients, making the monkeys suitable for preclinical study of HD [6–12]. However, until HD monkey colonies can be readily expanded, their use in preclinical studies will be limited [1, 13, 14]. In the present study, we confirmed germline transmission of the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) transgene in both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from three male HD monkey founders (F0), as well as in second-generation offspring (F1) produced via artificial insemination by using intrauterine insemination (IUI) technique. A total of five offspring were produced from fifteen females that were inseminated by IUI using semen collected from the three HD founders (5/15; 33%). Thus far, sperm collected from HD founder (rHD8) has led to two F1 transgenic HD moenkys with germline transmission rate at 100% (2/2). mHTT expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using skin fibroblasts from the F1 HD monkeys, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established from one of the F1 HD monkeys (rHD8-2). Here we report the stable germline transmission and expression of the mHTT transgene in HD monkeys, which suggest possible expansion of HD monkey colonies for preclinical and biomedical researches. PMID:25917881

  5. MAR elements and transposons for improved transgene integration and expression.

    PubMed

    Ley, Déborah; Harraghy, Niamh; Le Fourn, Valérie; Bire, Solenne; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Regamey, Alexandre; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence; Bigot, Yves; Mermod, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Reliable and long-term expression of transgenes remain significant challenges for gene therapy and biotechnology applications, especially when antibiotic selection procedures are not applicable. In this context, transposons represent attractive gene transfer vectors because of their ability to promote efficient genomic integration in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, expression from genome-integrating vectors may be inhibited by variable gene transcription and/or silencing events. In this study, we assessed whether inclusion of two epigenetic control elements, the human Matrix Attachment Region (MAR) 1-68 and X-29, in a piggyBac transposon vector, may lead to more reliable and efficient expression in CHO cells. We found that addition of the MAR 1-68 at the center of the transposon did not interfere with transposition frequency, and transgene expressing cells could be readily detected from the total cell population without antibiotic selection. Inclusion of the MAR led to higher transgene expression per integrated copy, and reliable expression could be obtained from as few as 2-4 genomic copies of the MAR-containing transposon vector. The MAR X-29-containing transposons was found to mediate elevated expression of therapeutic proteins in polyclonal or monoclonal CHO cell populations using a transposable vector devoid of selection gene. Overall, we conclude that MAR and transposable vectors can be used to improve transgene expression from few genomic transposition events, which may be useful when expression from a low number of integrated transgene copies must be obtained and/or when antibiotic selection cannot be applied.

  6. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  7. Bt-transgenic cotton is more sensitive to CeO₂ nanoparticles than its parental non-transgenic cotton.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuguang; Gui, Xin; Rui, Yukui; Ji, Weikang; Van Nhan, Le; Yu, Zihan; Peng, Shengnan

    2014-06-15

    Because genetically modified crops are developing widely in the world while nanoparticles (NPs) are being synthesized and applied in various fields, they will have many opportunities for interactions in the future. The effects of NPs on genetically modified crops therefore require investigation. In the present study, CeO2 NPs were revealed to have toxic effects on root biomass of Bt 29317 at 100 and 500 mg L(-1), but had no toxic effects on Jihe 321. Besides, we also studied the effects of CeO2 NPs on nutrient element uptake in transgenic cotton, and found that contents of most nutrient elements (Fe, Ca, Mg, Zn and Na) in roots of Bt 29317 were affected at lower NP concentrations (100 mg L(-1)) compared with Jihe 321. In addition, ICP-MS analysis revealed that CeO2 NPs were more heavily adsorbed by roots of Bt 29317 than Jihe 321, whereas fewer CeO2 NPs were transported from roots to shoots of Bt 29317 than its non-transgenic counterpart. These data confirm that Bt 29317 is more sensitive to CeO2 NPs than its parental non-transgenic cotton, indicating that nanomaterials are potentially more detrimental to transgenic plants than conventional ones.

  8. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  9. 78 FR 76193 - Special Notice; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Questionnaire)] Special Notice; Correction AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published a... of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420, at (202) 632-7492. Correction...

  10. 77 FR 60039 - Availability of Records; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Part 1631 Availability of Records; Correction AGENCY: Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. ACTION: Direct final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board (Agency... corrections to FRTIB regulations stemming from the direct final rule published in the February 27,...

  11. The Effects of Fe2O3 Nanoparticles on Physiology and Insecticide Activity in Non-Transgenic and Bt-Transgenic Cotton.

    PubMed

    Van Nhan, Le; Ma, Chuanxin; Rui, Yukui; Cao, Weidong; Deng, Yingqing; Liu, Liming; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    As the demands for nanotechnology and nanoparticle (NP) applications in agriculture increase, the ecological risk has drawn more attention because of the unpredictable results of interactions between NPs and transgenic crops. In this study, we investigated the effects of various concentrations of Fe2O3 NPs on Bt-transgenic cotton in comparison with conventional cotton for 10 days. Each treatment was conducted in triplicate, and each experiment was repeated three times. Results demonstrated that Fe2O3 NPs inhibited the plant height and root length of Bt-transgenic cotton and promoted root hairs and biomass of non-transgenic cotton. Nutrients such as Na and K in Bt-transgenic cotton roots increased, while Zn contents decreased with Fe2O3 NPs. Most hormones in the roots of Bt-transgenic cotton increased at low Fe2O3 NP exposure (100 mg⋅L(-1)) but decreased at high concentrations of Fe2O3 NPs (1000 mg⋅L(-1)). Fe2O3 NPs increased the Bt-toxin in leaves and roots of Bt-transgenic cotton. Fe2O3 NPs were absorbed into roots, then transported to the shoots of both Bt-transgenic and non-transgenic cottons. The bioaccumulation of Fe2O3 NPs in plants might be a potential risk for agricultural crops and affect the environment and human health.

  12. String-Corrected Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

    2005-02-07

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  13. Universality of quantum gravity corrections.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C

    2008-11-28

    We show that the existence of a minimum measurable length and the related generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), predicted by theories of quantum gravity, influence all quantum Hamiltonians. Thus, they predict quantum gravity corrections to various quantum phenomena. We compute such corrections to the Lamb shift, the Landau levels, and the tunneling current in a scanning tunneling microscope. We show that these corrections can be interpreted in two ways: (a) either that they are exceedingly small, beyond the reach of current experiments, or (b) that they predict upper bounds on the quantum gravity parameter in the GUP, compatible with experiments at the electroweak scale. Thus, more accurate measurements in the future should either be able to test these predictions, or further tighten the above bounds and predict an intermediate length scale between the electroweak and the Planck scale.

  14. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  15. Corrections in Montana: A Consultation on Corrections in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Helena.

    The findings and recommendations of a two-day conference on the civil and human rights of inmates of Montana's correctional institutions are contained in this report. The views of private citizens and experts from local, state, and federal organizations are presented in edited form under seven subject headings: existing prison reform legislation,…

  16. When Correction Turns Positive: Processing Corrective Prosody in Dutch

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Diana V.; Stowe, Laurie A.; Hoeks, John C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research on spoken language does not provide a consistent picture as to whether prosody, the melody and rhythm of speech, conveys a specific meaning. Perception studies show that English listeners assign meaning to prosodic patterns, and, for instance, associate some accents with contrast, whereas Dutch listeners behave more controversially. In two ERP studies we tested how Dutch listeners process words carrying two types of accents, which either provided new information (new information accents) or corrected information (corrective accents), both in single sentences (experiment 1) and after corrective and new information questions (experiment 2). In both experiments corrective accents elicited a sustained positivity as compared to new information accents, which started earlier in context than in single sentences. The positivity was not modulated by the nature of the preceding question, suggesting that the underlying neural mechanism likely reflects the construction of an interpretation to the accented word, either by identifying an alternative in context or by inferring it when no context is present. Our experimental results provide strong evidence for inferential processes related to prosodic contours in Dutch. PMID:25973607

  17. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    In the January 2015 issue of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking (vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 3–7), the article "Individual Differences in Cyber Security Behaviors: An Examination of Who Is Sharing Passwords." by Prof. Monica Whitty et al., has an error in wording in the abstract. The sentence in question was originally printed as: Contrary to our hypotheses, we found older people and individuals who score high on self-monitoring were more likely to share passwords. It should read: Contrary to our hypotheses, we found younger people and individuals who score high on self-monitoring were more likely to share passwords. The authors wish to apologize for the error.

  18. Correction.

    PubMed

    1991-09-25

    In Temperature taking - getting it right' (Nursing Standard December 12 1990), the author erroneously referred to TcmpaDOT thermometers as using liquid crystal indicators. They in fact function through a colour change, using a mix of two organic chemicals.

  19. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    The feature article “Neutrons for new drugs” (August pp26-29) stated that neutron crystallography was used to determine the structures of “wellknown complex biological molecules such as lysine, insulin and trypsin”.

  20. Correction.

    PubMed

    1992-12-11

    Last month, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) prompted a 13 November Random Sample naming a group of scientists whose faces were appearing, USPS said, on stamps belonging to its Black Heritage Series. Among them: chemist Percy Lavon Julian; George Washington Carver; physician Charles R. Drew; astronomer and mathematician Benjamin Banneker; and inventor Jan Matzeliger. Science readers knew better. Two of the quintet appeared years ago: a stamp bearing Carver's picture was issued in 1948, and Drew appeared in the Great Americans Series in 1981.

  1. Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    1. The first photograph on p12 of News in Physics Educaton January 2004 is of Prof. Paul Black and not Prof. Jonathan Osborne, as stated. 2. The review of Flowlog on p209 of the March 2004 issue wrongly gives the maximum sampling rate of the analogue inputs as 25 kHz (40 ms) instead of 25 kHz (40 µs) and the digital inputs as 100 kHz (10 ms) instead of 100 kHz (10 µs). 3. The letter entitled 'A trial of two energies' by Eric McIldowie on pp212-4 of the March 2004 issue was edited to fit the space available. We regret that a few small errors were made in doing this. Rather than detail these, the interested reader can access the whole of the original letter as a Word file from the link below.

  2. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    An error was made in the spelling of the name of Noah Petro, who was quoted in the news article "The summer of supermoons," published in the 19 August 2014 issue of Eos (95(33), 297, doi:10.1002/2014EO330005). Eos regrets the error.

  3. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    An error was made in the spelling of the name of Mark Abbott, who was quoted in the news article "Earth observation plan looks toward balancing U.S. federal priorities," published in the 19 August 2014 issue of Eos (95(33), 295-296, doi:10.1002/2014EO330003). Eos regrets the error.

  4. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    In the About AGU article "AGU Union Fellows elected for 2014," published in the 29 July 2014 issue of Eos (95(30), 272, doi:10.1022/ 2014EO300008), a joint research group affiliation was inadvertently omitted for one Fellow. Antje Boetius is with the Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany, and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

  5. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    In the 5 March 2013 issue of Eos, the Forum, "Consider nominating a woman for an AGU award" (Eos, 94(10), 99, doi:10.1002/2013EO100003), incorrectly stated that of the three female AGU medalists in 2012, two became new Fellows at that time. This was based on incorrect information in AGU's records. In fact, one of the three female 2012 medalists became a new Fellow at that time; the other two had been elected Fellows earlier.

  6. Automated Confocal Microscope Bias Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Thierry; Genovesio, Auguste

    2006-10-01

    Illumination artifacts systematically occur in 2D cross-section confocal microscopy imaging . These bias can strongly corrupt an higher level image processing such as a segmentation, a fluorescence evaluation or even a pattern extraction/recognition. This paper presents a new fully automated bias correction methodology based on large image database preprocessing. This method is very appropriate to the High Content Screening (HCS), method dedicated to drugs discovery. Our method assumes that the amount of pictures available is large enough to allow a reliable statistical computation of an average bias image. A relevant segmentation evaluation protocol and experimental results validate our correction algorithm by outperforming object extraction on non corrupted images.

  7. DARHT Radiographic Grid Scale Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Warthen, Barry J.

    2015-02-13

    Recently it became apparent that the radiographic grid which has been used to calibrate the dimensional scale of DARHT radiographs was not centered at the location where the objects have been centered. This offset produced an error of 0.188% in the dimensional scaling of the radiographic images processed using the assumption that the grid and objects had the same center. This paper will show the derivation of the scaling correction, explain how new radiographs are being processed to account for the difference in location, and provide the details of how to correct radiographic image processed with the erroneous scale factor.

  8. Genetic and biochemical dissection of transgenic RNA-mediated virus resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J; Chapman, K; Swaney, S; Parks, T D; Wernsman, E A; Dougherty, W G

    1996-01-01

    RNA-mediated virus resistance has been observed in transgenic plants at varying frequencies, suggesting that a nuclear requirement or other pre-condition must be met. This study was undertaken to characterize genetically transgenes that confer a highly resistant state to infection by tobacco etch virus (TEV). Transgenic tobacco line 2RC-6.13, expressing an untranslatable mRNA containing the TEV coat protein open reading frame, had three distinct transgene integration events that segregated as two linkage groups. A genetic series of plants that contained zero, one, two, or all three transgene inserts in both homozygous and heterozygous conditions was produced and examined. Genetic and biochemical data suggested that RNA-mediated virus resistance is a multigenic trait in line 2RC-6.13; three or more transgenes were necessary to establish the highly resistant state. One or two transgene copies resulted in an inducible form of resistance (i.e., recovery). Transcription rates and steady state RNA levels of the transgene-derived transcript present in different members of the genetic series supported a post-transcriptional RNA degradation process as the underlying mechanism for transgene transcript reduction and virus resistance. This degradation process appeared to initiate via cleavage of specific sites within the target RNA sequence, as determined by RNA get blot and primer extension analyses of transgene-derived mRNA from various transgenic plant lines. PMID:8597662

  9. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Laura; North, Ace; Collins, C. Matilda; Mumford, John D.; Facchinelli, Luca; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Benedict, Mark Q.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks. PMID:27669312

  10. Toxicity assessment of transgenic papaya ringspot virus of 823-2210 line papaya fruits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Yen, Gow-Chin; Huang, Ting-Tzu; Chan, Lit-Fu; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2013-02-20

    The transgenic papaya is a valuable strategy for creating plants resistant to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection and increasing production. This study was further performed to evaluate the comparative toxicity effects of the newly developed transgenic line of the fruits of two backcross transgenic papaya lines (2210 and 823) and one hybrid line (823-2210) and compare to their parent non-transgenic (TN-2) counterparts. The stability analysis of coat protein (CP) of PRSV was investigated using the digestion stability assays in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), and bile salts to detect the CP fragments. Results revealed that the CP fragments were rapidly hydrolyzed in SGF and were undetectable in organs and gastrointestinal contents in rats. For the genotoxicity, three in vitro assays were conducted and exhibited that non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits were negative. Moreover, a repeated animal feeding study was conducted by feeding 2 g/kg of body weight (bw) of non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits for 28 days in rats. There were no biological or toxicological significances between non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits in rats. The results demonstrated that the backcross transgenic papaya fruit can be recognized as an equivalent substitution for traditional papaya in food safety.

  11. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Laura; North, Ace; Collins, C Matilda; Mumford, John D; Facchinelli, Luca; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Benedict, Mark Q

    2016-09-22

    The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks.

  12. 77 FR 61229 - Availability of Records; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Part 1631 Availability of Records; Correction AGENCY: Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board... INFORMATION: This document contains corrections to FRTIB regulations stemming from the direct final...

  13. Molecular and functional characterization of cry1Ac transgenic pea lines.

    PubMed

    Teressa Negawo, Alemayehu; Baranek, Linda; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Hassan, Fathi

    2016-10-01

    Transgenic pea lines transformed with the cry1Ac gene were characterized at molecular (PCR, RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and immunostrip assay) and functional levels (leaf paint and insect feeding bioassays). The results showed the presence, expression, inheritance and functionality of the introduced transgene at different progeny levels. Variation in the expression of the cry1Ac gene was observed among the different transgenic lines. In the insect bioassay studies using the larvae of Heliothis virescens, both larval survival and plant damage were highly affected on the different transgenic plants. Up to 100 % larval mortality was observed on the transgenic plants compared to 17.42 % on control plants. Most of the challenged transgenic plants showed very negligible to substantially reduced feeding damage indicating the insect resistance of the developed transgenic lines. Further analysis under field condition will be required to select promising lines for future uses.

  14. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  15. Multichannel error correction code decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Paul K.; Ivancic, William D.

    1993-01-01

    A brief overview of a processing satellite for a mesh very-small-aperture (VSAT) communications network is provided. The multichannel error correction code (ECC) decoder system, the uplink signal generation and link simulation equipment, and the time-shared decoder are described. The testing is discussed. Applications of the time-shared decoder are recommended.

  16. "Free Speech" and "Political Correctness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Peter

    2016-01-01

    "Free speech" and "political correctness" are best seen not as opposing principles, but as part of a spectrum. Rather than attempting to establish some absolute principles, this essay identifies four trends that impact on this debate: (1) there are, and always have been, legitimate debates about the--absolute--beneficence of…

  17. The Politics of Political Correctness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minsky, Leonard

    1992-01-01

    This article reacts to President Bush's entry into the dispute over "political correctness" on college campuses. The paper summarizes discussions of students, faculty, and others in the Washington, D.C. area which concluded that this seeming defense of free speech is actually an attack on affirmative action and multiculturalism stemming…

  18. Political Correctness and American Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that today's political correctness atmosphere is a throwback to attempts made by the Nazis and Stalinists to force society into conformity. Academia, it is claimed, is being forced to conform to gain control of the institution of higher education. It is predicted that this effort will fail. (GR)

  19. Analysis of the VPE sequences in the Caenorhabditis elegans vit-2 promoter with extrachromosomal tandem array-containing transgenic strains.

    PubMed Central

    MacMorris, M; Spieth, J; Madej, C; Lea, K; Blumenthal, T

    1994-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vit genes, encoding vitellogenins, are abundantly expressed in the adult hermaphrodite intestine. Two repeated elements, vit promoter element 1 (VPE1 [TGTCAAT]) and VPE2 (CTGATAA), have been identified in the 5' flanking DNA of each of the vit genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae. These elements have previously been shown to be needed for correctly regulated expression of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene in low-copy-number, integrated transgenes. Here we extend the analysis of the function of VPE1 and VPE2 by using transgenic lines carrying large, extrachromosomal arrays of the test genes. The results validate the use of such arrays for transgenic analysis of gene regulation in C. elegans, by confirming previous findings showing that the VPE1 at -45 and both VPE2s are sites of activation. Additional experiments now indicate that when the -45 VPE1 is inverted or replaced by a VPE2, nearly total loss of promoter function results, suggesting that the highly conserved -45 VPE1 plays a unique role in vit-2 promoter function. In contrast, single mutations eliminating the three upstream VPE1s are without effect. However, in combination in double and triple mutants, these upstream VPE1 mutations cause drastic reductions in expression levels. The -150 VPE2 can be replaced by a XhoI site (CTCGAG), and the -90 VPE2 can be eliminated, as long as the overlapping VPE1 is left intact, but when these two replacements are combined, activity is lost. Thus, the promoter must have at least one VPE2 and it must have at least two VPE1s, one at -45 and one additional upstream element. Images PMID:8264616

  20. Transgenic plants as a sustainable, terrestrial source of fish oils.

    PubMed

    Napier, Johnathan A; Usher, Sarah; Haslam, Richard P; Ruiz-Lopez, Noemi; Sayanova, Olga

    2015-09-01

    1An alternative, sustainable source of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids is widely recognized as desirable, helping to reduce pressure on current sources (wild capture fisheries) and providing a de novo source of these health beneficial fatty acids. This review will consider the efforts and progress to develop transgenic plants as terrestrial sources of omega-3 fish oils, focusing on recent developments and the possible explanations for advances in the field. We also consider the utility of such a source for use in aquaculture, since this industry is the major consumer of oceanic supplies of omega-3 fish oils. Given the importance of the aquaculture industry in meeting global requirements for healthy foodstuffs, an alternative source of omega-3 fish oils represents a potentially significant breakthrough for this production system. Transgenic Camelina seeds engineered to accumulate the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, represent a sustainable alternative to fish oils.

  1. Biolistic-mediated production of transgenic oil palm.

    PubMed

    Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Bahariah, Bohari

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of mannose (using phosphomannose isomerase [pmi] gene) as a positive selection agent to preferably allow the growth of transformed oil palm embryogenic calli was successfully evaluated. Using the above selection agent in combination with the previously optimized physical and biological parameters and the best constitutive promoter, oil palm embryogenic calli were transformed with pmi gene for producing transgenic plants. Bombarded embryogenic calli were exposed to embryogenic calli medium containing 30:0 g/L mannose to sucrose 3 weeks postbombardment. Selectively, proliferating embryogenic calli started to emerge around 6 months on the above selection medium. The proliferated embryogenic calli were individually isolated once they reached a specific size and regenerated to produce complete plantlets. The complete regenerated plantlets were evaluated for the presence of transgenes by PCR and Southern analyses.

  2. Suspension culture of gametophytes of transgenic kelp in a photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiangtao; Zhang, Yicheng; Wang, Honghua; Qin, Song

    2005-07-01

    Transgenic Laminaria japonica gametophytes producing a recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) protein, which is an effective third-generation thrombolytic agent for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), were cultured in an illuminated bubble column bioreactor. A maximum final dry cell weight of 1120 mg l(-1) was obtained in batch culture with an initial dry cell weight of 126 mg l(-1) and with aeration rate of 1.2 l air min(-1 )l(-1) culture, nitrate at 1.5 mM: and phosphate at 0.17 mM: . The yield of rtPA was 56 microg g(-1) dry cell wt. This is the first report regarding cultivation of a transgenic macroalga in a bioreactor.

  3. Transgenic plants for the production of veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dus Santos, María José; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2005-06-01

    The expression of antigens in transgenic plants has been increasingly used in the development of experimental vaccines, particularly oriented to the development of edible vaccines. Hence, this technology becomes highly suitable to express immunogenic proteins from pathogens. Foot and mouth disease virus, bovine rotavirus and bovine viral diarrhoea virus are considered to be the most important causative agents of economic loss of cattle production in Argentina, and they are thus optimal candidates for alternative means of immunization. Here, we present a review of our results corresponding to the expression of immunogenic proteins from these three viruses in alfalfa transgenic plants, and we discuss the possibility of using them for the development of plant-based vaccines.

  4. Slow-growth phenotype of transgenic tomato expressing apoplastic invertase

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.D.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The growth of transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants that express in their apoplast yeast invertase under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter is severely inhibited. The higher the level of invertase, the greater the inhibition of growth. A second phenotypic characteristic of these transgenic plants is the development of yellow and necrotic spots on the leaves, and leaf curling. Again the severity of the symptoms is correlated with the level of invertase. These symptoms do not develop in shaded leaves indicating the need for photosynthesis. Keeping the plants in the dark for a prolonged period (24 hours) results in the disappearance of leaf starch from the control plants, but not from the plants with apoplastic invertase. These results are consistent with the interpretation that apoplastic invertase prevents photosynthate export from source leaves and that phloem loading includes an apoplastic step.

  5. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  6. Lupine leghemoglobin I: expression in transgenic Lotus and tobacco tissues.

    PubMed

    Strózycki, P M; Karłowski, W M; Dessaux, Y; Petit, A; Legocki, A B

    2000-03-01

    The proximal parts of the promoters of the genes for symbiotic-type hemoglobins are generally conserved, but the promoter of the lbI gene of lupine (LulbI) shows some unusual structural features. It lacks typical organ-specific elements characteristic of all the leghemoglobin gene promoters described thus far. We have analysed its functional activity in transgenic Lotus corniculatus. A fusion construct between the lbI promoter and the GUS reporter gene was expressed mainly in the central zone of the root nodule, but the product was also detected in the non-nodule root zone and in roots in tissue culture. In roots of transgenic tobacco, the activity of the promoter was only 24% lower than in Lotus nodules. LulbI promoter activity was also detected in tobacco leaves. Lupine hemoglobin I has a higher sequence identity to symbiotic-type hemoglobins and thus it groups within the "Class II" hemoglobins.

  7. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders.

  8. Optimizing pyramided transgenic Bt crops for sustainable pest management.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Yves; Crickmore, Neil; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2015-02-01

    Transgenic crop pyramids producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that kill the same insect pest have been widely used to delay evolution of pest resistance. To assess the potential of pyramids to achieve this goal, we analyze data from 38 studies that report effects of ten Bt toxins used in transgenic crops against 15 insect pests. We find that compared with optimal low levels of insect survival, survival on currently used pyramids is often higher for both susceptible insects and insects resistant to one of the toxins in the pyramid. Furthermore, we find that cross-resistance and antagonism between toxins used in pyramids are common, and that these problems are associated with the similarity of the amino acid sequences of domains II and III of the toxins, respectively. This analysis should assist in future pyramid design and the development of sustainable resistance management strategies.

  9. Economic impact of transgenic crops in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Raney, Terri

    2006-04-01

    Transgenic crops are being adopted rapidly at the global level, but only a few developing countries are growing them in significant quantities. Why are these crops so successful in some countries but not in others? Farm level profitability ultimately determines whether farmers adopt and retain a new technology, but this depends on much more than technical performance. Recent economic studies in developing countries find positive, but highly variable, economic returns to adopting transgenic crops. These studies confirm that institutional factors such as national agricultural research capacity, environmental and food safety regulations, intellectual property rights and agricultural input markets matter at least as much as the technology itself in determining the level and distribution of economic benefits.

  10. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  11. [Detection of trehalose in transgenic tobacco by HPLC with ELSD].

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Yang, B; Dai, X

    2001-06-01

    The E. coli trehase synthalose gene(otsA) was transferred into Nicotiana tabacum mediated by Agrobacterium, but the method for detecting low concentration of trehalose in transgenic plant was not available. The high performance liquid chromatograph(HPLC) with evaporative light-scatting detector(ELSD) using water: methyl cyanide(1:2.6 v/v) as mobile phase was established in this work. An ODS column Zorbax RX-SIL was employed. the trehalose detection limits of ELSD was 5 mg/L. From the linear relationship between the logarithm of trehalose concentration and the logarithm of peak area, it was shown there was 14.7 micrograms.(g FW)-1 in transgenic plant. The data strongly confirmed that trehalose was responsible for the improved stress tolerance of the tobacco.

  12. Using transgenic reporter assays to functionally characterize enhancers in animals.

    PubMed

    Kvon, Evgeny Z

    2015-09-01

    Enhancers or cis-regulatory modules play an instructive role in regulating gene expression during animal development and in response to the environment. Despite their importance, we only have an incomplete map of enhancers in the genome and our understanding of the mechanisms governing their function is still limited. Recent advances in genomics provided powerful tools to generate genome-wide maps of potential enhancers. However, most of these methods are based on indirect measures of enhancer activity and have to be followed by functional testing. Animal transgenesis has been a valuable method to functionally test and characterize enhancers in vivo. In this review I discuss how different transgenic strategies are utilized to characterize enhancers in model organisms focusing on studies in Drosophila and mouse. I will further discuss recent large-scale transgenic efforts to systematically identify and catalog enhancers as well as highlight the challenges and future directions in the field.

  13. A translationally optimized AAV-UGT1A1 vector drives safe and long-lasting correction of Crigler-Najjar syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Bortolussi, Giulia; van Dijk, Remco; Collaud, Fanny; Charles, Severine; Leborgne, Christian; Vidal, Patrice; Martin, Samia; Gjata, Bernard; Sola, Marcelo Simon; van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Vignaud, Alban; Veron, Philippe; Bosma, Piter J; Muro, Andres F; Mingozzi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a severe metabolic disease of the liver due to a reduced activity of the UDP Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) enzyme. In an effort to translate to the clinic an adeno-associated virus vector mediated liver gene transfer approach to treat Crigler-Najjar syndrome, we developed and optimized a vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene. For this purpose, we designed and tested in vitro and in vivo multiple codon-optimized UGT1A1 transgene cDNAs. We also optimized noncoding sequences in the transgene expression cassette. Our results indicate that transgene codon-optimization is a strategy that can improve efficacy of gene transfer but needs to be carefully tested in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, while inclusion of introns can enhance gene expression, optimization of these introns, and in particular removal of cryptic ATGs and splice sites, is an important maneuver to enhance safety and efficacy of gene transfer. Finally, using a translationally optimized adeno-associated virus vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene, we demonstrated rescue of the phenotype of Crigler-Najjar syndrome in two animal models of the disease, Gunn rats and Ugt1a1-/- mice. We also showed long-term (>1 year) correction of the disease in Gunn rats. These results support further translation of the approach to humans. PMID:27722180

  14. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  15. Efficient selection and evaluation of transgenic lines of Crambe abyssinica

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueyuan; Fan, Jing; Gruber, Jens; Guan, Rui; Frentzen, Margrit; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Crambe abyssinica is a dedicated oilseed crop suitable for production of industrial feedstocks. Genetic modification of crambe has progressed substantially in the last few years, but the transformation efficiency needs to be further improved. Meanwhile, developing a reliable molecular system including Southern blot and qRT-PCR analyses is desired for effectively evaluating transgenic lines and gene expression levels of both endogenous and transgenes. In this study, we have developed an efficient transformation protocol with hygromycin as the selective agent for crambe transformation. In the regeneration test, addition of hygromycin at concentration of 5 mg L−1 resulted in 18% of shoot regeneration using crambe hypocotyls as explants, while no regeneration occurred when the hygromycin concentration reached 10 mg L−1. Based on this result, the hygromycin concentration up to 10 mg L−1 was used in the subsequent transformations. The results showed that the transformation efficiency under constant low selection pressure (H3-H3) was similar to that under higher selection pressure first, followed by transfer to lower selection pressure (H10-H3). The PCR, Southern blot and fatty acid composition analyses confirmed the integration of transgenes in the crambe genome. We have also optimized the Southern and qRT-PCR methods for future studies on crambe or related species. For Southern blot analysis on crambe, more than 50 μg DNA is required for a clear band. The choice of enzymes for DNA digestion was not rigid for confirmation of the T-DNA integration, while for determining the copy number of transgenes, suitable enzymes should be chosen. Increasing the enzyme concentration could improve the digestion and 20 μl enzyme was recomended for a complete digestion of up to 80 μg crambe DNA. For qRT-PCR analysis, around 20 days after flowering was observed to be the suitable sampling time for expresseion analysis of genes invovled in the seed oil biosynthesis. PMID:23750164

  16. Efficient selection and evaluation of transgenic lines of Crambe abyssinica.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyuan; Fan, Jing; Gruber, Jens; Guan, Rui; Frentzen, Margrit; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Crambe abyssinica is a dedicated oilseed crop suitable for production of industrial feedstocks. Genetic modification of crambe has progressed substantially in the last few years, but the transformation efficiency needs to be further improved. Meanwhile, developing a reliable molecular system including Southern blot and qRT-PCR analyses is desired for effectively evaluating transgenic lines and gene expression levels of both endogenous and transgenes. In this study, we have developed an efficient transformation protocol with hygromycin as the selective agent for crambe transformation. In the regeneration test, addition of hygromycin at concentration of 5 mg L(-1) resulted in 18% of shoot regeneration using crambe hypocotyls as explants, while no regeneration occurred when the hygromycin concentration reached 10 mg L(-1). Based on this result, the hygromycin concentration up to 10 mg L(-1) was used in the subsequent transformations. The results showed that the transformation efficiency under constant low selection pressure (H3-H3) was similar to that under higher selection pressure first, followed by transfer to lower selection pressure (H10-H3). The PCR, Southern blot and fatty acid composition analyses confirmed the integration of transgenes in the crambe genome. We have also optimized the Southern and qRT-PCR methods for future studies on crambe or related species. For Southern blot analysis on crambe, more than 50 μg DNA is required for a clear band. The choice of enzymes for DNA digestion was not rigid for confirmation of the T-DNA integration, while for determining the copy number of transgenes, suitable enzymes should be chosen. Increasing the enzyme concentration could improve the digestion and 20 μl enzyme was recomended for a complete digestion of up to 80 μg crambe DNA. For qRT-PCR analysis, around 20 days after flowering was observed to be the suitable sampling time for expresseion analysis of genes invovled in the seed oil biosynthesis.

  17. Transgene × Environment Interactions in Genetically Modified Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Simon L.; Kalinina, Olena; Brunner, Susanne; Keller, Beat; Schmid, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Background The introduction of transgenes into plants may cause unintended phenotypic effects which could have an impact on the plant itself and the environment. Little is published in the scientific literature about the interrelation of environmental factors and possible unintended effects in genetically modified (GM) plants. Methods and Findings We studied transgenic bread wheat Triticum aestivum lines expressing the wheat Pm3b gene against the fungus powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici. Four independent offspring pairs, each consisting of a GM line and its corresponding non-GM control line, were grown under different soil nutrient conditions and with and without fungicide treatment in the glasshouse. Furthermore, we performed a field experiment with a similar design to validate our glasshouse results. The transgene increased the resistance to powdery mildew in all environments. However, GM plants reacted sensitive to fungicide spraying in the glasshouse. Without fungicide treatment, in the glasshouse GM lines had increased vegetative biomass and seed number and a twofold yield compared with control lines. In the field these results were reversed. Fertilization generally increased GM/control differences in the glasshouse but not in the field. Two of four GM lines showed up to 56% yield reduction and a 40-fold increase of infection with ergot disease Claviceps purpurea compared with their control lines in the field experiment; one GM line was very similar to its control. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that, depending on the insertion event, a particular transgene can have large effects on the entire phenotype of a plant and that these effects can sometimes be reversed when plants are moved from the glasshouse to the field. However, it remains unclear which mechanisms underlie these effects and how they may affect concepts in molecular plant breeding and plant evolutionary ecology. PMID:20635001

  18. Control of pollen-mediated gene flow in transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsheng; Norris-Caneda, Kim H; Rottmann, William H; Gulledge, Jon E; Chang, Shujun; Kwan, Brian Yow-Hui; Thomas, Anita M; Mandel, Lydia C; Kothera, Ronald T; Victor, Aditi D; Pearson, Leslie; Hinchee, Maud A W

    2012-08-01

    Pollen elimination provides an effective containment method to reduce direct gene flow from transgenic trees to their wild relatives. Until now, only limited success has been achieved in controlling pollen production in trees. A pine (Pinus radiata) male cone-specific promoter, PrMC2, was used to drive modified barnase coding sequences (barnaseH102E, barnaseK27A, and barnaseE73G) in order to determine their effectiveness in pollen ablation. The expression cassette PrMC2-barnaseH102E was found to efficiently ablate pollen in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), pine, and Eucalyptus (spp.). Large-scale and multiple-year field tests demonstrated that complete prevention of pollen production was achieved in greater than 95% of independently transformed lines of pine and Eucalyptus (spp.) that contained the PrMC2-barnaseH102E expression cassette. A complete pollen control phenotype was achieved in transgenic lines and expressed stably over multiple years, multiple test locations, and when the PrMC2-barnaseH102E cassette was flanked by different genes. The PrMC2-barnaseH102E transgenic pine and Eucalyptus (spp.) trees grew similarly to control trees in all observed attributes except the pollenless phenotype. The ability to achieve the complete control of pollen production in field-grown trees is likely the result of a unique combination of three factors: the male cone/anther specificity of the PrMC2 promoter, the reduced RNase activity of barnaseH102E, and unique features associated with a polyploid tapetum. The field performance of the PrMC2-barnaseH102E in representative angiosperm and gymnosperm trees indicates that this gene can be used to mitigate pollen-mediated gene flow associated with large-scale deployment of transgenic trees.

  19. Fast-muscle-specific expression of human aldolase A transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, M; Maire, P; Concordet, J P; Moch, C; Porteu, A; Kahn, A; Daegelen, D

    1994-01-01

    The expression of the human aldolase A gene is controlled by three alternative promoters. In transgenic mice, pN and pH are active in all tissues whereas pM is activated specifically in adult muscles composed mainly of fast, glycolytic fibers. To detect potential regulatory regions involved in the fast-muscle-specific activation of pM, we analyzed DNase I hypersensitivity in a 4.3-kbp fragment from the 5' end of the human aldolase A gene. Five hypersensitive sites were located near the transcription initiation site of each promoter in those transgenic-mouse tissues in which the corresponding promoter was active. Only one muscle-specific hypersensitive site was detected, mapping near pM. To functionally delimit the elements required for muscle-specific activity of pM, we performed a deletion analysis of the aldolase A 5' region in transgenic mice. Our results show that a 280-bp fragment containing 235 bp of pM proximal upstream sequences together with the noncoding M exon is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of pM. When a putative MEF-2-binding site residing in this proximal pM region is mutated, pM is still active and no change in its tissue specificity is detected. Furthermore, we observed a modulation of pM activity by elements lying further upstream and downstream from pM. Interestingly, pM was expressed in a tissue-specific way in all transgenic mice in which the 280-bp region was present (32 lines and six founder animals). This observation led us to suggest that the proximal pM region contains elements that are able to override to some extent the effects of the surrounding chromatin. Images PMID:7935397

  20. Gene editing activity on extrachromosomal arrays in C. elegans transgenics.

    PubMed

    Falgowski, Kerry A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2011-04-15

    Gene editing by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides is a strategy aimed at inducing single base changes into the genome, generating a permanent genetic change. The work presented here explores gene editing capabilities in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Current approaches to gene mutagenesis in C. elegans have been plagued by non-specificity and thus the ability to induce precise, directed alterations within the genome of C. elegans would offer a platform upon which structure/function analyses can be carried out. As such, several in vivo assay systems were developed to evaluate gene editing capabilities in C. elegans. Fluorescence was chosen as the selectable endpoint as fluorescence can be easily detected through the transparent worm body even from minimal expression. Two tissue specific fluorescent expression vectors containing either a GFP or mCherry transgene were mutagenized to create a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of each respective fluorescent gene. These served as the target site to evaluate the frequency of gene editing on extrachromosomal array transgenic lines. Extrachromosomal arrays can carry hundreds of copies of the transgene, therefore low frequency events (like those in the gene editing reaction) may be detected. Delivery of the oligonucleotide was accomplished by microinjection into the gonads of young adult worms in an effort to induce repair of the mutated fluorescent gene in the F1 progeny. Despite many microinjections on the transgenic strains with varying concentrations of ODNs, no gene editing events were detected. This result is consistent with the previous research, demonstrating the difficulties encountered in targeting embryonic stem cells and the pronuclei of single-celled embryos.

  1. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  2. A transgenic embryonic sexing system for Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Schetelig, Marc F; Handler, Alfred M

    2012-10-01

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a highly successful biologically-based strategy to control pest insect populations that relies on the large-scale release of sterilized males to render females in the field non-reproductive. For medfly, a mutant-based sexing system is available as well as a transgenic system where a tetracycline-suppressible (Tet-off) toxic molecule is female-specifically produced. However, the former classical genetic system took many years to refine, and the latter system results in female death by a poorly understood mechanism, primarily in the pupal stage after rearing costs have been incurred. Here we describe a Tet-off transgenic embryonic sexing system (TESS) for Anastrepha suspensa that uses a driver construct having the promoter from the embryo-specific A. suspensa serendipity α gene, linked to the Tet-transactivator. This was used to drive the expression of a phospho-mutated variant of the pro-apoptotic cell death gene, Alhid, from Anastrepha ludens. The system uses a sex-specific intron splicing cassette linked to a cell death gene lethal effector. Progeny from TESS strains heterozygous for the transgene combination were 80-100% males, whereas four double homozygous TESS strains had 100% male-only progeny, with female death limited primarily to embryogenesis. In a large-scale test, more than 30,000 eggs from two strains resulted in 100% male-only progeny. The transgenic sexing approach described here is highly effective and cost-efficient by eliminating most, if not all, female insects early in embryogenesis using a well-characterized apoptotic mechanism.

  3. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  4. 20 Years of unc-119 as a transgene marker

    PubMed Central

    Maduro, Morris F

    2015-01-01

    This fall marks 20 years since the cloning of unc-119 was reported. Despite having a strong phenotype that makes animals somewhat difficult to grow and handle, unc-119 mutant rescue has become one of the most frequently-used markers for C. elegans transformation. In this Commentary, I describe the history of how unc-119 rescue traveled through the worm community, contributing to the development of transgene methods in C. elegans. PMID:26430568

  5. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  6. Immunological Prevention of Spontaneous Mammary Carcinoma in Transgenic Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    developed more slowly by transgenic FVB Anatomia Patologica, Ospedale S.S. Annunziata, Via Valignani, 66100 female mice carrying the wild-type proto...coopted (Pezzella et al., 1997). Anatomia Patologica. Ospedale SS. Annunziata, Via Valignani, 66100 Chieti, Italy. Fax: 39 0871 330471. E-mail: musiani...lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; and Reprints: Piero Musiani, G. d’ Annunzio University of Chieti, Anatomia Department of Experimental

  7. 76 FR 15212 - Operations Specifications; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 129 RIN 2120-AJ45 Operations Specifications; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The FAA is correcting... document. DATES: The final rule and this correction will become effective on April 11, 2011. FOR...

  8. 78 FR 63100 - Unified Registration System; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... System; Correction AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: FMCSA makes corrections to its August 23, 2013, final rule regarding the Unified... Friday, August 23, 2013, the following corrections are made: Sec. 390.3 0 1. In Part 390--Federal...

  9. 76 FR 30254 - Taxpayer Assistance Orders; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... 9519] RIN 1545-BF33 Taxpayer Assistance Orders; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to final regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains a correction to final...) relating to taxpayer assistance orders. DATES: This correction is effective May 25, 2011 and...

  10. 24 CFR 1720.515 - Corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corrections. 1720.515 Section 1720... Proceedings Hearings § 1720.515 Corrections. Corrections of the official transcript ordered by the administrative law judge shall be included in the record. Corrections shall not be ordered by the...

  11. 5 CFR 1604.6 - Error correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Error correction. 1604.6 Section 1604.6... correction. (a) General rule. A service member's employing agency must correct the service member's account... corrections must be made in accordance with 5 CFR part 1605. (b) Missed bonus contributions. This paragraph...

  12. 5 CFR 1601.34 - Error correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Error correction. 1601.34 Section 1601.34... Contribution Allocations and Interfund Transfer Requests § 1601.34 Error correction. Errors in processing... in the wrong investment fund, will be corrected in accordance with the error correction...

  13. 5 CFR 1604.6 - Error correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Error correction. 1604.6 Section 1604.6... correction. (a) General rule. A service member's employing agency must correct the service member's account... corrections must be made in accordance with 5 CFR part 1605. (b) Missed bonus contributions. This paragraph...

  14. 24 CFR 1720.515 - Corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corrections. 1720.515 Section 1720... Proceedings Hearings § 1720.515 Corrections. Corrections of the official transcript ordered by the administrative law judge shall be included in the record. Corrections shall not be ordered by the...

  15. 5 CFR 1601.34 - Error correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Error correction. 1601.34 Section 1601.34... Contribution Allocations and Interfund Transfer Requests § 1601.34 Error correction. Errors in processing... in the wrong investment fund, will be corrected in accordance with the error correction...

  16. Internal Correction Of Errors In A DRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Watson, R. Kevin; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Nevill, Leland R.; Hasnain, Zille

    1989-01-01

    Error-correcting Hamming code built into circuit. A 256 K dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) circuit incorporates Hamming error-correcting code in its layout. Feature provides faster detection and correction of errors at less cost in amount of equipment, operating time, and software. On-chip error-correcting feature also makes new DRAM less susceptible to single-event upsets.

  17. 7 CFR 800.165 - Corrected certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... this process shall be corrected according to this section. (b) Who may correct. Only official personnel.... According to this section and the instructions, corrected certificates shall show (i) the terms “Corrected... that has been superseded by another certificate or on the basis of a subsequent analysis for...

  18. Transformation of pecan and regeneration of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, G H; Leslie, C A; Dandekar, A M; Uratsu, S L; Yates, I E

    1993-09-01

    A gene transfer system developed for walnut (Juglans regia L.) was successfully applied to pecan (Carya illinoensis [Wang] K. Koch). Repetitively embryogenic somatic embryos derived from open-pollinated seed of 'Elliott', 'Wichita', and 'Schley' were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium strain EHA 101/pCGN 7001, which contains marker genes for beta-glucuronidase activity and resistance to kanamycin. Several modifications of the standard walnut transformation techniques were tested, including a lower concentration of kanamycin and a modified induction medium, but these treatments had no measurable effect on efficiency of transformation. Nineteen of the 764 viable inoculated embryos produced transgenic subclones; 13 of these were from the line 'Elliott'6, 3 from 'Schley'5/3, and 3 from 'Wichita'9. Transgenic embryos of 'Wichita'9 germinated most readily and three subclones were successfully micropropagated. Three transgenic plants of one of these subclones were obtained by grafting the tissue cultured shoots to seedling pecan rootstock in the greenhouse. Gene insertion, initially detected by GUS activity, was confirmed by detection of integrated T-DNA sequences using Southern analysis.

  19. Cutaneous lymphoproliferation and lymphomas in interleukin 7 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the role of interleukin 7 (IL-7) in the development of the lymphoid system, we have generated two lines of transgenic mice carrying an IL-7 cDNA fused to an immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter and enhancer. This transgene is expressed in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, and skin provoking a perturbation of T cell development characterized by a marked reduction of CD4+ CD8+ (double- positive) thymocytes. Quite unexpectedly, however, both lines also develop a progressive cutaneous disorder involving a dermal lymphoid infiltrate that results in progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and exfoliation. Although the infiltrate is primarily composed of T lineage cells, its development is not impeded in the athymic nu/nu background. Furthermore, the phenotype can be transmitted horizontally by transplanting lymphoid tissues or skin to syngeneic wild-type mice. Thus, the phenotype is conveyed by skin-homing, mobile cells (presumably the infiltrating lymphocytes) in a cell-autonomous fashion. In addition to the skin phenotype, this transgene also provokes the development of a lymphoproliferative disorder that induces B and T cell lymphomas within the first 4 mo of life. These findings suggest potential physiologic actions of IL-7 in T cell development and in cutaneous immunity. They also demonstrate that IL-7 can act as an oncogene in the living organism. PMID:7678850

  20. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  1. Transgenic Plants Lower the Costs of Cellulosic Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion. Expression of a single gene derived from bacteria in plants has resulted in transgenic plants that are easier and cheaper to convert into biofuels. Part of the high production cost of cellulosic biofuels is the relatively poor accessibility of substrates to enzymes due to the strong associations between plant cell wall components. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have created transgenic maize expressing an active glycosyl hydrolase enzyme, E1 endoglucanase, originally isolated from a thermophilic bacterium, Acidothermus cellulolyticus. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced severity pretreatments and post-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis. This reduction in recalcitrance was manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion of wild-type biomass. The improvements observed are significant enough to positively affect the economics of the conversion process through decreased capital construction costs and decreased degradation products and inhibitor formation.

  2. Enhanced hyperplasia in muscles of transgenic zebrafish expressing Follistatin1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Nie, Fen; Yin, Zhan; He, JiangYan

    2011-02-01

    Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) super-family and functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Binding of the specific receptor, Activin receptor IIB (Act RIIB), with myostatin or other related TGF-β members, could be inhibited by the activin-binding protein follistatin (Fst) in mammals. Overexpressing Fst in mouse skeletal muscle leads to muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. To determine if Fst has similar roles in fish, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing high levels of zebrafish Fst1 using the promoter of the zebrafish skeletal muscle-specific gene, myosin, light polypeptide 2, skeletal muscle (Mylz2). Independent transgenic zebrafish lines exhibited elevated expression levels of myogenic regulatory genes MyoD and Pax7 in muscle cells. Adult Fst1 overexpressing transgenic zebrafish exhibited a slight body weight increase. The high level of Fst1 expression dramatically increased myofiber numbers in skeletal muscle, without significantly changing the fiber size. Our findings suggest that Fst1 overexpression can promote zebrafish muscle growth by enhancing myofiber hyperplasia.

  3. Transgenic rodent assay for quantifying male germ cell mutant frequency.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Gingerich, John D; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-08-06

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources.

  4. Transgenic Rodent Assay for Quantifying Male Germ Cell Mutant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Gingerich, John D.; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources. PMID:25145276

  5. [The prospects of using transgenic insects in biocontrol programs].

    PubMed

    Tkachuk, A P; Kim, M V; Savitskiĭ, V Iu; Savitskiĭ, M Iu

    2011-01-01

    Methods of biocontrol are widely used for suppression of pests and human disease vectors. One of the key methods is insects sterilization (sterile insect technique--SIT), which currently is accomplished by irradiation. Radiation-exposed insects have reduced fitness so theis competitive abilities are diminished as compared to insects from wild populations. Modern bioengineering is capable of producing transgenic insects with predetermined traits, and by now the schemes for getting sterile insects without exposure to radiation are developed. Another area of modern studies is producing insects that are unable to transmit diseases malaria, for example. In the present review the implementation and perspectives are outlined for replacement of Anopheles wild populations with transgenic mosquitos. The main way for delivering the genetic material to recipient's genome is using transposon-based constructs. The markers of transgenesis are described. The potential danger for the environment of transgenic constructs remobilization and the necessity of their stabilization within the genome are emphasized. The existing methods of stabilization which involve the deletion of transposon terminal inverted repeats are described.

  6. Using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans in soil toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, Amber L; Boyd, Windy A; Williams, Phillip L

    2005-05-01

    Soil bioassays are important tools for evaluating toxicological effects within the terrestrial environment. The American Society for Testing and Materials E2172-01 Standard Guide outlines a method for conducting laboratory soil toxicity tests using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This method is an efficient tool for extracting C. elegans from soil samples and can be carried out after a 24-h exposure period using relatively small amounts of soil. Drawbacks of this method include problems with (1) recovery of nematodes from soils containing a high percentage of organic matter, and (2) distinguishing indigenous nematode species from nematodes added for the laboratory test. Due in part to these issues, C. elegans has not been extensively accepted for use in soil testing. To address these concerns and improve upon the American Society for Testing and Materials method, this project focused on using transgenic strains of C. elegans carrying a GFP-expressing element. Lethality and behavior tests revealed that the transgenic nematodes respond similarly to the wild-type N2 strain, indicating that they can be used in the same manner in soil testing. The GFP marker is easily identifiable not only within soils containing a large amount of organic matter, but also in field-collected soils containing indigenous nematodes. These results support the use of transgenic GFP C. elegans in soil bioassays as a tool to further the reliability of laboratory toxicity tests.

  7. A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Anilkumar; Rydel, Timothy J; Wollacott, Andrew M; Brown, Robert S; Akbar, Waseem; Clark, Thomas L; Flasinski, Stanislaw; Nageotte, Jeffrey R; Read, Andrew C; Shi, Xiaohong; Werner, Brent J; Pleau, Michael J; Baum, James A

    2016-07-18

    Lygus species of plant-feeding insects have emerged as economically important pests of cotton in the United States. These species are not controlled by commercial Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton varieties resulting in economic losses and increased application of insecticide. Previously, a Bt crystal protein (Cry51Aa2) was reported with insecticidal activity against Lygus spp. However, transgenic cotton plants expressing this protein did not exhibit effective protection from Lygus feeding damage. Here we employ various optimization strategies, informed in part by protein crystallography and modelling, to identify limited amino-acid substitutions in Cry51Aa2 that increase insecticidal activity towards Lygus spp. by >200-fold. Transgenic cotton expressing the variant protein, Cry51Aa2.834_16, reduce populations of Lygus spp. up to 30-fold in whole-plant caged field trials. One transgenic event, designated MON88702, has been selected for further development of cotton varieties that could potentially reduce or eliminate insecticide application for control of Lygus and the associated environmental impacts.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260

  9. A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Anilkumar; Rydel, Timothy J.; Wollacott, Andrew M.; Brown, Robert S.; Akbar, Waseem; Clark, Thomas L.; Flasinski, Stanislaw; Nageotte, Jeffrey R.; Read, Andrew C.; Shi, Xiaohong; Werner, Brent J.; Pleau, Michael J.; Baum, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Lygus species of plant-feeding insects have emerged as economically important pests of cotton in the United States. These species are not controlled by commercial Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton varieties resulting in economic losses and increased application of insecticide. Previously, a Bt crystal protein (Cry51Aa2) was reported with insecticidal activity against Lygus spp. However, transgenic cotton plants expressing this protein did not exhibit effective protection from Lygus feeding damage. Here we employ various optimization strategies, informed in part by protein crystallography and modelling, to identify limited amino-acid substitutions in Cry51Aa2 that increase insecticidal activity towards Lygus spp. by >200-fold. Transgenic cotton expressing the variant protein, Cry51Aa2.834_16, reduce populations of Lygus spp. up to 30-fold in whole-plant caged field trials. One transgenic event, designated MON88702, has been selected for further development of cotton varieties that could potentially reduce or eliminate insecticide application for control of Lygus and the associated environmental impacts. PMID:27426014

  10. The production of recombinant proteins in transgenic barley grains.

    PubMed

    Horvath, H; Huang, J; Wong, O; Kohl, E; Okita, T; Kannangara, C G; von Wettstein, D

    2000-02-15

    The grain of the self-pollinating diploid barley species offers two modes of producing recombinant enzymes or other proteins. One uses the promoters of genes with aleurone-specific expression during germination and the signal peptide code for export of the protein into the endosperm. The other uses promoters of the structural genes for storage proteins deposited in the developing endosperm. Production of a protein-engineered thermotolerant (1, 3-1, 4)-beta-glucanase with the D hordein gene (Hor3-1) promoter during endosperm development was analyzed in transgenic plants with four different constructs. High expression of the enzyme and its activity in the endosperm of the mature grain required codon optimization to a C+G content of 63% and synthesis as a precursor with a signal peptide for transport through the endoplasmic reticulum and targeting into the storage vacuoles. Synthesis of the recombinant enzyme in the aleurone of germinating transgenic grain with an alpha-amylase promoter and the code for the export signal peptide yielded approximately 1 microgram small middle dotmg(-1) soluble protein, whereas 54 microgram small middle dotmg(-1) soluble protein was produced on average in the maturing grain of 10 transgenic lines with the vector containing the gene for the (1, 3-1, 4)-beta-glucanase under the control of the Hor3-1 promoter.

  11. [Implications of transgenics for environmental and agricultural sustainability].

    PubMed

    Nodari, R O; Guerra, M P

    2000-01-01

    The potential risks of GMOs, their impact on human and animal health, and on the environment, as well as their socioeconomic effects, have generated a worldwide discussion which is far from drawing to a close for lack of sufficient information. Part of this information supports risk-hypotheses previously put forward. Thus the presence of transgenic plant genes in other plants and in other organisms has been confirmed in several occasions. Therefore, gene dissemination to plants of the same species as well as to widely different species is already regarded as an actual risk. The principle of substantial equivalence has opened the way for the liberation of transgenic plants for commercial crops, despite short-term tests, which are quantitatively and qualitatively insufficient to certify that the foods deriving from those plants are healthy and safe. Thus, the adoption of the so-called precautionary principle (PP) has turned out to be the most adequate safety measure to date, or else until scientific data should be able to demonstrate the actual impact of transgenic plants on human and animal health, and on the environment.

  12. Restriction of transgene expression to the B-lymphoid progeny of human lentivirally transduced CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Bardin, Florence; Imbert, Jean; Chabannon, Christian; Tonnelle, Cécile

    2004-07-01

    Development of gene transfer strategies will necessitate improved efficiency and control of transduction and transgene expression. We here provide evidence that targeting expression of the GFP reporter gene to the B-lymphoid progeny of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells can be achieved through the insertion of regulatory sequences from the human CD19 gene promoter into a lentiviral vector. Based on a bioinformatics approach, three human CD19-derived sequences were designed and inserted into a self-inactivated lentiviral vector backbone upstream of the GFP gene: S.CD19 (230 bp), M.CD19 (464 bp), and L.CD19 (1274 bp). These new lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced cord blood CD34(+) cells. The M.CD19 and especially L.CD19 sequences preferentially targeted GFP expression to in vitro and in vivo differentiated CD19(+) progeny; moreover, transgene expression was detected from the CD34(+) pro/pre-B cell to the mature peripheral IgM(+) B cell stage. In contrast, GFP expression was weak or absent in primary T-lymphoid and uncommitted progenitor cells or in erythroid, natural killer, or myeloid differentiated cells. Such B-lineage-specific lentiviral vectors may be useful for correcting inherited disorders that affect B-lymphoid cells or for deciphering the transcriptional program that controls B cell commitment and differentiation.

  13. Comparative nutritional compositions and proteomics analysis of transgenic Xa21 rice seeds compared to conventional rice.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Dipak; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-07-15

    Transgenic rice expressing the Xa21 gene have enhanced resistant to most devastating bacterial blight diseases caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). However, identification of unintended modifications, owing to the genetic modification, is an important aspect of transgenic crop safety assessment. In this study, the nutritional compositions of seeds from transgenic rice plants expressing the Xa21 gene were compared against non-transgenic rice seeds. In addition, to detect any changes in protein translation levels as a result of Xa21 gene expression, rice seed proteome analyses were also performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No significant differences were found in the nutritional compositions (proximate components, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and anti-nutrients) of the transgenic and non-transgenic rice seeds. Although gel electrophoresis identified 11 proteins that were differentially expressed between the transgenic and non-transgenic seed, only one of these (with a 20-fold up-regulation in the transgenic seed) shows nutrient reservoir activity. No new toxins or allergens were detected in the transgenic seeds.

  14. Transcriptionally Silenced Transgenes in Maize Are Activated by Three Mutations Defective in Paramutation

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Karen M.; Springer, Catherine; Lin, Yan; Carey, Charles C.; Chandler, Vicki

    2006-01-01

    Plants with mutations in one of three maize genes, mop1, rmr1, and rmr2, are defective in paramutation, an allele-specific interaction that leads to meiotically heritable chromatin changes. Experiments reported here demonstrate that these genes are required to maintain the transcriptional silencing of two different transgenes, suggesting that paramutation and transcriptional silencing of transgenes share mechanisms. We hypothesize that the transgenes are silenced through an RNA-directed chromatin mechanism, because mop1 encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In all the mutants, DNA methylation was reduced in the active transgenes relative to the silent transgenes at all of the CNG sites monitored within the transgene promoter. However, asymmetrical methylation persisted at one site within the reactivated transgene in the rmr1-1 mutant. With that one mutant, rmr1-1, the transgene was efficiently resilenced upon outcrossing to reintroduce the wild-type protein. In contrast, with the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutants, the transgene remained active in a subset of progeny even after the wild-type proteins were reintroduced by outcrossing. Interestingly, this immunity to silencing increased as the generations progressed, consistent with a heritable chromatin state being formed at the transgene in plants carrying the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutations that becomes more resistant to silencing in subsequent generations. PMID:16702420

  15. Absence of detectable transgenes in local landraces of maize in Oaxaca, Mexico (2003-2004).

    PubMed

    Ortiz-García, S; Ezcurra, E; Schoel, B; Acevedo, F; Soberón, J; Snow, A A

    2005-08-30

    In 2000, transgenes were detected in local maize varieties (landraces) in the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico [Quist, D. & Chapela, I. H. (2001) Nature 414, 541-543]. This region is part of the Mesoamerican center of origin for maize (Zea mays L.), and the genetic diversity that is maintained in open-pollinated landraces is recognized as an important genetic resource of great cultural value. The presence of transgenes in landraces was significant because transgenic maize has never been approved for cultivation in Mexico. Here we provide a systematic survey of the frequency of transgenes in currently grown landraces. We sampled maize seeds from 870 plants in 125 fields and 18 localities in the state of Oaxaca during 2003 and 2004. We then screened 153,746 sampled seeds for the presence of two transgene elements from the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus and the nopaline synthase gene (nopaline synthase terminator) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. One or both of these transgene elements are present in all transgenic commercial varieties of maize. No transgenic sequences were detected with highly sensitive PCR-based markers, appropriate positive and negative controls, and duplicate samples for DNA extraction. We conclude that transgenic maize seeds were absent or extremely rare in the sampled fields. This study provides a much-needed preliminary baseline for understanding the biological, socioeconomic, and ethical implications of the inadvertent dispersal of transgenes from the United States and elsewhere to local landraces of maize in Mexico.

  16. [Enhancement of artemisinin biosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. by overexpressed HDR and ADS genes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Xiong; Long, Shi-Ping; Zeng, Li-Xia; Xiang, Li-En; Lin, Zhi; Chen, Min; Liao, Zhi-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Artemisnin is a novel sesquiterpene lactone with an internal peroxide bridge structure, which is extracted from traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L. (Qinghao). Recommended by World Health Organization, artemisinin is the first-line drug in the treatment of encephalic and chloroquine-resistant malaria. In the present study, transgenic A. annua plants were developed by overexpressing the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin. Based on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods, transgenic plants of A. annua with overexpression of both HDR and ADS were obtained through hygromycin screening. The genomic PCR analysis confirmed six transgenic lines in which both HDR and ADS were integrated into genome. The gene expression analysis given by real-time quantitative PCR showed that all the transgenic lines had higher expression levels of HDR and ADS than the non-transgenic control (except ah3 in which the expression level of ADS showed no significant difference compared with control); and the HPLC analysis of artemisinin demonstrated that transgenic A. annua plants produced artemisinin at significantly higher level than non-transgenic plants. Especially, the highest content of artemisinin was found in transgenic line ah70, in which the artemisinin content was 3.48 times compared with that in non-transgenic lines. In summary, overexpression of HDR and ADS facilitated artemisinin biosynthesis and this method could be applied to develop transgenic plants of A. annua with higher yield of artemisinin.

  17. Estimation of transgene copy number in transformed citrus plants by quantitative multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmad A; Dekkers, Marty G H; Graham, James H; Grosser, Jude W

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was adapted to estimate transgene copy number of the rice Xa21 gene in transgenic citrus plants. This system used TaqMan qRT-PCR and the endogenous citrus gene encoding for lipid transfer protein (LTP). Transgenic "Hamlin" sweet orange plants were generated using two different protoplast-GFP transformation systems: cotransformation and single plasmid transformation. A dilution series of genomic DNA from one of the transgenic lines was used to generate a standard curve for the endogenous LTP and the transgene Xa21. This standard curve was used for relative quantification of the endogenous gene and the transgene. Copy numbers of the transgene Xa21 detected from qRT-PCR analysis correlated with that from Southern blot analysis (r = 0.834). Thus, qRT-PCR is an efficient means of estimating copy number in transgenic citrus plants. This analysis can be performed at much earlier stages of transgenic plant development than southern blot analysis, which expedites investigation of transgenes in slow-growing woody plants.

  18. Absence of detectable transgenes in local landraces of maize in Oaxaca, Mexico (2003–2004)

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-García, S.; Ezcurra, E.; Schoel, B.; Acevedo, F.; Soberón, J.; Snow, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, transgenes were detected in local maize varieties (landraces) in the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico [Quist, D. & Chapela, I. H. (2001) Nature 414, 541–543]. This region is part of the Mesoamerican center of origin for maize (Zea mays L.), and the genetic diversity that is maintained in open-pollinated landraces is recognized as an important genetic resource of great cultural value. The presence of transgenes in landraces was significant because transgenic maize has never been approved for cultivation in Mexico. Here we provide a systematic survey of the frequency of transgenes in currently grown landraces. We sampled maize seeds from 870 plants in 125 fields and 18 localities in the state of Oaxaca during 2003 and 2004. We then screened 153,746 sampled seeds for the presence of two transgene elements from the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus and the nopaline synthase gene (nopaline synthase terminator) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. One or both of these transgene elements are present in all transgenic commercial varieties of maize. No transgenic sequences were detected with highly sensitive PCR-based markers, appropriate positive and negative controls, and duplicate samples for DNA extraction. We conclude that transgenic maize seeds were absent or extremely rare in the sampled fields. This study provides a much-needed preliminary baseline for understanding the biological, socioeconomic, and ethical implications of the inadvertent dispersal of transgenes from the United States and elsewhere to local landraces of maize in Mexico. PMID:16093316

  19. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants: regulation and biosafety concern.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Verma, Shiv; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Raveendar, Sebastian; Reddy, I N Bheema Lingeshwara

    2012-03-01

    During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically valuable genes into crop plants. From the biosafety authority and consumer viewpoints, the presence of selectable marker genes in released transgenic crops may be transferred to weeds or pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract or soil, making them resistant to treatment with herbicides or antibiotics, respectively. Sexual crossing also raises the problem of transgene expression because redundancy of transgenes in the genome may trigger homology-dependent gene silencing. The future potential of transgenic technologies for crop improvement depends greatly on our abilities to engineer stable expression of multiple transgenic traits in a predictable fashion and to prevent the transfer of undesirable transgenic material to non-transgenic crops and related species. Therefore, it is now essential to develop an efficient marker-free transgenic system. These considerations underline the development of various approaches designed to facilitate timely elimination of transgenes when their function is no longer needed. Due to the limiting number of available selectable marker genes, in future the stacking of transgenes will be increasingly desirable. The production of marker-free transgenic plants is now a critical requisite for their commercial deployment and also for engineering multiple and complex trait. Here we describe the current technologies to eliminate the selectable marker genes (SMG) in order to develop marker-free transgenic plants and also discuss the regulation and biosafety concern of genetically modified (GM) crops.

  20. Comparative analysis of nutritional compositions of transgenic RNAi-mediated virus-resistant bean (event EMB-PV051-1) with its non-transgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, José L V; de Oliveira Santos, Juliana; Conte, Carmine; Pacheco, Sidney; Nogueira, Elsa O P L; Souza, Thiago L P O; Faria, Josias C; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2015-10-01

    Golden mosaic is among the most economically important diseases that severely reduce bean production in Latin America. In 2011, a transgenic bean event named Embrapa 5.1 (EMB-PV051-1), resistant to bean golden mosaic virus, was approved for commercial release in Brazil. The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate the nutritional components of the beans, as well as the anti-nutrient levels in the primary transgenic line and its derived near-isogenic lines after crosses and backcrosses with two commercial cultivars. Nutritional assessment of transgenic crops used for human consumption is an important aspect of safety evaluations. Results demonstrated that the transgenic bean event, cultivated under field conditions, was substantially equivalent to that of the non-transgenic bean plants. In addition, the amounts of the nutritional components are within the range of values observed for several bean commercial varieties grown across a range of environments and seasons.

  1. Effect of maternal aging on transgene heritability in transgenic founder mice derived from zygotes microinjected with retroviral long terminal repeat-containing recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, T H; Yang, W K; Hoyt, P R; Ch'ang, L Y; Savin, T J

    1993-05-01

    To determine the stability of artificially introduced recombinant DNA in the mouse germline throughout the reproductive life, founder mice derived from fertilized eggs injected with retroviral long-terminal-repeat-containing recombinant DNAs were mated with congenic FVB/N mice. Tail DNA of all progeny were screened and restriction fragment patterns of the transgenes were examined. Litter size and percentage of transgene transmission at various reproductive age periods were analyzed. Microinjection of 1737 eggs with four different recombinant DNAs resulted in 12 female and 11 male transgenic mice; 2 males were sterile and the remaining 21 mice served as founders to produce 1087 F1 progeny. With increasing parental age, litter size decreased generally. The percentage of progeny inheriting the transgenes declined markedly with increasing aging of 4 female founders; this aging effect was not observed in male founders (p < 0.005). No apparent change in transgenes was detected in progeny from late reproductive stages.

  2. The Mathematical Structure of Error Correction Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    The error correction model for a vector valued time series has been proposed and applied in the economic literature with the papers by Sargan (1964...the notion of cointegratedness of a vector process and showed the relation between cointegration and error correction models. This paper defines a...general error correction model, that encompasses the usual error correction model as well as the integral correction model by allowing a finite number of

  3. MR image intensity inhomogeneity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Vişan Pungǎ, Mirela; Moldovanu, Simona; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-01-01

    MR technology is one of the best and most reliable ways of studying the brain. Its main drawback is the so-called intensity inhomogeneity or bias field which impairs the visual inspection and the medical proceedings for diagnosis and strongly affects the quantitative image analysis. Noise is yet another artifact in medical images. In order to accurately and effectively restore the original signal, reference is hereof made to filtering, bias correction and quantitative analysis of correction. In this report, two denoising algorithms are used; (i) Basis rotation fields of experts (BRFoE) and (ii) Anisotropic Diffusion (when Gaussian noise, the Perona-Malik and Tukey's biweight functions and the standard deviation of the noise of the input image are considered).

  4. Corrected body surface potential mapping.

    PubMed

    Krenzke, Gerhard; Kindt, Carsten; Hetzer, Roland

    2007-02-01

    In the method for body surface potential mapping described here, the influence of thorax shape on measured ECG values is corrected. The distances of the ECG electrodes from the electrical heart midpoint are determined using a special device for ECG recording. These distances are used to correct the ECG values as if they had been measured on the surface of a sphere with a radius of 10 cm with its midpoint localized at the electrical heart midpoint. The equipotential lines of the electrical heart field are represented on the virtual surface of such a sphere. It is demonstrated that the character of a dipole field is better represented if the influence of the thorax shape is reduced. The site of the virtual reference electrode is also important for the dipole character of the representation of the electrical heart field.

  5. Trajectory correction propulsion for TOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, H. R.; Bjorklund, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A blowdown-pressurized hydrazine propulsion system was selected to provide trajectory correction impulse for outer planet flyby spacecraft as the result of cost/mass/reliability tradeoff analyses. Present hydrazine component and system technology and component designs were evaluated for application to the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS); while general hydrazine technology was adequate, component design changes were deemed necessary for TOPS-type missions. A prototype hydrazine propulsion system was fabricated and fired nine times for a total of 1600 s to demonstrate the operation and performance of the TOPS propulsion configuration. A flight-weight trajectory correction propulsion subsystem (TCPS) was designed for the TOPS based on actual and estimated advanced components.

  6. Interaction and self-correction

    PubMed Central

    Satne, Glenda L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I address the question of how to account for the normative dimension involved in conceptual competence in a naturalistic framework. First, I present what I call the naturalist challenge (NC), referring to both the phylogenetic and ontogenetic dimensions of conceptual possession and acquisition. I then criticize two models that have been dominant in thinking about conceptual competence, the interpretationist and the causalist models. Both fail to meet NC, by failing to account for the abilities involved in conceptual self-correction. I then offer an alternative account of self-correction that I develop with the help of the interactionist theory of mutual understanding arising from recent developments in phenomenology and developmental psychology. PMID:25101044

  7. Surgical correction of "rhinoplastic look".

    PubMed

    Sciuto, S; Bianco, N

    2013-06-01

    A pointed, narrow and exaggeratedly upturned nasal tip and concave dorsal profile can give the nose an unnatural and artificial appearance that is the unmistakable hallmark of plastic surgery. As a result of changes in social attitudes, noses that have evidently been operated on are no longer acceptable and requests are made for correction. While a more natural dorsal profile can be obtained with camouflage grafts of autologous cartilage or alloplastic material (EPTFE), autologous grafts alone are used to reconstruct the tip. The most complex correction regards an obtuse nasolabial angle, for which the extension graft technique is used. Particular care must be taken during preoperative planning, where the aid of computer simulation and agreement with the patient are essential.

  8. Entropic corrections to Friedmann equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-05-15

    Recently, Verlinde discussed that gravity can be understood as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. In Verlinde's argument, the area law of the black hole entropy plays a crucial role. However, the entropy-area relation can be modified from the inclusion of quantum effects, motivated from the loop quantum gravity. In this note, by employing this modified entropy-area relation, we derive corrections to Newton's law of gravitation as well as modified Friedmann equations by adopting the viewpoint that gravity can be emerged as an entropic force. Our study further supports the universality of the log correction and provides a strong consistency check on Verlinde's model.

  9. Lightweight Specifications for Parallel Correctness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-05

    this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204... George Necula Professor David Wessel Fall 2012 1 Abstract Lightweight Specifications for Parallel Correctness by Jacob Samuels Burnim Doctor of Philosophy...enthusiasm and endless flow of ideas, and for his keen research sense. I would also like to thank George Necula for chairing my qualifying exam committee and

  10. Dark energy from gravitational corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yugo; Horikoshi, Masaatsu; Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-01

    We study physics concerning the cosmological constant problem in the framework of effective field theory and suggest that a dominant part of dark energy can originate from gravitational corrections of vacuum energy, under the assumption that the classical gravitational fields do not couple to a large portion of the vacuum energy effectively, in spite of the coupling between graviton and matters at a microscopic level. Our speculation is excellent with terascale supersymmetry.

  11. Corrective osteotomies in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Gill, J Brian; Levin, Andrew; Burd, Tim; Longley, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Spinal deformities can result in increasing thoracic kyphosis or loss of lumbar lordosis, leading to imbalance in the sagittal plane. Such deformities can be functionally and psychologically debilitating. The Smith-Petersen osteotomy can achieve approximately 10 degrees of correction in the sagittal plane at each spinal level at which it is performed. This osteotomy is beneficial for patients who have a degenerative imbalance in the sagittal plane. The pedicle subtraction osteotomy can achieve approximately 30 degrees to 40 degrees of correction in the sagittal plane at each spinal level at which it is performed. It is the preferred osteotomy for patients with ankylosing spondylitis who have an imbalance of the spine in the sagittal plane. The cervical extension osteotomy is performed in the cervical spine, at the cervicothoracic junction, in patients who have a cervical flexion deformity that impedes their ability to look straight ahead while walking or who have difficulty swallowing. The vertebral column resection is used when the imbalance is severe enough that the other osteotomies cannot correct the deformity, especially in patients who have a combined sagittal and coronal spinal imbalance. Neurologic problems, whether transient or permanent, are the most commonly encountered complications following these procedures. Recent results have shown a high patient satisfaction rate and good functional outcomes after spinal osteotomies done to treat a variety of disorders.

  12. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ℏ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that since the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ℏ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  13. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-12-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ħ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that as the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ħ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  14. Analysis of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harboring a maize (Zea mays L.) gene for plastid EF-Tu: segregation pattern, expression and effects of the transgene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Ristic, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) carrying a maize (Zea mays L.) gene (Zmeftu1) for chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, displays reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation following exposure to heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C) [Fu et al. in Plant Mol Biol 68:277-288, 2008]. In the current study, we investigated the segregation pattern and expression of the transgene Zmeftu1 and determined the grain yield of transgenic plants after exposure to a brief heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C). We also assessed thermal aggregation of soluble leaf proteins in transgenic plants, testing the hypothesis that increased levels of EF-Tu will lead to a non-specific protection of leaf proteins against thermal aggregation. The transgenic wheat displayed a single-gene pattern of segregation of Zmeftu1. Zmeftu1 was expressed, and the transgenic plants synthesized and accumulated three anti-EF-Tu cross-reacting polypeptides of similar molecular mass but different pI, suggesting the possibility of posttranslational modification of this protein. The transgenic plants also showed better grain yield after exposure to heat stress compared with their non-transgenic counterparts. Soluble leaf proteins of various molecular masses displayed lower thermal aggregation in transgenic than in non-transgenic wheat. The results suggest that overexpression of chloroplast EF-Tu can be beneficial to wheat tolerance to heat stress. Moreover, the results also support the hypothesis that EF-Tu contributes to heat tolerance by acting as a molecular chaperone and protecting heat-labile proteins from thermal aggregation in a non-specific manner.

  15. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  16. Transgenic plants for enhanced biodegradation and phytoremediation of organic xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, P C; Jamil, Sarah; Singh, Nandita

    2009-01-01

    Phytoremediation--the use of plants to clean up polluted soil and water resources--has received much attention in the last few years. Although plants have the inherent ability to detoxify xenobiotics, they generally lack the catabolic pathway for the complete degradation of these compounds compared to microorganisms. There are also concerns over the potential for the introduction of contaminants into the food chain. The question of how to dispose of plants that accumulate xenobiotics is also a serious concern. Hence the feasibility of phytoremediation as an approach to remediate environmental contamination is still somewhat in question. For these reasons, researchers have endeavored to engineer plants with genes that can bestow superior degradation abilities. A direct method for enhancing the efficacy of phytoremediation is to overexpress in plants the genes involved in metabolism, uptake, or transport of specific pollutants. Furthermore, the expression of suitable genes in root system enhances the rhizodegradation of highly recalcitrant compounds like PAHs, PCBs etc. Hence, the idea to amplify plant biodegradation of xenobiotics by genetic manipulation was developed, following a strategy similar to that used to develop transgenic crops. Genes from human, microbes, plants, and animals are being used successfully for this venture. The introduction of these genes can be readily achieved for many plant species using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation or direct DNA methods of gene transfer. One of the promising developments in transgenic technology is the insertion of multiple genes (for phase 1 metabolism (cytochrome P450s) and phase 2 metabolism (GSH, GT etc.) for the complete degradation of the xenobiotics within the plant system. In addition to the use of transgenic plants overexpressed with P450 and GST genes, various transgenic plants expressing bacterial genes can be used for the enhanced degradation and remediation of herbicides, explosives

  17. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of young adult CBY/B6 nude mouse hosts to determine whether the bipolar, migration- dependent differentiation pathways of gut epithelial cells can be established and maintained in the absence of its normal luminal environment. Immunocytochemical analysis of isografts harvested 4-6 wk after implantation revealed that activation of the intact endogenous mouse L-FABP gene (fabpl) in differentiating enterocytes is perfectly recapitulated as these cells are translocated along the crypt-to-villus axis. Similarly, Paneth and goblet cells appear to appropriately differentiate as they migrate to the crypt base and villus tip, respectively. The enteroendocrine cell subpopulations present in intact 4-6-wk-old jejunum are represented in these isografts. Their precise spatial distribution along the crypt-to-villus axis mimics that seen in the intact gut. A number of complex interrelationships between enteroendocrine subpopulations are also recapitulated. In both "intact" and isografted jejunum, nucleotides -596 to +21 of the rat L-FABP gene were sufficient to direct efficient expression of the hGH reporter to enterocytes although precocious expression of the transgene occurred in cells located in the upper crypt, before their translocation to the villus base. Inappropriate expression of hGH occurred in a high percentage (greater than 80%) of secretin, gastrin, cholecystokinin, and gastric inhibitory peptide producing enteroendocrine cells present

  18. Bias correction with Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canter, Martin; Barth, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this work, we aim at developping a new method of bias correction using data assimilation. This method is based on the stochastic forcing of a model to correct bias. First, through a preliminary run, we estimate the bias of the model and its possible sources. Then, we establish a forcing term which is directly added inside the model's equations. We create an ensemble of runs and consider the forcing term as a control variable during the assimilation of observations. We then use this analysed forcing term to correct the bias of the model. Since the forcing is added inside the model, it acts as a source term, unlike external forcings such as wind. This procedure has been developed and successfully tested with a twin experiment on a Lorenz 95 model. Indeed, we were able to estimate and recover an artificial bias that had been added into the model. This bias had a spatial structure and was constant through time. The mean and behaviour of the corrected model corresponded to those the reference model. It is currently being applied and tested on the sea ice ocean NEMO LIM model, which is used in the PredAntar project. NEMO LIM is a global and low resolution (2 degrees) coupled model (hydrodynamic model and sea ice model) with long time steps allowing simulations over several decades. Due to its low resolution, the model is subject to bias in area where strong currents are present. We aim at correcting this bias by using perturbed current fields from higher resolution models and randomly generated perturbations. The random perturbations need to be constrained in order to respect the physical properties of the ocean, and not create unwanted phenomena. To construct those random perturbations, we first create a random field with the Diva tool (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis). Using a cost function, this tool penalizes abrupt variations in the field, while using a custom correlation length. It also decouples disconnected areas based on topography. Then, we filter

  19. A novel THz spectroscopy recognition method for transgenic organisms based on APSO combined with SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. J.; Liu, J. J.; Shao, G. F.; Fan, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the transgenic products detection methods are mostly based on visible/near-infrared light spectrum. In addition, it is hard to set up the parameters in the support vector machine (SVM) model and there is a large amount of calculation on spectrum data. To solve these problems, this paper proposed an algorithm based on terahertz (THz) spectrum and SVM using adaptive particle swarm optimize (APSO-SVM) for building up the classifications of transgenic cotton seed. To conduct the transgenic cotton seed classification, within the wavelength region 150 μm—3 mm, the THz spectrums are first sampled from 165 samples of three newest transgenic cotton seeds. Then, the 165 transgenic cotton seeds are recognized based on the APSO-SVM. Experiment results indicate that the total recognition rate is up to 97.3%, which prove that the THz spectrum combined with APSO-SVM can provide a reliable, rapid, simple and nondestructive detection method for transgenic cotton seed.

  20. Expression of the Nicotiana protein kinase (NPK1) enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Shou, Huixia; Bordallo, Patricia; Wang, Kan

    2004-05-01

    Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting the productivity of maize. Previous studies have shown that expression of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene activated an oxidative signal cascade and led to the tolerance of freezing, heat, and salinity stress in transgenic tobacco. To analyse the role of activation of oxidative stress signalling in improving drought tolerance in major crops, a tobacco MAPKKK (NPK1) was expressed constitutively in maize. Results show that NPK1 expression enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize. Under drought conditions, transgenic maize plants maintained significantly higher photosynthesis rates than did the non-transgenic control, suggesting that NPK1 induced a mechanism that protected photosynthesis machinery from dehydration damage. In addition, drought-stressed transgenic plants produced kernels with weights similar to those under well-watered conditions, while kernel weights of drought-stressed non-transgenic control plants were significantly reduced when compared with their non-stressed counterparts.

  1. Pyramiding transgenic resistance in elite indica rice cultivars against the sheath blight and bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Maruthasalam, S; Kalpana, K; Kumar, K K; Loganathan, M; Poovannan, K; Raja, J A J; Kokiladevi, E; Samiyappan, R; Sudhakar, D; Balasubramanian, P

    2007-06-01

    Elite indica rice cultivars were cotransformed with genes expressing a rice chitinase (chi11) and a thaumatin-like protein (tlp) conferring resistance to fungal pathogens and a serine-threonine kinase (Xa21) conferring bacterial blight resistance, through particle bombardment, with a view to pyramiding sheath blight and bacterial blight resistance. Molecular analyses of putative transgenic lines by polymerase chain reaction, Southern Blot hybridization, and Western Blotting revealed stable integration and expression of the transgenes in a few independent transgenic lines. Progeny analyses showed the stable inheritance of transgenes to their progeny. Coexpression of chitinase and thaumatin-like protein in the progenies of a transgenic Pusa Basmati1 line revealed an enhanced resistance to the sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani, as compared to that in the lines expressing the individual genes. A transgenic Pusa Basmati1 line pyramided with chi11, tlp, and Xa21 showed an enhanced resistance to both sheath blight and bacterial blight.

  2. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria [New York, NY; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A [Santiago, CL; Nero, Damion C [Woodside, NY

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  3. Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I transgenic tobacco leaves and calli

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu ); Hooker, Brian S. ); Quesenberry, Ryan D. ); Gao, Jianwei

    1998-12-01

    Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) gene in transgenic tobacco was under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. In transgenic leaf tissues, CBHI activity up to 66.1 mmol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein was observed. In transgenic calli, the highest CBHI activity was 83.6 umol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein. Protein immunoblot analysis confirms the presence of CBHI enzyme in both transgenic calli and leaf tissues. CBHI expression levels accounted for about 0.11% and 0.082% of total protein in transgenic leaf tissues and calli, respectively. Furthermore, expression of CBHI gene did not affect normal growth and development of transgenic plants.

  4. Real-time immuno-PCR: an approach for detection of trace amounts of transgenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-01-01

    The research on manipulation of crop genomes for transgenic development is continuously increasing due to several benefits. The major concerns linked to the effect of transgenic crops are human health and environment sustainability. To monitor transgenic samples in the food chain, several highly sensitive and specific DNA-based and protein-based detection methods are being used. However, real- time immunio-PCR (RT-IPCR) assay would be able to provide a sensitive detection of trace amounts of transgenic proteins or allergens in the samples and help in monitoring these materials. In the present study, we developed a novel RT-IPCR method to monitor CrylAc transgenic protein in samples with an LOD of 100 pg/mL. The assay may also be useful in the evaluation of functional stability of transgenes inserted in the plant genome.

  5. [Gene flow and its ecological risks of transgenic oilseed rape ( Brassica napus)].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guixiang; Song, Wenjian; Zhou, Weijun

    2005-12-01

    Transgenic oilseed rape Brassica napus, one of the first genetically modified crops, has now been released to commercial use in Canada and Australia. As a cross-pollinating crop, its natural crossing rate is 30%, and it is liable to cross with other Brassica species. The ecological risk of transgenic oilseed rape has been concerned by the scientists all over the world. There are two ways for the pollens flow of transgenic oilseed rape, one takes place between transgenic oilseed rape and other related wild species, and the other occurs between transgenic and nontransgenic oilseed rape. The gene may flow to other related wild species, but it is unlikely to get hybrids in field. Because the gene can really flow to the conventional oilseed rape, it is necessary to have a sufficient isolation distance in cultivating transgenic oilseed rape.

  6. Production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative in transgenic tobacco plants and suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Helga; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Soeur, Raphael; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    Thrombomodulin is a membrane-bound protein that plays an active role in the blood coagulation system by binding thrombin and initiating the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Solulin is a recombinant soluble derivative of human thrombomodulin. It is used for the treatment of thrombotic disorders. To evaluate the production of this pharmaceutical protein in plants, expression vectors were generated using four different N-terminal signal peptides. Immunoblot analysis of transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that intact Solulin could be detected using three of these signal peptides. Furthermore transgenic tobacco plants and BY2 cells producing Solulin were generated. Immunoblot experiments showed that Solulin accumulated to maximum levels of 115 and 27 microg g(-1) plant material in tobacco plants and BY2 cells, respectively. Activity tests performed on the culture supernatant of transformed BY2 cells showed that the secreted Solulin was functional. In contrast, thrombomodulin activity was not detected in total soluble protein extracts from BY2 cells, probably due to inhibitory effects of substances in the cell extract. N-terminal sequencing was carried out on partially purified Solulin from the BY2 culture supernatant. The sequence was identical to that of Solulin produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, confirming correct processing of the N-terminal signal peptide. We have demonstrated that plants and plant cell cultures can be used as alternative systems for the production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative.

  7. Intravenous Administration of Self-complementary AAV9 Enables Transgene Delivery to Adult Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Sandra; Joussemet, Béatrice; Riviere, Christel; Marais, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Douar, Anne-Marie; Fyfe, John; Moullier, Philippe; Colle, Marie-Anne; Barkats, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic gene delivery to the whole spinal cord is a major challenge for the treatment of motor neuron (MN) diseases. Systemic administration of viral gene vectors would provide an optimal means for the long-term delivery of therapeutic molecules from blood to the spinal cord but this approach is hindered by the presence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Here, we describe the first successful study of MN transduction in adult animals following intravenous (i.v.) delivery of self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors (up to 28% in mice). Intravenous MN transduction was achieved in adults without pharmacological disruption of the BBB and transgene expression lasted at least 5 months. Importantly, this finding was successfully translated to large animals, with the demonstration of an efficient systemic scAAV9 gene delivery to the neonate and adult cat spinal cord. This new and noninvasive procedure raises the hope of whole spinal cord correction of MN diseases and may lead to the development of new gene therapy protocols in patients. PMID:19367261

  8. Assessing compositional variability through graphical analysis and Bayesian statistical approaches: case studies on transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, George G; Harrison, Jay M

    2012-01-01

    New transgenic (GM) crops are subjected to extensive safety assessments that include compositional comparisons with conventional counterparts as a cornerstone of the process. The influence of germplasm, location, environment, and agronomic treatments on compositional variability is, however, often obscured in these pair-wise comparisons. Furthermore, classical statistical significance testing can often provide an incomplete and over-simplified summary of highly responsive variables such as crop composition. In order to more clearly describe the influence of the numerous sources of compositional variation we present an introduction to two alternative but complementary approaches to data analysis and interpretation. These include i) exploratory data analysis (EDA) with its emphasis on visualization and graphics-based approaches and ii) Bayesian statistical methodology that provides easily interpretable and meaningful evaluations of data in terms of probability distributions. The EDA case-studies include analyses of herbicide-tolerant GM soybean and insect-protected GM maize and soybean. Bayesian approaches are presented in an analysis of herbicide-tolerant GM soybean. Advantages of these approaches over classical frequentist significance testing include the more direct interpretation of results in terms of probabilities pertaining to quantities of interest and no confusion over the application of corrections for multiple comparisons. It is concluded that a standardized framework for these methodologies could provide specific advantages through enhanced clarity of presentation and interpretation in comparative assessments of crop composition.

  9. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  10. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSEs Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    high scrapie susceptibility genotype VVRRQQ. All three lines of the mouse transgenics carrying sheep, human, and elk PrP have been now re-derived. We...have observed the first transmission of the disease from our standard scrapie -infected sheep brain inoculum to the transgenic mice with sheep PrP and...already been distributed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Transgenic, Mouse, Hamster, TSE, Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. [Comparison of commercialization of transgenic crops in China and world-wide].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xujing; Jia, Shirong

    2008-04-01

    Currently, transgenic crops create huge economic, social and ecological benefits with the development of its commercial production. For China, the speed of development and commercialization of transgenic crops is a strategic issue for the sustainable agriculture development and the international competitiveness of our agricultural products. In this paper, we compared and analyzed the status of commercialization of transgenic crops in China and world-wide.

  12. Overexpression of apolipoprotein AII in transgenic mice converts high density lipoproteins to proinflammatory particles.

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, L W; Navab, M; Van Lenten, B J; Hedrick, C C; Hama, S Y; Goto, A M; Fogelman, A M; Lusis, A J

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies showed that transgenic mice overexpressing either apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) or apolipoprotein AII (apoAII), the major proteins of HDL, exhibited elevated levels of HDL cholesterol, but, whereas the apoAI-transgenic mice were protected against atherosclerosis, the apoAII-transgenic mice had increased lesion development. We now examine the basis for this striking functional heterogeneity. HDL from apoAI transgenics exhibited an enhanced ability to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages, but HDL from apoAII transgenics and nontransgenics were not discernibly different in efflux studies. In contrast with HDL from nontransgenics and apoAI transgenics, HDL from the apoAII transgenics were unable to protect against LDL oxidation in a coculture model of the artery wall. Furthermore, HDL taken from apoAII-transgenic mice, but not HDL taken from either the apoAI transgenics or nontransgenic littermate controls, by itself stimulated lipid hydroperoxide formation in artery wall cells and induced monocyte transmigration, indicating that the apoAII-transgenic HDL were in fact proinflammatory. This loss in the ability of the apoAII-transgenic HDL to function as an antioxidant/antiinflammatory agent was associated with a decreased content of paraoxonase, an enzyme that protects against LDL oxidation. Reconstitution of the apoAII transgenic HDL with purified paraoxonase restored both paraoxonase activity and the ability to protect against LDL oxidation. We conclude that overexpression of apoAII converts HDL from an anti- to a proinflammatory particle and that paraoxonase plays a role in this transformation. PMID:9218525

  13. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Deqiang

    Optical interconnects are considered a promising solution for long distance and high bitrate data transmissions, outperforming electrical interconnects in terms of loss and dispersion. Due to the bandwidth and distance advantage of optical interconnects, longer links have been implemented with optics. Recent studies show that optical interconnects have clear advantages even at very short distances---intra system interconnects. The biggest challenge for such optical interconnects is the alignment tolerance. Many free space optical components require very precise assembly and installation, and therefore the overall cost could be increased. This thesis studied the misalignment tolerance and possible alignment correction solutions for optical interconnects at backplane or board level. First the alignment tolerance for free space couplers was simulated and the result indicated the most critical alignments occur between the VCSEL, waveguide and microlens arrays. An in-situ microlens array fabrication method was designed and experimentally demonstrated, with no observable misalignment with the waveguide array. At the receiver side, conical lens arrays were proposed to replace simple microlens arrays for a larger angular alignment tolerance. Multilayer simulation models in CodeV were built to optimized the refractive index and shape profiles of the conical lens arrays. Conical lenses fabricated with micro injection molding machine and fiber etching were characterized. Active component VCSOA was used to correct misalignment in optical connectors between the board and backplane. The alignment correction capability were characterized for both DC and AC (1GHz) optical signal. The speed and bandwidth of the VCSOA was measured and compared with a same structure VCSEL. Based on the optical inverter being studied in our lab, an all-optical flip-flop was demonstrated using a pair of VCSOAs. This memory cell with random access ability can store one bit optical signal with set or

  14. Male mating strategy and the introgression of a growth hormone transgene

    PubMed Central

    Valosaari, Kata-Riina; Aikio, Sami; Kaitala, Veijo

    2008-01-01

    Escaped transgenic organisms (GMO's) may threaten the populations of their wild relatives if able to hybridize with each other. The introgression of a growth enhancement transgene into a wild Atlantic salmon population may be affected by the transgene's effects not only on fitness parameters, but also on mating behaviour. Large anadromous GMO males are most preferred in mating, but a transgene can also give the large sneakers a reproductive advantage over the smaller wild individuals. With a simulation model, we studied whether the increase in the proportion and mating success of sneakers in transgenic and hybrid genotypes could facilitate the introgression of a transgene into wild population after the release of GMOs. The model combines population dynamics and Mendelian inheritance of a transgenic trait. We found that the introgression of the transgene is strongly affected by the greater mating preference of large GMO males. Furthermore, the difference in reproductive success between the anadromous versus sneaker strategy defines how much GMO's have to be preferred to be able to invade. These results emphasize the importance of detailed knowledge of reproductive systems and the effect of a transgene on the phenotype and behaviour of GMOs when assessing the consequences of their release or escape to the wild. PMID:25567801

  15. Male mating strategy and the introgression of a growth hormone transgene.

    PubMed

    Valosaari, Kata-Riina; Aikio, Sami; Kaitala, Veijo

    2008-11-01

    Escaped transgenic organisms (GMO's) may threaten the populations of their wild relatives if able to hybridize with each other. The introgression of a growth enhancement transgene into a wild Atlantic salmon population may be affected by the transgene's effects not only on fitness parameters, but also on mating behaviour. Large anadromous GMO males are most preferred in mating, but a transgene can also give the large sneakers a reproductive advantage over the smaller wild individuals. With a simulation model, we studied whether the increase in the proportion and mating success of sneakers in transgenic and hybrid genotypes could facilitate the introgression of a transgene into wild population after the release of GMOs. The model combines population dynamics and Mendelian inheritance of a transgenic trait. We found that the introgression of the transgene is strongly affected by the greater mating preference of large GMO males. Furthermore, the difference in reproductive success between the anadromous versus sneaker strategy defines how much GMO's have to be preferred to be able to invade. These results emphasize the importance of detailed knowledge of reproductive systems and the effect of a transgene on the phenotype and behaviour of GMOs when assessing the consequences of their release or escape to the wild.

  16. Preservation and Faithful Expression of Transgene via Artificial Seeds in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenting; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Xinhua; Sibbald, Susan; Hunter, David; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Proper preservation of transgenes and transgenic materials is important for wider use of transgenic technology in plants. Here, we report stable preservation and faithful expression of a transgene via artificial seed technology in alfalfa. DNA constructs containing the uid reporter gene coding for β-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by a 35S promoter or a tCUP promoter were introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic alfalfa plants via in vitro technology. These embryos were treated with abscisic acid to induce desiccation tolerance and were subjected to a water loss process. After the desiccation procedure, the water content in dried embryos, or called artificial seeds, was about 12–15% which was equivalent to that in true seeds. Upon water rehydration, the dried somatic embryos showed high degrees of viability and exhibited normal germination. Full plants were subsequently developed and recovered in a greenhouse. The progeny plants developed from artificial seeds showed GUS enzyme activity and the GUS expression level was comparable to that of plants developed from somatic embryos without the desiccation process. Polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the transgene was well retained in the plants and Southern blot analysis showed that the transgene was stably integrated in plant genome. The research showed that the transgene and the new trait can be well preserved in artificial seeds and the progeny developed. The research provides a new method for transgenic germplasm preservation in different plant species. PMID:23690914

  17. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  18. MicroRNA-150-regulated vectors allow lymphocyte-sparing transgene expression in hematopoietic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Jagielska, J; Heckl, D; Brennig, S; Pfaff, N; Maetzig, T; Modlich, U; Cantz, T; Gentner, B; Schambach, A; Moritz, T

    2012-09-01

    Endogenous microRNA (miRNA) expression can be exploited for cell type-specific transgene expression as the addition of miRNA target sequences to transgenic cDNA allows for transgene downregulation specifically in cells expressing the respective miRNAs. Here, we have investigated the potential of miRNA-150 target sequences to specifically suppress gene expression in lymphocytes and thereby prevent transgene-induced lymphotoxicity. Abundance of miRNA-150 expression specifically in differentiated B and T cells was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Mono- and bicistronic lentiviral vectors were used to investigate the effect of miRNA-150 target sequences on transgene expression in the lymphohematopoietic system. After in vitro studies demonstrated effective downregulation of transgene expression in murine B220(+) B and CD3(+) T cells, the concept was further verified in a murine transplant model. Again, marked suppression of transgene activity was observed in B220(+) B and CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells whereas expression in CD11b(+) myeloid cells, lin(-) and lin(-)/Sca1(+) progenitors, or lin(-)/Sca1(+)/c-kit(+) stem cells remained almost unaffected. No toxicity of miRNA-150 targeting in transduced lymphohematopoietic cells was noted. Thus, our results demonstrate the suitability of miRNA-150 targeting to specifically suppress transgene expression in lymphocytes and further support the concept of miRNA targeting for cell type-specific transgene expression in gene therapy approaches.

  19. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic Leymus chinensis plants with constitutively expressed wheat TaLEA3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shuangyan; Liu, Gongshe

    2009-02-01

    Leymus chinensis is an important grassland perennial grass. However, its drought tolerance requires to be improved. LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) genes are believed to confer resistance to drought and water deficiency. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, a wheat LEA gene, TaLEA(3), was integrated into L. chinensis. The transgenic lines showed enhanced growth ability under drought stress during which transgenic lines had increased the relative water content, leaf water potential, relative average growth rate, but decreased the malondialdehyde content compared with the non-transgenic plant. Thus, transgenic breeding is an efficient approach to enhance drought tolerance in L. chinensis.

  20. [Safety evaluation of food from transgenic fish and the molecular biological mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichun; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2004-03-01

    More progresses have been made in the studying of transgenic fish in China, but the studying work of safety evaluation of food from transgenic fish are started up just now. Compared to plants and animals on the land, it is more difficult to control the mobility of fish and fish can give birth to a large number of offsprings, so the ecological risk or hazard about transgenic fish is more critical than others. Another safety problem is the chimerism which is initiated by the gene transfer methods used in the transgenic fish. Getting sterile triploid transgenic fish and fixed point integration are efficient to solve the two problems above respectively. The solution of the two problems are also the basis of safety evaluation and detection of food from transgenic fish. Up to now, there are little reports on the safety evaluation of transgenic fish including nutritional evaluation and allergic reaction, and there are no basic research on the detection of transgenic fish for the aim of food safety. In brief, it is very urgent to start up the research on the safety evaluation and detection of transgenic fish for the control of food safety.