Science.gov

Sample records for phone-based exercise persistence

  1. Pilot study of a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention post-rehabilitation for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong Q; Gill, Dawn P; Wolpin, Seth; Steele, Bonnie G; Benditt, Joshua O

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a six-month, cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods Participants who completed a two-week run-in were randomly assigned to either MOBILE-Coached (n = 9) or MOBILE-Self-Monitored (n = 8). All participants met with a nurse to develop an individualized exercise plan, were issued a pedometer and exercise booklet, and instructed to continue to log their daily exercise and symptoms. MOBILE-Coached also received weekly reinforcement text messages on their cell phones; reports of worsening symptoms were automatically flagged for follow-up. Usability and satisfaction were assessed. Participants completed incremental cycle and six minute walk (6MW) tests, wore an activity monitor for 14 days, and reported their health-related quality of life (HRQL) at baseline, three, and six months. Results The sample had a mean age of 68 ±11 and forced expiratory volume in one second 18% predicted. Participants reported that logging their exercise and symptoms (FEV1) of 40 ± was easy and that keeping track of their exercise helped them remain active. There were no differences between groups over time in maximal workload, 6MW distance, or HRQL (p > 0.05); however, MOBILE-Self-Monitored increased total steps/day whereas MOBILE-Coached logged fewer steps over six months (p =0.04). Conclusions We showed that it is feasible to deliver a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention to patients with COPD post-rehabilitation and that the addition of coaching appeared to be no better than self-monitoring. The latter finding needs to be interpreted with caution since this was a purely exploratory study. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00373932). PMID:19750190

  2. Efficacy of a cell phone-based exercise programme for COPD.

    PubMed

    Liu, W-T; Wang, C-H; Lin, H-C; Lin, S-M; Lee, K-Y; Lo, Y-L; Hung, S-H; Chang, Y-M; Chung, K F; Kuo, H-P

    2008-09-01

    The application of a supervised endurance exercise training programme in a home setting offering convenience and prolonged effects is a challenge. In total, 48 patients were initially assessed by the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT), spirometry and the Short Form-12 (SF-12) quality-of-life questionnaire, and then every 4 weeks for 3 months thereafter and again after 1 yr. During the first 3 months, 24 patients in the cell phone group were asked to perform daily endurance walking at 80% of their maximal capacity by following the tempo of music from a program installed on a cell phone. The level of endurance walking at home was readjusted monthly according to the result of ISWT. In the control group, 24 patients received the same protocol and were verbally asked to take daily walking exercise at home. Patients in the cell phone group significantly improved their ISWT distance and duration of endurance walking after 8 weeks. The improvements in ISWT distance, inspiratory capacity and SF-12 scoring at 12 weeks persisted until the end of the study, with less acute exacerbations and hospitalisations. In the present pilot study, the cell phone-based system provides an efficient, home endurance exercise training programme with good compliance and clinical outcomes in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Persistent low-grade inflammation and regular exercise.

    PubMed

    Astrom, Maj-Briit; Feigh, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    Persistent low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and dementia and evidence exists that inflammation is a causal factor in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Regular exercise offers protection against all of these diseases and recent evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to an anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise. Visceral adiposity contributes to systemic inflammation and is independently associated with the occurrence of CVD, type 2 diabetes and dementia. We suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via a long-term effect of exercise leading to a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines with each bout of exercise.

  4. Persistence of functional sympatholysis post-exercise in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moynes, Jaclyn; Bentley, Robert F.; Bravo, Michael; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Tschakovsky, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Blunting of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising muscle is well-established. Whether it persists during the early post-exercise period is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that it persists in human skeletal muscle during the first 10 min of recovery from exercise. Eight healthy young males (21.4 ± 0.8 yrs, SE) performed 7 min of forearm rhythmic isometric handgrip exercise at 15% below forearm critical force (fCF). In separate trials, a cold pressor test (CPT) of 2 min duration was used to evoke forearm sympathetic vasoconstriction in each of Rest (R), Steady State Exercise (Ex), 2–4 min Post-Exercise (PEearly), and 8–10 min Post-Exercise (PElate). A 7 min control exercise trial with no CPT was also performed. Exercising forearm brachial artery blood flow, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), forearm deep venous catecholamine concentration, and arterialized venous catecholamine concentration were obtained immediately prior to and following the CPT in each trial. CPT resulted in a significant increase in forearm venous plasma norepinephrine concentration in all trials (P = 0.007), but no change in arterialized plasma norepinephrine (P = 0.32). CPT did not change forearm venous plasma epinephrine (P = 0.596) or arterialized plasma epinephrine concentration (P = 0.15). As assessed by the %reduction in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) the CPT evoked a robust vasoconstriction at rest that was severely blunted in exercise (R = −39.9 ± 4.6% vs. Ex = 5.5 ± 7.4%, P < 0.001). This blunting of vasoconstriction persisted at PEearly (-12.3 ± 10.1%, P = 0.02) and PElate (-18.1 ± 8.2%, P = 0.03) post-exercise. In conclusion, functional sympatholysis remains evident in human skeletal muscle as much as 10 min after the end of a bout of forearm exercise. Persistence of functional sympatholysis may have important implications for blood pressure regulation in the face of a challenge to blood pressure following exercise. PMID

  5. Effects of the swimming exercise on the consolidation and persistence of auditory and contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Faria, Rodolfo Souza; Gutierres, Luís Felipe Soares; Sobrinho, Fernando César Faria; Miranda, Iris do Vale; Reis, Júlia Dos; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Sartori, Cesar Renato; Moreira, Dalmo Antonio Ribeiro

    2016-08-15

    Exposure to negative environmental events triggers defensive behavior and leads to the formation of aversive associative memory. Cellular and molecular changes in the central nervous system underlie this memory formation, as well as the associated behavioral changes. In general, memory process is established in distinct phases such as acquisition, consolidation, evocation, persistence, and extinction of the acquired information. After exposure to a particular event, early changes in involved neural circuits support the memory consolidation, which corresponds to the short-term memory. Re-exposure to previously memorized events evokes the original memory, a process that is considered essential for the reactivation and consequent persistence of memory, ensuring that long-term memory is established. Different environmental stimuli may modulate the memory formation process, as well as their distinct phases. Among the different environmental stimuli able of modulating memory formation is the physical exercise which is a potent modulator of neuronal activity. There are many studies showing that physical exercise modulates learning and memory processes, mainly in the consolidation phase of the explicit memory. However, there are few reports in the literature regarding the role of physical exercise in implicit aversive associative memory, especially at the persistence phase. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between swimming exercise and the consolidation and persistence of contextual and auditory-cued fear memory. Male Wistar rats were submitted to sessions of swimming exercise five times a week, over six weeks. After that, the rats were submitted to classical aversive conditioning training by a pairing tone/foot shock paradigm. Finally, rats were evaluated for consolidation and persistence of fear memory to both auditory and contextual cues. Our results demonstrate that classical aversive conditioning with tone/foot shock pairing induced

  6. Mobile phone based SCADA for industrial automation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Engin; Karacor, Mevlut

    2006-01-01

    SCADA is the acronym for "Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition." SCADA systems are widely used in industry for supervisory control and data acquisition of industrial processes. Conventional SCADA systems use PC, notebook, thin client, and PDA as a client. In this paper, a Java-enabled mobile phone has been used as a client in a sample SCADA application in order to display and supervise the position of a sample prototype crane. The paper presents an actual implementation of the on-line controlling of the prototype crane via mobile phone. The wireless communication between the mobile phone and the SCADA server is performed by means of a base station via general packet radio service (GPRS) and wireless application protocol (WAP). Test results have indicated that the mobile phone based SCADA integration using the GPRS or WAP transfer scheme could enhance the performance of the crane in a day without causing an increase in the response times of SCADA functions. The operator can visualize and modify the plant parameters using his mobile phone, without reaching the site. In this way maintenance costs are reduced and productivity is increased.

  7. Developing a Community-Based Tailored Exercise Program for People With Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kamden D.; Walnoha, Adrienne; Sloan, Jennifer; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Borrebach, Jeffrey; Cluss, Patricia A.; Burke, Jessica G.

    2016-01-01

    Background People with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) are at a greater risk of medical issues compared with the general population. Exercise has a positive effect on physical and mental health outcomes among this population in community settings. Objectives To describe community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods used to tailor an exercise program among people with SPMI, demonstrate its impact, and present lessons learned for future research. Methods The partnership developed a project to explore the feasibility of implementing a physical activity program at a community agency among clients with SPMI. Lessons Learned Data showed improved trends in mood, social support, and physical and mental health outcomes. Facilitators and barriers must be carefully considered for recruitment and retention. Conclusions A gender-specific, group-based, tailored exercise intervention developed through collaboration with a community agency serving people with SPMI using CBPR methods is feasible. Keywords: Community-based participatory research, severe and persistent mental illness, exercise, community partnership, sustainability PMID:26412763

  8. Exercises for Women with Persistent Pelvic and Low Back Pain after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Unsgaard-Tøndel, Monica; Vasseljen, Ottar; Woodhouse, Astrid; Mørkved, Siv

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specific stabilizing exercises activating deep local muscles in coordination with global muscles are recommended in the treatment of pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. Some studies have suggested that recruitment of the deepest abdominal muscle, transversus abdominis, is crucial in the development and improvement of lumbopelvic pain. Objective: This exploratory study aimed to describe the development of pain, disability and transversus abdominis recruitment before, during and after an individually designed intervention including an exercise program for women with persisting lumbopelvic pain after delivery. Design: A multiple-baseline, single-subject experimental design was applied. Methods: Sixteen women with lumbopelvic pain after delivery were included and received tailored exercise therapy, including ultrasound-guided activation of deep muscles, strengthening and stretching exercises and advice. Pain, disability and ultrasound-recorded activation of transversus abdominis was registered weekly. Treatment and testing was performed in a primary care setting in Trondheim, Norway. Results: All sixteen included women reported reduced pain and decreased disability over the intervention period. The magnitude of transversus abdominis activation varied substantially between individuals and tests. While there was a statistically significant correlation between change in pain and change in disability, no correlation was observed between change in transversus abdominis activation and change in symptoms. Limitations: This is an exploratory study and results cannot be generalized without replication in controlled studies. Conclusions: Pain and disability due to persistent low back and pelvic pain after delivery were reduced after specific, individual adapted exercise including deep and superficial lumbopelvic muscles. Changes in pain and disability were not associated with changes in transversus abdominis activation. PMID:27157173

  9. Effects of cycling exercise on vigor, fatigue, and electroencephalographic activity among young adults who report persistent fatigue.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Thom, Nathaniel J; Puetz, Timothy W; O'Connor, Patrick J; Clementz, Brett A

    2010-11-01

    We previously reported that 6 weeks of exercise training had positive effects on feelings of vigor and fatigue among college students who reported persistent fatigue. Here we examined whether transient mood changes after single sessions of exercise would mimic those chronic effects and whether they would be related to changes in brain activity measured by electroencephalography (EEG). Feelings of vigor were higher after both low- and moderate-intensity exercise during Weeks 1, 3, and 6 compared to a control condition. Feelings of fatigue were lower after low-intensity exercise during Weeks 3 and 6. Posterior theta activity accounted for about half the changes in vigor. Studies that manipulate mood, EEG activity, or both during exercise are needed to determine whether EEG changes after exercise are causally linked with mood.

  10. Electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base station - variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Bienkowski, Pawel; Zubrzak, Bartlomiej

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the character of electromagnetic field (EMF) in mobile phone base station (BS) surroundings and its variability in time with an emphasis on the measurement difficulties related to its pulse and multi-frequency nature. Work also presents long-term monitoring measurements performed recently in different locations in Poland - small city with dispersed building development and in major polish city - dense urban area. Authors tried to determine the trends in changing of EMF spectrum analyzing daily changes of measured EMF levels in those locations. Research was performed using selective electromagnetic meters and also EMF meter with spectrum analysis.

  11. Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-11-01

    Eudora Welty, the famous writer, was once asked what should be done by society or government to encourage young writers. Her response, which surprised the questioner, and me when I heard it, was "Nothing". Welty contended that a person who was really a writer would be persistent enough to overcome whatever obstacles were in the way, needing no interference or support from others.

  12. A mobile phone-based approach to detection of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Archibong, Edikan; Konnaiyan, Karthik Raj; Kaplan, Howard; Pyayt, Anna

    2017-02-15

    Preeclampsia and HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome are pregnancy-related complications with high rates of morbidity and mortality. HELLP syndrome, in particular, can be difficult to diagnose. Recent work suggests that elevated levels of free cell hemoglobin in blood plasma can, as early as the first trimester, potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker for impending complications. We therefore developed a point-of-care mobile phone-based platform that can quickly characterize a patient's level of hemolysis by measuring the color of blood plasma. The custom hardware and software are designed to be easy to use. A sample of the whole blood (~10µL or less) is first collected into a clear capillary tube or microtube, which is then inserted into a low-cost 3D-printed sample holder attached to the phone. A 5-10min period of quiescence allows for gravitational sedimentation of the red blood cells, leaving a layer of yellowish plasma at the top of the tube. The phone camera then photographs the capillary tube and analyzes the color components of the cell-free plasma layer. The software converts these color values to a concentration of free hemoglobin, based on a built-in calibration curve, and reports the patient's hemolysis level: non-hemolyzed, slightly hemolyzed, mildly hemolyzed, frankly hemolyzed, or grossly hemolyzed.. The accuracy of the method is ~1mgdL(-1). This phone-based point-of-care system provides the potentially life-saving advantage of a turnaround time of about 10min (versus 4+hours for conventional laboratory analytical methods) and a cost of approximately one dollar USD (assuming you have the phone and the software are already available).

  13. Mobile phones, mobile phone base stations and cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Moulder, J E; Foster, K R; Erdreich, L S; McNamee, J P

    2005-03-01

    There have been reports in the media and claims in the courts that radiofrequency (RF) emissions from mobile phones are a cause of cancer, and there have been numerous public objections to the siting of mobile phone base antennas because of a fear of cancer. This review summarizes the current state of evidence concerning whether the RF energy used for wireless communication might be carcinogenic. Relevant studies were identified by searching MedLine with a combination of exposure and endpoint terms. This was supplemented by a review of the over 1700 citations assembled by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety as part of their updating of the IEEE C95.1 RF energy safety guidelines. Where there were multiple studies, preference was given to recent reports, to positive reports of effects and to attempts to confirm such positive reports. Biophysical considerations indicate that there is little theoretical basis for anticipating that RF energy would have significant biological effects at the power levels used by modern mobile phones and their base station antennas. The epidemiological evidence for a causal association between cancer and RF energy is weak and limited. Animal studies have provided no consistent evidence that exposure to RF energy at non-thermal intensities causes or promotes cancer. Extensive in vitro studies have found no consistent evidence of genotoxic potential, but in vitro studies assessing the epigenetic potential of RF energy are limited. Overall, a weight-of-evidence evaluation shows that the current evidence for a causal association between cancer and exposure to RF energy is weak and unconvincing. However, the existing epidemiology is limited and the possibility of epigenetic effects has not been thoroughly evaluated, so that additional research in those areas will be required for a more thorough assessment of the possibility of a causal connection between cancer and the

  14. Analysis of a SNP linked to lactase persistence: An exercise for teaching molecular biology techniques to undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Patrick J; Bowling, Bethany V

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence indicates that the ability of adults to tolerate milk, cheese, and other lactose-containing dairy products is an autosomal dominant trait that co-evolved with dairy farming in Central Europe about 7,500 years ago. Among persons of European descent, this trait is strongly associated with a C to T substitution at a polymorphic site 13,910 bp upstream of the lactase gene. This mutation results in the persistent expression of lactase into adulthood enabling individuals carrying a T(-13,910) allele to digest lactose as adults. In this report, we describe a laboratory exercise for an undergraduate molecular biology course in which students determine their own genotype at the -13,910 polymorphic site and correlate this with their ability to tolerate dairy products. The exercise is used as a tool to teach basic molecular biology procedures such as agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR1, and DNA sequencing. Students are actively engaged in the learning process, not only by analyzing their own DNA but also by applying their knowledge and skills to answer an authentic question. The exercise is also integrated with lecture material on the control of gene expression at the transcriptional level, in particular, how transcription factors can influence the activity of a promoter by binding to cis-acting DNA regulatory elements located within the proximal promoter of a gene or distant enhancer regions.

  15. Mobile phone base stations-Effects on wellbeing and health.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Michael; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2009-08-01

    Studying effects of mobile phone base station signals on health have been discouraged by authoritative bodies like WHO International EMF Project and COST 281. WHO recommended studies around base stations in 2003 but again stated in 2006 that studies on cancer in relation to base station exposure are of low priority. As a result only few investigations of effects of base station exposure on health and wellbeing exist. Cross-sectional investigations of subjective health as a function of distance or measured field strength, despite differences in methods and robustness of study design, found indications for an effect of exposure that is likely independent of concerns and attributions. Experimental studies applying short-term exposure to base station signals gave various results, but there is weak evidence that UMTS and to a lesser degree GSM signals reduce wellbeing in persons that report to be sensitive to such exposures. Two ecological studies of cancer in the vicinity of base stations report both a strong increase of incidence within a radius of 350 and 400m respectively. Due to the limitations inherent in this design no firm conclusions can be drawn, but the results underline the urgent need for a comprehensive investigation of this issue. Animal and in vitro studies are inconclusive to date. An increased incidence of DMBA induced mammary tumors in rats at a SAR of 1.4W/kg in one experiment could not be replicated in a second trial. Indications of oxidative stress after low-level in vivo exposure of rats could not be supported by in vitro studies of human fibroblasts and glioblastoma cells. From available evidence it is impossible to delineate a threshold below which no effect occurs, however, given the fact that studies reporting low exposure were invariably negative it is suggested that power densities around 0.5-1mW/m(2) must be exceeded in order to observe an effect. The meager data base must be extended in the coming years. The difficulties of investigating

  16. Radiofrequency radiation injures trees around mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Waldmann-Selsam, Cornelia; Balmori-de la Puente, Alfonso; Breunig, Helmut; Balmori, Alfonso

    2016-12-01

    In the last two decades, the deployment of phone masts around the world has taken place and, for many years, there has been a discussion in the scientific community about the possible environmental impact from mobile phone base stations. Trees have several advantages over animals as experimental subjects and the aim of this study was to verify whether there is a connection between unusual (generally unilateral) tree damage and radiofrequency exposure. To achieve this, a detailed long-term (2006-2015) field monitoring study was performed in the cities of Bamberg and Hallstadt (Germany). During monitoring, observations and photographic recordings of unusual or unexplainable tree damage were taken, alongside the measurement of electromagnetic radiation. In 2015 measurements of RF-EMF (Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields) were carried out. A polygon spanning both cities was chosen as the study site, where 144 measurements of the radiofrequency of electromagnetic fields were taken at a height of 1.5m in streets and parks at different locations. By interpolation of the 144 measurement points, we were able to compile an electromagnetic map of the power flux density in Bamberg and Hallstadt. We selected 60 damaged trees, in addition to 30 randomly selected trees and 30 trees in low radiation areas (n=120) in this polygon. The measurements of all trees revealed significant differences between the damaged side facing a phone mast and the opposite side, as well as differences between the exposed side of damaged trees and all other groups of trees in both sides. Thus, we found that side differences in measured values of power flux density corresponded to side differences in damage. The 30 selected trees in low radiation areas (no visual contact to any phone mast and power flux density under 50μW/m(2)) showed no damage. Statistical analysis demonstrated that electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone masts is harmful for trees. These results are consistent with the fact

  17. [Study on mobile phone based wireless ECG monitoring technology system realization and performance test].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2010-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel mobile phone based wireless real-time ECG monitoring system. And experiments were conducted to demonstrate the reliability and stability of the device. This novel system not only addresses the contradiction between continuous monitoring and device cost, but also represents advanced concepts of low cost medicine and personal health management.

  18. Physical Exercise Counteracts Stress-induced Upregulation of Melanin-concentrating Hormone in the Brain and Stress-induced Persisting Anxiety-like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces anxiety disorders, whereas physical exercise is believed to help people with clinical anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying stress-induced anxiety and its counteraction by exercise using an established animal model of anxiety. Mice treated with restraint for 2 h daily for 14 days exhibited anxiety-like behaviors, including social and nonsocial behavioral symptoms, and these behavioral impairments lasted for more than 12 weeks after the stress treatment was removed. Despite these lasting behavioral changes, wheel-running exercise treatment for 1 h daily from post-stress days 1 - 21 counteracted anxiety-like behaviors, and these anxiolytic effects of exercise persisted for more than 2 months, suggesting that anxiolytic effects of exercise stably induced. Repeated restraint treatment up-regulated the expression of the neuropeptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, the brain regions important for emotional behaviors. In an in vitro study, treatment of HT22 hippocampal cells with glucocorticoid increased MCH expression, suggesting that MCH upregulation can be initially triggered by the stress hormone, corticosterone. In contrast, post-stress treatment with wheel-running exercise reduced the stress-induced increase in MCH expression to control levels in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Administration of an MCH receptor antagonist (SNAP94847) to stress-treated mice was therapeutic against stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest that repeated stress produces long-lasting anxiety-like behaviors and upregulates MCH in the brain, while exercise counteracts stress-induced MCH expression and persisting anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27574483

  19. The protective effects of free wheel-running against cocaine psychomotor sensitization persist after exercise cessation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lespine, L-F; Tirelli, E

    2015-12-03

    Previous literature suggests that free access to a running wheel can attenuate the behavioral responsiveness to addictive drugs in rodents. In a few studies, wheel-running cessation accentuated drug responsiveness. Here, we tested whether free wheel-running cessation is followed by (1) an accentuation or (2) an attenuation of cocaine psychomotor sensitization, knowing that no cessation of (continuous) wheel-running is associated with an attenuation of cocaine responsiveness. Male C57BL/6J mice, aged 35 days, were housed singly either with (exercising mice) or without (non-exercising mice) a running wheel. At the end of a period of 36 days, half of the exercising mice were deprived of their wheel whereas the other half of exercising mice kept their wheel until the end of experimentation (which lasted 85 days). The non-exercising mice were housed without wheel throughout experimentation. Testing took place 3 days after exercise cessation. After 2 once-daily drug-free test sessions, mice were tested for initiation of psychomotor sensitization over 13 once-daily injections of 8 mg/kg cocaine. Post-sensitization conditioned activation (saline challenge) and long-term expression of sensitization were assessed 2 or 30 days after the last sensitizing injection (same treatments as for initiation of sensitization), respectively. Exercising mice and mice undergoing wheel-running cessation exhibited comparable degrees of attenuation of all cocaine effects in comparison with the continuously non-exercising mice, which showed the greatest effects. Thus, the efficaciousness of wheel-running at attenuating cocaine sensitization not only resisted to exercise cessation but was also unambiguously persistent (an important effect rarely reported in previous literature).

  20. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living with Chronic Lung Disease Common Feelings Anxiety Depression Sleep Intimacy Importance of Being Together Body Changes with Age Communicating with Your Partner Exercise and Sexual Activity Less Strenuous Positions for Sexual ...

  1. Mobile phone-based clinical guidance for rural health providers in India.

    PubMed

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Iyengar, M Sriram; Johnson, Craig W

    2015-12-01

    There are few tried and tested mobile technology applications to enhance and standardize the quality of health care by frontline rural health providers in low-resource settings. We developed a media-rich, mobile phone-based clinical guidance system for management of fevers, diarrhoeas and respiratory problems by rural health providers. Using a randomized control design, we field tested this application with 16 rural health providers and 128 patients at two rural/tribal sites in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Protocol compliance for both groups, phone usability, acceptability and patient feedback for the experimental group were evaluated. Linear mixed-model analyses showed statistically significant improvements in protocol compliance in the experimental group. Usability and acceptability among patients and rural health providers were very high. Our results indicate that mobile phone-based, media-rich procedural guidance applications have significant potential for achieving consistently standardized quality of care by diverse frontline rural health providers, with patient acceptance.

  2. Epidemiological evidence for a health risk from mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vini G; Hardell, Lennart; Everaert, Joris; Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Carlberg, Michael; Ahonen, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Human populations are increasingly exposed to microwave/radiofrequency (RF) emissions from wireless communication technology, including mobile phones and their base stations. By searching PubMed, we identified a total of 10 epidemiological studies that assessed for putative health effects of mobile phone base stations. Seven of these studies explored the association between base station proximity and neurobehavioral effects and three investigated cancer. We found that eight of the 10 studies reported increased prevalence of adverse neurobehavioral symptoms or cancer in populations living at distances < 500 meters from base stations. None of the studies reported exposure above accepted international guidelines, suggesting that current guidelines may be inadequate in protecting the health of human populations. We believe that comprehensive epidemiological studies of long-term mobile phone base station exposure are urgently required to more definitively understand its health impact.

  3. Novel versatile smart phone based Microplate readers for on-site diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Yu, Shiting; Xiao, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2016-07-15

    Microplate readers are important diagnostic instruments, used intensively for various readout test kits (biochemical analysis kits and ELISA kits). However, due to their expensive and non-portability, commercial microplate readers are unavailable for home testing, community and rural hospitals, especially in developing countries. In this study, to provide a field-portable, cost-effective and versatile diagnostic tool, we reported a novel smart phone based microplate reader. The basic principle of this devise relies on a smart phone's optical sensor that measures transmitted light intensities of liquid samples. To prove the validity of these devises, developed smart phone based microplate readers were applied to readout results of various analytical targets. These targets included analanine aminotransferase (ALT; limit of detection (LOD) was 17.54 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (AKP; LOD was 15.56 U/L), creatinine (LOD was 1.35μM), bovine serum albumin (BSA; LOD was 0.0041mg/mL), prostate specific antigen (PSA; LOD was 0.76pg/mL), and ractopamine (Rac; LOD was 0.31ng/mL). The developed smart phone based microplate readers are versatile, portable, and inexpensive; they are unique because of their ability to perform under circumstances where resources and expertize are limited.

  4. A mobile phone-based Communication Support System for elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Caldwell, W Morton

    2007-01-01

    A mobile phone-based communication support system has been developed for assisting elderly people to communicate by mobile phone. The system consists of a low power mobile phone (PHS phone) having a large liquid crystal screen. When an elderly person telephones, they then choose a communication person from registered support personnel pictures displayed on the liquid crystal screen. The PHS phone dials that person automatically. The elderly person can therefore easily recognize and verify the person. The newly-developed communication support system assists a significant percentage of elderly people with poor eyesight and memory, which frequently cause communication problems, such as dialing a wrong number.

  5. Mobile phone based mini-spectrometer for rapid screening of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anshuman; Swedish, Tristan; Wahi, Akshat; Moufarrej, Mira; Noland, Marie; Gurry, Thomas; Aranda-Michel, Edgar; Aksel, Deniz; Wagh, Sneha; Sadashivaiah, Vijay; Zhang, Xu; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive mobile phone based spectrometer that has potential to detect cancerous skin lesions in a rapid, non-invasive manner. Earlier reports of low cost spectrometers utilize the camera of the mobile phone to image the field after moving through a diffraction grating. These approaches are inherently limited by the closed nature of mobile phone image sensors and built in optical elements. The system presented uses a novel integrated grating and sensor that is compact, accurate and calibrated. Resolutions of about 10 nm can be achieved. Additionally, UV and visible LED excitation sources are built into the device. Data collection and analysis is simplified using the wireless interfaces and logical control on the smart phone. Furthermore, by utilizing an external sensor, the mobile phone camera can be used in conjunction with spectral measurements. We are exploring ways to use this device to measure endogenous fluorescence of skin in order to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous lesions with a mobile phone based dermatoscope.

  6. Highly Stable and Sensitive Nucleic Acid Amplification and Cell-Phone-Based Readout.

    PubMed

    Kong, Janay E; Wei, Qingshan; Tseng, Derek; Zhang, Jingzi; Pan, Eric; Lewinski, Michael; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2017-03-02

    Key challenges with point-of-care (POC) nucleic acid tests include achieving a low-cost, portable form factor, and stable readout, while also retaining the same robust standards of benchtop lab-based tests. We addressed two crucial aspects of this problem, identifying a chemical additive, hydroxynaphthol blue, that both stabilizes and significantly enhances intercalator-based fluorescence readout of nucleic acid concentration, and developing a cost-effective fiber-optic bundle-based fluorescence microplate reader integrated onto a mobile phone. Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification on lambda DNA we achieve a 69-fold increase in signal above background, 20-fold higher than the gold standard, yielding an overall limit of detection of 25 copies/μL within an hour using our mobile-phone-based platform. Critical for a point-of-care system, we achieve a >60% increase in fluorescence stability as a function of temperature and time, obviating the need for manual baseline correction or secondary calibration dyes. This field-portable and cost-effective mobile-phone-based nucleic acid amplification and readout platform is broadly applicable to other real-time nucleic acid amplification tests by similarly modulating intercalating dye performance and is compatible with any fluorescence-based assay that can be run in a 96-well microplate format, making it especially valuable for POC and resource-limited settings.

  7. Mobile Phone Based System Opportunities to Home-based Managing of Chemotherapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Applying mobile base systems in cancer care especially in chemotherapy management have remarkable growing in recent decades. Because chemotherapy side effects have significant influences on patient’s lives, therefore it is necessary to take ways to control them. This research has studied some experiences of using mobile phone based systems to home-based monitor of chemotherapy side effects in cancer. Methods: In this literature review study, search was conducted with keywords like cancer, chemotherapy, mobile phone, information technology, side effects and self managing, in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 2005. Results: Today, because of the growing trend of the cancer, we need methods and innovations such as information technology to manage and control it. Mobile phone based systems are the solutions that help to provide quick access to monitor chemotherapy side effects for cancer patients at home. Investigated studies demonstrate that using of mobile phones in chemotherapy management have positive results and led to patients and clinicians satisfactions. Conclusion: This study shows that the mobile phone system for home-based monitoring chemotherapy side effects works well. In result, knowledge of cancer self-management and the rate of patient’s effective participation in care process improved. PMID:27482134

  8. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. Materials and Methods: A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P < 0.01) as compared to the control subjects. Conclusions: The effects of prolonged exposure to EMRs from mobile phone base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health. PMID:27011934

  9. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs.

  10. Precise observation of C. elegans dynamic behaviours under controlled thermal stimulus using a mobile phone-based microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoon, T; Shin, D-M; Kim, S; Lee, S; Lee, T G; Kim, K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the temperature-dependent locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans by using the mobile phone-based microscope. We developed the customized imaging system with mini incubator and smartphone to effectively control the thermal stimulation for precisely observing the temperature-dependent locomotory behaviours of C. elegans. Using the mobile phone-based microscope, we successfully followed the long-term progress of specimens of C. elegans in real time as they hatched and explored their temperature-dependent locomotory behaviour. We are convinced that the mobile phone-based microscope is a useful device for real time and long-term observations of biological samples during incubation, and can make it possible to carry out live observations via wireless communications regardless of location. In addition, this microscope has the potential for widespread use owing to its low cost and compact design.

  11. Development and Feasibility of a Cell Phone-Based Transitional Intervention for Women Prisoners with Comorbid Substance Use and Depression.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Williams, Collette; Zlotnick, Caron

    2015-09-01

    This article describes the development and feasibility testing of a cell phone-based intervention (Sober Network IPT) among 22 women with comorbid substance use and depressive disorders transitioning from prison to surrounding communities. Feasibility/acceptability measures included phone logs, exit interviews, and pre-post measures of substance use and depressive symptoms up to 9 months post-release. Results indicated that phone-based transitional treatment is feasible and acceptable. Participants valued the opportunity to maintain contact with familiar prison treatment providers by phone after release, and used the cell phones for help with service linkage, support, and crisis management. We describe relational and practical lessons learned.

  12. Development and Feasibility of a Cell Phone-Based Transitional Intervention for Women Prisoners with Comorbid Substance Use and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Williams, Collette; Zlotnick, Caron

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development and feasibility testing of a cell phone-based intervention (Sober Network IPT) among 22 women with comorbid substance use and depressive disorders transitioning from prison to surrounding communities. Feasibility/acceptability measures included phone logs, exit interviews, and pre-post measures of substance use and depressive symptoms up to 9 months post-release. Results indicated that phone-based transitional treatment is feasible and acceptable. Participants valued the opportunity to maintain contact with familiar prison treatment providers by phone after release, and used the cell phones for help with service linkage, support, and crisis management. We describe relational and practical lessons learned. PMID:26508805

  13. Compliance to Cell Phone-Based EMA Among Latino Youth in Outpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Comulada, W Scott; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Swendeman, Dallas; Grella, Christine; Wu, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Outpatient treatment practices for adolescent substance users utilize retrospective self-report to monitor drug use. Cell phone-based ecological momentary assessment (CEMA) overcomes retrospective self-report biases and can enhance outpatient treatment, particularly among Latino adolescents, who have been understudied with regard to CEMA. This study explores compliance to text message-based CEMA with youth (n = 28; 93% Latino) in outpatient treatment. Participants were rotated through daily, random, and event-based CEMA strategies for 1-month periods. Overall compliance was high (>80%). Compliance decreased slightly over the study period and was less during random versus daily strategies and on days when alcohol use was retrospectively reported. Findings suggest that CEMA is a viable monitoring tool for Latino youth in outpatient treatment, but further study is needed to determine optimal CEMA strategies, monitoring time periods, and the appropriateness of CEMA for differing levels of substance use.

  14. Cell-phone based assistance for waterworks/sewage plant maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kawada, T; Nakamichi, K; Hisano, N; Kitamura, M; Miyahara, K

    2006-01-01

    Cell-phones are now incorporating the functions necessary for them to be used as mobile IT devices. In this paper, we present our results of the evaluation of cell-phones as the mobile IT device to assist workers in industrial plants. We use waterworks and sewage plants as examples. By employing techniques to squeeze the SCADA screen on CRT into a small cell-phone LCD, we have made it easier for a plant's field workers to access the information needed for effective maintenance, regardless of location. An idea to link SCADA information and the plant facility information on the cell-phone is also presented. Should an accident or emergency situation arise, these cell-phone-based IT systems can efficiently deliver the latest plant information, thus the worker out in the field can respond to and resolve the emergency.

  15. Implicit attitudes toward nuclear power and mobile phone base stations: support for the affect heuristic.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen; Cousin, Marie-Eve

    2006-08-01

    The implicit association test (IAT) measures automatic associations. In the present research, the IAT was adapted to measure implicit attitudes toward technological hazards. In Study 1, implicit and explicit attitudes toward nuclear power were examined. Implicit measures (i.e., the IAT) revealed negative attitudes toward nuclear power that were not detected by explicit measures (i.e., a questionnaire). In Study 2, implicit attitudes toward EMF (electro-magnetic field) hazards were examined. Results showed that cell phone base stations and power lines are judged to be similarly risky and, further, that base stations are more closely related to risk concepts than home appliances are. No differences between experts and lay people were observed. Results of the present studies are in line with the affect heuristic proposed by Slovic and colleagues. Affect seems to be an important factor in risk perception.

  16. Psychotherapeutic Applications of Mobile Phone-based Technologies: A Systematic Review of Current Research and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vikas; Rajan, Tess Maria; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using mobile phone technology to offer real-time psychological interventions and support. However, questions remain on the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of such approaches in psychiatric populations. Our aim was to systematically review the published literature on mobile phone apps and other mobile phone-based technology for psychotherapy in mental health disorders. To achieve this, electronic searches of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were carried out in January 2016. Generated abstracts were systematically screened for eligibility to be included in the review. Studies employing psychotherapy in any form, being delivered through mobile-based technology and reporting core mental health outcomes in mental illness were included in the study. We also included trials in progress with published protocols reporting at least some outcome measures of such interventions. From a total of 1563 search results, 24 eligible articles were identified and reviewed. These included trials in anxiety disorders (8), substance use disorders (5), depression (4), bipolar disorders (3), schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (3), and attempted suicide (1). Of these, eight studies involved the use of smartphone apps and others involved personalized text messages, automated programs, or delivered empirically supported treatments. Trial lengths varied from 6 weeks to 1 year. Good overall retention rates indicated that the treatments were feasible and largely acceptable. Benefits were reported on core outcomes in mental health illness indicating efficacy of such approaches though sample sizes were small. To conclude, mobile phone-based psychotherapies are a feasible and acceptable treatment option for patients with mental disorders. However, there remains a paucity of data on their effectiveness in real-world settings, especially from low- and middle-income countries. PMID:28250552

  17. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  18. Psychotherapeutic Applications of Mobile Phone-based Technologies: A Systematic Review of Current Research and Trends.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vikas; Rajan, Tess Maria; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using mobile phone technology to offer real-time psychological interventions and support. However, questions remain on the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of such approaches in psychiatric populations. Our aim was to systematically review the published literature on mobile phone apps and other mobile phone-based technology for psychotherapy in mental health disorders. To achieve this, electronic searches of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were carried out in January 2016. Generated abstracts were systematically screened for eligibility to be included in the review. Studies employing psychotherapy in any form, being delivered through mobile-based technology and reporting core mental health outcomes in mental illness were included in the study. We also included trials in progress with published protocols reporting at least some outcome measures of such interventions. From a total of 1563 search results, 24 eligible articles were identified and reviewed. These included trials in anxiety disorders (8), substance use disorders (5), depression (4), bipolar disorders (3), schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (3), and attempted suicide (1). Of these, eight studies involved the use of smartphone apps and others involved personalized text messages, automated programs, or delivered empirically supported treatments. Trial lengths varied from 6 weeks to 1 year. Good overall retention rates indicated that the treatments were feasible and largely acceptable. Benefits were reported on core outcomes in mental health illness indicating efficacy of such approaches though sample sizes were small. To conclude, mobile phone-based psychotherapies are a feasible and acceptable treatment option for patients with mental disorders. However, there remains a paucity of data on their effectiveness in real-world settings, especially from low- and middle-income countries.

  19. A mobile phone based telemonitoring concept for the simultaneous acquisition of biosignals physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Kumpusch, Hannes; Hayn, Dieter; Kreiner, Karl; Falgenhauer, Markus; Mor, Jürgen; Schreier, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is a common chronic heart disease with high socioeconomic impact. Conventional treatment of CHF is often ineffective and inefficient, since self-management is complex and patients are insufficiently involved in therapy management. With telemedical concepts, continuous monitoring of the health status can be ensured, and consequently therapy management can be adapted to the individual requirements of every individual patient. Therefore, a mobile phone based patient terminal for the concurrent acquisition of biosignals (e.g. ECG) and bioparameters (e.g. blood pressure) for patients with CHF has been developed and prototypically implemented. Usability and interoperability aspects were especially considered by using Bluetooth and Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for data acquisition and standardized data formats for transmission of the data to a central monitoring centre. Results indicated that even complicated measurements like the acquisition of ECG signals could be accomplished autonomously by the patients in an intuitive and easy-to-use way. Through the usage of IHE conform HL7 messages, self-measured data could easily be integrated into a higher-ranking eHealth infrastructure.

  20. Multidimensional control using a mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Scott; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2011-01-01

    Many well-known brain-computer interfaces measure signals at the brain, and then rely on the brain's ability to learn via operant conditioning in order to control objects in the environment. In our lab, we have been developing brain-muscle-computer interfaces, which measure signals at a single muscle and then rely on the brain's ability to learn neuromuscular skills via operant conditioning. Here, we report a new mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface prototype for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single sEMG signal. Electromyographic activity on the surface of a single face muscle (Auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone. User-modulated power in two separate frequency band serves as two separate and simultaneous control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via Bluetooth. Users are trained to use the device via biofeedback, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen.

  1. Time averaged transmitter power and exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Alfred; Scanferla, Damiano; Lehmann, Hugo

    2014-08-07

    Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP), is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot). Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels.

  2. Study of variations of radiofrequency power density from mobile phone base stations with distance.

    PubMed

    Ayinmode, B O; Farai, I P

    2013-10-01

    The variations of radiofrequency (RF) radiation power density with distance around some mobile phone base stations (BTSs), in ten randomly selected locations in Ibadan, western Nigeria, were studied. Measurements were made with a calibrated hand-held spectrum analyser. The maximum Global System of Mobile (GSM) communication 1800 signal power density was 323.91 µW m(-2) at 250 m radius of a BTS and that of GSM 900 was 1119.00 µW m(-2) at 200 m radius of another BTS. The estimated total maximum power density was 2972.00 µW m(-2) at 50 m radius of a different BTS. This study shows that the maximum carrier signal power density and the total maximum power density from a BTS may be observed averagely at 200 and 50 m of its radius, respectively. The result of this study demonstrates that exposure of people to RF radiation from phone BTSs in Ibadan city is far less than the recommended limits by International scientific bodies.

  3. An iPhone-based digital image colorimeter for detecting tetracycline in milk.

    PubMed

    Masawat, Prinya; Harfield, Antony; Namwong, Anan

    2015-10-01

    An iPhone-based digital image colorimeter (DIC) was fabricated as a portable tool for monitoring tetracycline (TC) in bovine milk. An application named ColorConc was developed for the iPhone that utilizes an image matching algorithm to determine the TC concentration in a solution. The color values; red (R), green (G), blue (B), hue (H), saturation (S), brightness (V), and gray (Gr) were measured from each pictures of the TC standard solutions. TC solution extracted from milk samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) was captured and the concentration was predicted by comparing color values with those collected in a database. The amount of TC could be determined in the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg mL(-1). The proposed DIC-iPhone is able to provide a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 μg mL(-1) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 1.5 μg mL(-1). The enrichment factor was 70 and color of the extracted milk sample was a strong yellow solution after SPE. Therefore, the SPE-DIC-iPhone could be used for the assay of TC residues in milk at the concentration lower than LOD and LOQ of the proposed technique.

  4. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available.

  5. Time Averaged Transmitter Power and Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Mobile Phone Base Stations

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Alfred; Scanferla, Damiano; Lehmann, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP), is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot). Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor F ≈ 0.32 ± 0.08 for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels. PMID:25105551

  6. Measurement and analysis of radiofrequency radiations from some mobile phone base stations in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J; Darko, E O

    2009-08-01

    A survey of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 50 cellular phone base stations has been carried out. The primary objective was to measure and analyse the electromagnetic field strength levels emitted by antennae installed and operated by the Ghana Telecommunications Company. On all the sites measurements were made using a hand-held spectrum analyser to determine the electric field level with the 900 and 1800 MHz frequency bands. The results indicated that power densities at public access points varied from as low as 0.01 microW m(-2) to as high as 10 microW m(-2) for the frequency of 900 MHz. At a transmission frequency of 1800 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 0.01 to 100 microW m(-2). The results were found to be in compliant with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiological Protection guidance level but were 20 times higher than the results generally obtained for such a practice elsewhere. There is therefore a need to re-assess the situation to ensure reduction in the present level as an increase in mobile phone usage is envisaged within the next few years.

  7. Experiences With a Self-Reported Mobile Phone-Based System Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In cancer care, mobile phone-based systems are becoming more widely used in the assessment, monitoring, and management of side effects. Objective To explore the experiences of patients with colorectal cancer on using a mobile phone-based system for reporting neurotoxic side effects. Methods Eleven patients were interviewed (ages 44-68 years). A semistructured interview guide was used to perform telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Results The patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system were identified and constructed as: “being involved,” “pacing oneself,” and “managing the questions.” “Being involved” refers to their individual feelings. Patients were participating in their own care by being observant of the side effects they were experiencing. They were aware that the answers they gave were monitored in real time and taken into account by health care professionals when planning further treatment. “Pacing oneself” describes how the patients can have an impact on the time and place they choose to answer the questions. Answering the questionnaire was easy, and despite the substantial number of questions, it was quickly completed. “Managing the questions” pointed out that the patients needed to be observant because of the construction of the questions. They could not routinely answer all the questions. Patients understood that side effects can vary during the cycles of treatment and need to be assessed repeatedly during treatment. Conclusions This mobile phone-based system reinforced the patients’ feeling of involvement in their own care. The patients were comfortable with the technology and appreciated that the system was not time consuming. PMID:27282257

  8. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  9. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Åsa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%–50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension. PMID:24910510

  10. Mobile Phone-Based mHealth Approaches for Public Health Surveillance in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brinkel, Johanna; Krämer, Alexander; Krumkamp, Ralf; May, Jürgen; Fobil, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Whereas mobile phone-based surveillance has the potential to provide real-time validated data for disease clustering and prompt respond and investigation, little evidence is available on current practice in sub-Sahara Africa. The objective of this review was to examine mobile phone-based mHealth interventions for Public Health surveillance in the region. We conducted electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEE Xplore, African Index Medicus (AIM), BioMed Central, PubMed Central (PMC), the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and IRIS for publications used in the review. In all, a total of nine studies were included which focused on infectious disease surveillance of malaria (n = 3), tuberculosis (n = 1) and influenza-like illnesses (n = 1) as well as on non-infectious disease surveillance of child malnutrition (n = 2), maternal health (n = 1) and routine surveillance of various diseases and symptoms (n = 1). Our review revealed that mobile phone-based surveillance projects in the sub-Saharan African countries are on small scale, fragmented and not well documented. We conclude by advocating for a strong drive for more research in the applied field as well as a better reporting of lessons learned in order to create an epistemic community to help build a more evidence-based field of practice in mHealth surveillance in the region. PMID:25396767

  11. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Asa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%-50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension.

  12. Mobile Phone-Based Self-Management Tools for Type 2 Diabetes: The Few Touch Application

    PubMed Central

    Årsand, Eirik; Tatara, Naoe; Østengen, Geir; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background Mobile phones and other mobile information and communication technology applications and technologies hold great potential as a basis for powerful patient-operated self-management tools within diabetes. The work presented shows how such tools can be designed for supporting lifestyle changes among people with type 2 diabetes and how these were perceived by a group of 12 patients during a 6-month period. Method The study used focus groups, interviews, feasibility testing, questionnaires, paper prototyping, and prototyping of both software and hardware components. The design process was iterative, addressing the various elements several times at an increasing level of detail. The final test of the application was done qualitatively in everyday settings in a cohort of 12 people with type 2 diabetes, aged 44–70 (four men and eight women). Results A mobile phone-based system called the Few Touch application was developed. The system includes an off-the-shelf blood glucose (BG) meter, a tailor-made step counter, and software for recording food habits and providing feedback on how users perform in relation to their own personal goals. User feedback from the 6-month user intervention demonstrated good usability of the tested system, and several of the participants adjusted their medication, food habits, and/or physical activity. Of the five different functionalities, the cohort considered the BG sensor system the best. Conclusions It was shown that it is possible and feasible to design an application where several sensors and feedback applications are integrated in an overall system. The presented Few Touch application challenges people with type 2 diabetes to think about how they can improve their health, providing them with a way to capture and analyze relevant personal information about their disease. The half-year user intervention demonstrated that the system had a motivational effect on the users. PMID:20307393

  13. Cell Phone-Based System (Chaak) for Surveillance of Immatures of Dengue Virus Mosquito Vectors

    PubMed Central

    LOZANO–FUENTES, SAUL; WEDYAN, FADI; HERNANDEZ–GARCIA, EDGAR; SADHU, DEVADATTA; GHOSH, SUDIPTO; BIEMAN, JAMES M.; TEP-CHEL, DIANA; GARCÍA–REJÓN, JULIÁN E.; EISEN, LARS

    2014-01-01

    Capture of surveillance data on mobile devices and rapid transfer of such data from these devices into an electronic database or data management and decision support systems promote timely data analyses and public health response during disease outbreaks. Mobile data capture is used increasingly for malaria surveillance and holds great promise for surveillance of other neglected tropical diseases. We focused on mosquito-borne dengue, with the primary aims of: 1) developing and field-testing a cell phone-based system (called Chaak) for capture of data relating to the surveillance of the mosquito immature stages, and 2) assessing, in the dengue endemic setting of Mérida, México, the cost-effectiveness of this new technology versus paper-based data collection. Chaak includes a desktop component, where a manager selects premises to be surveyed for mosquito immatures, and a cell phone component, where the surveyor receives the assigned tasks and captures the data. Data collected on the cell phone can be transferred to a central database through different modes of transmission, including near-real time where data are transferred immediately (e.g., over the Internet) or by first storing data on the cell phone for future transmission. Spatial data are handled in a novel, semantically driven, geographic information system. Compared with a pen-and-paper-based method, use of Chaak improved the accuracy and increased the speed of data transcription into an electronic database. The cost-effectiveness of using the Chaak system will depend largely on the up-front cost of purchasing cell phones and the recurring cost of data transfer over a cellular network. PMID:23926788

  14. Pilot Study of Aurora, a Social, Mobile-Phone-Based Emotion Sharing and Recording System

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Geri; Pollak, JP; Adams, Phil; Leonard, John P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Emotion is a ubiquitous aspect of humanity that governs behavior in a number of ways and is linked inextricably with health. Pausing to evaluate one’s emotional state in the face of decisions and reflecting on past patterns of emotion have been shown to improve behaviors. Further, social expression of emotion has been shown to directly improve health outcomes. While the virtual reality research community does not ignore emotion on the whole, there does exist a need to explore what roles emotional awareness and emotion sharing can play in this domain. Methods: A mobile-phone-based social emotion recording and sharing system, Aurora, was developed to provide individuals with a means to pause and evaluate their emotional state, reflect on past emotions, share emotions with others, and participate in socially supportive activities with peers. A study was conducted with 65 subjects to evaluate Aurora as a tool to encourage emotional reflection and awareness as well as social sharing of emotion. Results: Users of Aurora reported an increased comfort in socially expressing emotion and were encouraged to share emotions, even with strangers. Subjects also reported liking reflecting on their emotional state and found it valuable. Subjects’ behavior also suggested that the system encouraged individuals to reach out to one another in acts of social support. Conclusions: The Aurora system offers a tool for encouraging emotional awareness, emotion sharing, and socially supportive behavior. Such a tool could be impactful in numerous health settings where emotion is considered to be an important indicator of or influence on outcome, such as for weight loss, alcohol cessation, or cancer sufferers. PMID:21527101

  15. Cell-phone-based measurement of TSH using Mie scatter optimized lateral flow assays.

    PubMed

    You, David J; Park, Tu San; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-02-15

    Semi-quantitative thyr oid stimulating hormone (TSH) lateral flow immunochromatographic assays (LFA) are used to screen for serum TSH concentration >5 mIUL(-1) (hypothyroidism). The LFA format, however, is unable to measure TSH in the normal range or detect suppressed levels of TSH (<0.4 mIU L(-1); hyperthyroidism). In fact, it does not provide quantitative TSH values at all. Obtaining quantitative TSH results, especially in the low concentration range, has until now required the use of centralized clinical laboratories which require specimen transport, specialized equipment and personnel, and result in increased cost and delays in the timely reporting of important clinical results. We have conducted a series of experiments to develop and validate an optical system and image analysis algorithm based upon a cell phone platform. It is able to provide point-of-care quantitative TSH results with a high level of sensitivity and reproducibility comparable to that of a clinical laboratory-based third-generation TSH immunoassay. Our research approach uses the methodology of the optimized Rayleigh/Mie scatter detection by taking into consideration the optical characteristics of a nitrocellulose membrane and gold nanoparticles on an LFA for quantifying TSH levels. Using a miniature spectrometer, LED light source, and optical fibers on a rotating benchtop apparatus, the light intensity from different angles of incident light and angles of detection to the LFA were measured. The optimum angles were found that the minimized Mie scattering from nitrocellulose membrane, consequently maximizes the Rayleigh scatter detection from the gold nanoparticles in the LFA bands. Using the results from the benchtop apparatus, a cell-phone-based apparatus was designed which utilized the embedded flash in the cell phone camera as the light source, piped the light with an optical fiber from the flash through a collimating lens to illuminate the LFA. Quantification of TSH was performed in an i

  16. Effect of a mobile phone-based intervention on post-abortion contraception: a randomized controlled trial in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thoai D; Gold, Judy; Edwards, Phil; Vannak, Uk; Sokhey, Ly; Machiyama, Kazuyo; Slaymaker, Emma; Warnock, Ruby; McCarthy, Ona; Free, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effect of a mobile phone-based intervention (mHealth) on post-abortion contraception use by women in Cambodia. Methods The Mobile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) study involved women who sought safe abortion services at four Marie Stopes International clinics in Cambodia. We randomly allocated 249 women to a mobile phone-based intervention, which comprised six automated, interactive voice messages with counsellor phone support, as required, whereas 251 women were allocated to a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was the self-reported use of an effective contraceptive method, 4 and 12 months after an abortion. Findings Data on effective contraceptive use were available for 431 (86%) participants at 4 months and 328 (66%) at 12 months. Significantly more women in the intervention than the control group reported effective contraception use at 4 months (64% versus 46%, respectively; relative risk, RR: 1.39; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.17–1.66) but not at 12 months (50% versus 43%, respectively; RR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.92–1.47). However, significantly more women in the intervention group reported using a long-acting contraceptive method at both follow-up times. There was no significant difference between the groups in repeat pregnancies or abortions at 4 or 12 months. Conclusion Adding a mobile phone-based intervention to abortion care services in Cambodia had a short-term effect on the overall use of any effective contraception, while the use of long-acting contraceptive methods lasted throughout the study period. PMID:26668436

  17. Mobile Phone-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Overall Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Guangzhou, China: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiting; Chen, Songting; Zhang, Guanrong; Lin, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid and widespread adoption of mobile devices, mobile phones offer an opportunity to deliver cardiovascular disease (CVD) interventions. This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile phone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing the overall CVD risk at a health management center in Guangzhou, China. We recruited 589 workers from eight work units. Based on a group-randomized design, work units were randomly assigned either to receive the mobile phone-based lifestyle interventions or usual care. The reduction in 10-year CVD risk at 1-year follow-up for the intervention group was not statistically significant (–1.05%, p = 0.096). However, the mean risk increased significantly by 1.77% (p = 0.047) for the control group. The difference of the changes between treatment arms in CVD risk was –2.83% (p = 0.001). In addition, there were statistically significant changes for the intervention group relative to the controls, from baseline to year 1, in systolic blood pressure (–5.55 vs. 6.89 mmHg; p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (–6.61 vs. 5.62 mmHg; p < 0.001), total cholesterol (–0.36 vs. –0.10 mmol/L; p = 0.005), fasting plasma glucose (–0.31 vs. 0.02 mmol/L; p < 0.001), BMI (–0.57 vs. 0.29 kg/m2; p < 0.001), and waist hip ratio (–0.02 vs. 0.01; p < 0.001). Mobile phone-based intervention may therefore be a potential solution for reducing CVD risk in China. PMID:26694436

  18. Coded illumination for motion-blur free imaging of cells on cell-phone based imaging flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Manish; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2014-10-01

    Cell-phone based imaging flow cytometry can be realized by flowing cells through the microfluidic devices, and capturing their images with an optically enhanced camera of the cell-phone. Throughput in flow cytometers is usually enhanced by increasing the flow rate of cells. However, maximum frame rate of camera system limits the achievable flow rate. Beyond this, the images become highly blurred due to motion-smear. We propose to address this issue with coded illumination, which enables recovery of high-fidelity images of cells far beyond their motion-blur limit. This paper presents simulation results of deblurring the synthetically generated cell/bead images under such coded illumination.

  19. Use of a smart phone based thermo camera for skin prick allergy testing: a feasibility study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barla, Lindi; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Klaessens, John; van der Veen, Albert

    2016-02-01

    Allergy testing is usually performed by exposing the skin to small quantities of potential allergens on the inner forearm and scratching the protective epidermis to increase exposure. After 15 minutes the dermatologist performs a visual check for swelling and erythema which is subjective and difficult for e.g. dark skin types. A small smart phone based thermo camera (FLIR One) was used to obtain quantitative images in a feasibility study of 17 patients Directly after allergen exposure on the forearm, thermal images were captured at 30 seconds interval and processed to a time lapse movie over 15 minutes. Considering the 'subjective' reading of the dermatologist as golden standard, in 11/17 pts (65%) the evaluation of dermatologist was confirmed by the thermo camera including 5 of 6 patients without allergic response. In 7 patients thermo showed additional spots. Of the 342 sites tested, the dermatologist detected 47 allergies of which 28 (60%) were confirmed by thermo imaging while thermo imaging showed 12 additional spots. The method can be improved with user dedicated acquisition software and better registration between normal and thermal images. The lymphatic reaction seems to shift from the original puncture site. The interpretation of the thermal images is still subjective since collecting quantitative data is difficult due to motion patient during 15 minutes. Although not yet conclusive, thermal imaging shows to be promising to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of allergy testing using a smart phone based camera.

  20. A persistent increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles after a single exercise session by old rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Castorena, Carlos M; Cartee, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to enhance subsequent insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) by predominantly type II (fast-twitch) muscle of old rats, but previous research has not evaluated exercise effects on GU by type I (slow-twitch) muscle from old rats. Accordingly, we studied male Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats (24 months old) and determined GU (0, 100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) of isolated soleus (predominantly type I) and epitrochlearis (predominantly type II) muscles after one exercise session. Epitrochlearis (100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) and soleus (100 and 200 μU/ml insulin) GU were greater at 3-h postexercise vs. age-matched sedentary controls. Insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr1162/1163) was unaltered by exercise in either muscle. Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Ser473 and Thr308 with 100 and 200 μU/ml, respectively) and soleus (Ser473 with 200 μU/ml). AS160 phosphorylation (pAS160) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Thr642 with 100 μU/ml), but not the soleus. Exercised vs. sedentary rats did not differ for total protein abundance of insulin receptor, Akt, AS160, or GLUT4 in either muscle. These results demonstrate that both predominantly type I and type II muscles from old rats are susceptible to exercise-induced improvement in insulin-mediated GU by mechanisms that are independent of enhanced insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation or altered abundance of important signaling proteins or GLUT4. Exercise-induced elevation in pAkt, and possibly pAS160, may contribute to this effect in the epitrochlearis of old rats, but other mechanisms are likely important for the soleus.

  1. Effects of Adding an Internet-Based Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol to a Standardized Education and Exercise Program for People With Persistent Hip Pain (HOPE Trial): Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; French, Simon; Nelligan, Rachel; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Dobson, Fiona; Haxby Abbott, J.; Dalwood, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent hip pain in older people is usually due to hip osteoarthritis (OA), a major cause of pain, disability, and psychological dysfunction. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adding an Internet-based pain coping skills training (PCST) protocol to a standardized intervention of education followed by physical therapist–instructed home exercise leads to greater reductions in pain and improvements in function. Design An assessor-, therapist-, and participant-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Setting The study will be conducted in a community setting. Participants The participants will be 142 people over 50 years of age with self-reported hip pain consistent with hip OA. Intervention Participants will be randomly allocated to: (1) a control group receiving a 24-week standardized intervention comprising an 8-week Internet-based education package followed by 5 individual physical therapy exercise sessions plus home exercises (3 times weekly) or (2) a PCST group receiving an 8-week Internet-based PCST protocol in addition to the control intervention. Measurements Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 8, 24, and 52 weeks, with the primary time point at 24 weeks. Primary outcomes are hip pain on walking and self-reported physical function. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality-of-life, participant-perceived treatment response, self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts, pain catastrophizing, and physical activity. Measurements of adherence, adverse events, use of health services, and process measures will be collected at 24 and 52 weeks. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed at 52 weeks. Limitations A self-reported diagnosis of persistent hip pain will be used. Conclusions The findings will help determine whether adding an Internet-based PCST protocol to standardized education and physical therapist–instructed home exercise is more effective than education and exercise

  2. Persistent Persister Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Wood, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells survive antibiotic treatment due to their lack of metabolism, rather than through genetic change, as shown via four seminal experiments conducted by the discoverers of the phenotype (Hobby et al., 1942; Bigger, 1944). Unfortunately, over seven decades of persister cell research, the literature has been populated by misperceptions that do not withstand scrutiny. This opinion piece examines some of those misunderstandings in the literature with the hope that by shining some light on these inaccuracies, the field may be advanced and subsequent manuscripts may be reviewed more critically. PMID:28082974

  3. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with number ACTRN12609000251224. PMID:20109196

  4. Assessment of radiofrequency/microwave radiation emitted by the antennas of rooftop-mounted mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Keow, Man Ah; Radiman, Shahidan

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiation exposures from the antennas of rooftop-mounted mobile telephone base stations have become a serious issue in recent years due to the rapidly evolving technologies in wireless telecommunication systems. In Malaysia, thousands of mobile telephone base stations have been erected all over the country, most of which are mounted on the rooftops. In view of public concerns, measurements of the RF/MW levels emitted by the base stations were carried out in this study. The values were compared with the exposure limits set by several organisations and countries. Measurements were performed at 200 sites around 47 mobile phone base stations. It was found that the RF/MW radiation from these base stations were well below the maximum exposure limits set by various agencies.

  5. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  6. The Beneficial Effects of Group-Based Exercises on Fall Risk Profile and Physical Activity Persist One-Year Post-Intervention in Older Women with Low Bone Mass: Follow-up After Withdrawal of Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa YL; Khan, Karim M; Eng, Janice J; Gillies, Graham L; Lord, Stephen R; McKay, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether exercise-induced reductions in fall risk are maintained in older women one year following the cessation of three types of interventions – resistance training, agility training, and general stretching. DESIGN One-year observational study. PARTICIPANTS 98 women aged 75–85 years with low bone mass. MEASUREMENTS Primary outcome measure was fall risk as measured by the Physiological Profile Assessment tool. Secondary outcome measures were current physical activity level as assessed by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly and formal exercise participation as assessed by interview. RESULTS At the end of the follow-up, the fall risk among former participants of all three exercise programs was maintained (i.e., still reduced) from trial completion. Mean fall risk value at the end of follow-up was 43.3% reduced compared with the mean baseline value among former participants of the Resistance Training group, 40.1% reduced in the Agility Training group, and 37.4% reduced in the general Stretching group. Physical activity levels were also maintained from trial completion. Specifically, there was a 3.8% increase in physical activity from baseline for the Resistance Training group, a 29.2% increase for the Agility Training group, and 37.7% increase for the general Stretching group. CONCLUSION After three types of group-based exercise programs, benefits are sustained for at least 12 months without further formal exercise intervention. Thus, these six-month exercise interventions appeared to act as a catalyst for increasing physical activity with resultant reductions in fall risk profile that were maintained for at least 18 months among older women with low bone mass. PMID:16181178

  7. A discussion of potential exposure metrics for use in epidemiological studies on human exposure to radiowaves from mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Schüz, J; Mann, S

    2000-01-01

    There is currently a high level of concern in many countries that exposure to radiowaves from mobile phone base stations may be hazardous to health. When investigating such suggested risks, epidemiologists need to define an exposure metric that can reliably discriminate between exposed and unexposed groups of people. We conducted a feasibility study to investigate if either short-term measurements of electric field strength, calculations of electric field strength, or distance from nearby mobile phone base stations could be used to develop a metric reflecting an individual's exposure to radiowaves. With electric field strengths in the range of 0.012-0.343 V/m, radiowaves from mobile phone base stations were found to give a material contribution to total exposure; however, stronger signals were frequently measured from other sources such as broadcast radio and television transmitters. Theoretical considerations and the measurements made during this work demonstrated that studies at the population level on suggested adverse effects of radiowaves from mobile phone base stations are not feasible since no valid metric for estimating historical exposures is currently available. The pace of radio infrastructure development is also such that today's measurements are unlikely to be good proxies for either past or future exposures. The complex propagation characteristics affecting the beams from base station antennas include shielding effects and multiple reflections from house walls and other buildings. These factors, combined with the presence of other environmental sources of radiowaves, cause distance from a base station to be a poor proxy for exposure to radiowaves indoors. It may be possible to adapt computer models developed by network providers to predict network coverage for epidemiological purposes; however, this has yet to be investigated. Furthermore, there is little evidence that presently justifies epidemiological studies being restricted to adverse effects of

  8. Mobile Phone-Based Unobtrusive Ecological Momentary Assessment of Day-to-Day Mood: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Ejdys, Michal; Schrader, Niels; Sijbrandij, Marit; Riper, Heleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a useful method to tap the dynamics of psychological and behavioral phenomena in real-world contexts. However, the response burden of (self-report) EMA limits its clinical utility. Objective The aim was to explore mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA, in which mobile phone usage logs are considered as proxy measures of clinically relevant user states and contexts. Methods This was an uncontrolled explorative pilot study. Our study consisted of 6 weeks of EMA/unobtrusive EMA data collection in a Dutch student population (N=33), followed by a regression modeling analysis. Participants self-monitored their mood on their mobile phone (EMA) with a one-dimensional mood measure (1 to 10) and a two-dimensional circumplex measure (arousal/valence, –2 to 2). Meanwhile, with participants’ consent, a mobile phone app unobtrusively collected (meta) data from six smartphone sensor logs (unobtrusive EMA: calls/short message service (SMS) text messages, screen time, application usage, accelerometer, and phone camera events). Through forward stepwise regression (FSR), we built personalized regression models from the unobtrusive EMA variables to predict day-to-day variation in EMA mood ratings. The predictive performance of these models (ie, cross-validated mean squared error and percentage of correct predictions) was compared to naive benchmark regression models (the mean model and a lag-2 history model). Results A total of 27 participants (81%) provided a mean 35.5 days (SD 3.8) of valid EMA/unobtrusive EMA data. The FSR models accurately predicted 55% to 76% of EMA mood scores. However, the predictive performance of these models was significantly inferior to that of naive benchmark models. Conclusions Mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA is a technically feasible and potentially powerful EMA variant. The method is young and positive findings may not replicate. At present, we do not recommend the application of FSR-based mood

  9. Integrating visual dietary documentation in mobile-phone-based self-management application for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Årsand, Eirik

    2015-05-01

    The goal of modern diabetes treatment is to a large extent focused on self-management to achieve and maintain a healthy, low HbA1c. Despite all new technical diabetes tools and support, including advanced blood glucose meters and insulin delivery systems, diabetes patients still struggle to achieve international treatment goals, that is, HbA1c < 7.5 in children and adolescents. In this study we developed and tested a mobile-phone-based tool to capture and visualize adolescents' food intake. Our aim was to affect understanding of carbohydrate counting and also to facilitate doctor-adolescent communication with regard to daily treatment. Furthermore, we wanted to evaluate the effect of the designed tool with regard to empowerment, self-efficacy, and self-treatment. The study concludes that implementing a visualization tool is an important contribution for young people to understand the basics of diabetes and to empower young people to define their treatment challenges. By capturing a picture of their own food, the person's own feeling of being in charge can be affected and better self-treatment achieved.

  10. An Efficient Power Harvesting Mobile Phone-Based Electrochemical Biosensor for Point-of-Care Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alexander C; Yao, Chengyang; Venkatesh, A G; Hall, Drew A

    2016-11-01

    Cellular phone penetration has grown continually over the past two decades with the number of connected devices rapidly approaching the total world population. Leveraging the worldwide ubiquity and connectivity of these devices, we developed a mobile phone-based electrochemical biosensor platform for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and wellness tracking. The platform consists of an inexpensive electronic module (< $20) containing a low-power potentiostat that interfaces with and efficiently harvests power from a wide variety of phones through the audio jack. Active impedance matching improves the harvesting efficiency to 79%. Excluding loses from supply rectification and regulation, the module consumes 6.9 mW peak power and can measure < 1 nA bidirectional current. The prototype was shown to operate within the available power budget set by mobile devices and produce data that matches well with that of an expensive laboratory grade instrument. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to track the concentration of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a biomarker for monitoring lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients, in its physiological range via an electrochemical sandwich assay on disposable screen-printed electrodes with a 1 nM limit of detection.

  11. Systematic review on the health effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations

    PubMed Central

    Frei, Patrizia; Mohler, Evelyn; Hug, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review and evaluate the recent literature on the health effects of exposure to mobile phone base station (MPBS) radiation. Methods We performed a systematic review of randomized human trials conducted in laboratory settings and of epidemiological studies that investigated the health effects of MPBS radiation in the everyday environment. Findings We included in the analysis 17 articles that met our basic quality criteria: 5 randomized human laboratory trials and 12 epidemiological studies. The majority of the papers (14) examined self-reported non-specific symptoms of ill-health. Most of the randomized trials did not detect any association between MPBS radiation and the development of acute symptoms during or shortly after exposure. The sporadically observed associations did not show a consistent pattern with regard to symptoms or types of exposure. We also found that the more sophisticated the exposure assessment, the less likely it was that an effect would be reported. Studies on health effects other than non-specific symptoms and studies on MPBS exposure in children were scarce. Conclusion The evidence for a missing relationship between MPBS exposure up to 10 volts per metre and acute symptom development can be considered strong because it is based on randomized, blinded human laboratory trials. At present, there is insufficient data to draw firm conclusions about health effects from long-term low-level exposure typically occurring in the everyday environment. PMID:21124713

  12. Putting Prevention in Their Pockets: Developing Mobile Phone-Based HIV Interventions for Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Emily C.; Fowler, Beth; LeGrand, Sara; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Bull, Sheana S.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Wohl, David A.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. Rapid expansion of mobile technologies, including smartphone applications (apps), provides a unique opportunity for outreach and tailored health messaging. We collected electronic daily journals and conducted surveys and focus groups with 22 black MSM (age 18–30) at three sites in North Carolina to inform the development of a mobile phone-based intervention. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically using NVivo. Half of the sample earned under $11,000 annually. All participants owned smartphones and had unlimited texting and many had unlimited data plans. Phones were integral to participants' lives and were a primary means of Internet access. Communication was primarily through text messaging and Internet (on-line chatting, social networking sites) rather than calls. Apps were used daily for entertainment, information, productivity, and social networking. Half of participants used their phones to find sex partners; over half used phones to find health information. For an HIV-related app, participants requested user-friendly content about test site locators, sexually transmitted diseases, symptom evaluation, drug and alcohol risk, safe sex, sexuality and relationships, gay-friendly health providers, and connection to other gay/HIV-positive men. For young black MSM in this qualitative study, mobile technologies were a widely used, acceptable means for HIV intervention. Future research is needed to measure patterns and preferences of mobile technology use among broader samples. PMID:23565925

  13. Supporting the self-management of hypertension: Patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, I; Ranerup, A; Kjellgren, K

    2016-02-01

    Globally, hypertension is poorly controlled and its treatment consists mainly of preventive behavior, adherence to treatment and risk-factor management. The aim of this study was to explore patients' experiences of an interactive mobile phone-based system designed to support the self-management of hypertension. Forty-nine patients were interviewed about their experiences of using the self-management system for 8 weeks regarding: (i) daily answers on self-report questions concerning lifestyle, well-being, symptoms, medication intake and side effects; (ii) results of home blood-pressure measurements; (iii) reminders and motivational messages; and (iv) access to a web-based platform for visualization of the self-reports. The audio-recorded interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. The patients considered the self-management system relevant for the follow-up of hypertension and found it easy to use, but some provided insight into issues for improvement. They felt that using the system offered benefits, for example, increasing their participation during follow-up consultations; they further perceived that it helped them gain understanding of the interplay between blood pressure and daily life, which resulted in increased motivation to follow treatment. Increased awareness of the importance of adhering to prescribed treatment may be a way to minimize the cardiovascular risks of hypertension.

  14. MIOTIC study: a prospective, multicenter, randomized study to evaluate the long-term efficacy of mobile phone-based Internet of Things in the management of patients with stable COPD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Yuan-Lin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that leads to huge economic and social burden. Efficient and effective management of stable COPD is essential to improve quality of life and reduce medical expenditure. The Internet of Things (IoT), a recent breakthrough in communication technology, seems promising in improving health care delivery, but its potential strengths in COPD management remain poorly understood. We have developed a mobile phone-based IoT (mIoT) platform and initiated a randomized, multicenter, controlled trial entitled the 'MIOTIC study' to investigate the influence of mIoT among stable COPD patients. In the MIOTIC study, at least 600 patients with stable GOLD group C or D COPD and with a history of at least two moderate-to-severe exacerbations within the previous year will be randomly allocated to the control group, which receives routine follow-up, or the intervention group, which receives mIoT management. Endpoints of the study include (1) frequency and severity of acute exacerbation; (2) symptomatic evaluation; (3) pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) measurement; (4) exercise capacity; and (5) direct medical cost per year. Results from this study should provide direct evidence for the suitability of mIoT in stable COPD patient management.

  15. MIOTIC study: a prospective, multicenter, randomized study to evaluate the long-term efficacy of mobile phone-based Internet of Things in the management of patients with stable COPD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Yuan-lin; Bai, Chun-xue

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that leads to huge economic and social burden. Efficient and effective management of stable COPD is essential to improve quality of life and reduce medical expenditure. The Internet of Things (IoT), a recent breakthrough in communication technology, seems promising in improving health care delivery, but its potential strengths in COPD management remain poorly understood. We have developed a mobile phone-based IoT (mIoT) platform and initiated a randomized, multicenter, controlled trial entitled the ‘MIOTIC study’ to investigate the influence of mIoT among stable COPD patients. In the MIOTIC study, at least 600 patients with stable GOLD group C or D COPD and with a history of at least two moderate-to-severe exacerbations within the previous year will be randomly allocated to the control group, which receives routine follow-up, or the intervention group, which receives mIoT management. Endpoints of the study include (1) frequency and severity of acute exacerbation; (2) symptomatic evaluation; (3) pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) measurement; (4) exercise capacity; and (5) direct medical cost per year. Results from this study should provide direct evidence for the suitability of mIoT in stable COPD patient management. PMID:24082784

  16. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations: A retrospective before-after study.

    PubMed

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; Bolte, John; Kelfkens, Gert; van Dijk, Christel; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Hooiveld, Mariette; Lebret, Erik; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-09-15

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and after increase of installed MPBS antennas. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, comparing two time periods with high contrast in terms of number of installed MPBS. Symptom data were based on electronic health records from 1069 adult participants, registered in 9 general practices in different regions in the Netherlands. All participants were living within 500m from the nearest bases station. Among them, 55 participants reported to be sensitive to MPBS at T1. A propagation model combined with a questionnaire was used to assess indoor exposure to RF-EMF from MPBS at T1. Estimation of exposure at T0 was based on number of antennas at T0 relative to T1. At T1, there was a >30% increase in the total number of MPBS antennas. A higher prevalence for most NSS was observed in the MPBS-sensitive group at T1 compared to baseline. Exposure estimates were not associated with GP-registered NSS in the total sample. Some significant interactions were observed between MPBS-sensitivity and exposure estimates on risk of symptoms. Using clinically defined outcomes and a time difference of >6years it was demonstrated that RF-EMF exposure to MPBS was not associated with the development of NSS. Nonetheless, there was some indication for a higher risk of NSS for the MPBS-sensitive group, mainly in relation to exposure to UMTS, but this should be interpreted with caution. Results have to be verified by future longitudinal studies with a particular focus on potentially susceptible population subgroups of large sample size and integrated exposure assessment.

  17. Mobile phone-based telemedicine system for the home follow-up of patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, Carlos; Cerdán, María Teresa; López, Rodrigo S

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was done to address the efficacy of a General Packet Radio Service mobile phone-based telemedicine system used to improve follow-up after ambulatory surgery. The method involves sending images of surgical wounds or other areas from the patient's home, to assess local complications and avoid unnecessary hospital visits. Ninety-six (N = 96) patients were enrolled in the study. The phone used was a Nokia 6600, which provides images in Joint Photographic Experts Group format. These images were sent via e-mail and visualized on a standard 17-inch screen of a personal computer. After the follow-up period, self-reported patient satisfaction was assessed by analyzing the replies to a 9-item questionnaire. Thirty of the 96 patients (31.3%) reported local problems including: hematoma in 20 (66.7%) patients, surgical bandage blood-stained in 7 (23.3%), exudates in 1 (3.3%), allergic skin reactions in 1 (3.3%), and bandage too tight in 1 (3.3%). In total, 225 photographs were evaluated by 3 physicians. In all cases, it was possible to identify and assess the postoperative problem with consensus among the 3 physicians. Images served to resolve patients' concerns in 20 individuals (66.7%). In 10 patients (33.3%), concerns were satisfied but it was suggested that follow-up images be sent in the following days. Only 1 patient (3.3%) was asked to visit the hospital. The telemedicine system proposed increases the efficiency of home follow-up to ambulatory surgery, avoids unnecessary hospital visits, and clearly improves patient satisfaction.

  18. Efficacy of a randomized cell phone-based counseling intervention in postponing subsequent pregnancy among teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Kathy S; Rodan, Margaret; Milligan, Renee; Tan, Sylvia; Courtney, Lauren; Gantz, Marie; Blake, Susan M; McClain, Lenora; Davis, Maurice; Kiely, Michele; Subramanian, Siva

    2011-12-01

    considerable challenges to treatment success. Individual, social, and contextual factors are all important to consider in the prevention of repeat teen pregnancy. Cell phone-based approaches to counseling may not be the most ideal for addressing complex, socially-mediated behaviors such as this, except for selective subgroups. A lack of resources within the community for older teens may interfere with program success.

  19. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  20. Telemonitoring and Mobile Phone-Based Health Coaching Among Finnish Diabetic and Heart Disease Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karhula, Tuula; Rääpysjärvi, Katja; Pakanen, Mira; Itkonen, Pentti; Tepponen, Merja; Junno, Ulla-Maija; Jokinen, Tapio; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko; Kohtamäki, Kari; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a strong will and need to find alternative models of health care delivery driven by the ever-increasing burden of chronic diseases. Objective The purpose of this 1-year trial was to study whether a structured mobile phone-based health coaching program, which was supported by a remote monitoring system, could be used to improve the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and/or the clinical measures of type 2 diabetes and heart disease patients. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted among type 2 diabetes patients and heart disease patients of the South Karelia Social and Health Care District. Patients were recruited by sending invitations to randomly selected patients using the electronic health records system. Health coaches called patients every 4 to 6 weeks and patients were encouraged to self-monitor their weight, blood pressure, blood glucose (diabetics), and steps (heart disease patients) once per week. The primary outcome was HRQL measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among diabetic patients. The clinical measures assessed were blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, and lipid levels. Results A total of 267 heart patients and 250 diabetes patients started in the trial, of which 246 and 225 patients concluded the end-point assessments, respectively. Withdrawal from the study was associated with the patients’ unfamiliarity with mobile phones—of the 41 dropouts, 85% (11/13) of the heart disease patients and 88% (14/16) of the diabetes patients were familiar with mobile phones, whereas the corresponding percentages were 97.1% (231/238) and 98.6% (208/211), respectively, among the rest of the patients (P=.02 and P=.004). Withdrawal was also associated with heart disease patients’ comorbidities—40% (8/20) of the dropouts had at least one comorbidity, whereas the corresponding percentage was 18.9% (47/249) among the rest of the patients (P=.02). The intervention showed

  1. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer.

  2. Semibiotic Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothmann, C.; Zauner, K.-P.

    From observation, we find four different strategies to successfully enable structures to persist over extended periods of time. If functionally relevant features are very large compared to the changes that can be effectuated by entropy, the functional structure itself has a high enough probability to erode only slowly over time. If the functionally relevant features are protected from environmental influence by sacrificial layers that absorb the impinging of the environment, deterioration can be avoided or slowed. Loss of functionality can be delayed, even for complex systems, by keeping alternate options for all required components available. Biological systems also apply information processing to actively counter the impact of entropy by mechanisms such as self-repair. The latter strategy increases the overall persistence of living systems and enables them to maintain a highly complex functional organisation during their lifetime and over generations. In contrast to the other strategies, information processing has only low material overhead. While at present engineered technology is far from achieving the self-repair of evolved systems, the semibiotic combination of biological components with conventionally engineered systems may open a path to long-term persistence of functional devices in harsh environments. We review nature's strategies for persistence, and consider early steps taken in the laboratory to import such capabilities into engineered architectures.

  3. Videoconference- and cell phone-based cognitive-behavioral therapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a case series.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick A; Launes, Gunvor; Moen, Erna M; Solem, Stian; Hansen, Bjarne; Håland, Ashild Tellefsen; Himle, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    For most patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) the availability of exposure-based therapy is limited. In our study six outpatients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) received 15 sessions of therapy delivered only over teleconference (six sessions) and cell phones (nine sessions) over a 3-month period of time. Five of the patients were women and the average age of the participants was 31.5 (SD=8.1). Patients presented a variety of OCD symptoms which were treated with standard exposure and response prevention exercises both during treatment sessions and as a part of homework exercises. All patients rated the treatment format as acceptable and rated the quality of the working alliance as high. At the end of therapy four of the six patients were highly improved and no longer met diagnostic criteria for OCD according to the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. The same was true at 3-month follow-up although some small increases in OCD symptoms had occurred. The innovative treatment format shows promise as a method of delivery that may make treatment accessible for patients with poor access to specialty clinics.

  4. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  5. Can exercise prevent cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-01-01

    As the tolerability of pharmacological agents decreases with age, exercise may be particularly helpful as a possible treatment or stabiliser of mood and cognitive function in older age. Exercise has been most commonly evaluated for the treatment of depression. Exercise interventions designed primarily for treatment of physical conditions in the elderly do appear to confer psychological benefits as well, with reduction in depressive symptoms over the course of treatment. The effects of exercise on reducing depressive symptoms are not dissimilar to the effects of antidepressant drugs and cognitive behaviour therapy. Exercise may be a useful low-tech intervention for people with mild to moderate depression. In particular, exercise may be helpful in the elderly and in patients who have had insufficient response to, or are intolerant of, pharmacotherapy. Mastery of a new skill and positive feedback from others may increase feelings of self-esteem and improve mood. Exercise may distract participants from persistent negative thoughts. Exercise has been shown to improve executive function acutely in adults of all ages. It is possible that dance routines or other exercise regimens requiring some cognitive input may confer additional benefit to cognitive function. Exercise has a moderate effect on the ability of people with dementia to perform activities of daily living and may improve cognitive function. Midlife exercise may also have an impact on later cognitive function.

  6. ‘TXT2BFiT’ a mobile phone-based healthy lifestyle program for preventing unhealthy weight gain in young adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite international efforts to arrest increasing rates of overweight and obesity, many population strategies have neglected young adults as a target group. Young adults are at high risk for unhealthy weight gain which tends to persist throughout adulthood with associated chronic disease health risks. Methods/design TXT2BFiT is a nine month two-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial aimed at improving weight management and weight-related dietary and physical activity behaviors among young adults. Participants are recruited via general practice (primary medical care) clinics in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. All participants receive a mailed resource outlining national physical activity and dietary guidelines and access to the study website. Additional resources accessible to the intervention arm via the study website include Smartphone mobile applications, printable handouts, an interactive healthy weight tracker chart, and a community blog. The study consists of two phases: (1) Intensive phase (weeks 1 to 12): the control arm receives four short message service (SMS) text messages; the intervention arm receives eight SMS messages/week tailored to their baseline stage-of-change, one Email/week, and personalized coaching calls during weeks 0, 2, 5, 8, and 11; and (2) Maintenance phase (weeks 14 to 36): the intervention arm receives one SMS message/month, one Email/month and booster coaching calls during months 5 and 8. A sample of N = 354 (177 per arm) is required to detect differences in primary outcomes: body weight (kg) and body mass index (kg/m2), and secondary outcomes: physical activity, sitting time, intake of specific foods, beverages and nutrients, stage-of-change, self-efficacy and participant well-being, at three and nine months. Program reach, costs, implementation and participant engagement will also be assessed. Discussion This mobile phone based program addresses an important gap in obesity prevention efforts to date. The

  7. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  8. Patients' perceptions and experiences of using a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) to monitor and manage chemotherapy related toxicity.

    PubMed

    McCann, L; Maguire, R; Miller, M; Kearney, N

    2009-03-01

    Chemotherapy forms a core component of treatment for the majority patients with cancer. Recent changes in cancer services mean patients frequently receive such treatment as outpatients and are often required to manage side effects at home without direct support from oncology health professionals. Information technology continues to develop to support patients in the community; this study evaluated the impact of a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) on chemotherapy related toxicity in patients with lung, breast or colorectal cancer. One hundred and twelve patients were randomized from seven clinical sites across the UK; 56 patients used the mobile phone to record their symptoms, sending their reports directly to the nurses at their clinical site; 56 control group patients received standard care. Health professionals were alerted about any severe or life-threatening symptoms through the development of a chemotherapy symptom risk model. Patients' perceptions of ASyMS were evaluated pre and post participation. Patients reported many benefits of using ASyMS including improved communication with health professionals, improvements in the management of their symptoms, and feeling reassured their symptoms were being monitored while at home. ASyMS has the potential to positively impact on the management of symptoms in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment.

  9. Phone-based intervention under nurse guidance after stroke: concept for lowering blood pressure after stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 4 decades, rates of stroke occurrence in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) have roughly doubled, whereas they have substantively decreased in high-income countries. Most of these LMIC are in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) where the burden of stroke will probably continue to rise over the next few decades because of an ongoing epidemiologic transition. Moreover, SSA is circumstantially distinct: socioeconomic obstacles, cultural barriers, underdiagnosis, uncoordinated care, and shortage of physicians impede the ability of SSA countries to implement cardiovascular disease prevention among people with diabetes mellitus in a timely and sustainable manner. Reducing the burden of stroke in SSA may necessitate an initial emphasis on high-risk individuals motivated to improve their health, multidisciplinary care coordination initiatives with clinical decision support, evidence-based interventions tailored for cultural relevance, task shifting from physicians to nurses and other health providers, use of novel patient-accessible tools, and a multilevel approach that incorporates individual- and system-level components. This article proposes a theory-based integrated blood pressure (BP) self-management intervention called Phone-based Intervention under Nurse Guidance after Stroke (PINGS) that could be tested among hospitalized stroke patients with poorly controlled hypertension encountered in SSA. PINGS would comprise the implementation of nurse-run BP control clinics and administration of health technology (personalized phone text messaging and home telemonitoring), aimed at boosting patient self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation for sustained adherence to antihypertensive medications.

  10. A pilot study of a mobile-phone-based home monitoring system to assist in remote interventions in cases of acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hang; Karunanithi, Mohan; Kanagasingam, Yogi; Vignarajan, Janardhan; Moodley, Yuben

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a six-month feasibility study of a mobile-phone-based home monitoring system, called M-COPD. Patients with a history of moderate Acute Exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) were given a mobile phone to record major symptoms (dyspnoea, sputum colour and volume), minor symptoms (cough and wheezing) and vital signs. A care team remotely monitored the recorded data and provided clinical interventions. Eight patients (mean age 65 years) completed the trial. Ten acute exacerbations occurred during the trial and were successfully treated at home. Prior to the AECOPD episode, the combined score of the major symptoms increased significantly (P < 0.05). Following the intervention, it decreased significantly (P < 0.05) within two weeks and returned to the baseline. The score of the minor symptoms also increased significantly (P < 0.05), but the decrease following the intervention was not significant. There were significantly fewer hospital admissions during the trial, fewer ED presentations and fewer GP visits than in a six-month matched period in the preceding year. The results demonstrate the potential of home monitoring for analysing respiratory symptoms for early intervention of AECOPD.

  11. PDA-phone-based instant transmission of radiological images over a CDMA network by combining the PACS screen with a Bluetooth-interfaced local wireless link.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Keun; Yoo, Sun K; Park, Jeong Jin; Kim, Sun Ho

    2007-06-01

    Remote teleconsultation by specialists is important for timely, correct, and specialized emergency surgical and medical decision making. In this paper, we designed a new personal digital assistant (PDA)-phone-based emergency teleradiology system by combining cellular communication with Bluetooth-interfaced local wireless links. The mobility and portability resulting from the use of PDAs and wireless communication can provide a more effective means of emergency teleconsultation without requiring the user to be limited to a fixed location. Moreover, it enables synchronized radiological image sharing between the attending physician in the emergency room and the remote specialist on picture archiving and communication system terminals without distorted image acquisition. To enable rapid and fine-quality radiological image transmission over a cellular network in a secure manner, progressive compression and security mechanisms have been incorporated. The proposed system is tested over a code division Multiple Access 1x-Evolution Data-Only network to evaluate the performance and to demonstrate the feasibility of this system in a real-world setting.

  12. Exercise & Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way Exercise & Sleep Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents ... helps kids. Photo: iStock 6 "Bests" About Kids' Exercise At least one hour of physical activity a ...

  13. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... overdoing it for almost anyone. Much like with eating disorders, many people who engage in compulsive exercise do ... compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany an eating disorder, the two often go hand in hand. In ...

  14. Kegel Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your pelvic floor muscles. The part of your body including your ... bone. Kegel exercises are designed to make your pelvic floor muscles stronger. These are the muscles that hold ...

  15. Exercise Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... also can help prevent exercise headaches. References Cutrer FM, et al. Cough, exercise, and sex headaches. Neurology ... aspx?bookid=690. Accessed Jan. 19, 2015. Cutrer FM. Exertional headaches. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  16. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes at a time throughout your day. Remember: exercise has so many health benefits that any amount is better than none.How ... The cost might give you an incentive to exercise on a regular basis.Benefits of regular exerciseReduces your risk of heart disease, ...

  17. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  18. A camera-phone based study reveals erratic eating pattern and disrupted daily eating-fasting cycle among adults in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neelu Jain; Kumar, Vinod; Panda, Satchidananda

    2017-01-01

    The daily rhythm of feeding-fasting and meal-timing are emerging as important determinants of health. Circadian rhythm research in animal models and retrospective analyses of human nutrition data have shown that reduced length of overnight fasting or increased late night eating increases risk for metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. However, the daily rhythm in eating pattern in humans is rarely measured. Traditional methods to collect nutrition information through food diary and food log pay little attention to the timing of eating which may also change from day to day. We adopted a novel cell-phone based approach to longitudinally record all events of food and beverage intake in adults. In a feasibility study daily food-eating patterns of 93 healthy individuals were recorded for 21 days using camera phones. Analysis of the daily eating patterns of these individuals indicates deviation from conventional assumption that people eat three meals-a-day within a 12 h interval. We found that eating events are widespread throughout the day, with <30% of calories consumed before noon and >30% consumed in evening and late night hours. There was little difference in eating pattern between weekdays and weekends. In this cohort more than 50% of people spread their caloric intake events over 15 h or longer. One decile of the cohort who were spouses of shift-workers or had flexible work schedule spread their caloric intake over 20 h. Although the nutrition quality and diversity of food consumed is different between South-East Asian and Western countries, such overall disruption of daily eating-fasting rhythm is similar. Therefore, in view of hypothesis that disrupted daily eating pattern may contribute to the global increase in metabolic diseases and modification of daily eating pattern is a potential modifiable behavior to contain these diseases, monitoring eating pattern is an important aspect of lifestyle.

  19. A camera-phone based study reveals erratic eating pattern and disrupted daily eating-fasting cycle among adults in India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neelu Jain; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    The daily rhythm of feeding-fasting and meal-timing are emerging as important determinants of health. Circadian rhythm research in animal models and retrospective analyses of human nutrition data have shown that reduced length of overnight fasting or increased late night eating increases risk for metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. However, the daily rhythm in eating pattern in humans is rarely measured. Traditional methods to collect nutrition information through food diary and food log pay little attention to the timing of eating which may also change from day to day. We adopted a novel cell-phone based approach to longitudinally record all events of food and beverage intake in adults. In a feasibility study daily food-eating patterns of 93 healthy individuals were recorded for 21 days using camera phones. Analysis of the daily eating patterns of these individuals indicates deviation from conventional assumption that people eat three meals-a-day within a 12 h interval. We found that eating events are widespread throughout the day, with <30% of calories consumed before noon and >30% consumed in evening and late night hours. There was little difference in eating pattern between weekdays and weekends. In this cohort more than 50% of people spread their caloric intake events over 15 h or longer. One decile of the cohort who were spouses of shift-workers or had flexible work schedule spread their caloric intake over 20 h. Although the nutrition quality and diversity of food consumed is different between South-East Asian and Western countries, such overall disruption of daily eating-fasting rhythm is similar. Therefore, in view of hypothesis that disrupted daily eating pattern may contribute to the global increase in metabolic diseases and modification of daily eating pattern is a potential modifiable behavior to contain these diseases, monitoring eating pattern is an important aspect of lifestyle. PMID:28264001

  20. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you ... to tie your shoes Alternative Names Age and exercise Images Benefit of regular exercise Flexibility exercise Exercise and age ...

  1. Exercise Physiologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAAHEP). High school students interested in postsecondary exercise physiology programs should take courses in anatomy, physiology, and physics. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations Louisiana is ...

  2. Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: A Systematic Review Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juliana; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite social marketing campaigns and behavior change interventions, young adults remain among the lowest consumers of vegetables. The digital era offers potential new avenues for both social marketing and individually tailored programs, through texting, web, and mobile applications. The effectiveness and generalizability of such programs have not been well documented. Objective The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and external validity of social marketing, electronic, and mobile phone-based (mHealth) interventions aimed at increasing vegetable intake in young adults. Methods The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) protocol will be used to conduct this systematic review. The search strategy will be executed across eleven electronic databases using combinations of the following search terms: “online intervention”, “computer-assisted therapy”, “internet”, “website”, “cell phones”, “cyber”, “telemedicine”, “email”, “social marketing”, “social media”, “mass media”, “young adult”, and “fruit and vegetables”. The reference lists of included studies will also be searched for additional citations. Titles and abstracts will be screened against inclusion criteria and full texts of potentially eligible papers will be assessed by two independent reviewers. Data from eligible papers will be extracted. Quality and risk of bias will be assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies and The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias assessment tool respectively. The external validity of the studies will be determined based on components such as reach, adoption, and representativeness of participants; intervention implementation and adaption; and program maintenance and institutionalization. Results will be reported quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Our research is in progress. A draft

  3. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes.

  4. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a Good Thing? We all know the benefits of exercise, and it seems that everywhere we turn, we ... stress. So how can something with so many benefits have the potential to cause ... out because it's fun or it makes them feel good, but exercise can become a compulsive habit when it is ...

  5. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... eating . Compulsive exercise behavior can grow out of student athletes' demanding practice schedules and their quest to ... negative image of themselves and feel worthless. Their social and academic lives may suffer as they ... and abandons responsibilities to make more time for exercise seems to ...

  6. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Littleton, Ed.

    This collection focuses on writing exercises, both expository and creative, as well as areas of adjacent concern. The book is divided into nine major sections: prewriting; diction; theme, thesis, and paragraph; style; ideas for whole papers and special topics; description; research; the short story; and rewriting. The exercises deal with such…

  7. Carbohydrate Estimation by a Mobile Phone-Based System Versus Self-Estimations of Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehais, Joachim; Anthimopoulos, Marios; Shevchik, Sergey; Botwey, Ransford Henry; Duke, David; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is spreading throughout the world and diabetic individuals have been shown to often assess their food intake inaccurately; therefore, it is a matter of urgency to develop automated diet assessment tools. The recent availability of mobile phones with enhanced capabilities, together with the advances in computer vision, have permitted the development of image analysis apps for the automated assessment of meals. GoCARB is a mobile phone-based system designed to support individuals with type 1 diabetes during daily carbohydrate estimation. In a typical scenario, the user places a reference card next to the dish and acquires two images using a mobile phone. A series of computer vision modules detect the plate and automatically segment and recognize the different food items, while their 3D shape is reconstructed. Finally, the carbohydrate content is calculated by combining the volume of each food item with the nutritional information provided by the USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Objective The main objective of this study is to assess the accuracy of the GoCARB prototype when used by individuals with type 1 diabetes and to compare it to their own performance in carbohydrate counting. In addition, the user experience and usability of the system is evaluated by questionnaires. Methods The study was conducted at the Bern University Hospital, “Inselspital” (Bern, Switzerland) and involved 19 adult volunteers with type 1 diabetes, each participating once. Each study day, a total of six meals of broad diversity were taken from the hospital’s restaurant and presented to the participants. The food items were weighed on a standard balance and the true amount of carbohydrate was calculated from the USDA nutrient database. Participants were asked to count the carbohydrate content of each meal independently and then by using GoCARB. At the end of each session, a questionnaire was completed to assess the user’s experience with Go

  8. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... diets, and for some, this may develop into eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. And some people ... exercise, especially when it is combined with an eating disorder, can cause serious and permanent health problems, and ...

  9. Exercise Tolerance and the Post Exercise Diastolic Filling Pattern in Patients With the Resting Impaired Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Steven J.; Walsh, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background In patients with normal LV systolic function, cardiac output increases with exercise mediated by increased stroke volume early in exercise and an increase in heart rate later in exercise. Despite normal LV systolic function, patients who display an impaired relaxation pattern may have a reduced exercise tolerance. We hypothesized that the resting impaired relaxation pattern that persists during exercise results in reduced LV filling volume and reduced exercise tolerance. Methods We evaluated consecutive exercise echocardiograms performed at Harper Hospital from 1998-2000 for patients with sinus rhythm, normal resting wall motion and ejection fraction (> 55%), evidence of resting impaired relaxation, and a negative exercise echocardiogram. There were 49 patients fitting the above criteria who were compared with a group of age and sex matched patients (43 patients) with a normal rest and exercise echocardiogram with normal resting transmitral Doppler. Rest and post exercise echocardiography and Doppler parameters were obtained. Results Patients in the impaired relaxation group demonstrated shorter exercise times as compared to the normal control group (8.8 ± 1.6 versus 9.7 ± 2.0 minutes, P < 0.001). In patients with normal resting transmitral diastolic filling, there was an increased the extent of atrial contribution to LV filling volume post exercise associated with shortening of isovolumic relaxation. Two patterns were seen in the impaired relaxation group post exercise. In 1 subgroup in which E/A ratio decreased post exercise, exercise duration was reduced (7.4 ± 1.3 minutes, P < 0.001) as compared to the subgroup with E/A increase (9.6 ± 1.2 minutes) post exercise which was similar to normal controls. Forward stepwise regression indicated that exercise time was primarily related to E/A change post exercise for all patient groups (r = 0.625, P = 0.0008). Specifically, this was true for patients with E/A reversal at rest (r = 0.584, P = 0

  10. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet ePublications Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet How can physical activity improve my ... recent hip surgery More information on physical activity (exercise) For more information about physical activity (exercise), call ...

  11. Why Exercise Is Wise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Why Exercise Is Wise KidsHealth > For Teens > Why Exercise Is ... exercise, strength training, and flexibility training. continue Aerobic Exercise Like other muscles, the heart enjoys a good ...

  12. Kids and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Kids and Exercise KidsHealth > For Parents > Kids and Exercise A A ... or when playing tag. The Many Benefits of Exercise Everyone can benefit from regular exercise. Kids who ...

  13. Exercise-Induced Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ...

  14. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ...

  15. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Ask a Question Find a Doctor ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  16. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  17. Diabetes and exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000083.htm Diabetes and exercise To use the sharing features on this page, ... not exercising at all. Your Blood Sugar and Exercise Check your blood sugar before you exercise. Also, ...

  18. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  19. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-13

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Muhammed Hasanato, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  1. Development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A Persistent Chemical Agent Simulation System was developed (PCASS) to simulate, for force-on-force training exercises, the field environment produced by the presence of persistent chemical agents. Such a simulant system must satisfy several requirements to be of value as a training aid. Specifically, it must provide for realistic training which will generate competency in at least the following areas: (1) detection of the persistent agent presence; (2) proper use of protective equipment and procedures; (3) determination of the extent of contamination; and (4) decontamination of equipment and personnel.

  2. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  3. Exercise, inflammation, and fatigue in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    LaVoy, Emily C.P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue significantly disrupts normal functioning and quality of life for a substantial portion of cancer survivors, and may persist for years following cancer treatment. While the causes of persistent fatigue among cancer survivors are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that several pathways, including chronic inflammation, autonomic imbalance, HPA-axis dysfunction, and/or mitochondrial damage, could contribute towards the disruption of normal neuronal function and result in the symptom of cancer-related fatigue. Exercise training interventions have been shown to be some of the more successful treatment options to address cancer-related fatigue. In this review, we discuss the literature regarding the causes of persistent fatigue in cancer survivors and the mechanisms by which exercise may relieve this symptom. There is still much work to be done until the prescription of exercise becomes standard practice for cancer survivors. With improvements in the quality of studies, evidenced-based exercise interventions will allow exercise scientists and oncologists to work together to treat cancer-related fatigue. PMID:26853557

  4. Glyphosate persistence in seawater.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Flores, Florita; Mueller, Jochen F; Carter, Steve; Negri, Andrew P

    2014-08-30

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely applied herbicides globally but its persistence in seawater has not been reported. Here we quantify the biodegradation of glyphosate using standard "simulation" flask tests with native bacterial populations and coastal seawater from the Great Barrier Reef. The half-life for glyphosate at 25 °C in low-light was 47 days, extending to 267 days in the dark at 25 °C and 315 days in the dark at 31 °C, which is the longest persistence reported for this herbicide. AMPA, the microbial transformation product of glyphosate, was detected under all conditions, confirming that degradation was mediated by the native microbial community. This study demonstrates glyphosate is moderately persistent in the marine water under low light conditions and is highly persistent in the dark. Little degradation would be expected during flood plumes in the tropics, which could potentially deliver dissolved and sediment-bound glyphosate far from shore.

  5. Persistent heap Management library

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables to a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.

  6. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... But, symptoms are not as severe as with major depression . Persistent depressive disorder used to be called dysthymia. ... with PDD will also have an episode of major depression at some point in their lives. Older people ...

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study.

  8. The Influence of Prenatal Exercise on Offspring Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Carmen; Reoyo, Olga Roldan; May, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Research has continued to demonstrate that exercise during pregnancy is safe. Growing evidence supports that exercise during pregnancy is beneficial for mother and fetus during gestation, with benefits persisting for the child into adulthood. Regardless of income or socioeconomic status, exercise during pregnancy is associated with increased incidence of full-term delivery. Additionally, normalization of birth measures, such as birth weight, occurs when women perform regular exercise throughout gestation. Measures of growth and development further indicate that exercise during pregnancy does not harm and may stimulate healthy growth throughout childhood. Measures of cognition and intelligence demonstrate that exercise during pregnancy causes no harm and may be beneficial. Overall, the benefits of exercise during pregnancy decrease the risk of chronic disease for both mother and child. PMID:27777506

  9. Orthostasis: exercise and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    There are two major problems here that are not independent. One is the more practically oriented problem of determining the effect of various modes of exercise training on gravitational tolerances, i.e., the point of syncope (unconsciousness) usually estimated from the time of appearance of presyncopal signs and symptoms. The other is more theoretical and concerns the mechanism of blood pressure failure that results in syncope. In many experimental designs these two problems or purposes have been intermingled, with equivocal results.

  10. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term…

  11. Exercise detraining: Applicability to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    Physical training exposes the various systems of the body to potent physiologic stimuli. These stimuli induce specific adaptations that enhance an individual's tolerance for the type of exercise encountered in training. The level of adaptation and the magnitude of improvement in exercise tolerance is proportional to the potency of the physical training stimuli. Likewise, our bodies are stimulated by gravity, which promotes adaptations of both the cardiovascular and skeletal muscles. Exposure to microgravity removes normal stimuli to these systems, and the body adapts to these reduced demands. In many respects the cessation of physical training in athletes and the transition from normal gravity to microgravity represent similar paradigms. Inherent to these situations is the concept of the reversibility of the adaptations induced by training or by exposure to normal gravity. The reversibility concept holds that when physical training is stopped (i.e., detraining) or reduced, or a person goes from normal gravity to microgravity, the bodily systems readjust in accordance with the diminished physiologic stimuli. The focus of this chapter is on the time course of loss of the adaptations to endurance training as well as on the possibility that certain adaptations persist, to some extent, when training is stopped. Because endurance exercise training generally improves cardiovascular function and promotes metabolic adaptations within the exercising skeletal musculature, the reversibility of these specific adaptations is considered. These observations have some applicability to the transition from normal to microgravity.

  12. Persistent hyperkinesis in normotensive patients after coarctation repair

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.D.; Carpenter, M.A.; Dammann, J.F.; Beller, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    Rest and exercise gated radionuclide ventriculography was used to evaluate 30 patients operated on between 1955 and 1982 for coarctation of the aorta. Twenty-one of these (COARC) patients have remained clinically normal for an average time of 15 years between surgery and the time of this study. A second group of 22 normal subjects (CTL) participating in an exercise physiology protocol were used as controls. Similar values were found comparing CTL vs. COARC for rate pressure products of 9.3 vs. 10.2 x 10/sup 3/ at rest and 26.8 vs 26.1 x 10/sup 3/ with exercise. Relative increase in cardiac output with exercise was 2.6 CTL vs. 2.1 COARC. Relative change in end-diastolic volume with exercises was +13% vs +5%. Early diastolic filling velocities at rest were 2.2 vs. 2.7 EDV/SEC and 5.2 vs. 5.2 EDV/SEC at exercise. Highly significant differences were found in resting ejection fraction of 59% CTL vs. 71% COARC, exercise EF of 70% vs. 82%, systolic ejection velocities at rest of 2.3 vs 2.9 EDV/SEC increasing with exercise to 3.6 vs. 4.8 EDV/SEC. Increased wall thickness was noted on scintiphotos and corroborated by thickness and muscle mass estimates from 2-D echo. The data indicate a persistent hyperdynamic state and LVH in these patients many years after elimination of the ventricular pressure overload. Further study is indicated to determine the cause of persistent hyperdynamic function, if this occurs with other after load stresses and the long term affect on cardiovascular function and longevity.

  13. Visual persistence and cinema?

    PubMed

    Galifret, Yves

    2006-01-01

    In Faraday and Plateau's days, both apparent motion and the fusion of intermittent lights, two phenomena that are hardly connected, were explained by retinal persistence. The works of Exner and of the 'Gestalt' psychologists, as well as the modern works on 'sampled' motion and smooth motion, disregarded retinal persistence. One tried, originally, to measure this persistence using intermittent stimulation, but under the pressure of practical concern, what was established in 1902 was the logarithmic relation between fusion frequency and the intensity of the stimulation. One had to wait until the 1950s for the use of harmonic analysis to finally allow a renewal in which many problems that, for decades, had only given rise to discussions that led nowhere and to groundless assertions, were correctly stated and easily solved.

  14. Toward a Next Generation of Widely Accessible Spatial Interfaces: Mobile VR Environments for Patients with Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Jolton, Joseph; Keefe, Francis J.; Haley, Alex; Keefe, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a series of multi-modal spatial interfaces and virtual environments that can be implemented with widely accessible virtual reality (VR) technologies. The results demonstrate and evaluate the new degree to which rich virtual experiences involving motion sensing, physiological inputs, stereoscopic imagery, sound, and haptic feedback can now be created using low-cost (e.g., mobile phone based) VR environments. Adapting spatial interfaces to these new platforms can open up exciting new application areas for VR. This is demonstrated through a series of prototype systems aimed at delivering in-home VR therapies to patients suffering from persistent pain conditions (e.g. arthritis pain, cancer pain). A rich spatial interface and visual aesthetic is particularly important for the success of these applications; thus an interdisciplinary team with expertise in technology, design, meditation, and the psychology of pain worked together to iteratively develop and evaluate the current prototypes. PMID:24807994

  15. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma ... they choose. previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with ...

  16. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  17. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    Prevention - learn to love exercise; Wellness - learn to love exercise ... With so many options for exercise, there is no need to suffer through a workout you do not like. Be true to yourself. Look for activities that ...

  18. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on ... take a daily walk or follow a simple exercise routine a few times a week. Exercise helps ...

  19. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  20. Human baroreflex rhythms persist during handgrip and muscle ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, D. L.; Cooke, W. H.; Diedrich, A.; Levine, B. D.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Buckey, J. C.; Ertl, A. C.; Biaggioni, I.; Cox, J. F.; Robertson, D.; Baisch, F. J.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U. O.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine if physiological, rhythmic fluctuations of vagal baroreflex gain persist during exercise, post-exercise ischaemia, and recovery. Methods We studied responses of six supine healthy men and one woman to a stereotyped protocol comprising rest, handgrip exercise at 40 % maximum capacity to exhaustion, post-exercise forearm ischaemia, and recovery. We measured electrocardiographic R-R intervals, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressures, and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. We derived vagal baroreflex gains from a sliding (25 s window moved by 2 s steps) systolic pressure – R-R interval transfer function at 0.04 – 0.15 Hz. Results Vagal baroreflex gain oscillated at low, nearly constant frequencies throughout the protocol (at ~ 0.06 Hz – a period of about 18 s); however, during exercise, most oscillations were at low gain levels, and during ischaemia and recovery, most oscillations were at high gain levels. Conclusions Vagal baroreflex rhythms are not abolished by exercise, and they are not overwhelmed after exercise during ischaemia and recovery. PMID:23809494

  1. The Persistence of PCBs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert H.; Highland, Joseph H.

    1979-01-01

    PCB's are one of the most persistent chemicals ever introduced into the environment by man. From very early in their history of manufacture PCB's were suspected of being hazardous to health, but public awareness of the hazard was slow in coming. (RE)

  2. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  3. Persistence to Graduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.; Smart, John C.

    1986-01-01

    A study is reported of the relationship of family education and income, high school grades, academic and social self-confidence, undergraduate institutional selectivity and size, academic and social integration, overall college satisfaction, bachelor's degree attainment, and financial aid on students' persistence to graduate school. (MSE)

  4. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise; Osteopenia - exercise ... To build up bone density, the exercise must make your muscles pull on your bones. These are called weight-bearing exercises. Some of them are: ...

  5. Persisting cholinergic erythema: a variant of cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G M; Black, A K; Greaves, M W

    1983-09-01

    A new variant of cholinergic urticaria is described. Four patients each had a similar persistent macular skin rash distributed maximally over the upper limbs and upper trunk. Though the rash was persistent, individual macules were of short duration but new macules continually appeared at adjacent sites. Exercise and hot baths exacerbated pruritus and provoked lesions in previously unaffected areas. Topically applied benzoyl scopolamine blocked the appearance of the lesions after challenge. Tests of cholinergic function were normal, apart from an exaggerated pupillary response to arecoline in one patient.

  6. Easy Exercises for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Easy Exercises for Teens KidsHealth > For Teens > Easy Exercises for Teens A A A en español Ejercicios ... all the running around we do counts as exercise. (It does. But if it's the only exercise ...

  7. Exercise After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... moderate-intensity exercise. Remember, even 10 minutes of exercise benefits your body. If you exercised vigorously before pregnancy ... want to join a gym but want the benefits of having someone to exercise with, ask a friend to be your workout ...

  8. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid.

  9. Optimization and Persistence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    and production costs are amplified by first-time applica- tion of high technology , security, and lim- ited production quantities. Alternate can...stred spendmg levels, average fleet age, average " technological advantage" of the fleet, and so forth. (The persistent features we discuss have all...a precise concept when dealing with nonmonetary units, such as technological advantage, but all elastic penalties are usually adjusted by the same

  10. Caffeine, exercise and the brain.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Romain; Roelands, Bart; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine can improve exercise performance when it is ingested at moderate doses (3-6 mg/kg body mass). Caffeine also has an effect on the central nervous system (CNS), and it is now recognized that most of the performance-enhancing effect of caffeine is accomplished through the antagonism of the adenosine receptors, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. Adenosine and dopamine interact in the brain, and this might be one mechanism to explain how the important components of motivation (i.e. vigor, persistence and work output) and higher-order brain processes are involved in motor control. Caffeine maintains a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained attention, vigilance, and reduces symptoms of fatigue. Other aspects that are localized in the CNS are a reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation, leading to a reduction in perception of effort during exercise and therefore influencing the motivational factors to sustain effort during exercise. Because not all CNS aspects have been examined in detail, one should consider that a placebo effect may also be present. Overall, it appears that the performance-enhancing effects of caffeine reside in the brain, although more research is necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms through which the CNS effect is established.

  11. [Mobile phone based wireless microscopy imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yucheng; Liu, Jing

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new device named "Wireless Cellscope" that combining mobile phone and optical microscope together. The established wireless microscope platform consists of mobile phone, network monitor, miniaturized microscope or high resolution microscope etc. A series of conceptual experiments were performed on microscopic observation of ordinary objects and mice tumor tissue slices. It was demonstrated that, the new method could acquire microscopy images via a wireless way, which is spatially independent. With small size and low cost, the device thus developed has rather wide applicability in non-disturbing investigation of cell/tissue culture and long distance observation of dangerous biological sample etc.

  12. The role of exercise in the rehabilitation of patients with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Hardee, Justin P; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2015-01-01

    Severe burn trauma results in persistent skeletal muscle catabolism and prolonged immobilization. We hypothesize that structured rehabilitative exercise is a safe and efficacious strategy to restore lean body mass and physical function in burn victims. Here, we review the evidence for the utility of rehabilitative exercise training in restoring physiological function in burn survivors.

  13. Isometric exercise (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Isometric exercise works muscles and strengthens bone. Increased muscle mass elevates metabolism, which in turn burns fat. Strength training is also called anaerobic exercise, as opposed to aerobic, because ...

  14. Easy Exercises for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... third component of well-rounded exercise. Check out yoga as one way to stay flexible. You can ... Sports and Exercise Safety Stretching Dynamic Stretching (Video) Yoga Welcome Home Yoga (Video) Study Break Yoga (Video) ...

  15. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  16. Diet and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Diet And Exercise Transplant recipients need to be aware of the ... help arrange for counseling and other support services. Exercise After a Transplant Most people are weak after ...

  17. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... underlying chronic asthma as the cause of symptoms. Exercise challenge tests An additional test that enables your ... to take daily for long-term control. Pre-exercise medications Your doctor may prescribe a drug that ...

  18. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  19. Strength and Balance Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Strength and Balance Exercises Updated:Sep 8,2016 If you have medical ... if you have been inactive and want to exercise vigorously, check with your doctor before beginning a ...

  20. Why Exercise Is Wise

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. Exercising causes the body to produce endorphins, chemicals ...

  1. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  2. Assessing Exercise Limitation Using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Stickland, Michael K.; Butcher, Scott J.; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Bhutani, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max) is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation (V˙O2 = cardiac output × arterial-venous O2 content difference). In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O2 content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO2. Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O2 pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance. PMID:23213518

  3. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  4. Persistent Temporal Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, David; Ramachandran, Umakishore

    Distributed continuous live stream analysis applications are increasingly common. Video-based surveillance, emergency response, disaster recovery, and critical infrastructure protection are all examples of such applications. They are characterized by a variety of high- and low-bandwidth streams as well as a need for analyzing both live and archived streams. We present a system called Persistent Temporal Streams (PTS) that supports a higher-level, domain-targeted programming abstraction for such applications. PTS provides a simple but expressive stream abstraction encompassing transport, manipulation and storage of streaming data. In this paper, we present a system architecture for implementing PTS. We provide an experimental evaluation which shows the system-level primitives can be implemented in a lightweight and high-performance manner, and an application-based evaluation designed to show that a representative high-bandwidth stream analysis application can be implemented relatively simply and with good performance.

  5. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V.; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving. PMID:27570347

  6. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder.

    PubMed

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving.

  7. New daily persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Alok

    2012-08-01

    New daily persistent headache (NDPH) is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment.

  8. Post-exercise alcohol ingestion perturbs blood haemostasis during recovery.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, M; Omar, A; Lin, X

    2000-09-15

    It is known that exercise induces modification in blood haemostasis. It is, however, not known whether alcohol consumption post-exercise influences these modifications during recovery. Eleven moderately active young men were studied immediately after a standardised cycle ergometer test and during the 24-hour period of recovery. Alcohol (0. 7 g/kg body mass) was given 1 hour after exercise on one test occasion, while an equal volume of alcohol-free solution was administered on the other. Exercise induced a significant increase in factor VIII activity with a significant shortening of activated partial thromboplastin time. Parallel increases in tissue plasminogen activity and antigen with a concomitant decrease in tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity were also observed after exercise. During recovery, while the increase in factor VIII activity post-exercise persisted in both trials, fibrinolytic activity demonstrated a sharp fall. The elevated factor VIII activity was significantly higher at 5 and 22 hours during the alcohol trial compared with the control. Although no demonstrable effect of alcohol on tissue plasminogen activator activity was present from 1 hour after ingestion onward, tissue plasminogen activator antigen and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen increased significantly 22 hours following alcohol ingestion. Further comparison between trials revealed a higher plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity 5 hours after alcohol ingestion. In conclusion, exercise-induced changes to blood haemostasis are balanced during exercise but not during recovery. Alcohol consumption after physical exercise further perturbs blood haemostasis and could constitute a thrombotic risk.

  9. Cyber Exercise Playbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    all parties benefit from the exercise experience. Exercises are not performed to make an organization look bad; instead, they help to train and...techniques it utilized to attack a security posture. All parties benefit from an exercise that underscores the RT motto: ”we win, we lose. 23 Appendix...Jason Kick November 2014 Cyber Exercise Playbook The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of The

  10. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  11. Eating and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... hand. When and what you eat can be important to how you feel when you exercise, whether it's a casual workout or training for a competition. Consider these eating and exercise tips. If you exercise in the morning, get up early enough to finish breakfast at least one hour before your workout. Be ...

  12. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Getting Exercise in College KidsHealth > For Teens > Getting Exercise in College A A A What's in this ... energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. But with high ...

  13. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  14. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  15. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise.

  16. Kids and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... or when playing tag. The Many Benefits of Exercise Everyone can benefit from regular exercise. Kids who are active will: have stronger muscles ... better outlook on life Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit sleep better. They' ...

  17. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  18. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-05-05

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity-induced plasticity with specific cognitive training-induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  20. Twelve weeks of moderate aerobic exercise without dietary intervention or weight loss does not affect 24-h energy expenditure in lean and obese adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise might have a persistent effect on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, resulting in increased fat loss. However, even without weight loss, exercise results in positive metabolic effects. The effect of an aerobic exercise program on 24-h total energy expenditure (TEE), and its components-ba...

  1. Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Schocken, D.D.

    1984-08-01

    Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

  2. Exercise in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hinman, Sally K.; Smith, Kristy B.; Quillen, David M.; Smith, M. Seth

    2015-01-01

    Context: Health professionals who care for pregnant women should discuss potential health benefits and harms of exercise. Although most pregnant women do not meet minimal exercise recommendations, there are a growing number of physically active women who wish to continue training throughout pregnancy. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the Web of Science database of articles and reviews available in English through 2014. The search terms exercise pregnancy, strenuous exercise pregnancy, and vigorous exercise pregnancy were used. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: With proper attention to risk stratification and surveillance, exercise is safe for the mother and fetus. Benefits of exercise in pregnancy include reduction in Cesarean section rates, appropriate maternal and fetal weight gain, and managing gestational diabetes. Exercise as a means of preventing gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, or perinatal depression cannot be reliably supported. Overall, the current evidence suffers from a lack of rigorous study design and compliance with physical activity interventions. Conclusion: Research thus far has been unable to consistently demonstrate proposed benefits of exercise in pregnancy, such as preventing gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, or perinatal depression. However, moderate- and high-intensity exercise in normal pregnancies is safe for the developing fetus and clearly has several important benefits. Thus, exercise should be encouraged according to the woman’s preconception physical activity level. PMID:26502446

  3. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  4. Analysis of basal physical fitness and lumbar muscle function according to indoor horse riding exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Hong, Chul Un; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to verify the effect of indoor horse riding exercise on basal physical exercise and lumbar muscular function. The subjects included were 20 healthy females, who participated in the horse riding exercise using SRider (Rider Co. & ChonbuK National Univ, Korea) for 30 minutes per day, 3 days per week, over a period of 8 weeks. The subjects were divided into 4 groups as follows, with 10 subjects in each group: Postural Balance Exercise mode (PBE), Abdomen Exercise mode (ADE), Whole body Exercise mode (WBE), and Multiple Exercise (MTE). Isokinetic muscular function test was performed before and after the horse riding exercise, to assess the effect of horse riding on basal physical exercise and lumbar muscular function. The test result on basal physical exercise and isokinetic muscular function showed improvements with variable degree in the back muscle strength, maximum joint torque, total work, and muscular acceleration time. The result signifies that the horse riding is an antagonistic exercise mainly performed on waist and abdomen area, and the machine induces persistent muscle contraction and causes myotonic induction enhancing the muscle strength. Indoor horse riding exercise proved its effectiveness for senior or the disabled people who need muscle exercises but have difficulties performing outdoor activities.

  5. Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

  6. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  7. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  8. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  9. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  10. Exercise therapy for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Busch, Angela J; Webber, Sandra C; Brachaniec, Mary; Bidonde, Julia; Bello-Haas, Vanina Dal; Danyliw, Adrienne D; Overend, Tom J; Richards, Rachel S; Sawant, Anuradha; Schachter, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome, a chronic condition typically characterized by widespread pain, nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and other somatic symptoms, negatively impacts physical and emotional function and reduces quality of life. Exercise is commonly recommended in the management of people with fibromyalgia, and interest in examining exercise benefits for those with the syndrome has grown substantially over the past 25 years. Research supports aerobic and strength training to improve physical fitness and function, reduce fibromyalgia symptoms, and improve quality of life. However, other forms of exercise (e.g., tai chi, yoga, Nordic walking, vibration techniques) and lifestyle physical activity also have been investigated to determine their effects. This paper highlights findings from recent randomized controlled trials and reviews of exercise for people with fibromyalgia, and includes information regarding factors that influence response and adherence to exercise to assist clinicians with exercise and physical activity prescription decision-making to optimize health and well-being.

  11. Diabetes and exercise.

    PubMed

    Lumb, Alistair

    2014-12-01

    Exercise has a beneficial effect on metabolic parameters affecting cardiovascular risk, such as lipids and blood glucose, and is a key component in both the prevention and the management of type 2 diabetes. Glycaemic control improves with both aerobic and resistance exercise in type 2 diabetes, but no glycaemic benefit is seen in type 1 diabetes. This probably results from glucose fluctuations commonly seen with exercise. Low and moderate intensity exercise are generally associated with a fall in blood glucose, and high intensity exercise can be associated with a rise in blood glucose. Trial evidence is suggestive of a reduction in cardiovascular risk with exercise, although evidence from prospective, randomised controlled trials is certainly not conclusive.

  12. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joanne M.; Wales, David J.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-02-07

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  13. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  14. Exercise for the Overweight Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Janis A.

    1990-01-01

    Exercise can help patients maintain lean body mass during weight loss. Although exercise is not extremely useful in shedding excess pounds, it helps keep off weight lost through calorie restriction. This article discusses the specifics of exercise prescription, types of exercise, motivation to exercise, and special problems such as diabetes. (SM)

  15. [MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BRUCELLA PERSISTENCE].

    PubMed

    Kulakov Yu K

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a dangerous zoonotic disease of animals and humans caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella, which are able to survive, multiply, and persist in host cells. The review is devoted to the Brucella species persistence connected to the molecular mechanisms of escape from innate and adaptive immunity of the host and active interaction of effector proteins of the type IV secretion system with the host's signaling pathways. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by Brucella for the intracellular persistence in the host organism can allow us to develop new and effective means for the prevention and treatment of chronic brucellosis infection.

  16. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  17. Autonomic responses to exercise: cortical and subcortical responses during post-exercise ischaemia and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-03-01

    Sustained isometric contraction of skeletal muscle causes an increase in blood pressure, due to an increase in cardiac output and an increase in total peripheral resistance-brought about by an increase in sympathetically-mediated vasoconstriction. Both central command and reflex inputs from metaboreceptors in the contracting muscles have been shown to contribute to this sympathetically mediated increase in blood pressure. Occluding the blood supply and trapping the metabolites in the contracted muscle (post-exercise ischaemia) has shown that, while heart rate returns to baseline following exercise, the increase in MSNA and blood pressure persists in the absence of central command-sustained by peripheral inputs. Post-exercise ischaemia activates group III and IV muscle afferents, which are also activated during noxious stimulation. Indeed, post-exercise ischaemia is painful, so what is the role of pain in the increase in blood pressure? Intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline causes a deep dull ache, not unlike that produced by post-exercise ischaemia, and we have shown that this can cause a sustained increase in MSNA and blood pressure. We have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of the brain to identify the cortical and subcortical sites involved in the sensory processing of muscle pain, and in the generation of the autonomic responses to muscle pain, produced either by post-exercise ischaemia or intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline. During static hand-grip exercise there were parallel increases in signal intensity in the contralateral primary motor cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebellar cortex that ceased at the end of the exercise, reflecting the start and end of central command. Progressive increases during the contraction phase occurred in the contralateral insula, as well as the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, and continued during the period of post-exercise ischaemia. Decreases in signal intensity occurred in the

  18. Development of a Mobile Phone-Based Weight Loss Lifestyle Intervention for Filipino Americans with Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol and Early Results From the PilAm Go4Health Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Filipino Americans are the second largest Asian subgroup in the United States, and were found to have the highest prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared to all Asian subgroups and non-Hispanic whites. In addition to genetic factors, risk factors for Filipinos that contribute to this health disparity include high sedentary rates and high fat diets. However, Filipinos are seriously underrepresented in preventive health research. Research is needed to identify effective interventions to reduce Filipino diabetes risks, subsequent comorbidities, and premature death. Objective The overall goal of this project is to assess the feasibility and potential efficacy of the Filipino Americans Go4Health Weight Loss Program (PilAm Go4Health). This program is a culturally adapted weight loss lifestyle intervention, using digital technology for Filipinos with T2D, to reduce their risk for metabolic syndrome. Methods This study was a 3-month mobile phone-based pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) weight loss intervention with a wait list active control, followed by a 3-month maintenance phase design for 45 overweight Filipinos with T2D. Participants were randomized to an intervention group (n=22) or active control group (n=23), and analyses of the results are underway. The primary outcome will be percent weight change of the participants, and secondary outcomes will include changes in waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, physical activity, fat intake, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake. Data analyses will include descriptive statistics to describe sample characteristics and a feasibility assessment based on recruitment, adherence, and retention. Chi-square, Fisher's exact tests, t-tests, and nonparametric rank tests will be used to assess characteristics of randomized groups. Primary analyses will use analysis of covariance and linear mixed models to compare primary and secondary outcomes at 3 months, compared by arm

  19. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of persistent cloaca.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Obayashi, Shintaro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    We report four cases of persistent cloaca diagnosed at 32-33 weeks of gestation. In cases of persistent cloaca, serial prenatal ultrasonography shows transient fetal ascites, enlarged cystic structures arising from the fetal pelvis. Our four cases of persistent cloaca were diagnosed prenatally. Persistent cloaca should be considered in any female fetus presenting with hydronephrosis and a large cystic lesion arising from the pelvis as assessed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Neither pulmonary hypoplasia nor severe oligohydramnios were found in any of our four cases, and they each had a good prognosis. Prenatal diagnosis allows time for parental counseling and delivery planning at a tertiary care center for neonatal intensive care and pediatric surgery.

  1. Object-oriented Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  2. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  3. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  4. How to avoid exercise injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000859.htm How to avoid exercise injuries To use the sharing features on this ... injury and stay safe during exercise. What Causes Exercise Injuries? Some of the most common causes of ...

  5. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing ... and easily. DO NOT hold your breath. Balance Exercises You can do some balance exercises during everyday ...

  6. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  7. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  8. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  9. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  10. Exercise and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Thomas W.

    This book paints a broad picture of the role of exercise in children's health and provides information for the physician and other health care providers on healthful forms of physical activity for children. The book is divided into three parts: (1) "Developmental Exercise Physiology: The Physiological Basis of Physical Fitness in Children"; (2)…

  11. Exercise through Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  12. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... to make sure that the asthma unrelated to exercise is well controlled. For many children this means the regular ... for using an inhaler. If the asthma is well controlled but your child still has problems during or after exercise, let your child’s doctor know. The following are ...

  13. Exercise: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Dangardt, Frida J; McKenna, William J; Lüscher, Thomas F; Deanfield, John E

    2013-09-01

    Physical activity and exercise have been associated with reduced cardiovascular risk, morbidity, and mortality, as well as all-cause mortality, both in the general population and in patients with various forms of cardiovascular disease. Increasing amounts of exercise are associated with incremental reductions in mortality, but considerable benefits have been found even with a low level of exercise. Exercise is beneficial for most individuals, but risks exist. Exercise is associated with reduced long-term morbidity and mortality, but acute exercise can transiently increase the risk of fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular events. Although tragic, these events are very rare, and even to some extent preventable with screening programmes. Low-intensity physical activity is important and beneficial to all individuals, including those with a high risk of adverse cardiovascular events. In individuals who are physically fit and who do not have genetic predisposition to, or signs of, cardiovascular disease, the greater the intensity and amount of exercise, the greater the health benefits. Nevertheless, effective strategies to encourage exercise in the population are lacking. A sustained increase in physical activity is likely to require more than individual advice, and needs to include urban planning and possibly even legislation.

  14. Exercising after Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... before beginning a new exercise program. Benefits of Exercise for Post-Menopausal Women Helps prevent osteoporosis by keeping bone and cartilage tissue strong and healthy. Reduces the risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular diseases by increasing heart and respiratory rates. Keeps your ...

  15. Saliva composition and exercise.

    PubMed

    Chicharro, J L; Lucía, A; Pérez, M; Vaquero, A F; Ureña, R

    1998-07-01

    Little attention has been directed toward identifying the changes which occur in salivary composition in response to exercise. To address this, our article first refers to the main aspects of salivary gland physiology. A knowledge of the neural control of salivary secretion is especially important for the understanding of the effects of exertion on salivary secretion. Both salivary output and composition depend on the activity of the autonomic nervous system and any modification of this activity can be observed indirectly by alternations in the salivary excretion. The effects of physical activity (with reference to factors such as exercise intensity and duration, or type of exercise protocol) on salivary composition are then considered. Exercise might indeed induce changes in several salivary components such as immunoglobulins, hormones, lactate, proteins and electrolytes. Saliva composition might therefore be used as an alternative noninvasive indicator of the response of the different body tissues and systems to physical exertion. In this respect, the response of salivary amylase and salivary electrolytes to incremental levels of exercise is of particular interest. Beyond a certain intensity of exercise, and coinciding with the accumulation of blood lactate (anaerobic threshold or AT), a 'saliva threshold' (Tsa) does indeed exist. Tsa is the point during exercise at which the levels of salivary alpha-amylase and electrolytes (especially Na+) also begin to rise above baseline levels. The occurrence of the 2 thresholds (AT and Tsa) might, in turn, be attributable to the same underlying mechanism, that of increased adrenal sympathetic activity at high exercise intensities.

  16. Lab Exercises for Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Brett D.; And Others

    This monograph presents descriptions of various exercises and athletic activities with a kinesiological and biomechanical analysis of the muscle systems involved. It is intended as examples of laboratory activities and projects in a college course in kinesiology. A listing of the required laboratory exercises precedes the examples. Specific…

  17. Exercise Against Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Michal; Sherman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Physical activity is useful for preventing and easing depression symptoms. When prescribing exercise as an adjunct to medication and psychotherapy, physicians must consider each patient's individual circumstances. Hopelessness and fatigue can make physical exercise difficult. A feasible, flexible, and pleasurable program has the best chance for…

  18. Using implicit attitudes of exercise importance to predict explicit exercise dependence symptoms and exercise behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lauren N.; Smith, April R.; Fussner, Lauren M.; Dodd, Dorian R.; Clerkin, Elise M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives ”Fast” (i.e., implicit) processing is relatively automatic; “slow” (i.e., explicit) processing is relatively controlled and can override automatic processing. These different processing types often produce different responses that uniquely predict behaviors. In the present study, we tested if explicit, self-reported symptoms of exercise dependence and an implicit association of exercise as important predicted exercise behaviors and change in problematic exercise attitudes. Design We assessed implicit attitudes of exercise importance and self-reported symptoms of exercise dependence at Time 1. Participants reported daily exercise behaviors for approximately one month, and then completed a Time 2 assessment of self-reported exercise dependence symptoms. Method Undergraduate males and females (Time 1, N = 93; Time 2, N = 74) tracked daily exercise behaviors for one month and completed an Implicit Association Test assessing implicit exercise importance and subscales of the Exercise Dependence Questionnaire (EDQ) assessing exercise dependence symptoms. Results Implicit attitudes of exercise importance and Time 1 EDQ scores predicted Time 2 EDQ scores. Further, implicit exercise importance and Time 1 EDQ scores predicted daily exercise intensity while Time 1 EDQ scores predicted the amount of days exercised. Conclusion Implicit and explicit processing appear to uniquely predict exercise behaviors and attitudes. Given that different implicit and explicit processes may drive certain exercise factors (e.g., intensity and frequency, respectively), these behaviors may contribute to different aspects of exercise dependence. PMID:26195916

  19. Physical exercise and health.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Alberto; Masiá, M Dolores; Galve, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is an established recommendation for preventing and treating the main modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Performing physical activity of moderate intensity for a minimum of 30 min 5 days a week or of high intensity for a minimum of 20 min 3 days a week improves functional capacity and is associated with reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Physical exercise induces physiological cardiovascular adaptations that improve physical performance, and only in extreme cases can these adaptations lead to an increased risk of physical exercise-associated complications. The incidence of sudden death or serious complications during physical exercise is very low and is concentrated in people with heart diseases or with pathological cardiac adaptation to exercise. Most of these cases can be detected by cardiology units or well-trained professionals.

  20. Integrative biology of exercise.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A; Hargreaves, Mark; Joyner, Michael J; Zierath, Juleen R

    2014-11-06

    Exercise represents a major challenge to whole-body homeostasis provoking widespread perturbations in numerous cells, tissues, and organs that are caused by or are a response to the increased metabolic activity of contracting skeletal muscles. To meet this challenge, multiple integrated and often redundant responses operate to blunt the homeostatic threats generated by exercise-induced increases in muscle energy and oxygen demand. The application of molecular techniques to exercise biology has provided greater understanding of the multiplicity and complexity of cellular networks involved in exercise responses, and recent discoveries offer perspectives on the mechanisms by which muscle "communicates" with other organs and mediates the beneficial effects of exercise on health and performance.

  1. The Effect of Regular Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Daniel A.; Baker, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of regular exercise training on insulin sensitivity in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the pooled data available from randomised controlled trials. In addition, we sought to determine whether short-term periods of physical inactivity diminish the exercise-induced improvement in insulin sensitivity. Eligible trials included exercise interventions that involved ≥3 exercise sessions, and reported a dynamic measurement of insulin sensitivity. There was a significant pooled effect size (ES) for the effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity (ES, –0.588; 95% confidence interval [CI], –0.816 to –0.359; P<0.001). Of the 14 studies included for meta-analyses, nine studies reported the time of data collection from the last exercise bout. There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity in favour of exercise versus control between 48 and 72 hours after exercise (ES, –0.702; 95% CI, –1.392 to –0.012; P=0.046); and this persisted when insulin sensitivity was measured more than 72 hours after the last exercise session (ES, –0.890; 95% CI, –1.675 to –0.105; P=0.026). Regular exercise has a significant benefit on insulin sensitivity in adults with T2DM and this may persist beyond 72 hours after the last exercise session. PMID:27535644

  2. "It's exercise or nothing": a qualitative analysis of exercise dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bamber, D; Cockerill, I; Rodgers, S; Carroll, D

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To explore, using qualitative methods, the concept of exercise dependence. Semistructured interviews were undertaken with subjects screened for exercise dependence and eating disorders. Methods—Female exercisers, four in each case, were allocated a priori to four groups: primary exercise dependent; secondary exercise dependent, where there was a coincidence of exercise dependence and an eating disorder; eating disordered; control, where there was no evidence of either exercise dependence or eating disorder. They were asked about their exercise and eating attitudes and behaviour, as well as about any history of psychological distress. Their narratives were taped, transcribed, and analysed from a social constructionist perspective using QSR NUD*IST. Results—Participants classified as primary exercise dependent either showed no evidence of exercise dependent attitudes and behaviour or, if they exhibited features of exercise dependence, displayed symptoms of an eating disorder. Only the latter reported a history of psychological distress, similar to that exhibited by women classified as secondary exercise dependent or eating disordered. For secondary exercise dependent and eating disordered women, as well as for controls, the narratives largely confirmed the a priori classification. Conclusions—Where exercise dependence was manifest, it was always in the context of an eating disorder, and it was this co-morbidity, in addition to eating disorders per se, that was associated with psychological distress. As such, these qualitative data support the concept of secondary, but not primary, exercise dependence. Key Words: exercise dependence; eating disorders; psychological distress; anorexia; bulimia PMID:11131229

  3. [Exercise tests in spirometry].

    PubMed

    Löllgen, H; Dirschedl, P; Fahrenkrog, U

    1994-01-01

    Actual situation: There is a great variety of exercise programs (formerly called protocols) used in daily routine and general practice. Exercise programs vary with increments, step-duration, speed and grade, although standard recommendations have been published recently. In the USA, the Bruce program is widely accepted, although some criticism has been published. Comparing different exercise programs it is obvious, that maximal values (VO2, heart rate etc.) are only moderately affected by the program, but submaximal values are strongly influenced by the methodological procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of the different exercise testing procedures will be presented. As we need some standardized exercise programs to avoid "free-style ergometry", recommendations may be based on the following assumptions: Exercise testing should not be too short nor too long (10-12 min total test time), work rate increments should be intermediate (adapted to physical fitness), work rate steps should be about 2 min or an individualized ramp test should be used. Exercise test programs have to be selected according to the patient's fitness, to the disease or function to be studied, and to the laboratory setting. Standardization is strongly recommended.

  4. Exercise and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David J; Eckstein, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Exercise remains an extremely popular leisure time activity in many countries throughout the western world. It is widely promoted in the lay press as having salutory benefits for weight control, disease management advantages for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in addition to improving psychological well-being amongst an array of other benefits. In contrast, however, the lay press and community perception is also that exercise is potentially deleterious to one's joints. The purpose of this review is to consider what osteoarthritis (OA) is and provide an overview of the epidemiology of OA focusing on validated risk factors for its development. In particular the role of both exercise and occupational activity in OA will be described as well as the role of exercise to the joints’ tissues (particularly cartilage) and the role of exercise in disease management. Despite the common misconception that exercise is deleterious to one's joints, in the absence of joint injury there is no evidence to support this notion. Rather it would appear that exercise has positive salutory benefits for joint tissues in addition to its other health benefits. PMID:19207981

  5. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise.

  6. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  7. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Schiller, Steven R.; Todd, Annika; Billingsley, Megan A.; Goldman, Charles A.; Schwartz, Lisa C.

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  8. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…

  9. Non-Persisting Student Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and opinions of the non-persisting students at Moraine Valley Community College. A random sample of 500 non-persisting students was selected, with equal numbers of full-time and part-time ex-students. Separate questionnaires were used for non-persisting full-time and non-persisting part-time…

  10. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Vestibular Disorder Family Support Network Desorden Vestibular/Vértigo - En Español הפרעות ... What is a Home VRT program? During vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT), home exercises ...

  11. Exercise Metabolism: Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A; Maughan, Ronald J; Hargreaves, Mark

    2015-07-07

    The past 25 years have witnessed major advances in our knowledge of how exercise activates cellular, molecular, and biochemical pathways with regulatory roles in training response adaptation, and how muscle "cross-talk" with other organs is a mechanism by which physical activity exerts its beneficial effects on "whole-body" health. However, during the late 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries, scientific debate in the field of exercise metabolism centered on questions related to the sources of energy for muscular activity, diet-exercise manipulations to alter patterns of fuel utilization, as well as the factors limiting physical work capacity. Posing novel scientific questions and utilizing cutting-edge techniques, the contributions made by the great pioneers of the 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries laid the foundation on which much of our present knowledge of exercise metabolism is based and paved the way for future discoveries in the field.

  12. Parkinson's Disease: Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... many types of exercise. Biking, running, tai chi, yoga , Pilates, dance , weight training, non-contact boxing, qi gong and more all have been shown to have positive effects on symptoms for people with Parkinson’s. Researchers in ...

  13. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease - treadmill References Balady GJ, Morise AP. Exercise testing. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  14. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... do a push-up or swing across the monkey bars at the playground? Those are exercises that ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  15. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... hours of studying burn mental energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. ...

  16. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  17. Realism in Exercises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    me expand on this thesis just a bit. My contention is that in every exercise, even the ones like Wintex- Cimex which are supposed to test the logistics...Wintex- Cimex and Gallant Eagle, occur every other year and in the off-year there is a complimentary FTX. Addit-ionally, there is usually one big CPX...spares calculations, and other logistics concerns. 3-2 Observation and Participation The researcher observed the winter exercise known as Wintex- Cimex

  18. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  19. Respiratory factors limiting exercise.

    PubMed

    Bye, P T; Farkas, G A; Roussos, C

    1983-01-01

    The question of respiratory factors limiting exercise has been examined in terms of possible limitations arising from the function of gas exchange, the respiratory mechanics, the energetics of the respiratory muscles, or the development of respiratory muscle fatigue. Exercise capacity is curtailed in the presence of marked hypoxia, and this is readily observed in patients with chronic airflow limitation and interstitial lung disease and in some athletes at high intensities of exercise. In patients with interstitial lung disease, gas exchange abnormality--partly the result of diffusion disequilibrium for oxygen transfer--occurs during exercise despite abnormally high ventilations. In contrast, in certain athletes arterial hypoxemia has been documented during heavy exercise, apparently as a result of relative hypoventilation. During strenuous exercise the maximum expiratory flow volume curves are attained both by patients with chronic airflow limitation and by normal subjects, in particular when they breathe dense gas, so that a mechanical constraint is imposed on further increases in ventilation. Similarly, the force velocity characteristics of the inspiratory muscles may also impose a constraint to further increases in inspiratory flows that affects the ability to increase ventilation. In addition, the oxygen cost of maintaining high ventilations is large. Analysis of results from blood flow experiments reveal a substantial increase in blood flow to the respiratory muscles during exercise, with the result that oxygen supply to the rest of the body may be lessened. Alternatively, high exercise ventilations may not be sustained indefinitely owing to the development of respiratory muscle fatigue that results in hypoventilation and reduced arterial oxygen tension.

  20. Pulmonary circulation at exercise.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Chesler, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high-flow and low-pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg/min/L in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg/min/L over four to six decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20 to 25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40 to 50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease.

  1. Rhinophototherapy in persistent allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bella, Zsolt; Kiricsi, Ágnes; Viharosné, Éva Dósa-Rácz; Dallos, Attila; Perényi, Ádám; Kiss, Mária; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos; Jóri, József; Rovó, László; Kadocsa, Edit

    2017-03-01

    Previous published results have revealed that Rhinolight(®) intranasal phototherapy is safe and effective in intermittent allergic rhinitis. The present objective was to assess whether phototherapy is also safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis. Thirty-four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis were randomized into two groups; twenty-five subjects completed the study. The Rhinolight(®) group was treated with a combination of UV-B, UV-A, and high-intensity visible light, while the placebo group received low-intensity visible white light intranasal phototherapy on a total of 13 occasions in 6 weeks. The assessment was based on the diary of symptoms, nasal inspiratory peak flow, quantitative smell threshold, mucociliary transport function, and ICAM-1 expression of the epithelial cells. All nasal symptom scores and nasal inspiratory peak flow measurements improved significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group relative to the placebo group and this finding persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. The smell and mucociliary functions did not change significantly in either group. The number of ICAM-1 positive cells decreased non-significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group. No severe side-effects were reported during the treatment period. These results suggest that Rhinolight(®) treatment is safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis.

  2. Retrospection and Persistent School Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses data based on the perceptions of 128 persistent school absentees on their initial and continued reasons for missing school. The findings suggest that a greater proportion of the students were inclined to blame their institutions, rather than social or psychological factors, for their behavior. (SSH)

  3. [Exercise capacity after heart valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D; Niehues, R; Schulte, H D; Strauer, B E

    1994-01-01

    Exercise capacity following heart-valve replacement is dependent on how close to normal the artificial device can restore valve function, to what degree a preoperative impaired myocardial function and/or an increased pulmonary vascular resistance is normalized. The postoperative functional result can be determined by the subjective improvement of the patient, his functional capacity, exercise capacity, the central hemodynamics at rest and during exercise, and the systolic and diastolic function of the left and right ventricular myocardium. The subjective improvement of individual symptoms is obviously dependent on the degree of postoperative normalization of hemodynamics, especially of pressures in the pulmonary circulation. Subjective improvement can be objectified by comparing the functional capacities before and after surgery. Post-operative normalization of central hemodynamics and myocardial function does not happen immediately but within 3 to more than 12 months. A 12-month period can generally be expected in patients with mitral stenosis and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (> 400 dyn.sec.cm-5) prior to surgery. In patients with mitral and aortic regurgitation as well as with aortic stenosis and preoperative decrease of their left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise, continuous improvement of left ventricular pump function also may need up to 12 months. Physiological hemodynamic conditions generally are not restored by valve replacement. All prostheses are stenotic to forward blood flow because of the obstruction created by the narrowing of the valve area by sewing cuff and valve poppet. This may result in a hemodynamically important stenosis, especially after atrio-ventricular valve implantation, and may limit subjective and functional improvement. Exercise capacity after aortic valve replacement depends mainly on whether or not myocardial damage persists postoperatively. A workload of 1.5 w/kg body weight (BW) has been performed by 100% of

  4. Parkinson disease and exercise.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Falvo, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder. PD was originally attributed to neuronal loss within the substantia nigra pars compacta, and a concomitant loss of dopamine. PD is now thought to be a multisystem disorder that involves not only the dopaminergic system, but other neurotransmitter systems whose role may become more prominent as the disease progresses (189). PD is characterized by four cardinal symptoms, resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, all of which are motor. However, PD also may include any combination of a myriad of nonmotor symptoms (195). Both motor and nonmotor symptoms may impact the ability of those with PD to participate in exercise and/or impact the effects of that exercise on those with PD. This article provides a comprehensive overview of PD, its symptoms and progression, and current treatments for PD. Among these treatments, exercise is currently at the forefront. People with PD retain the ability to participate in many forms of exercise and generally respond to exercise interventions similarly to age-matched subjects without PD. As such, exercise is currently an area receiving substantial research attention as investigators seek interventions that may modify the progression of the disease, perhaps through neuroprotective mechanisms.

  5. Exercise, Heart and Health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity provides a variety of health benefits, including improvement in cardiopulmonary or metabolic status, reduction of the risk of coronary artery disease or stroke, prevention of cancer, and decrease in total mortality. Exercise-related cardiac events are occasionally reported during highly competitive sports activity or vigorous exercises. However, the risk of sudden death is extremely low during vigorous exercise, and habitual vigorous exercise actually decreases the risk of sudden death during exercise. The cause of sudden death is ischemic in older subjects (≥35 years old), while cardiomyopathies or genetic ion channel diseases are important underlying pathology in younger (<35 years old) victims. The subgroup of patients who are particularly at higher risk of exercise-related sudden death may be identified in different ways, such as pre-participation history taking, physical examination and/or supplementary cardiac evaluation. Limitations exist because current diagnostic tools are not sufficient to predict a coronary artery plaque with potential risk of disruption and/or an acute thrombotic occlusion. Proper and cost-effective methods for identification of younger subjects with cardiac structural problems or genetic ion channel diseases are still controversial. PMID:21519508

  6. Exercise, heart and health.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gi-Byoung

    2011-03-01

    Regular physical activity provides a variety of health benefits, including improvement in cardiopulmonary or metabolic status, reduction of the risk of coronary artery disease or stroke, prevention of cancer, and decrease in total mortality. Exercise-related cardiac events are occasionally reported during highly competitive sports activity or vigorous exercises. However, the risk of sudden death is extremely low during vigorous exercise, and habitual vigorous exercise actually decreases the risk of sudden death during exercise. The cause of sudden death is ischemic in older subjects (≥35 years old), while cardiomyopathies or genetic ion channel diseases are important underlying pathology in younger (<35 years old) victims. The subgroup of patients who are particularly at higher risk of exercise-related sudden death may be identified in different ways, such as pre-participation history taking, physical examination and/or supplementary cardiac evaluation. Limitations exist because current diagnostic tools are not sufficient to predict a coronary artery plaque with potential risk of disruption and/or an acute thrombotic occlusion. Proper and cost-effective methods for identification of younger subjects with cardiac structural problems or genetic ion channel diseases are still controversial.

  7. Intense Exercise Promotes Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis But Not Spatial Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    So, Ji H.; Huang, Chao; Ge, Minyan; Cai, Guangyao; Zhang, Lanqiu; Lu, Yisheng; Mu, Yangling

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis persists throughout adult life and plays an important role in learning and memory. Although the influence of physical exercise on neurogenesis has been intensively studied, there is controversy in regard to how the impact of exercise may vary with its regime. Less is known about how distinct exercise paradigms may differentially affect the learning behavior. Here we found that, chronic moderate treadmill running led to an increase of cell proliferation, survival, neuronal differentiation, and migration. In contrast, intense running only promoted neuronal differentiation and migration, which was accompanied with lower expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, and erythropoietin. In addition, the intensely but not mildly exercised animals exhibited a lower mitochondrial activity in the dentate gyrus. Correspondingly, neurogenesis induced by moderate but not intense exercise was sufficient to improve the animal’s ability in spatial pattern separation. Our data indicate that the effect of exercise on spatial learning is intensity-dependent and may involve mechanisms other than a simple increase in the number of new neurons. PMID:28197080

  8. Exercise Protects against PCB-Induced Inflammation and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Margaret O.; Petriello, Michael C.; Han, Sung Gu; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Esser, Karyn; Hennig, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that contribute to the initiation of cardiovascular disease. Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease; however, whether exercise can modulate PCB-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated cardiovascular risk factors is unknown. We examined the effects of exercise on coplanar PCB- induced cardiovascular risk factors including oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired glucose tolerance, hypercholesteremia, and endothelium-dependent relaxation. Male ApoE−/− mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups (voluntary wheel running) over a 12 week period. Half of each group was exposed to vehicle or PCB 77 at weeks 1, 2, 9, and 10. For ex vivo studies, male C57BL/6 mice exercised via voluntary wheel training for 5 weeks and then were administered with vehicle or PCB 77 24 hours before vascular reactivity studies were performed. Exposure to coplanar PCB increased risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypercholesteremia. The 12 week exercise intervention significantly reduced these pro-atherogenic parameters. Exercise also upregulated antioxidant enzymes including phase II detoxification enzymes. Sedentary animals exposed to PCB 77 exhibited endothelial dysfunction as demonstrated by significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by exercise. Lifestyle modifications such as aerobic exercise could be utilized as a therapeutic approach for the prevention of adverse cardiovascular health effects induced by environmental pollutants such as PCBs. Keywords: exercise, polychlorinated biphenyl, endothelial function, antioxidant response, cardiovascular disease, inflammation, oxidative stress PMID:25586614

  9. The effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Daniel J; Abraham, Jean M; Rothman, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Employers are increasingly trying to promote healthy behaviors, including regular exercise, through wellness programs that offer financial incentives. However, there is limited evidence that these types of programs affect exercise habits within employee populations. In this study, we estimate the effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise. Since 2008, the University of Minnesota's Fitness Rewards Program has offered a $20 monthly incentive to encourage fitness center utilization among its employees. Using 2006 to 2010 health risk assessments and university administrative files for 2972 employees, we conducted a retrospective cohort study utilizing propensity score methods to estimate the effect of participation in the Fitness Rewards Program on self-reported exercise days per week from 2008 to 2010. On average, participation in the program led to an increase of 0.59 vigorous exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.42, 0.78) and 0.43 strength-building exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.31, 0.58) in 2008 for participants relative to non-participants. Increases in exercise persisted through 2010. Employees reporting less frequent exercise prior to the program were least likely to participate in the program, but when they participated they had the largest increases in exercise compared to non-participants. Offering an incentive for fitness center utilization encourages higher levels of exercise. Future policies may want to concentrate on how to motivate participation among individuals who are less frequently physically active.

  10. Acute exercise ameliorates differences in insulin resistance between physically active and sedentary overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rachael K; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2014-07-01

    Although regular exercise is associated with reduced cardiometabolic disease risk among overweight adults, it remains unclear whether much of the health benefits of exercise are derived from the most recent session(s) of exercise or if they are the result of adaptations stemming from weeks, months, or even years of training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of habitual and acute exercise on key markers of cardiometabolic disease risk in overweight adults. We compared insulin sensitivity index (ISI) using an oral glucose tolerance test, blood pressure (BP), blood lipids, and systemic inflammatory cytokines in 12 overweight to mildly obese adults (BMI: 27-34 kg/m(2)) who exercise regularly (EX; >2.5 h exercise per week) with a well-matched cohort of 12 nonexercisers (Non-EX). Baseline measurements in EX were performed exactly 3 days after exercise, whereas Non-EX remained sedentary. We repeated these measurements the day after a session of exercise in both groups. At baseline, ISI was significantly greater in EX versus Non-EX (3.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.3 ± 0.2; p = 0.02), but BP, blood lipids, and plasma concentration of the systemic inflammatory cytokines we measured were not different between groups. Acute exercise increased ISI the next morning in Non-EX (2.3 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.03) but not EX. As a result, ISI was similar between groups the morning after exercise. In summary, exercising regularly was accompanied by a persistent improvement in insulin sensitivity that lasted at least 3 days after exercise in overweight adults, but just one session of exercise increased insulin sensitivity among sedentary overweight adults to levels equivalent to the regular exercisers.

  11. Acute exercise ameliorates differences in insulin resistance between physically active and sedentary overweight adults

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Rachael K.; Horowitz, Jeffrey F.

    2014-01-01

    Although regular exercise is associated with reduced cardiometabolic disease risk among overweight adults, it remains unclear whether much of the health benefits of exercise are derived from the most recent session(s) of exercise or if they are the result of adaptations stemming from weeks, months, or even years of training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of habitual and acute exercise on key markers of cardiometabolic disease risk in overweight adults. We compared insulin sensitivity index (ISI) using an oral glucose tolerance test, blood pressure (BP), blood lipids, and systemic inflammatory cytokines in 12 overweight to mildly obese adults (BMI: 27–34 kg/m2) who exercise regularly (EX; >2.5 h exercise per week) with a well-matched cohort of 12 nonexercisers (Non-EX). Baseline measurements in EX were performed exactly 3 days after exercise, whereas Non-EX remained sedentary. We repeated these measurements the day after a session of exercise in both groups. At baseline, ISI was significantly greater in EX versus Non-EX (3.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.3 ± 0.2; p = 0.02), but BP, blood lipids, and plasma concentration of the systemic inflammatory cytokines we measured were not different between groups. Acute exercise increased ISI the next morning in Non-EX (2.3 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.03) but not EX. As a result, ISI was similar between groups the morning after exercise. In summary, exercising regularly was accompanied by a persistent improvement in insulin sensitivity that lasted at least 3 days after exercise in overweight adults, but just one session of exercise increased insulin sensitivity among sedentary overweight adults to levels equivalent to the regular exercisers. PMID:24773370

  12. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk.

  13. Regular Exercise Enhances Task-Based Industriousness in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Nicholas C.; Labuschagne, Lisa G.; Lura, Brent G.; Hillman, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals vary greatly in their willingness to select and persist in effortful tasks, even when high-effort will knowingly result in high-reward. Individuals who select and successively complete effortful, goal-directed tasks can be described as industrious. Trying to increase one’s industriousness is desirable from a productivity standpoint, yet intrinsically challenging given that effort expenditure is generally aversive. Here we show that in laboratory rats, a basic physical exercise regimen (20 min/day, five days/week) is sufficient to increase industriousness across a battery of subsequent testing tasks. Exercised rats outperformed their non-exercised counterparts in tasks designed to tax effort expenditure, strategic decision-making, problem solving and persistence. These increases in performance led to quicker reward obtainment and greater reward gain over time, and could not be accounted for simply by increased locomotor activity. Our results suggest that a basic exercise regimen can enhance effortful goal-directed behaviour in goal-directed tasks, which highlights a potential productivity benefit of staying physically active. PMID:26083255

  14. Persistent Identifiers Implementation in EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K. " Rama"

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides the motivation for and status of implementation of persistent identifiers in NASA's Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The motivation is provided from the point of view of long-term preservation of datasets such that a number of questions raised by current and future users can be answered easily and precisely. A number of artifacts need to be preserved along with datasets to make this possible, especially when the authors of datasets are no longer available to address users questions. The artifacts and datasets need to be uniquely and persistently identified and linked with each other for full traceability, understandability and scientific reproducibility. Current work in the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project and the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) in assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) is discussed as well as challenges that remain to be addressed in the future.

  15. Persistent Monitoring Platforms Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C L

    2007-02-22

    This project was inspired and motivated by the need to provide better platforms for persistent surveillance. In the years since the inception of this work, the need for persistence of surveillance platforms has become even more widely appreciated, both within the defense community and the intelligence community. One of the most demanding technical requirements for such a platform involves the power plant and energy storage system, and this project concentrated almost exclusively on the technology associated with this system for a solar powered, high altitude, unmanned aircraft. An important realization for the feasibility of such solar powered aircraft, made at the outset of this project, was that thermal energy may be stored with higher specific energy density than for any other known practical form of rechargeable energy storage. This approach has proved to be extraordinarily fruitful, and a large number of spin-off applications of this technology were developed in the course of this project.

  16. Search along persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2008-06-01

    Optimal search strategies and their implementations in biological systems are a subject of active research. Here we study a search problem which is motivated by the hunt of sperm cells for the egg. We ask for the probability for an active swimmer to find a target under the condition that the swimmer starts at a certain distance from the target. We find that success probability is maximal for a certain level of fluctuations characterized by the persistence length of the swimming path of the swimmer. We derive a scaling law for the optimal persistence length as a function of the initial target distance and search time by mapping the search on a polymer physics problem.

  17. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities.

  18. Exercise and Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Phu, Steven; Boersma, Derek; Duque, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a major component of the frailty syndrome and is also a strong predictor of disability, morbidity, and mortality in older persons. Without any available pharmacological intervention to sarcopenia, non-pharmacological interventions are the only option to prevent these poor outcomes in sarcopenic patients. Among those interventions, physical activity with or without protein supplementation has demonstrated to be effective in improving muscle mass and function and in preventing disability and frailty in older persons. Additionally, to the beneficial effect of physical activity on metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, a regular exercise program (3 times/wk) that includes resistance and endurance exercise training would have a major positive effect on sarcopenic muscle through improving muscle mass, strength, and function. In this review, we looked at the effect of exercise on sarcopenic frail older persons from the biological aspects of the response of the muscle to exercise to some practical aspects of exercise prescription in this high-risk population. We conclude that, although challenging, older persons should be encouraged to participate in this type of programs, which would improve not only their function and independence but also their quality of life.

  19. Fish under exercise.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish well-being. Here, we review existing data on teleost fish that indicate that sustained exercise at optimal speeds enhances muscle growth and has consequences for flesh quality. Potential added benefits of sustained exercise may be delay of ovarian development and stimulation of immune status. Exercise could represent a natural, noninvasive, and economical approach to improve growth, flesh quality as well as welfare of aquacultured fish: a FitFish for a healthy consumer. All these issues are important for setting directions for policy decisions and future studies in this area. For this purpose, the FitFish workshop on the Swimming Physiology of Fish ( http://www.ub.edu/fitfish2010 ) was organized to bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists using exercise models, industrial partners, and policy makers. Sixteen international experts from Europe, North America, and Japan were invited to present their work and view on migration of fishes in their natural environment, beneficial effects of exercise, and applications for sustainable aquaculture. Eighty-eight participants from 19 different countries contributed through a poster session and round table discussion. Eight papers from invited speakers at the workshop have been contributed to this special issue on The Swimming Physiology of Fish.

  20. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  1. Diabetes and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Peirce, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    Exercise is frequently recommended in the management of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and can improve glucose uptake by increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering body adiposity. Both alone and when combined with diet and drug therapy, physical activity can result in improvements in glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. In addition, exercise can also help to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes, in particular in those at higher risk, and has an important role in reducing the significant worldwide burden of this type of diabetes. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the acute and long term physiological benefits of physical activity, although the precise duration, intensity, and type of exercise have yet to be fully elucidated. However, in type 1 diabetes, the expected improvements in glycaemic control with exercise have not been clearly established. Instead significant physical and psychological benefits of exercise can be achieved while careful education, screening, and planning allow the metabolic, microvascular, and macrovascular risks to be predicted and diminished. 


 PMID:10378067

  2. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  3. Resveratrol and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Baltaci, Saltuk Bugra; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recommended for a healthy lifestyle, moderate exercise is known to lead to oxidative stress, inflammation and muscle injury. Hence there are efforts to develop dietary strategies to counter the oxidative stress caused by physical activity. Recently, there has been an interest in the capability of resveratrol (RES) to modulate physical performance and prevent oxidative stress. Despite the inconsistency among reports regarding the topic, it has been suggested that RES delays fatigue by hindering lipid peroxidation. It is hypothesized that RES administration produces favorable effects on hepatic cell rejuvenation, exerts a regulatory effect on glucose metabolism, and preserves liver glycogen reserves that are diminished during physical activity. Consequently, there is a growing interest in the association between RES and exercise. The aim of the current review is to interpret the association between RES and exercise. PMID:27882212

  4. Blood flow in the brachial artery increases after intense cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Medbø, Jon Ingulf; Hisdal, Jonny; Stranden, Einar

    2009-01-01

    During cycling blood flow is redistributed from physically inactive tissues to working leg muscles. It is unknown how long this situation persists after very intense exercise or whether it differs between intense exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. It is also not known to what extent the redistribution differs between different types of non-active tissues. Therefore nine healthy young men cycled first for 2 min at 328 W (non-exhausting exercise, mean). Blood velocity in thigh and arm (ultrasound-doppler), perfusion of forearm skin (non-acral skin) and finger tip (acral skin, with arterio-venous anastomoses) were measured for 30 min after exercise (laser-doppler). To be able to study vascular resistance and central circulation, blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate (ECG), and stroke volume (ultrasound-doppler) were measured. Thereafter the subjects cycled at the same power to exhaustion (4 min), and the measurements were repeated. After both exercises mean blood pressure was unchanged (< or = 80 mm Hg) despite increased cardiac output (> or = + 30% vs. pre-exercise). Blood velocity in the brachial artery was higher during the whole recovery period than at rest (p< or =0.02; no differences between exercises). Blood perfusion of non-acral skin was unchanged from pre-exercise level after 2 min of non-exhausting exercise, but it was twice as high after 4 min cycling to exhaustion as at rest (p=0.02). Blood perfusion of acral skin rose after both exercises and did not differ between exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. In conclusion, arm blood flow increases above the pre-exercise level in the recovery period after short-lasting, strenuous exercise.

  5. Exercise acts as a drug; the pharmacological benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Vina, J; Sanchis-Gomar, F; Martinez-Bello, V; Gomez-Cabrera, M C

    2012-09-01

    The beneficial effects of regular exercise for the promotion of health and cure of diseases have been clearly shown. In this review, we would like to postulate the idea that exercise can be considered as a drug. Exercise causes a myriad of beneficial effects for health, including the promotion of health and lifespan, and these are reviewed in the first section of this paper. Then we deal with the dosing of exercise. As with many drugs, dosing is extremely important to get the beneficial effects of exercise. To this end, the organism adapts to exercise. We review the molecular signalling pathways involved in these adaptations because understanding them is of great importance to be able to prescribe exercise in an appropriate manner. Special attention must be paid to the psychological effects of exercise. These are so powerful that we would like to propose that exercise may be considered as a psychoactive drug. In moderate doses, it causes very pronounced relaxing effects on the majority of the population, but some persons may even become addicted to exercise. Finally, there may be some contraindications to exercise that arise when people are severely ill, and these are described in the final section of the review. Our general conclusion is that exercise is so effective that it should be considered as a drug, but that more attention should be paid to the dosing and to individual variations between patients.

  6. Exercise acts as a drug; the pharmacological benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vina, J; Sanchis-Gomar, F; Martinez-Bello, V; Gomez-Cabrera, MC

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of regular exercise for the promotion of health and cure of diseases have been clearly shown. In this review, we would like to postulate the idea that exercise can be considered as a drug. Exercise causes a myriad of beneficial effects for health, including the promotion of health and lifespan, and these are reviewed in the first section of this paper. Then we deal with the dosing of exercise. As with many drugs, dosing is extremely important to get the beneficial effects of exercise. To this end, the organism adapts to exercise. We review the molecular signalling pathways involved in these adaptations because understanding them is of great importance to be able to prescribe exercise in an appropriate manner. Special attention must be paid to the psychological effects of exercise. These are so powerful that we would like to propose that exercise may be considered as a psychoactive drug. In moderate doses, it causes very pronounced relaxing effects on the majority of the population, but some persons may even become addicted to exercise. Finally, there may be some contraindications to exercise that arise when people are severely ill, and these are described in the final section of the review. Our general conclusion is that exercise is so effective that it should be considered as a drug, but that more attention should be paid to the dosing and to individual variations between patients. PMID:22486393

  7. MOOCs and Persistence: Definitions and Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brent J.; Baker, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter argues for redefining the term "persistence" as it relates to MOOCs and considers how different measures produce different results in the research; it closes with a review of research on persistence in MOOCs.

  8. PERSISTENT CONTAMINANTS: NEW PRIORITIES, NEW CONCERNS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was adopted in 2001 to protect human health and the environment from chemicals that are highly toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative, and undergo long range transport. These POPs include 9 pesticides, polychlorin...

  9. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of animals in sinks can compromise persistence. Conversely, sinks can bolster population sizes, improving viability. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional persistence, we simulated the removal of sink hab...

  10. Exercise boosts immune response.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  11. The endocrinology of exercise.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Donald

    2013-04-01

    Some obese individuals do not get cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or certain cancers associated with obesity. These healthy obese individuals exercise regularly and reduce circulating levels of inflammatory mediators which are associated with the complications of obesity. Bloated white adipocytes located in ectopic locations such as the liver, produce these inflammatory mediators. Exercise, by reducing the excess storage of fat in these bloated fat cells, reduces the levels of circulating inflammatory mediators. The processes of gathering and creating new energy-rich substances, storing energy, and consuming energy-rich substances, and the specific contribution of several hormones to this process, are reviewed.

  12. Exercise following burn injury.

    PubMed

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Shore, Wendy S

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue is a major barrier to recovery for burned individuals. Studies indicate that a slow return to normal or near-normal muscle strength is the natural course of recovery. With no special interventions, other than the "usual care" tailored to the needs of the individual, postburn patients will make gradual improvement in strength and aerobic capacity. Using the principle of initial condition (the worse the initial condition, the greater the response to exercise intervention) the authors outline an augmented exercise program that should result in a robust improvement in aerobic capacity.

  13. Exercising Your Finger After an Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  14. Exercise: the Cellular 'Fountain of Youth'

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Exercise for Seniors Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Exercise for Seniors About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  15. ISS Update: SPRINT Exercise Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Lori Ploutz-Snyder, Ph.D., NASA Lead Exercise Physiology Scientist, about the SPRINT exercise program used by the crew members aboard the Inter...

  16. Eye Exercises and Reading Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Earl J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Evaluated with a total of 60 primary-grade children was the effectiveness in improving ocular motor control of three training programs: the Bender proprioceptive facilitative feedback exercises, the Marsden ball program, and perceptual exercises. (DB)

  17. Kegel exercises - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000141.htm Kegel exercises - self-care To use the sharing features on ... move up and down. How to do Kegel Exercises Once you know what the movement feels like, ...

  18. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  19. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients.

  20. Neuroimaging studies of factors related to exercise: rationale and design of a 9 month trial.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Stephen D; Martin, Laura E; Breslin, Florence J; Honas, Jeffery J; Willis, Erik A; Lepping, Rebecca J; Gibson, Cheryl A; Befort, Christie A; Lambourne, Kate; Burns, Jeffrey M; Smith, Bryan K; Sullivan, Debra K; Washburn, Richard A; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Donnelly, Joseph E; Savage, Cary R

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is high resulting from chronic imbalances between energy intake and expenditure. On the expenditure side, regular exercise is associated with health benefits, including enhanced brain function. The benefits of exercise are not immediate and require persistence to be realized. Brain regions associated with health-related decisions, such as whether or not to exercise or controlling the impulse to engage in immediately rewarding activities (e.g., sedentary behavior), include reward processing and cognitive control regions. A 9 month aerobic exercise study will be conducted in 180 sedentary adults (n = 90 healthy weight [BMI = 18.5 to 26.0 kg/m(2)]; n = 90 obese [BMI = 29.0 to 41.0 kg/m(2)) to examine the brain processes underlying reward processing and impulse control that may affect adherence in a new exercise regimen. The primary aim is to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine reward processing and impulse control among participants that adhere (exercise >80% of sessions) and those that do not adhere to a nine-month exercise intervention with secondary analyses comparing sedentary obese and sedentary healthy weight participants. Our results will provide valuable information characterizing brain activation underlying reward processing and impulse control in sedentary obese and healthy weight individuals. In addition, our results may identify brain activation predictors of adherence and success in the exercise program along with measuring the effects of exercise and improved fitness on brain activation.

  1. Physical exercise can reverse the deficit in fear memory induced by maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mello, Pâmela Billig; Benetti, Fernando; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2009-10-01

    Maternal deprivation during the first 10 days of life induces significant behavioral alterations in rodents which persist through adulthood. Physical exercise reduces the cognitive deficits associated with pharmacologic and pathological conditions. Here we investigated whether forced physical exercise alters memory deficits caused by postnatal maternal deprivation. Male rats were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) deprived, (3) exercised, and (4) deprived+exercised. In groups 2 and 4, pups were deprived from their mothers for 3h/day during the first 10 days post-birth. In groups 3 and 4, from postnatal day 45 (PND-45) on, animals were submitted to forced treadmill exercise. At adulthood, animals were submitted to four different behavioral tasks: open field, Morris water maze (MWM), object recognition (OR) and inhibitory avoidance (IA). Maternal deprivation had no effect on open field behavior, but disrupted memory in the three other tasks. Physical exercise alone had no effect, except for a slight enhancement of MWM learning. Importantly, physical exercise reversed the deficit of IA and reduced the deficit of spatial memory but not that of OR seen in deprived animals. It is possible that physical exercise may counteract the influence of maternal deprivation on neurohumoral or hormonal memory modulatory systems related to stress. Indeed, the decreasing order of the effect of exercise on the memory disturbances induced by deprivation roughly follows the descending degree of stress associated with each task (IA>MWM>OR). Maternal deprivation is known to hinder hormonal mechanisms involved in coping with stress.

  2. Neuroimaging Studies of Factors Related to Exercise: Rationale and design of a 9 month trial

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Stephen D.; Martin, Laura E.; Breslin, Florence J.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Willis, Erik A.; Lepping, Rebecca J.; Gibson, Cheryl A.; Befort, Christie A.; Lambourne, Kate; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Bryan K.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Savage, Cary R.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is high resulting from chronic imbalances between energy intake and expenditure. On the expenditure side, regular exercise is associated with health benefits, including enhanced brain function. The benefits of exercise are not immediate and require persistence to be realized. Brain regions associated with health-related decisions, such as whether or not to exercise or controlling the impulse to engage in immediately rewarding activities (e.g., sedentary behavior), include reward processing and cognitive control regions. A 9 month aerobic exercise study will be conducted in 180 sedentary adults (n = 90 healthy weight [BMI= 18.5 to 26.0 kg/m2]; n = 90 obese [BMI=29.0 to 41.0 kg/m2) to examine the brain processes underlying reward processing and impulse control that may affect adherence in a new exercise regimen. The primary aim is to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine reward processing and impulse control among participants that adhere (exercise >80% of sessions) and those that do not adhere to a nine-month exercise intervention with secondary analyses comparing sedentary obese and sedentary healthy weight participants. Our results will provide valuable information characterizing brain activation underlying reward processing and impulse control in sedentary obese and healthy weight individuals. In addition, our results may identify brain activation predictors of adherence and success in the exercise program along with measuring the effects of exercise and improved fitness on brain activation. PMID:24291150

  3. Exercise protects against PCB-induced inflammation and associated cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret O; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Esser, Karyn; Hennig, Bernhard

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that contribute to the initiation of cardiovascular disease. Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease; however, whether exercise can modulate PCB-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated cardiovascular risk factors is unknown. We examined the effects of exercise on coplanar PCB-induced cardiovascular risk factors including oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired glucose tolerance, hypercholesteremia, and endothelium-dependent relaxation. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups (voluntary wheel running) over a 12-week period. Half of each group was exposed to vehicle or PCB 77 at weeks 1, 2, 9, and 10. For ex vivo studies, male C57BL/6 mice exercised via voluntary wheel training for 5 weeks and then were administered with vehicle or PCB 77 24 h before vascular reactivity studies were performed. Exposure to coplanar PCB increased risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypercholesteremia. The 12-week exercise intervention significantly reduced these proatherogenic parameters. Exercise also upregulated antioxidant enzymes including phase II detoxification enzymes. Sedentary animals exposed to PCB 77 exhibited endothelial dysfunction as demonstrated by significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by exercise. Lifestyle modifications such as aerobic exercise could be utilized as a therapeutic approach for the prevention of adverse cardiovascular health effects induced by environmental pollutants such as PCBs.

  4. Exercise SHERWOOD FOREST. General Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-05-28

    guide the play of the exercise so as to obtain maximum training benefit for all participants. b. Control and monitor aggressor guerrilla activities , c...loaders, CW radio communication with deployed detachment. (2) Brief Exercise Director on guerrilla activities , (3) Advise Exercise Director on...Maneuver, Field Exercises , Simulated War Games, Training Encampments and other similar activities . c. AR 37-20, Administrative Control of Appropriations

  5. The Extraction of Information From Visual Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    This research sought to distinguish among three concepts of visual persistence by substituting the physical presence of the target stimulus while simultaneously inhibiting the formation of a persisting representation. Reportability of information about the stimuli was compared to a condition in which visual persistence was allowed to fully develop…

  6. A Grounded Theory of Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This grounded theory study investigates adult student persistence at a community college. Student persistence in college is a prerequisite for degree achievement, which correlates with higher earnings and overall better quality of life. Persistence rates remain low for adult students, who combine their college endeavors with responsibilities to…

  7. Intent to Persist at Religiously Affiliated Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansom, J. Mel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the secondary data analysis was to examine the attributes of students who intend to persist at the same religiously affiliated institution. The review of literature indicated that persistence has been studied extensively, but there has been only limited investigation of persistence focused on religiously affiliated institutions. The…

  8. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  9. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  10. Exercise and Fluid Balance Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlicht, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    One common piece of advice that exercise professionals give their clients is to drink water before, during, and after exercise. During exercise people can lose as much as three liters of water per hour (about 100 ounces) through sweat. Dehydration alters normal sweat patterns, which can lead to an increased core body temperature. Since most of the…

  11. VOCATIONAL TALENT EXERCISES, PART D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. School of Education.

    THIS WORKBOOK WAS DEVELOPED IN A CURRICULUM PROJECT, DESCRIBED IN VT 004 454, TO HELP YOUNG PEOPLE LEARN BASIC PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF MECHANICS AND TECHNOLOGY BY MEANS OF A SERIES OF APTITUDE TRAINING EXERCISES. IT IS THE LAST OF FOUR BOOKS WHICH PRESENT 30 EXERCISES DESIGNED FOR 30 CLASS PERIODS. THE EXERCISES ARE SIMILAR TO APTITUDE TEST…

  12. Exercising Control Over Memory Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Edwin M; Takacs, Adam

    2017-03-28

    Exercise can improve human cognition. A mechanistic connection between exercise and cognition has been revealed in several recent studies. Exercise increases cortical excitability and this in turn leads to enhanced memory consolidation. Together these studies dovetail with our growing understanding of memory consolidation and how it is regulated through changes in motor cortical excitability.

  13. Exercise behaviors after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jennifer; Li, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate exercise behaviors in adult burn survivors and to identify barriers to exercise in this population. A two-page questionnaire developed by the authors was administered on a single occasion to adults attending the ambulatory burns clinic at a metropolitan hospital. Data from 68 adult burn survivors were analyzed. Within this cohort, 59% of subjects reported exercising several times per week or more and the remaining 41% exercised once per week or less. There was no correlation among exercise frequency and age, TBSA, or hospital length of stay. Walking was the most common type of exercise, and subjects reported lower compliance with stretching and strengthening exercises. Physical condition and motivation were identified as the main barriers to exercise. Although this preliminary study reveals that a higher proportion of burn survivors engage in exercise compared with their healthy counterparts, a substantial number are exercising just once per week or less, below the recommended guidelines to improve physical fitness. Physical and occupational therapists play an important role in providing exercise prescription and education, as well as addressing barriers to exercise in burn survivors. The potential for further research into physical activity across all domains of life using a validated questionnaire is identified.

  14. The Role of Macronutrients in Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arterberry, Christopher M.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the role of macronutrients in exercise, examining research pertaining to exercise intensity, exercise duration, macronutrient intake, and mode of exercise as they pertain to both athletes and recreational exercisers. The paper explains that coaches and trainers must interpret and apply research findings to individual exercisers,…

  15. Cold urticaria with persistent weals.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L

    1981-06-01

    A patient with cold urticaria is described in whom weals appeared immediately after an ice cube test for 3 min and persisted for a week as a red, tender swelling. The duration of the oedema was dependent on the intensity of the immediate reaction. If the immediate wealing was blocked by treatment with an oral antihistamine 3 h before the ice cube test, no delayed reaction was seen. Antihistamines given after the immediate wealing had occurred did not influence the delayed reaction. Reactions to intradermally injected histamine, prostaglandin E, kallikrein, serotonin and serum appeared normal.

  16. Exercise for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an hour of physical activity every day. Regular exercise helps children Feel less stressed Feel better about themselves Feel more ready to learn in school Keep a healthy weight Build and keep healthy bones, muscles and joints Sleep better at night As kids spend more time ...

  17. Exercise and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    In this presentation on exercise and aging, the following explanations are made: the nature of physical fitness, physical fitness values, the importance of recognizing individual differences, physiological changes occurring with age through the adult years, physical fitness studies pertaining to middle-aged persons, the trainability of older…

  18. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  19. Exercise and Weight Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Victor L.

    This paper describes a number of factors which go into determining weight. The paper describes what calories are, how caloric expenditure is measured, and why caloric expenditure is different for different people. The paper then outlines the way the body tends to adjust food intake and exercise to maintain a constant body weight. It is speculated…

  20. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main types and each type is different. Doing them all will give you more benefits. Endurance, or aerobic, activities increase your breathing and heart rate. Brisk walking or jogging, dancing, swimming, ...

  1. Exercise Prescription for Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    Data on the dose-response gradient for the relation of physical activity or physical fitness to health and function are reviewed, refuting the idea that physical activity programs are either exercise for health or for fitness and suggesting that the key factor is the total energy expenditure of the activity. (SM)

  2. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  3. Computer Exercises in Meteorology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapasso, L. Michael; Conner, Glen; Stallins, Keith

    Beginning with Western Kentucky University's (Bowling Green) fall 1999 semester, exercises required for the geography and meteorology course used computers for learning. This course enrolls about 250 students per year, most of whom choose it to fulfill a general education requirement. Of the 185 geography majors, it is required for those who…

  4. Life Chances Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a life chances exercise that helps students identify the life chances that they and society value. Explains that students learn that the attainment of important life chances is related to the family into which one is born. Discusses John Rawls' social theory. Suggests that participants may need to consider alternative systems of economic…

  5. Exercises in Persuasion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck-Hamlin, William J.; And Others

    The 35 exercises presented in this paper have been designed to simulate real-life experiences involving the process of persuasion and to enhance understanding of the persuasive process. Among the aspects of the persuasive process dealt with are the identification of persuasive events, emotive language, language intensity, source credibility,…

  6. Affective response to exercise and preferred exercise intensity among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Margaret; Schmalbach, Priel

    2015-01-01

    Background Little information exists as to the exercise intensity that adolescents enjoy and whether identifiable subgroups of adolescents will choose higher-intensity exercise. Methods Healthy adolescents (N = 74; mean age = 11.09) completed a cardiorespiratory fitness test, a moderate-intensity exercise task, and an exercise task at an intensity that felt “good”. Heart rate (HR), work rate (WR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed every 3 minutes. Results During the “feels good” task, adolescents exercised at a HR recognized as beneficial for cardiovascular health (Mean HR = 66-72% of HR at VO2peak). Adolescents who experienced a positive affective shift during the moderate-intensity task engaged in higher-intensity exercise during the “feels-good” task as compared to those whose affective response to moderate-intensity exercise was neutral or negative (76% of peak HR vs. 70% of peak HR, p < .01).There was no difference between groups in RPE. Conclusions Adolescents tend to select an exercise intensity associated with fitness benefits when afforded the opportunity to choose an intensity that feels good. An identified subgroup engaged in higher-intensity exercise without a commensurate perception of working harder. Encouraging adolescents to exercise at an intensity that feels “good” may increase future exercise without sacrificing fitness. PMID:24770461

  7. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed

    Dimmock, James A; Guelfi, Kym J; West, Jessica S; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-06-15

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods.

  8. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, James A.; Guelfi, Kym J.; West, Jessica S.; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods. PMID:26083114

  9. Nutritional benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1989-03-01

    Specific nutritional benefits of regular exercise include the control of obesity and its complications, the improvement of blood lipid profile, the optimization of micro-nutrient intake and the assurance of a maximum quality-adjusted life-expectancy. While epidemiologists interpret various weight for height ratios in terms of obesity, such data can be misleading, particularly in older people (where an accumulation of fat is masked by lean tissue loss). Skinfold calipers provide a more unequivocal index of the amount and distribution of subcutaneous fat. Arguments against the treatment of obesity by exercise include the large energy yield of fat, the potential for compensating changes of resting metabolism, and an inherently high "set-point" of fat stores in the obese. Exercise cannot achieve rapid fat loss, but it has several advantages over other types of treatment, including the positive nature of the prescription, the associated elevation of mood and suppression of appetite, the conservation of lean tissue, and the establishment of an improved lifestyle. Moreover, blood pressure is reduced, insulin needs are decreased in the diabetic, and favourable changes of lipid profile are observed. Total cholesterol levels are not affected by exercise if body mass is held constant, but (provided a weekly threshold of exercise is exceeded) there is an increase of HDL cholesterol, particularly HDL-2 cholesterol. The intake of vitamins and most other micronutrients is increased by a high daily energy expenditure. Frank anaemia is not common in athletes, but a low iron saturation may be an indication for dietary supplements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Carnitine and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, O J

    1996-08-01

    Carnitine plays a central role in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. It transports long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation. Carnitine also modulates the metabolism of coenzyme-A (CoA). It is not surprising that the use of supplementary carnitine to improve physical performance has become widespread in recent years, although there is no unequivocal support to this practice. However, critical reflections and current scientific-based knowledge are important because the implications of reduced or increased carnitine concentrations in vivo are not thoroughly understood. Several rationales have been forwarded in support of the potential ergogenic effects of oral carnitine supplementation. However, the following arguments derived from established scientific observations may be forwarded: (i) carnitine supplementation neither enhances FA oxidation in vivo or spares glycogen or postpones fatigue during exercise. Carnitine supplementation does not unequivocally improve performance of athletes; (ii) carnitine supplementation does not reduce body fat or help to lose weight; (iii) in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is fully active already after a few seconds of intense exercise. Carnitine supplementation induces no further activation of PDC in vivo; (iv) despite an increased acetyl-CoA/free CoA ratio, PDC is not depressed during exercise in vivo and therefore supplementary carnitine has no effect on lactate accumulation; (v) carnitine supplementation per se does not affect the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); (vi) during exercise there is a redistribution of free carnitine and acylcarnitines in the muscle but there is no loss of total carnitine. Athletes are not at risk for carnitine deficiency and do not have an increased need for carnitine. Although there are some theoretical points favouring potential ergogenic effects of carnitine supplementation, there is currently no scientific basis for healthy individuals or athletes to use carnitine

  11. Persistence of random walk records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  12. Persistent ENSO in different climates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Manucharyan, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that, despite profound changes in tropical climate, ENSO has been active over a vast geological epoch stretching millions of years from the Late Cretaceous through the Holocene. In particular, ENSO persisted during the Pliocene when there occurred a dramatic reduction in the mean east-west temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific - a key element of tropical dynamics. Here we use a comprehensive climate model to explore the dependence of ENSO on this temperature gradient. We find that in a broad range of climates ENSO remains surprisingly robust. When the east-west temperature gradient is reduced from 6oC to 1oC, the amplitude of ENSO decreases only by 30-40%, its dominant period remains close to 3-4 years, and the spectral peak stays above red noise. To explain these results we assess the magnitude of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks that control the stability of the natural mode of ENSO (the Bjerknes Index). We find that due to reorganization of the atmospheric Walker circulation in response to changes in the mean temperature gradient, the growth/decay rates of the ENSO mode stay nearly constant throughout different climates. This factor explains the persistence of the Southern Oscillation in past geological epochs and reconciles the seemingly contradictory findings of ENSO occurrence and the small east-west temperature gradient during the Pliocene. Finally, our results explain why ENSO in many climate models seems to be controlled by a weakly-damped mode just below neutral stability.

  13. Upright exercise or supine lower body negative pressure exercise maintains exercise responses after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Bennett, B. S.; Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Ford, S. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Adaptation to bed rest or space flight is accompanied by an impaired ability to exercise in an upright position. We hypothesized that a daily, 30-min bout of intense, interval exercise in upright posture or supine against lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would maintain upright exercise heart rate and respiratory responses after bed rest. Twenty-four men (31 +/- 3 yr) underwent 5 d of 6 degree head-down tilt: eight performed no exercise (CON), eight performed upright treadmill exercise (UPex), and eight performed supine treadmill exercise against LBNP at -51.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg (LBNPex). Submaximal treadmill exercise responses (56, 74, and 85% of VO2peak) were measured pre- and post-bed rest. In CON, submaximal heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, and ventilation were significantly greater (P < or = 0.05) after bed rest. In UPex and LBNPex, submaximal exercise responses were similar pre- and post-bed rest. Our results indicate that a daily 30-min bout of intense, interval upright exercise training or supine exercise training against LBNP is sufficient to maintain upright exercise responses after 5 d of bed rest. These results may have important implications for the development of exercise countermeasures during space flight.

  14. Continuation of point clouds via persistence diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Marcio; Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Obayashi, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical and algorithmic framework for the continuation of point clouds by persistence diagrams. A key property used in the method is that the persistence map, which assigns a persistence diagram to a point cloud, is differentiable. This allows us to apply the Newton-Raphson continuation method in this setting. Given an original point cloud P, its persistence diagram D, and a target persistence diagram D‧, we gradually move from D to D‧, by successively computing intermediate point clouds until we finally find a point cloud P‧ having D‧ as its persistence diagram. Our method can be applied to a wide variety of situations in topological data analysis where it is necessary to solve an inverse problem, from persistence diagrams to point cloud data.

  15. Personality, emotional intelligence and exercise.

    PubMed

    Saklofske, Donald H; Austin, Elizabeth J; Rohr, Betty A; Andrews, Jac J W

    2007-11-01

    The associations of personality and self-report emotional intelligence (EI) with attitudes to exercise and self-reported exercise behaviour were investigated in a sample of 497 Canadian undergraduates. A positive attitude to exercise was negatively associated with Neuroticism and uncorrelated with other personality traits and EI. Exercise behaviour was positively associated with Extraversion and EI and negatively associated with Neuroticism. Structural equation modelling indicated that EI mediated the relationship between personality and exercise behaviour. The interpretation of this result in terms of EI having some properties of a coping style is discussed.

  16. Exercise modulates chloride homeostasis after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Gandhi, Sapan; Zambrotta, Marina; Houlé, John D

    2014-07-02

    Activity-based therapies are routinely integrated in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation programs because they result in a reduction of hyperreflexia and spasticity. However, the mechanisms by which exercise regulates activity in spinal pathways to reduce spasticity and improve functional recovery are poorly understood. Persisting alterations in the action of GABA on postsynaptic targets is a signature of CNS injuries, including SCI. The action of GABA depends on the intracellular chloride concentration, which is determined largely by the expression of two cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), KCC2 and NKCC1, which serve as chloride exporters and importers, respectively. We hypothesized that the reduction in hyperreflexia with exercise after SCI relies on a return to chloride homeostasis. Sprague Dawley rats received a spinal cord transection at T12 and were assigned to SCI-7d, SCI-14d, SCI-14d+exercise, SCI-28d, SCI-28d+exercise, or SCI-56d groups. During a terminal experiment, H-reflexes were recorded from interosseus muscles after stimulation of the tibial nerve and the low-frequency-dependent depression (FDD) was assessed. We provide evidence that exercise returns spinal excitability and levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 toward normal levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Acutely altering chloride extrusion using the KCC2 blocker DIOA masked the effect of exercise on FDD, whereas blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide returned FDD toward intact levels after SCI. Our results indicate that exercise contributes to reflex recovery and restoration of endogenous inhibition through a return to chloride homeostasis after SCI. This lends support for CCCs as part of a pathway that could be manipulated to improve functional recovery when combined with rehabilitation programs.

  17. An analysis of Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program exercise results. Volume 2: Preliminary evaluation and analysis of CSEPP exercise database

    SciTech Connect

    Wernette, D.; Lerner, K.

    1998-06-01

    This study investigated the quality and usefulness of the information in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) exercise database. It incorporates the results of two separate analytical efforts. The first effort investigated the process of assigning standardized codes to issues identified in CSEPP exercise reports. A small group of issues was coded independently by each of several individuals, and the results of the individual codings were compared. Considerable differences were found among the individuals` codings. The second effort consisted of a statistical multivariate analysis, to investigate whether exercise issues are evenly distributed among exercise tabs, sites, and objectives. It was found that certain tabs, sites, and objectives were disproportionately associated with problem areas in exercises. In some cases, these problem areas have persisted over time, but in other cases they have undergone significant shifts over the time span of the investigation. The study concludes that the database can be a useful resource for analyzing problem areas and setting priorities for CSEPP program resources. However, some further analyses should be performed in order to more fully explore the data and increase confidence in the results.

  18. Cardiovascular exercise and burden of arrhythmia in patients with atrial fibrillation - A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Hakmann, Stine; Mourier, Malene; Kallemose, Thomas; Dixen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity at moderate-high intensity is recommended to prevent lifestyle diseases. Patients with atrial fibrillation are at risk of a sedentary lifestyle due to fear of exercise-induced episodes of atrial fibrillation. The burden of arrhythmia can be reduced by physical exercise. The effect of exercise intensity on burden of atrial fibrillation needs to be studied further. Methods and results In a 12-week randomized controlled trial, 76 patients with paroxysmal/persistent atrial fibrillation were allocated to perform exercise at either low intensity or high intensity (50% and 80% of maximal perceived exertion, respectively). Primary outcome was burden of AF measured by daily electrocardiography-reporting during 12 weeks. Secondarily, change in maximal oxygen uptake (peak VO2) and 1-year hospitalization was compared between low and high intensity exercise. Sixty-three patients completed the follow-up. In the intention-to-treat analysis, we found no statistical difference in burden of atrial fibrillation between low and high intensity exercise (incidence rate ratio 0.742, 95% CI 0.29–1.91, P = 0.538). No serious adverse events were reported and there was no difference in hospitalization between the two exercise groups. Both exercise groups improved significantly in peak VO2 (low intensity: 3.62 mL O2/kg/min, SD 3.77; high intensity: 2.87 mL O2/kg/min, SD 4.98), with no statistical difference between-groups (mean difference: 0.76 mL O2/kg/min, 95% CI -3.22–1.7). Conclusions High intensity physical exercise was not superior to low intensity physical exercise in reducing burden of atrial fibrillation. HI exercise was well tolerated; no evidence of an increased risk was found for HI compared to LI exercise. Larger studies are required to further prove our findings. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817998 PMID:28231325

  19. The TreadWheel: A Novel Apparatus to Measure Genetic Variation in Response to Gently Induced Exercise for Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Sean; Watanabe, Louis; Hill, Rachel; Owens, Meredith; Moraczewski, Jason; Rowe, Glenn C.; Riddle, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is one of the dramatic health issues affecting developed and developing nations, and exercise is a well-established intervention strategy. While exercise-by-genotype interactions have been shown in humans, overall little is known. Using the natural negative geotaxis of Drosophila melanogaster, an important model organism for the study of genetic interactions, a novel exercise machine, the TreadWheel, can be used to shed light on this interaction. The mechanism for inducing exercise with the TreadWheel is inherently gentle, thus minimizing possible confounding effects of other stressors. Using this machine, we were able to assess large cohorts of adult flies from eight genetic lines for their response to exercise after one week of training. We measured their triglyceride, glycerol, protein, glycogen, glucose content, and body weight, as well as their climbing ability and feeding behavior in response to exercise. Exercised flies showed decreased stored triglycerides, glycogen, and body weight, and increased stored protein and climbing ability. In addition to demonstrating an overall effect of TreadWheel exercise on flies, we found significant interactions of exercise with genotype, sex, or genotype-by-sex effects for most of the measured phenotypes. We also observed interaction effects between exercise, genotype, and tissue (abdomen or thorax) for metabolite profiles, and those differences can be partially linked to innate differences in the flies' persistence in maintaining activity during exercise bouts. In addition, we assessed gene expression levels for a panel of 13 genes known to be associated with respiratory fitness and found that many responded to exercise. With this study, we have established the TreadWheel as a useful tool to study the effect of exercise in flies, shown significant genotype-specific and sex-specific impacts of exercise, and have laid the ground work for more extensive studies of how genetics, sex, environment, and aging interact

  20. Getting to Know "The Watcher at the Gates": A Writing Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Friel, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Presents a writing exercise which involves students in their own and their peers' writing. Claims validity in that it personifies one of the most persistent blocks to expression--the inner critic which causes the writer to reject too soon and discriminate too severely. (RAE)

  1. Exercise among commercial truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Turner, Lisa M; Reed, Deborah B

    2011-10-01

    This study examines the exercise habits and perceived barriers to exercise of a convenience sample of 300 commercial truck drivers. Participants reported minimal amounts of exercise, with nearly 20% not exercising in the past week. A high prevalence of obesity was found in this sample: 93.3% of study participants had a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher. Drivers with BMIs of greater than 30 were significantly more likely to rate the exercise environment as terrible/bad. Drivers who had at least one health condition engaged in significantly less aerobic exercise, used fewer strengthening exercises, did not exercise for 30 minutes continuously, and had a higher BMI. Drivers who spent most of their off-duty time in their truck while their partner drove were also significantly more likely to not exercise regularly. Most drivers cited lack of time and place as the primary barriers to exercising. This study adds to the limited knowledge about exercise behaviors among commercial truck drivers.

  2. Exercise and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    There are alarming increases in the incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of these diseases is significantly reduced by appropriate lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity. However, the exact mechanisms by which exercise influences the development and progression of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this paper we review some important exercise-induced changes in cardiac, vascular, and blood tissues and discuss recent clinical trials related to the benefits of exercise. We also discuss the roles of boosting antioxidant levels, consequences of epicardial fat reduction, increases in expression of heat shock proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, mitochondrial adaptation, and the role of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial potassium channels in the contributing to the cardioprotection offered by exercise. In terms of vascular benefits, the main effects discussed are changes in exercise-induced vascular remodeling and endothelial function. Exercise-induced fibrinolytic and rheological changes also underlie the hematological benefits of exercise.

  3. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Chen, Xiaojie; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a well-known source of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which can produce mechanical hyperalgesia. Since some neuromuscular diseases are associated with both increased release of GDNF and intense muscle pain, we explored the role of GDNF as an endogenous mediator in muscle pain. Intramuscularly injected GDNF induced a dose-dependent (0.1–10 ng/20 μl) persistent (up to 3 wk) mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat. Once hyperalgesia subsided, injection of prostaglandin E2 at the site induced a prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia (>72 h) compared with naïve rats (<4 h; hyperalgesic priming). Selective neurotoxic destruction of IB4(+) nociceptors attenuated both GDNF hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Ergonomic muscular injury induced by eccentric exercise or mechanical vibration increased muscle GDNF levels at 24 h, a time point where rats also exhibited marked muscle hyperalgesia. Intrathecal antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to mRNA encoding GFRα1, the canonical binding receptor for GDNF, reversibly inhibited eccentric exercise- and mechanical vibration-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Finally, electrophysiological recordings from nociceptors innervating the gastrocnemius muscle in anesthetized rats, revealed significant increase in response to sustained mechanical stimulation after local GDNF injection. In conclusion, these data indicate that GDNF plays a role as an endogenous mediator in acute and induction of chronic muscle pain, an effect likely to be produced by GDNF action at GFRα1 receptors located in IB4(+) nociceptors. PMID:22914655

  4. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  5. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  6. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  7. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn; Van Opstal, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made.

  8. Dematerialization: Variety, caution, and persistence.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, Jesse H; Waggoner, Paul E

    2008-09-02

    Dematerialization, represented by declining consumption per GDP of energy or of goods, offers some hope for rising environmental quality with development. The declining proportion of income spent on staples as affluence grows, which income elasticity <1.0 measures, makes dematerialization widespread. Further, as learning improves efficiency of resource use, the intensity of environmental impact per production of staples often declines. We observe that combinations of low income elasticity for staples and of learning by producers cause a variety of dematerializations and declining intensities of impact, from energy use and carbon emission to food consumption and fertilizer use, globally and in countries ranging from the United States and France to China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia. Because dematerialization and intensity of impact are ratios of parameters that may be variously defined and are sometimes difficult to estimate, their fluctuations must be interpreted cautiously. Nevertheless, substantial declining intensity of impact, and especially, dematerialization persisted between 1980 and 2006.

  9. Exercise for tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  10. Exercise and obesity.

    PubMed

    McInnis, K J

    2000-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically during the past decade in the USA. This is despite an estimated 50 million Americans who try to lose weight each year. The increasing prevalence of obesity is particularly alarming due to the numerous health implications associated with this condition, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cancer, and various musculoskeletal conditions. The economic impact of treating illnesses associated with obesity has been estimated to be US$40 billion in the USA. Dieting is largely ineffective in maintaining initial weight loss as numerous studies suggest the majority of dieters regain all lost weight with 3-5 years. On, the other hand, regular exercise has been shown to be one of the best predictors of successful weight maintenance. Moreover, studies indicate that improved fitness through regular physical activity reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality for overweight individuals even if they remain overweight. Providing advice about exercise to overweight or obese individuals requires explicit information about the frequency, intensity, duration, and type of physical activity that should be performed. The ultimate goal for the exercising obese patient is to make a life-long commitment to achieving reasonable energy expenditure through routine physical activity.

  11. Neurobiology of exercise.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Booth, Frank W; Cotman, Carl W; Edgerton, V Reggie; Fleshner, Monika R; Gandevia, Simon C; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Levin, Barry E; Moran, Timothy H; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A; Salamone, John D; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline D; Wade, Charles E; York, David A; Zigmond, Michael J

    2006-03-01

    Voluntary physical activity and exercise training can favorably influence brain plasticity by facilitating neurogenerative, neuroadaptive, and neuroprotective processes. At least some of the processes are mediated by neurotrophic factors. Motor skill training and regular exercise enhance executive functions of cognition and some types of learning, including motor learning in the spinal cord. These adaptations in the central nervous system have implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity, cancer, depression, the decline in cognition associated with aging, and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, ischemic stroke, and head and spinal cord injury. Chronic voluntary physical activity also attenuates neural responses to stress in brain circuits responsible for regulating peripheral sympathetic activity, suggesting constraint on sympathetic responses to stress that could plausibly contribute to reductions in clinical disorders such as hypertension, heart failure, oxidative stress, and suppression of immunity. Mechanisms explaining these adaptations are not as yet known, but metabolic and neurochemical pathways among skeletal muscle, the spinal cord, and the brain offer plausible, testable mechanisms that might help explain effects of physical activity and exercise on the central nervous system.

  12. Exercise Responses after Inactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1986-01-01

    The exercise response after bed rest inactivity is a reduction in the physical work capacity and is manifested by significant decreases in oxygen uptake. The magnitude of decrease in maximal oxygen intake V(dot)O2max is related to the duration of confinement and the pre-bed-rest level of aerobic fitness; these relationships are relatively independent of age and gender. The reduced exercise performance and V(dot)O2max following bed rest are associated with various physiological adaptations including reductions in blood volume, submaximal and maximal stroke volume, maximal cardiac output, sceletal muscle tone and strength, and aerobic enzyme capacities, as well as increases in venous compliance and submaximal and maximal heart rate. This reduction in physiological capacity can be partially restored by specific countermeasures that provide regular muscular activity or orhtostatic stress or both during the bed rest exposure. The understanding of these physiological and physical responses to exercise following bed rest inactivity has important implications for the solution to safety and health problems that arise in clinical medicine, aerospace medicine, sedentary living, and aging.

  13. Exercise Prevents Mental Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, K. I.; Doewes, M.; Giri, M. K. W.; Setiawan, K. H.; Wibowo, I. P. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple current studies show that neuroinflammation may contribute to mental illness such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorder. Chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues is indicated by the increase of inflammatory marker like cytokine IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Pro-inflammatory cytokine in peripheral tissues can reach brain tissues and activate microglia and it causes neuroinflammation. Psychological stress may led peripheral and central inflammation. Activated microglia will produce pro-inflammatory cytokine, ROS, RNS, and tryptophan catabolizes. This neuroinflammation can promote metabolism changes of any neurotransmitter, such as serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate that will influence neurocircuit in the brain including basal ganglia and anterior cingulated cortex. It leads to mental illness. Exercise give contribution to reduce tissue inflammation. When muscle is contracting in an exercise, muscle will produce the secretion of cytokine like IL-6, IL-1ra, and IL-10. It will react as anti-inflammation and influence macrophage, T cell, monosit, protein Toll-Like Receptor (TLR), and then reduce neuroinflammation, characterised by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokine and prevent the activation of microglia in the brain. The objective of the present study is to review scientific articles in the literature related to the contribution of exercise to prevent and ease mental illness.

  14. Omics and Exercise: Global Approaches for Mapping Exercise Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J

    2017-03-27

    The application of global "-omics" technologies to exercise has introduced new opportunities to map the complexity and interconnectedness of biological networks underlying the tissue-specific responses and systemic health benefits of exercise. This review will introduce major research tracks and recent advancements in this emerging field, as well as critical gaps in understanding the orchestration of molecular exercise dynamics that will benefit from unbiased omics investigations. Furthermore, significant research hurdles that need to be overcome to effectively fill these gaps related to data collection, computation, interpretation, and integration across omics applications will be discussed. Collectively, a cross-disciplinary physiological and omics-based systems approach will lead to discovery of a wealth of novel exercise-regulated targets for future mechanistic validation. This frontier in exercise biology will aid the development of personalized therapeutic strategies to improve athletic performance and human health through precision exercise medicine.

  15. [Exercise training in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, F; Grabs, V; Halle, M

    2014-06-01

    Exercise training in patients with chronic stable heart failure (HF) is a recommended and broadly accepted treatment strategy that is an integral part of an evidence-based management involving pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. There is ample scientific evidence that exercise training in HF with reduced (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) improves exercise capacity, HF symptoms and quality of life. This is due to an improvement of central hemodynamics, endothelial function, neurohumoral activation, skeletal muscle structure and function as well as a decrease in inflammatory markers. The largest randomized, controlled HF-ACTION study (Heart Failure-A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of exercise TraiNing) demonstrated that exercise training results in a modest improvement of all-cause mortality and hospitalizations in HFrEF, depending on adequate compliance. Outcome data in HFpEF are lacking. Besides compliance, efficacy of exercise training is dependent on the intensity and type of exercise. Resistance and high intensity endurance training in addition to a standard aerobic exercise seem to be superior in improving the clinical status of HF patients. In the future, individualized exercise programs will help to improve long-term adherence to exercise training.

  16. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  17. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Erik B.; Frankemolle, Anneke M.M.; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D.; Lowe, Mark J.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity. PMID:26414696

  18. Improved Infrared-Sensing Running Wheel Systems with an Effective Exercise Activity Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Wen; Chang, Ching-Ping; Chang, Wen-Ying; Chang, Shin-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Yang, Chin-Lung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an infrared-sensing running wheel (ISRW) system for the quantitative measurement of effective exercise activity in rats. The ISRW system provides superior exercise training compared with commercially available traditional animal running platforms. Four infrared (IR) light-emitting diode/detector pairs embedded around the rim of the wheel detect the rat’s real-time position; the acrylic wheel has a diameter of 55 cm and a thickness of 15 cm, that is, it is larger and thicker than traditional exercise wheels, and it is equipped with a rubber track. The acrylic wheel hangs virtually frictionless, and a DC motor with an axially mounted rubber wheel, which has a diameter of 10 cm, drives the acrylic wheel from the outer edge. The system can automatically train rats to run persistently. The proposed system can determine effective exercise activity (EEA), with the IR sensors (which are connected to a conventional PC) recording the rat exercise behavior. A prototype of the system was verified by a hospital research group performing ischemic stroke experiments on rats by considering middle cerebral artery occlusion. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed system provides greater neuroprotection in an animal stroke model compared with a conventional treadmill and a motorized running wheel for a given exercise intensity. The quantitative exercise effectiveness indicator showed a 92% correlation between an increase in the EEA and a decrease in the infarct volume. This indicator can be used as a noninvasive and objective reference in clinical animal exercise experiments. PMID:25875841

  19. Improved infrared-sensing running wheel systems with an effective exercise activity indicator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Wen; Chang, Ching-Ping; Chang, Wen-Ying; Chang, Shin-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Yang, Chin-Lung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an infrared-sensing running wheel (ISRW) system for the quantitative measurement of effective exercise activity in rats. The ISRW system provides superior exercise training compared with commercially available traditional animal running platforms. Four infrared (IR) light-emitting diode/detector pairs embedded around the rim of the wheel detect the rat's real-time position; the acrylic wheel has a diameter of 55 cm and a thickness of 15 cm, that is, it is larger and thicker than traditional exercise wheels, and it is equipped with a rubber track. The acrylic wheel hangs virtually frictionless, and a DC motor with an axially mounted rubber wheel, which has a diameter of 10 cm, drives the acrylic wheel from the outer edge. The system can automatically train rats to run persistently. The proposed system can determine effective exercise activity (EEA), with the IR sensors (which are connected to a conventional PC) recording the rat exercise behavior. A prototype of the system was verified by a hospital research group performing ischemic stroke experiments on rats by considering middle cerebral artery occlusion. The experimental data demonstrated that the proposed system provides greater neuroprotection in an animal stroke model compared with a conventional treadmill and a motorized running wheel for a given exercise intensity. The quantitative exercise effectiveness indicator showed a 92% correlation between an increase in the EEA and a decrease in the infarct volume. This indicator can be used as a noninvasive and objective reference in clinical animal exercise experiments.

  20. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  1. Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease: Pedaling Rate Is Related to Changes in Motor Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chintan; Beall, Erik B; Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Penko, Amanda; Phillips, Michael D; Lowe, Mark J; Alberts, Jay L

    2016-02-01

    Forced-rate lower-extremity exercise has recently emerged as a potential safe and low-cost therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The efficacy is believed to be dependent on pedaling rate, with rates above the subjects' voluntary exercise rates being most beneficial. In this study, we use functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to further elucidate the mechanism underlying this effect. Twenty-seven PD patients were randomized to complete 8 weeks of forced-rate exercise (FE) or voluntary-rate exercise (VE). Exercise was delivered using a specialized stationary bicycle, which can augment patients' voluntary exercise rates. The FE group received assistance from the cycle. Imaging was conducted at baseline, end of therapy, and after 4 weeks of follow-up. Functional connectivity (FC) was determined via seed-based correlation analysis, using activation-based seeds in the primary motor cortex (M1). The change in FC after exercise was compared using linear correlation with pedaling rate. Results of the correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between pedaling rate and change in FC from the most affected M1 to the ipsilateral thalamus. This effect persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. These results indicate that a plausible mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of high-rate exercise in PD is that it improves thalamo-cortical connectivity.

  2. Carbohydrate feeding speeds reversal of enhanced glucose uptake in muscle after exercise.

    PubMed

    Young, J C; Garthwaite, S M; Bryan, J E; Cartier, L J; Holloszy, J O

    1983-11-01

    Muscle contractile activity results in an increase in glucose uptake rate that can persist for hours. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of carbohydrate repletion on reversal of an exercise-induced increase in glucose uptake. Rats were exercised by swimming. In rats studied 60 min after exercise, muscle glycogen content was 75% depleted and glucose uptake rate was increased. The effect of exercise on glucose uptake was reversed, and glycogen concentration had increased 44 mumol/g muscle, within 18 h in rats fed carbohydrate. In rats fed a carbohydrate-free diet, muscle glycogen increased only 11 mumol/g, and glucose uptake rate had returned only 50% of the way to base line 18 h after exercise. The rate of 3-methylglucose accumulation in muscles was increased sixfold 60 min after exercise. This increase in permeability to sugar was reversed within 18 h in rats fed carbohydrate. In rats fed a carbohydrate-free diet the rate of 3-methylglucose accumulation was still threefold above base line 18 h after exercise. Our results provide evidence that decreased availability of carbohydrate slows reversal of an exercise-induced increase in permeability of muscle to sugar.

  3. Nutrition Support for Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression, and Catabolism Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, Frederick A; Phillips, Stuart M; McClain, Craig J; Patel, Jayshil J; Martindale, Robert G

    2017-04-01

    Despite tremendous advances in critical care, multiple-organ failure continues to be a significant problem. However, in recent years, far fewer patients with multiple-organ failure die early, but many experience ongoing immune dysregulation and are developing persistent inflammation, immunosuppression, and catabolism syndrome (PICS). Most PICS patients are discharged to nonhome destinations, fail to rehabilitate, and succumb to indolent death. From a nutrition perspective, patients with PICS experience persistent inflammation-induced cachexia despite evidenced-based recommended intensive care unit nutrition support. Recent basic and translational research indicates that prolonged expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PICS. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells express arginase 1, which depletes arginine, causing immunosuppression and impaired wound healing. This is the rationale for arginine supplementation in PICS. Other nutrition support recommendations for PICS are based on inferences made from other patient populations who experience similar persistent inflammation-induced cachexia. These include patients with established cancers, major burns, and sarcopenia. These patients experience anabolic resistance, but studies show that this can be overcome by providing higher levels of protein and certain specific amino acids. Nutrition support guidelines recommend provision of >1.5 g/kg/d of protein and indicate that higher levels may be needed. Protein composition is also important. There is good evidence that leucine can promote anabolism in patients with cancer and sarcopenia. Finally, anabolic interventions-including intensive insulin, oxandrolone, propranolol, and resistance exercise-have proven to be effective in patients with major burns and are likely relevant in combating PICS cachexia.

  4. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (persistent fetal circulation syndrome).

    PubMed

    Drummond, W H

    1983-01-01

    This 15-year-old disease has been clearly described anatomically. Some understanding of possible in utero predisposing conditions has emerged from clinical and animal studies. However, we have very little understanding of the cellular processes that trigger and/or prolong the abnormal medial smooth muscle hypertrophy underlying the condition. Empiric observation has resulted in the development of hyperventilation as a fairly successful treatment modality, although the underlying mechanism of this salubrious effect is unknown. Drugs, a major focus of clinical and laboratory investigations, sometimes are marginally successful (and sometimes are utter failures). Translated into the neonatal intensive care unit, the disease is more frequently accurately diagnosed than in the past, but it remains frustratingly difficult to manage, and thus far is impossible to prevent. The research foundations laid in the past decade provide impetus for accelerated search into the fundamental cellular and biochemical derangements that cause persistent pulmonary hypertension. It is to be hoped that the next decade will yield major advances in both mechanistic understanding and in treatment.

  5. Persistent homology analysis of craze formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi; Obayashi, Ippei; Hiraoka, Yasuaki

    2017-01-01

    We apply a persistent homology analysis to investigate the behavior of nanovoids during the crazing process of glassy polymers. We carry out a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the uniaxial deformation of an amorphous polymer and analyze the results with persistent homology. Persistent homology reveals the void coalescence during craze formation, and the results suggest that the yielding process is regarded as the percolation of nanovoids created by deformation.

  6. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  7. Exercise order in resistance training.

    PubMed

    Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Figueiredo, Tiago; Dias, Ingrid; Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2012-03-01

    Resistance training (RT) is now an integral component of a well rounded exercise programme. For a correct training prescription, it is of the utmost importance to understand the interaction among training variables, such as the load, volume, rest interval between sets and exercises, frequency of sessions, exercise modality, repetition velocity and, finally, exercise order. Sports medicine research has indicated that exercise order is an important variable that affects both acute responses and chronic adaptations to RT programmes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to analyse and discuss exercise order with relevance to acute responses (e.g. repetition performance) and also the expression of chronic adaptable characteristics (e.g. maximal strength and hypertrophy). To accomplish this purpose, the Scielo, Science Citation Index, National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus™ and CINAHL® databases were accessed to locate previously conducted original scientific investigations. The studies reviewed examined both acute responses and chronic adaptations with exercise order as the experimental variable. Generally, with relevance to acute responses, a key finding was that exercise order affects repetition performance over multiple sets, indicating that the total repetitions, and thus the volume, is greater when an exercise is placed at the beginning of an RT session, regardless of the relative amount of muscle mass involved. The pre-exhaustion method might not be an effective technique to increase the extent of neuromuscular recruitment for larger muscle groups (e.g. pectoralis major for the bench press) when preceded by a single-joint movement (e.g. pec-deck fly). With relevance to localized muscular endurance performance, oxygen consumption and ratings of perceived exertion, the limited amount of research conducted thus far indicates that exercise order does not appear to impact the acute expression of these variables. In terms of chronic

  8. Role of aortic input impedance in the decreased cardiovascular response to exercise with aging in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, F C; Weisfeldt, M L; Milnor, W R

    1981-01-01

    The diminished cardiac output response to exercise with advancing age may be attributable to intrinsic inability of the old ventricle to respond appropriately and/or to an additional loading imposed upon the ventricle by the aged vascular system. The steady (resistance) and pulsatile (characteristic impedance) load components together comprise the vascular load faced by the ejecting ventricle. To study the effect of exercise on both vascular components of load, the aortic input impedance was measured in chronically instrumented young and old beagle dogs during graded treadmill exercise before and after beta blockade. Ascending aortic flow was measured by a cuff electromagnetic flow probe, and pressure was measured by a high-fidelity semiconductor transducer. At low levels of exercise the old animals demonstrated a striking 20% increase in characteristic impedance and a 28% decrease in peripheral resistance with no increase in stroke volume. This vascular loading and limitation in stroke volume persisted across the higher exercise levels. In contrast, the young group demonstrated no increase in characteristic impedence, a progressive decrease in peripheral resistance, and a progressive increase in stroke volume across the same exercise levels. These age differences in vascular response and ventricular output were abolished by beta blockade. The groups did not demonstrate a difference in heart rate response, but the young had a greater increase in external left ventricular power than the old across exercise. These data demonstrated a profound difference in the response of young and old vasculature to exercise. At low and intermediate exercise levels the pulsatile vascular load appeared to be a major factor in the limitation of stroke volume in old dogs. At high levels of exercise, the limited exercise response in the old dog may be caused in part by a diminished inotropic responsiveness as well as by the vascular loading. PMID:7251864

  9. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  10. [Physical exercise and intraocular pressure].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-bo; Wu, Yue; Li, Si-zhen; Sun, Lan-ping; Wang, Ning-li

    2011-09-01

    In the 1960s, it had been observed that physical exercises could reduce the intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with glaucoma. However, the effect of IOP reduction varied with exercise type and intensity, as well as the duration after exercise. Difference of lowering the IOP in glaucoma patients and healthy people were also observed. The mechanisms of reducing the IOP by exercise were very complicated and believed to be associated with the lower concentration of norepinephrine, the rising of colloid osmotic pressure, the co-action of nitric oxide and endothelin after exercise, and also related to the gene polymorphism of β2-adrenergic receptor. Physical exercise, such as jogging, walking and bicycle riding, could be suggested as a complimentary therapy in addition to the pharmaceutical and surgical therapies available for glaucoma patients, even though the mechanism for lowering IOP is not clear enough.

  11. Persistant photoconductivity of strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Violet Mary

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a transparent conducting oxide with a range of interesting properties, including a large, temperature-dependent dielectric constant and superconductivity at low temperatures. It has a wide indirect band gap of 3.2 eV at room temperature. Annealing in a reducing atmosphere with additional strontium oxide (SrO) powder at 1200°C results in the creation of native defects. These annealed samples show persistent photoconductivity (PPC) at room temperature, when exposed to light of energy 2.9 eV or greater. The three or more order of magnitude change in resistance persists long after the light is turned off. This effect is attributed to an electron being excited from an acceptor defect, with a large barrier for recapture, to the conduction band. This work investigates many of the changes that occur and factors that affect PPC. The right amount of SrO powder is crucial to the formation of PPC. The presence of some oxygen vacancies is also necessary for PPC; however, too many will mute the dramatic change in resistivity. Peaks at 430 nm and 520 nm appear in the visible region of the spectrum. The peak at 430 nm is due to iron, while the peak at 520 nm has not been identified. The infrared region of the spectrum also shows changes. First, the intensity of the transmitted signal drops significantly after light exposure, due to free carrier absorption. Additionally, a hydrogen line at 3500 cm-1 and satellites are often observed in as-received samples. The satellites disappear during annealing and return during PPC. The hydrogen lines have the same thermal kinetics as the 520 nm peak. Hydrogen lines at 3355 and 3384 cm-1, if present, will prevent PPC. An exposed chip can be erased (i.e. returned to its pre-light exposed state) by using a heat treatment. Erasing and polishing an annealed chip prior to light exposure can result in weakly p-type behavior with high mobility holes ( > 100 cm2/Vs). This is an order of magnitude higher than those

  12. Automatic Activation of Exercise and Sedentary Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya; Spence, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the automatic activation of "sedentary" and "exerciser" stereotypes using a social prime Stroop task. Results showed significantly slower response times between the exercise words and the exercise control words and between the sedentary words and the exercise control words when preceded by an attractive exerciser prime. Words preceded…

  13. Individualizing Exercise: Some Biomechanical and Physiological Reminders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Kathy D.; Darby, Lynn A.

    1998-01-01

    It is important to individualize exercise programs to safely achieve exercise goals. The article reviews several key points to help exercise leaders individualize new exercise programs or rejuvenate routine workouts, focusing on cardiorespiratory and muscular training. The article emphasizes that individualizing exercise programs reduces injury,…

  14. Family Physicians and Exercise Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Ciliska, Donna; Singer, Joel; Williams, Kimberly; Alleyne, Julia; Lindsay, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    This trial took 22 volunteer family physicians and randomly exposed some to training intervention and some to no training to study the effect on frequency and quality of exercise prescription to ambulatory adults. During the 6 weeks after training, the trained physicians addressed the issue of exercise with 35.3% of patients. The untrained physicians discussed exercise with only 8.6% of their patients. PMID:21221270

  15. Smoking, Exercise, and Physical Fitness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    activity , smoking behavior, and physical fitness were examined in 3,045 Navy personnel. Exercise and smoking behaviors were measured using a "life-style... physical endurance-both cardiorespiratory (1.5-mile run) and muscular (sit-ups). After controlling for the effects of exercise activity , smoking was...although smoking has been associated with lower physical activity in supervised exercise programs (Dishman, Sallis, & Orenstein, 1985). There has also

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus and exercise.

    PubMed

    Ayán, C; Martín, V

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rheumatic disease characterized by a variety of symptoms, especially fatigue, pain and reduced quality of life. Physical exercise is a useful tool for improving cardiovascular fitness, reducing metabolic abnormalities and fatigue and improving quality of life. However, very few studies have focused on the relationship between SLE and physical exercise. This paper reviews the main SLE symptoms that can be alleviated by exercising, as well as the results of studies seeking to analyse the exercise capacity and physical training possibilities of SLE patients. Considerations for future research are also discussed.

  17. Exercise, muscle, and CHO metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, M

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrates (CHO) are a key source of energy for contracting skeletal muscle during strenuous exercise and fatigue during such exercise often coincides with CHO depletion. Our current understanding of the importance of CHO for exercise metabolism has its foundations in classic studies in the early 20th century by Scandinavian physiologists and Bengt Saltin contributed significantly to that tradition. This brief review summarizes our contemporary understanding of key aspects of muscle glycogen and glucose metabolism during exercise, through the lens of seminal studies by Bengt Saltin.

  18. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  19. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  20. Exercise for the management of cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, V S; Dunn, V

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common, persistent and disabling side-effect of the cancer and its treatments. Exercise, once was contraindicated, is now the key non-pharmacological management for cancer-related fatigue. However, the role of exercise in lung cancer cohort is not clear. A computerised database search was undertaken using keyword search in the CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, AMED and Web of Science. Ten relevant articles were reviewed; the evidence on this cohort was found to be limited, warrants further research. However, the available evidence from other than lung cancer groups shows significant beneficial effects of exercises on cancer-related fatigue. Hence, exercises could possibly be used in the management of cancer-related fatigue in this cohort with due caution until more robust evidences are available.

  1. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research.

  2. Exercise science: research to sustain and enhance performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, Jonathan E.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular adjustments accompanying exercise in high ambient temperatures are likely responsible for diminished aerobic capacity and performance in such conditions. These adjustments include a phenomenon known as cardiovascular drift in which heart rate rises and stroke volume declines progressively over time during constant-rate exercise. A variety of factors modulate the magnitude of cardiovascular drift, e.g., elevated core and skin temperatures, dehydration, and exercise intensity. Regardless of the mode of manipulation, decreases in stroke volume associated with cardiovascular drift result in directionally and proportionally similar decreases in maximal aerobic capacity. Maximal aerobic capacity is determined by maximal heart rate, maximal tissue oxygen extraction, and maximal stroke volume. Because maximal heart rate and maximal tissue oxygen extraction are unaffected during exercise in the heat, decreased stroke volume associated with cardiovascular drift likely persists during maximal efforts and explains the decrease in maximal aerobic capacity. Decreased maximal aerobic capacity results in a greater perceptual and physiological strain accompanying any given level of work. Therefore, sustaining and enhancing performance involves sophisticated monitoring of physiological strain combined with development of countermeasures that mitigate the magnitude of deleterious phenomena like cardiovascular drift.

  3. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  4. Microgravity strategic planning exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Richard; Downey, Jim; Harvey, Harold

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space and Advanced Technology supported a planning exercise for the Microgravity Program management at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The effort focused on the status of microgravity work at MSFC and elsewhere with the objective of preparing a goal-oriented strategic planning document which could be used for informational/brochure purposes. The effort entailed numerous interactions and presentations with Field Center programmatic components and Headquarters personnel. Appropriate material was consolidated in a draft format for a MSFC Strategic Plan.

  5. Religiosity, self-efficacy for exercise, and African American women.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bridget K; Wicks, Mona Newsome

    2012-09-01

    Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration.

  6. Pendulum Exercises After Hip Arthroscopy: A Video Technique.

    PubMed

    Sauber, Ryan; Saborio, George; Nickel, Beth M; Kivlan, Benjamin R; Christoforetti, John J

    2016-08-01

    Advanced hip joint-preserving arthroscopic techniques have been shown to improve patient-reported functional outcomes with low rates of postoperative complications. Prior work has shown that formation of adhesive scar is a potential source of persistent pain and cause for revision surgery. As resources for postoperative in-studio physical therapy become scarce, a home-based strategy to avoid scar formation without adding formal therapy cost may be beneficial. The purpose of this technical note is to introduce a patient-centered educational video technique for home-caregiver delivery of manual hip pendulum exercises in the postoperative setting. This video technique offers access to our method for pendulum exercise as part of early recovery after advanced hip arthroscopy.

  7. The Exercise: An Exercise Generator Tool for the SOURCe Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakoyianni-Doa, Fryni; Tziafa, Eleni; Naskos, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    The Exercise, an Exercise generator in the SOURCe project, is a tool that complements the properties and functionalities of the SOURCe project, which includes the search engine for the Searchable Online French-Greek parallel corpus for the UniveRsity of Cyprus (SOURCe) (Kakoyianni-Doa & Tziafa, 2013), the PENCIL (an alignment tool)…

  8. Exercise testing in cardiac rehabilitation. Exercise prescription and beyond.

    PubMed

    Williams, M A

    2001-08-01

    The prescription of exercise, either as a part of a formal exercise training program or as a means to increase physical activity in general, has been and will remain a primary component of cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programming. Wherever possible, this prescription should be based on a recent exercise test that documents the cardiac patient's functional capacity, cardiac and hemodynamic responses to exercise, and signs and symptoms associated with exertion. Clearly the prescription of exercise and suggestions for increasing levels of physical activity must be based on accepted principles of exercise physiology and expected training responses. Nonetheless, the art of exercise prescription should guarantee flexible methodologies to meet the specific needs of each individual patient. Although the patient must accept ultimate responsibility for participation, the clinician bears the burden of continually attempting to reinforce the importance of increasing caloric expenditure and motivating patients to initiate and commit to long-term participation in a safe and appropriately designed program of exercise and increasing physical activity.

  9. Exercise Motivation and Exercise Attribution of Recreational Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaurigue, Jerson Jalandoni

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study determined the exercise motivation and exercise attribution of recreational athletes in one of the major cities in Panay Island. A total of 75 purposively selected respondents who are regular members in a particular club for at least a year and have finished at least a college degree participated in the study. To gather data…

  10. Graduate Student Persistence: Evidence from Three Decades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gururaj, Suchitra; Heilig, Julian Vasquez; Somers, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article conducts a meta-analysis of results of studies by Andrieu (1991), DeAngelis (1998), and Liseo (2005) to assess changes over time in the effects of financial aid and other factors on graduate student persistence. A descriptive review of the studies finds that combination aid packages encouraged persistence in 1987 (Andrieu, 1991),…

  11. Correlated neural variability in persistent state networks.

    PubMed

    Polk, Amber; Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2012-04-17

    Neural activity that persists long after stimulus presentation is a biological correlate of short-term memory. Variability in spiking activity causes persistent states to drift over time, ultimately degrading memory. Models of short-term memory often assume that the input fluctuations to neural populations are independent across cells, a feature that attenuates population-level variability and stabilizes persistent activity. However, this assumption is at odds with experimental recordings from pairs of cortical neurons showing that both the input currents and output spike trains are correlated. It remains unclear how correlated variability affects the stability of persistent activity and the performance of cognitive tasks that it supports. We consider the stochastic long-timescale attractor dynamics of pairs of mutually inhibitory populations of spiking neurons. In these networks, persistent activity was less variable when correlated variability was globally distributed across both populations compared with the case when correlations were locally distributed only within each population. Using a reduced firing rate model with a continuum of persistent states, we show that, when input fluctuations are correlated across both populations, they drive firing rate fluctuations orthogonal to the persistent state attractor, thereby causing minimal stochastic drift. Using these insights, we establish that distributing correlated fluctuations globally as opposed to locally improves network's performance on a two-interval, delayed response discrimination task. Our work shows that the correlation structure of input fluctuations to a network is an important factor when determining long-timescale, persistent population spiking activity.

  12. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  13. Persistence of Undergraduate Women in STEM Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedone, Maggie Helene

    2016-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a complex problem that continues to persist at the postsecondary level, particularly in computer science and engineering fields. This dissertation explored the pre-college and college level factors that influenced undergraduate women's persistence in…

  14. STEM Field Persistence: The Impact of Engagement on Postsecondary STEM Persistence for Underrepresented Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Persistence studies in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields indicate that the pipeline to degree attainment is "leaky" and underrepresented minorities are not persisting in the STEM fields. Those students who do not persist in the STEM fields either migrate to other fields of study or drop out of higher education…

  15. Exercise limitation, exercise testing and exercise recommendations in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Machado, Roberto; Hue, Olivier; Reid, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA or SS homozygous sickle cell disease) is an inherited blood disorder caused by single nucleotide substitution in the β-globin gene that renders their hemoglobin (HbS) much less soluble than normal hemoglobin (HbA) when deoxygenated. The polymerization of HbS upon deoxygenation is the basic pathophysiologic event leading to RBC sickling, hemolysis, vasoocclusion and ultimately to chronic organ damage. The metabolic changes imposed by exercise may initiate sickling and vaso-occlusive episodes. Further, in patients with SCA, exercise limitation may be related to anemia or chronic complications such as pulmonary vascular disease, congestive heart failure and chronic parenchymal lung disease. Few studies have investigated the cardiorespiratory responses of patients with SCA during either symptom-limited maximal exercise test on cyclo-ergometer or during a six minute walk test. Therefore, patients are advised to start exercise slowly and progressively, to maintain adequate hydration during and after exercise, to avoid cold exposure or sudden change in temperature, and to avoid sports associated with mechanical trauma. There are, however, lack of evidence to allow practitioners to prescribe an exercise program for patients with SCA, and individuals are usually encouraged to exercise on a symptom-limited basis. Finally, this review will also highlight the basic principles that are often used for exercise practice and could be used for exercise prescription and rehabilitation in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  16. Depression and Anxiety: Exercise Eases Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercise shows that the psychological and physical benefits of exercise can also help reduce anxiety and improve mood. ... such as running or bicycling. The mental health benefits of exercise and physical activity may last only if you ...

  17. Exercise Concepts for Individuals with Syringomyelia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Research Great Expectations Post navigation ← Previous Next → Exercise Concepts for Individuals with Syringomyelia Posted on November ... related duties? 3. Do you have questions about exercise? Do you exercise regularly? Are you involved in ...

  18. Exercise and activity for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    Weight loss - activity; Weight loss - exercise; Obesity - activity ... Calories used in exercise > calories eaten = weight loss. This means that to lose weight, the number of calories you burn by exercising needs ...

  19. Exercise Pills: At the Starting Line.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunchang; Laher, Ismail

    2015-12-01

    Sedentary lifestyles, limited physical exercise, and prolonged inactivity undoubtedly increase chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. It is widely acknowledged that exercise induces a number of physiological adaptations that have beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of these chronic metabolic diseases. Unfortunately, exercise compliance is extremely low and often not possible. The development of exercise science and molecular techniques has increased our understanding of the molecular pathways responsive to exercise. Knowledge of these molecular targets has led to the development of chemical interventions that can mimic the beneficial effects of exercise without requiring actual muscle activity. This review focuses on the concept of 'exercise pills' and how they mimic the effects produced by physical exercise including oxidative fiber-type transformation, mitochondrial biogenesis, increased fat oxidation, angiogenesis, and improvement of exercise capacity. We also review candidate exercise pills, and contrast the beneficial effects and molecular mechanisms between physical exercise and exercise pills.

  20. Pretreatment task persistence predicts smoking cessation outcome.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Herzog, Thaddeus A; Juliano, Laura M; Irvin, Jennifer E; Lazev, Amy B; Simmons, Vani Nath

    2003-08-01

    R. Eisenberger's (1992) learned industriousness theory states that individuals display differing degrees of persistence depending on their history of reinforcement for effortful behavior. These differences may influence the development, maintenance, and cessation of addictive behaviors. In cross-sectional studies, E. P. Quinn, T. H. Brandon, and A. L. Copeland (1996) found that cigarette smokers were less persistent than nonsmokers, and R. A. Brown, C. W. Lejuez, C. W. Kahler, and D. R. Strong (2002) found that smokers who had previously abstained for 3 months were more persistent than those who had never quit. The present study extended these findings by using a prospective design. A pretreatment measure of task persistence (mirror tracing) completed by 144 smokers predicted sustained abstinence throughout 12 months of follow-up. Moreover, persistence predicted outcome independent of other significant predictors: gender, nicotine dependence, negative affect, and self-efficacy.

  1. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  2. Airflow obstruction and exercise.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher B

    2009-03-01

    The primary abnormality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic airway inflammation which results in airflow limitation. Disease progression is usually depicted as an accelerated decline in FEV(1) over time. However, COPD patients also manifest progressive static hyperinflation due to the combined effects of reduced lung elastic recoil and increased airway resistance. Superimposed on static hyperinflation are further increases in operational lung volumes (dynamic hyperinflation) brought on during exercise, exacerbations or tachypnea. An important consequence of exertional dyspnea is activity limitation. COPD patients have been shown to spend only a third of the day walking or standing compared with age-matched healthy individuals who spend more than half of their time in these activities. Furthermore, the degree of activity limitation measured by an accelerometer worsens with disease progression. COPD patients have been shown to have an accelerated loss of aerobic capacity (VO(2)max) and this correlates with mortality just as is seen with hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Thus physical inactivity is an important therapeutic target in COPD. Summarizing; airflow obstruction leads to progressive hyperinflation, activity limitation, physical deconditioning and other comorbidities that characterize the COPD phenotype. Targeting the airflow obstruction with long-acting bronchodilator therapy in conjunction with a supervised exercise prescription is currently the most effective therapeutic intervention in earlier COPD. Other important manifestations of skeletal muscle dysfunction include muscle atrophy and weakness. These specific problems are best addressed with resistance training with consideration of anabolic supplementation.

  3. Exercise and Cognition-2016.

    PubMed

    Tomporowski, Phillip D

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity is purported to promote children's brain health and enhance mental development (1). Three studies were selected for review because of their focus on issues that challenge translational research applications in exercise pediatric science. While some disagreement exists concerning the definition of translational research, most suggest that translational interventions focus on the uptake, implementation, and sustainability of research findings within standard care (2). Translational researchers typically highlight differences that exist between efficacy experiments, which provide evidence that a specific intervention works, and effectiveness experiments, which show that the intervention will reap benefits under real-world conditions. Results obtained from laboratory-based efficacy studies that have examined the relation between exercise and cognition led researchers (3,4) and policy makers to consider the importance of physical activity in school settings. Large-scale studies that assess the impact of various types of school based physical activity intervention on children's cognitive and academic performance have begun. The initial results have been uneven and suggestive of a lack of benefit for children in authentic school settings. Before drawing such conclusions, however, it will be important for researchers and practitioners to recognize the methodological and measurement issues that challenge attempts to employ laboratory methodologies to academic settings.

  4. Prescriptive Exercise for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piscopo, John

    1985-01-01

    In addition to physical benefits, exercise also provides a natural way to sustain mental alertness in the aging individual by supplying oxygen to the brain. A table focuses on 10 specific health-fitness problems with suggested prescriptive exercises designed to ameliorate the condition. (MT)

  5. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  6. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  7. The Caltech Political Military Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, E. S.; And Others

    The Caltech political military exercise (PME) is a game in which players assume roles of leaders of various countries and attempt to act as they think these leaders would in a time of international crises. The main purposes of the exercise are (1) to provide students with an experience in crisis diplomacy and policy formation, and (2) to provide a…

  8. Effects of Exercise on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rarick, G. Lawrence

    Exercise is generally held to be a significant factor in the growth, development, and health of children and adolescents. The effects of physical activity regimens on general growth, as well as quantitative and qualitative changes, in animal muscle and bone tissue have been clearly demonstrated. Less is known about the role of exercise and related…

  9. Exercise Prescription for Physical Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Michael L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines current guidelines for physical fitness, noting issues that may influence the updating of the American College of Sports Medicine exercise statement. Differences between exercise prescription for fitness and physical activity for health are discussed, noting the importance of designing individualized programs with appropriate levels of…

  10. Exercise at 65 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Batt, Mark E; Tanji, Jeffrey; Börjesson, Mats

    2013-07-01

    Aging is characterized by increasing muscle loss, physical inactivity and frailty. Physical inactivity is known to be associated with increased incidence of obesity and many life-threatening chronic conditions. We know that exercise, through many factors including antiinflammatory effects and enhanced fitness, can help prevent and treat many chronic diseases as well as help maintain independent living. We set out to demonstrate the utility of regular exercise in this potentially vulnerable age group in both the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases. The benefits, risks and recommendations for physical activity are discussed with an emphasis on practical advice for safe exercise in the context of established international guidelines. These guidelines typically state that 150 min per week of moderate aerobic intensity exercise should be achieved with some additional whole-body strength training and balance work. Individual risk assessment should be undertaken in a way to enable safe exercise participation to achieve maximum benefit with minimum risk. The risk assessment, subsequent advice and prescription for exercise should be personalized to reflect individual fitness and functional levels as well as patient safety. Newer and potentially exciting benefits of exercise are discussed in the areas of neuroscience and inflammation where data are suggesting positive effects of exercise in maintaining memory and cognition as well as having beneficial antiinflammatory effects.

  11. Space exercise and Earth benefits.

    PubMed

    Macias, Brandon R; Groppo, Eli R; Eastlack, Robert K; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Lee, Stuart M C; Schneider, Suzanne M; Boda, Wanda L; Smith, Scott M; Cutuk, Adnan; Pedowitz, Robert A; Meyer, R Scott; Hargens, Alan R

    2005-08-01

    The detrimental impact of long duration space flight on physiological systems necessitates the development of exercise countermeasures to protect work capabilities in gravity fields of Earth, Moon and Mars. The respective rates of physiological deconditioning for different organ systems during space flight has been described as a result of data collected during and after missions on the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Mir, and bed rest studies on Earth. An integrated countermeasure that simulates the body's hydrostatic pressure gradient, provides mechanical stress to the bones and muscles, and stimulates the neurovestibular system may be critical for maintaining health and well being of crew during long-duration space travel, such as a mission to Mars. Here we review the results of our studies to date of an integrated exercise countermeasure for space flight, lower body negative pressure (LBNP) treadmill exercise, and potential benefits of its application to athletic training on Earth. Additionally, we review the benefits of Lower Body Positive Pressure (LBPP) exercise for rehabilitation of postoperative patients. Presented first are preliminary data from a 30-day bed rest study evaluating the efficacy of LBNP exercise as an integrated exercise countermeasure for the deconditioning effects of microgravity. Next, we review upright LBNP exercise as a training modality for athletes by evaluating effects on the cardiovascular system and gait mechanics. Finally, LBPP exercise as a rehabilitation device is examined with reference to gait mechanics and safety in two groups of postoperative patients.

  12. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers. PMID:28356634

  13. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Kwang; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers.

  14. Shoulder Coordination During Full-Can and Empty-Can Rehabilitation Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Lachaine, Xavier; Allard, Paul; Gobout, Veronique; Begon, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    Context Supraspinatus tear is a common rotator cuff injury. During rehabilitation, debate persists regarding the most appropriate exercises. Whereas shoulder coordination is part of normal arm function, it has been infrequently considered in the context of exercise selection. Objective To assess shoulder-motion coordination during 2 common supraspinatus rehabilitation exercises and to characterize load and motion-direction influences on shoulder coordination. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Motion-analysis laboratory. Patient or Other Participants Fifteen asymptomatic right-hand–dominant men (age = 26 ± 4 years, height = 1.77 ± 0.06 m, mass = 74.3 ± 7.7 kg). Intervention(s) Full-can and empty-can exercises with and without a 2.27-kg load. Main Outcome Measure(s) We recorded motion with an optoelectronic system. Scapulohumeral rhythm and complete shoulder joint kinematics were calculated to quantify shoulder coordination. The effects of exercise type, load, motion direction, and humerothoracic-elevation angle on the scapulohumeral rhythm and shoulder-joint angles were assessed. Results We observed multivariate interactions between exercise type and humerothoracic elevation and between load and humerothoracic elevation. Scapulohumeral rhythm increased by a mean ratio of 0.44 ± 0.22 during the full-can exercise, whereas the addition of load increased mean glenohumeral elevation by 4° ± 1°. Conclusions The full-can exercise increased the glenohumeral contribution, as hypothesized, and showed normal shoulder coordination. During the empty-can exercise, the increased scapulothoracic contribution was associated with a compensatory pattern that limits the glenohumeral contribution. Using loads during shoulder rehabilitation seems justified because the scapulohumeral rhythm is similar to that of unloaded arm elevation. Finally, motion direction showed a limited effect during the exercises in healthy individuals. PMID:26451620

  15. PHYSICAL FITNESS AND SKILLED WORK AFTER EXERCISE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXERCISE (PHYSIOLOGY), *PERFORMANCE(HUMAN)), (* PHYSICAL FITNESS, EXERCISE (PHYSIOLOGY)), MEASUREMENT, MOTOR REACTIONS, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), GREAT BRITAIN

  16. Exercise Dose in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-06-07

    There is wide variability in the physical activity patterns of the patients in contemporary clinical cardiovascular practice. This review is designed to address the impact of exercise dose on key cardiovascular risk factors and on mortality. We begin by examining the body of literature that supports a dose-response relationship between exercise and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including plasma lipids, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. We next explore the relationship between exercise dose and mortality by reviewing the relevant epidemiological literature underlying current physical activity guideline recommendations. We then expand this discussion to critically examine recent data pertaining to the impact of exercise dose at the lowest and highest ends of the spectrum. Finally, we provide a framework for how the key concepts of exercise dose can be integrated into clinical practice.

  17. Respiratory weight losses during exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporative water loss from the respiratory tract was determined over a wide range of exercise. The absolute humidity of the expired air was the same at all levels of exercise and equal to that measured at rest. The rate of respiratory water loss during exercise was found to be 0.019 of the oxygen uptake times (44 minus water vapor pressure). The rate of weight loss during exercise due to CO2-O2 exchange was calculated. For exercise at oxygen consumption rates exceeding 1.5 L/min in a dry environment with a water vapor pressure of 10 mm Hg, the total rate of weight loss via the respiratory tract is on the order of 2-5 g/min.

  18. Effects of exercise on sleep.

    PubMed

    Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2005-04-01

    Historically, perhaps no daytime behavior has been more closely associated with better sleep than exercise. The assumption that exercise promotes sleep has also been central to various hypotheses about the functions of sleep. Hypotheses that sleep serves an energy conservation function, a body tissue restitution function, or a temperature down-regulation function all have predicted a uniquely potent effect of exercise on sleep because no other stimulus elicits greater depletion of energy stores, tissue breakdown, or elevation of body temperature, respectively. Exercise offers a potentially attractive alternative or adjuvant treatment for insomnia. Sleeping pills have a number of adverse side effects and are not recommended for long-term use, partly on the basis of a significant epidemiologic association of chronic hypnotic use with mortality. Other behavioral/cognitive treatments are more effective for chronic insomnia treatment, but difficult and costly to deliver. By contrast, exercise could be a healthy, safe, inexpensive, and simple means of improving sleep.

  19. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole.

  20. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  1. [Nutrition and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Palacios Gil-Antuñano, N

    2000-01-01

    The principles of a good diet and proper nutrition are the same for people practising sports and for non-athletes. The main difference lies in the amount of energy that sportsmen and women need to carry out a more intense physical activity and to keep an appropriate weight to allow greater performance. The relationship between nutrition and physical exercise has often been shrouded in confusion and conjecture, so certain products or supplements turn into real myths through attempts to achieve better athletic results, despite the fact the information available on the true effect of a particular substance or food on athletic performance is, quite limited and disputed. This paper attempts to clarify the scientific information available on this subject.

  2. Youth Exercise Intention and Past Exercise Behavior: Examining the Moderating Influences of Sex and Meeting Exercise Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Graham, George M.; Yang, Stephen; Bargainnier, Sandra; Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    The study purposes were to examine: (a) the determinants of exercise intention and past exercise behavior (PEB) using the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior, and (b) the moderating influences of sex and exercise group (meeting or not meeting exercise guidelines). Participants (n = 676 adolescents) completed self-reported measures of…

  3. Formative Evaluation of a Massively Multi-Player Persistent (MMP) Environment for Asymmetric Warfare Exercises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Bessemer , & Bolton, 2002). In formative evaluations, the intent is focused on gaining sufficient information to guide the development process ; and...training requires multiple, iterative cycles of implementation, review and test, and revised development. Key in this process is acquisition of user input...immediately provided to the project team, and used by the developers to prioritize and guide the iterative development process . The RDECOM-STTC program has

  4. Habits of Spiritually Grounded Leaders: It Takes Discipline and Persistence to Exercise These Practices of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Superintendents work in environments that can become politically charged and psychically dangerous. Staying open-hearted and steadily focused on a higher purpose in such circumstances requires the inner strength that results from spiritual practice. Engaging in such practices is not likely to eliminate all stress or prevent political turmoil. But…

  5. Atypical persistence of tunica vasculosa lentis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashima V; Chhabra, Manpreet S; Mets, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of persistent tunica vasculosa lentis in a patient with minimal retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A 3-month-old male infant who had been born at 31 weeks' gestation presented with a significant amount of persistent tunica vasculosa lentis and arteriolar tortuosity with minimal ROP and no plus disease. After weekly observation and no surgical intervention, the arteriolar tortuosity lessened but the tunica vasculosa lentis persisted. Persistent tunica vasculosa lentis can be mistaken for iris vascular engorgement, suggesting plus disease and high-risk prethreshold ROP. Differentiation between tunica vasculosa lentis and iris vascular engorgement, as well as correct diagnosis of plus disease, is critical when considering laser treatment for high-risk prethreshold ROP.

  6. The persistent stereotype: children's images of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emens McAdam, Janice

    1990-03-01

    Through their reading children learn to regard scientists as eccentrics. It is shown that this stereotype has persisted for over thirty years and affects many adult attitudes. Some methods of breaking the author-reader cycle are suggested.

  7. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and the Persistence of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence from basic and translational research with pigeons and humans suggesting that the persistence of operant behavior depends on the contingency between stimuli and reinforcers, and considers some implications for clinical interventions. (Contains 4 figures.)

  8. Effects of Kamishoyosan, a Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine, on Pain Conditions in Patients with Intractable Persistent Dentoalveolar Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Young-Chang P.; Makino, Izumi; Aono, Shuichi; Yasui, Hiromichi; Isai, Hideya; Nishihara, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Kawai, Takashi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Inoue, Shinsuke; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    There are patients who suffer from persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder (PDAP) which is a pain of the teeth, either dentoalveolar pain or nonodontogenic toothache, and its cause has not yet been identified. An effective intervention for PDAP has not yet been established. Interventions for patients with PDAP are generally pharmacological treatments such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and pregabalin. However, these medicines are not always effective for patients. The pain disorder in the orofacial region including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and PDAP was effectively treated with our original exercise therapy. However, we did observe some intractable cases of PDAP even when our original exercise therapy was used. This paper presents our findings in which Kamishoyosan improved the pain intensity in 14 out of 15 PDAP patients refractory to our original exercise therapy. PMID:26495024

  9. [Persistent dento-alveolar pain disorder (PDAP)].

    PubMed

    Warnsinck, C J; Koutris, M; Shemesh, H; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-02-01

    Dento-alveolar pain is common in the orofacial area. Persistent dento-alveolar pain could be experienced without an identifiable etiology with poor response to existing treatments. Confusion about the diagnosis and classification of persistent dento-alveolar pain (PDAP) disorders could explain the difficulties in treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Recently, initial steps were made to improve the taxonomy and diagnostic criteria for PDAP in order to improve clinical research and care.

  10. Wolf population persistence in real life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Liberg, O.

    2005-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) populations tend to be resilient and to persist for long periods, and several characteristics contribute to their resilience and persistence: (1) age of first reproduction (2-3 years), (2) high annual litter size (mean = 6), (3) low dispersal age (1-3 years), and (4) long potential dispersal distance (< 880 km). The only documented factor leading to extinction of well established wolf populations with sufficient food is deliberate poisoning, although conceivably disease could have such an effect.

  11. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ^{4} lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  12. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  13. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience.

  14. Exercise-induced pulmonary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kyle, J M

    1994-03-01

    When respiratory distress occurs in the exercise arena, the clinician must differentiate between a potential serious bout of EIA or the commoner EIB. The physician's game day medical kit should include epinephrine for initial treatment in suspected EIA. Sports medicine personnel need to maintain a high index of suspicion for EIB in athletes at risk and confirm the diagnosis with a treadmill exercise challenge test. Initial pharmacologic management should consist of a trial of albuterol inhaler use 15 minutes before exercise. Early identification and treatment of EIB may enhance sports performance as well as enjoyment.

  15. Proprioception exercises in medical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Stępień, Justyna

    2013-01-03

    Proprioception, or kinesthesia, is the sense of orientation responsible for perception of body and relative position of its parts. Kinaesthesia is received by receptors located in muscles and tendons. In this study a set of proprioception developing exercises was presented. Proprioception should be restored in case of musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. Proprioception training can also be used as a prophylaxis before starting various sporting activities. Proprioception developing exercises have significant meaning for the elderly, who are at risk of balance disorders. These exercises help developing motor memory and at the same time protect from falls.

  16. Exercise London: a disaster exercise involving numerous casualties

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A large-scale disaster exercise was conducted to assess how one large community would handle such a situation — particularly, how it would deal with 150 casualties. The planning, undertaken by a subcommittee composed of representatives of all resource groups in the city, took more than a year. The deficiencies of the disaster plan detected during the exercise, which included a lack of trained personnel and various problems of communication, are now being corrected. PMID:1260617

  17. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations

    PubMed Central

    Marchette, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in Rn resulting from Vietoris–Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power Gr of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of ‘persistent triviality’, ‘transient noise’ and ‘persistent periodicity’ in power filtrations are introduced. PMID:27853540

  18. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  19. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  20. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  1. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  2. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  3. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  4. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  5. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  6. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  7. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  8. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  9. Hypertension. Part 1: How Exercise Helps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews possible mechanisms by which exercise lowers blood pressure and discusses research which indicates exercise is an effective therapy for hypertension. The article presents information to help physicians counsel hypertensive patients wanting to start an exercise program and examines the use of exercise testing to predict the onset of…

  10. Exercise Attenuates the Major Hallmarks of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garatachea, Nuria; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Morán, María; Emanuele, Enzo; Joyner, Michael J.; Lucia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular exercise has multi-system anti-aging effects. Here we summarize how exercise impacts the major hallmarks of aging. We propose that, besides searching for novel pharmaceutical targets of the aging process, more research efforts should be devoted to gaining insights into the molecular mediators of the benefits of exercise and to implement effective exercise interventions for elderly people. PMID:25431878

  11. Work, exercise, and space flight. 3: Exercise devices and protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William

    1989-01-01

    Preservation of locomotor capacity by earth equivalent, exercise in space is the crucial component of inflight exercise. At this time the treadmill appears to be the only way possible to do this. Work is underway on appropriate hardware but this and a proposed protocol to reduce exercise time must be tested. Such exercise will preserve muscle, bone Ca(++) and cardiovascular-respiratory capacity. In addition, reasonable upper body exercise can be supplied by a new force generator/measurement system-optional exercise might include a rowing machine and bicycle ergometer. A subject centered monitoring-evaluation program will allow real time adjustments as required. Absolute protection for any astronaut will not be possible and those with hypertrophied capacities such as marathoners or weight lifters will suffer significant loss. However, the program described should return the crew to earth with adequate capacity of typical activity on earth including immediate ambulation and minimal recovery time and without permanent change. An understanding of the practical mechanics and biomechanics involved is essential to a solution of the problem.

  12. Abolition of exercise induced ST depression after exercise training and its recurrence after beta blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, I C; McGuinness, J B; Ballantyne, D

    1988-01-01

    Exercise training can improve angina. A patient whose exercise tolerance test became normal after a year on an exercise programme nevertheless had a positive exercise test when he was taking a beta blocker. These results suggest that it may be undesirable to use beta blockers in patients with angina who are on exercise programmes. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3342165

  13. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Moderately Strenuous Aerobic Exercise After an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Glenny, Robb W.; Burr, Robert L.; Flo ARNP, Gayle L.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its salutary effects on health, aerobic exercise is often avoided after receipt of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) because of fears that exercise may provoke acute arrhythmias. We prospectively evaluated the effects of a home aerobic exercise training and maintenance program (EX) on aerobic performance, ICD shocks and hospitalizations exclusively in ICD recipients. Methods and Results One hundred sixty (124 men, 36 women) were randomized who had an ICD for primary (43%) or secondary (57%) prevention to EX or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2), measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline, 8 and 24 weeks. EX consisted of 8 weeks of home walking 1 hour/day, 5 days/week at 60-80% of heart rate reserve, followed by 16 weeks of maintenance home walking for 150 minutes/week. Adherence to EX was determined from exercise logs, ambulatory HR recordings of exercise, and weekly telephone contacts. UC received no exercise directives and were monitored by monthly telephone contact. Adverse events were identified by ICD interrogations, patient reports and medical records. ICD recipients averaged 55±12 years and mean ejection fraction of 40.6±15.7, all were taking beta blocker medications. EX significantly increased peakVO2 ml/kg/min (EX 26.7±7.0; UC 23.9±6.6, p=0.002) at 8 weeks, which persisted during maintenance exercise at 24 weeks (EX 26.9±7,7; UC 23.4±6.0, p<0.001). ICD shocks were infrequent (EX=4 vs UC=8), with no differences in hospitalizations or deaths between groups. Conclusions Prescribed home exercise is safe and significantly improves cardiovascular performance in ICD recipients without causing shocks or hospitalizations. PMID:25792557

  14. Qualitative outcomes of progressive resistance exercise for people with COPD.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, S D; Taylor, N F; Paratz, J D

    2007-01-01

    The outcomes of quantitative investigations examining the effectiveness of exercise interventions for people with COPD are limited by the small number of measurement tools that can be included. In contrast, qualitative inquiry allows broader exploration of the perceived outcomes of an intervention. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the qualitative outcomes of a progressive resistance exercise (PRE) program for people with COPD. People with COPD, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of PRE, were invited to participate in two semi-structured interviews conducted at the end (12 weeks) and 12 weeks after the training intervention (24 weeks). Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and then coded independently by two researchers. Themes relating to training outcomes were then developed and described. Twenty-two participants were interviewed at 12 weeks, and 19 participants at 24 weeks. After PRE, participants reported a range of physical gains, particularly with regard to improved strength and reduced breathlessness during daily activities. Improved control and confidence during activities of daily living were important psychological benefits perceived by people with COPD, as was the social support experienced during group training sessions. At 24 weeks, confidence persisted despite a perceived plateau or dissipation of physical gains. People with COPD reported physical, psychological and social benefits after PRE, which had a positive effect on activity performance. Although the perceived physical benefits of training were not prominent at 24 weeks, feelings of increased confidence and control persisted.

  15. Factors predicting persistence of early wheezing through childhood and adolescence: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Monica P; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Background For the early identification of persistent asthma symptoms among young children with recurrent wheezing, it would be helpful to identify all available studies that have identified at least one factor for predicting the persistence of early wheezing. The objective of the present study was to perform a systematic review of all studies that have identified factors that predict the persistence of symptoms among young patients with recurring wheezing. Methods A systematic review of relevant studies was conducted through searching in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, and SCOPUS databases up to June 2016. Studies that identified predictors of persistence of wheezing illness among young children with recurrent wheezing were retrieved. Two independent reviewers screened the literature and extracted relevant data. Results The literature search returned 649 references, 619 of which were excluded due to their irrelevance. Five additional studies were identified from reference lists, and 35 studies were finally included in the review. Among all the identified predictors, the most frequently identified ones were the following: family asthma or atopy; personal history of atopic diseases; allergic sensitization early in life; and frequency, clinical pattern, or severity of wheezing/symptoms. Conclusion Parental asthma (especially maternal), parental allergy, eczema, allergic rhinitis, persistent wheezing, wheeze without colds, exercise-induced wheeze, severe wheezing episodes, allergic sensitization (especially polysensitization), eosinophils (blood or eosinophil cationic protein in nasal sample), and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide were risk factors predicting persistence of early wheezing through school age. All of them are included in conventional algorithms, for example, Asthma Predictive Index and its modifications, for predicting future asthma. PMID:28392707

  16. Cell Phone-Based Expert Systems for Smoking Cessation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    is based on the empirically-supported Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change ( TTM ). A web-based CTI modified for a veteran population will be...CTI is based on the empirically-supported Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change ( TTM ) (Prochaska & Velicer, 1997; Velicer, Prochaska, & Redding...Velicer, W. F. (1997). The transtheoretical model of health behavior change. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12, 38-48. 4. Smith, E. A

  17. Cell Phone-Based Expert Systems for Smoking Cessation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    beneficial for intervening with some mental health issues because they offer anonymity29,30, reduce fear of stigma, and increase self...Veterans have a distinctive sociodemographic profile (Koepsell, 2002). Examining the mental health effects in recent Veterans returning from Iraq...stigma associated with seeking mental health care, this Veteran-tailored, motivational enhancement CTI may provide unique benefits. In addition

  18. A mobile phone-based ECG monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sada, Kouji; Hamada, Shingo; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a telemedicine system for monitoring a patient's electrocardiogram during daily activities. The recording system consists of three ECG chest electrodes, a variable gain instrumentation amplifier, a low power 8-bit single-chip microcomputer, a 256 KB EEPROM and a 2.4 GHz low transmitting power mobile phone (PHS). The complete system is mounted on a single, lightweight, chest electrode array. When a heart discomfort is felt, the patient pushes the data transmission switch on the recording system. The system sends the recorded ECG waveforms of the two prior minutes and ECG waveforms of the two minutes after the switch is pressed, directly in the hospital server computer via the PHS. The server computer sends the data to the physician on call. The data is displayed on the doctor's Java mobile phone LCD (Liquid Crystal Display), so he or she can monitor the ECG regardless of their location. The developed ECG monitoring system is not only applicable to at-home patients, but should also be useful for monitoring hospital patients.

  19. A new mobile phone-based ECG monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Ogawa, Hiromichi Maki Hidekuni; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sada, Kouji; Hamada, Shingo; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a system for monitoring a patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) and movement during daily activities. The complete system is mounted on chest electrodes and continuously samples the ECG and three axis accelerations. When the patient feels a heart discomfort, he or she pushes the data transmission switch on the recording system and the system sends the recorded ECG waveforms and three axis accelerations of the two prior minutes, and for two minutes after the switch is pressed. The data goes directly to a hospital server computer via a 2.4 GHz low power mobile phone. These data are stored on a server computer and downloaded to the physician's Java mobile phone. The physician can display the data on the phone's liquid crystal display.

  20. Internet and Cell Phone Based Smoking Cessation Programs among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Purvi; Sharma, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Smoking cessation among adolescents is a salient public health issue, as it can prevent the adoption of risky health behaviors and reduce negative impacts on health. Self-efficacy, household and social support systems, and perceived benefits are some important cessation determinants. With the popular use of the Internet and cell phone usage among…

  1. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  2. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform. PMID:26308615

  3. Exercise Training During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Chou, J. L.; Simonson, S. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose is to study the effect of passive (without exercise) and active (with exercise) +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration training, using a short-arm (1.9m radius) centrifuge, on post- training maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max, work capacity) and 70 deg head-up tilt (orthostatic) tolerance in ambulatory subjects to test the hypothesis that (a) both passive and active acceleration training will improve post-training tilt-tolerance, and (b) there will be no difference in tilt-tolerance between passive and active exercise acceleration training because increased hydrostatic and blood pressures, rather than increased muscular metabolism, will provide the major adaptive stimulus. The purpose of the pilot study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the metabolic responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  4. Exercise Science: A New Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricci, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Exercise science represents an integrated approach to the study of the physiological, biochemical, and mechanical adaptations of humans to stresses imposed by a variety of physical performances as well as ambient conditions such as temperature and humidity. (MLW)

  5. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... fields or lawns. A student with asthma should warm up before exercising and cool down afterward. ... For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk the ... The warm, moist air may keep symptoms away. Football, baseball, ...

  6. Health Psychology and Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Although the association between vigorous exercise and certain aspects of mental health is well documented, explanations for this relationship are not well understood. Research in this area is reviewed, and recommendations for more study are presented. (CJ)

  7. NASA Now: Exercise Physiology: Countermeasures

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aaron Weaver is a biomedical engineer responsible for setting up and running experiments and recruiting test subjects in the Exercise Countermeasures Laboratory at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in...

  8. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes.

  9. Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Intervention.

    PubMed

    Archer, T; Ricci, S; Massoni, F; Ricci, L; Rapp-Ricciardi, M

    2016-01-01

    Exercise, as a potent epigenetic regulator, implies the potential to counteract pathophysiological processes and alterations in most cardiovascular/respiratory cells and tissues not withstanding a paucity of understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and doseresponse relationships. In the present account, the assets accruing from physical exercise and its influence upon executive functioning are examined. Under conditions of neuropsychiatric and neurologic ill-health, age-related deterioration of functional and biomarker indicators during healthy and disordered trajectories, neuroimmune and affective unbalance, and epigenetic pressures, exercise offers a large harvest of augmentations in health and well-being. Both animal models and human studies support the premise of manifest gains from regular exercise within several domains, besides cognitive function and mood, notably as the agency of a noninvasive, readily available therapeutic intervention.

  10. Benefits of exercise during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Spitznagle, Tracy; Hunt, Devyani

    2012-11-01

    There is a direct link between healthy mothers and healthy infants. Exercise and appropriate nutrition are important contributors to maternal physical and psychological health. The benefits and potential risks of exercise during pregnancy have gained even more attention, with a number of studies having been published after the 2002 American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists guidelines. A review of the literature was conducted by using PubMed, Scopus, and Embase to assess the literature regarding the benefits of exercise during pregnancy. The search revealed 219 publications, which the authors then narrowed to 125 publications. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the known benefits of exercise to the mother, fetus, and newborn.

  11. Our World: Exercise in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out why exercise is so important to the astronauts who travel into space. Learn how gravity affects our bodies and what astronauts must do in reduced gravity environments to keep their bodies ...

  12. Herbs in exercise and sports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chee Keong; Muhamad, Ayu Suzailiana; Ooi, Foong Kiew

    2012-03-08

    The use of herbs as ergogenic aids in exercise and sport is not novel. Ginseng, caffeine, ma huang (also called 'Chinese ephedra'), ephedrine and a combination of both caffeine and ephedrine are the most popular herbs used in exercise and sports. It is believed that these herbs have an ergogenic effect and thus help to improve physical performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of these herbs on exercise performance. Recently, researchers have also investigated the effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack on endurance cycling and running performance. These investigators have reported no significant improvement in either cycling or running endurance after supplementation with this herb. As the number of studies in this area is still small, more studies should be conducted to evaluate and substantiate the effects of this herb on sports and exercise performance. For instance, future research on any herbs should take the following factors into consideration: dosage, supplementation period and a larger sample size.

  13. Exercise Versus +Gz Acceleration Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J. M.; Evans, J. M.; Knapp, C. F.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Decreased working capacity and "orthostatic" intolerance are two major problems for astronauts during and after landing from spaceflight in a return vehicle. The purpose was to test the hypotheses that (1) supine-passive-acceleration training, supine-interval-exercise plus acceleration training, and supine exercise plus acceleration training will improve orthostatic tolerance (OT) in ambulatory men; and that (2) addition of aerobic exercise conditioning will not influence this enhanced OT from that of passive-acceleration training. Seven untrained men (24-38 yr) underwent 3 training regimens (30 min/d x 5d/wk x 3wk on the human-powered centrifuge - HPC): (a) Passive acceleration (alternating +1.0 Gz to 50% Gzmax); (b) Exercise acceleration (alternating 40% - 90% V02max leg cycle exercise plus 50% of HPCmax acceleration); and (c) Combined intermittent exercise-acceleration at 40% to 90% HPCmax. Maximal supine exercise workloads increased (P < 0.05) by 8.3% with Passive, by 12.6% with Exercise, and by 15.4% with Combined; but maximal V02 and HR were unchanged in all groups. Maximal endurance (time to cessation) was unchanged with Passive, but increased (P < 0.05) with Exercise and Combined. Resting pre-tilt HR was elevated by 12.9% (P < 0.05) only after Passive training, suggesting that exercise training attenuated this HR response. All resting pre-tilt blood pressures (SBP, DBP, MAP) were not different pre- vs. post-training. Post-training tilt-tolerance time and HR were increased (P < 0.05) only with Passive training by 37.8% and by 29.1%, respectively. Thus, addition of exercise training attenuated the increased Passive tilt tolerance. Resting (pre-tilt) and post-tilt cardiac R-R interval, stroke volume, end-diastolic volume, and cardiac output were all uniformly reduced (P < 0.05) while peripheral resistance was uniformly increased (P < 0.05) pre-and post-training for the three regimens indicating no effect of any training regimen on those cardiovascular

  14. The Biomechanics of Exercise Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Arnold, Steven; Derr, Janice; Sharkey, Neil; Wu, Ge

    1999-01-01

    The Penn State Zero-gravity Simulator (PSZS) is a device developed by the Center for Locomotion Studies (CELOS) to enable ground studies of exercise countermeasures for the bone loss that has been shown to occur during long-term exposure to zero gravity (0G). The PSZS simulates 0G exercise by providing a suspension system that holds an individual in a horizontal (supine) position above the floor in order to enable exercise on a wall-mounted treadmill. Due to this orientation, exercise performed in the PSZS is free of the force of -ravity in the direction that would normally contribute to ground reaction forces. In order for movements to be more similar to those in 0G, a constant force suspension of each segment (equal to the segment weight) is provided regardless of limb position. During the preliminary development of the PSZS, CELOS researchers also designed an optional gravity-replacement simulation feature for the PSZS. This feature was a prototype tethering system that consisted of a spring tension system to pull an exercising individual toward the treadmill. The immediate application of the tethering system was to be the provision of gravity-replacement loading so that exercise in 0G- and 1G-loading conditions could be compared, and the PSZS could then be used to evaluate exercise countermeasures for bone loss during space flight. This tethering system would also be a model for the further refinement of gravity-replacement systems provided for astronaut usage while performing prescribed exercise countermeasures for bone loss during long-term space flights.

  15. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  16. Exercise Testing in Hypertension Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Chinese Version) before the exercise testing. According to the daily mobility, existing symptoms and physiological adaptability, physical function of the...completed the WHOQOL-BREF and the physical function questionnaire, and the form of general information, includ- ing age, sex and etc. All...sys- tem. During the exercising testing the function of symp a- thetic nerve and parasympathetic nerve will be more active than that in the resting

  17. When exercise causes exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Furman, Janet

    2015-04-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis is a clinical condition caused by intense, repetitive exercise or a sudden increase in exercise in an untrained person, although rhabdomyolysis can occur in trained athletes. In many cases, the presentation of early, uncomplicated rhabdomyolysis is subtle, but serious complications such as renal failure, compartment syndrome, and dysrhythmias may arise if severe exertional rhabdomyolysis is undiagnosed or untreated. Management is further complicated by the lack of concrete management guidelines for treating rhabdomyolysis and returning patients to activity.

  18. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  19. Sequence-Dependent Persistence Lengths of DNA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Glowacki, Jaroslaw; Grandchamp, Alexandre E; Manning, Robert S; Maddocks, John H

    2017-03-24

    A Monte Carlo code applied to the cgDNA coarse-grain rigid-base model of B-form double-stranded DNA is used to predict a sequence-averaged persistence length of lF = 53.5 nm in the sense of Flory, and of lp = 160 bp or 53.5 nm in the sense of apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay. These estimates are slightly higher than the consensus experimental values of 150 bp or 50 nm, but we believe the agreement to be good given that the cgDNA model is itself parametrized from molecular dynamics simulations of short fragments of length 10-20 bp, with no explicit fit to persistence length. Our Monte Carlo simulations further predict that there can be substantial dependence of persistence lengths on the specific sequence [Formula: see text] of a fragment. We propose, and confirm the numerical accuracy of, a simple factorization that separates the part of the apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay [Formula: see text] attributable to intrinsic shape, from a part [Formula: see text] attributable purely to stiffness, i.e., a sequence-dependent version of what has been called sequence-averaged dynamic persistence length l̅d (=58.8 nm within the cgDNA model). For ensembles of both random and λ-phage fragments, the apparent persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of 4 nm over sequence, whereas our dynamic persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of only 1 nm. However, there are notable dynamic persistence length outliers, including poly(A) (exceptionally straight and stiff), poly(TA) (tightly coiled and exceptionally soft), and phased A-tract sequence motifs (exceptionally bent and stiff). The results of our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with both molecular dynamics simulation and diverse experimental data including minicircle cyclization rates and stereo cryo-electron microscopy images.

  20. Exercise and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, J P Lopes; Silvestre, R; Pinto, A C; de Carvalho, M

    2012-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease in which much burden is geared towards end-of-life care. Particularly in the earlier stages of ALS, many people have found both physiological and psychological boosts from various types of physical exercise for disused muscles. Proper exercise is important for preventing atrophy of muscles from disuse-a key for remaining mobile for as long as possible-and as long as it is possible to exercise comfortably and safely, for preserving cardiovascular fitness. However, the typical neuromuscular patient features a great physical inactivity and disuse weakness, and for that reason many controversial authors have contested exercise in these patients during years, especially in ALS which is rapidly progressive. There is an urgent need for dissecting in detail the real risks or benefits of exercise in controlled clinical trials to demystify this ancient paradigm. Yet, recent research studies document significant benefits in terms of survival and quality of life in ALS, poor cooperation, small sample size, uncontrolled and short-duration trials, remain the main handicaps. Sedentary barriers such as early fatigue and inherent muscle misuse should be overcome, for instance with body-weight supporting systems or non-invasive ventilation, and exercise should be faced as a potential non-monotonous way for contributing to better health-related quality of life.

  1. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  2. Metabolic responses during postprandial exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jie; Raines, Emily; Rosenberg, Joseph; Ratamess, Nicholas; Naclerio, Fernando; Faigenbaum, Avery

    2013-01-01

    To examine metabolic interaction between meal and exercise, 10 men and 10 women completed three trials: (1) exercise (E), (2) consumption of a meal (M), and (3) consumption of a meal followed by exercise (M+E). All trials commenced after an overnight fast and were preceded by a rest period in which resting metabolic rate (RMR) was determined. The meal contained 721 kilocalories composed of 41%, 36%, and 23% of carbohydrate, lipids, and protein, respectively. Exercise protocol consisted of three continuous 10-minute cycling at 50%, 60%, and 70% VO2peak. Measurement began 60 min after the start of the meal and included VO2 that was used to determine meal-induced thermogenesis (MIT). VO2 was greater (p < .05) in M+E than in E at 50% and 60% VO2peak. MIT was higher (p < .05) during exercise at 50% VO2peak than at rest. It appears that postprandial exercise of mild intensities can potentiate MIT, thereby provoking a greater increase in energy expenditure.

  3. The long-term benefits of a multi-component exercise intervention to balance and mobility in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Bird, M; Hill, K D; Ball, M; Hetherington, S; Williams, A D

    2011-01-01

    We examined the long-term effects of a multi-component exercise program on balance, mobility and exercise behavior. The benefits of a community-based resistance and flexibility exercise intervention in a group of healthy older (60-75 years) individuals were recorded 12 months after completion of the randomized control intervention. Differences between those participants who continued to exercise and those who discontinued were investigated. Significant improvements from baseline in sit to stand (p<0.001), timed up and go (p=0.001), and sway (p<0.001) remained at follow up in the exercise intervention group, with a control group unchanged. Participants who continued exercising had significantly greater improvements in strength immediately after the intervention, compared to those who discontinued (p=0.004). Those who continued regular resistance training performed better in the step test at 12-month follow up (p=0.009) and believed that the program was of more benefit to their physical activity (p<0.001) than those who discontinued exercising. Benefits to balance and mobility persist 1 year after participation in a multi-component exercise program, due in part to some continuing participation in resistance training. Motivation to continue resistance training may be related real and perceived benefits attained from the intervention as well as the environmental context of the intervention.

  4. Adherence to a home-based exercise program and incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shinji, S; Shigeru, M; Ryusei, U; Mitsuru, M; Shigehiro, K

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to a home-based exercise program and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated 102 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 75 years, and followed them prospectively for 17.2 months. Before enrollment, all patients received a traditional exercise prescription. The exercise program consisted of a daily walking exercise at home for 20 - 30 minutes. Self-reported adherence to the exercise program and the incidence of CVD were confirmed by information obtained from telephone interviews. There were 38 dropouts among the patients in the exercise program. Dropouts were significantly younger than completers. The rate of obesity was significantly higher among the dropouts than among the completers. No differences were observed between the two groups for gender, history of CVD and other clinical characteristics. During the follow-up, we documented 8 new cases of CVD. The incidence of CVD during the follow-up was 1.56 percent among the program completers and 18.4 percent among the dropouts. Adherence to the home-based exercise was inversely related to the incidence of CVD (p < 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and other covariates. In conclusion, adherence to an exercise program is associated with a reduced incidence of CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Measuring thermal expansion using X-band persistent scatterer interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosetto, Michele; Monserrat, Oriol; Cuevas-González, María; Devanthéry, Núria; Luzi, Guido; Crippa, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    This paper is focused on the estimation of the thermal expansion of buildings and infrastructures using X-band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) observations. For this purpose an extended PSI model is used, which allows separating the thermal expansion from the total observed deformation thus generating a new PSI product: the map of the thermal expansion parameter, named thermal map. The core of the paper is devoted to the exploitation of the information contained in the thermal maps: three examples are discussed in detail, which concern a viaduct, a set of industrial buildings and two skyscrapers. The thermal maps can be used to derive the thermal expansion coefficient of the observed objects and information on their static structure. In addition, the paper illustrates the distortions in the PSI deformation products that occur if the thermal expansion is not explicitly modelled. Finally, an inter-comparison exercise is described, where the thermal expansion coefficients estimated by PSI are compared with those derived by a Ku-band ground-based SAR campaign.

  6. Exercise-Induced Vasculitis: A Review with Illustrated Cases.

    PubMed

    Espitia, Olivier; Dréno, Brigitte; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Didier, Quentin; Quillard, Thibaut; Nicol, Christelle; Le Bouch, Yann; Planchon, Bernard; Pistorius, Marc-Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Although exercise-induced vasculitis (EIV) is usually misdiagnosed, it is not uncommon. Occurring mostly after prolonged exercise, especially in hot weather, EIV is an isolated cutaneous vasculitis with stereotypical presentation. This article reviews the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of EIV based on the published literature. We report 99 patients who developed EIV after walking, dancing, swimming, or hiking especially during hot weather, including the records of 16 patients with EIV treated at our hospital from 2007 to 2015. Erythematous or purpuric plaques arise on the lower legs, without the involvement of compression socks or stockings. Symptoms include itch, pain, and a burning sensation. EIV is an isolated cutaneous vasculitis. Lesions resolve spontaneously after 10 days. When triggering conditions persist, relapses are frequent (77.5 %). Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis in 95 % of cases with C3 or immunoglobulin M deposits in 88 and 46 % of cases, respectively. Blood investigations are negative. EIV appears to be a consequence of venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation. Both appear after prolonged and unusual exercise in hot weather. Treatment is not codified; topical corticosteroids may reduce symptoms and wearing light clothes might limit lesion occurrence.

  7. EEG activity and mood in health orientated runners after different exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Askew, Christopher D; Diehl, Julia; Mierau, Andreas; Kleinert, Jens; Abel, Thomas; Carnahan, Heather; Strüder, Heiko K

    2009-03-23

    An increasing number of studies within the recent years connected physical exercise with changes in brain cortical activity. Most of this data (1) refers to aerobic exercise and (2) does not correlate to psychological parameters although it is well known that exercise has a positive effect on mood. In times where health activities play a major role it is increasingly necessary to connect somato-physiological and somatopsychological components of physical activity. This study aimed to find changes in EEG activity and mood after low, preferred and high intensity running. EEG and actual state of mood were recorded before and after exercise. Results showed an effect for the preferred and high intensity velocity in both, EEG and mood. As only the higher frequency areas N18 Hz showed persisting decreases post-exercise we concluded that this might be a sign of outlasting effects of exercise on brain cortical activity which may have influences on general well-being. We could also show that there is a clear relationship between EEG activity and mood reflecting a basic principle of cortical excitation.

  8. Carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise: impact on affect and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, S H; Ali, A; Biddle, S J H; Williams, C

    2007-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of ingesting a carbohydrate (CHO) solution on affective states and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during prolonged intermittent high-intensity exercise. Seventeen male soccer players completed a prolonged intermittent high-intensity exercise protocol for 90 min on two occasions, separated by at least 7 days. Participants consumed either a 6.4% CHO (0.6 g/kg body mass (BM)/h) or an artificially sweetened placebo (PLA) solution immediately before (8 mL/kg BM) and every 15 min (3 mL/kg BM) during exercise in a double-blind, counterbalanced design. Pleasure-displeasure, perceived activation, RPE and plasma glucose concentration was assessed. The results showed that compared with the CHO trial, perceived activation were lower in the placebo trial during the last 30 min of exercise and this was accompanied by lowered plasma glucose concentrations. In the CHO trial, RPE was maintained in the last 30 min of exercise but carried on increasing in the PLA trial. Therefore, CHO ingestion during prolonged high-intensity exercise appears to elicit an enhanced perceived activation profile that may impact upon task persistence and performance. This finding is in addition to the physiological and metabolic benefits of the exogenous energy supply.

  9. Personality characteristics and psychological distress associated with primary exercise dependence: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Silvana; Clementi, Cecilia; Guidi, Jenny; Benassi, Mariagrazia; Tossani, Eliana

    2011-09-30

    The aim of this study was to assess personality characteristics and psychological distress associated with primary exercise dependence (ExeDepI) in a mixed gender sample. A cross-sectional study was carried out with adult habitual physical exercisers. A total of 79 participants voluntarily completed a package of self-report questionnaires including the Exercise Dependence Questionnaire (EDQ), the Eating Disorder Inventory II (EDI-2), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the Attitude Toward Self scale (ATS), and the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ). Significant differences were found on the EDQ exercise for weight control subscale with regard to gender, as well as on the EDI-2 total score and five of its subscales, with higher scores for females compared to males. Participants reporting primary exercise dependence (N=32) were more likely to present with disordered eating patterns than controls (N=47). They also showed higher levels of harm avoidance and persistence on the TCI, but lower self-directness and less mature character. Furthermore, ExeDepI group scored higher on the ATS dysmorphophobia subscale, as well as on the anxiety and hostility subscales of the SQ compared to the control group. These findings provide support to the idea that primary exercise dependence can be considered as a clinical syndrome associated with certain personality characteristics and psychological symptoms that might be accurately assessed in clinical settings.

  10. Exhaled breath condensate pH is increased after moderate exercise.

    PubMed

    Riediker, Michael; Danuser, Brigitta

    2007-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of patients with inflammatory diseases has a decreased pH. This could make EBC-pH an interesting tool for studying work-related inflammatory processes, provided that normal work activities would not interfere with the results. We consequently tested whether EBC-pH was influenced by moderate exercise. Fifteen healthy nonsmoking subjects exercised for 30 min on a treadmill by walking at 60% of predicted maximal heart rate. Four EBC samples were obtained: one to learn the technique, one before exercise, one immediately after exercise, and one 60 min later. EBC-pH was significantly increased after exercise compared to before (mean of 8.27 vs. 8.20, p = 0.001). It remained significantly increased after 60 min (8.25, p = 0.02). The increase was strongest for the subjects with lowest pH. All pH measures were significantly correlated with each other. Light physical activity increases EBC-pH. The persistence of this increase after the end of the exercise poses a serious challenge if one wants to use this technique for health surveys or for diagnostic purposes. It could prevent the observation of a lowered EBC-pH that results from an inflammatory response.

  11. Emergence of Persistent Infection due to Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vidit; Moitra, Promit; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2017-02-01

    We explore the emergence of persistent infection in a closed region where the disease progression of the individuals is given by the SIRS model, with an individual becoming infected on contact with another infected individual. We investigate the persistence of contagion qualitatively and quantitatively, under increasing heterogeneity in the partitioning of the population into different disease compartments, as well as increasing heterogeneity in the phases of the disease among individuals within a compartment. We observe that when the initial population is uniform, consisting of individuals at the same stage of disease progression, infection arising from a contagious seed does not persist. However when the initial population consists of randomly distributed refractory and susceptible individuals, a single source of infection can lead to sustained infection in the population, as heterogeneity facilitates the de-synchronization of the phases in the disease cycle of the individuals. We also show how the average size of the window of persistence of infection depends on the degree of heterogeneity in the initial composition of the population. In particular, we show that the infection eventually dies out when the entire initial population is susceptible, while even a few susceptibles among an heterogeneous refractory population gives rise to a large persistent infected set.

  12. Persistent agents in Axelrod's social dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Axelrod's model of social dynamics has been studied under the effect of external media. Here we study the formation of cultural domains in the model by introducing persistent agents. These are agents whose cultural traits are not allowed to change but may be spread through local neighborhood. In the absence of persistent agents, the system is known to present a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural regime at some critical Q (number of traits). Our results reveal a dependence of critical Q on the occupation probability p of persistent agents and we obtain the phase diagram of the model in the (p,Q) -plane. The critical locus is explained by the competition of two opposite forces named here barrier and bonding effects. Such forces are verified to be caused by non-persistent agents which adhere (adherent agents) to the set of traits of persistent ones. The adherence (concentration of adherent agents) as a function of p is found to decay for constant Q. Furthermore, adherence as a function of Q is found to decay as a power law with constant p.

  13. Emergence of Persistent Infection due to Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vidit; Moitra, Promit; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2017-01-01

    We explore the emergence of persistent infection in a closed region where the disease progression of the individuals is given by the SIRS model, with an individual becoming infected on contact with another infected individual. We investigate the persistence of contagion qualitatively and quantitatively, under increasing heterogeneity in the partitioning of the population into different disease compartments, as well as increasing heterogeneity in the phases of the disease among individuals within a compartment. We observe that when the initial population is uniform, consisting of individuals at the same stage of disease progression, infection arising from a contagious seed does not persist. However when the initial population consists of randomly distributed refractory and susceptible individuals, a single source of infection can lead to sustained infection in the population, as heterogeneity facilitates the de-synchronization of the phases in the disease cycle of the individuals. We also show how the average size of the window of persistence of infection depends on the degree of heterogeneity in the initial composition of the population. In particular, we show that the infection eventually dies out when the entire initial population is susceptible, while even a few susceptibles among an heterogeneous refractory population gives rise to a large persistent infected set. PMID:28145522

  14. Swimming exercise: impact of aquatic exercise on cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    Swimming is an exercise modality that is highly suitable for health promotion and disease prevention, and is one of the most popular, most practiced and most recommended forms of physical activity. Yet little information is available concerning the influence of regular swimming on coronary heart disease (CHD). Exercise recommendations involving swimming have been generated primarily from unjustified extrapolation of the data from other modes of exercise (e.g. walking and cycling). Available evidence indicates that, similarly to other physically active adults, the CHD risk profile is more favourable in swimmers than in sedentary counterparts and that swim training results in the lowering of some CHD risk factors. However, the beneficial impact of regular swimming may be smaller than land-based exercises. In some cases, regular swimming does not appear to confer beneficial effects on some CHD risk factors. Moreover, swimming has not been associated with the reduced risks of developing CHD. Thus, extrapolation of research findings using land-based exercises into swimming cannot be justified, based on the available research. Clearly, more research is required to properly assess the effects of regular swimming on CHD risks in humans.

  15. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Hildemar; Bredehoft, Margaret Dinhluu; Gonzalez, Frecia M.; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants’ exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants. PMID:27336015

  16. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Hildemar; Bredehoft, Margaret Dinhluu; Gonzalez, Frecia M; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants' exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants.

  17. A disaster relief exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliotti, Fulvia; Novaro Mascarello, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) is an effective tool for military applications, both for properly military operations, such as research missions and road surveillance, and for civilian support after natural disasters, like landslides, floods, and earthquakes, when reaching victims is often hard or it would take too much time for their survival. Information are needed without hazarding the life of the military troops. When roads, bridges and other communication ways are usually not available, the unmanned platform is the only easy and fast way to contact people. It can be launched directly from the operation site and it could take crucial information or carry medication, necessaries and everything that could help rescue teams. The unmanned platform can also be used for the first aid in an emergency situation when the use of a helicopter is too dangerous and other troops could be involved in heavy fighting. The RPAS has some advantages. First is the reduced cost, compared to traditional aircraft, that could enable the user to have several operating units. Secondly, pilots are not on board and therefore, if needed, the crew' rotation and rest do not imply the need to stop operations. The third fact is that, depending on the type of delivery that is used, the operations may take place on a twenty-four hours' base. The main benefit achieved with these three facts is that continuous operation may take place and eventually make up the capacity difference. To sum up, the main motivation behind this employment of UAS is to replace human lives on the cockpits and to assure the execution of Dangerous, Dull and Dirty missions. In May 2015, the ERIDANO Exercise was performed in Moncalieri city, near Turin (Italy) and it was a joint exercise between the Italian Army, National Emergency Service and Politecnico of Turin. The aim was the control and management of emergency situations due to natural disasters. In particular, a flood was simulated. A multicopter was used

  18. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  19. Improving Underrepresented Minority Student Persistence in STEM.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Mica; Burnett, Myra; Campbell, Andrew G; Campbell, Patricia B; Denetclaw, Wilfred F; Gutiérrez, Carlos G; Hurtado, Sylvia; John, Gilbert H; Matsui, John; McGee, Richard; Okpodu, Camellia Moses; Robinson, T Joan; Summers, Michael F; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Zavala, MariaElena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Joint Working Group on Improving Underrepresented Minorities (URMs) Persistence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)-convened by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-review current data and propose deliberation about why the academic "pathways" leak more for URM than white or Asian STEM students. They suggest expanding to include a stronger focus on the institutional barriers that need to be removed and the types of interventions that "lift" students' interests, commitment, and ability to persist in STEM fields. Using Kurt Lewin's planned approach to change, the committee describes five recommendations to increase URM persistence in STEM at the undergraduate level. These recommendations capitalize on known successes, recognize the need for accountability, and are framed to facilitate greater progress in the future. The impact of these recommendations rests upon enacting the first recommendation: to track successes and failures at the institutional level and collect data that help explain the existing trends.

  20. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  1. Persistent currents in mesoscopic Fibonacci rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, G.J.; Wang, Z.D.; Hu, A.; Jiang, S.S.

    1997-04-01

    In the framework of a tight-binding model, we study energy spectra and persistent currents in mesoscopic Fibonacci rings threaded by a magnetic flux. It is found that the flux-dependent electron eigenenergies E({Phi}) in mesoscopic Fibonacci rings still form ``bands`` with respect to the flux {Phi}, but there is a scaling relation between the total ``bandwidth`` and the Fibonacci number. When the strength of the one-dimensional quasiperiodic potential increases, the persistent current decreases rapidly. Interestingly, for a generalized mixing model of mesoscopic Fibonacci rings, free-electron-like persistent current may appear if the number of electrons of the system takes a specific value. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  3. The origins of lactase persistence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Itan, Yuval; Powell, Adam; Beaumont, Mark A; Burger, Joachim; Thomas, Mark G

    2009-08-01

    Lactase persistence (LP) is common among people of European ancestry, but with the exception of some African, Middle Eastern and southern Asian groups, is rare or absent elsewhere in the world. Lactase gene haplotype conservation around a polymorphism strongly associated with LP in Europeans (-13,910 C/T) indicates that the derived allele is recent in origin and has been subject to strong positive selection. Furthermore, ancient DNA work has shown that the--13,910*T (derived) allele was very rare or absent in early Neolithic central Europeans. It is unlikely that LP would provide a selective advantage without a supply of fresh milk, and this has lead to a gene-culture coevolutionary model where lactase persistence is only favoured in cultures practicing dairying, and dairying is more favoured in lactase persistent populations. We have developed a flexible demic computer simulation model to explore the spread of lactase persistence, dairying, other subsistence practices and unlinked genetic markers in Europe and western Asia's geographic space. Using data on--13,910*T allele frequency and farming arrival dates across Europe, and approximate Bayesian computation to estimate parameters of interest, we infer that the--13,910*T allele first underwent selection among dairying farmers around 7,500 years ago in a region between the central Balkans and central Europe, possibly in association with the dissemination of the Neolithic Linearbandkeramik culture over Central Europe. Furthermore, our results suggest that natural selection favouring a lactase persistence allele was not higher in northern latitudes through an increased requirement for dietary vitamin D. Our results provide a coherent and spatially explicit picture of the coevolution of lactase persistence and dairying in Europe.

  4. Comparing the effectiveness of individualistic, altruistic, and competitive incentives in motivating completion of mental exercises.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Heather; Loewenstein, George; Kopsic, Jessica; Volpp, Kevin G

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the impact of individually oriented, purely altruistic, and a hybrid of competitive and cooperative monetary reward incentives on older adults' completion of cognitive exercises and cognitive function. We find that all three incentive structures approximately double the number of exercises completed during the six-week active experimental period relative to a no incentive control condition. However, the altruistic and cooperative/competitive incentives led to different patterns of participation, with significantly higher inter-partner correlations in utilization of the software, as well as greater persistence once incentives were removed. Provision of all incentives significantly improved performance on the incentivized exercises. However, results of an independent cognitive testing battery suggest no generalizable gains in cognitive function resulted from the training.

  5. Amnestically Induced Persistence in Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressoni, J. C.; da Silva, Marco Antonio Alves; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2007-02-01

    We study how the Hurst exponent α depends on the fraction f of the total time t remembered by non-Markovian random walkers that recall only the distant past. We find that otherwise nonpersistent random walkers switch to persistent behavior when inflicted with significant memory loss. Such memory losses induce the probability density function of the walker’s position to undergo a transition from Gaussian to non-Gaussian. We interpret these findings of persistence in terms of a breakdown of self-regulation mechanisms and discuss their possible relevance to some of the burdensome behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  6. Platforms for Persistent Communications, Surveillance and Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    GPS Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) – e.g.,DSCS/ UFO / INMARSAT Grading Factors (1–4 shown as colors) Sensitivity Analysis Observations Notes: 10Persistent...SWaP/Manpack Not Voice Capable Voice Capable Image Capable Video Capable Acquisition Cost > $50M $10M – $50M $1M – $10M < $1M Flying Hr Cost > $20K $5K...GPS Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) – e.g.,DSCS/ UFO / INMARSAT Grading Factors (1–4 shown as colors) Sensitivity Analysis Observations Notes: 12Persistent

  7. Chronic Bacterial Pathogens: Mechanisms of Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Byndloss, Mariana X.; Tsolis, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many bacterial pathogens can cause acute infections that are cleared with onset of adaptive immunity, however a subset of these pathogens can establish persistent, and sometimes lifelong infections. While bacteria causing chronic infections are phylogenetically diverse, they share common features in their interactions with the host that enable a protracted period of colonization. This chapter will compare the persistence strategies of two chronic pathogens from the Proteobacteria, Brucella abortus, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) to consider how these two pathogens, which are very different at the genomic level, can utilize common strategies to evade immune clearance to cause chronic intracellular infections of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:27227304

  8. Screening chemicals for persistence in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gouin, T.; MacKay, D.; Webster, E.; Wania, F.

    2000-03-01

    A method is suggested for rapid screening of chemicals for persistence in the environment. Physical-chemical equilibrium partitioning information between air, water, and octanol are used as a first screen to identify the media for which degradation half-lives are required and those for which half-lives may be unnecessary. An overall persistence under equilibrium conditions is then estimated using half-lives in air, water, soil, and sediment using a steady-state mass balance model. A graphical technique to identify the key half-lives is demonstrated using 233 chemicals. For chemicals of more extreme partitioning properties, some half-lives may not be needed.

  9. Long persistence effects of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrenn, Gordon L.

    1990-03-01

    The identification of the physical processes which perturb the dynamic equilibrium of the charged particle populations in the terrestrial magnetosphere is investigated. A planetary index was used and it was proved that the introduction of a persistence factor for a derived index, a time weighted accumulation of recent values, gives a better correlation with an estimation of characteristic persistence times in order to establish the temporal response of observed effects in relation to available measures of geomagnetic activity. The analysis procedure was illustrated by results pertaining to ionospheric foF2, cold plasma concentration at geosynchronous orbit and ring current strength.

  10. Persistent and refractory thrush with unknown cause.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Liu, Dongjuan; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Lanyan; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Qianming; Zeng, Xin; Jin, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Oral thrush is considered as the opportunistic infection, which is caused by fungus Candida albicans. Various kinds of immunodeficiency diseases, such as HIV infection, immunosuppressive therapy, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and invasive surgical procedures such as solid organ or bone marrow transplantation, lead to increased susceptibility to fungal infections, but persistent and refractory thrush, with typical clinical signs of oral fungal infection and without any other sign of immunodeficiencies, has not been reported so far. We describe a case of persistent and refractory thrush with Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) as the unusual cause.

  11. Amnestically induced persistence in random walks.

    PubMed

    Cressoni, J C; da Silva, Marco Antonio Alves; Viswanathan, G M

    2007-02-16

    We study how the Hurst exponent alpha depends on the fraction f of the total time t remembered by non-Markovian random walkers that recall only the distant past. We find that otherwise nonpersistent random walkers switch to persistent behavior when inflicted with significant memory loss. Such memory losses induce the probability density function of the walker's position to undergo a transition from Gaussian to non-Gaussian. We interpret these findings of persistence in terms of a breakdown of self-regulation mechanisms and discuss their possible relevance to some of the burdensome behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

  12. Considerations for an exercise prescription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1989-01-01

    A number of past and most recent research findings that describe some of the physiological responses to exercise in man and their relationship with exposure to various gravitational environments are discussed. Most of the data pertain to adaptations of the cardiovascular and body fluid systems. It should be kept in mind that the data from studies on microgravity simulation in man include exposures of relatively short duration (5 hours to 14 days). However, it is argued that the results may provide important guidelines for the consideration of many variables which are pertinent to the development of exercise prescription for long-duration space flight. The following considerations for exercise prescriptions during long-duration space flight are noted: (1) Relatively high aerobic fitness and strength, especially of the upper body musculature, should be a criterion for selection of astronauts who will be involved in EVA, since endurance and strength appear to be predominant characteristics for work performance. (2) Some degree of upper body strength will probably be required for effective performance of EVA. However, the endurance and strength required by the upper body for EVA can probably be obtained through preflight exercise prescription which involves swimming. (3) Although some degree of arm exercise may be required to maintain preflight endurance and strength, researchers propose that regular EVA will probably be sufficient to maintain the endurance and strength required to effectively perform work tasks during space flight. (4) A minimum of one maximal aerobic exercise every 7 to 10 days during space flight may be all that is necessary for maintenance of normal cardiovascular responsiveness and replacement of body fluids for reentry following prolonged space flight. (5) The possible reduction in the amount of exercise required for maintenance of cardiovascular system and body fluids in combination with the use of electromyostimulation (EMS) or methods other

  13. [Space flight/bedrest immobilization and bone. In-flight exercise device to support a health of astronauts].

    PubMed

    Mukai, Chiaki; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Despite the fact that astronauts living in the International Space Station (ISS) conduct daily two-hour intensive exercise programs to maintain their health, many health problems persist. These problems which include adverse effects of microgravity to bone, muscle and stamina, have not completely been countered. For example, bone mass reduction (about 1.6%/month at the neck of femur) , muscle atrophy (about 0.8%/day at the calf) , and exercise capacity reduction (about 10-20% decrease in the maximum oxygen uptake) have been reported. Interdisciplinary research approaches, such as various exercise countermeasures, a nutrition treatment, and medicine (bone absorption inhibitor) are employed in order to lower an astronaut's health risk and to promote productivity of work in space. This paper introduces the exercise equipment currently used in the ISS.

  14. Clothing and thermoregulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P

    2003-01-01

    Exercise increases heat production. During exercise in both warm and cold conditions, the major dilemma is the dissipation of the heat produced from muscular activity. The use of clothing generally represents a layer of insulation and as such imposes a barrier to heat transfer and evaporation from the skin surface. In warm environments, additional clothing increases thermal insulation causing more rapid increases in temperature during exercise and imposes a barrier to sweat evaporation. However, clothing can serve a protective function by reducing radiant heat gain and thermal stress. Recent research suggests that neither the inclusion of modest amounts of clothing nor the clothing fabric alter thermoregulation or thermal comfort during exercise in warm conditions. In the cold, most reports do not support an effect of clothing fabric on thermoregulation; however, there are reports demonstrating an effect. Clothing construction does alter thermoregulation during and following exercise in the cold, where fishnet construction offers greater heat dissipation. Future research should include conditions that more closely mimic outdoor conditions, where high work rates, large airflow and high relative humidity can significantly impact thermoregulation.

  15. Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunna

    2013-12-31

    Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction.

  16. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking.

  17. DHEA, physical exercise and doping.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Buisson, C; Lasne, F; Collomp, R

    2015-01-01

    The dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) concentrations during acute and chronic exercise (training) have been investigated only fairly recently. DHEA is generally preferred to DHEA-S for exploring the acute exercise repercussions in laboratory or field tests because of its shorter elimination half-life. Conversely, DHEA-S is preferred to estimate chronic adaptations. Both can be measured noninvasively in saliva, and it is therefore possible to follow these hormone responses in elite athletes during competitive events and in healthy and pathological populations, without imposing additional stress. Indeed, the correlation between saliva and serum concentrations is high for steroid hormones, both at rest and during exercise. In this review, we will first summarize the current knowledge on the DHEA/DHEA-S responses to exercise and examine the potential modulating factors: exercise intensity, gender, age, and training. We will then discuss the ergogenic effects that athletes expect from the exogenous administration of DHEA and the antidoping methods of analysis currently used to detect this abuse.

  18. Human exercise capabilities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Maintenance of rest and exercise performance are prime requirements for all astronauts during flight, not only for maintaining day-to-day productivity, but also for coping with unlikely emergencies. Indirect estimates of submaximal work capacity (oxygen uptake) made from changes in the heart rates of 27 Apollo astronauts (less than 15-day flights) indicated a reduction in work capacity (maximal oxygen uptake) of 17 to 21 percent. This percentage decrease was similar to that measured in middle-aged men after 21 to 30 days of -6 deg head-down bed-rest deconditioning without exercise training. Heart-rate changes during submaximal exercise in the nine Skylab astronauts suggested that they were better able to maintain their work capacity because of longer and more intensive in-flight exercise training. The strength of the flexor and extensor muscle groups decreased by 2 to 9 percent in the elbow and by 6 to 20 percent in the knee in the Skylab astronauts, also similar to the decreases in men undergoing 30 days of bed-rest deconditioning. Exercise protocols have been devised that result in maintenance of work capacity and muscular strength during 30 to 49 days of bed-rest deconditioning.

  19. Exercise for older patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Petrella, R J

    1999-10-01

    Coronary artery disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cognitive disorders become more prevalent as people age. Besides delaying the onset of many of these conditions, regular exercise may improve function and delay disability and morbidity in those who have them. Further, exercise may work synergistically with medication to combat the effects of some chronic diseases. Special adaptations for older patients include lower-intensity exercise (eg, fewer repetitions), low-impact exercise (cycling, exercise while sitting), and modified equipment (smaller weights, special shoes, loose clothing). Unresolved issues include development of optimal strategies for motivating older patients to begin and maintain exercise programs.

  20. Functional plyometric exercises for the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Pezzullo, D J; Karas, S; Irrgang, J J

    1995-03-01

    In this article we provide athletic health care professionals with a variety of functional strengthening exercises to use in improving the muscular strength of the throwing athlete's shoulder. Upper extremity functional plyometric exercise in sport-specific patterns can be an important component of a throwing athlete's rehabilitation. We discuss several plyometric exercises, using the Inertial Exercise System, the Plyo-ball, and the Theraband. Proper use of these exercises can facilitate a safe and progressive rehabilitation program for the injured, throwing athlete. After the athlete has successfully completed the functional plyometric exercises, a throwing progression can be initiated.