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Sample records for phorbol ester-resistant human

  1. Effects of phorbol ester on mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase activity in wild-type and phorbol ester-resistant EL4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gause, K C; Homma, M K; Licciardi, K A; Seger, R; Ahn, N G; Peterson, M J; Krebs, E G; Meier, K E

    1993-08-05

    Phorbol ester-sensitive and -resistant EL4 thymoma cell lines differ in their ability to activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in response to phorbol ester. Treatment of wild-type EL4 cells with phorbol ester results in the rapid activations of MAPK and pp90rsk kinase, a substrate for MAPK, while neither kinase is activated in response to phorbol ester in variant EL4 cells. This study examines the activation of MAPK kinase (MAPKK), an activator of MAPK, in wild-type and variant EL4 cells. Phosphorylation of a 40-kDa substrate, identified as MAPK, was observed following in vitro phosphorylation reactions using cytosolic extracts or Mono Q column fractions prepared from phorbol ester-treated wild-type EL4 cells. MAPKK activity coeluted with a portion of the inactive MAPK upon Mono Q anion-exchange chromatography, permitting detection of the MAPKK activity in fractions containing both kinases. This MAPKK activity was present in phorbol ester-treated wild-type cells, but not in phorbol ester-treated variant cells or in untreated wild-type or variant cells. The MAPKK from wild-type cells was able to activate MAPK prepared from either wild-type or variant cells. MAPKK activity could be stimulated in both wildtype and variant EL4 cells in response to treatment of cells with okadaic acid. These results indicate that the failure of variant EL4 cells to activate MAP kinase in response to phorbol ester is due to a failure to activate MAPKK. Therefore, the step that confers phorbol ester resistance to variant EL4 cells lies between the activation of protein kinase C and the activation of MAPKK.

  2. Deficient tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl and associated proteins in phorbol ester-resistant EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Sando, J J

    1997-05-02

    Two tyrosine phosphoproteins in phorbol ester-sensitive EL4 (S-EL4) mouse thymoma cells have been identified as the p120 c-Cbl protooncogene product and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 and p85 increased rapidly after phorbol ester stimulation. Phorbol ester-resistant EL4 (R-EL4) cells expressed comparable amounts of c-Cbl and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase protein but greatly diminished tyrosine phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed complexes of c-Cbl with p85, and of p85 with the tyrosine kinase Lck in phorbol ester-stimulated S-EL4 but not in unstimulated S-EL4 or in R-EL4 cells. In vitro binding of c-Cbl with Lck SH2 or SH3 domains was detected in both S-EL4 and R-EL4 cells, suggesting that c-Cbl, p85, and Lck may form a ternary complex. In vitro kinase assays revealed phosphorylation of p85 by Lck only in phorbol ester-stimulated S-EL4 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cbl-p85 and Lck-p85 complexes may form in unstimulated S-EL4 and R-EL4 cells but were not detected due to absence of tyrosine phosphorylation of p85. Greatly decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl and p85 in the complexes may contribute to the failure of R-EL4 cells to respond to phorbol ester.

  3. Differential effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} on Hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression in the phorbol ester-resistant human myeloid HL-525 leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong J.; Galoforo, S.S.; Berns, C.M.

    We investigated the effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] on the expression of the 28-kDa heat shock protein gene (hsp28) and the protein kinase C beta gene (PKC{beta}) in the human myeloid HL-60 leukemic cell variant HL-525, which is resistance to phorbol ester-induced macrophage differentiation. Northern and Western blot analysis showed little or no hsp28 gene expression in the HL-60 cell variant, HL-205, which is susceptible to such differentiation, while a relatively high basal level of hps28 gene expression was observed in the HL-525 cells. However, both cell lines demonstrated heat shock-induced expression of this gene. During treatmentmore » with 50-300 nM 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a marked reduction of hsp28 gene expression was not associated with heat shock transcription factor-heat shock element (HSF-HSE) binding activity. Our results suggest that the differential effect of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression is due to the different sequence composition of the vitamin D response element in the in the promoter region as well as an accessory factor for each gene or that 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} increases PKC{beta} gene expression, which in turn negatively regulates the expression of the hsp28 gene, or vice versa.« less

  4. Phorbol ester stimulates calcium sequestration in saponized human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Nachmias, V.T.

    1987-11-25

    When platelets are activated by agonists, calcium (Ca2+) is released from an intracellular storage site. Recent studies using fura-2 show that, after thrombin stimulation, the rise in free calcium is transient and returns to base-line levels in 2-3 min, while the transient following ADP stimulation lasts only 15-20 s. We reported previously that the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), added at nanomolar levels after thrombin, immediately accelerated the rate of return of calcium to the base line severalfold. In the present study, we used both intact and saponized platelets to determine whether this is due to stimulation of calciummore » sequestration. Using fura-2 and intact platelets, we found 1) that PMA stimulated the restoration of free Ca2+ levels after ADP as well as after thrombin, and 2) that H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme), slowed the return of Ca2+ to baseline levels. Using saponized platelets, we also found 3) that pretreatment of platelets with PMA before saponin treatment increased the ATP-dependent /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, with a half-maximal effect at 5 nm; 4) that most of the Ca2+ released by ionomycin or by myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; and 5) that a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), decreased basal or PMA-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake in saponin-treated platelets. Our data suggest that activation of protein kinase C stimulates the sequestration of Ca2+ independently of cAMP or myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.« less

  5. Reversible structural alterations of undifferentiated and differentiated human neuroblastoma cells induced by phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Tint, I S; Bonder, E M; Feder, H H; Reboulleau, C P; Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M

    1992-01-01

    Morphological alterations in the structure of undifferentiated and morphologically differentiated human neuroblastoma cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, were examined by video microscopy and immunomorphology. In undifferentiated cells, PMA induced the formation of motile actin-rich lamellas and of stable cylindrical processes rich in microtubules. Formation of stable processes resulted either from the collapse of lamellas or the movement of the cell body away from the base of a process. In differentiated cells, PMA induced the rapid extension of small lamellas and subsequent formation of short-lived elongated processes from the lateral edges of neurites. Additionally, growth cones exhibited enhanced modulation in shape after PMA treatment. These reversible reorganizations were similar to the actinoplast-tubuloplast transformations exhibited by PMA-treated fibroblasts. We suggest that actinoplast-tubuloplast reorganizations play essential roles in morphogenesis where stable cytoplasmic extensions are induced by external stimuli. In particular, PMA-induced reorganizations of neural cells in culture may be a model for morphological modulations that occur in nerve tissue. Images PMID:1518842

  6. Effects of protein kinase C activators on phorbol ester-sensitive and -resistant EL4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sansbury, H M; Wisehart-Johnson, A E; Qi, C; Fulwood, S; Meier, K E

    1997-09-01

    Phorbol ester-sensitive EL4 murine thymoma cells respond to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate with activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases, synthesis of interleukin-2, and death, whereas phorbol ester-resistant variants of this cell line do not exhibit these responses. Additional aspects of the resistant phenotype were examined, using a newly-established resistant cell line. Phorbol ester induced morphological changes, ERK activation, calcium-dependent activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), interleukin-2 synthesis, and growth inhibition in sensitive but not resistant cells. A series of protein kinase C activators caused membrane translocation of protein kinase C's (PKCs) alpha, eta, and theta in both cell lines. While PKC eta was expressed at higher levels in sensitive than in resistant cells, overexpression of PKC eta did not restore phorbol ester-induced ERK activation to resistant cells. In sensitive cells, PKC activators had similar effects on cell viability and ERK activation, but differed in their abilities to induce JNK activation and interleukin-2 synthesis. PD 098059, an inhibitor of the mitogen activated protein (MAP)/ERK kinase kinase MEK, partially inhibited ERK activation and completely blocked phorbol ester-induced cell death in sensitive cells. Thus MEK and/or ERK activation, but not JNK activation or interleukin-2 synthesis, appears to be required for phorbol ester-induced toxicity. Alterations in phorbol ester response pathways, rather than altered expression of PKC isoforms, appear to confer phorbol ester resistance to EL4 cells.

  7. Apoptosis induced by microtubule disrupting drugs in cultured human lymphoma cells. Inhibitory effects of phorbol ester and zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Okudaira, M; Harmon, B V

    1993-03-01

    The effects of the microtubule disrupting drugs (MDD) vinblastine, vincristine and colchicine on a human lymphoma cell line, BM 13674, were investigated. Twelve hours after administration of vinblastine (10(-3) mg/ml), vincristine (10(-2) mg/ml) or colchicine (10(-2) mg/ml), cell death with the characteristic morphology of apoptosis was observed in 71.6%, 82.2% and 76.9% of the cells respectively. The mode of death was confirmed as apoptotic by the occurrence of internucleosomal DNA cleavage, which was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis. For the purpose of casting light on the mechanism involved, inhibition tests were performed on apoptosis induced by one of these drugs, vinblastine, using a phorbol ester (PDBu), zinc sulphate and cycloheximide. PDBu, an activator of protein kinase C, and zinc sulphate, a putative inhibitor of the endonuclease were thought to be responsible for internucleosomal DNA cleavage; both markedly reduced the induction of apoptosis. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, on the other hand, had no inhibitory effect. Moreover, cycloheximide treatment per se enhanced apoptosis. This suggests that new protein synthesis is not required for the execution of vinblastine-induced apoptosis. Such a finding is in accord with recent reports suggesting that the "death program" within many cell types may be primed but unable to proceed due to concomitant production of specific "apoptotic inhibitors". It is suggested that phorbol esters prevent vinblastine-induced apoptosis in the BM 13674 cells by activating one or more of these specific "apoptotic inhibitors", possibly by means of PKC-mediated phosphorylation.

  8. Characterization of muscarinic receptors on intact human neuroblastoma cells: coupling to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and phosphorylation by phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, M.; Watson, M.; Roeske, W.R.

    Cloned human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were grown. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)(-)QNB) and its quaternary derivative (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB to muscarinic receptors (MR) on intact SH-SY5Y cells was studied. A 30 min rinse time gave a ratio of specific/total binding of 90% for both ligands. Association rates of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB and (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB were determined. Both ligands reached steady state by 60 min at 37/sup 0/C. Rates of dissociation for both radioligands were biphasic, although (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB was faster. Saturation studies yielded K/sub d/ (dissociation constant) values of 16 and 260 pM and B/submore » max/ (maximal MR density) values of 172 and 134 fmoles/mg prot for (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB and (/sup 3/H)(-)methyl QNB, respectively. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters produced increased phosphorylation of cellular proteins. Pretreatment with 100 nM of 4..beta..-phorbol 12..beta..-myristate 13..cap alpha..-acetate (PMA) induced a decrease in agonist affinity for MR, suggesting a PMA-promoted phosphorylation of the MR protein. Phosphoinositide (PhI) turnover was measured by MR agonist-induced accumulation of inositol-1-phosphate in the presence of Li/sup + +/ (10 mM). Only carbachol and acetylcholine elicited potent responses with oxotremorine (16%) pilocarpine (17%) and McN-A-343 (8%) appearing to be weak partial agonist of low efficacy.« less

  9. Specific receptors for phorbol diesters on freshly isolated human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cells: comparable binding characteristics despite different cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B J; Moore, J O; Weinberg, J B

    1984-02-01

    Freshly isolated human leukemia cells have been shown in the past to display varying in vitro responses to phorbol diesters, depending on their cell type. Specific receptors for the phorbol diesters have been demonstrated on numerous different cells. This study was designed to characterize the receptors for phorbol diesters on leukemia cells freshly isolated from patients with different kinds of leukemia and to determine if differences in binding characteristics for tritium-labeled phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu) accounted for the different cellular responses elicited in vitro by phorbol diesters. Cells from 26 patients with different kinds of leukemia were studied. PDBu or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute promyelocytic (APML), acute myelomonocytic (AMML), acute monocytic (AMoL), acute erythroleukemia (AEL), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in blast crisis (myeloid), acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL), and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) (n = 15) to adhere to plastic and spread. However, they caused no adherence or spreading and only slight aggregation of cells from patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), or CML-blast crisis (lymphoid) (n = 11). All leukemia cells studied, irrespective of cellular type, displayed specific receptors for 3H-PDBu. The time courses for binding by all leukemia types were similar, with peak binding at 5-10 min at 37 degrees C and 120 min at 4 degrees C. The binding affinities were similar for patients with ALL (96 +/- 32 nM, n = 4), CLL (126 +/- 32 nM, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (73 +/- 14 nM, n = 11). Likewise, the numbers of specific binding sites/cell were comparable for the patients with ALL (6.2 +/- 1.3 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 4), CLL (5.0 +/- 2.0 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (4.4 +/- 1.9 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 11). Thus, the differing responses to phorbol diesters of

  10. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and 1-oleyl-2-acetyldiacylglycerol stimulate inositol trisphosphate dephosphorylation in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Molina y Vedia, L.M.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1986-08-15

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP3) is formed in response to specific agonists that cause activation of phospholipase C and degradation of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. IP3 is a second messenger that releases Ca/sup 2 +/ from the dense tubular system to the cytosol in stimulated platelets. Our present information indicates that (/sup 3/H)IP3 is dephosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)inositol bisphosphate (IP2) and (/sup 3/H)inositol monophosphate (IP) by human platelets treated with 0.05-0.10% Triton X-100. This dephosphorylation of (/sup 3/H)IP3 to (/sup 3/H)IP2 and (/sup 3/H)IP is also observed when platelets are permeabilized by electrical stimulation or by 20 micrograms/ml saponin. These detergents or electropermeabilization allowmore » IP3 to access cytosolic IP3 phosphatase. Pretreatment of intact platelets with phorbol dibutyrate and 1-oleyl-2-acetyldiacylglycerol for 30 s, at concentrations that maximally activate protein kinase C, stimulates the conversion of IP3 to IP2 and IP. This suggests a role for protein kinase C in the regulation of IP3 degradation.« less

  11. Cross Talk Mechanism among EMT, ROS, and Histone Acetylation in Phorbol Ester-Treated Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Tetsuro; Goto, Aki; Kurokawa, Eri; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a pivotal role in the progression of cancer, and some transcription factors including Slug and Snail are known to be involved in EMT processes. It has been well established that the excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and epigenetics such as DNA methylation and histone modifications participate in carcinogenesis; however, the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and epigenetics remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the treatment of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with phorbol ester (TPA), a protein kinase C activator, significantly induced cell proliferation and migration, and these were accompanied by the significant induction of Slug expression. Moreover, the TPA-elicited induction of Slug expression was regulated by histone H3 acetylation and NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2-derived ROS signaling, indicating that ROS and histone acetylation are involved in TPA-elicited EMT processes. We herein determined the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and histone acetylation, and our results provide an insight into the progression of cancer metastasis.

  12. Failure of matrix metalloproteinase-9 dimer induction by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in normal human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Waheed Roomi, Mohd; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Rath, Matthias; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    Increasing experimental and clinical data has identified an association between increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and shortened patient survival, cancer progression and metastasis. MMP-9 has a significant role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis, as it digests the basement membrane and components of the extracellular matrix. MMP-9 is secreted in either a monomeric or dimeric form. Although limited evidence exists concerning MMP-9 dimers, certain studies have demonstrated that the dimer is associated with aggressive tumor progression. This is believed to be due to the fact that cellular migration depends upon the MMP-9 dimer, and not the monomer. Our previous study revealed that cancer cell MMP-9 dimer secretion patterns could be divided into different categories, and that high MMP-9 and MMP-9 dimer secretion levels were correlated with the most aggressive cancer cell lines. It has been established that signal transduction pathways and cytokines, including those activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), regulate the expression of MMPs. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression patterns of MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-9 dimer in normal human cells from a number of tissues treated with PMA. Muscle, epithelial and connective tissues were selected for use in the present study, since adenosarcomas, carcinomas and sarcomas are derived from these tissue types, respectively. The cell lines were first cultured in 24-well tissue culture plates containing recommended media that was supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and antibiotics. When at confluency, the cells were washed and fresh medium was added. In addition, a parallel set of cultures was treated with PMA. Subsequent to a 24-h incubation period, the media were collected and analyzed using gelatinase zymography for the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 monomer and dimer forms. The results revealed that the cellular expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was dependent upon the primary

  13. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  14. Effects of 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the colony growth of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Foa, R; Lusso, P; Fierro, M T; Giubellino, M C; Ferrando, M L; Pegoraro, L

    1984-01-01

    The T colony promoting activity of 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was assessed in a double layer culture assay which is dependent on the simultaneous presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and a leucocyte rich underlayer. TPA (10(-8) M) incorporated in the overlayer in place of PHA was capable of promoting T cell growth in the form of clusters in all 37 experiments performed and in the form of colonies in more than 50% of the samples tested. However, the T colony promoting activity of TPA alone was markedly less evident and consistent than that of PHA (mean 13 +/- 19.9 s.d. colonies vs 168 +/- 78.6). TPA concentrations of 10(-6) M, 10(-9) M and 10(-10) M were practically ineffective. On the other hand, the number of colonies obtained when both TPA 10(8) M and PHA were incorporated in the overlayer was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than that observed with PHA alone (mean 250 +/- 108.2 vs 178 +/- 84.5 colonies). When TPA concentrations of 10(-9) M and 10(-10) M were used in addition to PHA, the enhancing effect was less evident, while an inhibition of T colony growth was observed with TPA 10(-6) M + PHA. TPA 10(-8) M was also capable of enhancing T colony growth when incorporated in the leucocyte rich underlayer (222 +/- 98.6 vs 172 +/- 80.9 colonies). In all cultures with TPA the peak of growth was delayed compared with that of control experiments with PHA. These findings demonstrate that TPA, particularly when co-cultured with PHA, is an effective T colony promoting agent. The observation that the number of colonies formed in the presence of TPA plus PHA is higher than the sum of those observed with the two stimulators independently, suggests that their synergistic effect may be mediated via the production of colony stimulating soluble factors. PMID:6610514

  15. Different translocation and calcium dependence of protein kinase C isoforms induced by phorbol ester in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Crabos, M.; Fabbro, D.; Imber, R.

    1991-03-11

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is an important intraplatelet second messenger which is activated and translocated from cytosol to membrane in response to extracellular stimuli. Molecular cloning revealed that PKC represents a family of closely related subspecies. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibodies specific for {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} and polyclonal antibodies specific for the {delta}, {epsilon}, and {zeta} subspecies revealed the presence of {alpha}, {beta}, and {zeta} isoforms in human platelets. The subcellular distribution of {alpha}, {beta} and {zeta} in resting state was in the range of 80% in cytosol and 20% in membrane. After 2 min incubation of platelets withmore » 300 nM TPA there was an increase of 10% of {beta} and {zeta} subspecies in membrane whereas incubation after one hour incubation with TPA about 70% of all isoforms were associated with the membrane. Incubation of platelets with 1mM of CaCl{sub 2} for 10 min prior to stimulation with 100 nM TPA for 30 min resulted in an increase in the membrane of: 31{plus minus}1 for {alpha}, 30{plus minus}1 for {beta} and 36{plus minus}6 for {zeta}, while in the presence of 1mM EDTA the increase was 14{plus minus}2 for {alpha}, 28{plus minus}1 for {beta} and 34{plus minus}1 for {zeta} (mean %{plus minus}sem). These results demonstrate the presence of three different subtypes of PKC in human platelets which display different time courses of translocation and different sensitivity to external calcium with respect to TPA. This suggest that these isoforms can be activated differently with hormones and may be involved in different intracellular pathways.« less

  16. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-induced protein kinase C activation triggers sustained contracture in human myometrium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Massenavette, Laurence; Paul, Wilène; Corriveau, Stéphanie; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Rousseau, Éric

    2017-09-01

    Although physiologic transition from rhythmic contractions to uterine retraction postpartum remains a poorly understood process, it has been shown that the latter is essential in the prevention of hemorrhage and its negative consequences. To investigate the transition from oscillatory contractions to tonic contracture in human myometrium after delivery, a mechanism purported to facilitate postpartum hemostasis. Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key regulatory role in human uterine contractions because it can prevent dephosphorylation of regulatory proteins and sensitize the contractile machinery to low Ca 2+ . Thus, activation of PKC by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) may act as a strong uterotonic agent. Uterine biopsies were obtained from consenting women undergoing elective caesarian delivery at term without labor (N = 19). Isometric tension measurements were performed on uterine strips (n = 114). The amplitudes and area under the curve of phasic contractions and tonic responses were measured and compared. A total of 1 μM PDBu was added to the isolated organ baths, and maximal tension of the uterine contracture was determined in the absence and presence of either 1 μM of staurosporine, 100 nM nifedipine, or 10 μM cyclopiazonic acid to assess the role of PKC and calcium sensitivity on uterine contractility. On the addition of PDBu on either basal or oxytocin-induced activity, consistent contractures were obtained concomitant with complete inhibition of phasic contractions. After a 30-minute incubation period, the mean amplitude of the PDBu-induced tone represented 65.3% of the amplitude of spontaneous contraction. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, induced a 91.9% inhibition of PDBu contractures, a process not affected by nifedipine or cyclopiazonic acid, thus indicating that this mechanism is largely Ca 2+ independent. Pharmacologic activation of PKC leads to a significant contracture of the myometrium. Together, these data suggest that the up

  17. Selective up-regulation of protein kinase C eta in phorbol ester-sensitive versus -resistant EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M S; Luo, X; Vinton, E G; Sando, J J

    1997-06-01

    Stimulation of sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) with phorbol esters results in production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), adherence to a plastic substrate, and growth inhibition, whereas a phorbol ester-resistant variant (r-EL4) fails to respond. Previous studies revealed substantially decreased expression of protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon in the r-EL4 versus s-EL4 cells. This work has been extended to examine the more recently described PKC isozymes. Western and Northern analyses revealed a marked decrease in PKC eta and theta in r-EL4 as compared to s-EL4 cells. Treatment of these lines with phorbol ester for 24 h resulted in down-regulation of all PKC isozymes examined except PKC eta, which was up-regulated in the s-EL4 cells at the time of maximal IL-2 production. Two newly isolated EL4 clones, resistant to phorbol ester-induced growth inhibition but still exhibiting the phorbol ester-induced adherence and IL-2 production, both expressed PKC eta and theta. Collectively, these observations suggest a dissociation of growth inhibition from adherence and IL-2 production pathways and a potential role for PKC eta in the latter.

  18. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Burzynska-Pedziwiatr, Izabela; Bukowiecka-Matusiak, Malgorzata; Wojcik, Marzena; Machala, Waldemar; Bienkiewicz, Malgorzata; Spolnik, Grzegorz; Danikiewicz, Witold; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05) and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05). Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D)-glucose (PGG), the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans. PMID:25298860

  19. Dual stimulus-dependent effect of Oenothera paradoxa extract on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes: suppressing for Escherichia coli and phorbol myristate acetate and stimulating for formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Burzynska-Pedziwiatr, Izabela; Bukowiecka-Matusiak, Malgorzata; Wojcik, Marzena; Machala, Waldemar; Bienkiewicz, Malgorzata; Spolnik, Grzegorz; Danikiewicz, Witold; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05) and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05). Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D)-glucose (PGG), the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans.

  20. Effects of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate [corrected] and sodium lauryl sulfate on the production and expression of cytokines and proto-oncogenes in photoaged and intrinsically aged human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Suh, D H; Youn, J I; Eun, H C

    2001-11-01

    Skin aging may be divided into photoaging and intrinsic aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium lauryl sulfate on the production and expression of cytokines and proto-oncogenes in photoaged and intrinsically aged skin, compared with young skin. Keratinocytes were taken from newborns, young adults in their twenties, and from the forearm and thigh of volunteers in their fifties and seventies. Interleukin-1alpha and -6, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, c-fos and c-myc were measured after cultured keratinocytes had been treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium lauryl sulfate. There has been no report concerning the dependence of cytokine production by sodium lauryl sulfate upon photoaging and intrinsic aging. This study also involves the first investigation of the effects of aging on c-myc expression by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment. Cytokine production decreased markedly with age. These results suggest the progressive decline of cellular function with age. The ratio of cytokine production in the irritant-treated group compared with that in the control group showed a different pattern in photoaging and intrinsic aging. With the significant difference between photoaging and intrinsic aging, T/C ratio decreased in interleukin-1alpha and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist upon aging, whereas it increased in interleukin-6. S/C ratio was uniquely elevated on photoaged skin in the 50 y age group. It is suggested that photoaged skin shows an exaggerated reaction to surfactant. Compared with the control, c-fos expression in 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate-treated keratinocytes decreased with age in the thigh, but increased in the photoaged skin of forearm. The increased c-fos expression in 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate-treated keratinocytes could be relevant for the predisposition of photoaged keratinocytes to malignant transformation.

  1. Inhibition of EGR-1 and NF-kappa B gene expression by dexamethasone during phorbol ester-induced human monocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hass, R; Brach, M; Gunji, H; Kharbanda, S; Kufe, D

    1992-10-20

    The treatment of human myeloid leukemia cells (HL-60, U-937, THP-1) with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is associated with growth arrest and appearance of a differentiated monocytic phenotype. While previous studies have reported that the glucocorticoid dexamethasone blocks phenotypic characteristics of monocytic differentiation, we demonstrated in the present work that dexamethasone delays the effects of TPA on the loss of U-937 cell proliferation. We also demonstrated that this glucocorticoid inhibits TPA-induced increases in expression of the EGR-1 early response gene. The results of nuclear run-on assays and half-life experiments indicated that this effect of dexamethasone is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Similar studies were performed for the NF-kappa B gene. While TPA treatment was associated with transient increases in NF-kappa B mRNA levels, this induction was blocked by dexamethasone. In contrast, dexamethasone had no significant effect on the activation of pre-existing NF-kappa B protein as determined in DNA-binding assays. Taken together, these findings suggest that the activated glucocorticoid receptor inhibits signaling pathways which include expression of the EGR-1 and NF-kappa B genes and that such effects may contribute to a block in TPA-induced monocytic differentiation.

  2. Phorbol esters in seed oil of Jatropha curcas L. (saboodam in Thai) and their association with cancer prevention: from the initial investigation to the present topics.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suttajit, Maitree; Rawangkan, Anchalee; Iida, Keisuke; Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Umsumarng, Sonthaya; Suganuma, Masami

    2017-08-01

    In 1988, we first reported the complete chemical structure of a new type of phorbol ester, abbreviated to DHPB, found in seed oil of Jatropha curcas L. (Saboodam in Thai) and its tumor-promoting activity on mouse skin. Although this seed oil contains toxic phorbol ester, it was planned to use it as a feasible renewable oil and the extracted seed cake as fertilizer. This utilization value opened a new science of Jatropha curcas. The main experimental results are cited from our publications, and the relevant literature screened from journals and PubMed. This paper begins with our original work on the structural elucidation of a new phorbol ester, 12-deoxy-16-hydroxyphorbol (DHPB): its tumor-promoting activity was compared with that of TPA. We think that it is timely to review the following research advances with Jatropha curcas, so numerous topics are classified as follows: (1) historical development of phorbol esters in seed oil; (2) toxicity of phorbol ester based on various bioassays; (3) degradation of phorbol ester; (4) a new pharmaceutical compound in seed; and (5) tumor promotion and progression with endogeneous tumor promoters in human carcinogenesis. The discovery of phorbol ester in seed oil raised awareness of the danger of public use of seed oil and seed cake in Thailand, and also indicated the necessity of discussing the concept of primary and tertiary cancer preventions. It is worthwhile to study the future benefits and cancer risks of globally distributed Jatropha curcas L.

  3. Occular and dermal toxicity of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Roach, Joy S; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Jatropha curcas seeds are a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. However, Jatropha seed oil and other plant parts are toxic due to the presence of phorbol esters (PEs). The ever-increasing cultivation of toxic genotype of J. curcas runs the risk of increased human exposure to Jatropha products. In the present study, effects of J. curcas oil (from both toxic and nontoxic genotypes), purified PEs-rich extract and purified PEs (factors C1, C2, C(3mixture), (C4+C5)) on reconstituted human epithelium (RHE) and human corneal epithelium (HCE) were evaluated in vitro. The PEs were purified from toxic Jatropha oil. In both RHE and HCE, the topical application of PEs containing samples produced severe cellular alterations such as marked oedema, presence of less viable cell layers, necrosis and/or partial tissue disintegration in epithelium and increased inflammatory response (interleukin-1α and prostaglandin E2). When compared to toxic oil, histological alterations and inflammatory response were less evident (P<0.05) in nontoxic oil indicating the severity of toxicity was due to PEs. Conclusively, topical applications of Jatropha PEs are toxic towards RHE and HCE models, which represents dermal and occular toxicity respectively. Data obtained from this study would aid in the development of safety procedures for Jatropha biodiesel industries. It is advised to use protective gloves and glasses when handling PEs containing Jatropha products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Light induced degradation of phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Yunping, Bu; Ha, Bui Thi Ngoc; Eunice, Yeo; Chueng, Lo Loong; Yan, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Jatropha curcas (Jatropha) is a tropical shrub that is gaining popularity as a biofuel feedstock plant. Phorbol esters (PEs) are tetracyclic tiglian diterpenoids that are present in Jatropha seeds and other parts of plant. Epidermal cell irritating and cancer promoting PEs not only reduce commercial values of Jatropha seed cake but also cause some safety and environment concerns on PE leaching to soil. A simple bioassay of PE toxicity was conducted by incubating 48 h old brine shrimp (Artemia salina) nauplii with Jatropha oil for 24 h. 1-4% of Jatropha oil (corresponding to PE concentration of 25-100 mg L(-1)) had mortality rate of 5-95%, with LC50 estimated to be 2.7% of oil or 67 mg L(-1) of PE. Jatropha oil was incubated with clay or black soil (autoclaved or non-autoclaved) in the darkness or under sunlight for different periods of time before oil was re-extracted and tested for PE content by HPLC and for remaining toxicity with the brine shrimp bioassay. Under sunlight, PE decreased to non-detectable level within six days. Toxicity reduced to less than 5% mortality rate that is comparable to rapeseed oil control within the same period. In contrast, PE level and toxicity remained little changed when Jatropha oil was incubated in the darkness. Such PE degradation/detoxification was also found independent of the presence of soil or soil microorganisms. We conclude that sunlight directly degrades and detoxifies PEs and this finding should alleviate the concern on long term environmental impact of PE leaching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma application for detoxification of Jatropha phorbol esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongmany, S.; Matsuura, H.; Furuta, M.; Okuda, S.; Imamura, K.; Maeda, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma generated by helium gas at high voltage and input power of about 50 W was first applied to detoxification of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters (J. PEs) as well as standard phorbol ester (4β-12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, TPA) in water and methanol. Plasma irradiation on the solution sample was conducted for 15 min. In aqueous solution, only 16% of TPA was degraded and complete degradation of J. PEs was observed. On the contrary, complete degradation of both TPA and J. PEs in methanol was achieved by the same plasma irradiation condition. Hydroxyl radical (•OH) generated by plasma irradiation of the solution is expected as the main radical inducing the degradation of PEs.

  6. Phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate promotes anchorage-independent growth and survival of melanomas through MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Kjersti; Skrede, Martina; Cruciani, Veronique

    2005-04-01

    The phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKCs, is known to stimulate the in vitro growth of monolayer cultures of normal human melanocytes whereas it inhibits the growth of most malignant melanoma cell lines. We examined the effect of PMA on proliferation and survival of melanoma cells grown as multicellular aggregates in suspension (spheroids), and aimed to elucidate downstream targets of PKC signaling. In contrast to monolayer cultures, PMA increased cell proliferation as well as protected melanoma cells from suspension-mediated apoptosis (anoikis). Supporting the importance of PKC in anchorage-independent growth, treatment of anoikis-resistant melanoma cell lines with antisense oligonucleotidesmore » against PKC-{alpha}, or the PKC inhibitor Goe6976, strongly induced anoikis. PMA induced activation of ERK1/2, but this effect was not prevented by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 or by U0126. Whereas PD98059 treatment alone led to marked activation of the pro-apoptotic Bim and Bad proteins and significantly increased anoikis, these effects were clearly reversed by PMA. In conclusion, our results indicate that the protective effect of PMA on anchorage-independent survival of melanoma cells at least partly is mediated by MEK-independent activation of ERK1/2 and inactivation of downstream pro-apoptotic effector proteins.« less

  7. Potential treatments to reduce phorbol esters levels in jatropha seed cake for improving the value added product.

    PubMed

    Sadubthummarak, Umapron; Parkpian, Preeda; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Kongchum, Manoch; Delaune, R D

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha seed cake contains high amounts of protein and other nutrients, however it has a drawback due to toxic compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the methods applied to detoxify the main toxin, phorbol esters in jatropha seed cake, to a safe and acceptable level by maintaining the nutritional values. Phorbol esters are tetracyclic diterpenoids-polycyclic compounds that are known as tumor promoters and hence exhibited the toxicity within a broad range of species. Mismanagement of the jatropha waste from jatropha oil industries would lead to contamination of the environment, affecting living organisms and human health through the food chain, so several methods were tested for reducing the toxicity of the seed cake. The results from this investigation showed that heat treatments at either 120°C or 220°C for 1 hour and then mixing with adsorbing bentonite (10%), nanoparticles of zinc oxide (100 μg/g) plus NaHCO3 at 4%, followed by a 4-week incubation period yielded the best final product. The remaining phorbol esters concentration (0.05-0.04 mg/g) from this treatment was less than that reported for the nontoxic jatropha varieties (0.11-0.27 mg/g). Nutritional values of the seed cake after treatment remained at the same levels found in the control group and these values were crude protein (20.47-21.40 + 0.17-0.25%), crude lipid (14.27-14.68 + 0.13-0.14%) and crude fiber (27.33-29.67 + 0.58%). A cytotoxicity test conducted using L929 and normal human dermal fibroblast cell lines confirmed that most of the toxic compounds, especially phorbol esters, were shown as completely eliminated. The results suggested that the detoxification of phorbol esters residues in the jatropha seed cake was possible while it also retained nutritional values. Therefore, the methods to detoxify phorbol esters are necessary to minimize the toxicity of jatropha seed cake. Further, it is essential to reduce the possible environmental impacts that may be generated

  8. Biological responsiveness to the phorbol esters and specific binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a manipulable genetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, K.K.; Chritton, S.; Blumberg, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of its suitability for genetic studies, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was examined for its responsiveness to the phorbol esters. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate had three effects. It inhibited the increase in animal size during growth; it decreased the yield of progeny; and it caused uncoordinated movement of the adult. The effects on nematode size, progeny yield, and movement were quantitated. Concentrations of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate yielding half-maximal responses were 440, 460, and 170 nM, respectively. As was expected from the biological responsiveness of the nematodes, specific, saturable binding of phorbol ester to nematode extracts was found. (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate boundmore » with a dissociation constant of 26.8 +/- 3.9 nM. At saturation, 5.7 +/- 1.4 pmole/mg protein was bound.« less

  9. Influence of the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate on the intracellular activity of antibiotics against hemin- and menadione-auxotrophic small-colony variant mutants of Staphylococcus aureus and their wild-type parental strain in human THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Laetitia G; Lemaire, Sandrine; Kahl, Barbara C; Becker, Karsten; Proctor, Richard A; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2012-12-01

    In a previous study (L. G. Garcia et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 56:3700-3711, 2012), we evaluated the intracellular fate of menD and hemB mutants (corresponding to menadione- and hemin-dependent small-colony variants, respectively) of the parental COL methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and the pharmacodynamic profile of the intracellular activity of a series of antibiotics in human THP-1 monocytes. We have now examined the phagocytosis and intracellular persistence of the same strains in THP-1 cells activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and measured the intracellular activity of gentamicin, moxifloxacin, and oritavancin in these cells. Postphagocytosis intracellular counts and intracellular survival were lower in PMA-activated cells, probably due to their higher killing capacities. Gentamicin and moxifloxacin showed a 5- to 7-fold higher potency (lower static concentrations) against the parental strain, its hemB mutant, and the genetically complemented strain in PMA-activated cells and against the menD strain in both activated and nonactivated cells. This effect was inhibited when cells were incubated with N-acetylcysteine (a scavenger of oxidant species). In parallel, we observed that the MICs of these drugs were markedly reduced if bacteria had been preexposed to H(2)O(2). In contrast, the intracellular potency of oritavancin was not different in activated and nonactivated cells and was not decreased by the addition of N-acetylcysteine, regardless of the phenotype of the strains. The oritavancin MIC was also unaffected by preincubation of the bacteria with H(2)O(2). Thus, activation of THP-1 cells by PMA may increase the intracellular potency of certain antibiotics (probably due to synergy with reactive oxygen species), but this effect cannot be generalized to all antibiotics.

  10. Degradation of phorbol 12,13-diacetate in aqueous solution by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongmany, Santi; Furuta, Masakazu; Matsuura, Hiroto; Okuda, Shuichi; Imamura, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2014-12-01

    Phorbol esters (PEs) are highly toxic compounds that cause skin irritation, inflammation, and tumor promotion upon contact with humans or animals. These compounds are naturally present in Jatropha curcas L. To promote the use of J. curcas seed oil in bio-diesel production industries and reduce environmental concerns, it is necessary to find methods of degrading PEs. In this study, the degradation of phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA), as a representative PE, in aqueous solution at a concentration of 10 mg/L by 60Co-γ-irradiation was investigated. The results demonstrate that PDA was effectively degraded by this treatment and the degradation efficiency increased with the absorbed dose within the range of 0.5-3 kGy. Complete degradation of PDA was achieved at a dose of 3 kGy. In the presence of radical scavengers (i.e., methanol, tert-butanol, 2-propanol), reactive species from water radiolysis were scavenged, and significant inhibition of PDA degradation was observed at absorbed doses less than 1 kGy. In the presence of nitrous oxide, the generation of hydroxyl radicals (rad OH) was promoted during gamma irradiation and PDA degradation was drastically enhanced.

  11. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  12. Sulforaphane inhibits phorbol ester-stimulated IKK-NF-κB signaling and COX-2 expression in human mammary epithelial cells by targeting NF-κB activating kinase and ERK.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Na; Kim, Do-Hee; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Na, Hye-Kyung; Cha, Young-Nam; Surh, Young-Joon

    2014-08-28

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane suppresses inflammation and carcinogenesis are yet to be fully elucidated. Since the aberrant expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) links inflammation and cancer, the present study was aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which sulforaphane modulates COX-2 overexpression in human mammary epithelial (MCF-10A) cells stimulated with a prototypic tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Treatment of MCF-10A cells with sulforaphane significantly inhibited TPA-induced expression of COX-2 protein and its mRNA transcript. Transient transfection of cells with deletion mutant constructs of COX-2 promoter revealed that the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a key role in TPA-induced COX-2 expression in MCF-10A cells. Pretreatment with sulforaphane significantly attenuated nuclear localization, DNA binding and the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in MCF-10A cells stimulated with TPA. Sulforaphane also attenuated TPA-induced activation of IκB kinases (IKK), NF-κB-activating kinase (NAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2). Pharmacological inhibition of IKK or transient transfection of cells with dominant-negative mutant forms of this kinase abrogated TPA-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. In addition, the blockade of ERK1/2 activation negated the catalytic activity of IKKα, but not that of IKKβ, whereas silencing NAK by specific siRNA abrogated the IKKβ activity in TPA-treated cells. Taken together, sulforaphane inhibits TPA-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression in MCF-10A cells by blocking two distinct signaling pathways mediated by ERK1/2-IKKα and NAK-IKKβ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  13. Hyperoxia, unlike phorbol ester, induces glutathione peroxidase through a protein kinase C-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Jornot, L; Junod, A F

    1997-01-01

    Human selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GP) is implicated as a mechanism of resistance against oxygen free radicals. The 5' flanking sequence upstream from the coding region of GP contained an oxygen-responsive element termed ORE1 that is responsive to hypoxia, as well as several copies of the activator protein-1 (AP-1)- and AP-1-like-binding sites. In this study, we sought to define the molecular events that lead to GP gene transcription in response to hyperoxia in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells, and asked whether such induction is mimicked and sustained by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol esters. Treatment of cells with 100 nM phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PdBu) induced a delayed (24-48 h) but significant (2-fold) increase in steady-state GP mRNA levels. Steady-state GP mRNA levels also rose after exposure to 95% O2, again after considerable delay (48-72 h). For both PdBu and oxygen, induction was transcriptionally regulated, as demonstrated by nuclear run-on experiments. The simulations by PdBu and oxygen were additive. In contrast with PdBu, hyperoxia did not stimulate translocation of PKC from the cytosol to the particulate fraction, although the specific activity of both cytosolic and particulate-associated PKC was increased 2-fold in cells exposed to 95% O2 for 5 days. In addition, gel mobility-shift assays using double-stranded tumour-promoting-agent-responsive element (TRE) and nuclear extracts derived from phorbol- and oxygen-treated cells revealed that PdBu, but not hyperoxia, increased AP-1 DNA-binding activity. On the other hand, the up-regulation of GP expression by oxygen could not be accounted for by the ORE1 core sequence, since no specific protein-DNA binding activity could be detected using nuclear extracts from hyperoxic cells and ORE1. Taken together, these results suggest that there may be different molecular mechanisms controlling GP expression. After exposure to PdBu, GP undergoes transcriptional activation via a

  14. Activities of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters in various bioassays.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Rajesh, Sanjay K; Kumar, Vikas; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Jatropha curcas seeds contain 30-35% oil, which can be converted to high quality biodiesel. However, Jatropha oil is toxic, ascribed to the presence of phorbol esters (PEs). In this study, isolated phorbol ester rich fraction (PEEF) was used to evaluate the activity of PEs using three aquatic species based bioassays (snail (Physa fontinalis), brine shrimp (Artemeia salina), daphnia (Daphnia magna)) and microorganisms. In all the bioassays tested, increase in concentration of PEs increased mortality with an EC(50) (48 h) of 0.33, 26.48 and 0.95 mg L(-1) PEs for snail, artemia and daphnia, respectively. The sensitivity of various microorganisms for PEs was also tested. Among the bacterial species tested, Streptococcus pyogenes and Proteus mirabilis were highly susceptible with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 215 mg L(-1) PEs; and Pseudomonas putida were also sensitive with MIC of 251 mg L(-1) PEs. Similarly, Fusarium species of fungi exhibited EC(50) of 58 mg L(-1) PEs, while Aspergillus niger and Curvularia lunata had EC(50) of 70 mg L(-1). The snail bioassay was most sensitive with 100% snail mortality at 1 μg of PEs mL(-1). In conclusion, snail bioassay could be used to monitor PEs in Jatropha derived products such as oil, biodiesel, fatty acid distillate, kernel meal, cake, glycerol or for contamination in soil or other environmental matrices. In addition, PEs with molluscicidal/antimicrobial activities could be utilized for agricultural and pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phorbol esters inhibit smooth muscle contractions through activation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaguri, T.; Watson, S. P.

    1990-01-01

    1. The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in agonist-induced contractions of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal smooth muscle has been investigated. 2. The phorbol esters, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), relaxed tissues precontracted by submaximal concentrations of carbachol, histamine or substance P. 3. This inhibitory action of the phorbol esters was reversed following the application of ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Similarly, pretreatment with ouabain inhibited the ability of phorbol esters to relax tissues precontracted by the above agonists. 4. The slow relaxation of the tonic component of contraction induced by submaximal concentrations of carbachol and histamine, and all concentrations of substance P, was abolished in the presence of ouabain. 5. In Na(+)-loaded tissues, PDBu and carbachol caused a concentration-dependent increase of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, assessed by ouabain-sensitive 86Rb(+)-uptake. Extrusion of Na+, assessed by the cellular content of the ion, was also stimulated by PDBu (the effect of carbachol was not investigated). 6. We conclude that phorbol esters inhibit the tonic component of contractions induced by submaximal concentrations of these agonists through activation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. We suggest that PKC may exert feedback control over the tonic component of agonist contractions through stimulation of the pump. PMID:1691673

  16. The Phorbol Ester Fraction from Jatropha curcas Seed Oil: Potential and Limits for Crop Protection against Insect Pests

    PubMed Central

    Ratnadass, Alain; Wink, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The physic nut shrub, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), has been considered as a “miracle tree”, particularly as a source of alternate fuel. Various extracts of the plant have been reported to have insecticidal/acaricidal or molluscicidal/anthelminthic activities on vectors of medical or veterinary interest or on agricultural or non-agricultural pests. Among those extracts, the phorbol ester fraction from seed oil has been reported as a promising candidate for use as a plant-derived protectant of a variety of crops, from a range of pre-harvest and post-harvest insect pests. However, such extracts have not been widely used, despite the “boom” in the development of the crop in the tropics during recent years, and societal concerns about overuse of systemic chemical pesticides. There are many potential explanations to such a lack of use of Jatropha insecticidal extracts. On the one hand, the application of extracts potentially harmful to human health on stored food grain, might not be relevant. The problem of decomposition of phorbol esters and other compounds toxic to crop pests in the field needing further evaluation before such extracts can be widely used, may also be a partial explanation. High variability of phorbol ester content and hence of insecticidal activity among physic nut cultivars/ecotypes may be another. Phytotoxicity to crops may be further limitation. Apparent obstacles to a wider application of such extracts are the costs and problems involved with registration and legal approval. On the other hand, more studies should be conducted on molluscicidal activity on slugs and land snails which are major pests of crops, particularly in conservation agriculture systems. Further evaluation of toxicity to natural enemies of insect pests and studies on other beneficial insects such as pollinators are also needed. PMID:23203190

  17. The phorbol ester fraction from Jatropha curcas seed oil: potential and limits for crop protection against insect pests.

    PubMed

    Ratnadass, Alain; Wink, Michael

    2012-11-30

    The physic nut shrub, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), has been considered as a "miracle tree", particularly as a source of alternate fuel. Various extracts of the plant have been reported to have insecticidal/acaricidal or molluscicidal/anthelminthic activities on vectors of medical or veterinary interest or on agricultural or non-agricultural pests. Among those extracts, the phorbol ester fraction from seed oil has been reported as a promising candidate for use as a plant-derived protectant of a variety of crops, from a range of pre-harvest and post-harvest insect pests. However, such extracts have not been widely used, despite the "boom" in the development of the crop in the tropics during recent years, and societal concerns about overuse of systemic chemical pesticides. There are many potential explanations to such a lack of use of Jatropha insecticidal extracts. On the one hand, the application of extracts potentially harmful to human health on stored food grain, might not be relevant. The problem of decomposition of phorbol esters and other compounds toxic to crop pests in the field needing further evaluation before such extracts can be widely used, may also be a partial explanation. High variability of phorbol ester content and hence of insecticidal activity among physic nut cultivars/ecotypes may be another. Phytotoxicity to crops may be further limitation. Apparent obstacles to a wider application of such extracts are the costs and problems involved with registration and legal approval. On the other hand, more studies should be conducted on molluscicidal activity on slugs and land snails which are major pests of crops, particularly in conservation agriculture systems. Further evaluation of toxicity to natural enemies of insect pests and studies on other beneficial insects such as pollinators are also needed.

  18. A phorbol ester-binding protein is required downstream of Rab5 in endosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Aballay, A; Barbieri, M A; Colombo, M I; Arenas, G N; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1998-12-28

    Previous observations indicate that a zinc and phorbol ester binding factor is necessary for endosome fusion. To further characterize the role of this factor in the process, we used an in vitro endosome fusion assay supplemented with recombinant Rab5 proteins. Both zinc depletion and addition of calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, inhibited endosome fusion in the presence of active Rab5. Addition of the phorbol ester PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) reversed the inhibition of endosome fusion caused by a Rab5 negative mutant. Moreover, PMA stimulated fusion in the presence of Rab5 immunodepleted cytosol. These results suggest that the phorbol ester binding protein is acting downstream of Rab5 in endosome fusion.

  19. Phorbol ester and spontaneous activity in SHR aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Moisey, D.M.; Cox, R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Thoracic aortas (TA) were excised from 6-week old SHR and WKY. 2mm rings were mounted isometrically at optimum preload. Spontaneous rhythmical activity developed in TA from SHR and had a frequency of 3-4/min with varying periods of quiescence between bursts of activity. The spontaneous activity often produced an increase in tension development which was associated with increased frequency of oscillations. Verapamil (10/sup -7/ M) or Ca/sup + +/-free solution added during the contractile phase resulted in an immediate loss of tension and spontaneous activity. Addition of ouabain (10/sup -4/ M) during the contractile phase of spontaneous activity, increased the frequencymore » of oscillations which appeared to fuse into a tetanus. Spontaneous rhythmical activity was infrequently observed in TA from WKY. However, addition of phorbol 12-myristate-13 acetate (TPA), frequently induced spontaneous rhythmic oscillations associated with tension development in TA from WKY. TPA contracted the SHR TA and increased the frequency of oscillations. SHR TA were more sensitive to TPA than WKY. This study demonstrates (1) spontaneous rhythmical activity, independent of agonist stimulation in TA from 6-week old SHR and (2) TPA induced spontaneous oscillatory activity. The mechanism underlying the spontaneous oscillatory activity may involve membrane coupling events and Na-pump difference between SHR and WKY.« less

  20. Biodegradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters in soil.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Makkar, Harinder Ps; Becker, Klaus

    2010-09-01

    Jatropha curcas seed cake is generated as a by-product during biodiesel production. Seed cake containing toxic phorbol esters (PEs) is currently used as a fertiliser and thus it is of eco-toxicological concern. In the present study the fate of PEs in soil was studied. Two approaches for the incorporation of PEs in soil were used. In the first, silica was bound to PEs, and in the second, seedcake was used. At day 0, the concentration of PEs in soil was 2.6 and 0.37 mg g(-1) for approach 1 and 2 respectively. PEs from silica bound PEs were completely degraded after 19, 12, 12 days (at 130 g kg(-1) moisture) and after 17, 9, 9 days (at 230 g kg(-1) moisture) at room temperature, 32 degrees C and 42 degrees C respectively. Similarly at these temperatures PEs from seed cake were degraded after 21, 17 and 17 days (at 130 g kg(-1) moisture) and after 23, 17, and 15 days (at 230 g kg(-1) moisture). Increase in temperature and moisture increased rate of PEs degradation. Using the snail (Physa fontinalis) bioassay, mortality by PE-amended soil extracts decreased with the decrease in PE concentration in soil. Jatropha PEs are biodegradable. The degraded products are innocuous. Copyright 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Regulatory elements involved in constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, E; Medcalf, R L; Bergonzelli, G E; Kruithof, E K

    1991-01-01

    Gene transcription rates and mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) are markedly induced by the tumor promoting agent phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. To identify promoter elements required for basal-, and phorbol ester-inducible expression, deletion mutants of the PAI-1 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene, were transiently expressed in HT1080 cells. Constitutive CAT activity was expressed from constructs containing more than 215 bp of promoter sequence, whereas deletion to position -91 bp abolished CAT gene expression. Treatment of transfected cells with PMA resulted in a three- to ten-fold increase in CAT expression from all constructs except from the construct shortened to position -91. DNAse1 protection analysis of the promoter region between -215 and the transcription initiation site revealed numerous protected regions, including two AP1-like binding sites (AP1a and AP1b) and one CRE-like element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the AP1a site or of the CRE-like site resulted in the loss of basal CAT activity and abolished the PMA effect, whereas mutagenesis of AP1b only partially inhibited basal and PMA-mediated expression. Our results suggest that the PAI-2 promoter contains at least two elements required for basal gene transcription and PMA-mediated induction. Images PMID:1650454

  2. Antiproliferative Effect of Synadenium grantii Hook f. stems (Euphorbiaceae) and a Rare Phorbol Diterpene Ester.

    PubMed

    Campos, Adriana; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Longato, Giovanna Barbarini; Zermiani, Tailyn; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Pandiella, Atanasio; Cechinel Filho, Valdir

    2016-11-01

    Synadenium grantii is frequently used for the treatment of various diseases such as allergies, gastric disorders, and especially cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible antiproliferative potential of the methanol extract, fractions, and pure compounds from the stems of S grantii Phytochemical analysis was carried out by conventional chromatographic techniques, and the antiproliferative activity was analyzed using the sulforhodamine B assay and an MTT-based assay. Nonpolar fraction and its subfractions from the stems of S grantii exhibited promising cytostatic effect against several human tumor cell lines (glioma, breast, kidney, and lung), with total grown inhibition values ranging from 0.37 to 2.9 μg/mL. One of the active principles of this plant was identified as a rare phorbol diterpene ester, denoted as 3,4,12,13-tetraacetylphorbol-20-phenylacetate. This compound demonstrated antiproliferative activity against glioma, kidney, lung, and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that S grantii stems produce active principles with relevant antiproliferative potential. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Phorbol esters alter alpha4 and alphad integrin usage during eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Matsuo; Tachimoto, Hiroshi; Nutku, Esra; Hudson, Sherry A; Bochner, Bruce S

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effect of the protein kinase C activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) on the human eosinophil adhesion molecule phenotype and attachment to VCAM-1 via alpha4 and alphad integrins under static and flow conditions. PMA increased surface expression of alphad integrins and decreased alpha4 integrin expression. Under static conditions, eosinophils bound well to VCAM-1, primarily via alpha4beta1 integrins, with a minor alphadbeta2 integrin component. Unexpectedly, PMA-stimulated eosinophils bound equally well to VCAM-1 and albumin in a temperature- and divalent cation-dependent manner, yet adhesion was independent of beta1 and beta2 integrins. Under flow conditions, eosinophils readily attached to VCAM-1, and adhesion was inhibited by both alpha4 and alphad mAbs (95 and 50% inhibition, respectively). Many fewer PMA-stimulated eosinophils bound to VCAM-1 under flow conditions, but both alpha4 and alphad mAbs inhibited adhesion equally. Thus, PMA alters eosinophil integrin expression and the relative contributions of alpha4 and alphad integrins during attachment to VCAM-1.

  4. Role of circulating granulocytes in sheep lung injury produced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed

    Dyer, E L; Snapper, J R

    1986-02-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and endotoxin cause pulmonary granulocyte sequestration and alteration in lung fluid and solute exchange in awake sheep that are felt to be analogous to the adult respiratory distress syndrome in humans. The basic hypothesis that PMA causes lung injury by activating circulating granulocytes has never been tested. The effects of infused PMA on lung mechanics and the cellular constituents of lung lymph have also not been reported. We therefore characterized the effects of intravenous PMA, 5 micrograms/kg, on lung mechanics, pulmonary hemodynamics, lung fluid and solute exchange, pulmonary gas exchange, blood and lymph leukocyte counts, and plasma and lymph cyclooxygenase products of arachidonate metabolism in 10 awake sheep with normal granulocyte counts and after granulocyte depletion with hydroxyurea. PMA significantly altered lung mechanics from base line in both nongranulocyte depleted and granulocyte-depleted sheep. Dynamic compliance decreased by over 50% and resistance to airflow across the lungs increased over threefold acutely following PMA infusion in both sets of experiments. Changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary hemodynamics, lung fluid and solute exchange, pulmonary gas exchange, and plasma and lymph arachidonate metabolites were not significantly affected by greater than 99% depletion of circulating granulocytes. We conclude that the lung injury caused by PMA in chronically instrumented awake sheep probably is not a result of activation of circulating granulocytes.

  5. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence against roles for phorbol binding protein Munc13-1, ADAM adaptor Eve-1, or vesicle trafficking phosphoproteins Munc18 or NSF as phospho-state-sensitive modulators of phorbol/PKC-activated Alzheimer APP ectodomain shedding

    PubMed Central

    Ikin, Annat F; Causevic, Mirsada; Pedrini, Steve; Benson, Lyndsey S; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Lovestone, Simon; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Mustelin, Tomas; Burgoyne, Robert D; Gandy, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Background Shedding of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) ectodomain can be accelerated by phorbol esters, compounds that act via protein kinase C (PKC) or through unconventional phorbol-binding proteins such as Munc13-1. We have previously demonstrated that application of phorbol esters or purified PKC potentiates budding of APP-bearing secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and toward the plasma membrane where APP becomes a substrate for enzymes responsible for shedding, known collectively as α-secretase(s). However, molecular identification of the presumptive "phospho-state-sensitive modulators of ectodomain shedding" (PMES) responsible for regulated shedding has been challenging. Here, we examined the effects on APP ectodomain shedding of four phorbol-sensitive proteins involved in regulation of vesicular membrane trafficking of APP: Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and Eve-1. Results Overexpression of either phorbol-sensitive wildtype Munc13-1 or phorbol-insensitive Munc13-1 H567K resulted in increased basal APP ectodomain shedding. However, in contrast to the report of Roßner et al (2004), phorbol ester-dependent APP ectodomain shedding from cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 wildtype was indistinguishable from that observed following application of phorbol to cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 H567K mutant. This pattern of similar effects on basal and stimulated APP shedding was also observed for Munc18 and NSF. Eve-1, an ADAM adaptor protein reported to be essential for PKC-regulated shedding of pro-EGF, was found to play no obvious role in regulated shedding of sAPPα. Conclusion Our results indicate that, in the HEK293 system, Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and EVE-1 fail to meet essential criteria for identity as PMES for APP. PMID:18067682

  7. Evidence against roles for phorbol binding protein Munc13-1, ADAM adaptor Eve-1, or vesicle trafficking phosphoproteins Munc18 or NSF as phospho-state-sensitive modulators of phorbol/PKC-activated Alzheimer APP ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Ikin, Annat F; Causevic, Mirsada; Pedrini, Steve; Benson, Lyndsey S; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Lovestone, Simon; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Mustelin, Tomas; Burgoyne, Robert D; Gandy, Sam

    2007-12-09

    Shedding of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) ectodomain can be accelerated by phorbol esters, compounds that act via protein kinase C (PKC) or through unconventional phorbol-binding proteins such as Munc13-1. We have previously demonstrated that application of phorbol esters or purified PKC potentiates budding of APP-bearing secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and toward the plasma membrane where APP becomes a substrate for enzymes responsible for shedding, known collectively as alpha-secretase(s). However, molecular identification of the presumptive "phospho-state-sensitive modulators of ectodomain shedding" (PMES) responsible for regulated shedding has been challenging. Here, we examined the effects on APP ectodomain shedding of four phorbol-sensitive proteins involved in regulation of vesicular membrane trafficking of APP: Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and Eve-1. Overexpression of either phorbol-sensitive wildtype Munc13-1 or phorbol-insensitive Munc13-1 H567K resulted in increased basal APP ectodomain shedding. However, in contrast to the report of Rossner et al (2004), phorbol ester-dependent APP ectodomain shedding from cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 wildtype was indistinguishable from that observed following application of phorbol to cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 H567K mutant. This pattern of similar effects on basal and stimulated APP shedding was also observed for Munc18 and NSF. Eve-1, an ADAM adaptor protein reported to be essential for PKC-regulated shedding of pro-EGF, was found to play no obvious role in regulated shedding of sAPPalpha. Our results indicate that, in the HEK293 system, Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and EVE-1 fail to meet essential criteria for identity as PMES for APP.

  8. Transcription profile data of phorbol esters biosynthetic genes during developmental stages in Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Jadid, Nurul; Mardika, Rizal Kharisma; Purwani, Kristanti Indah; Permatasari, Erlyta Vivi; Prasetyowati, Indah; Irawan, Mohammad Isa

    2018-06-01

    Jatropha curcas is currently known as an alternative source for biodiesel production. Beside its high free fatty acid content, J. curcas also contains typical diterpenoid-toxic compounds of Euphorbiaceae plant namely phorbol esters. This article present the transcription profile data of genes involved in the biosynthesis of phorbol esters at different developmental stages of leaves, fruit, and seed in Jatropha curcas . Transcriptional profiles were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We used two genes including GGPPS (Geranylgeranyl diphospate synthase), which is responsible for the formation of common diterpenoid precursor (GGPP) and CS (Casbene Synthase), which functions in the synthesis of casbene. Meanwhile, J. curcas Actin ( ACT ) was used as internal standard. We demonstrated dynamic of GGPPS and CS expression among different stage of development of leaves, fruit and seed in Jatropha .

  9. Engineering low phorbol ester Jatropha curcas seed by intercepting casbene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhong; Ng, Ailing; Xie, Lifen; Mao, Huizhu; Qiu, Chengxiang; Srinivasan, Ramachandran; Yin, Zhongchao; Hong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Casbene is a precursor to phorbol esters and down-regulating casbene synthase effectively reduces phorbol ester biosynthesis. Seed-specific reduction of phorbol ester (PE) helps develop Jatropha seed cake for animal nutrition. Phorbol esters (PEs) are diterpenoids present in some Euphorbiaceae family members like Jatropha curcas L. (Jatropha), a tropical shrub yielding high-quality oil suitable as feedstock for biodiesel and bio jet fuel. Jatropha seed contains up to 40 % of oil and can produce oil together with cake containing high-quality proteins. However, skin-irritating and cancer-promoting PEs make Jatropha cake meal unsuitable for animal nutrition and also raise some safety and environmental concerns on its planting and processing. Two casbene synthase gene (JcCASA163 and JcCASD168) homologues were cloned from Jatropha genome and both genes were highly expressed during seed development. In vitro functional analysis proved casbene synthase activity of JcCASA163 in converting geranylgeranyl diphosphate into casbene which has been speculated to be the precursor to PEs. A seed-specific promoter driving inverted repeats for RNAi interference targeting at either JcCASA163 or both genes could effectively down-regulate casbene synthase gene expression with concurrent marked reduction of PE level (by as much as 85 %) in seeds with no pleiotropic effects observed. Such engineered low PE in seed was heritable and co-segregated with the transgene. Our work implicated casbene synthase in Jatropha PE biosynthesis and provided evidence for casbene being the precursor for PEs. The success in reducing seed PE content through down-regulation of casbene synthase demonstrates the feasibility of intercepting PE biosynthesis in Jatropha seed to help address safety concerns on Jatropha plantation and seed processing and facilitate use of its seed protein for animal nutrition.

  10. Method of phorbol ester degradation in Jatropha curcas L. seed cake using rice bran lipase.

    PubMed

    Hidayat, Chusnul; Hastuti, Pudji; Wardhani, Avita Kusuma; Nadia, Lana Santika

    2014-03-01

    A novel enzymatic degradation of phorbol esters (PE) in the jatropha seed cake was developed using lipase. Cihera rice bran lipase had the highest ability to hydrolyze PE, and reduced PE to a safe level after 8 h of incubation. Enzymatic degradation may be a promising method for PE degradation. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Resveratrol inhibits phorbol ester-induced membrane translocation of presynaptic Munc13-1.

    PubMed

    Pany, Satyabrata; Ghosh, Anamitra; You, Youngki; Nguyen, Nga; Das, Joydip

    2017-11-01

    Resveratrol (1) is a naturally occurring polyphenol that has been implicated in neuroprotection. One of resveratrol's several biological targets is Ca 2+ -sensitive protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). Resveratrol inhibits PKCα by binding to its activator-binding C1 domain. Munc13-1 is a C1 domain-containing Ca 2+ -sensitive SNARE complex protein essential for vesicle priming and neurotransmitter release. To test if resveratrol could also bind and inhibit Munc13-1, we studied the interaction of resveratrol and its derivatives, (E)-1,3-dimethoxy-5-(4-methoxystyryl)benzene, (E)-5,5'-(ethene-1,2-diyl)bis(benzene-1,2,3-triol), (E)-1,2-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)ethane, and (E)-5-(4-(hexadecyloxy)-3,5-dihydroxystyryl)benzene-1,2,3-triol with Munc13-1 by studying its membrane translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane in HT22 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. Resveratrol, but not the derivatives inhibited phorbol ester-induced Munc13-1 translocation from cytosol to membrane in HT22 cells and primary hippocampal neurons, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis and confocal microscopy. Resveratrol did not show any effect on Munc13-1 H567K , a mutant which is not sensitive to phorbol ester. Binding studies with Munc13-1 C1 indicated that resveratrol competes with phorbol ester for the binding site. Molecular docking and dynamics studies suggested that hydroxyl groups of resveratrol interact with phorbol-ester binding residues in the binding pocket. This study characterizes Munc13-1 as a target of resveratrol and highlights the importance of dietary polyphenol in the management of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a phorbol ester-stimulated S6 kinase from MDCK renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.E.; Krebs, E.G.

    Increased phosphorylation of S6, a 40S ribosomal subunit protein, is observed in mammalian cells in response to growth factors and phorbol esters. The goal of this study was to identify the S6 kinase that is stimulated by phorbol ester treatment of MDCK cells. MDCK clone D1 cells express high levels of protein kinase C(PKC). PKC and S6 kinase activities were measured following DEAE-Sephacel fractionation of cytosol; this procedure separated the two kinase activities. When confluent MDCK-D1 cells were exposed to 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), 95% of the total cellular PKC activity became associated with the particulate fraction withinmore » 1 hour. Cytosolic S6 kinase activity was maximal by 1 hour and then declined thereafter, preceding any detectable loss of total cellular PKC. The PMA-responsive S6 kinase was partially purified from MDCK-D1 cytosol by consecutive steps of DEAE-Sephacel, ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ultrogel AcA 34, heparin-agarose, and Ultrogel AcA 34. The partially-purified enzyme had an apparent molecular size of approximately 80 kDa. In addition to S6, the enzyme phosphorylated synthetic peptides based on the carboxyl terminal sequence of S6. S6 kinase activity utilized ATP but not GTP, and was inhibited by heparin, NaCl, and ..beta..-glycerophosphate. In conclusion, a phorbol ester-stimulated S6 kinase has been partially purified from an epithelial cell line. This kinase is distinct from PKC.« less

  13. Move over protein kinase C, you've got company: alternative cellular effectors of diacylglycerol and phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2002-12-01

    Diacylglycerol is an essential second messenger in mammalian cells. The most prominent intracellular targets of diacylglycerol and of the functionally analogous phorbol esters belong to the protein kinase C (PKC) family. However, at least five alternative types of high-affinity diacylglycerol/phorbol-ester receptor are known: chimaerins, protein kinase D, RasGRPs, Munc13s and DAG kinase gamma. Recent evidence indicates that these have functional roles in diacylglycerol second messenger signalling in vivo and that several cellular processes depend on these targets rather than protein kinase C isozymes. These findings contradict the still prevalent view according to which all diacylglycerol/phorbol-ester effects are caused by the activation of protein kinase C isozymes. RasGRP1 (in Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signalling) and Munc13-1 (in neurotransmitter secretion) are examples of non-PKC diacylglycerol/phorbol-ester receptors that mediate diacylglycerol and phorbol-ester effects originally thought to be caused by PKC isozymes. In the future, pharmacological studies on PKC must be complemented with alternative experimental approaches to allow the separation of PKC-mediated effects from those caused by alternative targets of the diacylglycerol second messenger pathway. The examples of RasGRP1 and Munc13-1 show that detailed genetic analyses of C(1)-domain-containing non-PKC diacylglycerol/phorbol-ester receptors in mammals are ideally suited to achieve this goal.

  14. Effect of phorbol derivatives and staurosporine on gravitropic response of primary root of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Mulkey, T.J.; Kim, S.Y.; Lee, J.S.

    1991-05-01

    Time-lapse videography and computer-based, video image digitization were used to examine the effects of phorbol derivatives (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, TPA; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate 4-O-methyl ether, mTPA) and staurosporine on the kinetics of gravicurvature of primary roots of maize (Zea mays L., Pioneer 3343 and Golden Cross Bantam). Pretreatment of roots with TPA (3 hr, 1 {mu}M) decreases the time lag prior to induction of positive gravicurvature in horizontally-oriented roots by > 60%. The rate of curvature is not significantly different than the rate observed in control roots. Wrongway curvature which is observed in 30-40% of control roots is not observedmore » in TPA-pretreated roots. Oscillatory movements observed in control roots after completion of gravitropic reorientation is completely dampened in TPA-pretreated roots. Pretreatment of roots with mTPA(3hr,1{mu}M), the inactive analog of TPA, does not significantly alter the kinetics of gravicurvature of primary roots of maize. Staurosporine (10{sup {minus}8}M), a microbial alkaloid which has been reported to have antifungal activity and to inhibit phospholipid/Ca{sup ++} dependent protein kinase, completely inhibits TPA-induced alteration of the kinetics of gravitropism. DAG (1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-rac-glycerol), a synthetic diglyceride activator of protein kinase C, exhibits similar activity to TPA. TPA-induced alterations in tissue response to auxin are presented.« less

  15. Pleiotropic Effects of Chronic Phorbol Ester Treatment to Improve Glucose Transport in Insulin-Resistant Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Christelle; Khoramdin, Bahareh; Praplan, Guillaume; Montessuit, Christophe

    2017-12-01

    Stimulation of glucose transport is an important determinant of myocardial susceptibility to ischemia and reperfusion. Stimulation of glucose transport is markedly impaired in cardiomyocytes exposed to free fatty acids (FFA). Deactivation of the Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) by FFA contributes to glucose transport impairment, and could be corrected by chronic treatment with the phorbol ester TPA. However, TPA must have effects in addition to FAK reactivation to restore stimulated glucose transport. Chronic treatment with TPA improved basal and stimulated glucose transport in FFA-exposed, but not in control cardiomyocytes. Chronic FFA exposure induced the activation of PKCδ and PKCϵ. TPA markedly downregulated the expression of PKCα, PKCδ, and PKCϵ, suggesting that PKCδ or PKCϵ activation could contribute to inhibition of glucose transport by FFA. Rottlerin, a specific PKCδ inhibitor, improved glucose transport in FFA-exposed cardiomyocytes; and PKCδ was reduced in the particulate fraction of FFA + TPA-exposed cardiomyocytes. TPA also activated Protein Kinase D 1(PKD1) in FFA-exposed cardiomyocytes, as assessed by autophosphorylation of PKD1 on Y916. Pharmaceutical inhibition of PKD1 only partially prevented the improvement of glucose transport by TPA. Chronic TPA treatment also increased basal and stimulated glycolysis and favored accumulation of lipid droplets in FFA-exposed cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, basal and stimulated glucose transport in cardiomyocytes is reduced by chronic FFA exposure, but restored by concomitant treatment with a phorbol ester. The mechanism of action of phorbol esters may involve downregulation of PKCδ, activation of PKD1 and a general switch from fatty acid to glucose metabolism. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 4716-4727, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  17. Down-modulation of receptors for phorbol ester tumor promoter in primary epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    The specific (20-/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ((/sup 3/H)PDBu) binding to intact epidermal cells displayed the phenomenon of down-modulation, i.e., the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PDBu to its receptors on primary epidermal cells reached a maximum within 1 h and steadily declined thereafter. The apparent down-modulation of radiolabel resulted from a partial loss in the total number of receptors; the affinity of receptors for the ligand was essentially unchanged. A number of agents such as chloroquine, methylamine, or arginine which are known to prevent clustering, down-modulation, and/or internalization of several hormone receptors did not affect the down-modulation of phorbol ester receptors. Furthermore,more » cycloheximide had no effect either on down-modulation or on the binding capacity of cells. The surface binding capacity of down-modulated cells following a 90-min incubation with unlabeled ligand was almost returned to normal within 1 h. The effect of the antidepressant drug chlorpromazine, which is known to interact with calmodulin, on (/sup 3/H)PDBu binding was also investigated. Our data indicate that the effect of chlorpromazine on (/sup 3/H)PDBu binding is probably unrelated to its calmodulin-binding activity.« less

  18. Degradation of phorbol esters by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA during solid-state fermentation of deoiled Jatropha curcas seed cake.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chetna; Mathur, Priyanka; Khare, S K

    2011-04-01

    Large amount of seed cake is generated as by-product during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts its utilization as livestock feed. Safe disposal or meaningful utilization of this major by-product necessitates the degradation of these phorbol esters. The present study describes the complete degradation of phorbol esters by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA strain during solid state fermentation (SSF) of deoiled Jatropha curcas seed cake. Phorbol esters were completely degraded in nine days under the optimized SSF conditions viz. deoiled cake 5.0 g; moistened with 5.0 ml distilled water; inoculum 1.5 ml of overnight grown P. aeruginosa; incubation at temperature 30 °C, pH 7.0 and RH 65%. SSF of deoiled cake seems a potentially viable approach towards the complete degradation of the toxic phorbol esters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phorbol esters seed content and distribution in Latin American provenances of Jatropha curcas L.: potential for biopesticide, food and feed.

    PubMed

    Bueso, Francisco; Sosa, Italo; Chun, Roldan; Pineda, Renan

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Jatropha) is believed to have originated from Mexico and Central America. So far, characterization efforts have focused on Asia, Africa and Mexico. Non-toxic, low phorbol ester (PE) varieties have been found only in Mexico. Differences in PE content in seeds and its structural components, crude oil and cake from Jatropha provenances cultivated in Central and South America were evaluated. Seeds were dehulled, and kernels were separated into tegmen, cotyledons and embryo for PE quantitation by RP-HPLC. Crude oil and cake PE content was also measured. No phenotypic departures in seed size and structure were observed among Jatropha cultivated in Central and South America compared to provenances from Mexico, Asia and Africa. Cotyledons comprised 96.2-97.5 %, tegmen 1.6-2.4 % and embryo represented 0.9-1.4 % of dehulled kernel. Total PE content of all nine provenances categorized them as toxic. Significant differences in kernel PE content were observed among provenances from Mexico, Central and South America (P < 0.01), being Mexican the highest (7.6 mg/g) and Cabo Verde the lowest (2.57 mg/g). All accessions had >95 % of PEs concentrated in cotyledons, 0.5-3 % in the tegmen and 0.5-1 % in the embryo. Over 60 % of total PE in dehulled kernels accumulated in the crude oil, while 35-40 % remained in the cake after extraction. Low phenotypic variability in seed physical, structural traits and PE content was observed among provenances from Latin America. Very high-PE provenances with potential as biopesticide were found in Central America. No PE-free, edible Jatropha was found among provenances currently cultivated in Central America and Brazil that could be used for human consumption and feedstock. Furthermore, dehulled kernel structural parts as well as its crude oil and cake contained toxic PE levels.

  20. Noradrenaline, oxymetazoline and phorbol myristate acetate induce distinct functional actions and phosphorylation patterns of α1A-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Pupo, André S; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2017-12-01

    In LNCaP cells that stably express α 1A -adrenergic receptors, oxymetazoline increased intracellular calcium and receptor phosphorylation, however, this agonist was a weak partial agonist, as compared to noradrenaline, for calcium signaling. Interestingly, oxymetazoline-induced receptor internalization and desensitization displayed greater effects than those induced by noradrenaline. Phorbol myristate acetate induced modest receptor internalization and minimal desensitization. α 1A -Adrenergic receptor interaction with β-arrestins (colocalization/coimmunoprecipitation) was induced by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline and, to a lesser extent, by phorbol myristate acetate. Oxymetazoline was more potent and effective than noradrenaline in inducing ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunopurified α 1A -adrenergic receptors from cells treated with adrenergic agonists and the phorbol ester clearly showed that phosphorylated residues were present both at the third intracellular loop and at the carboxyl tail. Distinct phosphorylation patterns were observed under the different conditions. The phosphorylated residues were: a) Baseline and all treatments: T233; b) noradrenaline: S220, S227, S229, S246, S250, S389; c) oxymetazoline: S227, S246, S381, T384, S389; and d) phorbol myristate acetate: S246, S250, S258, S351, S352, S401, S402, S407, T411, S413, T451. Our novel data, describing the α 1A -AR phosphorylation sites, suggest that the observed different phosphorylation patterns may participate in defining adrenoceptor localization and action, under the different conditions examined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumour-promoting phorbol esters increase basal and inhibit insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in rat adipocytes without decreasing insulin binding.

    PubMed Central

    van de Werve, G; Proietto, J; Jeanrenaud, B

    1985-01-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, tumour-promoting phorbol esters caused (1) dose-dependent stimulation of lipogenesis in the absence of insulin and (2) inhibition of the lipogenic effect of submaximal concentrations of insulin, but without affecting insulin binding. The possible involvement of protein kinase C in insulin action is discussed. PMID:3883992

  2. Screening for toxic phorbol esters in jerky pet treat products using LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Nishshanka, Upul; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Chattopadhaya, Chaitali; Kijak, Philip J; Chu, Pak-Sin; Reimschuessel, Renate; Tkachenko, Andriy; Ceric, Olgica; De Alwis, Hemakanthi G

    2016-05-01

    Since 2007, the U.S. FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) has been investigating reports of pets becoming ill after consuming jerky pet treats. Jerky used in pet treats contains glycerin, which can be made from vegetable oil or as a byproduct of biodiesel production. Because some biodiesel is produced using oil from Jatropha curcas, a plant that contains toxic compounds including phorbol esters, CVM developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) screening method to evaluate investigational jerky samples for the presence of these toxins. Results indicated that the samples analyzed with the new method did not contain Jatropha toxins at or above the lowest concentration tested. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Muscarinic agonists and phorbol esters increase tyrosine phosphorylation of a 40-kilodalton protein in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, K.R.; Worley, P.F.; Huganir, R.L.

    The authors have used the hippocampal slice preparation to investigate the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in brain. After pharmacological treatment of intact slices, proteins were separated by electrophoresis, and levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation were assessed by immunoblotting with specific anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Phorbol esters, activators of the serine- and threonine-phosphorylating enzyme protein kinase C, selectively increase tyrosine phosphorylation of a soluble protein with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 40 kilodaltons. Muscarinic agonists such as carbachol and oxotremorine M that strongly activate the inositol phospholipid system also increase tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein. Neurotransmitter activation of the inositol phospholipidmore » system and protein kinase C appears to trigger a cascade leading to increased tyrosine phosphorylation.« less

  4. Integrated modulation of phorbol ester-induced Raf activation in EL4 lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Shujie; Meier, Kathryn E

    2009-05-01

    The EL4 murine lymphoma cell line exists in variant phenotypes that differ with respect to responses to the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA1). Previous work showed that "PMA-sensitive" cells, characterized by a high magnitude of PMA-induced Erk activation, express RasGRP, a phorbol ester receptor that directly activates Ras. In "PMA-resistant" and "intermediate" EL4 cell lines, PMA induces Erk activation to lesser extents, but with a greater response in intermediate cells. In the current study, these cell lines were used to examine mechanisms of Raf-1 modulation. Phospho-specific antibodies were utilized to define patterns and kinetics of Raf-1 phosphorylation on several sites. Further studies showed that Akt is constitutively activated to a greater extent in PMA-resistant than in PMA-sensitive cells, and also to a greater extent in resistant than intermediate cells. Akt negatively regulates Raf-1 activation (Ser259), partially explaining the difference between resistant and intermediate cells. Erk activation exerts negative feedback on Raf-1 (Ser289/296/301), thus resulting in earlier termination of the signal in cells with a higher level of Erk activation. RKIP, a Raf inhibitory protein, is expressed at higher levels in resistant cells than in sensitive or intermediate cells. Knockdown of RKIP increases Erk activation and also negative feedback. In conclusion, this study delineates Raf-1 phosphorylation events occurring in response to PMA in cell lines with different extents of Erk activation. Variations in the levels of expression and activation of multiple signaling proteins work in an integrated fashion to modulate the extent and duration of Erk activation.

  5. INTEGRATED MODULATION OF PHORBOL ESTER-INDUCED RAF ACTIVATION IN EL4 LYMPHOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shujie; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The EL4 murine lymphoma cell line exists in variant phenotypes that differ with respect to responses to the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA1). Previous work showed that “PMA-sensitive” cells, characterized by a high magnitude of PMA-induced Erk activation, express RasGRP, a phorbol ester receptor that directly activates Ras. In “PMA-resistant” and “intermediate” EL4 cell lines, PMA induces Erk activation to lesser extents, but with a greater response in intermediate cells. In the current study, these cell lines were used to examine mechanisms of Raf-1 modulation. Phospho-specific antibodies were utilized to define patterns and kinetics of Raf-1 phosphorylation on several sites. Further studies showed that Akt is constitutively activated to a greater extent in PMA-resistant than in PMA-sensitive cells, and also to a greater extent in resistant than intermediate cells. Akt negatively regulates Raf-1 activation (Ser259), partially explaining the difference between resistant and intermediate cells. Erk activation exerts negative feedback on Raf-1 (Ser289/296/301), thus resulting in earlier termination of the signal in cells with a higher level of Erk activation. RKIP, a Raf inhibitory protein, is expressed at higher levels in resistant cells than in sensitive or intermediate cells. Knockdown of RKIP increases Erk activation and also negative feedback. In conclusion, this study delineates Raf-1 phosphorylation events occurring in response to PMA in cell lines with different extents of Erk activation. Variations in the levels of expression and activation of multiple signaling proteins work in an integrated fashion to modulate the extent and duration of Erk activation. PMID:19263515

  6. Stimulation of progesterone production by phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in cultured Leydig tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, L.R.; Raju, V.S.; Stocco, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has been shown that addition of hCG or c-AMP to cultured Leydig tumor cells (MA-10) increases synthesis of progesterone as the major steroid. To investigate the possible involvement of protein kinase C (PK-C) in the regulation of steroid synthesis, the authors have studied the effect of PMA, an activator of PK-C, on progesterone production in MA-10 cells. The addition of PMA (100 ng/ml) stimulated steroid production whereas 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, an inactive phorbol ester, did not have any effects. Like hCG and c-AMP, PMA-stimulated progesterone production was inhibited by cycloheximide. hCG-stimulated steroid synthesis was inhibited by PMA. The addition ofmore » PMA to MA-10 Leydig cells further increased the c-AMP-stimulated progesterone production. To determine whether c-AMP has a obligatory role in the regulation of steroid production, the effect of adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)adenine (TFA), was studied on progesterone production in the presence of hCG. At lower dose (17 ng/ml) hCG-stimulated intracellular c-AMP levels and steroid production were inhibited by TFA (300 M). At higher dose of hCG (34 ng/ml) TFA did not inhibit the hCG-stimulated intracellular c-AMP levels, however, progesterone production was inhibited. Results suggest that the action of hCG, c-AMP and PMA in controlling steroidogenesis might be regulated by similar but different mechanisms.« less

  7. Rab11 is phosphorylated by classical and novel protein kinase C isoenzymes upon sustained phorbol ester activation.

    PubMed

    Pavarotti, Martín; Capmany, Anahí; Vitale, Nicolas; Colombo, María Isabel; Damiani, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    Rab11 is a small GTPase that controls diverse intracellular trafficking pathways. However, the molecular machinery that regulates the participation of Rab11 in those different transport events is poorly understood. In resting cells, Rab11 localizes at the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), whereas the different protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms display a cytosolic distribution. Sustained phorbol ester stimulation induces the translocation of the classical PKCα and PKCβII isoenzymes to the ERC enriched in Rab11, and results in transferrin recycling inhibition. In contrast, novel PKCε and atypical PKCζ isoenzymes neither redistribute to the perinucleus nor modify transferrin recycling transport after phorbol ester stimulation. Although several Rabs have been shown to be phosphorylated, there is to date no evidence indicating Rab11 as a kinase substrate. In this report, we show that Rab11 appears phosphorylated in vivo in phorbol ester-stimulated cells. A bioinformatic analysis of Rab11 allowed us to identify several high-probability Ser/Thr kinase phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate that classical PKC (PKCα and PKCβII but not PKCβI) directly phosphorylate Rab11 in vitro. In addition, novel PKCε and PKCη but not PKCδ isoenzymes also phosphorylate Rab11. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that Ser 177 is the Rab11 residue to be phosphorylated in vitro by either PKCβII or PKCε. In agreement, the phosphomimetic mutant, Rab11 S177D, retains transferrin at the ERC in the absence of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate stimulus. This report shows for the first time that Rab11 is differentially phosphorylated by distinct PKC isoenzymes and that this post-translational modification might be a regulatory mechanism of intracellular trafficking. Copyright © 2012 Soçiété Francaise des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France.

  8. Phorbol ester inhibits arginine vasopressin activation of phospholipase C and promotes contraction of, and prostaglandin production by, cultured mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, D A; Gonzalez, O F; Douglas, J G; Kreisberg, J I

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that arginine vasopressin (AVP) causes a rapid (5-10 min) contractile response in cultured mesangial cells plated onto slippery substrata such as poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-coated dishes. This contraction is associated with an increase in the levels of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), diacylglycerol and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We now report that agents which are known to activate protein kinase C, i.e. phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and oleolylacetylglycerol (OAG), also contract mesangial cells; however, the contractile response is slow to develop (15-30 min). The inactive phorbol ester, 4 alpha -phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, did not elicit contraction. PMA and OAG did not increase InsP3 release in mesangial cells. However, pretreatment of mesangial cells with PMA inhibited the formation of InsP3. This inhibition could not be explained by a reduction in AVP binding since PMA treatment did not influence the number or affinity of [3H]AVP binding sites in intact cells. PMA alone stimulated PGE2 production in mesangial cells to a degree similar to AVP. Contrary to what was seen with InsP3, pretreatment of cells with PMA before AVP had an additive effect on arachidonic acid release and PGE2 production. Thus, there is an apparent dissociation of phospholipase C activity from that of phospholipase A2. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3046605

  9. Phorbol esters alter adenylate cyclase responses to vasoactive intestinal peptide and forskolin in the GH cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, S.; Florio, T.; Cronin, M.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester modifies cyclic AMP production in several anterior pituitary cell systems. In the GH cell line from a rat pituitary tumor, exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA: 100 nM) for 30 minutes significantly reduces vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP: 100 nM) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in subsequent membrane preparations to 62 + 4% of control (n = 6 independent studies). In contrast, these same membrane preparations respond to forskolin (1 ..mu..M) with significantly more activity, 130 +/- 6% of controls (n = 6 independent studies). Finally, phorbol ester does not block an inhibitorymore » hormone input into the AC system; somatostatin (100 nM) reduction of VIP-stimulated AC activity is not significantly different in membrane preparations from PMA treated and control cells (n = 3 independent studies). These other findings lead the authors to propose that protein kinase C can modify several sites in the AC complex in anterior pituitary cells.« less

  10. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  11. Protective effect of U74500A on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shi-Jye; Chang, Deh-Ming; Wang, David; Lin, Hen-I; Lin, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Kang

    2004-08-01

    1. The present study was designed to determine whether U74500A could ameliorate acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in our rat isolated lung model compared with any amelioration induced by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. 2. Acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 microg/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, the lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with 1.5 mg/kg U74500A significantly attenuated ALI; there was no significant increase in any parameters measured, except for pulmonary arterial pressure. The protective effect of U74500A was approximately the same as that of 600 mg/kg DMTU. However, 6000 U/kg SOD, 50,000 U/kg catalase and 6000 U/kg SOD + 50,000 U/kg catalase had no protective effect. 4. These experimental data suggest that U74500A significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats.

  12. Rapid isolation and purification of phorbol esters from Jatropha curcas by high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wan; Hu, Huiling; Chen, Fang; Tang, Lin; Peng, Tong; Wang, Zhanguo

    2015-03-18

    In this work, a high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) method was established for the preparation of phorbol esters (PEs) from Jatropha curcas. n-Hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1.5:1.5:1.2:0.5, v/v) was selected as the optimum two-phase solvent system to separate and purify jatropha factor C1 (JC1) with a purity of 85.2%, as determined by HPLC, and to obtain a mixture containing four or five PEs. Subsequently, continuous semipreparative HPLC was applied to further purify JC1 (99.8% as determined by HPLC). In addition, UPLC-PDA and UPLC-MS were established and successfully used to evaluate the isolated JC1 and PE-rich crude extract. The purity of JC1 was only 87.8% by UPLC-UV. A peak (a compound highly similar to JC1) was indentified as the isomer of JC1 by comparing the characteristic UV absorption and MS spectra. Meanwhile, this strategy was also applied to analyze the PE-rich crude extract from J. curcas. It is interesting that there may be more than 15 PEs according to the same quasi-molecular ion peaks, highly similar sequence-specific fragment ions, and similar UV absorption spectrum.

  13. Comparative effects of endothelin and phorbol 12-13 dibutyrate in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Auguet, M.; Delaflotte, S.; Chabrier, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The vasoconstrictive properties of endothelin (ET-1) and the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-13 dibutyrate (PDB) were comparatively investigated in isolated rat aorta. ET-1 and PDB induced a slowly developing sustained contraction in endothelium denuded aorta. Maximal contractions induced by ET-1 and PDB were unaffected by diltiazem. Substantial contraction to ET-1 and PDB remained in calcium-free medium. Contractions of ET-1 and PDB in calcium-free medium were unaffected by intracellular calcium depletion induced by phenylephrine. Following the response to ET-1 and PDB in a calcium-free medium, an additional sustained was observed after calcium was added to the bath. The protein kinasemore » C inhibitor, H7 was more potent in inhibiting contractions induced by phenylephrine and KCl than the ones elicited by ET-1 and PDB. The other protein kinase C inhibitors i.e. staurosporine and phloretin inhibited to a similar extent all the agonists tested. These results suggest that protein kinase C may play an important role in mediating the contraction to ET-1 in rat aorta.« less

  14. Effect of Dark Chocolate Extracts on Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-Induced Oxidative Burst in Leukocytes Isolated by Normo-Weight and Overweight/Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ioannone, Francesca; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Serafini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative and inflammatory stress represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight and obese subjects. Between the different plant foods, chocolate has been shown to decrease CVD risk due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, as we recently showed in epidemiological studies, meta-analyses, and human trials, dietary antioxidants resulted more effective in subjects characterized by an ongoing oxidative stress, than in healthy people. Aim of this work was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of chocolate phenolic extract (CPE) on in vitro free radical production, stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), in leukocytes extracted from blood of normo-weight and overweight/obese subjects. Neutrophils from overweight/obese group had a significantly higher free radical production compared to the normo-weight group. In neutrophils, the lowest CPE concentration significantly reduced free radical production in overweight/obese group only, and higher CPE concentrations were effective in both groups. In monocytes, the CPE concentration that was significantly effective in reducing free radical production was lower in overweight/obese subjects than in normo-weight subjects. Chocolate polyphenol extracts inhibit oxidative burst in human neutrophils and monocytes with a higher efficiency in subjects characterized by an unphysiological oxidative/inflammatory stress, such as overweight and obese. Results of this study provide further evidence about a differential role of dietary antioxidant strictly related to the “stress” condition of the subjects. PMID:28649567

  15. Effect of Dark Chocolate Extracts on Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-Induced Oxidative Burst in Leukocytes Isolated by Normo-Weight and Overweight/Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ioannone, Francesca; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Serafini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative and inflammatory stress represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight and obese subjects. Between the different plant foods, chocolate has been shown to decrease CVD risk due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, as we recently showed in epidemiological studies, meta-analyses, and human trials, dietary antioxidants resulted more effective in subjects characterized by an ongoing oxidative stress, than in healthy people. Aim of this work was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of chocolate phenolic extract (CPE) on in vitro free radical production, stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), in leukocytes extracted from blood of normo-weight and overweight/obese subjects. Neutrophils from overweight/obese group had a significantly higher free radical production compared to the normo-weight group. In neutrophils, the lowest CPE concentration significantly reduced free radical production in overweight/obese group only, and higher CPE concentrations were effective in both groups. In monocytes, the CPE concentration that was significantly effective in reducing free radical production was lower in overweight/obese subjects than in normo-weight subjects. Chocolate polyphenol extracts inhibit oxidative burst in human neutrophils and monocytes with a higher efficiency in subjects characterized by an unphysiological oxidative/inflammatory stress, such as overweight and obese. Results of this study provide further evidence about a differential role of dietary antioxidant strictly related to the "stress" condition of the subjects.

  16. Myricetin down-regulates phorbol ester-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in mouse epidermal cells by blocking activation of nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kang, Nam Joo; Han, Jin Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2007-11-14

    Abnormal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in the development of cancer. There are multiple lines of evidence that red wine exerts chemopreventive effects, and 3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene (resveratrol), which is a non-flavonoid polyphenol found in red wine, has been reported to be a natural chemopreventive agent. However, other phytochemicals might contribute to the cancer-preventive activities of red wine, and the flavonol content of red wines is about 30 times higher than that of resveratrol. Here we report that 3,3',4',5,5',7-hexahydroxyflavone (myricetin), one of the major flavonols in red wine, inhibits 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (phorbol ester)-induced COX-2 expression in JB6 P+ mouse epidermal (JB6 P+) cells by suppressing activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). Myricetin at 10 and 20 microM inhibited phorbol ester-induced upregulation of COX-2 protein, while resveratrol at the same concentration did not exert significant effects. The phorbol ester-induced production of prostaglandin E 2 was also attenuated by myricetin treatment. Myricetin inhibited both COX-2 and NF-kappaB transactivation in phorbol ester-treated JB6 P+ cells, as determined using a luciferase assay. Myricetin blocked the phorbol ester-stimulated DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB, as determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, TPCK (N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone), a NF-kappaB inhibitor, significantly attenuated COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB promoter activity in phorbol ester-treated JB6 P+ cells. In addition, red wine extract inhibited phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB transactivation in JB6 P+ cells. Collectively, these data suggest that myricetin contributes to the chemopreventive effects of red wine through inhibition of COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of NF-kappaB.

  17. INTERNALIZATION AND DEGRADATION OF THE GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER GLT-1 IN RESPONSE TO PHORBOL ESTER

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Bala T.S.; Robinson, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) decreases the activity and cell surface expression of the predominant forebrain glutamate transporter, GLT-1. In the present study, C6 glioma were used as a model system to define the mechanisms that contribute to this decrease in cell surface expression and to determine the fate of internalized transporter. As was previously observed, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused a decrease in biotinylated GLT-1. This effect was blocked by sucrose or by co-expression with a dominant-negative variant of dynamin 1, and it was attenuated by co-expression with a dominant-negative variant of the clathrin heavy chain. Depletion of cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, co-expression with a dominant-negative caveolin-1 mutant (Cav1/S80E), co-expression with dominant-negative variants of Eps15 (epidermal-growth-factor receptor pathway substrate clone 15), or co-expression with dominant-negative Arf6 (T27N) had no effect on the PMA-induced loss of biotinylated GLT-1. Long-term treatment with PMA caused a time-dependent loss of biotinylated GLT-1 and decreased the levels of GLT-1 protein. Inhibitors of lysosomal degradation (chloroquine or ammonium chloride) or co-expression with a dominant-negative variant of a small GTPase implicated in trafficking to lysosomes (Rab7) prevented the PMA-induced decrease in protein and caused an intracellular accumulation of GLT-1. These results suggest that the PKC-induced redistribution of GLT-1 is dependent upon clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These studies identify a novel mechanism by which the levels of GLT-1 could be rapidly down-regulated via lysosomal degradation. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to the loss of GLT-1 observed after acute insults to the CNS is discussed. PMID:17919781

  18. Identification of a phorbol ester-repressible v-src-inducible gene

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.L.; Levy, D.B.; Yannoni, Y.

    1989-02-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) infected with a temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) mutant, tsNY72-4, express a set of pp60{sup v-src}-induced RNAs soon after shift to the permissive temperature. By subtractive and differential screening, the authors have cloned 12 of these sequences, 2 of which were c-fos and krox-24. Serum induced all the v-src-inducible genes tested, suggesting that these genes serve roles in normal cell division and are not specific to transformation per se. Significantly, however, v-src produced prolonged, and in some cases kinetically complex, patterns of induction compared to serum. For most of the clones, phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA) inducedmore » mRNAs with kinetics similar to that of serum. However, one clone (CEF-4) was expressed in a biphasic manner. Another (CEF-10) was repressed by TPA at 1 hr, after which this mRNA was permanently induced. The pattern of repression-induction of CEF-10 mRNA is the inverse of protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the cell, suggesting that PKC actively represses this gene. In vivo expression of CEF-10 mRNA is restricted predominantly to the lung. A full-length CEF-10 cDNA encodes a 41-kDa protein that has an amino-terminal signal peptide for secretion, contains a markedly high number of cysteine residues, and shows no sequence similarity to known proteins.« less

  19. Mapping of QTLs for Seed Phorbol Esters, a Toxic Chemical in Jatropha curcas (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Amkul, Kitiya; Laosatit, Kularb; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Suk-Ha; Tanya, Patcharin; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is an oil-bearing plant that has potential to be cultivated as a biodiesel crop. The seed cake after oil extraction has 40–50% protein that can be used in animal feeds. A major limitation in utilizing the cake is the presence of phorbol esters (PE), a heat-tolerant toxic chemical. To identify the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for PE, we constructed a genetic linkage map from an F2 population of 95 individuals from a cross “Chai Nat” × “M10” using 143 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. M10 is low in seed PE while Chai Nat is high. Seeds from each F2 individual were quantified for PE content by high performance liquid chromatography. A single marker analysis revealed five markers from linkage group 3 (LG3) and nine markers from LG8 associated with seed PE. Inclusive composite interval mapping identified two QTLs, each on LG3 (qPE3.1) and LG8 (qPE8.1) responsible for the PE. qPE3.1 and qPE8.1 accounted for 14.10%, and 15.49% of total variation in seed PE, respectively. Alelle(s) from M10 at qPE3.1 increased seed PE, while at qPE8.1 decreased seed PE. qPE3.1 is a new loci for PE, while qPE8.1 is the same locus with that reported recently for PE. PMID:28820491

  20. Mapping of QTLs for Seed Phorbol Esters, a Toxic Chemical in Jatropha curcas (L.).

    PubMed

    Amkul, Kitiya; Laosatit, Kularb; Somta, Prakit; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Suk-Ha; Tanya, Patcharin; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-08-18

    Jatropha ( Jatropha curcas L.) is an oil-bearing plant that has potential to be cultivated as a biodiesel crop. The seed cake after oil extraction has 40-50% protein that can be used in animal feeds. A major limitation in utilizing the cake is the presence of phorbol esters (PE), a heat-tolerant toxic chemical. To identify the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for PE, we constructed a genetic linkage map from an F₂ population of 95 individuals from a cross "Chai Nat" × "M10" using 143 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. M10 is low in seed PE while Chai Nat is high. Seeds from each F₂ individual were quantified for PE content by high performance liquid chromatography. A single marker analysis revealed five markers from linkage group 3 (LG3) and nine markers from LG8 associated with seed PE. Inclusive composite interval mapping identified two QTLs, each on LG3 ( qPE3.1 ) and LG8 ( qPE8.1 ) responsible for the PE. qPE3.1 and qPE8.1 accounted for 14.10%, and 15.49% of total variation in seed PE, respectively. Alelle(s) from M10 at qPE3.1 increased seed PE, while at qPE8.1 decreased seed PE. qPE3.1 is a new loci for PE, while qPE8.1 is the same locus with that reported recently for PE.

  1. RasGRP1 confers the phorbol ester-sensitive phenotype to EL4 lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Shujie; Knoepp, Stewart M; Hallman, Mark A; Meier, Kathryn E

    2007-01-01

    The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line exists in variants that are either sensitive or resistant to the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In sensitive EL4 cells, PMA causes robust Erk mitogen-activated protein kinase activation that results in growth arrest. In resistant cells, PMA induces minimal Erk activation, without growth arrest. PMA stimulates IL-2 production in sensitive, but not resistant, cells. The role of RasGRP1, a PMA-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras, in EL4 phenotype was examined. Endogenous RasGRP1 protein is expressed at much higher levels in sensitive than in resistant cells. PMA-induced Ras activation is observed in sensitive cells but not in resistant cells lacking Ras-GRP1. PMA induces down-regulation of RasGRP1 protein in sensitive cells but increases RasGRP1 in resistant cells. Transfection of RasGRP1 into resistant cells enhances PMA-induced Erk activation. In the reverse experiment, introduction of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for RasGRP1 suppresses PMA-induced Ras and Erk activations in sensitive cells. Sensitive cells incubated with siRNA for RasGRP1 exhibit the PMA-resistant phenotype, in that they are able to proliferate in the presence of PMA and do not secrete IL-2 when stimulated with PMA. These studies indicate that the PMA-sensitive phenotype, as previously defined for the EL4 cell line, is conferred by endogenous expression of RasGRP1 protein.

  2. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate enhances nm23 gene expression in murine melanocytes but not in syngeneic B16-BL6 melanoma variants.

    PubMed

    Huijzer, J C; McFarland, M; Niles, R M; Meadows, G G

    1996-03-01

    The nm23 gene has been described as a potential metastasis suppressor gene in certain rodent and human tumors. We previously demonstrated that tyrosine and phenylalanine restriction suppresses metastatic heterogeneity of B16-BL6 murine melanoma and selects for tumor variants with decreased metastatic potential. In this study, we investigated nm23 expression in the highly metastatic B16-BL6 (ND) melanoma, its nutritionally derived poorly metastatic (LT) variant, and the syngeneic non-tumorigenic Mel-ab melanocytes. No differences in nm23 expression were observed between ND and LT cells, and nm23 expression varied between different isolates. Previously, we showed that metastatic potential of 1-ND cells decreases and is not altered in 1-LT cells after prolonged in vitro cell passage; however, nm23 expression is equivalently increased by 2-fold. In 2-ND and 2-LT cells, expression of nm23 is not different at higher in vitro cell passage. Expression of nm23 decreased about 2-fold when phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was removed from Mel-ab cells, which induces these cells to become quiescent. Although membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity decreased after prolonged PMA treatment in all cells, neither nm23 expression nor proliferation of ND and LT cells was affected by PMA. These data indicate that nm23 expression is related to proliferative activity rather than to the suppression of metastatic potential.

  3. Analysis of seed phorbol-ester and curcin content together with genetic diversity in multiple provenances of Jatropha curcas L. from Madagascar and Mexico.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; King, Andrew J; Khan, M Awais; Cuevas, Jesús A; Ramiaramanana, Danièle; Graham, Ian A

    2011-10-01

    Jatropha curcas L. has been promoted as an oilseed crop for use to meet the increased world demand for vegetable oil production, and in particular, as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Seed meal is a protein-rich by-product of vegetable oil extraction, which can either be used as an organic fertilizer, or converted to animal feed. However, conversion of J. curcas seed meal into animal feed is complicated by the presence of toxins, though plants producing "edible" or "non-toxic" seeds occur in Mexico. Toxins present in the seeds of J. curcas include phorbol esters and a type-I ribosome inactivating protein (curcin). Although the edible seeds of J. curcas are known to lack phorbol esters, the curcin content of these seeds has not previously been studied. We analyzed the phorbol ester and curcin content of J. curcas seeds obtained from Mexico and Madagascar, and conclude that while phorbol esters are lacking in edible seeds, both types contain curcin. We also analyzed spatial distribution of these toxins in seeds. Phorbol-esters were most concentrated in the tegmen. Curcin was found in both the endosperm and tegmen. We conclude that seed toxicity in J. curcas is likely to be due to a monogenic trait, which may be under maternal control. We also conducted AFLP analysis and conclude that genetic diversity is very limited in the Madagascan collection compared to the Mexican collection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells by growth factors and phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Ververis, J J; Ku, L; Delafontaine, P

    1993-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) is an important mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells. To characterize regulation of vascular IGF I receptors, we performed radioligand displacement experiments using rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMs). Serum deprivation for 48 hours caused a 40% decrease in IGF I receptor number. Exposure of quiescent RASMs to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), or angiotensin II (Ang II) caused a 1.5-2.0-fold increase in IGF I receptors per cell. After FGF exposure, there was a marked increase in the mitogenic response to IGF I. IGF I downregulated its receptors in the presence of platelet-poor plasma. Stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) by exposure of quiescent RASMs to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate caused a biphasic response in IGF I binding; there was a 42% decrease in receptor number at 45 minutes and a 238% increase at 24 hours. To determine the role of PKC in growth factor-induced regulation of IGF I receptors, we downregulated PKC by exposing RASMs to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) for 48 hours. PDGF- and FGF- but not Ang II-mediated upregulation of IGF I receptors was completely inhibited in PDBu-treated cells. Thus, acute PKC activation by phorbol esters inhibits IGF I binding, whereas chronic PKC activation increases IGF I binding. PDGF and FGF but not Ang II regulate vascular IGF I receptors through a PKC-dependent pathway. These data provide new insights into the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell IGF I receptors in vitro and are of potential importance in characterizing vascular proliferative responses in vivo.

  5. Phorbol ester impairs electrical excitation of rat pancreatic beta-cells through PKC-independent activation of KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Suga, S; Wu, J; Ogawa, Y; Takeo, T; Kanno, T; Wakui, M

    2001-01-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) is often used as an activating phorbol ester of protein kinase C (PKC) to investigate the roles of the kinase in cellular functions. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to activating PKC, PMA also produces some regulatory effects in a PKC-independent manner. In this study, we investigated the non-PKC effects of PMA on electrical excitability of rat pancreatic beta-cells by using patch-clamp techniques. In current-clamp recording, PMA (80 nM) reversibly inhibited 15 mM glucose-induced action potential spikes superimposed on a slow membrane depolarization and this inhibition can not be prevented by pre-treatment of the cell with a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (BIM, 1 microM). In the presence of a subthreshold concentration (5.5 mM) of glucose, PMA hyperpolarized beta-cells in a concentration-dependent manner (0.8-240 nM), even in the presence of BIM. Based on cell-attached single channel recordings, PMA increased ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) activity. Based on inside-out patch-clamp recordings, PMA had little effect on KATP activity if no ATP was in the bath, while PMA restored KATP activity that was suppressed by 10 microM ATP in the bath. In voltage-clamp recording, PMA enhanced tolbutamide-sensitive membrane currents elicited by repetitive ramp pulses from -90 to -50 mV in a concentration-dependent manner, and this potentiation could not be prevented by pre-treatment of cell with BIM. 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4alpha-PDD), a non-PKC-activating phorbol ester, mimicked the effect of PMA on both current-clamp and voltage-clamp recording configurations. With either 5.5 or 16.6 mM glucose in the extracellular solution, PMA (80 nM) increased insulin secretion from rat islets. However, in islets pretreated with BIM (1 microM), PMA did not increase, but rather reduced insulin secretion. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, PMA modulates insulin secretion through a mixed mechanism: increases

  6. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. Methods The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. Results PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Conclusions Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA

  7. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Chih; Hsieh, Nan-Kuang; Liou, Huey Ling; Chen, Hsing I

    2012-03-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA-induced lung injury. ATP is beneficial

  8. Release of superoxide and change in morphology by neutrophils in response to phorbol esters: antagonism by inhibitors of calcium-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The ability of phorbol derivatives to function as stimulating agents for superoxide (O2-) release by guinea pig neutrophils has been evaluated and compared to the known ability of each compound to activate protein kinase C. Those that activate the kinase also stimulate O2- release, while those that are inactive with respect to the kinase have no effect on O2- release. The same correlation was observed with respect to the ability of phorbol esters to induce morphological changes in neutrophils, i.e., vesiculation and reduction in granule content. Certain phenothiazines and naphthalene sulfonamides that are known antagonists of calcium-binding proteins blocked both phorbol ester-induced O2- release and morphological changes in these cells. PMID:2993312

  9. 1,2-Diacylglycerols, but not phorbol esters, activate a potential inhibitory pathway for protein kinase C in GH3 pituitary cells. Evidence for involvement of a sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kolesnick, R N; Clegg, S

    1988-05-15

    It has been suggested that sphingoid bases may serve as physiologic inhibitors of protein kinase C. Because 1,2-diacylglycerols, but not phorbol esters, enhance sphingomyelin degradation via a sphingomyelinase in GH3 pituitary cells (Kolesnick, R. N. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 16759-16762), the effects of phorbol esters, 1,2-diacylglycerols, and sphingomyelinase on protein kinase C activation were assessed. Under basal conditions, the inactive cytosolic form of protein kinase C predominated. 1,2-Diacylglycerols stimulated transient protein kinase C redistribution to the membrane. 1,2-Dioctanoylglycerol (200 micrograms/ml) reduced cytosolic protein kinase C activity to 67% of control from 72 to 48 pmol.min-1.10(6) cells-1 and enhanced membrane-bound activity to 430% of control from 6 to 25 pmol.min-1.10(6) cells-1 after 4 min of stimulation. Thereafter, protein kinase C activity returned to the cytosol. In contrast, the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), stimulated redistribution to the membrane without return to the cytosol. Exogenous sphingomyelinase reduced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity to 30% of control, yet did not alter cytosolic activity. Sphingomyelinase, added after phorbol ester-induced redistribution was completed, restored activity to the cytosol. In these studies, TPA (10(-8) M) reduced cytosolic activity to 62% of control and elevated membrane-bound protein kinase C activity to 650% of control. Sphingomyelinase restored cytosolic activity to 84% of control and reduced membrane-bound activity to 297% of control. Similarly, the free sphingoid bases, sphingosine, sphinganine, and phytosphingosine, reversed phorbol ester-induced protein kinase C redistribution. Since 1,2-diacylglycerols activate a sphingomyelinase and sphingomyelinase action can reverse protein kinase C activation, these studies suggest that a pathway involving a sphingomyelinase might comprise a physiologic negative effector system for protein kinase C

  10. Cardiomyocytes from phorbol myristate acetate-activated mesenchymal stem cells restore electromechanical function in infarcted rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Heesang; Hwang, Hye Jin; Chang, Woochul; Song, Byeong-Wook; Cha, Min-Ji; Lim, Soyeon; Choi, Eun Ju; Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Park, Jun-Hee; Lee, Se-Yeon; Choi, Eunmi; Lee, Chungkeun; Lee, Myoungho; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Hou; Jang, Yangsoo; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Despite the safety and feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy, an optimal cell type has not yet emerged in terms of electromechanical integration in infarcted myocardium. We found that poor to moderate survival benefits of MSC-implanted rats were caused by incomplete electromechanical integration induced by tissue heterogeneity between myocytes and engrafted MSCs in the infarcted myocardium. Here, we report the development of cardiogenic cells from rat MSCs activated by phorbol myristate acetate, a PKC activator, that exhibited high expressions of cardiac-specific markers and Ca2+ homeostasis-related proteins and showed adrenergic receptor signaling by norepinephrine. Histological analysis showed high connexin 43 coupling, few inflammatory cells, and low fibrotic markers in myocardium implanted with these phorbol myristate acetate-activated MSCs. Infarct hearts implanted with these cells exhibited restoration of conduction velocity through decreased tissue heterogeneity and improved myocardial contractility. These findings have major implications for the development of better cell types for electromechanical integration of cell-based treatment for infarcted myocardium. PMID:21173226

  11. Molecular Basis for Failure of “Atypical” C1 Domain of Vav1 to Bind Diacylglycerol/Phorbol Ester*

    PubMed Central

    Geczy, Tamas; Peach, Megan L.; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Sigano, Dina M.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Valle, Christopher J.; Selezneva, Julia; Woo, Wonhee; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Garfield, Susan H.; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Marquez, Victor E.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains, the recognition motif of the second messenger diacylglycerol and of the phorbol esters, are classified as typical (ligand-responsive) or atypical (not ligand-responsive). The C1 domain of Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, plays a critical role in regulation of Vav activity through stabilization of the Dbl homology domain, which is responsible for exchange activity of Vav. Although the C1 domain of Vav1 is classified as atypical, it retains a binding pocket geometry homologous to that of the typical C1 domains of PKCs. This study clarifies the basis for its failure to bind ligands. Substituting Vav1-specific residues into the C1b domain of PKCδ, we identified five crucial residues (Glu9, Glu10, Thr11, Thr24, and Tyr26) along the rim of the binding cleft that weaken binding potency in a cumulative fashion. Reciprocally, replacing these incompatible residues in the Vav1 C1 domain with the corresponding residues from PKCδ C1b (δC1b) conferred high potency for phorbol ester binding. Computer modeling predicts that these unique residues in Vav1 increase the hydrophilicity of the rim of the binding pocket, impairing membrane association and thereby preventing formation of the ternary C1-ligand-membrane binding complex. The initial design of diacylglycerol-lactones to exploit these Vav1 unique residues showed enhanced selectivity for C1 domains incorporating these residues, suggesting a strategy for the development of ligands targeting Vav1. PMID:22351766

  12. Inhibition of endothelin- and phorbol ester-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity by corticotrophin in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kapas, S; Hinson, J P

    1996-01-01

    1. The experiments described in this study were carried out to investigate the role of tyrosine kinase in the acute adrenal response to peptide hormone stimulation, and to determine whether the activity of this kinase may be subject to regulation by other intracellular signalling mechanisms in the adrenal zona glomerulosa. 2. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that angiotensin II stimulates tyrosine kinase activity in the rat adrenal cortex. This study has shown, for the first time, that endothelin-1 also stimulates tyrosine kinase activity in this tissue. 3. Using the specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) activity, Ro 31-8220, we have shown that stimulation of tyrosine kinase activity, in response to endothelin-1, angiotensin II or the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, is at least partly dependent on increased PKC activity. 4. The data presented also provide further evidence of cross-talk between signalling systems in the adrenal cortex. Corticotrophin and its intracellular second messenger, cyclic AMP, significantly attenuate the increment in tyrosine kinase activity seen in response to each of the effectors used. 5. The results of this study provide important new evidence for the regulation of protein kinases by other intracellular second messenger systems. PMID:8611168

  13. Coordinated activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and autophagy regulates phorbol myristate acetate-induced differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zogovic, Nevena; Tovilovic-Kovacevic, Gordana; Misirkic-Marjanovic, Maja; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Janjetovic, Kristina; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    We explored the interplay between the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and autophagy in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. PMA-triggered expression of neuronal markers (dopamine transporter, microtubule-associated protein 2, β-tubulin) was associated with an autophagic response, measured by the conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-I to autophagosome-bound LC3-II, increase in autophagic flux, and expression of autophagy-related (Atg) proteins Atg7 and beclin-1. This coincided with the transient activation of AMPK and sustained activation of ERK. Pharmacological inhibition or RNA interference-mediated silencing of AMPK suppressed PMA-induced expression of neuronal markers, as well as ERK activation and autophagy. A selective pharmacological blockade of ERK prevented PMA-induced neuronal differentiation and autophagy induction without affecting AMPK phosphorylation. Conversely, the inhibition of autophagy downstream of AMPK/ERK, either by pharmacological agents or LC3 knockdown, promoted the expression of neuronal markers, thus indicating a role of autophagy in the suppression of PMA-induced differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, PMA-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells depends on a complex interplay between AMPK, ERK, and autophagy, in which the stimulatory effects of AMPK/ERK signaling are counteracted by the coinciding autophagic response. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induces the expression of dopamine transporter, microtubule-associated protein 2, and β-tubulin, and subsequent neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The activation of AMPK/ERK axis also induces the expression of beclin-1 and Atg7, and increases LC3 conversion, thereby triggering

  14. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activities of Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) Leaves and Other Selected Tropical Green Vegetables Investigated on Lipoperoxidation and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) Activated Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsumbu, Cesar N.; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Tits, Monique; Angenot, Luc; Franck, Thierry; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2011-01-01

    Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae), Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae), Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae) leaves are currently consumed as vegetables by migrants from sub-Saharan Africa living in Western Europe and by the people in the origin countries, where these plants are also used in the folk medicine. Manihot leaves are also eaten in Latin America and some Asian countries. This work investigated the capacity of aqueous extracts prepared from those vegetables to inhibit the peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion. Short chain, volatile C-compounds as markers of advanced lipid peroxidation were measured by gas chromatography by following the ethylene production. The generation of lipid hydroperoxides, was monitored by spectroscopy using N-N′-dimethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DMPD). The formation of intermediate peroxyl, and other free radicals, at the initiation of the lipid peroxidation was investigated by electron spin resonance, using α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin trap agent. The ability of the extracts to decrease the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in “inflammation like” conditions was studied by fluorescence technique using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescine-diacetate as fluorogenic probe, in a cell model of human monocytes (HL-60 cells) activated with phorbol ester. Overall the extracts displayed efficient concentration-dependent inhibitory effects. Their total polyphenol and flavonoid content was determined by classic colorimetric methods. An HPLC-UV/DAD analysis has clearly identified the presence of some polyphenolic compounds, which explains at least partially the inhibitions observed in our models. The role of these plants in the folk medicine by sub-Saharan peoples as well as in the prevention of oxidative stress and ROS related diseases requires further consideration. PMID:22254126

  15. The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response as assessed by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The differences between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on whole blood oxidative response using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) are currently unknown in cattle. Luminol-dependent CL measures the amount of reactive oxygen species released from leukocytes a...

  16. Synergistic stimulation of interleukin 6 release and gene expression by phorbol esters and interleukin 1 beta in rat cortical astrocytes: role of protein kinase C activation and blockade.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, M; Arcone, R; Ciliberto, G; Schettini, G

    1995-05-01

    The involvement of protein kinase C and its interaction with interleukin 1 beta in the control of interleukin 6 release by cortical astrocytes was studied. The blockade of protein kinase C catalytic domain, by staurosporine, as well as the desensitization of protein kinase C by short-term phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate pretreatment, increased the basal release of interleukin 6 by rat cortical astrocytes, whereas calphostin C, an antagonist of phorbol ester binding on protein kinase C regulatory domain, did not affect the basal release of the cytokine. The activation of protein kinase C by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate enhanced concentration- and time-dependently interleukin 6 release. This stimulatory action of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly reduced by staurosporine, by calphostin C and by the desensitization of protein kinase C. Interleukin 1 beta increased interleukin 6 release in a concentration-related manner. Protein kinase C inhibition, by staurosporine or desensitization, potentiated severalfold, whereas calphostin C reduced interleukin 1 beta stimulation of interleukin 6 release. The treatment of cortical astrocytes with both interleukin 1 beta (3 ng/ml) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM) caused a synergistic stimulation of interleukin 6 release and its gene expression, an effect that was not relieved by either 20 nM staurospine or by calphostin C but was slightly affected by protein kinase C desensitization. In conclusion, our data show that in rat cortical astrocytes the basal release of interleukin 6 is under a tonic inhibition exerted by a protein kinase C isoform or isoforms sensitive to blockade by staurosporine and desensitization but insensitive to calphostin C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Detoxification of Toxic Phorbol Esters from Malaysian Jatropha curcas Linn. Kernel by Trichoderma spp. and Endophytic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Azhar; Abdullah, Norhani; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Ahmad, Syahida; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abas, Faridah; Gherbawy, Youssuf

    2014-01-01

    The presence of phorbol esters (PEs) with toxic properties limits the use of Jatropha curcas kernel in the animal feed industry. Therefore, suitable methods to detoxify PEs have to be developed to render the material safe as a feed ingredient. In the present study, the biological treatment of the extracted PEs-rich fraction with non-pathogenic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum JQ350879.1, T. harzianum JQ517493.1, Paecilomyces sinensis JQ350881.1, Cladosporium cladosporioides JQ517491.1, Fusarium chlamydosporum JQ350882.1, F. chlamydosporum JQ517492.1 and F. chlamydosporum JQ350880.1) was conducted by fermentation in broth cultures. The PEs were detected by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESIMS) and quantitatively monitored by HPLC using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate as the standard. At day 30 of incubation, two T. harzianum spp., P. sinensis and C. cladosporioides significantly (p < 0.05) removed PEs with percentage losses of 96.9%–99.7%, while F. chlamydosporum strains showed percentage losses of 88.9%–92.2%. All fungal strains could utilize the PEs-rich fraction for growth. In the cytotoxicity assay, cell viabilities of Chang liver and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines were less than 1% with the untreated PEs-rich fraction, but 84.3%–96.5% with the fungal treated PEs-rich fraction. There was no inhibition on cell viability for normal fungal growth supernatants. To conclude, Trichoderma spp., Paecilomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. are potential microbes for the detoxification of PEs. PMID:24504029

  18. Effect of phorbol esters on the macrophage-mediated biodegradation of polyurethanes via protein kinase C activation and other pathways.

    PubMed

    McBane, Joanne Eileen; Santerre, J P; Labow, Rosalind

    2009-01-01

    It was previously found that re-seeding monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) on polycarbonate-based polyurethanes (PCNUs) in the presence of the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) inhibited MDM-mediated degradation of PCNUs synthesized with 1,6-hexane diisocyanate (HDI), as well as esterase activity and monocyte-specific esterase (MSE) protein. However, no effect on the degradation of a 4,4'-methylene bisphenyl (MDI)-derived PCNU (MDI321) occurred. This finding suggested that oxidation, a process linked to the PKC pathway, was not activated in the same manner for all PCNUs. In the current study MDM were re-seeded onto the above PCNU surfaces with PMA, PKC-inactive 4alphaPMA and the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I hydrochloride (BIM) for 48 h before assaying for PCNU degradation, esterase activity, MSE protein, DNA, cell viability and cell morphology. 4alphaPMA did not alter MDM-mediated HDI PCNU degradation but MDI321 degradation increased in this condition. BIM alone had no effect on any parameter; however, when BIM and PMA were added together, the PMA inhibition of biodegradation, esterase activity and MSE protein was partially reversed for MDM on HDI PCNUs only. Adding PMA to MDM on HDI PCNUs increased intercellular connections, whereas 4alphaPMA or BIM+PMA increased cell size. Although this study demonstrated a role for oxidation via a PKC-activated pathway in MDM-mediated PCNU degradation, phorbol esters appear to also activate non-PKC pathways that have roles in biodegradation. Moreover, the sensitivity to material surface chemistry in the MDM response to each PCNU dictates a multi-factorial degradative process involving alternate material specific oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms.

  19. Detoxification of toxic phorbol esters from Malaysian Jatropha curcas Linn. kernel by Trichoderma spp. and endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Azhar; Abdullah, Norhani; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Ahmad, Syahida; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abas, Faridah; Gherbawy, Youssuf

    2014-02-05

    The presence of phorbol esters (PEs) with toxic properties limits the use of Jatropha curcas kernel in the animal feed industry. Therefore, suitable methods to detoxify PEs have to be developed to render the material safe as a feed ingredient. In the present study, the biological treatment of the extracted PEs-rich fraction with non-pathogenic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum JQ350879.1, T. harzianum JQ517493.1, Paecilomyces sinensis JQ350881.1, Cladosporium cladosporioides JQ517491.1, Fusarium chlamydosporum JQ350882.1, F. chlamydosporum JQ517492.1 and F. chlamydosporum JQ350880.1) was conducted by fermentation in broth cultures. The PEs were detected by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESIMS) and quantitatively monitored by HPLC using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate as the standard. At day 30 of incubation, two T. harzianum spp., P. sinensis and C. cladosporioides significantly (p < 0.05) removed PEs with percentage losses of 96.9%-99.7%, while F. chlamydosporum strains showed percentage losses of 88.9%-92.2%. All fungal strains could utilize the PEs-rich fraction for growth. In the cytotoxicity assay, cell viabilities of Chang liver and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines were less than 1% with the untreated PEs-rich fraction, but 84.3%-96.5% with the fungal treated PEs-rich fraction. There was no inhibition on cell viability for normal fungal growth supernatants. To conclude, Trichoderma spp., Paecilomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. are potential microbes for the detoxification of PEs.

  20. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated inositol phosphate formation in hepatocytes is abolished by pertussis toxin and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The EGF-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protein phosphorylation events in isolated hepatocytes are blocked by pertussis toxin and phorbol ester pretreatment. The present study characterized the EGF-stimulated formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/) and inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4)P/sub 3/) in hepatocytes using HPLC methodology to separate the InsP/sub 3/ isomers. Both 66 nM EGF and 10 nM angiotensin II (ANG II) caused a rapid increase in the Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ isomer although EGF-stimulated formation was smaller. At a concentration of ANG II (0.1 nM) which gave an equivalent rise in (Ca/sup 2more » +/)/sub i/ as 66 nM EGF, the kinetics and magnitude of Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation were similar. EGF or ANG II-stimulated formation of the Ins(1,3,4)P/sub 3/ isomer was more gradual and increased beyond the level of Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ after 60 sec. The initial EGF and ANG II-stimulated increase in both InsP/sub 3/ isomers was not affected by removing external Ca/sup 2 +/ with a 10-fold excess of EGTA. Pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin for 72 hrs blocked the ability of EGF to increase Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ but did not affect the increase due to ANG II. Three main pretreatment of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) also inhibited the EGF-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation. PMA slightly attenuated Ins(1,4,5)P/sub 3/ formation stimulated by 0.1 nM ANG II but not enough to affect the Ca/sup 2 +/ signal. These data suggest that the signal transduction system used by EGF receptors to increase Ins (1,4,5)P/sub 3/ in hepatocytes is somehow different from that used by ANG II receptors.« less

  1. Structural insights into the interactions of phorbol ester and bryostatin complexed with protein kinase C: a comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Tateing, Suriya; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are important regulatory enzymes that have been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and in the eradication of HIV/AIDS. Given their potential clinical ramifications, PKC modulators, e.g. phorbol esters and bryostatin, are also of great interest in the drug development. However, structural details on the binding between PKC and its modulators, especially bryostatin - the highly potent and non-tumor promoting activator for PKCs, are still lacking. Here, we report the first comparative molecular dynamics study aimed at gaining structural insight into the mechanisms by which the PKC delta cys2 activator domain is used in its binding to phorbol ester and bryostatin-1. As anticipated in the phorbol ester binding, hydrogen bonds are formed through the backbone atoms of Thr242, Leu251, and Gly253 of PKC. However, the opposition of H-bond formation between Thr242 and Gly253 may cause the phorbol ester complex to become less stable when compared with the bryostatin binding. For the PKC delta-bryostatin complex, hydrogen bonds are formed between the Gly253 backbone carbonyl and the C30 carbomethoxy substituent of the ligand. Additionally, the indole Nε1 of the highly homologous Trp252 also forms an H-bond to the C20 ester group on bryostatin. Backbone fluctuations also suggest that this latter H-bond formation may abrogate the transient interaction between Trp252 and His269, thus dampening the fluctuations observed on the nearby Zn(2+)-coordinating residues. This new dynamic fluctuation dampening model can potentially benefit future design of new PKC modulators.

  2. Bio-detoxification of phorbol esters and other anti-nutrients of Jatropha curcas seed cake by fungal cultures using solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sharath, B S; Mohankumar, B V; Somashekar, D

    2014-03-01

    Jatropha seed cake, a byproduct after biodiesel extraction, has several anti-nutrients and toxins. Solid-state fermentation was carried out for the detoxification of the Jatropha seed cake (JSC) using different fungal cultures. The reduction in the anti-nutritional components such as tannins, phytates, saponins, lectin and protease inhibitor, and phorbol esters on 6th, 9th, and 12th day of fermentation was analyzed. The phorbol ester content in the unfermented JSC was 0.83 mg/g, and the maximum degradation of phorbol esters to the extent of 75% was observed in the case of JSC fermented with Cunninghamella echinulata CJS-90. The phytate degradation in the fermented JSC was in the range of 65-96%. There was a gradual reduction of saponin content in the JSC from 6th to 12th day, and the reduction of saponin was in the range of 55-99% after solid-state fermentation. The trypsin inhibitor activity and lectin were 1,680 trypsin inhibitor units (TIU) per gram and 0.32 hemagglutinating unit in the unfermented JSC, respectively. Trypsin inhibitor activity and lectin could not be detected in JSC after 12th day of solid-state fermentation. Tannins accounted for 0.53% in unfermented JSC, and there was a marginal increase of tannins after solid-state fermentation. The results indicate that biological detoxification could be a promising method to reduce anti-nutritional compounds and toxins in the JSC.

  3. Cross-linking of surface Ig receptors on murine B lymphocytes stimulates the expression of nuclear tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chiles, T.C.; Liu, J.L.; Rothstein, T.L.

    1991-03-15

    Cross-linking of sIg on primary B lymphocytes leads to increased nuclear DNA-binding activity specific for the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element (TRE), as judged by gel mobility shift assays. Stimulation of B cells to enter S phase of the cell cycle by treatment with the combination of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore also stimulated nuclear TRE-binding activity within 2 h, with maximal expression at 4 h; however, phorbol ester and calcium ionophore were not as effective in stimulating binding activity when examined separately. Stimulated nuclear expression of TRE-binding activity appears to require protein synthesis. Fos- and Jun/AP-1-related proteins participate directly inmore » the identified nucleoprotein complex, as shown by the ability of c-fos- and c-jun-specific antisera to either alter or completely abolish electrophoretic migration of the complex in native gels. Further, UV photo-cross-linking studies identified two major TRE-binding protein species, whose sizes correspond to TRE-binding proteins derived from HeLa cell nuclear extracts. The results suggest that in primary B cells nuclear TRE-binding activity represents a downstream signaling event that occurs subsequent to changes in protein kinase C activity and intracellular Ca2+ but that can be triggered physiologically through sIg.« less

  4. Degradation rates of phorbol esters in Jatropha curcas L. oil and pressed seeds under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Phasukarratchai, Naphatsarnan; Damrongsiri, Seelawut; Tongcumpou, Chantra

    2017-03-01

    Phorbol esters (PEs), found in Jatropha curcas crude oil (JCO) and J. curcas pressed seeds (JPS), are known as bioactive compounds in agricultural and pharmaceutical applications. The degradation rates of PEs in JCO and JPS under various conditions is important for the utilisation of PEs. Thus the objective of this study was to determine the PE degradation rates in JCO and JPS under different storage conditions. PE degradation rates were found to be first-order reactions. The slowest degradation rate was at 0.9 × 10 -3 d -1 for both JCO and JPS unexposed to light at 4 °C. Light intensity (1097 lx and 4690 lx, representing diffused sunlight and fluorescent lighting, respectively) and temperature (25 to 35 °C) were the significant degradation factors. Light exposure led to 280% to 380% higher degradation rates in JCO than in JPS due to light penetration through the transparent oil. Dried and sterilised JPS showed an 80% to 90% lower PE degradation rate than untreated JPS under all storage conditions since biodegradation was assembly limited. The PEs were unstable under the studied conditions, especially when exposed to light and room temperature. To protect against PE degradation, a material should be stored in a light-protected container and below 4 °C. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Inhibition of phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion in mice by vitamin A analog and anti-inflammatory steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, C.E.; Slaga, T.J.; Hennings, H.

    1979-08-01

    The effects of a vitamin A analog, TMMP ethyl retinoate (abbreviated Ro 10-9359), and an anti-inflammatory steroid, fluocinoione acetonide (abbreviated FA), given alone or together were studied in a two-stage carcinogenesis system. the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was used as the tumor promoter in a DMBA-initiated mouse skin system. Two stocks of female mice, which differ in their degrees of sensitivity to skin carcinogenesis, were used. A dose-dependent inhibition of carcinogenic expression, as determined by a decreased number of papillomas per animal, was observed in each mouse stock with the use of both FA and Ro 10-9359 were given alone.more » When FA and RO 10-9359 were given together, an enhanced effect on the lowering of tumor incidence was noted. FA effectively inhibited tumor formation in the sensitive mouse stock even when the steroid was given 1 day prior to TPA treatment under conditions of unusually high doses of initiator (DMBA) and/or promoter (TPA). These results suggest that both anti-inflammatory steroids and retinoids inhibit tumor promotion and can be effectively used as a combination regimen for increased chemopreventive response.« less

  6. Dmrt1 Expression Is Regulated by Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Phorbol Esters in Postnatal Sertoli Cells*

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIANG KAI; HECKERT, LESLIE L.

    2006-01-01

    Dmrt1 is a recently described gene that is expressed exclusively in the testis and is required for postnatal testis differentiation. Here we describe the expression of Dmrt1 in postnatal rat testis and Sertoli cells. RNase protection analysis was used to examine Dmrt1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in intact testis during postnatal development and in primary cultures of Sertoli cells under various culture conditions. We show that Dmrt1 mRNA levels rise significantly beginning approximately 10 days after birth and remain elevated until after the third postnatal week. Thereafter, mRNA levels drop coincident with the proliferation of germ cells in the testis. In freshly isolated Sertoli cells, Dmrt1 mRNA levels were robust but decreased significantly when the cells were placed in culture for 24 h. Treatment of Sertoli cells with either FSH or 8-bromo-cAMP resulted in a significant rise in Dmrt1 mRNA levels. This cAMP response was sensitive to treatment with the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D but not to the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. The cAMP-dependent rise in Dmrt1 mRNA also required activation of protein kinase A, as mRNA induction was sensitive to the inhibitor H89. Studies also show that Dmrt1 expression was inhibited by phorbol esters (PMA) but only modestly effected by serum. PMID:11181532

  7. 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate activates cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons independently of TRPV4

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R; Kerby, A; Aubdool, AA; Power, AR; Grover, S; Gentry, C; Grant, AD

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPV4 is activated by mechanical disturbance of the cell membrane and is implicated in mechanical hyperalgesia. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased during inflammation and causes mechanical hyperalgesia. 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4αPDD) has been described as a selective TRPV4 agonist. We investigated NGF-induced hyperalgesia in TRPV4 wild-type (+/+) and knockout (–/–) mice, and the increases in [Ca2+]i produced by 4αPDD in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons following exposure to NGF. Experimental Approach Withdrawal thresholds to heat, von Frey hairs and pressure were measured in mice before and after systemic administration of NGF. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were measured by ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 in cultured DRG and trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons during perfusion of TRPV4 agonists. Key Results Administration of NGF caused a significant sensitization to heat and von Frey stimuli in TRPV4 +/+ and –/– mice, but only TRPV4 +/+ mice showed sensitization to noxious pressure. 4αPDD stimulated a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i in neurons from +/+ and –/– mice, with the proportion of responding neurons and magnitude of increase unaffected by the genotype. In contrast, the selective TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A failed to stimulate an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in cultured neurons. Responses to 4αPDD were unaffected by pretreatment with NGF. Conclusions and Implications TRPV4 contributes to mechanosensation in vivo, but there is little evidence for functional TRPV4 in cultured DRG and TG neurons. We conclude that 4αPDD activates these neurons independently of TRPV4, so it is not appropriate to refer to 4αPDD as a selective TRPV4 agonist. PMID:22928864

  8. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation.more » In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.« less

  9. Differential acute and chronic response of protein kinase C in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes to alpha 1-adrenergic and phorbol ester stimulation.

    PubMed

    Henrich, C J; Simpson, P C

    1988-12-01

    Both alpha 1-adrenergic agonists (e.g. norepinephrine, NE*) and tumor-promoting phorbol esters (e.g. phorbol myristate acetate, PMA) are known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) (Abdel-Latif, 1986, Niedel and Blackshear, 1986). However, alpha 1 agonists and PMA produce very different effects on cardiac function (see Simpson, 1985; Benfey, 1987; Meidell et al., 1986; Leatherman et al., 1987; Yuan et al., 1987; for examples). PKC activation in heart cells has been studied only for PMA treated perfused heart (Yuan et al., 1987). Therefore, acute activation and chronic regulation of PKC by NE and PMA were compared in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. NE acutely and transiently activated PKC, as measured by translocation of PKC activity to the cell particulate fraction (Niedel and Blackshear, 1986). Particulate PKC activity peaked at 23% of total after NE for 30 s, as compared with 8% for control (P less than 0.001). By contrast, acute PKC activation by PMA was more pronounced and persistent, with particulate PKC activity 62% of total at 5 min (P less than 0.001). Calcium/lipid-independent kinase activity increased acutely with PMA, but not with NE. Chronic treatment with NE (24 to 48 h) increased total per cell PKC activity and 3H-phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) binding sites, an index of the number of PKC molecules (Niedel and Blackshear, 1986), by 30 to 60% over control (all P less than 0.05 to 0.01). In contrast with NE, chronic treatment with PMA down-regulated PKC, reducing total per cell PKC activity and 3H-PDB binding sites to 3% and 12% of control, respectively (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. ROCK mediates phorbol ester-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via p21Cip1 up-regulation and JNK.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liqing; Eto, Masumi; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2009-10-23

    It is established that androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells undergo apoptosis upon treatment with phorbol esters and related analogs, an effect primarily mediated by PKCdelta. Treatment of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) causes a strong and sustained activation of RhoA and its downstream effector ROCK (Rho kinase) as well as the formation of stress fibers. These effects are impaired in cells subjected to PKCdelta RNA interference depletion. Functional studies revealed that expression of a dominant negative RhoA mutant or treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 inhibits the apoptotic effect of PMA in LNCaP cells. Remarkably, the cytoskeleton inhibitors cytochalasin B and blebbistatin blocked not only PMA-induced apoptosis but also the activation of JNK, a mediator of the cell death effect by the phorbol ester. In addition, we found that up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) is required for PMA-induced apoptosis and that inhibitors of ROCK or the cytoskeleton organization prevent p21(Cip1) induction. Real time PCR analysis and reporter gene assay revealed that PMA induces p21(Cip1) transcriptionally in a ROCK- and cytoskeleton-dependent manner. p21(Cip1) promoter analysis revealed that PMA induction is dependent on Sp1 elements in the p21(Cip1) promoter but independent of p53. Taken together, our studies implicate ROCK-mediated up-regulation of p21(Cip1) and the cytoskeleton in PKCdelta-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

  11. Stimulation of generation of inositol phosphates by carbamoylcholine and its inhibition by phorbol esters and iodide in dog thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, E; Mockel, J; Takazawa, K; Erneux, C; Dumont, J E

    1989-01-01

    The action of carbamoylcholine (Cchol), NaF and other agonists on the generation of inositol phosphates (IPs) was studied in dog thyroid slices prelabelled with myo-[2-3H]inositol. The stimulation by Cchol (0.1 microM-0.1 mM) of IPs accumulation through activation of a muscarinic receptor [Graff, Mockel, Laurent, Erneux & Dumont (1987) FEBS Lett. 210, 204-210] was pertussis- and cholera-toxin insensitive. Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4)P3 and InsP4 were generated. NaF (5-20 mM) also increased IPs generation (Graff et al., 1987); this effect was potentiated by AlCl3 (10 microM) and unaffected by pertussis toxin. Although phorbol dibutyrate (5 microM) abolished the cholinergic stimulation of IPs generation (Graff et al., 1987), it did not affect the fluoride-induced response. Cchol and NaF did not require extracellular Ca2+ to exert their effect, and neither KCl-induced membrane depolarization nor ionophore A23187 (10 microM) had any influence on basal IPs levels, or on cholinergic stimulation. However, more stringent Ca2+ depletion with EGTA (0.1 or 1 mM) decreased basal IPs levels as well as the amplitude of the stimulation by Cchol without abolishing it. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP, forskolin, cholera toxin and prostaglandin E1 had no effect on basal IPs levels and did not decrease the response to Cchol. Iodide (4 or 40 microM) also strongly decreased the cholinergic action on IPs, this inhibition being relieved by methimazole (1 mM). Our data suggest that Cchol activates a phospholipase C hydrolysing PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the dog thyroid cell in a cyclic AMP-independent manner. This activation requires no extracellular Ca2+ and depends on a GTP-binding protein insensitive to both cholera toxin and requires no extracellular Ca2+ and depends on a GTP-binding protein insensitive to both cholera toxin and pertussis toxin. The data are consistent with a rapid metabolism of Ins(1,4,5)P3 to Ins(1,3,4)P3 via the Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase pathway, followed by dephosphorylation by a 5

  12. Depletion of the cellular levels of Bag-1 proteins attenuates phorbol ester-induced downregulation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Jana V., E-mail: Jana.maier@kit.edu; Volz, Yvonne; Berger, Caroline

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields}Bag-1 depletion only marginally affects the action of the glucocorticoid receptor but strongly regulates the activity of NF-{kappa}B. {yields}Bag-1 depletion attenuates phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B p65 and p50. {yields}Bag-1 interacts with I{kappa}B{alpha} and partially restores I{kappa}B{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B activation in Bag-1 depleted cells. -- Abstract: Bag-1 consists in humans of four isoforms generated from the same RNA by alternative translation. Overexpression of single Bag-1 isoforms has identified Bag-1 as a negative regulator of action of many proteins including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here we have analysed the ability of Bag-1 to regulatemore » the transrepression function of the GR. Silencing Bag-1 expression only marginally affects the transrepression action of the GR but decreased the action of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. Furthermore phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of p65 and p50 NF-{kappa}B proteins in response to phorbol ester was attenuated following Bag-1 depletion in HeLa cells. Reconstitution of Bag-1 in depleted cells partially restored I{kappa}B{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B activation. Knock-down of Bag-1 expression also did not significantly alter GR-mediated transactivation but affected the basal transcription of some of the target genes. Thus Bag-1 proteins function as regulators of the action of selective transcription factors.« less

  13. Expression of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 and CD14 during differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3).

    PubMed

    Li, Changlin; Wang, Yibing; Gao, Li; Zhang, Jingsong; Shao, Jie; Wang, Shengnian; Feng, Weiguo; Wang, Xingyu; Li, Minglie; Chang, Zongliang

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages form a crucial bridge between the innate and adaptive immune response. One of their most important functions is to recognize infectious microorganisms. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key elements in pathogen recognition, and among them, TLR2 and TLR4 are most discussed. However, expression patterns of TLRs during myeloid cell differentiation to macrophage are unknown. In this study, we examined differentiation in the model human myeloid cell line, HL-60, treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or VitD(3). Expression of TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 were measured by reverse transcription-PCR, RNase protection assay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter assays. After treatment by PMA (1, 10, and 100 nM) for 12, 24, and 48 h, expression of TLR2 and CD14 mRNA was increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. However, VitD(3) only induced expression of CD14 but not TLR2 in HL-60 cells. TLR4 was expressed constitutively before differentiation and increased slightly after that. Thus, PMA-mediated differentiation of HL-60 cells to macrophages is associated largely with TLR2 expression and, to a much lesser extent, with TLR4. Furthermore, up-regulation of TLR2 and CD14 mRNA expression by PMA was abrogated by a protein kinase C inhibitor, Calphostine C, suggesting the up-regulation of TLR2 and CD14 mRNA is dependent on the activation of protein kinase C. Coexpression of CD14/TLR2 and/or CD14/TLR4 may be essential but not sufficient for the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in response to lipopolysaccharide in our system.

  14. Activation of syntaxin 1C, an alternative splice variant of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A, by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) suppresses glucose transport into astroglioma cells via the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1).

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Akagawa, Kimio

    2004-05-28

    Syntaxin 1C is an alternative splice variant lacking the transmembrane domain of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A. We found previously that syntaxin 1C is expressed as a soluble protein in human astroglioma (T98G) cells, and syntaxin 1C expression is enhanced by stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). However, the physiological function of syntaxin 1C is not known. In this study, we examined the relationship between syntaxin 1C and glucose transport. First, we discovered that glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) was the primary isoform in T98G cells. Second, we demonstrated that glucose uptake in T98G cells was suppressed following an increase in endogenous syntaxin 1C after stimulation with PMA, which did not alter the expression levels of other plasma membrane syntaxins. We further examined glucose uptake and intracellular localization of GLUT-1 in cells that overexpressed exogenous syntaxin 1C; glucose uptake via GLUT-1 was inhibited without affecting sodium-dependent glucose transport. The value of Vmax for the dose-dependent uptake of glucose was reduced in syntaxin 1C-expressing cells, whereas there was no change in Km. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a reduction in the amount of GLUT-1 in the plasma membrane in cells that expressed syntaxin 1C. Based on these results, we postulate that syntaxin 1C regulates glucose transport in astroglioma cells by changing the intracellular trafficking of GLUT-1. This is the first report to indicate that a syntaxin isoform that lacks a transmembrane domain can regulate the intracellular transport of a plasma membrane protein.

  15. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in hepatocytes is abolished by phorbol esters, pertussis toxin and partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    EGF has been demonstrated to increase free intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in isolated hepatocytes putatively by generation of the second messenger inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/). Pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) inhibited the EGF (66 nM) stimulated Ca/sup 2 +/ response as measured by quin2. Inhibition by PMA was maximal within 3 min and was concentration dependent (IC/sub 50/ = 13.5 nM). Four other active phorbol ester analogues blocked the Ca/sup 2 +/ response while inactive analogues did not. EGF was unable to increase intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ levels in hepatocytes isolated from rats treated with pertussismore » toxin for 72 hrs. Neither PMA nor toxin pretreatment was able to inhibit the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to angiotensin II (Ang II). In hepatocytes isolated 24 hrs after partial hepatectomy, the Ca/sup 2 +/ response to EGF (as measured by phosphorylase activity, EC/sub 50/ = 5 nM) was completely abolished and remained attenuated for 7 days post-hepatectomy. The Ca/sup 2 +/ response to Ang II in this model system was also blunted but required 3 days for development of the full effect and within 7 days full activity is nearly restored. The results suggest that fundamental differences exist in the transduction mechanisms used by these two Ca/sup 2 +/-linked hormones to mobilize intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (and putatively increase IP/sub 3/ formation).« less

  16. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin aremore » independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.« less

  17. Linkage mapping in the oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. reveals a locus controlling the biosynthesis of phorbol esters which cause seed toxicity

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew J; Montes, Luis R; Clarke, Jasper G; Affleck, Julie; Li, Yi; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van der Vossen, Edwin; van der Linde, Piet; Tripathi, Yogendra; Tavares, Evanilda; Shukla, Parul; Rajasekaran, Thirunavukkarasu; van Loo, Eibertus N; Graham, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to grow the tropical oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. economically are hampered by the lack of cultivars and the presence of toxic phorbol esters (PE) within the seeds of most provenances. These PE restrict the conversion of seed cake into animal feed, although naturally occurring ‘nontoxic’ provenances exist which produce seed lacking PE. As an important step towards the development of genetically improved varieties of J. curcas, we constructed a linkage map from four F2 mapping populations. The consensus linkage map contains 502 codominant markers, distributed over 11 linkage groups, with a mean marker density of 1.8 cM per unique locus. Analysis of the inheritance of PE biosynthesis indicated that this is a maternally controlled dominant monogenic trait. This maternal control is due to biosynthesis of the PE occurring only within maternal tissues. The trait segregated 3 : 1 within seeds collected from F2 plants, and QTL analysis revealed that a locus on linkage group 8 was responsible for phorbol ester biosynthesis. By taking advantage of the draft genome assemblies of J. curcas and Ricinus communis (castor), a comparative mapping approach was used to develop additional markers to fine map this mutation within 2.3 cM. The linkage map provides a framework for the dissection of agronomic traits in J. curcas, and the development of improved varieties by marker-assisted breeding. The identification of the locus responsible for PE biosynthesis means that it is now possible to rapidly breed new nontoxic varieties. PMID:23898859

  18. Linkage mapping in the oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. reveals a locus controlling the biosynthesis of phorbol esters which cause seed toxicity.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew J; Montes, Luis R; Clarke, Jasper G; Affleck, Julie; Li, Yi; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van der Vossen, Edwin; van der Linde, Piet; Tripathi, Yogendra; Tavares, Evanilda; Shukla, Parul; Rajasekaran, Thirunavukkarasu; van Loo, Eibertus N; Graham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    Current efforts to grow the tropical oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. economically are hampered by the lack of cultivars and the presence of toxic phorbol esters (PE) within the seeds of most provenances. These PE restrict the conversion of seed cake into animal feed, although naturally occurring 'nontoxic' provenances exist which produce seed lacking PE. As an important step towards the development of genetically improved varieties of J. curcas, we constructed a linkage map from four F₂ mapping populations. The consensus linkage map contains 502 codominant markers, distributed over 11 linkage groups, with a mean marker density of 1.8 cM per unique locus. Analysis of the inheritance of PE biosynthesis indicated that this is a maternally controlled dominant monogenic trait. This maternal control is due to biosynthesis of the PE occurring only within maternal tissues. The trait segregated 3 : 1 within seeds collected from F₂ plants, and QTL analysis revealed that a locus on linkage group 8 was responsible for phorbol ester biosynthesis. By taking advantage of the draft genome assemblies of J. curcas and Ricinus communis (castor), a comparative mapping approach was used to develop additional markers to fine map this mutation within 2.3 cM. The linkage map provides a framework for the dissection of agronomic traits in J. curcas, and the development of improved varieties by marker-assisted breeding. The identification of the locus responsible for PE biosynthesis means that it is now possible to rapidly breed new nontoxic varieties. © 2013 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Protein kinase C isoforms in iris sphincter smooth muscle: differential effects of phorbol ester on contraction and cAMP accumulation are species specific.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1996-03-01

    Objectives were to identify PKC isoforms in iris sphincter isolated from rabbit, cat, dog and bovine irides, to determine their subcellular distribution, and to investigate the effects of the phorbol ester, PDBu, on contraction and cAMP accumulation in this tissue. Using six isoform (alpha, beta, gamma, epsilon, delta, zeta)-specific polyclonal antibodies, PKC alpha, beta, epsilon, delta, and zeta were detected in the four species, whereas PKC gamma was detected only in dog and bovine. PKC alpha and epsilon are the most abundant isoforms in this tissue. PKC alpha is mainly cytosolic in rabbit and bovine and membrane associated in cat and dog. PKC gamma is equally distributed in cytosol and membrane fractions of bovine, but mostly cytosolic in dog. PKC beta, delta and epsilon are mainly membraneous and PKC zeta is mainly cytosolic in all species. PDBu (100 nM) induced a contractile response in rabbit- and cat-, but not in dog and bovine, sphincters, and increased cAMP accumulation in rabbit, cat, dog and bovine by 111, 130, 458 and 294%, respectively. Therefore, the lack of effect of PDBu on contraction in dog and bovine, as compared to rabbit and cat, may be due: (a) to the presence of PKC gamma isoform, and (b) to the stronger stimulatory effects of the phorbol ester on cAMP production in the non-contracting species. In addition to demonstrating the presence of various PKC isoforms in the iris sphincter and the activation of adenylyl cyclase by this protein kinase, we have shown that the distribution of the PKC isoforms in this tissue is species specific. Furthermore, our data suggest that there may be specific physiological functions associated with each of the PKC isoforms and that PKC is involved in the contractile response of some but not all smooth muscles.

  20. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  1. Green tea polyphenols and tannic acid act as potent inhibitors of phorbol ester-induced nitric oxide generation in rat hepatocytes independent of their antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R C; Husain, M M; Hasan, S K; Athar, M

    2000-05-29

    The deleterious effects of excessive release of nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in the tissue damage and inflammation. In this study, the effect of various flavonoids and other oxidant scavenging chemical agents have been studied for their ability to inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced NO generation in rat hepatocyte. Hepatocytes activated with TPA (25-200 nM) released NO in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Green tea polyphenols (GTP) and tannic acid (TA) were most effective in inhibiting TPA-induced NO generation (90%). These agents were also effective in inhibiting NO formation when added 2 h following TPA addition. The other oxidant scavengers, such as L-histidine, sodium azide, vitamin E and sodium benzoate, were not found to be effective even up to 1.0 mM concentration. These results suggest that TA and GTP are potent inhibitors of NOS activity and the inhibition of TPA-induced NO generation by these polyphenols is independent of their antioxidant activity. It is tempting to speculate that these agents could be utilized in the pharmacological manipulations of NO-dependent pathophysiological responses.

  2. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate down-regulates Na,K-ATPase independent of its protein kinase C site: decrease in basolateral cell surface area.

    PubMed Central

    Beron, J; Forster, I; Beguin, P; Geering, K; Verrey, F

    1997-01-01

    The effect of protein kinase C (PKC) stimulation on the pump current (Ip) generated by the Na,K-ATPase was measured in A6 epithelia apically permeabilized with amphotericin B. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) produced a decrease in Ip carried by sodium pumps containing the endogenous Xenopus laevis or transfected Bufo marinus alpha 1 subunits (approximately 30% reduction within 25 min, maximum after 40 min) independent of the PKC phosphorylation site (T15A/S16A). In addition to this major effect of PMA, which was independent of the intracellular sodium concentration and was prevented by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X (BIM), another BIM-resistant, PKC site-independent decrease was observed when the Ip was measured at low sodium concentrations (total reduction approximately 50% at 5 mM sodium). Using ouabain binding and cell surface biotinylation, stimulation of PKC was shown to reduce surface Na,K-ATPase by 14 to 20% within 25 min. The same treatment stimulated fluid phase endocytosis sevenfold and decreased by 16.5% the basolateral cell surface area measured by transepithelial capacitance measurements. In conclusion, PKC stimulation produces a decrease in sodium pump function which can be attributed, to a large extent, to a withdrawal of sodium pumps from the basolateral cell surface independent of their PKC site. This reduction of the number of sodium pumps is parallel to a decrease in basolateral membrane area. Images PMID:9188092

  3. Neutral endopeptidase promotes phorbol ester-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells by inhibiting neuropeptide-induced protein kinase C delta degradation.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, M; Shen, R; Goldberg, J S; Dai, J; Navarro, D; Nanus, D M

    2000-12-01

    Phorbol esters induce apoptosis in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells, which express neutral endopeptidase (NEP), but not in androgen-independent prostate cancer (PC) cells, which lack NEP expression. We investigated the role of NEP in PC cell susceptibility to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Western analysis showed that expression of NEP and protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta) correlated with PC cell sensitivity to TPA-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in LNCaP cells and in TSU-Prl cells expressing an inducible wild-type NEP protein. Inhibition of NEP enzyme activity using the specific NEP inhibitor CGS24592, or inhibition of PKCdelta using Rottlerin at concentrations that inhibit PKCdelta but not PKCalpha, significantly inhibited TPA-induced growth inhibition and cell death. Furthermore, pulse-chase experiments showed PKCdelta is stabilized in LNCaP cells and in TSU-Pr1 cells overexpressing wild-type NEP compared with PC cells lacking NEP expression. This results from NEP inactivation of its neuropeptide substrates (bombesin and endothelin-1), which in the absence of NEP stimulate cSrc kinase activity and induce rapid degradation of PKCdelta protein. These results indicate that expression of enzymatically active NEP by PC cells is necessary for TPA-induced apoptosis, and that NEP inhibits neuropeptide-induced, cSrc-mediated PKCdelta degradation.

  4. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Estefania P.; Rochael, Natalia C.; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S.; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Palhano, Fernando L.; Foguel, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  5. Inhibitory effect of citrus nobiletin on phorbol ester-induced skin inflammation, oxidative stress, and tumor promotion in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Nakamura, Y; Torikai, K; Tanaka, T; Koshiba, T; Koshimizu, K; Kuwahara, S; Takahashi, Y; Ogawa, K; Yano, M; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H; Mimaki, Y; Sashida, Y; Kitanaka, S; Ohigashi, H

    2000-09-15

    The intake of citrus fruits has been suggested as a way to prevent the development of some types of human cancer. Nitric oxide (NO) is closely associated with the processes of epithelial carcinogenesis. We attempted a search for NO generation inhibitors in Citrus unshiu. The active constituent was traced by an activity-guiding separation. NO and superoxide (O2-) generation was induced by a combination of lipopolysaccharide and IFN-gamma in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, and by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in differentiated human promyelocyte HL-60, respectively. Expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 proteins were detected by Western blotting. The in vivo anti-inflammatory and antitumor promoting activities were evaluated by topical TPA application to ICR mouse skin with measurement of edema formation, epidermal thickness, leukocyte infiltration, hydrogen peroxide production, and the rate of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-stained cells. As a result, nobiletin, a polymethoxyflavonoid, was identified as an inhibitor of both NO and O2- generation. Nobiletin significantly inhibited two distinct stages of skin inflammation induced by double TPA application [first stage priming (leukocyte infiltration) and second stage activation (oxidative insult by leukocytes)] by decreasing the inflammatory parameters. It also suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase proteins and prostaglandin E2 release. Nobiletin inhibited dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (0.19 micromol)/TPA (1.6 nmol)-induced skin tumor formation at doses of 160 and 320 nmol by reducing the number of tumors per mouse by 61.2% (P < 0.001) and 75.7% (P < 0.001), respectively. The present study suggests that nobiletin is a functionally novel and possible chemopreventive agent in inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2more » (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.« less

  7. Involvement of the antioxidative property of morusin in blocking phorbol ester-induced malignant transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pai-Shan; Hu, Chao-Chin; Wang, Chau-Jong; Lee, Yean-Jang; Chung, Wei-Chia; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa

    2017-02-25

    Chemoprevention has been acknowledged as an important and practical strategy for managing cancer. We have previously synthesized morusin, a prenylated flavonoid that exhibits anti-cancer progression activity. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-cancer promotion potential of morusin by using the mouse epidermal JB6 P + cell model. Extensive evidence shows that tumor promotion by phorbol esters is due to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the effect of morusin on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ROS production was assessed. Noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin were found to dose-dependently reduce TPA-induced ROS production. Moreover, morusin inhibited TPA-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, which can mediate cell proliferation and malignant transformation. Furthermore, morusin inhibited the TPA upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which may be regulated by AP-1 and NF-κB. In addition, noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin reduced the TPA-promoted cell growth of JB6 P + cells and inhibited TPA-induced malignant properties, such as cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell migration of JB6 P + cells. Similar to the effects of glutathione (GSH) pretreatment, morusin inhibited TPA-induced expression of N-cadeherin and vimentin, which are malignant cell surface proteins. Finally, morusin treatment dose-dependently suppressed the TPA-induced anchorage-independent cell transformation of JB6 P + cells. In conclusion, our results evidence that morusin possesses anti-cancer promotion potential because of its antioxidant property, which mediates multiple transformation-associated gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Conventional Cytogenetics Using CpG Oligonucleotide in Combination with Pokeweed Mitogen and Phorbol Myristate Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Natarajan; Breidenbach, Heather; Andritsos, Leslie; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Ramanunni, Asha; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C.; Heerema, Nyla A.

    2011-01-01

    Reproducible cytogenetic analysis in CLL has been limited by the inability to obtain reliable metaphase cells for analysis. CpG oligonucleotide and cytokine stimulation have been shown to improve metaphase analysis of CLL cytogenetic abnormalities, but is limited by variability in the cytokine receptor levels, stability and biological activity of the cytokine in culture conditions and high costs associated with these reagents. We report here use of a novel, stable CpG, GNKG168 along with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for conventional cytogenetic assessment in CLL. We demonstrate that the combined use of GNKG168+PWM/PMA increased the sensitivity of detection of chromosomal abnormalities compared to PWM/PMA (n=207, odds ratio=2.2, p=0.0002) and GNKG168 (n=219, odds ratio=1.5, p=0.0452). Further, a significant increase in sensitivity to detect complexity ≥3 with GNKG168+PWM/PMA compared to GNKG168 alone (odds ratio 8.0, p=0.0022) or PWM/PMA alone (odds ratio 9.6, p=0.0007) was observed. The trend toward detection of higher complexity was significantly greater with GNKG168+PWM/PMA compared to GNKG168 alone (p=0.0412). The increased sensitivity was mainly attributed to the addition of PWM/PMA with GNKG168 because GNKG168 alone showed no difference in sensitivity for detection of complex abnormalities (p=0.17). Comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results with karyotypic results showed a high degree of consistency, although some complex karyotypes were present in cases with no adverse FISH abnormality. These studies provide evidence for potential use of GNKG168 in combination with PWM and PMA in karyotypic analysis of CLL patient samples to better identify chromosomal abnormalities for risk stratification. PMID:21494579

  9. Dexamethasone potently enhances phorbol ester-induced IL-1beta gene expression and nuclear factor NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhang, J J; Dai, W; Lei, K Y; Pike, J W

    1997-07-15

    The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, an immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agent, was investigated for its effect on PMA-mediated expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in the human monocytic leukemic cell line THP-1. PMA alone induced the production of low levels of IL-1beta in THP-1 cells, whereas dexamethasone alone had no effect. However, dexamethasone potently enhanced PMA-mediated IL-1beta production. Using a selective and potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, we found that synergistic interaction between PMA and dexamethasone requires protein kinase C activation. PMA has been known to activate nuclear factor NF-kappaB in THP-1 cells. Using an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to an NF-kappaB DNA-binding motif of the IL-1beta gene promoter in gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that PMA-induced NF-kappaB activation was greatly potentiated by dexamethasone. Our results indicate that glucocorticoids can be positive regulators of inflammatory cytokine gene expression during monocytic cell differentiation.

  10. Regulation of synthesis and activity of NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) by dexamethasone and phorbol ester in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, C.Q.; Ensor, C.M.; Tai, H.H.

    1991-06-28

    Dexamethasone stimulated 15-PGDH activity in HEL cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. Increase in 15-PGDH activity by dexamethasone was found to be accompanied by an increase in enzyme synthesis as revealed by Western blot and (35S)methionine labeling studies. In addition to dexamethasone, other anti-inflammatory steroids also increased 15-PGDH activity in the order of their glucocorticoid activity. Among sex steroids only progesterone increased significantly 15-PGDH activity. 12-0-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also induced the synthesis of 15-PGDH but inhibited the enzyme activity. It appears that TPA caused a time dependent inactivation of 15-PGDH by a protein kinase C mediated mechanism.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, temsirolimus and torin 1, attenuate stemness-associated properties and expression of mesenchymal markers promoted by phorbol-myristate-acetate and oncostatin-M in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chandrika, Goparaju; Natesh, Kumar; Ranade, Deepak; Chugh, Ashish; Shastry, Padma

    2017-03-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway is crucial for tumor survival, proliferation, and progression, making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In glioblastoma, activated mammalian target of rapamycin promotes invasive phenotype and correlates with poor patient survival. A wide range of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are currently being evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity in various tumor types but are not explored sufficiently for controlling tumor invasion and recurrence. We recently reported that mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors-rapamycin, temsirolimus, torin 1, and PP242-suppressed invasion and migration promoted by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and phorbol-myristate-acetate in glioblastoma cells. As aggressive invasion and migration of tumors are associated with mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties, this study aimed to examine the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors on these features in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that temsirolimus and torin 1 effectively reduced the constitutive as well as phorbol-myristate-acetate/oncostatin-M-induced expression of mesenchymal markers (fibronectin, vimentin, and YKL40) and neural stem cell markers (Sox2, Oct4, nestin, and mushashi1). The inhibitors significantly abrogated the neurosphere-forming capacity induced by phorbol-myristate-acetate and oncostatin-M. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the drugs dephosphorylated signal transducer and activator transcription factor 3, a major regulator of mesenchymal and neural stem cell markers implicating the role of signal transducer and activator transcription factor 3 in the inhibitory action of these drugs. The findings demonstrate the potential of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as "stemness-inhibiting drugs" and a promising therapeutic approach to target glioma stem cells.

  12. Functional characterization of the Hyles euphorbiae hawkmoth transcriptome reveals strong expression of phorbol ester detoxification and seasonal cold hardiness genes.

    PubMed

    Barth, M Benjamin; Buchwalder, Katja; Kawahara, Akito Y; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Shanlin; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Björn; Horres, Ralf; Hundsdoerfer, Anna K

    2018-01-01

    The European spurge hawkmoth, Hyles euphorbiae (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae), has been intensively studied as a model organism for insect chemical ecology, cold hardiness and evolution of species delineation. To understand species isolation mechanisms at a molecular level, this study aims at determining genetic factors underlying two adaptive ecological trait candidates, phorbol ester (TPA) detoxification and seasonal cold acclimation. A draft transcriptome of H. euphorbiae was generated using Illumina sequencing, providing the first genomic resource for the hawkmoth subfamily Macroglossinae. RNA expression levels in tissues of experimental TPA feeding larvae and cooled pupae was compared to levels in control larvae and pupae using 26 bp RNA sequence tag libraries (DeepSuperSAGE). Differential gene expression was assessed by homology searches of the tags in the transcriptome. In total, 389 and 605 differentially expressed transcripts for detoxification and cold hardiness, respectively, could be identified and annotated with proteins. The majority (22 of 28) of differentially expressed detox transcripts of the four 'drug metabolism' enzyme groups (cytochrome P450 (CYP), carboxylesterases (CES), glutathione S-transferases (GST) and lipases) are up-regulated. Triacylglycerol lipase was significantly over proportionally annotated among up-regulated detox transcripts. We record several up-regulated lipases, GSTe2, two CESs, CYP9A21, CYP6BD6 and CYP9A17 as candidate genes for further H. euphorbiae TPA detoxification analyses. Differential gene expression of the cold acclimation treatment is marked by metabolic depression with enriched Gene Ontology terms among down-regulated transcripts almost exclusively comprising metabolism, aerobic respiration and dissimilative functions. Down-regulated transcripts include energy expensive respiratory proteins like NADH dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase and ATP synthase. Gene expression patterns show shifts in carbohydrate

  13. The Croton megalobotrys Müll Arg. traditional medicine in HIV/AIDS management: Documentation of patient use, in vitro activation of latent HIV-1 provirus, and isolation of active phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Ian; Ngwenya, Barbara N; Fotso, Ghislain; Williams, David E; Simonambango, Sundana; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Andersen, Raymond J; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin

    2018-01-30

    Current HIV therapies do not act on latent cellular HIV reservoirs; hence they are not curative. While experimental latency reversal agents (LRAs) can promote HIV expression in these cells, thereby exposing them to immune recognition, existing LRAs exhibit limited clinical efficacy and high toxicity. We previously described a traditional 3-step medicinal plant regimen used for HIV/AIDS management in Northern Botswana that inhibits HIV replication in vitro. Here we describe use of one component of the regimen that additionally contains novel phorbol esters possessing HIV latency-reversal properties. We sought to document experiences of traditional medicine users, assess the ability of traditional medicine components to reverse HIV latency in vitro, and identify pure compounds that conferred these activities. Experiences of two HIV-positive traditional medicine users (patients) were documented using qualitative interview techniques. Latency reversal activity was assessed using a cell-based model (J-Lat, clone 9.2). Crude plant extracts were fractionated by open column chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Compound structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Patients using the 3-step regimen reported improved health over several years despite no reported use of standard HIV therapies. Crude extracts from Croton megalobotrys Müll Arg. ("Mukungulu"), the third component of the 3-step regimen, induced HIV expression in J-lat cells to levels comparable to the known LRA prostratin. Co-incubation with known LRAs and pharmacological inhibitors indicated that the active agent(s) in C. megalobotrys were likely to be protein kinase C (PKC) activator(s). Consistent with these results, two novel phorbol esters (Namushen 1 and 2) were isolated as abundant components of C. megalobotrys and were sufficient to confer HIV latency reversal in vitro. We have identified novel LRAs of the phorbol ester class from a medicinal plant used in HIV/AIDS management

  14. Structural and functional analysis of an enhancer GPEI having a phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate 13-acetate responsive element-like sequence found in the rat glutathione transferase P gene.

    PubMed

    Okuda, A; Imagawa, M; Maeda, Y; Sakai, M; Muramatsu, M

    1989-10-05

    We have recently identified a typical enhancer, termed GPEI, located about 2.5 kilobases upstream from the transcription initiation site of the rat glutathione transferase P gene. Analyses of 5' and 3' deletion mutants revealed that the cis-acting sequence of GPEI contained the phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate 13-acetate responsive element (TRE)-like sequence in it. For the maximal activity, however, GPEI required an adjacent upstream sequence of about 19 base pairs in addition to the TRE-like sequence. With the DNA binding gel-shift assay, we could detect protein(s) that specifically binds to the TRE-like sequence of GPEI fragment, which was possibly c-jun.c-fos complex or a similar protein complex. The sequence immediately upstream of the TRE-like sequence did not have any activity by itself, but augmented the latter activity by about 5-fold.

  15. The stimulation of superoxide anion production in guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils by phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan and IgG2-containing soluble immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, M A; Leslie, R G; Reeves, W G

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of superoxide anion production in guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils were determined following in vitro stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonized zymosan (OZ) and soluble immune complexes of guinea-pig IgG2 (SIC). Superoxide production was recorded as chemiluminescence (CL) arising from the reductive cleavage of lucigenin. With PMA, both macrophages and neutrophils displayed a two-phase response consisting of a rapid initial burst of CL, which preceded ligand ingestion, followed by a plateau in the CL response which persisted for more than 30 min. By contrast, OZ induced a slow progressive increase in CL in both phagocytes which was consistent with the development of an oxidative burst concomitant with ingestion. The phagocytes differed in their responses to SIC, the macrophages displaying CL kinetics similar to those observed with PMA, whereas the neutrophils responded in the manner observed with OZ. The relationship between disparity in the patterns of macrophage and neutrophil CL responses to SIC and differences in their expression of Fc receptors for IgG2 (Coupland & Leslie, 1983) is discussed. PMID:6299935

  16. NOX5 in Human Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Musset, Boris; Clark, Robert A.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Petheo, Gabor L.; Geiszt, Miklos; Chen, Yumin; Cornell, John E.; Eddy, Carlton A.; Brzyski, Robert G.; El Jamali, Amina

    2012-01-01

    Physiological and pathological processes in spermatozoa involve the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the identity of the ROS-producing enzyme system(s) remains a matter of speculation. We provide the first evidence that NOX5 NADPH oxidase is expressed and functions in human spermatozoa. Immunofluorescence microscopy detected NOX5 protein in both the flagella/neck region and the acrosome. Functionally, spermatozoa exposed to calcium ionophore, phorbol ester, or H2O2 exhibited superoxide anion production, which was blocked by addition of superoxide dismutase, a Ca2+ chelator, or inhibitors of either flavoprotein oxidases (diphenylene iododonium) or NOX enzymes (GKT136901). Consistent with our previous overexpression studies, we found that H2O2-induced superoxide production by primary sperm cells was mediated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. Moreover, the HV1 proton channel, which was recently implicated in spermatozoa motility, was required for optimal superoxide production by spermatozoa. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested an interaction among NOX5, c-Abl, and HV1. H2O2 treatment increased the proportion of motile sperm in a NOX5-dependent manner. Statistical analyses showed a pH-dependent correlation between superoxide production and enhanced sperm motility. Collectively, our findings show that NOX5 is a major source of ROS in human spermatozoa and indicate a role for NOX5-dependent ROS generation in human spermatozoa motility. PMID:22291013

  17. Number of Hydroxyl Groups on the B-Ring of Flavonoids Affects Their Antioxidant Activity and Interaction with Phorbol Ester Binding Site of PKCδ C1B Domain: In Vitro and in Silico Studies.

    PubMed

    Kongpichitchoke, Teeradate; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2015-05-13

    Although flavonoids have been reported for their benefits and nutraceutical potential use, the importance of their structure on their beneficial effects, especially on signal transduction mechanisms, has not been well clarified. In this study, three flavonoids, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol, were chosen to determine the effect of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of flavonoid structure on their antioxidant activity. In vitro assays, including DPPH scavenging activity, ROS quantification by flow cytometer, and proteins immunoblotting, and in silico analysis by molecular docking between the flavonoids and C1B domain of PKCδ phorbol ester binding site were both used to complete this study. Eriodictyol (10 μM), containing two hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, exhibited significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant activity than pinocembrin and naringenin. The IC50 values of eriodictyol, naringenin, and pinocembrin were 17.4 ± 0.40, 30.2 ± 0.61, and 44.9 ± 0.57 μM, respectively. In addition, eriodictyol at 10 μM remarkably inhibited the phosphorylation of PKCδ at 63.4% compared with PMA-activated RAW264.7, whereas pinocembrin and naringenin performed inhibition activity at 76.8 and 72.6%, respectively. According to the molecular docking analysis, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol showed -CDOCKER_energy values of 15.22, 16.95, and 21.49, respectively, reflecting that eriodictyol could bind with the binding site better than the other two flavonoids. Interestingly, eriodictyol had a remarkably different pose to bind with the kinase as a result of the two hydroxyl groups on its B-ring, which consequently contributed to greater antioxidant activity over pinocembrin and naringenin.

  18. Suppressed PHA Activation of T Lymphocytes in Simulated Microgravity Is Restored by Direct Activation of Protein Kinase C with Phorbol Ester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pellis, Neal R.

    1997-01-01

    Various aspects of spaceflight, including microgravity, cosmic radiation, and physiological stress, may perturb immune function. We sought to understand the impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. We utilized clinostatic RWV bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity to analyze the response of human PBMC to polyclonal activation. PHA responsiveness in the RWV was almost completely diminished. IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion was reduced whereas IL- 1 beta and IL-6 secretion was increased, suggesting that monocytes may not be as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Activation marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD71) was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, addition of exogenous IL-2 to these cultures did not restore proliferation. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness. However, PHA activation in Teflon culture bags that limit cell-substratum interactions did not suppress PHA activation. Furthermore, increasing cell density and, therefore, cell-cell interactions in the RWV cultures did not help restore PHA activation. However, placing PBMC within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. Activation of both PBMC and purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture, indicating that signaling mechanisms downstream of PKC activation and calcium flux are not sensitive to simulated microgravity. Furthermore, submitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus, our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  19. Expression of the transforming growth factor alpha protooncogene in differentiating human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells.

    PubMed

    Walz, T M; Malm, C; Wasteson, A

    1993-01-01

    The process of myeloid differentiation in human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) is accompanied by the coordinate expression of numerous protooncogenes. To investigate the expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in myeloid differentiation, HL-60 cells were induced to differentiate into granulocytes with 1.25% dimethyl sulfoxide, 0.2 microM all-trans retinoic acid, or 500 microM N6,O2-dibutyryladenosine-3'5'-cyclic monophosphate or differentiated along the monocyte/macrophage pathway with 0.1 microM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Using Northern blot analyses, TGF-alpha transcripts were detected within 24 h of treatment in cells differentiating toward granulocytes; maximal levels of gene expression were reached after 3 days or later and remained essentially constant throughout the observation period. These cells released TGF-alpha protein, as demonstrated by analysis of the incubation medium. In contrast, no TGF-alpha RNA or protein was detectable in HL-60 cell cultures when induced with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Epidermal growth factor receptor transcripts could not be detected either in undifferentiated or in differentiated HL-60 cells; therefore it appears as if an autocrine loop involving TGF-alpha in HL-60 cells is unlikely. In conclusion, the results demonstrate, for the first time, the expression of TGF-alpha in human granulocyte precursor cells. Our findings may indicate novel regulatory pathways in hematopoiesis.

  20. Analysis of leukotriene B4 metabolism in human promyelocytic HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Kasimir, S; Schönfeld, W; Hilger, R A; König, W

    1991-10-01

    We previously reported that human alveolar macrophages rapidly metabolize the chemotactic active lipid mediator leukotriene B4 (LTB4) into the dihydro-LTB4 by reduction of one of the conjugated double bonds. We herein report that human HL-60 cells (a myeloid precursor which can be differentiated into granulocyte- as well as monocyte-like cells by dimethyl sulphoxide or phorbol myristate acetate) express a highly active LTB4 reductase in the undifferentiated state. Differentiation by dimethyl sulphoxide (1.3%) along the granulocyte lineage, as confirmed by light microscopy, conversion of NitroBlue Tetrazolium into formazan, failed to induce a substantial capacity for omega-oxidation of LTB4; this reaction is exclusively found in mature granulocytes. Studies with the cell homogenate of undifferentiated HL-60 cells indicated that the activity of the enzyme depends on the presence of NADPH, Ca2+ and Mg2+, with a pH optimum of 7.5 at 37 degrees C. The enzyme was not released into the supernatant after stimulation of HL-60 cells with phorbol myristate acetate (100 ng) or Ca2+ ionophore (7.5 microM). Subcellular fractionation revealed evidence that the LTB4 reductase is located within the membrane fraction. Purification of the enzyme by gel filtration and gel electrophoresis suggests an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa.

  1. Parallel human genome analysis: microarray-based expression monitoring of 1000 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schena, M; Shalon, D; Heller, R; Chai, A; Brown, P O; Davis, R W

    1996-01-01

    Microarrays containing 1046 human cDNAs of unknown sequence were printed on glass with high-speed robotics. These 1.0-cm2 DNA "chips" were used to quantitatively monitor differential expression of the cognate human genes using a highly sensitive two-color hybridization assay. Array elements that displayed differential expression patterns under given experimental conditions were characterized by sequencing. The identification of known and novel heat shock and phorbol ester-regulated genes in human T cells demonstrates the sensitivity of the assay. Parallel gene analysis with microarrays provides a rapid and efficient method for large-scale human gene discovery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855227

  2. Ethanol inhibits thrombin-induced secretion by human platelets at a site distinct from phospholipase C or protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Benistant, C; Rubin, R

    1990-01-01

    Ethanol is known to inhibit the activation of platelets in response to several physiological agonists, but the mechanism of this action is unclear. The addition of physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (25-150 mM) to suspensions of washed human platelets resulted in the inhibition of thrombin-induced secretion of 5-hydroxy[14C]tryptamine. Indomethacin was included in the incubation buffer to prevent feedback amplification by arachidonic acid metabolites. Ethanol had no effect on the activation of phospholipase C by thrombin, as determined by the formation of inositol phosphates and the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Moreover, ethanol did not interfere with the thrombin-induced formation of diacylglycerol or phosphatidic acid. Stimulation of platelets with phorbol ester (5-50 nM) resulted in 5-hydroxy[14C]tryptamine release comparable with those with threshold doses of thrombin. However, ethanol did not inhibit phorbol-ester-induced secretion. Ethanol also did not interfere with thrombin- or phorbol-ester-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (20 kDa) or a 47 kDa protein, a known substrate for protein kinase C. By electron microscopy, ethanol had no effect on thrombin-induced shape change and pseudopod formation, but prevented granule centralization and fusion. The results indicate that ethanol does not inhibit platelet secretion by interfering with the activation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C or protein kinase C by thrombin. Rather, the data demonstrate an inhibition of a Ca2(+)-mediated event such as granule centralization. Images p495-a PMID:2117442

  3. AO 1535 inhibits O2- production by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, G; Messina, L; Malaguarnera, L; Arcidiacono, A; Giuffrida, M A; Guarniera, E; Geremia, E; Rastrelli, A; Messina, A

    1992-01-01

    AO 1535 is a semisynthetic monoglycosylceramide derived from O-glycosilated sphingosine, with a chemical structure similar to the glycolipids present in many mammalian tissues. In the epidermis monoglycosylceramides contribute to consolidate the structure of cutaneous layers. It has been recently shown that sphingosine and its derivatives are potent inhibitors of Protein kinase C, and block the 'respiratory burst' of phagocitic cells. In macrophages, like in neutrophils, the reactive oxygen intermediates are produced by a membrane associated enzymatic complex, NADPH-oxidase, which is activated by Protein kinase C. This study demonstrates that AO 1535 is able to inhibit the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in human monocytes and macrophages stimulated by phorbol ester and chemotactic tetrapeptide, suggesting a potential clinical application of AO 1535 in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses.

  4. Suppression of bactericidal activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, M; Maeda, K; Aono, M

    1990-01-01

    The direct effects of the culture supernatant of oral microorganisms on the bactericidal activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were investigated. The bactericidal activity of PMNs, which were preincubated with the supernatant of Bacteroides gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Bacteroides melaninogenicus or phosphate-buffered saline, was examined by counting the surviving bacteria. B. gingivalis-treated PMNs were found to have a diminished ability for killing bacteria in the presence or absence of serum. The chemiluminescence response of PMNs, which were preincubated with the culture supernatant of B. gingivalis, was strikingly reduced compared with that of PMNs preincubated with phosphate-buffered saline or other bacterial culture supernatants. The production of superoxide anion (O2-) by PMNs stimulated with either formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or phorbol myristate acetate was reduced in both cases after the PMNs were preincubated with the culture supernatant of B. gingivalis. However, it was observed that there was more reduction in superoxide anion (O2-) production stimulated with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine compared with that stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. These results suggest that B. gingivalis releases a factor which interferes with the bactericidal activity of PMNs by modulating the generation of reactive oxygen species. These suppressive effects on bactericidal activity may be important in the pathogenesis of this microorganism. PMID:2153632

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of zinc in PMA-treated human gingival fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Jeon, Sangmi; Hui, Zheng; Kim, Young; Im, Yeonggwan; Lim, Wonbong; Kim, Changsu; Choi, Hongran; Kim, Okjoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Abnormal cellular immune response has been considered to be responsible for oral lesions in recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Zinc has been known to be an essential nutrient metal that is necessary for a broad range of biological activities including antioxidant, immune mediator, and anti-inflammatory drugs in oral mucosal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of zinc in a phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-treated inflammatory model on human gingival fibroblast cells (hGFs). Study Design: Cells were pre-treated with zinc chloride, followed by PMA in hGFs. The effects were assessed on cell viability, cyclooxygenease-1,2(COX-1/2) protein expression, PGE2 release, ROS production and cytokine release, Results: The effects were assessed on cell viability, COX1/2 protein expression, PGE2 release, ROS production, cytokine release. The results showed that, in the presence of PMA, zinc treatment leads to reduce the production of ROS, which results in decrease of COX-2 expression and PGE2 release. Conclusions: Thus, we suggest that zinc treatment leads to the mitigation of oral inflammation and may prove to be an alternative treatment for recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Key words:Zinc, inflammatory response, cytokines, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, gingival fibroblasts cells. PMID:25662537

  6. Decursin and PDBu: two PKC activators distinctively acting in the megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Ahn, Kyung Seop; Han, Hogyu; Choung, Se Young; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Ik-Hwan

    2005-12-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of various cell types including normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) induces the megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 human erythroleukemia cells through PKC activation. Decursin, a pyranocoumarin from Angelica gigas, exhibits the cytotoxic effects on various human cancer cell lines and in vitro PKC activation. We report here the differences between two PKC activators, tumor-suppressing decursin and tumor-promoting PDBu, in their actions on the megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 cells. First of all, decursin inhibited PDBu-induced bleb formation in K562 cells. Decursin also inhibited the PDBu-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 cells that is characterized by an increase in substrate adhesion, the secretion of granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the surface expression of integrin beta3. The binding of PDBu to PKC was competitively inhibited by decursin. Decursin induced the more rapid down-regulation of PKC alpha and betaII isozymes than that induced by PDBu in K562 cells. Unlike PDBu, decursin promoted the translocation of PKC alpha and betaII to the nuclear membrane. Decursin-induced faster down-regulation and nuclear translocation of PKC alpha and betaII were not affected by the presence of PDBu. All these results indicate that decursin and phorbol ester are PKC activators distinctively acting in megakaryocytic differentiation and PKC modulation in K562 leukemia cells.

  7. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I tax regulates the expression of the human lymphotoxin gene.

    PubMed

    Tschachler, E; Böhnlein, E; Felzmann, S; Reitz, M S

    1993-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I)-infected T-cell lines constitutively produce high levels of lymphotoxin (LT). To analyze the mechanisms that lead to the expression of LT in HTLV-I-infected cell lines, we studied regulatory regions of the human LT promoter involved in the activation of the human LT gene. As determined by deletional analysis, sequences between +137 and -116 (relative to the transcription initiation site) are sufficient to direct expression of a reporter gene in the HTLV-I-infected cell line MT-2. Site-directed mutation of a of the single kappa B-like motif present in the LT promoter region (positions -99 to -89) completely abrogated LT promoter activity in MT-2 cells, suggesting that this site plays a critical role in the activation of the human LT gene. Transfection of LT constructs into HTLV-I-uninfected and -unstimulated Jurkat and U937 cell lines showed little to no activity of the LT promoter. Cotransfection of the same constructs with a tax expression plasmid into Jurkat cells led to detectable promoter activity, which could be significantly increased by stimulation of the cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Similarly, cotransfection of the LT promoter constructs and the tax expression plasmid into U937 cells led to significant promoter activity upon stimulation with PMA. These data suggest that HTLV-I tax is involved in the upregulation of LT gene expression in HTLV-I-infected cells.

  8. Functional TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Che, Hui; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Sun, Hai-Ying; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The cellular physiology and biology of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells has not been extensively characterized and remains an area of active research. This study investigates the functional expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) and possible roles for this ion channel in regulating proliferation and migration of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. We found that genes coding for TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels and their proteins are significantly expressed in human c-kit(+) cardiac stem cells. Probenecid, an activator of TRPV2, induced an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) i ), an effect that may be attenuated or abolished by the TRPV2 blocker ruthenium red. The TRPV4 channel activator 4α-phorbol 12-13-dicaprinate induced Ca(2+) i oscillations, which can be inhibited by the TRPV4 blocker RN-1734. The alteration of Ca(2+) i by probenecid or 4α-phorbol 12-13-dicprinate was dramatically inhibited in cells infected with TRPV2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or TRPV4 shRNA. Silencing TRPV2, but not TRPV4, significantly reduced cell proliferation by arresting cells at the G0/G1 boundary of the cell cycle. Cell migration was reduced by silencing TRPV2 or TRPV4. Western blot revealed that silencing TRPV2 decreased expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, pERK1/2 and pAkt, whereas silencing TRPV4 only reduced pAkt expression. Our results demonstrate for the first time that functional TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels are abundantly expressed in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. TRPV2 channels, but not TRPV4 channels, participate in regulating cell cycle progression; moreover, both TRPV2 and TRPV4 are involved in migration of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Expression and regulation of complement C1q by human THP-1-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker, D G

    1998-01-01

    The regulation of C1q expression was examined in the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Since these cells can be differentiated into cells with macrophage properties and induced to express C1q, they were used as models for mature human monocyte/macrophages and indirectly microglia. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and the anti-inflammatory steroid agents dexamethasone and prednisone were powerful stimulators of C1q production, alone or in combination. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) also had significant stimulatory activity. Phorbol myristate acetate, a protein kinase C activator, reduced C1q expression. Four additional classes of pharmacological agents were tested for their effect on C1q secretion. Tacrine, but not indomethacin, cimetidine, or propentofylline, showed activity in inhibiting C1q secretion by IFN-gamma treated THP-1-derived macrophages.

  10. [Apoptosis of human leukemic cells induced by topoisomerase I and II inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Solary, E; Dubrez, L; Eymin, B; Bertrand, R; Pommier, Y

    1996-03-01

    Comparison between five human leukemic lines (BV173, HL60, U937, K562, KCL22) suggest that the main determinant of their sensitivity to topoisomerase I (camptothecin) and II (VP-16) inhibitors is their ability to regulate cell cycle progression in response to specific DNA damage, then to die through apoptosis: the more the cells inhibit cell cycle progression, the less sensitive they are. The final pathway of apoptosis induction involves a cytoplasmic signal, active at neutral pH, needing magnesium, sensitive to various protease inhibitors and activated directly by staurosporine. Modulators of intracellular signaling (calcium chelators, calmodulin inhibitors, PKC modulators, kinase and phosphatase inhibitors) have no significant influence upon apoptosis induction. Conversely, apoptosis induction pathway is modified during monocytic differentiation of HL60 cells induced by phorbol esters. Lastly, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and chromatine structure should regulate apoptotic DNA fragmentation that is prevented by 3-aminobenzamide and spermine, respectively.

  11. Activin-A as an intraovarian modulator: actions, localization, and regulation of the intact dimer in human ovarian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, J; Spencer, S J; Doldi, N; Goldsmith, P C; Schwall, R; Jaffe, R B

    1992-01-01

    The actions, localization, and regulation of activin in the human ovary are unknown. Therefore, the aims of this study were (a) to define the effects of recombinant activin-A and its structural homologue, inhibin-A, on mitogenesis and steroidogenesis (progesterone secretion and aromatase activity) in human preovulatory follicular cells; (b) to localize the activin-A dimer in the human ovary by immunohistochemistry; and (c) to examine regulation of intracellular activin-A production in cultured human follicular cells. In addition to stimulating mitogenic activity, activin-A causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of basal and gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion and aromatase activity in human luteinizing follicular cells on day 2 and day 4 of culture. Inhibin-A exerts no effects on mitogenesis, basal or gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion and aromatase activity, and does not alter effects observed with activin-A alone. Immunostaining for dimeric activin-A occurs in granulosa and cumulus cells of human ovarian follicles and in granulosa-lutein cells of the human corpus luteum. cAMP, and to a lesser degree human chorionic gonadotropin and follicle-stimulating hormone, but not inhibin-A, activin-A, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, increased the immunostaining for activin-A in cultured granulosa cells. These results indicate that activin-A may function as an autocrine or paracrine regulator of follicular function in the human ovary. Images PMID:1569191

  12. Csa-19, a radiation-responsive human gene, identified by an unbiased two-gel cDNA library screening method in human cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Meltzer, S. J.; Han, L. H.; Zhang, X. F.; Shi, Z. M.; Harrison, G. H.; Abraham, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was used to identify candidate genes whose expression is altered in cancer cells by ionizing radiation. Transcriptional induction of randomly selected genes in control versus irradiated human HL60 cells was compared. Among several complementary DNA (cDNA) clones recovered by this approach, one cDNA clone (CL68-5) was downregulated in X-irradiated HL60 cells but unaffected by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, forskolin, or cyclosporin-A. DNA sequencing of the CL68-5 cDNA revealed 100% nucleotide sequence homology to the reported human Csa-19 gene. Northern blot analysis of RNA from control and irradiated cells revealed the expression of a single 0.7-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. This 0.7-kb Csa-19 mRNA transcript was also expressed in a variety of human adult and corresponding fetal normal tissues. Moreover, when the effect of X- or fission neutron-irradiation on Csa-19 mRNA was compared in cultured human cells differing in p53 gene status (p53-/- versus p53+/+), downregulation of Csa-19 by X-rays or fission neutrons was similar in p53-wild type and p53-null cell lines. Our results provide the first known example of a radiation-responsive gene in human cancer cells whose expression is not associated with p53, adenylate cyclase or protein kinase C.

  13. Characterization of 5' end of human thromboxane receptor gene. Organizational analysis and mapping of protein kinase C--responsive elements regulating expression in platelets.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, D D; Davis, M G; Houser, W A; Eubank, J J; Ritchie, M E; Dorn, G W

    1995-09-01

    Platelet thromboxane receptors are acutely and reversibly upregulated after acute myocardial infarction. To determine if platelet thromboxane receptors are under transcriptional control, we isolated and characterized human genomic DNA clones containing the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene. The exon-intron structure of the 5' portion of the thromboxane receptor gene was determined initially by comparing the nucleotide sequence of the 5' flanking genomic clone with that of a novel human uterine thromboxane receptor cDNA that extended the mRNA 141 bp further upstream than the previously identified human placental cDNA. A major transcription initiation site was located in three human tissues approximately 560 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon and 380 bp upstream from any previously identified transcription initiation site. The thromboxane receptor gene has neither a TATA nor a CAAT consensus site. Promoter function of the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene was evaluated by transfection of thromboxane receptor gene promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) chimera plasmids into platelet-like K562 cells. Thromboxane receptor promoter activity, as assessed by CAT expression, was relatively weak but was significantly enhanced by phorbol ester treatment. Functional analysis of 5' deletion constructs in transfected K562 cells and gel mobility shift localized the major phorbol ester-responsive motifs in the thromboxane receptor gene promoter to a cluster of activator protein-2 (AP-2) binding consensus sites located approximately 1.8 kb 5' from the transcription initiation site. These studies are the first to determine the structure and organization of the 5' end of the thromboxane receptor gene and demonstrate that thromboxane receptor gene expression can be regulated by activation of protein kinase C via induction of an AP-2-like nuclear factor binding to upstream promoter elements. These findings strongly suggest

  14. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes and negatively regulates the maturation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors and cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jiangnan, E-mail: xuejinagnan@263.net; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Haiya

    Research highlights: {yields} LAIR-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes from an early stage. {yields} Up-regulation of LAIR-1 negatively regulates megakaryocytic differentiation of cell line. {yields} LAIR-1 negatively regulates the differentiation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors. -- Abstract: Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is an inhibitory collagen receptor which belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Although the inhibitory function of LAIR-1 has been extensively described in multiple leukocytes, its role in megakaryocyte (MK) has not been explored so far. Here, we show that LAIR-1 is expressed on human bone marrow CD34{sup +}CD41a{sup +} and CD41a{sup +}CD42b{sup +} cells. LAIR-1 is also detectable inmore » a fraction of human cord blood CD34{sup +} cell-derived MK that has morphological characteristics of immature MK. In megakaryoblastic cell line Dami, the membrane protein expression of LAIR-1 is up-regulated significantly when cells are treated with phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Furthermore, cross-linking of LAIR-1 in Dami cells with its natural ligand or anti-LAIR-1 antibody leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and PMA-promoted differentiation when examined by the MK lineage-specific markers (CD41a and CD42b) and polyploidization. In addition, we also observed that cross-linking of LAIR-1 results in decreased MK generation from primary human CD34{sup +} cells cultured in a cytokines cocktail that contains TPO. These results suggest that LAIR-1 is a likely candidate for an early marker of MK differentiation, and provide initial evidence indicating that LAIR-1 serves as a negative regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis.« less

  15. Mechanisms involved in the desflurane-induced post-conditioning of isolated human right atria from patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, S; Zhu, L; Buléon, C; Massetti, M; Gérard, J-L; Galera, P; Hanouz, J-L

    2011-10-01

    Desflurane triggers post-conditioning in the diabetic human myocardium. We determined whether protein kinase C (PKC), mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (mitoK(ATP)) channels, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were involved in the in vitro desflurane-induced post-conditioning of human myocardium from patients with type 2 diabetes. The isometric force of contraction (FoC) of human right atrial trabeculae obtained from patients with type 2 diabetes was recorded during 30 min of hypoxia followed by 60 min of reoxygenation. Desflurane (6%) was administered during the first 5 min of reoxygenation either alone or in the presence of calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) or 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) (mitoK(ATP) channel antagonist). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PKC activator) and diazoxide (a mitoK(ATP) channel opener) were superfused during early reoxygenation. The FoC at the end of the 60 min reoxygenation period was compared among treatment groups (FoC(60); mean and sd). The phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β was studied using western blotting. Desflurane enhanced the recovery of force [FoC(60): 79 (3)% of baseline] after 60 min of reoxygenation when compared with the control group (P>0.0001). Calphostin C and 5-HD abolished the beneficial effect of desflurane-induced post-conditioning (both P<0.0001). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and diazoxide enhanced the FoC(60) when compared with the control group (both P<0.0001). Desflurane increased the level of phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β (P<0.0001). Desflurane-induced post-conditioning in human myocardium from patients with type 2 diabetes was mediated by the activation of PKC, the opening of the mitoK(ATP) channels, and the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β.

  16. Activation of human herpesvirus replication by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Alka; Remick, Jill; Zeichner, Steven L

    2013-10-01

    A central feature of herpesvirus biology is the ability of herpesviruses to remain latent within host cells. Classically, exposure to inducing agents, like activating cytokines or phorbol esters that stimulate host cell signal transduction events, and epigenetic agents (e.g., butyrate) was thought to end latency. We recently showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, or human herpesvirus-8 [HHV-8]) has another, alternative emergency escape replication pathway that is triggered when KSHV's host cell undergoes apoptosis, characterized by the lack of a requirement for the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein, accelerated late gene kinetics, and production of virus with decreased infectivity. Caspase-3 is necessary and sufficient to initiate the alternative replication program. HSV-1 was also recently shown to initiate replication in response to host cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that an alternative apoptosis-triggered replication program might be a general feature of herpesvirus biology and that apoptosis-initiated herpesvirus replication may have clinical implications, particularly for herpesviruses that almost universally infect humans. To explore whether an alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program is a common feature of herpesvirus biology, we studied cell lines latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus/HHV-4, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, HHV-7, and KSHV. We found that apoptosis triggers replication for each HHV studied, with caspase-3 being necessary and sufficient for HHV replication. An alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program appears to be a common feature of HHV biology. We also found that commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents activate HHV replication, which suggests that treatments that promote apoptosis may lead to activation of latent herpesviruses, with potential clinical significance.

  17. Activation of Human Herpesvirus Replication by Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Alka; Remick, Jill

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of herpesvirus biology is the ability of herpesviruses to remain latent within host cells. Classically, exposure to inducing agents, like activating cytokines or phorbol esters that stimulate host cell signal transduction events, and epigenetic agents (e.g., butyrate) was thought to end latency. We recently showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, or human herpesvirus-8 [HHV-8]) has another, alternative emergency escape replication pathway that is triggered when KSHV's host cell undergoes apoptosis, characterized by the lack of a requirement for the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein, accelerated late gene kinetics, and production of virus with decreased infectivity. Caspase-3 is necessary and sufficient to initiate the alternative replication program. HSV-1 was also recently shown to initiate replication in response to host cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that an alternative apoptosis-triggered replication program might be a general feature of herpesvirus biology and that apoptosis-initiated herpesvirus replication may have clinical implications, particularly for herpesviruses that almost universally infect humans. To explore whether an alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program is a common feature of herpesvirus biology, we studied cell lines latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus/HHV-4, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, HHV-7, and KSHV. We found that apoptosis triggers replication for each HHV studied, with caspase-3 being necessary and sufficient for HHV replication. An alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program appears to be a common feature of HHV biology. We also found that commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents activate HHV replication, which suggests that treatments that promote apoptosis may lead to activation of latent herpesviruses, with potential clinical significance. PMID:23885073

  18. Hypochlorous acid regulates neutrophil extracellular trap release in humans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, L J; Cooper, P R; Ling, M R; Wright, H J; Huissoon, A; Chapple, I L C

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) comprise extracellular chromatin and granule protein complexes that immobilize and kill bacteria. NET release represents a recently discovered, novel anti-microbial strategy regulated non-exclusively by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), particularly hydrogen peroxide. This study aimed to characterize the role of ROIs in the process of NET release and to identify the dominant ROI trigger. We employed various enzymes, inhibitors and ROIs to record their effect fluorometrically on in vitro NET release by human peripheral blood neutrophils. Treatment with exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) supported the established link between hydrogen peroxide and NET production. However, treatment with myeloperoxidase inhibitors and direct addition of hypochlorous acid (HOCl; generated in situ from sodium hypochlorite) established that HOCl was a necessary and sufficient ROI for NET release. This was confirmed by the ability of HOCl to stimulate NET release in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patient neutrophils which, due to the lack of a functional NADPH oxidase, also lack the capacity for NET release in response to classical stimuli. Moreover, the exogenous addition of taurine, abundantly present within the neutrophil cytosol, abrogated NET production stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and HOCl, providing a novel mode of cytoprotection by taurine against oxidative stress by taurine. PMID:22236002

  19. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effects of Calendula officinalis on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pragtipal; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Song, Fengyu; Gregson, Karen S; Windsor, L Jack

    2012-04-01

    Calendula officinalis is commonly called the marigold. It is a staple topical remedy in homeopathic medicine. It is rich in quercetin, carotenoids, lutein, lycopene, rutin, ubiquinone, xanthophylls, and other anti-oxidants. It has anti-inflammatory properties. Quercetin, one of the active components in Calendula, has been shown to inhibit recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and decrease the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL), IL-6 and IL-8 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore-stimulated human mast cells. To examine the effects of Calendula on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) mediated collagen degradation and MMP activity. Lactate dehydrogenate assays were performed to determine the non-toxic concentrations of Calendula, doxycycline and quercetin. Cell-mediated collagen degradation assays were performed to examine the inhibitory effect on cell-mediated collagen degradation. Gelatin zymography was performed to examine their effects on MMP-2 activity. The experiments were repeated three times and ANOVA used for statistical analyses. Calendula at 2-3% completely inhibited the MMP-2 activity in the zymograms. Doxycycline inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05%, and MMP-2 activity completely at 0.05%. Quercetin inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02%, and MMP-2 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Calendula inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the same correlated concentration of pure quercetin. Calendula inhibits HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the corresponding concentration of quercetin. This may be attributed to additional components in Calendula other than quercetin. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. β Subunits Control the Effects of Human Kv4.3 Potassium Channel Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2017-01-01

    The transient outward K + current, I to , activates early in the cardiac myocyte action potential, to begin repolarization. Human I to is generated primarily by two Kv4.3 potassium channel α subunit splice variants (Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S) that diverge only by a C-terminal, membrane-proximal, 19-residue stretch unique to Kv4.3L. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of threonine 504 within the Kv4.3L-specific 19-residues mediates α-adrenergic inhibition of I to in human heart. Kv4.3 is regulated in human heart by various β subunits, including cytosolic KChIP2b and transmembrane KCNEs, yet their impact on the functional effects of human Kv4.3 phosphorylation has not been reported. Here, this gap in knowledge was addressed using human Kv4.3 splice variants, T504 mutants, and human β subunits. Subunits were co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and analyzed by two-electrode voltage-clamp, using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to stimulate PKC. Unexpectedly, KChIP2b removed the inhibitory effect of PKC on Kv4.3L (but not Kv4.3L threonine phosphorylation by PKC per-se ), while co-expression with KCNE2, but not KCNE4, restored PKC-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3L-KChIP2b to quantitatively resemble previously reported effects of α-adrenergic modulation of human ventricular I to . In addition, PKC accelerated recovery from inactivation of Kv4.3L-KChIP2b channels and, interestingly, of both Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S alone. Thus, β subunits regulate the response of human Kv4.3 to PKC phosphorylation and provide a potential mechanism for modifying the response of I to to α-adrenergic regulation in vivo .

  2. β Subunits Control the Effects of Human Kv4.3 Potassium Channel Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    The transient outward K+ current, Ito, activates early in the cardiac myocyte action potential, to begin repolarization. Human Ito is generated primarily by two Kv4.3 potassium channel α subunit splice variants (Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S) that diverge only by a C-terminal, membrane-proximal, 19-residue stretch unique to Kv4.3L. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of threonine 504 within the Kv4.3L-specific 19-residues mediates α-adrenergic inhibition of Ito in human heart. Kv4.3 is regulated in human heart by various β subunits, including cytosolic KChIP2b and transmembrane KCNEs, yet their impact on the functional effects of human Kv4.3 phosphorylation has not been reported. Here, this gap in knowledge was addressed using human Kv4.3 splice variants, T504 mutants, and human β subunits. Subunits were co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and analyzed by two-electrode voltage-clamp, using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to stimulate PKC. Unexpectedly, KChIP2b removed the inhibitory effect of PKC on Kv4.3L (but not Kv4.3L threonine phosphorylation by PKC per-se), while co-expression with KCNE2, but not KCNE4, restored PKC-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3L-KChIP2b to quantitatively resemble previously reported effects of α-adrenergic modulation of human ventricular Ito. In addition, PKC accelerated recovery from inactivation of Kv4.3L-KChIP2b channels and, interestingly, of both Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S alone. Thus, β subunits regulate the response of human Kv4.3 to PKC phosphorylation and provide a potential mechanism for modifying the response of Ito to α-adrenergic regulation in vivo. PMID:28919864

  3. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  4. Phorbol ester suppression of opioid analgesia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.J.; Wang, X.J.; Han, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to be an important substrate in intracellular signal transduction. Very little is known concerning its possible role in mediating opiate-induced analgesia. In the present study, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a selective activator of PKC, was injected intrathecally (ith) to assess its influence on the analgesia induced by intrathecal injection of the mu opioid agonist PL017, the delta agonist DPDPE and the kappa agonist 66A-078. Radiant heat-induced tail flick latency (TFL) was taken as an index of nociception. TPA in the dose of 25-50 ng, which did not affect the baseline TFL, produced a markedmore » suppression of opioid antinociception, with a higher potency in blocking mu and delta than the kappa effect. In addition, mu and delta agonists induced remarkable decreases in spinal cyclic AMP (cAMP) content whereas the kappa effect was weak. The results suggest a cross-talk between the PKC system and the signal transduction pathway subserving opioid analgesia.« less

  5. Dioctanoylglycerol stimulates accumulation of [methyl-14C]choline and its incorporation into acetylcholine and phosphatidylcholine in a human cholinergic neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, B. E.; Richardson, U. I.; Nitsch, R. M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diacylglycerol, stimulated [14C]choline uptake in cultured human neuroblastoma (LA-N-2) cells. As this effect has not, to our knowledge, been reported before, it was of interest to characterize it in more detail. In the presence of 500 microM dioctanoylglycerol the levels of [14C]choline attained during a 2 hour labeling period were elevated by 78 +/- 12%, while [14C]acetylcholine and long fatty acyl chain [14C]phosphatidylcholine levels increased by 26 +/- 2% and 19 +/- 5%, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). Total (long chain plus dioctanoyl-) [14C]phosphatidylcholine was increased by 198 +/- 33%. Kinetic analysis showed that dioctanoylglycerol reduced the apparent Km for choline uptake to 56 +/- 9% of control (n = 4). The Vmax was not significantly altered. The stimulation of [14C]choline accumulation by dioctanoylglycerol was not dependent on protein kinase C activation; the effect was not mimicked by phorbol ester or by 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and was not inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitors H-7 or staurosporine, or by prolonged pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The effect of dioctanoylglycerol was slightly (but not significantly) reduced by EGTA and strongly inhibited by the cell-permeant calcium chelator bis(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester. Although these results implicate elevated intracellular calcium in the response, dioctanoylglycerol did not increase phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in LA-N-2 cells, and its effect was not inhibited by the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R 59 022 (which blocks the conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid, a known stimulator of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. Human serum amyloid A genes are expressed in monocyte/macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Urieli-Shoval, S; Meek, R L; Hanson, R H; Eriksen, N; Benditt, E P

    1994-09-01

    Serum amyloid A (apoSAA) is a family of proteins found, mainly associated with high density lipoproteins, in the blood plasma of mammals and at least one avian species, the Pekin duck. These proteins are present in small amounts under normal circumstances, but their concentration is capable of rising 100- to 1,000-fold in situations involving tissue injury or infection. Like classic acute phase proteins they are produced in the liver; however, expression of one of the apoSAA genes is known to occur in activated macrophages of mice. We examined three human macrophage precursor cell lines (THP-1, U-937, and HL-60), before and after differentiation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, for apoSAA messenger (m)-RNA expression and found that: 1) induction of steady-state apoSAA mRNA by lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1, or interleukin-6 required the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone; 2) the three known active genes, apoSAA1, apoSAA2, and apoSAA4, were induced in THP-1 cells, whereas the pseudogene apoSAA3 was not; 3) differentiated and undifferentiated THP-1 cells expressed apoSAA mRNA, but U-937 cells expressed apoSAA mRNA (low levels) only after phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate differentiation and HL-60 cells did not express apoSAA mRNA whether differentiated or not; 4) apoSAA protein was detectable immunologically at a low level in lyophilized medium from induced THP-1 cells. Our findings are compatible with the hypotheses that 1) apoSAA gene expression in human monocytes/macrophages in vivo is differentiation dependent; 2) activated macrophages provide a local source of apoSAA at sites of tissue injury or inflammation; 3) apoSAA is induced in tissue macrophages by local stimuli, under conditions that may not evoke the systemic acute phase response.

  7. More Human than Human.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  8. Effect of soy saponin on the growth of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hwa; Chien, Yi-Wen; Huang, Wen-Hsuan; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of extracted soybean saponins on the growth of human colon cancer cells. METHODS: WiDr human colon cancer cells were treated with 150, 300, 600 or 1200 ppm of soy saponin to determine the effect on cell growth, cell morphology, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, and P53 protein, c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression. RESULTS: Soy saponin decreased the number of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed 12-O-tetradecanol-phorbol-13-acetate-stimulated PKC activity (P < 0.05). Cells treated with saponins developed cytoplasmic vesicles and the cell membrane became rougher and more irregular in a dose-dependent manner, and eventually disassembled. At 600 and 1200 ppm, the activity of AP was increased (P < 0.05). However, the apoptosis markers such as c-Jun and c-Fos were not significantly affected by saponin. CONCLUSION: Soy saponin may be effective in preventing colon cancer by affecting cell morphology, cell proliferation enzymes, and cell growth. PMID:20632438

  9. Procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao reactivates latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus.

    PubMed

    Hori, Takanori; Barnor, Jacob; Huu, Tung Nguyen; Morinaga, Osamu; Hamano, Akiko; Ndzinu, Jerry; Frimpong, Angela; Minta-Asare, Keren; Amoa-Bosompem, Mildred; Brandful, James; Odoom, John; Bonney, Joseph; Tuffour, Isaac; Owusu, Baffour-Awuah; Ofosuhene, Mark; Atchoglo, Philip; Sakyiamah, Maxwell; Adegle, Richard; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Ampofo, William; Koram, Kwadwo; Nyarko, Alexander; Okine, Laud; Edoh, Dominic; Appiah, Alfred; Uto, Takuhiro; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Uota, Shin; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2015-04-03

    Despite remarkable advances in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains incurable due to the incomplete elimination of the replication-competent virus, which persists in latent reservoirs. Strategies for targeting HIV reservoirs for eradication that involves reactivation of latent proviruses while protecting uninfected cells by cART are urgently needed for cure of HIV infection. We screened medicinal plant extracts for compounds that could reactivate the latent HIV-1 provirus and identified a procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao as a potent activator of the provirus in human T cells latently infected with HIV-1. This reactivation largely depends on the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways because either overexpression of a super-repressor form of IκBα or pretreatment with a MEK inhibitor U0126 diminished provirus reactivation by C1. A pan-PKC inhibitor significantly blocked the phorbol ester-induced but not the C1-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Although C1-induced viral gene expression persisted for as long as 48 h post-stimulation, NF-κB-dependent transcription peaked at 12 h post-stimulation and then quickly declined, suggesting Tat-mediated self-sustainment of HIV-1 expression. These results suggest that procyanidin C1 trimer is a potential compound for reactivation of latent HIV-1 reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chlamydophila pneumoniae in human immortal Jurkat cells and primary lymphocytes uncontrolled by interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kasumi; Kubo, Takeru; Saeki, Ayumi; Yamane, Chikayo; Matsuo, Junji; Yimin; Nakamura, Shinji; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Kunichika, Miyuki; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Hirai, Itaru; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Shibata, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Lymphocytes are a potential host cell for Chlamydophila pneumoniae, although why the bacteria must hide in lymphocytes remains unknown. Meanwhile, interferon (IFN)-γ is a crucial factor for eliminating chlamydiae from infected cells through indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression, resulting in depletion of tryptophan. We therefore assessed if lymphocytes could work as a shelter for the bacteria to escape IFN-γ. C. pneumoniae grew normally in human lymphoid Jurkat cells, even in the presence of IFN-γ or under stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin. Although Jurkat cells expressed IFN-γ receptor CD119, their lack of IDO expression was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting. Also, C. pneumoniae survived in enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes, even in the presence of IFN-γ. Furthermore, C. pneumoniae in spleen cells obtained from IFN-γ knockout mice with C57BL/6 background was maintained in a similar way to wild-type mice, supporting a minimal role of IFN-γ-related response for eliminating C. pneumoniae from lymphocytes. Thus, we concluded that IFN-γ did not remove C. pneumoniae from lymphocytes, possibly providing a shelter for C. pneumoniae to escape from the innate immune response, which has direct clinical significance. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Presence of estrogen receptors in human myeloid monocytic cells (THP-1 cell line).

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M; Villaggio, B; Bisso, A; Sulli, A; Coviello, D; Dayer, J M

    2001-01-01

    To test THP-1 cells for the presence of estrogen receptors (ER) since studies have demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, the influence of estrogens on cells involved in immune response (i.e. macrophages), and since it has been demonstrated that human myeloid monocytic THP-1 cells acquire phenotypic and functional macrophage-like features after incubation with several cytokines or pharmacological agents. Stimulation of THP-1 cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to prompt their differentiation into macrophage-like cells and evaluation of the possible induction of ER. The expression of ER was analyzed by immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. After stimulation by PMA, the human myeloid monocytic THP-1 cells showed the presence of ER, together with markers of monocytic cell differentiation such as CD68, CD54 and HLA-DR. Estrogen effects may be exerted directly through ER on monocytes/macrophages. PMA-treated THP-1 cells may constitute a useful in vitro model to determine the effects of estrogens on macrophage-like cells and their implications in the inflammatory and immune processes.

  12. Protein kinase C enhances the swelling-induced chloride current in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye-Tao; Du, Xin-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Swelling-activated chloride currents (ICl.swell) are thought to play a role in several physiologic and pathophysiologic processes and thus represent a target for therapeutic approaches. However, the mechanism of ICl.swell regulation remains unclear. In this study, we used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to examine the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ICl.swell in human atrial myocytes. Atrial myocytes were isolated from the right atrial appendages of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass and enzymatically dissociated. ICl.swell was evoked in hypotonic solution and recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The PKC agonist phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) enhanced ICl.swell in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reversed in isotonic solution and by a chloride current inhibitor, 9-anthracenecarboxylicacid. Furthermore, the PKC inhibitor bis-indolylmaleimide attenuated the effect and 4α-PDBu, an inactive PDBu analog, had no effect on ICl.swell. These results, obtained using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, demonstrate the ability of PKC to activate ICl,swell in human atrial myocytes. This observation was consistent with a previous study using a single-channel patch-clamp technique, but differed from some findings in other species.

  13. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents. PMID:21569243

  14. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. Themore » THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.« less

  15. Control of growth and squamous differentiation in normal human bronchial epithelial cells by chemical and biological modifiers and transferred genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Lechner, J F; Masui, T; Reddel, R R; Mark, G E; Harris, C C

    1989-01-01

    The majority of human lung cancers arise from bronchial epithelial cells. The normal pseudostratified bronchial epithelium is composed of basal, mucous, and ciliated cells. This multi-differentiated epithelium usually responds to xenobiotics and physical injury by undergoing basal cell hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia. One step of the multistage process of carcinogenesis is thought to involve aberrations in control of the squamous metaplastic processes. Decreased responsiveness to regulators of terminal squamous differentiation may confer a selective clonal expansion advantage to an initiated cell. We studied the effects of endogenous [e.g., transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and serum] and exogenous [e.g., 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol-acetate (TPA), tobacco smoke condensate, and aldehydes] modifiers of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell in a serum-free culture system. NHBE cells are growth inhibited by all of these compounds and induced to undergo squamous differentiation by TGF-beta 1 or TPA. In contrast, lung carcinoma cell lines are relatively resistant to inducers of terminal squamous differentiation which may provide them with a selective growth advantage. Chemical agents and activated protooncogenes (ras,raf,myc) altered the response to endogenous and exogenous inducers of squamous differentiation and caused extended cellular lifespan, aneuploidy, and/or tumorigenicity. The data suggest a close relationship between dysregulation of terminal differentiation pathways and neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:2538323

  16. Shear stress-induced calcium transients in endothelial cells from human umbilical cord veins.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, G; Callewaert, G; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    1992-01-01

    1. Changes of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration induced by shear stress were measured in Fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester-loaded endothelial cells from human umbilical cord veins. 2. We were able to induce Ca2+ transients in almost every cell by blowing a stream of physiological solution onto a single endothelial cell thereby inducing shear stress between 0 and 50 dyn cm-2. The Ca2+ response could be graded by varying the shear stress, and reached a half-maximal value at a shear stress of 30 dyn cm-2. 3. The shear stress responses critically depended on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration and were absent in a Ca(2+)-free solution. Repetitive application of short pulses of shear stress induced cumulative effects because of the slow decay of the shear stress Ca2+ responses (time constants 82.3 +/- 17.8 s from twenty-five cells). Application of a depolarizing high potassium solution to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry decreased the Ca2+ transients in some of the cells. 4. Application of shear stress in the presence of other divalent cations, such as nickel, cobalt or barium, always produced substantial changes in the ratio of the 390/360 nm fluorescence signal, indicating influx of these cations and subsequent quenching of the Fura-2 fluorescence. 5. Shear stress responses in the presence of 10 mM Ca2+ were completely blocked by application of 1 mM La3+. 6. Incubation of the cells with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) did not alter the shear stress response, but completely blocked histamine-induced Ca2+ transients. 7. Small submaximal shear stress potentiated the Ca2+ transients induced by histamine. 8. We conclude that shear stress-dependent Ca2+ signals are induced by an influx of calcium that is not modulated via protein kinase C and not activated by membrane depolarization. The influx pathway is also permeable to divalent cations such as Ni2+, Co2+ and Ba2+, but is blocked by La3+. PMID:1338792

  17. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of secondary metabolites of marine Pseudomonas sp. in human neutrophils are through inhibiting P38 MAPK, JNK, and calcium pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Jimmy; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Activated neutrophils play a significant role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. The metabolites of marine microorganisms are increasingly employed as sources for developing new drugs; however, very few marine drugs have been studied in human neutrophils. Herein, we showed that secondary metabolites of marine Pseudomonas sp. (N11) significantly inhibited superoxide anion generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated human neutrophils, with IC50 values of 0.67±0.38 µg/ml and 0.84±0.12 µg/ml, respectively. In cell-free systems, neither superoxide anion-scavenging effect nor inhibition of elastase activity was associated with the suppressive effects of N11. N11 inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and JNK, but not Erk and Akt, in FMLP-induced human neutrophils. Also, N11 dose-dependently attenuated the transient elevation of intracellular calcium concentration in activated neutrophils. In contrast, N11 failed to alter phorbol myristate acetate-induced superoxide anion generation, and the inhibitory effects of N11 were not reversed by protein kinase A inhibitor. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory effects of N11 on superoxide anion generation and elastase release in activated human neutrophils are through inhibiting p38 MAP kinase, JNK, and calcium pathways. Our results suggest that N11 has the potential to be developed to treat neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  19. Regulation of glutamate in cultures of human monocytic THP-1 and astrocytoma U-373 MG cells.

    PubMed

    Klegeris, A; Walker, D G; McGeer, P L

    1997-09-01

    Glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, is neurotoxic at high concentrations. Neuroglial cells, including astrocytes and microglia, play an important role in regulating its extracellular levels. Cultured human monocytic THP-1 cells increased their glutamate secretion following 18 and 68 h exposure to the inflammatory mediators zymosan, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma, tumor-necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Cultured astrocytoma U-373 MG cells increased their glutamate secretion following similar exposure to zymosan and PMA. DL-Alpha-aminopimelic acid, an inhibitor of the glutamate secretion system, reduced extracellular glutamate in both cell culture systems, while the high-affinity glutamate uptake inhibitors D-Aspartic acid, DL-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid and L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid increased extracellular glutamate in U-373 MG, but not THP-1 cell cultures. In co-cultures of THP-1 and U-373 MG cells, extracellular glutamate levels were increased significantly by the Alzheimer beta-amyloid peptide (1-40) and were decreased significantly by the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone. These data indicate that inflammatory stimuli may increase extracellular glutamate while antiinflammatory drugs decrease it.

  20. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated human basophils.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Toru; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Higa, Shinji; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that flavonoids such as luteolin, apigenin and fisetin inhibit interleukin 4 and interleukin 13 production. In this study, we investigated whether luteolin can suppress CD40 ligand expression by basophils. A human basophilic cell line, KU812, was stimulated with A23187 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) with or without various concentrations of luteolin or other flavonoids for 12 h, and CD40 ligand expression was analyzed by FACS. The effect of luteolin on CD40 ligand mRNA expression was studied by semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. In addition, CD40 ligand expression was also measured in purified basophils that had been stimulated for 12 h with A23187 plus PMA with or without various concentrations of luteolin. CD40 ligand expression by KU812 cells was enhanced noticeably in response to A23187 and even more strikingly augmented by A23187 plus PMA. The expression was significantly suppressed by 10 or 30 microM of luteolin, whereas myricetin failed to inhibit. Reverse transcription PCR analyses demonstrated that luteolin inhibited CD40 ligand mRNA expression by stimulated KU812 cells. Of the six flavonoids examined, luteolin, apigenin, fisetin and quercetin at 30 microM showed a significant inhibitory effect on CD40 ligand expression. The incubation of purified basophils with A23187 plus PMA significantly enhanced CD40 ligand expression, and the presence of luteolin again had an inhibitory effect. Luteolin inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated basophils.

  1. Gossypol inhibits phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-heng; Hu, Jia-qi; Tao, Wei-qun; Li, Yuan-hong; Li, Guan-ming; Xie, Pei-yi; Liu, Xiao-shan; Jiang, Jikai

    2010-10-25

    Gossypol is an attractive therapeutic anti-tumor agent as an apoptosis inducer and is being evaluated in preclinical tests. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying apoptosis induction by gossypol in malignant cells have not been completely enunciated. Here we investigate the alterations of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1 protein levels and Bcl-2 phosphorylation in gossypol-induced apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that gossypol treatment inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1 protein levels were slightly reduced and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at threonine 56 (phospho T56) was not altered. However, phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at serine 70 (phospho S70) was strikingly down-regulated in gossypol-exposed cells. This reduction was found to be not only in both dose- and time-dependent fashion but also obviated by phorbol l2,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). In addition, pre-treatment of PDBu partially prevented gossypol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Collectively, gossypol treatment can reduce phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at serine 70 in leukemia HL-60 cells and gossypol may be a promising therapeutical candidate for leukemia patients especially expressing phosphorylated Bcl-2 at Ser70. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition by fenoterol of human eosinophil functions including β2-adrenoceptor-independent actions

    PubMed Central

    TACHIBANA, A; KATO, M; KIMURA, H; FUJIU, T; SUZUKI, M; MORIKAWA, A

    2002-01-01

    Agonists at β2 adrenoceptors are used widely as bronchodilators in treating bronchial asthma. These agents also may have important anti-inflammatory effects on eosinophils in asthma. We examined whether widely prescribed β2-adrenoceptor agonists differ in ability to suppress stimulus-induced eosinophil effector functions such as superoxide anion (O2−) generation and degranulation. To examine involvement of cellular adhesion in such responses, we also investigated effects of β2 agonists on cellular adhesion and on CD11b expression by human eosinophils. O2− was measured using chemiluminescence. Eosinophil degranulation and adhesion were assessed by a radioimmunoassay for eosinophil protein X (EPX). CD11b expression was measured by flow cytometry. Fenoterol inhibited platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced O2− generation by eosinophils significantly more than salbutamol or procaterol. Fenoterol partially inhibited PAF-induced degranulation by eosinophils similarly to salbutamol or procaterol. Fenoterol inhibited phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced O2− generation and degranulation by eosinophils, while salbutamol or procaterol did not. Fenoterol inhibition of PMA-induced O2− generation was not reversed by ICI-118551, a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Fenoterol, but not salbutamol or procaterol, significantly inhibited PAF-induced eosinophil adhesion. Fenoterol inhibited O2− generation and degranulation more effectively than salbutamol or procaterol; these effects may include a component involving cellular adhesion. Inhibition also might include a component not mediated via β2 adrenoceptors. PMID:12452831

  3. Inhibition by fenoterol of human eosinophil functions including beta2-adrenoceptor-independent actions.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, A; Kato, M; Kimura, H; Fujiu, T; Suzuki, M; Morikawa, A

    2002-12-01

    Agonists at beta2 adrenoceptors are used widely as bronchodilators in treating bronchial asthma. These agents also may have important anti-inflammatory effects on eosinophils in asthma. We examined whether widely prescribed beta2-adrenoceptor agonists differ in ability to suppress stimulus-induced eosinophil effector functions such as superoxide anion (O2-) generation and degranulation. To examine involvement of cellular adhesion in such responses, we also investigated effects of beta2 agonists on cellular adhesion and on CD11b expression by human eosinophils. O2- was measured using chemiluminescence. Eosinophil degranulation and adhesion were assessed by a radioimmunoassay for eosinophil protein X (EPX). CD11b expression was measured by flow cytometry. Fenoterol inhibited platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced O2- generation by eosinophils significantly more than salbutamol or procaterol. Fenoterol partially inhibited PAF-induced degranulation by eosinophils similarly to salbutamol or procaterol. Fenoterol inhibited phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced O2- generation and degranulation by eosinophils, while salbutamol or procaterol did not. Fenoterol inhibition of PMA-induced O2- generation was not reversed by ICI-118551, a selective beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Fenoterol, but not salbutamol or procaterol, significantly inhibited PAF-induced eosinophil adhesion. Fenoterol inhibited O2- generation and degranulation more effectively than salbutamol or procaterol; these effects may include a component involving cellular adhesion. Inhibition also might include a component not mediated via beta2 adrenoceptors.

  4. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced aftermore » exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).« less

  5. The effect of hepatocyte growth factor on secretory functions in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yumiko; Ueki, Shigeharu; Konno, Yasunori; Ito, Wataru; Takeda, Masahide; Nakamura, Yuka; Nishikawa, Junko; Moritoki, Yuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Saga, Tomoo; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), originally identified as a potent mitogen for mature hepatocytes, is now recognized as a humoral mediator in inflammatory and immune responses. Previous studies indicated that HGF negatively regulated allergic airway inflammation. In view of eosinophils playing a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, especially in airway remodeling as a rich source of pro-fibrogenic mediators, the effects of HGF on the different types of eosinophil secretory functions were examined in this study. We found that HGF significantly inhibited IL-5-induced secretion of TGF-β and VEGF from human eosinophils. The inhibitory effect is not associated with TGF-β transcription; rather, it is associated with ultrastructural granule emptying and loss of intracellular TGF-β contents, indicating HGF inhibits the process of piecemeal degranulation. The effect of HGF on extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) that mediates cytolytic degranulation was also investigated; however, immobilized IgG- or phorbol myristate acetate-induced ETosis was only minimally attenuated by HGF. These results reveal the effect of HGF on the distinct pathways of eosinophil secretory functions and also provide novel insights into the role of HGF in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts of Psidium guajava leaves by DPPH and chemiluminescence inhibition in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M R V; Azzolini, A E C S; Martinez, M L L; Souza, C R F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M; Oliveira, W P

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β -cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH(•) method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells.

  7. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  8. Multiple receptors mobilize calcium through a pertussis toxin (PT) sensitive GTP-binding protein in human neutrophils (PMN's)

    SciTech Connect

    Lad, P.M.; Olson, C.V.; Grewal, I.S.

    1986-03-05

    Treatment of PMN's with PT causes an abolition of chemotaxis, enzyme release, superoxide generation and aggregation caused by f-met-leu-phe (FMLP),C5a and platelet activating factor (PAF). Lectin (Con-A) induced capping and receptor induced shape change are abolished, but phagocytosis is unaltered. In whole cells, calcium mobilization induced by FMLP, PAF and Con-A inhibited by PT although the FMLP-mediated effect is more susceptible to PT's effects. Treatment of PMN's with phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA) causes an abolition of calcium mobilization by all agents in a range which also inhibits cap formation. Investigation of calcium uptake reveals PT sensitive and insensitive components.more » Reciprocal interactions between Ns and Ni proteins are also observed since pretreatment with FMLP and PAF causes a stimulation of Ns-mediated cyclic AMP enhancement while pretreatment with Ns linked receptors (PGE/sub 1/ and beta receptor agonists) inhibits calcium mobilization. Comparative peptide mapping studies indicate substantial similarity between Ni proteins in PMN's, platelets and human erythrocytes. The authors results suggest that the Ni linked calcium mobilization sensitive to PMA is important to the regulation of the human neutrophil.« less

  9. Agonist-evoked changes in cytosolic pH and calcium concentration in human platelets: studies in physiological bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Sage, S O; Jobson, T M; Rink, T J

    1990-01-01

    1. Cytosolic pH (pHi) and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in the presence and absence of physiological HCO3- in human platelets co-loaded with the fluorescent indicators BCECF and Fura-2. Basal pHi and changes evoked by butyrate, thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), ADP and phorbol ester were investigated, as were the effects of removing external Na+. 2. In the presence of physiological HCO3- and CO2, basal pHi was 7.02 +/- 0.04 compared with 7.15 +/- 0.05 in the absence of HCO3-. Estimated cytosolic buffering power was reduced from 35.6 +/- 3.0 to 14.5 +/- 0.4 mM/pH unit by the omission of HCO3-. 3. Thrombin evoked an immediate acidification of 0.03 +/- 0.01 pH units in the presence of HCO3- and 0.07 +/- 0.01 pH units in its absence. The acidifications were followed by a slow alkalinization. The final pHi was 0.10 +/- 0.01 units above basal in the presence of HCO3- and 0.08 +/- 0.02 units above basal in the absence of HCO3-. The initial acidification was significantly greater in the absence of HCO3-. The subsequent increase in pHi was similar in the presence and absence of this ion, but the calculated loss of proton equivalents was greater in the presence of HCO3-. 4. Replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-D-glucamine resulted in a fall in basal pHi and abolished recovery from thrombin-evoked acidification in both the presence and absence of HCO3-. 5. In the presence of HCO3-, PAF and ADP evoked an intracellular acidification similar to that caused by thrombin. However, with PAF and ADP, the subsequent recovery in pHi was slow and did not rise above basal levels. Phorbol dibutyrate, an activator of protein kinase C, evoked a similar elevation in pHi of 0.04 +/- 0.01 units over 3 min in the presence and absence of HCO3-. 6. Stopped-flow fluorimetric measurements were made of both BCECF and Fura-2 fluorescence in the presence of HCO3-. In the presence and absence of external Ca2+, thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i peaked before

  10. PKC-dependent stimulation of the human MCT1 promoter involves transcription factor AP2.

    PubMed

    Saksena, Seema; Dwivedi, Alka; Gill, Ravinder K; Singla, Amika; Alrefai, Waddah A; Malakooti, Jaleh; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2009-02-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) plays an important role in the absorption of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) such as butyrate in the human colon. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that phorbol ester, PMA (1 microM, 24 h), upregulates butyrate transport and MCT1 protein expression in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transcriptional regulation of MCT1 gene expression by PMA in the intestine are not known. In the present study, we showed that PMA (0.1 microM, 24 h) increased the MCT1 promoter activity (-871/+91) by approximately fourfold. A corresponding increase in MCT1 mRNA abundance in response to PMA was also observed. PMA-induced stimulation of MCT1 promoter activity was observed as early as 1 h and persisted until 24 h, suggesting that the effects of PMA are attributable to initial PKC activation. Kinase inhibitor and phosphorylation studies indicated that these effects may be mediated through activation of the atypical PKC-zeta isoform. 5'-deletion studies demonstrated that the MCT1 core promoter region (-229/+91) is the PMA-responsive region. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed the predominant involvement of potential activator protein 2 (AP2) binding site in the activation of MCT1 promoter activity by PMA. In addition, overexpression of AP2 in Caco-2 cells significantly increased MCT1 promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These findings showing the regulation of MCT1 promoter by PKC and AP2 are of significant importance for an understanding of the molecular regulation of SCFA absorption in the human intestine.

  11. Regulated expression of telomerase activity in human T lymphocyte development and activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein that is capable of synthesizing telomeric repeats, is expressed in germline and malignant cells, and is absent in most normal human somatic cells. The selective expression of telomerase has thus been proposed to be a basis for the immortality of the germline and of malignant cells. In the present study, telomerase activity was analyzed in normal human T lymphocytes. It was found that telomerase is expressed at a high level in thymocyte subpopulations, at an intermediate level in tonsil T lymphocytes, and at a low to undetectable level in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Moreover, telomerase activity is highly inducible in peripheral T lymphocytes by activation through CD3 with or without CD28 costimulation, or by stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin. The induction of telomerase by anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 (anti-CD3/CD28) stimulation required RNA and protein synthesis, and was blocked by herbimycin A, an inhibitor of S pi protein tyrosine kinases. The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A selectively inhibited telomerase induction by PMA/ionomycin and by anti-CD3, but not by anti-CD3/CD28. Although telomerase activity in peripheral T lymphocytes was activation dependent and correlated with cell proliferation, it was not cell cycle phase restricted. These results indicate that the expression of telomerase in normal human T lymphocytes is both developmentally regulated and activation induced. Telomerase may thus play a permissive role in T cell development and in determining the capacity of lymphoid cells for cell division and clonal expansion. PMID:8676067

  12. Bioengineered human IAS reconstructs with functional and molecular properties similar to intact IAS

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Because of its critical importance in rectoanal incontinence, we determined the feasibility to reconstruct internal anal sphincter (IAS) from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with functional and molecular attributes similar to the intact sphincter. The reconstructs were developed using SMCs from the circular smooth muscle layer of the human IAS, grown in smooth muscle differentiation media under sterile conditions in Sylgard-coated tissue culture plates with central Sylgard posts. The basal tone in the reconstructs and its changes were recorded following 0 Ca2+, KCl, bethanechol, isoproterenol, protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and Rho kinase (ROCK) and PKC inhibitors Y-27632 and Gö-6850, respectively. Western blot (WB), immunofluorescence (IF), and immunocytochemical (IC) analyses were also performed. The reconstructs developed spontaneous tone (0.68 ± 0.26 mN). Bethanechol (a muscarinic agonist) and K+ depolarization produced contraction, whereas isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) and Y-27632 produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the tone. Maximal decrease in basal tone with Y-27632 and Gö-6850 (each 10−5 M) was 80.45 ± 3.29 and 17.76 ± 3.50%, respectively. WB data with the IAS constructs′ SMCs revealed higher levels of RhoA/ROCK, protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor or inhibitory phosphoprotein for myosin phosphatase (CPI-17), phospho-CPI-17, MYPT1, and 20-kDa myosin light chain vs. rectal smooth muscle. WB, IF, and IC studies of original SMCs and redispersed from the reconstructs for the relative distribution of different signal transduction proteins confirmed the feasibility of reconstruction of IAS with functional properties similar to intact IAS and demonstrated the development of myogenic tone with critical dependence on RhoA/ROCK. We conclude that it is feasible to bioengineer IAS constructs using human IAS SMCs that behave like intact IAS. PMID:22790596

  13. Downregulation of an Aim-1 Kinase Couples with Megakaryocytic Polyploidization of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Akira; Matsumura, Itaru; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Terada, Yasuhiko; Tatsuka, Masaaki; Machii, Takashi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Yusuke; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2001-01-01

    During the late phase of megakaryopoiesis, megakaryocytes undergo polyploidization, which is characterized by DNA duplication without concomitant cell division. However, it remains unknown by which mechanisms this process occurs. AIM-1 and STK15 belong to the Aurora/increase-in-ploidy (Ipl)1 serine/threonine kinase family and play key roles in mitosis. In a human interleukin-3–dependent cell line, F-36P, the expressions of AIM-1 and STK15 mRNA were specifically observed at G2/M phase of the cell cycle during proliferation. In contrast, the expressions of AIM-1 and STK15 were continuously repressed during megakaryocytic polyploidization of human erythro/megakaryocytic cell lines (F-36P, K562, and CMK) treated with thrombopoietin, activated ras (H-rasG12V), or phorbol ester. Furthermore, their expressions were suppressed during thrombopoietin-induced polyploidization of normal human megakaryocytes. Activation of AIM-1 by the induced expression of AIM-1(wild-type) canceled TPA-induced polyploidization of K562 cells significantly, whereas that of STK15 did not. Moreover, suppression of AIM-1 by the induced expression of AIM-1 (K/R, dominant-negative type) led to polyploidization in 25% of K562 cells, whereas STK15(K/R) showed no effect. Also, the induced expression of AIM-1(K/R) in CMK cells provoked polyploidization up to 32N. These results suggested that downregulation of AIM-1 at M phase may be involved in abortive mitosis and polyploid formation of megakaryocytes. PMID:11266445

  14. Omega-oxidation is the major pathway for the catabolism of leukotriene B4 in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shak, S; Goldstein, I M

    1984-08-25

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), formed by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), may be an important mediator of inflammation. Recent studies suggest that human leukocytes can convert LTB4 to products that are less biologically active. To examine the catabolism of LTB4, we developed (using high performance liquid chromatography) a sensitive, reproducible assay for this mediator and its omega-oxidation products (20-OH- and 20-COOH-LTB4). With this assay, we have found that human PMN (but not human monocytes, lymphocytes, or platelets) convert exogenous LTB4 almost exclusively to 20-OH- and 20-COOH-LTB4 (identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Catabolism of exogenous LTB4 by omega-oxidation is rapid (t1/2 approximately 4 min at 37 degrees C in reaction mixtures containing 1.0 microM LTB4 and 20 X 10(6) PMN/ml), temperature-dependent (negligible at 0 degrees C), and varies with cell number as well as with initial substrate concentration. The pathway for omega-oxidation in PMN is specific for LTB4 and 5(S),12(S)-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (only small amounts of other dihydroxylated-derivatives of arachidonic acid are converted to omega-oxidation products). Even PMN that are stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate to produce large amounts of superoxide anion radicals catabolize exogenous leukotriene B4 primarily by omega-oxidation. Finally, LTB4 that is generated when PMN are stimulated with the calcium ionophore, A23187, is rapidly catabolized by omega-oxidation. Thus, human PMN not only generate and respond to LTB4, but also rapidly and specifically catabolize this mediator by omega-oxidation.

  15. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  16. Human Parvoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. PMID:27806994

  17. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  18. Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus plantarum strains downregulate proinflammatory genes in an ex vivo system of cultured human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bäuerl, Christine; Llopis, Marta; Antolín, María; Monedero, Vicente; Mata, Manuel; Zúñiga, Manuel; Guarner, Francisco; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Significant health benefits have been demonstrated for certain probiotic strains through intervention studies; however, there is a shortage of experimental evidence relative to the mechanisms of action. Here, noninvasive experimental procedure based on a colon organ culture system has been used that, in contrast to most experimental in vitro models reported, can preserve natural immunohistochemical features of the human mucosa. This system has been used to test whether commensal lactobacilli (Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and L. plantarum 299v (A(-))) were able to hinder inflammation-like signals induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin (IO). Whole genome microarrays have been applied to analyze expression differences, from which mRNA markers could be inferred to monitor the effect of putative probiotic strains under such conditions. Regarding the gene expression, PMA/IO treatment induced not only interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ), as expected, but also other relevant genes related to immune response and inflammation, such as IL-17A, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL11. The ex vivo culturing did not modify the pattern of expression of those genes or others related to inflammation. Interestingly, this study demonstrated that lactobacilli downregulated those genes and triggered a global change of the transcriptional profile that indicated a clear homeostasis restoring effect and a decrease in signals produced by activated T cells.

  19. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Exosome release of ADAM15 and the functional implications of human macrophage-derived ADAM15 exosomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Doo; Koo, Bon-Hun; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Jeon, Ok-Hee; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2012-07-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 15 (ADAM15), the only ADAM protein containing an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in its disintegrin-like domain, is a widely expressed membrane protein that is involved in tumor progression and suppression. However, the underlying mechanism of ADAM15-mediated tumor suppression is not clearly understood. This study demonstrates that ADAM15 is released as an exosomal component, and ADAM15 exosomes exert tumor suppressive activities. We found that exosomal ADAM15 release is stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a typical protein kinase C activator, in various tumor cell types, and this results in a corresponding decrease in plasma membrane-associated ADAM15. Exosomes rich in ADAM15 display enhanced binding affinity for integrin αvβ3 in an RGD-dependent manner and suppress vitronectin- and fibronectin-induced cell adhesion, growth, and migration, as well as in vivo tumor growth. Exosomal ADAM15 is released from human macrophages, and macrophage-derived ADAM15 exosomes have tumor inhibitory effects. This work suggests a primary role of ADAM15 for exosome-mediated tumor suppression, as well as functional significance of exosomal ADAM protein in antitumor immunity.

  1. The kinetics of translocation and cellular quantity of protein kinase C in human leukocytes are modified during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Gaubert, F.; Lewis, M. L.; Darsel, Y.; Ohlmann, P.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that play an important role in mediating intracellular signal transduction in eukaryotes. U937 cells were exposed to microgravity during a space shuttle flight and stimulated with a radiolabeled phorbol ester ([3H]PDBu) to both specifically label and activate translocation of PKC from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of the cell. Although significant translocation of PKC occurred at all g levels, the kinetics of translocation in flight were significantly different from those on the ground. In addition, the total quantity of [3H]PDBu binding PKC was increased in flight compared to cells at 1 g on the ground, whereas the quantity in hypergravity (1.4 g) was decreased with respect to 1 g. Similarly, in purified human peripheral blood T cells the quantity of PKCdelta varied in inverse proportion to the g level for some experimental treatments. In addition to these novel findings, the results confirm earlier studies which showed that PKC is sensitive to changes in gravitational acceleration. The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity are poorly understood but the demonstrated sensitivity of PKC to this stimulus provides us with a useful means of measuring the effect of altered gravity levels on early cell activation events.

  2. Acetylshikonin Inhibits Human Pancreatic PANC-1 Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing the NF-κB Activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Cheol; Choi, Bu Young

    2015-09-01

    Acetylshikonin, a natural naphthoquinone derivative compound, has been used for treatment of inflammation and cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether acetylshikonin could regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby leading to suppression of tumorigenesis. We observed that acetylshikonin significantly reduced proliferation of several cancer cell lines, including human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, acetylshikonin inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or tumor necrosis-α (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB reporter activity. Proteome cytokine array and real-time RT-PCR results illustrated that acetylshikonin inhibition of PMA-induced production of cytokines was mediated at the transcriptional level and it was associated with suppression of NF-κB activity and matrix metalloprotenases. Finally, we observed that an exposure of acetylshikonin significantly inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of PANC-1 cells. Together, our results indicate that acetylshikonin could serve as a promising therapeutic agent for future treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Fenoterol inhibits superoxide anion generation by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes via beta-adrenoceptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zafar Nazir; Kato, Masahiko; Kimura, Hirokazu; Tachibana, Atsushi; Fujiu, Toru; Suzuki, Masato; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Kenichi; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2002-05-01

    Beta2-adrenoceptor agonists, used widely as bronchodilator in treating bronchial asthma, may have anti-inflammatory activity. We examined whether various widely prescribed beta2-adrenoceptor agonists differ in anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We investigated effects of these drugs on superoxide anion generation by stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro using chemiluminescence. At high concentrations, fenoterol significantly inhibited both N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine- and phorbol myristate acetate-induced superoxide generation by neutrophils. In contrast, salbutamol or procaterol partially inhibited generation with the former stimulus but not the latter. Inhibition by salbutamol or procaterol was completely reversed by either propranolol, a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, or ICI-118551, a beta2-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist. In contrast, the effect of fenoterol at concentrations exceeding 10(-6) M against superoxide generation with the former stimulus was only partially reversed by antagonists, and the effect of high concentrations of fenoterol against generation with the latter stimulus was not reversed. No drugs scavenged superoxide at the highest concentration used (10(-5) M). Fenoterol at high concentrations has an inhibitory effect on superoxide generation that includes a component not mediated via beta2-adrenoceptors. Direct inhibition at or downstream from protein kinase C may be involved.

  4. Expression of membrane-bound mucins in human nasal mucosa: different patterns for MUC4 and MUC16.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyun-Jae; Bae, Chang Hoon; Song, Si-Youn; Lee, Heung-Man; Kim, Yong-Dae

    2010-06-01

    To acquire basic information concerning the function of the membrane-bound mucin MUC16 in nasal mucosa compared with the best-characterized membrane-bound mucin, MUC4. In vitro study using semiquantatitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunoassay. Yeungnam University College of Medicine. We examined the nasal polyps obtained during endoscopic sinus surgery in 10 patients, the normal ethmoid sinus mucosa obtained from 10 patients, and human nasal polyp epithelial (HNPE) cells. Gene expression of MUC4 and MUC16 in nasal polyps and normal nasal mucosa. In addition, we evaluated the effect of 4 physiologically relevant agents, including retinoic acid, interleukin 1beta, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and dexamethasone, on the expression of MUC4 and MUC16 in HNPE cells at the gene and protein levels. In nasal polyps, MUC4 was upregulated compared with normal nasal mucosa (P = .009), whereas MUC16 expression did not differ between nasal polyps and normal nasal mucosa. Retinoic acid and interleukin 1beta increased MUC4 expression at the gene and protein level in HNPE cells, whereas MUC16 expression was not affected. Unlike retinoic acid and interleukin 1beta, PMA and dexamethasone increased MUC16 expression, whereas they had no significant effect on MUC4 expression. Expression of MUC4 and MUC16 are regulated differently in nasal mucosa. Dexamethasone and PMA are potent mediators for the expression of MUC16 in nasal polyps.

  5. Unique Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing the Third Extracellular Loop of CXCR4 Induces Lymphocyte Agglutination and Enhances Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Mediated Syncytium Formation and Productive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Reiko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Murakami, Tsutomu; Baba, Eishi; Lichtenfeld, Julliane; Omori, Takeru; Kimura, Tohru; Tsurutani, Naomi; Fujii, Nobutaka; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Peiper, Stephen C.; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2001-01-01

    To increase insight into the structural basis of CXCR4 utilization in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a new generation of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was developed in WKA rats. The A80 MAb, which binds an epitope in the third extracellular loop (ECL3) of CXCR4, has unique biologic properties that provide novel insights into CXCR4 function. This agent enhanced syncytium formation in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with X4 or R5 and CEM cells infected with X4 HIV-1 strains. Exposure to A80 increased the productive infection of activated CD4+ T cells and CEM cells with R5 and X4 viruses, respectively. This antibody uniquely induced agglutination of PBMC and CEM cells but did not activate calcium mobilization. Agglutination induced by A80 was inhibited by stromal cell-derived factor 1, T22, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate but was not significantly altered by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin, wortmannin, or MAbs to LFA-1, ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and ICAM-3. The binding of the A145 and A120 MAbs was mapped to the N-terminal extracellular domain and a conformational epitope involving ECL1 and ECL2, respectively. Both of these MAbs inhibited HIV-1 infection and lacked the novel properties of A80. These results suggest a new role for CXCR4 in homologous lymphocyte adhesion that is ligand independent and in HIV-1 infection. PMID:11689635

  6. Identification of a novel splice variant of human PD-L1 mRNA encoding an isoform-lacking Igv-like domain.

    PubMed

    He, Xian-hui; Xu, Li-hui; Liu, Yi

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the expression and regulation of PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The cDNA encoding human PD-L1 precursor was cloned from the total RNA extracted from the resting and phorbol dibutyrate plus ionomycin- or phytohemagglutinin-activated PBMC, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and independent clones were sequenced and analyzed. The expression and subcellular localization were examined in transiently transfected cells. The PD-L1 gene expression in different PBMC was also analyzed by RT-PCR. A novel human PD-L1 splice variant was identified from the activated PBMC. It was generated by splicing out exon? encoding an immunoglobulin variable domain (Igv)-like domain but retaining all other exons without a frame-shift. Consequently, the putative translated protein contained all other domains including the transmembrane region except for the Igv-like domain. Furthermore, the conventional isoform was expressed on the plasma surface whereas the novel isoform showed a pattern of intracellular membrane distribution in transiently transfected K562 cells. In addition, the expression pattern of the PD-L1 splice variant was variable in different individuals and in different cellular status. PD-L1 expression may be regulated at the posttranscriptional level through alternative splicing, and modulation of the PD-L1 isoform expression may influence the outcome of specific immune responses in the peripheral tissues.

  7. Rottlerin enhances IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression through sustained p38 MAPK activation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Jung

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important enzyme in inflammation. In this study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of the synergistic effect of rottlerin on interleukin1β (IL-1β)-induced COX-2 expression in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Treatment with rottlerin enhanced IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Combined treatment with rottlerin and IL-1β significantly induced COX-2 expression, at least in part, through the enhancement of COX-2 mRNA stability. In addition, rottlerin and IL-1β treatment drove sustained activation of p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is involved in induced COX-2 expression. Also, a pharmacological inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB 203580) and transient transfection with inactive p38 MAPK inhibited rottlerin and IL-1β-induced COX-2 upregulation. However, suppression of protein kinase C δ (PKC δ) expression by siRNA or overexpression of dominant-negative PKC δ (DN-PKC-δ) did not abrogate the rottlerin plus IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression. Furthermore, rottlerin also enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that rottlerin causes IL-1β-induced COX-2 upregulation through sustained p38 MAPK activation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. PMID:21971413

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of clovamide and Theobroma cacao phenolic extracts in human monocytes: evaluation of respiratory burst, cytokine release, NF-κB activation, and PPARγ modulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawu; Locatelli, Monica; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Coisson, Jean Daniel; Travaglia, Fabiano; Arlorio, Marco; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2011-05-25

    There is a great interest in the potential health benefits of biologically active phenolic compounds in cocoa (Theobroma cacao) and dark chocolate. We investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of clovamide (a N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acid amide present in cocoa beans) and two phenolic extracts from unroasted and roasted cocoa beans, by evaluating superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production, cytokine release, and NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The effects of rosmarinic acid are shown for comparison. Clovamide and rosmarinic acid inhibited PMA-induced O(2)(-) production and cytokine release (with a bell-shaped curve and maximal inhibition at 10-100 nM), as well as PMA-induced NF-κB activation; the two cocoa extracts were less effective. In all tests, clovamide was the most potent compound and also enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activity, which may exert anti-inflammatory effects. These findings indicate clovamide as a possible bioactive compound with anti-inflammatory activity in human cells.

  9. Immunocytochemical evidence for PDBu-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK in human internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Maxwell, Pinckney J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the unknown status of PKC and RhoA/ROCK in the phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu)-stimulated state in the human internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We determined the effects of PDBu (10−7 M), the PKC activator, on PKCα and RhoA and ROCK II translocation in the human IAS SMCs. We used immunocytochemistry and fluorescence microcopy in the basal state, following PDBu, and before and after PKC inhibitor calphostin C (10−6 M), cell-permeable RhoA inhibitor C3 exoenzyme (2.5 μg/ml), and ROCK inhibitor Y 27632 (10−6 M). We also determined changes in the SMC lengths via computerized digital micrometry. In the basal state PKCα was distributed almost uniformly throughout the cell, whereas RhoA and ROCK II were located in the higher intensities toward the periphery. PDBu caused significant translocation of PKCα, RhoA, and ROCK II. PDBu-induced translocation of PKCα was attenuated by calphostin C and not by C3 exoenzyme and Y 27632. However, PDBu-induced translocation of RhoA was blocked by C3 exoenzyme, and that of ROCK II was attenuated by both C3 exoenzyme and Y 27632. Contraction of the human IAS SMCs caused by PDBu in parallel with RhoA/ROCK II translocation was attenuated by C3 exoenzyme and Y 27632 but not by calphostin C. In human IAS SMCs RhoA/ROCK compared with PKC are constitutively active, and contractility by PDBu is associated with RhoA/ROCK activation rather than PKC. The relative contribution of RhoA/ROCK vs. PKC in the pathophysiology and potential therapy for the IAS dysfunction remains to be determined. PMID:21566015

  10. Characterization of Treefoil Peptide Genes in Iron-Ion or X-Irradiated Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Harrison, G. H.; Xu, J. F.; Zhou, X. F.

    1999-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is especially sensitive to ionizing radiation, probably because of its high rate of cell turn over. Most of the data in the literature concerns the histological/anatomical description of damage rather than functional studies. In fact, previous reports in humans have shown that, at doses of 2 Gy or more, functional abnormalities appear indicating that in radiation sensitive tissues the effects of radiation are not limited to cell death. GI functions are controlled in particular by GI peptides. One hypothesis is that ionizing radiation may modulate the synthesis and release of these peptides and consequently may contribute largely to abnormalities in GI function. However, no previous studies have been concerned with GI-specific gene expression in irradiated GI tissues. The family of human trefoil peptides comprises three members thus far, all of which are expressed in specific regions of the GI tract. In addition, two trefoil peptides, pS2 (TFFI) and HITF (TFF2) are expressed in breast tissue. Their exact function in GI and breast tissues is unclear but mucosal integrity, repair, mucin secretion and responsiveness to hormones have been shown. We recently isolated and characterized pS2 as a novel p53- and estrogen receptor-independent gene whose MRNA expression in several cells lines was found to be delayed 4 to 7 days after irradiation with X-rays, fission neutrons or 1 GeV/n Fe-ions. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pS2 and HITF have a similar induction kinetics in irradiated gastric and breast cell lines, and whether they have the phorbol ester (TPA) responsive element (TRE).

  11. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  12. PKC-Dependent Human Monocyte Adhesion Requires AMPK and Syk Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Ying; Huang, Duen-Yi; Ho, Feng-Ming; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2012-01-01

    PKC plays a pivotal role in mediating monocyte adhesion; however, the underlying mechanisms of PKC-mediated cell adhesion are still unclear. In this study, we elucidated the signaling network of phorbol ester PMA-stimulated human monocyte adhesion. Our results with pharmacological inhibitors suggested the involvement of AMPK, Syk, Src and ERK in PKC-dependent adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to culture plates. Biochemical analysis further confirmed the ability of PMA to activate these kinases, as well as the involvement of AMPK-Syk-Src signaling in this event. Direct protein interaction between AMPK and Syk, which requires the kinase domain of AMPK and linker region of Syk, was observed following PMA stimulation. Notably, we identified Syk as a novel downstream target of AMPK; AICAR can induce Syk phosphorylation at Ser178 and activation of this kinase. However, activation of AMPK alone, either by stimulation with AICAR or by overexpression, is not sufficient to induce monocyte adhesion. Studies further demonstrated that PKC-mediated ERK signaling independent of AMPK activation is also involved in cell adhesion. Moreover, AMPK, Syk, Src and ERK signaling were also required for PMA to induce THP-1 cell adhesion to endothelial cells as well as to induce adhesion response of human primary monocytes. Taken together, we propose a bifurcated kinase signaling pathway involved in PMA-mediated adhesion of monocytes. PKC can activate LKB1/AMPK, leading to phosphorylation and activation of Syk, and subsequent activation of Src and FAK. In addition, PKC-dependent ERK activation induces a coordinated signal for cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell adhesion. For the first time we demonstrate Syk as a novel substrate target of AMPK, and shed new light on the role of AMPK in monocyte adhesion, in addition to its well identified functions in energy homeostasis. PMID:22848421

  13. Presenilin expression during induced differentiation of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Flood, Fiona; Sundström, Erik; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Wiehager, Birgitta; Seiger, Ake; Johnston, Janet A; Cowburn, Richard F

    2004-06-01

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with both wild-type and exon-9 deleted (deltaE9) presenilin constructs were used to study the role of the presenilin proteins during differentiation. Cells transfected with either wild-type or deltaE9 PS1, of which the latter abolishes normal endoproteolytic cleavage of the protein, showed no obvious differences in their ability to differentiate to a neuronal-like phenotype upon treatment with retinoic acid (RA). A defined pattern of PS1 expression was observed during differentiation with both RA and the phorbol ester TPA. Full-length PS1 was shown to increase dramatically within 5-24 h of RA treatment. TPA gave an earlier and longer lasting increase in full-length PS1 levels. The intracellular distribution pattern of PS1 was markedly altered following RA treatment. Within 24h PS1 was highly up-regulated throughout the cell body around the nucleus. Between 2 and 4 weeks PS1 staining appeared punctate and also localised to the nucleus. Increases in PS1 expression upon treatment with RA and TPA were blocked by treatment with cycloheximide, indicating a role of de-novo protein synthesis in this effect. PS2 expression remained unchanged during differentiation. Levels of full-length PS1 were also seen to increase during neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation in the forebrain of first trimester human foetuses between 6.5 and 11 weeks. These combined observations support the idea that PS1 is involved in neuronal differentiation by a mechanism likely independent of endoproteolysis of the protein.

  14. Chloride Channel 3 Channels in the Activation and Migration of Human Blood Eosinophils in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Gaurav, Rohit; Bewtra, Againdra K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is responsible for respiratory burst in immune cells. Chloride channel 3 (CLC3) has been linked to the respiratory burst in eosinophils and neutrophils. The effect of cytokines and the involvement of CLC3 in the regulation of NADPH-dependent oxidative stress and on cytokine-mediated migration of eosinophils are not known. Human peripheral blood eosinophils were isolated from healthy individuals and from individuals with asthma by negative selection. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of NADPH oxidases in eosinophils. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement was done with flow cytometry. Superoxide generation was measured with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, eotaxin, and CLC3 blockers. CLC3 dependence of eosinophils in TGF-β- and eotaxin-induced migration was also examined. The messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2, dual oxidase (DUOX) 1, and DUOX2 were detected in blood eosinophils, with very low expression of NOX1, NOX3, and NOX5 and no NOX4 mRNA. The level of NOX2 mRNA transcripts increased with disease severity in the eosinophils of subjects with asthma compared with healthy nonatopic volunteers. Change in granularity and size in eosinophils, but no change in intracellular ROS, was observed with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA, TGF-β, and eotaxin used the CLC3-dependent pathway to increase superoxide radicals. TGF-β and eotaxin induced CLC3-dependent chemotaxis of eosinophils. These findings support the requirement of CLC3 in the activation and migration of human blood eosinophils and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target to regulate eosinophil hyperactivity in allergic airway inflammation in asthma.

  15. Chloride Channel 3 Channels in the Activation and Migration of Human Blood Eosinophils in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gaurav, Rohit; Bewtra, Againdra K.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is responsible for respiratory burst in immune cells. Chloride channel 3 (CLC3) has been linked to the respiratory burst in eosinophils and neutrophils. The effect of cytokines and the involvement of CLC3 in the regulation of NADPH-dependent oxidative stress and on cytokine-mediated migration of eosinophils are not known. Human peripheral blood eosinophils were isolated from healthy individuals and from individuals with asthma by negative selection. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of NADPH oxidases in eosinophils. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement was done with flow cytometry. Superoxide generation was measured with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, eotaxin, and CLC3 blockers. CLC3 dependence of eosinophils in TGF-β– and eotaxin-induced migration was also examined. The messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2, dual oxidase (DUOX) 1, and DUOX2 were detected in blood eosinophils, with very low expression of NOX1, NOX3, and NOX5 and no NOX4 mRNA. The level of NOX2 mRNA transcripts increased with disease severity in the eosinophils of subjects with asthma compared with healthy nonatopic volunteers. Change in granularity and size in eosinophils, but no change in intracellular ROS, was observed with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA, TGF-β, and eotaxin used the CLC3-dependent pathway to increase superoxide radicals. TGF-β and eotaxin induced CLC3-dependent chemotaxis of eosinophils. These findings support the requirement of CLC3 in the activation and migration of human blood eosinophils and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target to regulate eosinophil hyperactivity in allergic airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:25514499

  16. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B.S.; Kennelly, Edward J.; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC–MS), and small molecule finger-print analysis performed by HPLC–PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10 kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density. PMID:24434371

  17. Human Rights

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2005-12-01

    Daniel Meyer, president of the French League of the Defense of Human and Citizen Rights does an exposé on his political activism. In the second part, a Brazilian lawyer (exiled) gives witness about the human rights violation under the military dictatorship in her country; during 6 years she defended political prisoners.

  18. Human Rights

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-05-18

    Daniel Meyer, president of the French League of the Defense of Human and Citizen Rights does an exposé on his political activism. In the second part, a Brazilian lawyer (exiled) gives witness about the human rights violation under the military dictatorship in her country; during 6 years she defended political prisoners.

  19. Behavioral Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, Carl E.

    Behavioral humanism is defined as the synthesis of behavioral techniques with humanistic goals. Contemporary humanism, especially humanistic psychology, offers directions for the kind of behavior that individuals should be able to engage in; contemporary behaviorism offers principles and procedures to help individuals increase their humanistic…

  20. Teaching humanism.

    PubMed

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  1. Human Issues in Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the report of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee in Human Rights which seeks to ease the plight of individual scientists, engineers, and medical personnel suffering severe repression. Case studies of instances of negligence of human rights are provided. (CP)

  2. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor 4 expression in human T cell leukemia virus-I-transformed T cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Mamane, Yael; Genin, Pierre; Azimi, Nazli; Waldmann, Thomas; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-15

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is a lymphoid/myeloid-restricted member of the IRF transcription factor family that plays an essential role in the homeostasis and function of mature lymphocytes. IRF-4 expression is tightly regulated in resting primary T cells and is transiently induced at the mRNA and protein levels after activation by Ag-mimetic stimuli such as TCR cross-linking or treatment with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PMA/ionomycin). However, IRF-4 is constitutively upregulated in human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infected T cells as a direct gene target for the HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that chronic IRF-4 expression in HTLV-I-infected T lymphocytes is associated with a leukemic phenotype, and we examine the mechanisms by which continuous production of IRF-4 is achieved in HTLV-I-transformed T cells. IRF-4 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells is driven through activation of the NF-kappaB and NF-AT pathways, resulting in the binding of p50, p65, and c-Rel to the kappaB1 element and p50, c-Rel, and NF-ATp to the CD28RE element within the -617 to -209 region of the IRF-4 promoter. Furthermore, mutation of either the kappaB1 or CD28RE sites blocks Tax-mediated transactivation of the human IRF-4 promoter in T cells. These experiments constitute the first detailed analysis of human IRF-4 transcriptional regulation within the context of HTLV-I infection and transformation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

  3. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  4. Human tolerances.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1962-04-01

    The ultimate limitations in flight performance and in future civil air carrier equipment are the limitations imposed by what may be termed human tolerances. This is particularly applicable to the matter of the supersonic transport. The discussi...

  5. Human otoacariasis.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, K S Gangadhara; Rajeshwari, A

    2007-09-01

    Accidental entry of foreign bodies into the ear canal is very common. Animate foreign bodies constitute upto 14% of cases, majority being the cockroaches. Not many cases of ticks entering into human ears are found in the scientific literature. Even the available reports are from South Africa, Nepal, Malaysia, Chile and Srilanka. This Indian study discusses the occurence, clinical features, the methods adopted in the removal and the complications of tick infestation of human ear. A total of 144 cases of ticks entering the human ears were studied over a period of two years from Jan 2004 to Dec 2005. This report represents one of the largest recorded series of human otoacariasis available in the Indian literature.

  6. Human expunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  7. Human Cloning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-20

    parthenogenesis , to produce human embryos. ACT researchers obtained eggs from seven women, ages 24 to 32, who were paid $3,000 to $5,000. In the SCNT...cumulus cell nucleus began to divide but division stopped at the four-to-six-cell stage. In parthenogenesis , an egg cell is treated with chemicals...Human Subject Protection regulations] as of the date of enactment of this Act, that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis , cloning, or any

  8. Ex vivo preservation and expansion of human limbal epithelial stem cells on amniotic membrane cultures.

    PubMed

    Meller, D; Pires, R T F; Tseng, S C G

    2002-04-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM) transplantation effectively expands the remaining limbal epithelial stem cells in patients with partial limbal stem cell deficiency. The authors investigated whether this action could be produced ex vivo. The outgrowth rate on AM was compared among explants derived from human limbus, peripheral cornea, and central cornea. For outgrowth of human limbal epithelial cells (HLEC), cell cycle kinetics were measured by BrdU labelling for 1 or 7 days, of which the latter was also chased in primary cultures, secondary 3T3 fibroblast cultures, and in athymic Balb/c mice following a brief treatment with a phorbol ester. Epithelial morphology was studied by histology and transmission electron microscopy, and phenotype was defined by immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies to keratins and mucins. Outgrowth rate was 0/22 (0%) and 2/24 (8.3%) for central and peripheral corneal explants, respectively, but was 77/80 (96.2%) for limbal explants (p <0.0001). 24 hour BrdU labelling showed a uniformly low (that is, less than 5%) labelling index in 65% of the limbal explants, but a mixed pattern with areas showing a high (that is, more than 40%) labelling index in 35% of limbal explants, and in all (100%) peripheral corneal explants. Continuous BrdU labelling for 7 days detected a high labelling index in 61.5% of the limbal explants with the remainder still retaining a low labelling index. A number of label retaining cells were noted after 7 day labelling followed by 14 days of chase in primary culture or by 21 days of chase after transplantation to 3T3 fibroblast feeder layers. After exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate for 24 hours and 7 day labelling, HLEC transplanted in athymic mice still showed a number of label retaining basal cells after 9 days of chase. HLEC cultured on AM were strongly positive for K14 keratin and MUC4 and slightly positive in suprabasal cells for K3 keratin but negative for K12 keratin, AMEM2, and MUC5AC. After subcutaneous

  9. Fisetin inhibits IL-31 production in stimulated human mast cells: Possibilities of fisetin being exploited to treat histamine-independent pruritus.

    PubMed

    Che, Denis Nchang; Cho, Byoung Ok; Shin, Jae Young; Kang, Hyun Ju; Kim, Young-Soo; Jang, Seon Il

    2018-05-15

    Interleukin-31 (IL-31) is a recently discovered cytokine that is tightly linked to the pathogenesis of pruritus seen in atopic dermatitis. Flavonoids, like fisetin, are naturally occurring molecules with antioxidant, cytoprotective, and anti-inflammatory actions. the present study sought to investigate whether fisetin modulates IL-31 and histamine release in human mast cells (HMC-1). HMC-1 cells were pretreated with fisetin at various doses and stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PI) for different time intervals. We evaluated IL-31 production and histamine release and signaling mechanism of the action of fisetin on IL-31 production. We also investigated the effects of fisetin on scratching behaviors in mice. Fisetin decreased PI-stimulated mRNA expression and production of IL-31 in HMC-1 cells. Fisetin inhibited PI-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases that further suppressed nuclear factor (NF-κB) activation and translocation to the nucleus through the inhibition of IκB-α phosphorylation. Fisetin also prevented mast cell release of histamine in HMC-1 cells. Mice in-vivo studies show that fisetin reduced scratching behaviors in mice. These pharmacological actions of fisetin provide new suggestions that fisetin can be of potential use for the treatment of pruritus that cannot be treated with histamine receptor blockers alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of helper T cell clones. Early proliferative defects despite intact antigen-specific recognition and interleukin 4 secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Friedman, S M; Chartash, E K; Crow, M K; Posnett, D N

    1989-01-01

    HIV selectively inhibited the proliferative response of clonal CD4+ T lymphocytes to alloantigen while other alloantigen-dependent responses were unperturbed. Specifically, impaired blastogenesis could be dissociated from alloantigen-specific induction of the B cell activation molecule CD23, IL-4 release, and inositol lipid hydrolysis. In addition, membrane expression of pertinent T cell receptor molecules, including CD2, CD3, and T cell antigen receptor (Ti), remained intact. Using two MHC class II-specific human CD4+ helper T cell clones, the proliferative defect was shown to be an early consequence of HIV infection, occurring within 4 d of viral inoculation and preceding increases in mature virion production. It was generalizable to three distinct methods of T cell activation, all independent of antigen-presenting cells: anti-CD3 mediated cross-linking of the CD3/Ti complex; anti-CD2 and phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA); and anti-CD28 plus PMA. These abnormalities were not mitigated by addition of exogenous IL-2, even though expression of the IL-2 receptor (CD25) was unaltered. These studies define a selective blockade in T cell function early after HIV exposure that could serve as a model for certain in vivo manifestations of AIDS. PMID:2470786

  11. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  12. A novel interaction between calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand and Basigin regulates calcium signaling and matrix metalloproteinase activities in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Tingting; Su, Juan; Tang, Wen; Luo, Zhongling; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhou, Honghao; Qi, Min; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhang, Jianglin; Chen, Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular free calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger regulating a multitude of normal and pathogenic cellular responses, including the development of melanoma. Upstream signaling pathways regulating the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) may therefore have a significant impact on melanoma growth and metastasis. In this study, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is bound to Basigin, a widely expressed integral plasma membrane glycoprotein and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, or CD147) implicated in melanoma proliferation, invasiveness, and metastasis. This interaction between CAML and Basigin was first identified using yeast two-hybrid screening and further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. In human A375 melanoma cells, CAML and Basigin were co-localized to the ER. Knockdown of Basigin in melanoma cells by siRNA significantly decreased resting [Ca2+]i and the [Ca2+]i increase induced by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin (TG), indicating that the interaction between CAML and Basigin regulates ER-dependent [Ca2+]i signaling. Meanwhile upregulating the [Ca2+]i either by TG or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) could stimulate the production of MMP-9 in A375 cells with the expression of Basigin. Our study has revealed a previously uncharacterized [Ca2+]i signaling pathway that may control melanoma invasion, and metastasis. Disruption of this pathway may be a novel therapeutic strategy for melanoma treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids modulate Weibel-Palade body degranulation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in PMA-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bürgin-Maunder, Corinna S; Brooks, Peter R; Russell, Fraser D

    2013-11-08

    Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) produce cardiovascular benefits by improving endothelial function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand factor (vWF) in cytoplasmic Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). We examined whether LC n-3 PUFAs regulate WPB degranulation using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated with or without 75 or 120 µM docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid for 5 days at 37 °C. WPB degranulation was stimulated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and this was assessed by immunocytochemical staining for vWF. Actin reorganization was determined using phalloidin-TRITC staining. We found that PMA stimulated WPB degranulation, and that this was significantly reduced by prior incubation of cells with LC n-3 PUFAs. In these cells, WPBs had rounded rather than rod-shaped morphology and localized to the perinuclear region, suggesting interference with cytoskeletal remodeling that is necessary for complete WPB degranulation. In line with this, actin rearrangement was altered in cells containing perinuclear WPBs, where cells exhibited a thickened actin rim in the absence of prominent cytoplasmic stress fibers. These findings indicate that LC n-3 PUFAs provide some protection against WBP degranulation, and may contribute to an improved understanding of the anti-thrombotic effects previously attributed to LC n-3 PUFAs.

  14. Expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in human atherosclerosis and regulation in macrophages by colony stimulating factors and oxidized low density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ricote, Mercedes; Huang, Jannet; Fajas, Luis; Li, Andrew; Welch, John; Najib, Jamila; Witztum, Joseph L.; Auwerx, Johan; Palinski, Wulf; Glass, Christopher K.

    1998-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that has been demonstrated to regulate fat cell development and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ is also expressed in a subset of macrophages and negatively regulates the expression of several proinflammatory genes in response to natural and synthetic ligands. We here demonstrate that PPARγ is expressed in macrophage foam cells of human atherosclerotic lesions, in a pattern that is highly correlated with that of oxidation-specific epitopes. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which are known to be present in atherosclerotic lesions, stimulated PPARγ expression in primary macrophages and monocytic cell lines. PPARγ mRNA expression was also induced in primary macrophages and THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the induction of PPARγ expression by TPA, but not by oxLDL, suggesting that more than one signaling pathway regulates PPARγ expression in macrophages. TPA induced the expression of PPARγ in RAW 264.7 macrophages by increasing transcription from the PPARγ1 and PPARγ3 promoters. In concert, these observations provide insights into the regulation of PPARγ expression in activated macrophages and raise the possibility that PPARγ ligands may influence the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:9636198

  15. Houttuynia cordata Thunb inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Joe; Seo, Hye-Sook; Kim, Gyung-Jun; Jeon, Chan Yong; Park, Jong Hyeong; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Park, Sun-Ju; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is widely used in oriental medicine as a remedy for inflammation. However, at present there is no explanation for the mechanism by which HCT affects the production of inflammatory cytokines. The current study aimed to determine the effect of an essence extracted from HCT on mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. Inflammatory cytokine production induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus a calcium ionophore, A23187, was measured in the human mast cell line, HMC-1, incubated with various concentrations of HCT. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 secreted protein levels were measured using an ELISA assay. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR analysis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were examined by western blot analysis. The NF-κB promoter activity was examined by luciferase assay. It was observed that HCT inhibited PMA plus A23187-induced TNF-α and IL-6 secretion and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. It was also noted that HCT suppressed the induction of NF-κB activity, inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It was concluded that HCT is an inhibitor of NF-κB and cytokines blocking mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. These results indicate that HCT may be used for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and apoptotic effects of the polyphenol curcumin on human fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Kloesch, Burkhard; Becker, Tatjana; Dietersdorfer, Elisabeth; Kiener, Hans; Steiner, Guenter

    2013-02-01

    It has recently been reported that the polyphenol curcumin has pronounced anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic properties. This study investigated possible anti-inflammatory and apoptotic effects of curcumin on the human synovial fibroblast cell line MH7A, and on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MH7A cells and RA-FLS were stimulated either with interleukin (IL)-1β or phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), and treated simultaneously or sequentially with increasing concentrations of curcumin. Release of interleukin (IL)-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). In MH7A cells, modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as p38 and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) were analysed by a reporter gene assay and Western blot, respectively. Pro-apoptotic events were monitored by Annexin-V/7-AAD based assay. Cleavage of pro-caspase-3 and -7 was checked with specific antibodies. Curcumin effectively blocked IL-1β and PMA-induced IL-6 expression both in MH7A cells and RA-FLS. VEGF-A expression could only be detected in RA-FLS and was induced by PMA, but not by IL-1β. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited activation of NF-κB and induced dephosphorylation of ERK1/2. Treatment of FLS with high concentrations of curcumin was associated with a decrease in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The natural compound curcumin represents strong anti-inflammatory properties and induces apoptosis in FLS. This study provides an insight into possible molecular mechanisms of this substance and suggests it as a natural remedy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases like RA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as “Trojan horses” carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages. PMID:26056317

  19. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-06-23

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as "Trojan horses" carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages.

  20. Plasticity of Human THP-1 Cell Phagocytic Activity during Macrophagic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kurynina, A V; Erokhina, M V; Makarevich, O A; Sysoeva, V Yu; Lepekha, L N; Kuznetsov, S A; Onishchenko, G E

    2018-03-01

    Studies of the role of macrophages in phagocytosis are of great theoretical and practical importance for understanding how these cells are involved in the organism's defense response and in the development of various pathologies. Here we investigated phagocytic plasticity of THP-1 (acute monocytic human leukemia) cells at different stages (days 1, 3, and 7) of phorbol ester (PMA)-induced macrophage differentiation. Analysis of cytokine profiles showed that PMA at a concentration of 100 nM induced development of the proinflammatory macrophage population. The functional activity of macrophages was assessed on days 3 and 7 of differentiation using unlabeled latex beads and latex beads conjugated with ligands (gelatin, mannan, and IgG Fc fragment) that bind to the corresponding specific receptors. The general phagocytic activity increased significantly (1.5-2.0-fold) in the course of differentiation; phagocytosis occurred mostly through the Fc receptors, as shown previously for M1 macrophages. On day 7, the levels of phagocytosis of gelatin- and Fc-covered beads were high; however, the intensity of ingestion of mannan-conjugated beads via mannose receptors increased 2.5-3.0-fold as well, which indicated formation of cells with an alternative phenotype similar to that of M2 macrophages. Thus, the type and the plasticity of phagocytic activity at certain stages of macrophage differentiation can be associated with the formation of functionally mature morphological phenotype. This allows macrophages to exhibit their phagocytic potential in response to specific ligands. These data are of fundamental importance and can be used to develop therapeutic methods for correcting the M1/M2 macrophage ratio in an organism.

  1. Hydrocortisone activation of human herpesvirus 8 viral DNA replication and gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hudnall, S D; Rady, P L; Tyring, S K; Fish, J C

    1999-03-15

    Patients undergoing chronic steroid therapy for organ transplantation are at increased risk for development of human herpes virus 8(HHV-8)-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). It has also been reported that following steroid withdrawal, KS lesions often undergo partial or complete regression. We have examined the effect of corticosteroid treatment on HHV-8 replication, gene expression, and lytic protein expression in BCBL-1 cells in vitro. BCBL-1 cells were collected after culture for 24-72 hr with hydrocortisone (HC) 1-5 microM, phorbol ester 20 ng/ml (positive control), and culture medium only (negative control). HHV-8 genomic conformation was examined by Gardella gel analysis. mRNA expression of viral cyclin (v-Cyc), viral Bcl-2 (v-Bcl-2), viral macrophage inflammatory protein-I (v-MIP-I), viral interferon regulatory factor-1(v-IRF-1), and viral tegument protein (TP) was examined by RT-PCR Southern blot. Viral protein expression within the cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using 5 different HHV-8 positive antisera from 4 renal transplant recipients and 1 patient with classic KS. Gardella gel analysis revealed that HC induced an accumulation of the linear replicative genomic form of the virus in a time-dependent fashion. Southern blot analysis of the RT-PCR products revealed that HC induced increased expression of v-IRF-1, v-Bcl-2, and TP mRNA, with little discernible effect on v-Cyc, and v-MIP-I. Immunofluorescence revealed that HC induced increased numbers of cells expressing lytic antigens. These data indicate that hydrocortisone acts directly on BCBL-1 cells to activate the lytic cycle of HHV-8 and provide further support for the hypothesis that HHV-8 is activated in corticosteroid-treated immunocompromised patients.

  2. Partial characterization of a putative new growth factor present in pathological human vitreous.

    PubMed

    Pombo, C; Bokser, L; Casabiell, X; Zugaza, J; Capeans, M; Salorio, M; Casanueva, F

    1996-03-01

    Several growth factors have been implicated in the development of proliferative eye diseases, and some of those are present in human vitreous (HV). The effects of HV on cellular responses which modulate proliferative cell processes were studied. This study describes the partial characterization of a vitreous factor activity which does not correspond to any of the previously reported growth factors in pathological HV. Vitreous humour was obtained from medical vitrectomies, from patients with PDR and PVR. The biological activity of the vitreous factor was determined by its ability to increase cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), increase production of inositol phosphates, and induce cell proliferation in the cell line EGFR T17. In some experiments other cell lines, such as NIH 3T3, 3T3-L1, FRTL5, A431, PC12, Y79, and GH3, were also employed. Measurement of [Ca2+]i in cell suspensions was performed using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2. The activity of the factor present in HV was compared with other growth factors by means of: (a) [Ca2+]i mobilization pattern, (b) sequential homologous and heterologous desensitization of receptors, (c) effects of phorbol esters on their action, and (d) inactivation after treatment with different proteolytic enzymes. The HV-induced cell proliferation and increases in [Ca2+]i concentration were characterized by a peculiar time pattern. The different approaches used ruled out its identity with PDGF, bFGF, EGF, TGF-beta, IGFs, TNF-alpha, NGF, and other compounds such as ATP, angiotensin I, and bradykinin. Vitreous factor actions are mediated by specific receptors apparently regulated by PKC. This factor is able to induce [Ca2+]i mobilization in most of the cell lines studied, indicating that its effects are not tissue specific. These results suggest the presence of a growth factor activity in pathological HV which may be due to the presence of an undescribed growth factor in the eye.

  3. Oxygen Tension Modulates Differentiation and Primary Macrophage Functions in the Human Monocytic THP-1 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Grodzki, Ana Cristina G.; Giulivi, Cecilia; Lein, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    The human THP-1 cell line is widely used as an in vitro model system for studying macrophage differentiation and function. Conventional culture conditions for these cells consist of ambient oxygen pressure (∼20% v/v) and medium supplemented with the thiol 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) and serum. In consideration of the redox activities of O2 and 2-ME, and the extensive experimental evidence supporting a role for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the differentiation and function of macrophages, we addressed the question of whether culturing THP-1 cells under a more physiologically relevant oxygen tension (5% O2) in the absence of 2-ME and serum would alter THP-1 cell physiology. Comparisons of cultures maintained in 18% O2 versus 5% O2 indicated that reducing oxygen tension had no effect on the proliferation of undifferentiated THP-1 cells. However, decreasing the oxygen tension to 5% O2 significantly increased the rate of phorbol ester-induced differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells as well as the metabolic activity of both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Removal of both 2-ME and serum from the medium decreased the proliferation of undifferentiated THP-1 cells but increased metabolic activity and the rate of differentiation under either oxygen tension. In differentiated THP-1 cells, lowering the oxygen tension to 5% O2 decreased phagocytic activity, the constitutive release of β-hexosaminidase and LPS-induced NF-κB activation but enhanced LPS-stimulated release of cytokines. Collectively, these data demonstrate that oxygen tension influences THP-1 cell differentiation and primary macrophage functions, and suggest that culturing these cells under tightly regulated oxygen tension in the absence of exogenous reducing agent and serum is likely to provide a physiologically relevant baseline from which to study the role of the local redox environment in regulating THP-1 cell physiology. PMID:23355903

  4. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  5. Human brucellosis is characterized by an intense Th1 profile associated with a defective monocyte function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-07-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4(+) CD3(+) and CD8(+) CD3(+) T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-gamma levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes.

  6. Human Brucellosis Is Characterized by an Intense Th1 Profile Associated with a Defective Monocyte Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J.; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A.; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-01-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4+ CD3+ and CD8+ CD3+ T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-γ levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:20404074

  7. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.

    The authors have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, we found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2-) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAMmore » to O3 while the basal O2- release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3- exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of proteins made by HAM following in vitro exposure to O3 identified 11 proteins whose rate of synthesis was significantly altered. Thus, these studies show that exposure to O3 alters the functional competence of HAM. While there is a minimal effect on protein expression or synthesis, the responses of HAM to particulate immune complexes, to bacterial LPS, and to PMA are impaired. The release of arachidonic acid and PGE2 suggest that the effect of O3 is primarily targeted to the HAM cell membrane. These changes may ultimately result in increased susceptibility to inhaled infectious agents in the O3-exposed individual.« less

  8. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  9. Multiple Signals Regulate PLC beta 3 in Human Myometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Miao; Murtazina, Dilyara A.; Phillips, Jennifer; Ku, Chun-Ying; Sanborn, Barbara M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The regulation of PLCB3-Serine1105 phosphorylation by both negative feedback and negative crosstalk facilitates the integration of multiple signaling pathways in myometrial cells. Phospholipase CB3 (PLCB3) Serine1105, a substrate for multiple protein kinases, represents a potential point of convergence of several signaling pathways in the myometrium. To explore this hypothesis, the regulation of PLCB3-Serine1105 phosphorylation (P-S1105) was studied in immortalized and primary human myometrial cells. CPT-cAMP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCA) transiently increased P-S1105. Relaxin also stimulated P-S1105; this effect was partially blocked by the protein kinase A (PRKA) inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Oxytocin, which stimulates Gαq-mediated pathways, also rapidly increased P-S1105, as did PGF2α and ATP. Oxytocin-stimulated phosphorylation was blocked by the protein kinase C (PRKC) inhibitor Go6976 and by pretreatment overnight with a phorbol ester. Cypermethrin, a PP2B phosphatase inhibitor, but not okadaic acid, a PP1/PP2A inhibitor, prolonged the effect of CALCA on P-S1105, whereas the reverse was the case for the oxytocin-stimulated increase in P-S1105. PLCB3 was the predominant PLC isoform expressed in the myometrial cells and PLCB3 shRNA constructs significantly attenuated oxytocin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Oxytocin-induced phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover was inhibited by CPT-cAMP and okadaic acid but enhanced by pretreatment with Go6976. CPT-cAMP inhibited oxytocin-stimulated PI turnover in the presence of overexpressed PLCB3, but not overexpressed PLCB3-S1105A. These data demonstrate that both negative crosstalk from the cAMP/PRKA pathway and a negative feedback loop in the oxytocin/G protein/PLCB pathway involving PRKC operate in myometrial cells and suggest that different protein phosphatases predominate in mediating P-S1105 dephosphorylation in these pathways. The integration of multiple signal components at the level

  10. Stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone and Grave's immunoglobulin G of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression in human thyroid follicles in vitro and flt mRNA expression in the rat thyroid in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Yamazaki, K; Shizume, K; Kanaji, Y; Obara, T; Ohsumi, K; Demura, H; Yamaguchi, S; Shibuya, M

    1995-09-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of thyroid gland hypervascularity in patients with Graves' disease, we studied the expression of mRNAs for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor, Flt family, using human thyroid follicles in vitro and thiouracil-fed rats in vivo. Human thyroid follicles, cultured in the absence of endothelial cells, secreted de novo-synthesized thyroid hormone in response to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and Graves' IgG. The thyroid follicles produced VEGF mRNA but not flt-1 mRNA. The expression of VEGF mRNA was enhanced by insulin, tumor-promoting phorbol ester, calcium ionophore, dibutyryl cAMP, TSH, and Graves' IgG. When rats were fed thiouracil for 4 wk, their serum levels of TSH were increased at day 3. VEGF mRNA was also increased on day 3, accompanied by an increase in flt family (flt-1 and KDR/ flk-1) mRNA expression. These in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that VEGF is produced by thyroid follicles in response to stimulators of TSH receptors, via the protein kinase A and C pathways. VEGF, a secretable angiogenesis factor, subsequently stimulates Flt receptors on endothelial cells in a paracrine manner, leading to their proliferation and producing hypervascularity of the thyroid gland, as seen in patients with Graves' disease.

  11. Molecular characterization and differential gene induction of the neuroendocrine-specific genes neurotensin, neurotensin receptor, PC1, PC2, and 7B2 in the human ocular ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ortego, J; Coca-Prados, M

    1997-11-01

    The ocular ciliary epithelium is a bilayer of neuroepithelial cells specialized in the secretion of aqueous humor fluid and the regulation of intraocular pressure. In this study, we report on the expression of the regulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) and a set of differentiated neuroendocrine markers including neurotensin receptors (NTrs), the prohormone convertases furin, PC1, and PC2, and the neuroendocrine polypeptide 7B2 in the ciliary epithelium. Using a human cell line, ODM-2, derived from the nonpigmented ciliary epithelium, we demonstrate that (1) NT expression is highly activated by nerve growth factor, glucocorticoid, and activators of adenylate cyclase; (2) NTr expression is up-regulated by selective ligand-activated beta2-adrenergic receptor; and (3) PC1 and PC2 expression are up-regulated via distinct signaling transduction pathways. PC1 gene expression is activated by phorbol ester, and PC2 by the same inducers as those of NT expression. A radioimmunoassay for NT detected an NT-like immunoreactivity in human ciliary epithelium and ODM-2 cell extracts, in aqueous humor, and in conditioned culture medium. The results support the view that the entire ciliary epithelium functions as a neuroendocrine tissue, synthesizing, processing, and releasing NT into the aqueous humor where it may exert important physiological functions through autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms.

  12. Capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release from human dental pulp: a model system for the study of peripheral neuropeptide secretion in normal healthy tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C.; Sun, Xiaoling X.; Locke, Erin E.; Henry, Michael A.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying trigeminal pain conditions are incompletely understood. In vitro animal studies have elucidated various targets for pharmacological intervention; however, a lack of clinical models that allow evaluation of viable innervated human tissue has impeded successful translation of many preclinical findings into clinical therapeutics. Therefore, we developed and characterized an in vitro method that evaluates the responsiveness of isolated human nociceptors by measuring basal and stimulated release of neuropeptides from collected dental pulp biopsies. Informed consent was obtained from patients presenting for extraction of normal wisdom teeth. Patients were anesthetized using nerve block injection, teeth were extracted and bisected, and pulp was removed and superfused in vitro. Basal and capsaicin-evoked peripheral release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) was analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. The presence of nociceptive markers within neurons of the dental pulp was characterized using confocal microscopy. Capsaicin increased the release of iCGRP from dental pulp biopsies in a concentration-dependent manner. Stimulated release was dependent on extracellular calcium, reversed by a TRPV1 receptor antagonist, and desensitized acutely (tachyphylaxis) and pharmacologically by pretreatment with capsaicin. Superfusion with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased basal and stimulated release, whereas PGE2 augmented only basal release. Compared with vehicle treatment, pretreatment with PGE2 induced competence for DAMGO to inhibit capsaicin-stimulated iCGRP release, similar to observations in animal models where inflammatory mediators induce competence for opioid inhibition. These results indicate the release of iCGRP from human dental pulp provides a novel tool to determine the effects of pharmacological compounds on human nociceptor sensitivity. PMID:19428185

  13. Regulation of Src homology 2-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 during activation of human neutrophils. Role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Chan, C K; Butler, J; Borregaard, N; Siminovitch, K A; Grinstein, S; Downey, G P

    1997-01-10

    The tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins induced in neutrophils by soluble and particulate stimuli is thought to be crucial for initiating antimicrobial responses. Although activation of tyrosine kinases is thought to mediate this event, the role of tyrosine phosphatases in the initiation and modulation of neutrophil responses remains largely undefined. We investigated the role of Src homology 2-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1; also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C (PTP1C), hematopoetic cell phosphatase, PTP-N6, and SHPTP-1), a phosphatase expressed primarily in hemopoietic cells, in the activation of human neutrophils. SHP-1 mRNA and protein were detected in these cells, and the enzyme was found to be predominantly localized to the cytosol in unstimulated cells. Following stimulation with neutrophil agonists such as phorbol ester, chemotactic peptide, or opsonized zymosan, a fraction of the phosphatase redistributed to the cytoskeleton. Agonist treatment also induced significant decreases (30-60%) in SHP-1 activity, which correlated temporally with increases in the cellular phosphotyrosine content. Phosphorylation of SHP-1 on serine residues was associated with the inhibition of its enzymatic activity, suggesting a causal relationship. Accordingly, both the agonist-evoked phosphorylation of SHP-1 and the inhibition of its catalytic activity were blocked by treatment with bisindolylmaleimide I, a potent and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Immunoprecipitated SHP-1 was found to be phosphorylated efficiently by purified PKC in vitro. Such phosphorylation also caused a decrease in the phosphatase activity of SHP-1. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of SHP-1 by PKC-mediated serine phosphorylation plays a role in facilitating the accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins following neutrophil stimulation. These findings provide a new link between the PKC and tyrosine phosphorylation branches of the

  14. Glucocorticoids enhance activation of the human type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4 isomerase gene.

    PubMed

    Feltus, F Alex; Cote, Stephanie; Simard, Jacques; Gingras, Sebastien; Kovacs, William J; Nicholson, Wendell E; Clark, Barbara J; Melner, Michael H

    2002-09-01

    Glucocorticoids indirectly alter adrenocortical steroid output through the inhibition of ACTH secretion by the anterior pituitary. However, previous studies suggest that glucocorticoids can directly affect adrenocortical steroid production. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of glucocorticoids to affect transcription of adrenocortical steroid biosynthetic enzymes. One potential target of glucocorticoid action in the adrenal is an enzyme critical for adrenocortical steroid production: 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4 isomerase (3beta-HSD). Treatment of the adrenocortical cell line (H295R) with the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX) increased cortisol production and 3beta-HSD mRNA levels alone or in conjunction with phorbol ester. This increase in 3beta-HSD mRNA was paralleled by increases in Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) mRNA levels. The human type II 3beta-HSD promoter lacks a consensus palindromic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) but does contain a Stat5 response element (Stat5RE) suggesting that glucocorticoids could affect type II 3beta-HSD transcription via interaction with Stat5. Transfection experiments show enhancement of human type II 3beta-HSD promoter activity by coexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and Stat5A and treatment with 100nM dexamethasone. Furthermore, removal of the Stat5RE either by truncation of the 5' flanking sequence in the promoter or introduction of point mutations to the Stat5RE abolished the ability of DEX to enhance 3beta-HSD promoter activity. These studies demonstrate the ability of glucocorticoids to directly enhance the expression of an adrenal steroidogenic enzyme gene albeit independent of a consensus palindromic glucocorticoid response element.

  15. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  16. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  17. Humanizing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Abraham

    The task of humanizing Shakespeare for high school seniors is not simple but may be done in a variety of ways, all intended to arouse student interest, curiosity, respect, and fondness for the Bard. Gimmicks such as bulletin board signs, pictures, maps, charts, and writings attract attention, as do letters to local newspapers reporting informally…

  18. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  19. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1-mediated effects were

  20. Anticancer activity of Astragalus polysaccharide in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao-Yan; Ke, Yuan; Zeng, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Ying-Wen; Yu, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    We have reported that Chinese herbs Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) can inhibit nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity during the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice. NF-κB plays important roles in genesis, growth, development and metastasis of cancer. NF-κB is also involved in the development of treatment resistance in tumors. Here we investigated the antitumor activity of APS in human non-small cell lung cells (A549 and NCI-H358) and the related mechanisms of action. The dose-effect and time-effect of antitumor of APS were determined in human lung cancer cell line A549 and NCI-H358. The inhibition effect of APS on the P65 mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot in A549 cells respectively. The inhibition effect of APS on the p50, CyclinD1 and Bcl-xL protein was detected by Western blot in A549 cells respectively. The effect of APS on NF-κB transcription activity was measured with NF-κB luciferase detection. Finally, the nude mice A549 xenograft was introduced to confirm the antitumor activity of APS in vivo. Cell viability detection results indicated that APS can inhibit the proliferation of human lung cancer cell line A549 and NCI-H358 in the concentration of 20 and 40 mg/mL. NF-κB activator Phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) can attenuate the antitumor activity of APS in both cell lines, but NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (Bay) can enhance the effect of APS in both cell lines. In vivo APS can delay the growth of A549 xenograft in BALB/C nude mice. APS can down-regulate the expression of P65 mRNA and protein of A549 cells and decrease the expression of p50, CyclinD1 and Bcl-xL protein. The luciferase detection showed that the APS could reduce the P65 transcription activity in A549 cells. PMA can partially alleviate the inhibition activity of P65 transcription activity of APS in A549 cells, and Bay can enhance the down-regulation of the P65 transcription activity induced by APS in A549 cells. APS has a

  1. Cell Culture Systems To Study Human Herpesvirus 6A/B Chromosomal Integration.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Collin, Vanessa; Hall-Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R; Mori, Yasuko; Carbonneau, Julie; Boivin, Guy; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A/B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their viral genomes in the telomeres of human chromosomes. The viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration remain largely unknown, mostly due to the lack of efficient and reproducible cell culture models to study HHV-6A/B integration. In this study, we characterized the HHV-6A/B integration efficiencies in several human cell lines using two different approaches. First, after a short-term infection (5 h), cells were processed for single-cell cloning and analyzed for chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/B (ciHHV-6A/B). Second, cells were infected with HHV-6A/B and allowed to grow in bulk for 4 weeks or longer and then analyzed for the presence of ciHHV-6. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate that HHV-6A/B integrated in most human cell lines tested, including telomerase-positive (HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116, and HEK293T) and telomerase-negative cell lines (U2OS and GM847). Our results also indicate that inhibition of DNA replication, using phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect HHV-6A/B integration. Certain clones harboring ciHHV-6A/B spontaneously express viral genes and proteins. Treatment of cells with phorbol ester or histone deacetylase inhibitors triggered the expression of many viral genes, including U39 , U90 , and U100 , without the production of infectious virus, suggesting that the tested stimuli were not sufficient to trigger full reactivation. In summary, both integration models yielded comparable results and should enable the identification of viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration and the screening of drugs influencing viral gene expression, as well as the release of infectious HHV-6A/B from the integrated state. IMPORTANCE The analysis and understanding of HHV-6A/B genome integration into host DNA is currently limited due to the lack of reproducible and efficient viral integration systems. In the

  2. Human protothecosis.

    PubMed

    Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-04-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue.

  3. Human Protothecosis

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue. PMID:17428884

  4. Human Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    modification (e.g., for increased aggressiveness or decreased empathy ). Thus one strong recommendation of this study is that the US should develop a...Human Performance JASON The MITRE Corporation 7515 Colshire Drive McLean, Virginia 22102-7508 (703) 983-6997 Study Leader: E. Williams Contributors...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The tasking for this study was to

  5. Human suffering.

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    10 measures of quality of life are used to rank 141 countries in the International Human Suffering Index (HSI). The Index differentiates between extreme, high, moderate, and minimal levels of human suffering. Social welfare is the sum of 10 measures: life expectancy, daily caloric intake, clean drinking water, infant immunization, secondary school enrollment, gross national product per capita, the rate of inflation, communication technology (i.e., telephones), political freedom, and civil rights. Each measure is ranked between 0 and 10. The highest score indicates the greatest country stress, with the worst possible score being 100. About 1 billion people live in desperate poverty. Living conditions are the worst in Mozambique (93), followed by Somalia, Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan. Most of these countries also have high population growth. The most comfortable countries are Denmark (1), the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada, which have low population growth. Total scores of 75 or greater (extreme human suffering) occur in 27 countries (20 in Africa, 16 in Asia, and Haiti) with 8% of the world's population (432 million people). High human suffering scores range between 50 and 74 and include 56 countries (24 in Africa, 16 in Asia, 15 in the Western Hemisphere, and 1 in Oceania) with 3.5 billion people. The number of countries in this grouping increased from 44 countries with 58% of world population in 1987. Moderate suffering scores range from 25-49. Countries with moderate suffering number 34 countries (9 in Europe, 13 in Asia, 8 in the Western Hemisphere, and 2 in Oceania and 2 in Africa) with 11.8% of world population (636 million). Over the preceding 5-year period the number of countries increased from 29 countries with 10% of world population. Minimal human suffering occurs in 24 countries (17 in Europe, Israel and Japan in Asia; Canada, the US, and Barbados in the Western Hemisphere; and Australia and New Zealand in Oceania) with 14.8% of world

  6. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  8. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Sureshbabu, Munisamy

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changesmore » in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.« less

  9. Neurotoxicity of "ecstasy" and its metabolites in human dopaminergic differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patrícia Silva; Nogueira, Tiago Bernandes; Costa, Vera Marisa; Branco, Paula Sério; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Meisel, Andreas; Carvalho, Félix; Capela, João Paulo

    2013-02-04

    "Ecstasy" (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) is a widely abused recreational drug, reported to produce neurotoxic effects, both in laboratory animals and in humans. MDMA metabolites can be major contributors for MDMA neurotoxicity. This work studied the neurotoxicity of MDMA and its catechol metabolites, α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) and N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA) in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells differentiated with retinoic acid and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate. Differentiation led to SH-SY5Y neurons with higher ability to accumulate dopamine and higher resistance towards dopamine neurotoxicity. MDMA catechol metabolites were neurotoxic to SH-SY5Y neurons, leading to caspase 3-independent cell death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. MDMA did not show a concentration- and time-dependent death. Pre-treatment with the antioxidant and glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), resulted in strong protection against the MDMA metabolites' neurotoxicity. Neither the superoxide radical scavenger, tiron, nor the inhibitor of the dopamine (DA) transporter, GBR 12909, prevented the metabolites' toxicity. Cells exposed to α-MeDA showed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, which, at the 48 h time-point, was not dependent in the activity increase of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), revealing a possible transient effect. Importantly, pre-treatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of γ-GCS, prevented α-MeDA induced increase in GSH levels, but did not augment this metabolite cytotoxicity. Even so, BSO pre-treatment abolished NAC protective effects against α-MeDA neurotoxicity, which were, at least partially, due to GSH de novo synthesis. Inversely, pre-treatment of cells with BSO augmented N-Me-α-MeDA-induced neurotoxicity, but only slightly affected NAC neuroprotection. In conclusion, MDMA catechol metabolites promote differential toxic effects to differentiated dopaminergic human SH

  10. Protein kinase C activates non-capacitative calcium entry in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Juan A; Sage, Stewart O

    2000-01-01

    In many non-excitable cells Ca2+ influx is mainly controlled by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ stores. It has been suggested that this store-mediated or capacitative Ca2+ entry is brought about by a physical and reversible coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum with the plasma membrane. Here we provide evidence for an additional, non-capacitative Ca2+ entry mechanism in human platelets. Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and Sr2+ were measured in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2. Depletion of the internal Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin plus a low concentration of ionomycin stimulated store-mediated cation entry, as demonstrated upon Ca2+ or Sr2+ addition. Subsequent treatment with thrombin stimulated further divalent cation entry in a concentration-dependent manner. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol also stimulated divalent cation entry, without evoking the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Cation entry evoked by thrombin or activators of PKC was abolished by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220. Unlike store-mediated Ca2+ entry, jasplakinolide, which reorganises actin filaments into a tight cortical layer adjacent to the plasma membrane, did not inhibit divalent cation influx evoked by thrombin when applied after Ca2+ store depletion, or by activators of PKC. Thrombin also activated Ca2+ entry in platelets in which the release from intracellular stores and store-mediated Ca2+ entry were blocked by xestospongin C. These results indicate that the non-capacitative divalent cation entry pathway is regulated independently of store-mediated entry and does not require coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. These results support the existence of a mechanism for receptor-evoked Ca2+ entry in human platelets that is independent of Ca2+ store depletion. This Ca2+ entry mechanism may be activated by occupation of G-protein-coupled receptors

  11. Effects of five oleanolic acid triterpenoid saponins from the rhizome of Anemone raddeana on stimulus-induced superoxide generation, phosphorylation of proteins and translocation of cytosolic compounds to cell membrane in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shihu; He, Wenfei; Lu, Jincai; Wang, Zhonghuan; Yamashita, Koichi; Yokoyama, Masanori; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    Five oleanolic acid triterpenoid saponins (OTS-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) were isolated from the rhizome of Anemone raddeana. The effect of these triterpenoid saponins on stimulus-induced superoxide generation in human neutrophils was assayed by measuring the reduction of ferricytochrome c using a dual-beam spectrophotometer. The phosphorylation of neutrophil proteins, and translocation of p67(phox), p47(phox) and Rac to plasma membrane were investigated using specific monoclonal antibodies. The five oleanolic acid triterpenoid saponins used in this experiment suppressed N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced superoxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner. OTS-1, 2 and 4 suppressed phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced superoxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner, but OTS-3 and 5 showed no effect. fMLP- and PMA-induced tyrosyl or serine/threonine phosphorylation, and fMLP-, PMA- and AA-induced translocation of p67(phox), p47(phox) and Rac to plasma membrane were in parallel with the suppression of the stimulus-induced superoxide generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Humanized mouse models: Application to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryoji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ito, Mamoru

    2018-05-01

    Humanized mice are superior to rodents for preclinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of drug candidates using human cells or tissues. During the past decade, humanized mouse technology has been greatly advanced by the establishment of novel platforms of genetically modified immunodeficient mice. Several human diseases can be recapitulated using humanized mice due to the improved engraftment and differentiation capacity of human cells or tissues. In this review, we discuss current advanced humanized mouse models that recapitulate human diseases including cancer, allergy, and graft-versus-host disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Metabolic activation and nucleic acid binding of acetaminophen and related arylamine substrates by the respiratory burst of human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Corbett, M D; Corbett, B R; Hannothiaux, M H; Quintana, S J

    1989-01-01

    Following stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate, human granulocytes were found to incorporate acetaminophen, p-phenetidine, p-aminophenol, and p-chloroaniline into cellular DNA and RNA. Phenacetin was not incorporated into nucleic acid or metabolized by such activated granulocytes. None of the substrates gave nucleic acid binding if the granulocyte cultures were not induced to undergo the respiratory burst. Additional studies on the binding of acetaminophen to DNA and RNA were made by use of both ring-14C-labeled and carbonyl-14C-labeled forms of this substrate. The finding that equivalent amounts of these two labeled acetaminophen substrates were bound to cellular DNA demonstrated that the intact acetaminophen molecule was incorporated into DNA. On the other hand, the finding that excess ring-14C-labeled acetaminophen was incorporated into cellular RNA implies partial hydrolysis of the acetaminophen substrate prior to RNA binding. Evidence was presented which strongly indicates that the nucleic acid binding of the substrates was covalent in nature. The inability of the respiratory burst to result in the binding of phenacetin to nucleic acid suggests that arylamides are not normally activated or metabolized by activated granulocytes. Acetaminophen is an exception to the recalcitrance of arylamides to such bioactivation processes because it also possesses the phenolic functional group, which, like the arylamine group, is oxidized by certain reactive oxygen species. Myeloperoxidase appears to be much more important in the binding of acetaminophen to DNA than it is in the DNA binding of arylamines in general. The role of the respiratory burst in causing the bioactivation of certain arylamines, which are not normally genotoxic via the more usual microsomal activation pathways, was extended to include certain amide substrates such as acetaminophen.

  14. Transcriptional activation of the human inducible nitric-oxide synthase promoter by Kruppel-like factor 6.

    PubMed

    Warke, Vishal G; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Krishnan, Sandeep; Tenbrock, Klaus; Geller, David A; Koritschoner, Nicolas P; Atkins, James L; Farber, Donna L; Tsokos, George C

    2003-04-25

    Nitric oxide is a ubiquitous free radical that plays a key role in a broad spectrum of signaling pathways in physiological and pathophysiological processes. We have explored the transcriptional regulation of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) by Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6), an Sp1-like zinc finger transcription factor. Study of serial deletion constructs of the iNOS promoter revealed that the proximal 0.63-kb region can support a 3-6-fold reporter activity similar to that of the full-length 16-kb promoter. Within the 0.63-kb region, we identified two CACCC sites (-164 to -168 and -261 to -265) that bound KLF6 in both electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Mutation of both these sites abrogated the KLF6-induced enhancement of the 0.63-kb iNOS promoter activity. The binding of KLF6 to the iNOS promoter was significantly increased in Jurkat cells, primary T lymphocytes, and COS-7 cells subjected to NaCN-induced hypoxia, heat shock, serum starvation, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ ionophore stimulation. Furthermore, in KLF6-transfected and NaCN-treated COS-7 cells, there was a 3-4-fold increase in the expression of the endogenous iNOS mRNA and protein that correlated with increased production of nitric oxide. These findings indicate that KLF6 is a potential transactivator of the human iNOS promoter in diverse pathophysiological conditions.

  15. Induction of human macrophage vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 by Ureaplasma urealyticum and downregulation by steroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Hua; Brauner, Annelie; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Tullus, Kjell

    2002-01-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) remains a major cause of morbidity for the prematurely born infant. The pathogenesis of CLD is complex and has not been defined entirely. Infection and lung inflammatory events have been thought to play a key role in the development of CLD. However, the contribution of Ureaplasma urealyticum to the development of CLD is debated and steroids produce some improvement in neonates with this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if U. urealyticum could stimulate macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro, which are potentially associated with both early and later pathological changes in the lung during the development of CLD. In addition, the impact of dexamethasone and budesonide on these processes was examined. We found that U. urealyticum antigen (>/=4 x 10(7) color-changing units/ml) stimulated human macrophages (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated THP-1 cell line) to produce VEGF and soluble ICAM-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05) measured by ELISA. Likewise, cell surface ICAM-1 (CD54) measured by flow cytometry was increased after stimulation with U. urealyticum. This effect was attenuated by budesonide and dexamethasone (p < 0.05). The mRNA expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1 detected by a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were also induced in response to U. urealyticum and inhibited by the steroids (p < 0.05). The expression of ICAM-1 was reduced by 85.5% when the TNF-alpha production was neutralized with an anti-TNF-alpha antibody. Our findings imply that U. urealyticum might be involved in the development of CLD of prematurity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Dexamethasone inhibits inflammatory response via down regulation of AP-1 transcription factor in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Kavya, K; Babu, R L; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Chidananda Sharma, S

    2018-03-01

    The production of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells in inflammatory lung diseases may represent an important target for the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids. Activator protein-1 is a major activator of inflammatory genes and has been proposed as a target for inhibition by glucocorticoids. We have used human pulmonary type-II A549 cells to examine the effect of dexamethasone on the phorbol ester (PMA)/Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors. A549 cells were treated with and without PMA or LPS or dexamethasone and the cell viability and nitric oxide production was measured by MTT assay and Griess reagent respectively. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors mRNA were measured using semi quantitative RT-PCR. The PMA/LPS treated cells show significant 2-3 fold increase in the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α), cyclo‑oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and specific AP-1 factors (c-Jun, c-Fos and Jun-D). Whereas, pretreatment of cells with dexamethasone significantly inhibited the LPS induced nitric oxide production and PMA/LPS induced mRNAs expression of above pro-inflammatory cytokines, COX-2 and AP-1 factors. Cells treated with dexamethasone alone at both the concentrations inhibit the mRNAs expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α compared to control. Our study reveals that dexamethasone decreased the mRNAs expression of c-Jun and c-Fos available for AP-1 formation suggested that AP-1 is the probable key transcription factor involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of dexamethasone. This may be an important molecular mechanism of steroid action in asthma and other chronic inflammatory lung diseases which may be useful for treatment of lung inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% ofmore » the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.« less

  18. Fas Ligand-Mediated Lysis of Self Bystander Targets by Human Papillomavirus-Specific CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Mark J.; Krasovskis, Erika; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    1998-01-01

    Mouse cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) reactive with a H-2Db-presented 9-mer peptide of the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E749-57 (RAHYNIVTF) were generated from the spleen cells of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) or B6 perforin-deficient (B6.P0) mice. CD8+ B6 CTL displayed peptide-specific perforin- and Fas-mediated lysis of E7-transfected mouse RMA lymphoma cells (RMA-E7), while CD8+ CTL from B6.P0 mice lysed RMA-E7 cells via Fas ligand (FasL) exclusively. Rapid and efficient lysis of syngeneic bystander B6 blasts or RMA cells by either B6 or B6.P0 Ag-activated CTL was mediated by a FasL-Fas mechanism. Fas-resistant bystanders were not lysed, nor were allogeneic Fas-sensitive C3H/HeJ (H-2k) or BALB/c (H-2d) bystander blasts. Interestingly, however, phorbol myristate acetate-ionomycin preactivation of B6.P0 effectors enabled lysis of allogeneic H-2k and H-2d bystanders even in the absence of antigenic stimulation. Lysis of syngeneic bystander cells was always FasL-Fas dependent and required effector-bystander contact and, in particular, an interaction between CTL LFA-1 and bystander ICAM-1. Thus, in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I molecule-peptide ligation of the T-cell receptors of CD8+ CTL, neighboring bystander cells that are syngeneic and Fas sensitive and express the adhesion molecule ICAM-1 are potential targets of CTL attack. PMID:9621057

  19. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line: in vitro cell model of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-rong; Hu, Lin-sen; Li, Guo-yi

    2010-04-20

    To evaluate the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons for Parkinson's disease (PD) research and to determine the effect of differentiation on this cell model. The data of this review were selected from the original reports and reviews related to SH-SY5Y cells published in Chinese and foreign journals (Pubmed 1973 to 2009). After searching the literature, 60 articles were selected to address this review. The SH-SY5Y cell line has become a popular cell model for PD research because this cell line posses many characteristics of DAergic neurons. For example, these cells express tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, as well as the dopamine transporter. Moreover, this cell line can be differentiated into a functionally mature neuronal phenotype in the presence of various agents. Upon differentiation, SH-SY5Y cells stop proliferating and a constant cell number is subsequently maintained. However, different differentiating agents induce different neuronal phenotypes and biochemical changes. For example, retinoic acid induces differentiation toward a cholinergic neuronal phenotype and increases the susceptibility of SH-SY5Y cells to neurotoxins and neuroprotective agents, whereas treatment with retinoic acid followed by phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate results in a DAergic neuronal phenotype and decreases the susceptibility of cells to neurotoxins and neuroprotective agents. Some differentiating agents also alter kinetics of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP(+)) uptake, making SH-SY5Y cells more similar to primary mesencephalic neurons. Differentiated and undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells have been widely used as a cell model of DAergic neurons for PD research. Some differentiating agents afford SH-SY5Y cells with more potential for studying neurotoxicity and neuroprotection and are thus more relevant to experimental PD research.

  20. Distinct pathways of ERK activation by the muscarinic agonists pilocarpine and carbachol in a human salivary cell line.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alan L; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, WanKe; Dang, Howard; Zhang, Bin-Xian; Katz, Michael S; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2008-06-01

    Cholinergic-muscarinic receptor agonists are used to alleviate mouth dryness, although the cellular signals mediating the actions of these agents on salivary glands have not been identified. We examined the activation of ERK1/2 by two muscarinic agonists, pilocarpine and carbachol, in a human salivary cell line (HSY). Immunoblot analysis revealed that both agonists induced transient activation of ERK1/2. Whereas pilocarpine induced phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, carbachol did not. Moreover, ERK activation by pilocarpine, but not carbachol, was abolished by the EGF receptor inhibitor AG-1478. Downregulation of PKC by prolonged treatment of cells with the phorbol ester PMA diminished carbachol-induced ERK phosphorylation but had no effect on pilocarpine responsiveness. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i by EGTA did not affect ERK activation by either agent. In contrast to carbachol, pilocarpine did not elicit [Ca2+]i mobilization in HSY cells. Treatment of cells with the muscarinic receptor subtype 3 (M3) antagonist N-(3-chloropropyl)-4-piperidnyl diphenylacetate decreased ERK responsiveness to both agents, whereas the subtype 1 (M1) antagonist pirenzepine reduced only the carbachol response. Stimulation of ERKs by pilocarpine was also decreased by M3, but not M1, receptor small interfering RNA. The Src inhibitor PP2 blocked pilocarpine-induced ERK activation and EGF receptor phosphorylation, without affecting ERK activation by carbachol. Our results demonstrate that the actions of pilocarpine and carbachol in salivary cells are mediated through two distinct signaling mechanisms-pilocarpine acting via M3 receptors and Src-dependent transactivation of EGF receptors, and carbachol via M1/M3 receptors and PKC-converging on the ERK pathway.

  1. Human Factors Planning Guidelines

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-01-01

    To ensure human factors considerations are fully incorporated in the system : development, the Integrated Product Team (IPT) or Program Manager initiates a : Human Factors Program (HFP) that addresses the human performance and human : resource parame...

  2. Molecular and immunological tools for the evaluation of the cellular immune response in the neotropical monkey Saimiri sciureus, a non-human primate model for malaria research.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Evelyn K P; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian R; Bianco-Júnior, Cesare; Sanchez, Violette; Totino, Paulo R R; Carvalho, Leonardo J M; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu

    2015-04-18

    The neotropical, non-human primates (NHP) of the genus Saimiri and Aotus are recommended by the World Health Organization as experimental models for the study of human malaria because these animals can be infected with the same Plasmodium that cause malaria in humans. However, one limitation is the lack of immunological tools to assess the immune response in these models. The present study focuses on the development and comparative use of molecular and immunological methods to evaluate the cellular immune response in Saimiri sciureus. Blood samples were obtained from nineteen uninfected Saimiri. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these animals and splenocytes from one splenectomized animal were cultured for 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs in the presence of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and ionomycin. The cytokine levels in the supernatant were detected using human and NHP cytometric bead array Th1/Th2 cytokine kits, the Bio-Plex Pro Human Cytokine Th1/Th2 Assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine secretion assays. Cytokine gene expression was examined through TaqMan® Gene Expression Real-Time PCR using predesigned human gene-specific primers and probes or primers and probes designed based on published S. sciureus cytokine sequences. The use of five assays based on monoclonal antibodies specific for human cytokines facilitated the detection of IL-2, IL-4 and/or IFN-γ. TaqMan array plates facilitated the detection of 12 of the 28 cytokines assayed. However, only seven cytokines (IL-1A, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12B, IL-17, IFN-β, and TNF) presented relative expression levels of at least 70% of the gene expression observed in human PBMC. The use of primers and probes specific for S. sciureus cytokines facilitated the detection of transcripts that showed relative expression below the threshold of 70%. The most efficient evaluation of cytokine gene expression, in PBMC and splenocytes, was observed

  3. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  4. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  5. Helicobacter pylori induces IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytic cell line through activation of NLRP3 inflammasome via ROS signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Sheng; Luo, Jingjing; Liu, Anyuan; Tang, Shuangyang; Liu, Shuo; Yu, Minjun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether Helicobacter pylori could activate the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in human macrophages and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in inflammasome activation. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 was infected with H. pylori. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular ROS level was analyzed by flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis were employed to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 and caspase-1 in THP-1 cells, respectively. Our results showed that H. pylori infection could induce IL-1β and IL-18 production in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in THP-1 cells following H. pylori infection was remarkably reduced by NLRP3-specific small interfering RNA treatment. In addition, the intracellular ROS level was elevated by H. pylori infection, which could be eliminated by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Furthermore, NAC treatment could inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome formation and caspase-1 activation and suppress the release of IL-1β and IL-18 from H. pylori-infected THP-1 cells. These findings provide novel insights into the innate immune response against H. pylori infection, which could potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of H. pylori-related diseases. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2 (•-) by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase.

  7. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•- by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase. PMID:24936444

  8. Activation of classical protein kinase C reduces the expression of human cationic amino acid transporter 3 (hCAT-3) in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Rotmann, Alexander; Vékony, Nicole; Gassner, Davina; Niegisch, Günter; Strand, Dennis; Martiné, Ursula; Closs, Ellen I

    2006-04-01

    We have previously shown that activation of PKC (protein kinase C) results in internalization of hCAT-1 [human CAT-1 (cationic amino acid transporter 1)] and a decrease in arginine transport [Rotmann, Strand, Martiné and Closs (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54185-54192]. However, others found increased transport rates for arginine in response to PKC activation, suggesting a differential effect of PKC on different CAT isoforms. Therefore we investigated the effect of PKC on hCAT-3, an isoform expressed in thymus, brain, ovary, uterus and mammary gland. In Xenopus laevis oocytes and human U373MG glioblastoma cells, hCAT-3-mediated L-arginine transport was significantly reduced upon treatment with compounds that activate classical PKC. In contrast, inactive phorbol esters and an activator of novel PKC isoforms had no effect. PKC inhibitors (including the PKCalpha-preferring Ro 31-8280) reduced the inhibitory effect of the PKC-activating compounds. Microscopic analyses revealed a PMA-induced reduction in the cell-surface expression of fusion proteins between hCAT-3 and enhanced green fluorescent protein expressed in X. laevis oocytes and glioblastoma cells. Western-blot analysis of biotinylated surface proteins demonstrated a PMA-induced decrease in hCAT-3 in the plasma membrane, but not in total protein lysates. Pretreatment with a PKC inhibitor also reduced this PMA effect. It is concluded that similar to hCAT-1, hCAT-3 activity is decreased by PKC via reduction of transporter molecules in the plasma membrane. Classical PKC isoforms seem to be responsible for this effect.

  9. Activation of classical protein kinase C reduces the expression of human cationic amino acid transporter 3 (hCAT-3) in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rotmann, Alexander; Vékony, Nicole; Gassner, Davina; Niegisch, Günter; Strand, Dennis; Martiné, Ursula; Closs, Ellen I.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that activation of PKC (protein kinase C) results in internalization of hCAT-1 [human CAT-1 (cationic amino acid transporter 1)] and a decrease in arginine transport [Rotmann, Strand, Martiné and Closs (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54185–54192]. However, others found increased transport rates for arginine in response to PKC activation, suggesting a differential effect of PKC on different CAT isoforms. Therefore we investigated the effect of PKC on hCAT-3, an isoform expressed in thymus, brain, ovary, uterus and mammary gland. In Xenopus laevis oocytes and human U373MG glioblastoma cells, hCAT-3-mediated L-arginine transport was significantly reduced upon treatment with compounds that activate classical PKC. In contrast, inactive phorbol esters and an activator of novel PKC isoforms had no effect. PKC inhibitors (including the PKCα-preferring Ro 31-8280) reduced the inhibitory effect of the PKC-activating compounds. Microscopic analyses revealed a PMA-induced reduction in the cell-surface expression of fusion proteins between hCAT-3 and enhanced green fluorescent protein expressed in X. laevis oocytes and glioblastoma cells. Western-blot analysis of biotinylated surface proteins demonstrated a PMA-induced decrease in hCAT-3 in the plasma membrane, but not in total protein lysates. Pretreatment with a PKC inhibitor also reduced this PMA effect. It is concluded that similar to hCAT-1, hCAT-3 activity is decreased by PKC via reduction of transporter molecules in the plasma membrane. Classical PKC isoforms seem to be responsible for this effect. PMID:16332251

  10. Induction of differentiation in human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells activates p21, WAF1/CIP1, expression in the absence of p53.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.; Lin, J.; Su, Z.-Z.

    The melanoma differentiation associated gene, mda-6, which is identical to the P53-inducible gene WAF1/CIP1, encodes an M(r) 21,000 protein (p21) that can directly inhibit cell growth by repressing cyclin dependent kinases. mda-6 was identified using subtraction hybridization by virtue of its enhanced expression in human melanoma cells induced to terminally differentiate by treatment with human fibroblast interferon and the anti-leukemic compound mezerein (Jiang and Fisher, 1993). In the present study, we demonstrate that mda-6 (WAF1/CIP1) is an immediate early response gene induced during differentiation of the promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell line along the granulocytic or macrophage/monocyte pathway. mda-6 gene expressionmore » in HL-60 cells is induced within 1 to 3 h during differentiation along the macrophage/monocyte pathway evoked by 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (Vit D3) or the granulocytic pathway produced by retinoic acid (RA) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Immunoprecipitation analyses using an anti-p21 antibody indicate a temporal induction of p21 protein following treatment with TPA, DMSO or RA. A relationship between rapid induction of mda-6 gene expression and differentiation is indicated by a delay in this expression in an HL-60 cell variant resistant to TPA-induced growth arrest and differentiation. A similar delay in mda-6 gene expression is not observed in Vit D3 treated TPA-resistant variant cells that are also sensitive to induction of monocytic differentiation. Since HL-60 cells have a null-p53 phenotype, these results demonstrate that p21 induction occurs during initiation of terminal differentiation in a p53-independent manner. In this context, p21 may play a more global role in growth control and differentiation than originally envisioned.« less

  11. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  12. Human stones.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, K

    1968-03-15

    X-ray diffraction studies have shown that there are several different kinds of human urinary calculi, with different age, sex, period, and geographical distributions. Juvenile bladder stones are typically urate and oxalate in small boys in certain stone belts. They have disappeared in some areas, particularly in Britain, but are still common in Thailand. India. and Turkey. Their cause is unknown. Adult bladder stones, formerly common in elderly men, were largely of uric acid and were due to a faulty diet. Juvenile kidney stones are rare, except in Turkey where they are similar to juvenile bladder stones. Adult kidney stones are by far the most universally common, especially in technically developed communities. They are found in both sexes (equally at postmortem), and in the United States and in Czechoslovakia the average number of hospital entries for stones, relative to the whole population, is about 1 per 1000 per annum (increasing) although the incidence in different districts varies by 4 to 1 or more. Such stones are mainly calcium oxalates and calcium and MgNH(4) phosphates. The incidence among the administrative class is at least 20 times that among agricultural workers, relative to their numbers. Stones are reported also to be an occupational hazard for air pilots. It is probably that much more exercise and the drinking of more water to prevent kidney dehydration (spirits and coffee are not effective for this purpose) would lower the high rate of incidence. Moderate acidification would prevent phosphate supersaturation of the urine, but is not effective for oxalates. It seems certain that, once a suitable seed is formed, epitaxy is largely responsible for deposition from urines that would otherwise remain supersaturated until voided. This would explain the curioLls radial and layered texture of many stones. Laboratory experiments might suggest ways of preventing orientated overgrowth.

  13. Very late antigen integrins are involved in the adhesive interaction of lymphoid cells to human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, S; Saho, T; Shimabukuro, Y; Isoda, R; Miki, Y; Okada, H

    1993-01-01

    To date, it is still unclear how the trafficking and retention of activated lymphocytes in periodontal lesions are regulated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for the adhesive interactions between lymphocytes and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBT) exhibited binding ability, but only when the calls were activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Among several human cell lines tested, PMA-stimulated Molt-4, a human T-cell leukaemia line, also displayed significant binding ability to HGF. In order to clarify the molecule(s) involved in this cell-cell interaction, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) was prepared to PMA-activated Molt-4 and one clone, 4-145, was selected on the basis of its ability to block the binding of PMA-activated Molt-4 to HGF. Moreover, 4-145 inhibited the binding of not only activated Molt-4 but also activated PBT and other cell types to HGF. Biochemical and flow cytometric analyses revealed that 4-145 probably recognizes the beta 1 chain of very late antigen (VLA) integrins. Blocking experiments using mAb specific for the alpha-chain of VLA integrins demonstrated the involvement of alpha 4 (VLA-4) and, to a lesser extent, alpha 5 (VLA-5) chains in the adhesive interactions between T cells and HGF. Despite the significant involvement of VLA integrins in the adhesive interaction between PBT and HGF, the binding of PBT to human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) was not abrogated by 4-145, suggesting that HGF and HDF differ in their requirement of VLA integrins for adhesion to activated PBT. Furthermore, the fact that vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), one of the ligands of VLA-4, was not detected on HGF by flow cytometry and anti-fibronectin (FN) Ab did not block the adhesive interaction to HGF suggests that not-yet-identified ligand(s) for VLA-4 might be present on HGF. Images Figure 4 PMID:8406571

  14. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  15. Superintelligence, Humans, and War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    Recent studies of the human mind debunk the myth that humans only use 10-20 percent of the human mind. A healthy human mind uses up to 90 percent...way. They will eat what is in front of them to satiate their appetite not knowing if there is anymore food for the future. Humans can predict

  16. Human Factors Job Aid

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-12-09

    The purpose of this Human Factors Job Aid is to serve as a desk reference for : human factors integration during system acquisition. The first chapter contains : an overview of the FAA human factors process in system acquisitions. The : remaining eig...

  17. IVI human factors strategy

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    This document focuses on human factors research that supports the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative (IVI). The status of the problem areas within categories used often by the human factors community to organize human factors process is discussed. A simi...

  18. Analyzing phorbol ester effects on gap junctional communication: a dramatic inhibition of assembly

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12-O-tetradeconylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on gap junction assembly between Novikoff hepatoma cells was examined. Cells were dissociated with EDTA to single cells and then reaggregated to form new junctions. When TPA (25 nM) was added to the cells at the onset of the 60-min reaggregation, dye transfer was detected at only 0.6% of the cell-cell interfaces compared to 72% for the untreated control and 74% for 4-alpha TPA, an inactive isomer of TPA. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy of reaggregated control cells showed interfaces containing an average of more than 600 aggregated intramembranous gap junction particles, while TPA-treated cells had no gap junctions. However, Lucifer yellow dye transfer between nondissociated cells via gap junctions was unaffected by 60 min of TPA treatment. Therefore, TPA dramatically inhibited gap junction assembly but did not alter channel gating nor enhance disassembly of preexisting gap junction structures. Short term TPA treatment (< 30 min) increased phosphorylation of the gap junction protein molecular weight of 43,000 (Cx43), but did not change the cellular level of Cx43. Cell surface biotinylation experiments suggested that TPA did not substantially reduce the plasma membrane concentration of Cx43. Therefore, the simple presence of Cx43 in the plasma membrane is not sufficient for gap junction assembly, and protein kinase C probably exerts an effect on assembly of gap junctions at the plasma membrane level. PMID:7806568

  19. Ceruloplasmin inhibits carbonyl formation in endogenous proteins in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Krsek-Staples, J.; Webster, R.O.

    1991-03-11

    The respiratory burst of stimulated neutrophils can cause oxidative modifications of endogenous neutrophil proteins as measured by increased carbonyl formation. Ceruloplasmin is an acute phase protein and may act as an antioxidant during inflammation. Therefore, the role of ceruloplasmin in preventing oxidative damage of endogenous neutrophil proteins was investigated. Protein carbonyl content was determined spectrophotometrically using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Ceruloplasmin, at a concentration present during inflammation significantly inhibited carbonyl formation in endogenous proteins of PMA-stimulated neutrophils. In order to determine if oxidative damage was occurring to the ceruloplasmin upon incubation with stimulated neutrophils, carbonyl formation in the ceruloplasmin in the presence andmore » absence of stimulated neutrophils. This data suggests that ceruloplasmin may play a role in regulating oxidative damage to proteins and that ceruloplasmin itself may act as a target for these modifications.« less

  20. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function of the insulin receptor.

  1. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  2. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  3. Interferon-γ regulates chemokine expression and release in the human mast cell line HMC1: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, M; Befus, A D

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are critical immune effector cells that release cytokines and chemokines involved in both homeostasis and disease. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates multiple cellular activities. IFN-γ modulates rodent MC responsiveness via production of nitric oxide (NO), although the effects in human MC populations is unknown. We sought to investigate the effects of IFN-γ on expression of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and CCL1 (I-309) in a human mast cell line (HMC1) and to determine the underlying regulatory mechanism. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS), IL-8 and CCL1 expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NOS protein expression was analysed using western blot. NOS activity was determined using the citrulline assay. IL-8 and CCL1 release was measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IFN-γ inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced release of IL-8 and CCL1 (by 47 and 38%). Real-time PCR analysis of IFN-γ-treated HMC1 showed a significant (P < 0·05) time-dependent increase in NOS1 and NOS3 mRNA. NOS3 protein was significantly increased at 18 hr, which correlated with a significant (P < 0·05) increase in constitutive NOS (cNOS) activity. IFN-γ-induced inhibition of chemokine expression and release was NO dependent, as treatment with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reduced the IFN-γ inhibitory effect on IL-8 and CCL1 mRNA expression. NO donors mimicked the IFN-γ effect. IFN-γ inhibited PMA-induced cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity. Our observations indicate for the first time that IFN-γ enhances endogenous NO formation through NOS3 activity, and that NO regulates the transcription and release of IL-8 and CCL1 in a human MC line. PMID:17662042

  4. Hypotonic stress induces RANKL via transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) and vaniloid 4 (TRPV4) in human PDL cells.

    PubMed

    Son, G Y; Yang, Y M; Park, W S; Chang, I; Shin, D M

    2015-03-01

    Bone remodeling occurs in response to various types of mechanical stress. The periodontal ligament (PDL) plays an important role in mechanical stress-mediated alveolar bone remodeling. However, the underlying mechanism at the cellular level has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of shear stress on the expression of bone remodeling factors, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), as well as its upstream signaling pathway in primary human PDL cells. We applied hypotonic stress to reproduce shear stress to PDL cells. Hypotonic stress induced the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of RANKL but not OPG. It also increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Extracellular Ca(2+) depletion and nonspecific plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel blockers completely inhibited the increase in both [Ca(2+)]i and RANKL mRNA expression. We identified the expression and activation of transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) and vaniloid 4 (TRPV4) channels in PDL cells. Pregnenolone sulfate (PS) and 4α-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (4α-PDD), which are agonists of TRPM3 and TRPV4, augmented Ca(2+) influx and RANKL mRNA expression. Both pharmacological (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate [2-APB], ruthenium red [RR], ononetin [Ono], and HC 067047 [HC]) and genetic (small interfering RNA [siRNA]) inhibitors of TRPM3 and TRPV4 reduced the hypotonic stress-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i and RANKL mRNA expression. Our study shows that hypotonic stress induced RANKL mRNA expression via TRPM3- and TRPV4-mediated extracellular Ca(2+) influx and RANKL expression. This signaling pathway in PDL cells may play a critical role in mechanical stress-mediated alveolar bone remodeling. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  5. Inhibition of NF-kappaB-mediated transcription and induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by epoxypseudoisoeugenol-2-methyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guoyi; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Husnu Can Baser, K; Kirimer, Nese; Pasco, David S; Khan, Ikhlas A; Khan, Shabana I

    2009-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent woman cancers. Genomic instability, accumulative mutations, and subsequent changes in intracellular signaling cascades play key roles in the development of human breast cancers. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has been implicated in oncogenesis of breast cancers and is known to be associated with resistance to anticancer agents and apoptosis. Blocking NF-kappaB signaling may represent a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer therapy. The objective of this study is to investigate the in vitro effects of epoxypseudoisoeugenol-2-methyl butyrate (EPB), a phenylpropranoid isolated from Pimpinella corymbosa, on the activation of NF-kappaB, cell growth, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in MCF-7 (estrogen-dependent) and BT-549 (estrogen-independent) breast cancer cells. Transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB was measured by cell based reporter gene assay. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis was carried out by flow cytometry and apoptosis was observed by DAPI staining assy. EPB inhibited the NF-kappaB-mediated transcription activity induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in MCF-7 cells. EPB also inhibited constitutive NF-kappaB transcriptional activity in BT-549 cells. EPB inhibited the proliferation of both MCF-7 and BT-549 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. EPB induced cell cycle arrest in G(1)/G(0) phase and apoptosis in both MCF-7 and BT 549 cells. These in vitro results indicated that EPB has a potential for use against both hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancers and its effects seem to be mediated by inhibiting the NF-kappaB activity.

  6. Activation of p44/42 in Human Natural Killer Cells Decreases Cell-surface Protein Expression: Relationship to Tributyltin-induced alterations of protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Dudimah, Fred D.; Abraha, Abraham; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) activates the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), p44/42 in human natural killer (NK) cells. TBT also reduces NK cytotoxic function and decreases the expression of several NK-cell proteins. To understand the role that p44/42 activation plays in TBT-induced loss of NK cell function, we have investigated how selective activation of p44/42 by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) affects NK cells. Previously we showed that PMA caused losses of lytic function similar to those seen with TBT exposures. Here we examined activation of p44/42 in the regulation of NK-cell protein expression and how this regulation may explain the protein expression changes seen with TBT exposures. NK cells exposed to PMA were examined for levels of cell-surface proteins, granzyme mRNA, and perforin mRNA expression. The expression of CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56 were reduced, perforin mRNA levels were unchanged and granzyme mRNA levels were increased. To verify that activation of p44/42 was responsible for the alterations seen in CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56 with PMA, NK cells were treated with the p44/42 pathway inhibitor (PD98059) prior to PMA exposures. In the presence of PD98059, PMA caused no decreases in the expression of the cell-surface proteins. Results of these studies indicate that the activation of p44/42 may lead to the loss of NK cell cytotoxic function by decreasing the expression of CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56. Further, activation of p44/42 appears to be at least in part responsible for the TBT-induced decreases in expression of CD16, CD18, and CD56. PMID:20883105

  7. The investigation of minoxidil-induced [Ca2+]i rises and non-Ca2+-triggered cell death in PC3 human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Shu; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liu, Yuan-Yuarn; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2017-02-01

    Minoxidil is clinically used to prevent hair loss. However, its effect on Ca 2+ homeostasis in prostate cancer cells is unclear. This study explored the effect of minoxidil on cytosolic-free Ca 2+ levels ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and cell viability in PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Minoxidil at concentrations between 200 and 800 μM evoked [Ca 2+ ] i rises in a concentration-dependent manner. This Ca 2+ signal was inhibited by 60% by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ . Minoxidil-induced Ca 2+ influx was confirmed by Mn 2+ -induced quench of fura-2 fluorescence. Pre-treatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X, PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), nifedipine and SKF96365 inhibited minoxidil-induced Ca 2+ signal in Ca 2+ containing medium by 60%. Treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ pump inhibitor 2,5-ditert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) in Ca 2+ -free medium abolished minoxidil-induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Conversely, treatment with minoxidil abolished BHQ-induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished minoxidil-evoked [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Overnight treatment with minoxidil killed cells at concentrations of 200-600 μM in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chelation of cytosolic Ca 2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM) did not prevent minoxidil's cytotoxicity. Together, in PC3 cells, minoxidil induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises that involved Ca 2+ entry through PKC-regulated store-operated Ca 2+ channels and PLC-dependent Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Minoxidil-induced cytotoxicity in a Ca 2+ -independent manner.

  8. Analysis of T cell-replacing factor-like activity: potent induction of T helper activity for human B cells by residual concanavalin A and interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, R W; Van der Meer, W G; Aarden, L A

    1987-08-01

    At least two factors with the capacity to induce IgM synthesis in human B cells were found to be present in the 15-20-kDa fraction of the supernatant of mononuclear cells activated with concanavalin A (Con A) and phorbol ester. Previously, it has been shown (Sauerwein, R. W. et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1985. 15: 611) that interleukin 2 (IL2) in this material is able to induce T cell-dependent IgM secretion in normal B cells. Evidence was obtained for the presence of another factor distinct from IL2 that could replace T cells in the induction of B cell differentiation. We have analyzed this factor with the use of a neoplastic B cell population of prolymphocytic origin that was functionally nonresponsive to IL2. T cell-replacing factor (TRF)-like activity and IL2 could be separated by ion-exchange chromatography, although a small amount of IL2 was recovered in the TRF fractions. This small amount of IL2 was found to be crucial for the observed TRF activity. Moreover, a substantial amount of monomeric Con A was detected in the TRF preparation. Our studies show that Con A in the presence of IL2 can act as a potent inducer of helper function in lower numbers of T cells for normal and neoplastic B cells. Functional assays for T cell contamination in B cell suspensions are therefore of limited value because they are determined by the efficiency of the stimulating signal. Particularly in those B cell factor preparations, obtained from mitogen-activated T cells with an obligatory or unidentified role of IL2, the possible effect of a contaminating mitogen must be considered.

  9. Houttuynia cordata Thunb inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    LEE, HEE JOE; SEO, HYE-SOOK; KIM, GYUNG-JUN; JEON, CHAN YONG; PARK, JONG HYEONG; JANG, BO-HYOUNG; PARK, SUN-JU; SHIN, YONG-CHEOL; KO, SEONG-GYU

    2013-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is widely used in oriental medicine as a remedy for inflammation. However, at present there is no explanation for the mechanism by which HCT affects the production of inflammatory cytokines. The current study aimed to determine the effect of an essence extracted from HCT on mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. Inflammatory cytokine production induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus a calcium ionophore, A23187, was measured in the human mast cell line, HMC-1, incubated with various concentrations of HCT. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 secreted protein levels were measured using an ELISA assay. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR analysis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were examined by western blot analysis. The NF-κB promoter activity was examined by luciferase assay. It was observed that HCT inhibited PMA plus A23187-induced TNF-α and IL-6 secretion and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. It was also noted that HCT suppressed the induction of NF-κB activity, inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It was concluded that HCT is an inhibitor of NF-κB and cytokines blocking mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. These results indicate that HCT may be used for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23846481

  10. Transcription factor REST negatively influences the protein kinase C-dependent up-regulation of human mu-opioid receptor gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bedini, Andrea; Baiula, Monica; Carbonari, Gioia; Spampinato, Santi

    2010-01-01

    Mu-opioid receptor expression increases during neurogenesis, regulates the survival of maturing neurons and is implicated in ischemia-induced neuronal death. The repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (REST), a regulator of a subset of genes in differentiating and post-mitotic neurons, is involved in its transcriptional repression. Extracellular signaling molecules and mechanisms that control the human mu-opioid receptor (hMOR) gene transcription are not clearly understood. We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) on hMOR transcription in a model of neuronal cells and in the context of the potential influence of REST. In native SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, PKC activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 16 nM, 24h) down-regulated hMOR transcription and concomitantly elevated the REST binding activity to repressor element 1 of the hMOR promoter. In contrast, PMA activated hMOR gene transcription when REST expression was knocked down by an antisense strategy or by retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation. PMA acts through a PKC-dependent pathway requiring downstream MAP kinases and the transcription factor AP-1. In a series of hMOR-luciferase promoter/reporter constructs transfected into SH-SY5Y cells and PC12 cells, PMA up-regulated hMOR transcription in PC12 cells lacking REST, and in SH-SY5Y cells either transfected with constructs deficient in the REST DNA binding element or when REST was down-regulated in retinoic acid-differentiated cells. These findings help explain how hMOR transcription is regulated and may clarify its contribution to epigenetic modifications and reprogramming of differentiated neuronal cells exposed to PKC-activating agents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Insights in the Regulation of Phosphatidylserine Exposure in Human Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mauro C; Wagner-Britz, Lisa; Nguyen, Duc Bach; Asanidze, Salome; Mutua, Judy; Mohamed, Nagla; Hanf, Benjamin; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Kaestner, Lars; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    In previous publications we were able to demonstrate the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) in the outer membrane leaflet after activation of red blood cells (RBCs) by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), phorbol-12 myristate-13acetate (PMA), or 4-bromo-A23187 (A23187). It has been concluded that three different mechanisms are responsible for the PS exposure in human RBCs: (i) Ca2+-stimulated scramblase activation (and flippase inhibition) by A23187, LPA, and PMA; (ii) PKCα activation by LPA and PMA; and (iii) enhanced lipid flip flop caused by LPA. Further studies aimed to elucidate interconnections between the increased Ca2+ content, scramblase- and PKCα-activation. In addition, the role of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (Gardos channel) activity in the process of PS exposure needs to be investigated. The intracellular Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs have been investigated after treatment with LPA (2.5 µM), PMA (6 µM), or A23187 (2 µM). Fluo-4 and annexin V-FITC has been used to detect intracellular Ca2+ content and PS exposure, respectively. Both parameters (Ca2+ content, PS exposure) were studied using flow cytometry. Inhibitors of the scramblase, the PKCα, and the Gardos channel have been applied. The percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure after activation with LPA, PMA, or A23187 is significantly reduced after inhibition of the scramblase using the specific inhibitor R5421 as well as after the inhibition of the PKCα using chelerythrine chloride or calphostin C. The inhibitory effect is more pronounced when the scramblase and the PKCα are inhibited simultaneously. Additionally, the inhibition of the Gardos channel using charybdotoxin resulted in a significant reduction of the percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure under all conditions measured. Similar results were obtained when the Gardos channel activity was suppressed by increased extracellular K+ content. PS exposure is mediated by the Ca2+-dependent scramblase but also by PKCα activated by LPA

  12. Protein Kinase C Regulates Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Kinehara, Masaki; Kawamura, Suguru; Tateyama, Daiki; Suga, Mika; Matsumura, Hiroko; Mimura, Sumiyo; Hirayama, Noriko; Hirata, Mitsuhi; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Kohara, Arihiro; Yanagihara, Kana; Furue, Miho K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The self-renewal of human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells including embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells have been reported to be supported by various signal pathways. Among them, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) appears indispensable to maintain self-renewal of hPS cells. However, downstream signaling of FGF-2 has not yet been clearly understood in hPS cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we screened a kinase inhibitor library using a high-throughput alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity-based assay in a minimal growth factor-defined medium to understand FGF-2-related molecular mechanisms regulating self-renewal of hPS cells. We found that in the presence of FGF-2, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), GF109203X (GFX), increased ALP activity. GFX inhibited FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), suggesting that FGF-2 induced PKC and then PKC inhibited the activity of GSK-3β. Addition of activin A increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2) synergistically with FGF-2 whereas activin A alone did not. GFX negated differentiation of hPS cells induced by the PKC activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate whereas Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of PKCα, β, and γ isoforms could not counteract the effect of PMA. Intriguingly, functional gene analysis by RNA interference revealed that the phosphorylation of GSK-3β was reduced by siRNA of PKCδ, PKCε, and ζ, the phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 was reduced by siRNA of PKCε and ζ, and the phosphorylation of AKT was reduced by PKCε in hPS cells. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggested complicated cross-talk in hPS cells that FGF-2 induced the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT, mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK-1/2 kinase (MEK), PKC/ERK-1/2 kinase, and PKC/GSK-3β. Addition of GFX with a MEK inhibitor, U0126, in the presence of FGF-2 and activin A provided a long

  13. Rabbit notochordal cells modulate the expression of inflammatory mediators by human annulus fibrosus cells cocultured with activated macrophage-like THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Han; Moon, Hong Joo; Lee, Jin Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kwon, Taek Hyun; Park, Youn Kwan

    2012-10-15

    We evaluated the influence of rabbit notochordal cells on the expression of inflammatory mediators by human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells cocultured with macrophage-like cells. To identify the protective effect of rabbit notochordal cells on AF during in vitro inflammation. Discogenic pain, which is an important cause of intractable lower back pain, is associated with macrophage-mediated inflammation in the AF. Although rabbit notochordal cells prevent intervertebral disc degeneration, their effects on human AF inflammation remain unknown. Human AF pellets were cocultured for 48 hours with notochordal cell clusters from adult New Zealand White rabbits and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated human macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Conditioned media (CM) from the cocultures were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of inflammatory mediators in the AF pellets was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The levels of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the AF pellets cocultured with notochordal cells and macrophages (hAF[rNC-M]) were significantly lower than those in the AF pellets cultured with macrophages alone (hAF[M]) (P < 0.05). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 proteins in the CM of hAF(rNC-M) were significantly lower than those in the CM of hAF(M) (P < 0.05). Coculturing with notochordal cells significantly decreased the levels of mRNA for IL-6, IL-8, and iNOS in the macrophage-exposed AF pellets (P < 0.05). After 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulation, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA and the level of IL-8 protein production were significantly decreased in the AF pellets with notochordal cells compared with naïve AF pellets (P < 0.05). In an in vitro coculture system, rabbit notochordal cells reduced the levels of main inflammatory mediators and gene expression in the human AF during inflammation. Therefore, rabbit notochordal cells may constitute an important protective tool

  14. Identification of a major 50-kDa molecular weight human B-cell growth factor with Tac antigen-inducing activity on B cells.

    PubMed

    Kawano, M; Matsushima, K; Oppenheim, J J

    1987-08-01

    A bioassay was developed using human small B cells adherent to anti-human IgM (anti-mu)-coated wells. These B cells were stimulated to proliferate by culture supernatants of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (Con A Sup) even in the presence of high concentrations of anti-mu coated on assay wells. Human B-cell growth factor (BCGF) activities were partially purified from Con A Sup. Preparative chromatography (Sephacryl S-200 and isoelectrofocusing) yielded a major peak of BCGF activity for B cells adherent to anti-mu-coated wells with a molecular weight of 50,000 (50 kDa) and a pI 7.6. The 50-kDa BCGF was further purified by sequential chromatography using DEAE-Sephacel, CM-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200, CM-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and hydroxyapatite (HA)-HPLC. The HA-HPLC-purified 50-kDa BCGF was free of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon activities, but could support growth of BCL1 cells, similar to BCGF-II. Neither IL-1 nor interferon-gamma had any growth-stimulating effect in our B-cell proliferation assay with or without BCGF in Iscove's synthetic assay medium. BCGF-induced proliferation of B cells adherent to anti-mu-coated wells could be markedly augmented by the simultaneous or sequential addition of recombinant human IL-2 (rIL-2). When cultured for 3 days with 50-kDa BCGF, about 40% of B cells adherent to anti-mu-coated wells expressed Tac antigen, and monoclonal anti-Tac antibody inhibited rIL-2 enhancement of proliferation of 50-kDa BCGF-preactivated B cells. In addition, 50-kDa BCGF could induce Tac antigen on an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line (ORSON) in the presence of a suboptimal dose of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and also on a natural killer-like cell line (YT cells). We have therefore identified a major 50-kDa BCGF activity with Tac antigen-inducing activity that also has a synergistic effect with IL-2 on normal B-cell proliferation.

  15. What Are the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Francis

    A working definition of the humanities and characteristics of a liberally educated person are specified. The humanities embrace areas of human knowledge that possess these elements: central concern for human beings rather than for the processes of nature or the structures of society; primary focus on the individual rather than on the group;…

  16. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  17. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  18. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  19. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  20. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  1. [Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid and arsenic trioxide regulate the productions and activities of matrix metalloproteinases in human skin fibroblasts and human leukemia cell line THP-1].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ya-hui; Li, Ping; Zhao, Jing-xia; Liu, Xin; Huang, Qi-fu

    2010-11-01

    In order to reveal the treatment mechanism of Chinese medicine with the effect of activating blood and resolving putridity, we selected acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), the main monomeric components of frankincense and arsenolite which are two most commonly used Chinese medicine with effect of activating blood and resolving putridity. We combined AKBA and ATO as a compound, and explored its regulatory role in productions and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human skin fibroblasts (HSFbs) and human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 in inflammatory state. In order to simulate the inflammatory micro-environment of chronic wounds, we established 3 cell models: HSFb model activated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), THP-1 cell model activated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and HSFb-THP-1 cell coculture system. AKBA and ATO were cocultured with these cell models. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gelatin zymography assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to test the secretions, activities and mRNA expressions of MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9. In the study of the regulatory mechanism of AKBA and ATO on MMPs, AKBA and ATO were cocultured with the cell models. ELISA was used to test the secretions of TNF-α and interleukin-1beta (IL-β) and Western blot was used to test the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated proteinkinase (p38MAPK). Compound of AKBA and ATO inhibited MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, secretions and activities respectively in HSFbs and THP-1 cells in inflammatory state (P<0.05, P<0.01). Also compound of AKBA and ATO inhibited secretions of TNF-α and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and cell coculture system (P<0.01). It also decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in HSFbs and THP-1 cells (P<0.05, P<0.01). The combined use of AKBA and ATO which

  2. Human Dignity, Three Human Rights, and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberg, Donald

    1986-01-01

    A general theory of value is outlined to show that moral agency is necessary to human dignity and that liberty, equality, and fraternity are necessary to moral agency. These ideals can be implemented in schools and human dignity can be at the core of the professional ethics of teaching. (MT)

  3. Values for Human-to-Human Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Defines "values" and lists the eight values (stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, rationalism, literacy and learning, equity of access, privacy, democracy) derived by the author in an earlier work. Gives a brief history of the evolution of human-to-human reference service and discusses its future. Relates each of the author's eight values…

  4. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,…

  5. Human Melioidosis, Malawi, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Katangwe, Thembi; Purcell, Janet; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Denis, Brigitte; Montgomery, Jacqui; Alaerts, Maaike; Heyderman, Robert Simon; Dance, David A.B.; Kennedy, Neil; Feasey, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A case of human melioidosis caused by a novel sequence type of Burkholderia pseudomallei occurred in a child in Malawi, southern Africa. A literature review showed that human cases reported from the continent have been increasing. PMID:23735189

  6. Indicators: Human Disturbance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human disturbance is a measure of the vulnerability of aquatic resources to a variety of harmful human activities such as tree removal, road building, construction near shorelines/streambanks, and artificial hardening of lakeshores with retaining walls.

  7. Human Purposive Movement Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    theory and provides examples of developmental and operational technologies that could use this theory in common settings. 15. SUBJECT TERMS human ... activity , prediction of behavior, human algorithms purposive movement theory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18

  8. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association ... to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence documenting the serious ...

  9. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  11. Human Exposure and Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ROE is divided into 5 themes: Air, Water, Land, Human Exposure and Health and Ecological Condition. From these themes, the report indicators address fundamental questions that the ROE attempts to answer. For human health there are 3 questions.

  12. Civilian Human Resources

    Science.gov Websites

    open the menu (new window). Open Menu Navigate Up This page location is: Civilian Human Resources Pages Default BrowseTab 1 of 2. PageTab 2 of 2. Sign In You are leaving the Civilian Human Resources Website LinkedIn Search this site... Search Civilian Human Resources Top Link Bar Civilian Human Resources Home

  13. Human behavior and malaria.

    PubMed

    Hongvivatana, T

    1986-09-01

    Human behavior in malaria is often narrowly referred to behavior of the target populations in transmission and control of malaria. In this presentation it was discussed that such view is too narrow. A broader framework incorporating illness behavior and human behavior in malaria control bureaucracies is needed for the success of national malaria control programme. Literature under the three broad categories of human behavior in malaria is reviewed to justify future directions in human behavior research and their significance for successful malaria control.

  14. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intervention and Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Defends the right of nations to criticize human rights violations within other nations. Pointing out that the human rights protections cannot be left to domestic jurisdiction, Goldberg cites numerous treaties and declarations which make human rights protection a matter of international law. (GEA)

  16. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  17. Explaining Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Alton T.; And Others

    The Deductive-Nomological (D-N) model of human behavior is useful and provides the most objective explanation when it is appropriate but it is not necessarily an all-inclusive statement. For instance, explaining human behavior is always an act that entails languages and theories that are value laden and reveal human choices; however the D-N model…

  18. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  19. Humanities Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Mary Ann

    Designed as a model for a high school humanities program, this publication outlines a two-course, two-year elective in humanities for high school juniors and seniors. Introductory material includes an overview of the program and its history, credits, goals of the program, and an introduction to humanities. The major portion of the guide contains…

  20. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  1. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths…

  2. International Human Rights Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    Designed for students, educators, and citizens interested in human rights, the booklet presents resources for learning about the facts, perspectives, and existing procedures and institutions to promote human rights. Chapter one explores the relationship between human rights and war. Chapter two presents a self-survey to help readers clarify…

  3. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  4. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  5. The Virtual Physiological Human

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Peter V.; Diaz, Vanessa; Hunter, Peter; Kohl, Peter; Viceconti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human is synonymous with a programme in computational biomedicine that aims to develop a framework of methods and technologies to investigate the human body as a whole. It is predicated on the transformational character of information technology, brought to bear on that most crucial of human concerns, our own health and well-being.

  6. Multiple splicing events involved in regulation of human aromatase expression by a novel promoter, I.6.

    PubMed

    Shozu, M; Zhao, Y; Bulun, S E; Simpson, E R

    1998-04-01

    The expression of aromatase is regulated in a tissue-specific fashion through alternative use of multiple promoter-specific first exons. To date, eight different first exons have been reported in human aromatase, namely I.1., I.2, I.3. I.4, I.5, PII, 2a, and 1f. Recently, we have found a new putative exon I in a RACE-generated library of THP-1 cells and have conducted studies to characterize this new exon I. We confirmed that the constructs containing -1552/+17 or less flanking sequence of this exon function as a promoter in THP-1 cells, JEG-3 cells and osteoblast-like cells obtained from a human fetus. Results of transfection assays using a series of deletion constructs and mutation constructs indicate that a 1-bp mismatch of the consensus TATA-like box (TTTAAT) and the consensus sequence of the initiator site, which is located 45 bp downstream of the putative TATA box, were functioning cooperatively as a core promoter. The putative transcription site was confirmed by the results of RT-PCR southern blot analysis. We examined the regulation and the expression of this exon, I.6, in several human cells and tissues by RT-PCR Southern blot analysis. THP-1 cells (mononuclear leukemic origin) and JEG-3 cells (choriocarcinoma origin) expressed exon I.6 in serum-free media. The level of expression was increased by serum and phorbol myristyl acetate (PMA) in both cell lines. Adipose stromal cells also expressed exon I.6 in the presence of PMA. In fetal osteoblasts, the expression of exon I.6 was increased most effectively by serum and less so by dexamethasone (DEX) + IL-1beta and DEX + IL-11, whereas induction by serum was suppressed by the addition of DEX. The level of expression was low in granulosa cells in culture and did not change with forskolin. On the other hand, dibutyryl cAMP suppressed PMA-stimulated expression of exon I.6 in THP-1 cells and adipose stromal cells. This result supports the hypothesis that the expression of exon I.6 is regulated mainly via an AP-1

  7. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  8. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  9. Rethinking medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  10. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  11. Human rights and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  12. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authorsmore » find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.« less

  13. Integrated Environmental Modelling: Human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  14. Effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on cytokine production by peripheral blood naive, memory, and effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Paula; Pedrosa, Monia; Pedreiro, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-05

    The different distribution of T cells among activation/differentiation stages in immune disorders may condition the outcome of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. Indeed, the effect of MSCs in the different functional compartments of T cells is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of human bone marrow MSCs on naturally occurring peripheral blood functional compartments of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells: naive, central memory, effector memory, and effector compartments. For that, mononuclear cells (MNCs) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin were cultured in the absence/presence of MSCs. The percentage of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFNγ), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-17, IL-9, and IL-6 and the amount of cytokine produced were assessed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) in purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and phenotypic and mRNA expression changes induced by PMA + ionomycin stimulation in MSCs, were also evaluated. MSCs induced the reduction of the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL-2 in all functional compartments, except for naive IFNγ(+)CD4(+) T cells. This inhibitory effect differentially affected CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as the T-cell functional compartments; remarkably, different cytokines showed distinct patterns of inhibition regarding both the percentage of producing cells and the amount of cytokine produced. Likewise, the percentages of IL-17(+), IL-17(+)TNF-α(+), and IL-9(+) within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and of IL-6(+)CD4(+) T cells were decreased in MNC-MSC co-cultures. MSCs decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in stimulated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas TGF-β was reduced in CD8(+) and augmented in CD4(+) T cells, with no changes for CTLA4. Finally, PMA

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps possess anti-human respiratory syncytial virus activity: Possible interaction with the viral F protein.

    PubMed

    Souza, Priscila Silva Sampaio; Barbosa, Lia Vezenfard; Diniz, Larissa Figueiredo Alves; da Silva, Gabriel Soares; Lopes, Bruno Rafael Pereira; Souza, Pedro Miyadaira Ribeiro; de Araujo, Gabriela Campos; Pessoa, Diogo; de Oliveira, Juliana; Souza, Fátima Pereira; Toledo, Karina Alves

    2018-06-02

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is one of the main etiological agents of diseases of the lower respiratory tract, and is often responsible for the hospitalization of children and the elderly. To date, treatments are only palliative and there is no vaccine available. The airways of patients infected with hRSV exhibit intense neutrophil infiltration, which is responsible for the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are extracellular structures consisting of DNA associated with intracellular proteins, and are efficient in capturing and eliminating various microorganisms, including some viruses. hRSV induces the release of NETs into the lung tissue of infected individuals; however, the pathophysiological consequences of this event have not been elucidated. The objective of this study was to utilize in vitro and in silico assays to investigate the impact of NETs on hRSV infection. NETs, generated by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), displayed long fragments of DNA and an electrophoretic profile suggestive of the presence of proteins that are classically associated with these structures (elastase, cathepsin G, myeloperoxidase, and histones). The presence of NETs (>2 μg/ml) in HEp-2 cell culture medium resulted in cellular cytotoxicity of less than 50%. Pre-incubation (1 h) of viral particles (multiplicity of infection (MOI) values of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0) with NETs (2-32 μg/ml) resulted in cellular protection from virus-induced death of HEp-2 cells. Concurrently, there was a reduction in the formation of syncytia, which is related to decreased viral spread in infected tissue. Results from western blotting and molecular docking, suggest interactions between F protein of the hRSV viral envelope and BPI (bactericidal permeability-increasing protein), a microbicidal member of NETs. Interactions occurred at sites important for the neutralization and coordination of the hRSV infection/replication process. Our results

  16. Ligand binding and functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on the TE671/RD human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Lukas, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    Cells of the TE671/RD human clonal line express a finite number ((Bmax) of about 350 fmol/mg of membrane protein) of apparently noninteracting, high-affinity binding sites (KD of 0.07 nM and a Hill coefficient close to unity, nH = 0.94) for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) radio antagonist, tritium-labeled quinuclidinyl benzilate ({sup 3}H-QNB). The rank order potency of selective antagonists that inhibit specific {sup 3}HQNB binding is: atropine greater than 4-DAMP (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide) greater than pirenzepine greater than methoctramine greater than AFDx-116 (11-2(2-((diethylamino)methyl)-1-(piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepin-6-one). Functional studies indicate that phosphoinositide (PIns) hydrolysis in TE671/RD cells is increased by carbachol (EC50 of 10more » microM), but not by nicotine (to concentrations as high as 1 mM). Agonist-stimulated PIns metabolism is inhibited by antagonists with the same rank order potency as for inhibition of {sup 3}HQNB binding. Functional responses are augmented in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, are strongly inhibited after 24-hr exposure to cholera toxin, but are only slightly inhibited after long-term exposure to pertussis toxin or forskolin. These studies identify a pharmacologically-defined M3-subtype of mAChR strongly coupled via a cholera toxin-sensitive mechanism to PIns hydrolysis in these cells. Within 1 hr of treatment of TE671/RD cells with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP or with 10 microM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), there is a 30 to 50% decrease in carbachol-stimulated PIns responsiveness that recovers to control values after 5 days of continued drug treatment. However, a comparable and more persistent inhibition of mAChR function is observed on cell treatment with 20 nM PMA.« less

  17. Sensitization to human milk.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, U; Swoboda, I; Quirce, S; de la Hoz, B; Ollert, M; Pauli, G; Valenta, R; Spitzauer, S

    2008-01-01

    Allergy to milk is one of the earliest manifestations of IgE-mediated allergies and affects about 2.5% of newborn children. Several reports indicate that milk-allergic patients may be sensitized also to human milk proteins. To analyse the specificity and possible biological relevance of IgE reactivity to human milk antigens in milk-allergic patients. The specificity of IgE reactivity to cow's milk and human milk antigens was analysed with sera from milk-allergic children and adults by IgE immunoblotting. IgE cross-reactivity between milk antigens was studied by immunoblot inhibition experiments. That IgE reactivity to human milk antigens is not due to alloreactivity or due to the transmission of foreign antigens into mother's milk was demonstrated through the analysis of milk samples from genetically unrelated mothers before and after intake of dietary milk products. The biological relevance of IgE reactivity to human milk was confirmed by skin testing. Results IgE antibodies to human milk were found in more than 80% of the tested milk-allergic patients. Cross-reactive IgE-reactive human antigens such as alpha-lactalbumin and non-cross-reactive human milk antigens were identified. Immediate-type skin reactions could be elicited with human milk samples in patients with IgE reactivity to human milk. IgE reactivity to human milk in milk-allergic patients can be due to cross- sensitization and genuine sensitization to human milk and may cause allergic symptoms. IgE-mediated sensitization to human milk is common in milk-allergic patients and may require diagnostic testing and monitoring.

  18. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  19. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  20. The Human Cell Atlas.

    PubMed

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  1. Human Resource Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    costs . The goal of this thesis is to help the Portuguese Navy in formulating a formal and coherent approach to its human resource accounting , and in so...ABSTRACT Human Resource Accounting means accounting for people as an organizational asset. It is the measurement of the cost and value of people to the...29 II.HUMAN RESOURCE COSTS . . . . . . . . . . . 30 A. CONCEPTS OF COST AND MEASUREMENT METHODS . . . 30 1. Accounting Concepts of Costs

  2. Human Image Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    A Theory of Human Image Understanding " and the reprint of the chapter "Aspects and...Extensions of a Theory of Human Image Understanding " in Z. Pylyshyn (Ed). CONTENTS I. Introduction and Background ............................... 2 II. A...edges Fig;i 4 Some nonacmdentg differences between a brick and a cylinder. From Fig. 5, Recognition-by-Components: A theory of human image

  3. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  4. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  5. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  6. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  7. Enhanced interleukin-8 production in THP-1 human monocytic cells by lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Falkler, W A

    1999-10-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in macrophage mediated inflammatory processes including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in GM-CSF receiving cancer patients. The effect of GM-CSF supplementation on IL-8 production was investigated in a human monocyte cell line THP-1, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide extracted from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) for varying time periods. The production of IL-8 in THP-1 cells was measured by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A very low level of the cytokine IL-8 was produced constitutive in THP-1 cells. Starting from 8 h of treatment and afterwards GM-CSF alone significantly increased IL-8 production in THP-1 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) extracts from either F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis amplified IL-8 production 500-800 times in comparison to resting THP-1 cells. When lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis was supplemented with 50 IU/ml of GM-CSF, there was a statistically significant enhanced production of IL-8 by THP-1 cells after 1 day to 7 days of treatment as compared with lipopolysaccharide treatment alone. GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) also significantly increased IL-8 production from 2-7 days of treatment of THP-1 cells when supplemented with a positive control, phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA), as compared to PMA treatment alone. These investigations using the in vitro THP-1 human monocyte cell model indicate that there may be an increase in the response on a cellular level to oral endotoxin following GM-CSF therapy as evidenced by enhanced production of the tissue-reactive inflammatory cytokine, IL-8.

  8. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  9. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  10. Rationality in Human Movement.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan K; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-01-01

    It long has been appreciated that humans behave irrationally in economic decisions under risk: they fail to objectively consider uncertainty, costs, and rewards and instead exhibit risk-seeking or risk-averse behavior. We hypothesize that poor estimates of motor variability (influenced by motor task) and distorted probability weighting (influenced by relevant emotional processes) contribute to characteristic irrationality in human movement decisions.

  11. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  12. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  13. Incorporating Human Interindividual Biotransformation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The protection of sensitive individuals within a population dictates that measures other than central tendencies be employed to estimate risk. The refinement of human health risk assessments for chemicals metabolized by the liver to reflect data on human variability can be accomplished through (1) the characterization of enzyme expression in large banks of human liver samples, (2) the employment of appropriate techniques for the quantification and extrapolation of metabolic rates derived in vitro, and (3) the judicious application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. While in vitro measurements of specific biochemical reactions from multiple human samples can yield qualitatively valuable data on human variance, such measures must be put into the perspective of the intact human to yield the most valuable predictions of metabolic differences among humans. For quantitative metabolism data to be the most valuable in risk assessment, they must be tied to human anatomy and physiology, and the impact of their variance evaluated under real exposure scenarios. For chemicals metabolized in the liver, the concentration of parent chemical in the liver represents the substrate concentration in the MichaelisMenten description of metabolism. Metabolic constants derived in vitro may be extrapolated to the intact liver, when appropriate conditions are met. Metabolic capacity Vmax; the maximal rate of the reaction) can be scaled directly to the concentration

  14. Three Human Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaves, Ronald C.; Williams, Thomas O., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This study represents a beginning step in research that may ultimately show that the multitudes of human behavior that educators currently encounter may be reduced to three broad human attributes: arousal, affect, and cognition. The resulting simplicity should lead to improved understanding and better decision making by practitioners. Four…

  15. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  16. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  17. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  18. Human Sociobiology: Wilson's Fallacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Nathaniel S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an introduction to and a critique of E.O. Wilson's new science of sociobiology, which focuses on explaining the social behavior of species as diverse as ants, apes, and humans. Suggests that Wilson has gone beyond his data in claiming that complex human behaviors such as altruism are caused to any extent by genetic, as opposed to…

  19. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  20. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the…

  1. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  2. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  3. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of…

  4. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  5. Teaching Human Rights Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    The international community has developed a system of human rights law relevant to many areas of legal encounter, which American law schools have been slow to incorporate into curricula. Teaching human rights law provides an opportunity for law schools to enrich the learning process and contribute creatively to the respect for rights in society.…

  6. The Shattered Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, William J.

    Intellectual refinement and spiritual evaluation have been the traditional goals of the humanities and should remain so. If these aims are given up, then the noble endeavors in the humanities such as sustained reflection, intensive research, careful scholarship, inspired teaching, deep learning, and serious discussion will all become discredited…

  7. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  8. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  9. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  10. Digital Human Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The development of models to represent human characteristics and behaviors in human factors is broad and general. The term "model" can refer to any metaphor to represent any aspect of the human; it is generally used in research to mean a mathematical tool for the simulation (often in software, which makes the simulation digital) of some aspect of human performance and for the prediction of future outcomes. This section is restricted to the application of human models in physical design, e.g., in human factors engineering. This design effort is typically human interface design, and the digital models used are anthropometric. That is, they are visual models that are the physical shape of humans and that have the capabilities and constraints of humans of a selected population. They are distinct from the avatars used in the entertainment industry (movies, video games, and the like) in precisely that regard: as models, they are created through the application of data on humans, and they are used to predict human response; body stresses workspaces. DHM enable iterative evaluation of a large number of concepts and support rapid analysis, as compared with use of physical mockups. They can be used to evaluate feasibility of escape of a suited astronaut from a damaged vehicle, before launch or after an abort (England, et al., 2012). Throughout most of human spaceflight, little attention has been paid to worksite design for ground workers. As a result of repeated damage to the Space Shuttle which adversely affected flight safety, DHM analyses of ground assembly and maintenance have been developed over the last five years for the design of new flight systems (Stambolian, 2012, Dischinger and Dunn Jackson, 2014). The intent of these analyses is to assure the design supports the work of the ground crew personnel and thereby protect the launch vehicle. They help the analyst address basic human factors engineering questions: can a worker reach the task site from the work platform

  11. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  12. Human Milk Banking.

    PubMed

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  14. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-20

    uptake Chart 7 by POD was not affected by concurrent treatment with 0.1 mM quercetin (Chart 7). Epidermal growth factor (100 nM) also had no affect on...Therefore, we examined the affect on queuine uptake of quercetin , a flavanoid inhibitor of protein kinase C which binds to a site separate from the...phorbol ester binding site (12). Quercetin did not relieve the POO-effected inhibition of rQT3 uptake.. Although some residual activity of membrane bound

  15. Genetics of human hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Human hydrocephalus is a common medical condition that is characterized by abnormalities in the flow or resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in ventricular dilatation. Human hydrocephalus can be classified into two clinical forms, congenital and acquired. Hydrocephalus is one of the complex and multifactorial neurological disorders. A growing body of evidence indicates that genetic factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. An understanding of the genetic components and mechanism of this complex disorder may offer us significant insights into the molecular etiology of impaired brain development and an accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in cerebral compartments during the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. Genetic studies in animal models have started to open the way for understanding the underlying pathology of hydrocephalus. At least 43 mutants/loci linked to hereditary hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models and humans. Up to date, 9 genes associated with hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models. In contrast, only one such gene has been identified in humans. Most of known hydrocephalus gene products are the important cytokines, growth factors or related molecules in the cellular signal pathways during early brain development. The current molecular genetic evidence from animal models indicate that in the early development stage, impaired and abnormal brain development caused by abnormal cellular signaling and functioning, all these cellular and developmental events would eventually lead to the congenital hydrocephalus. Owing to our very primitive knowledge of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus, it is difficult to evaluate whether data gained from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. Initiation of a large population genetics study in humans will certainly provide invaluable information about the molecular and cellular etiology and the developmental mechanisms of human

  16. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  18. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Propelling medical humanities in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    Advances in the study of the medical humanities and medical humanities education have been made over the past few decades. Many influential journals have published articles examining the role of medical humanities and medical humanities education, the development and evaluation of medical humanities, and the design of a curriculum for medical humanities education in Western countries. However, most articles related to medical humanities in China were published in Chinese, moreover, researchers have worked in relative isolation and published in disparate journals, so their work has not been systematically presented to and evaluated by international readers. The six companion articles featured in this issue describe the current status and challenge of medical humanities and medical humanities education in China in the hope of providing international readers with a novel and meaningful glimpse into medical humanities in China. This Journal is calling for greater publication of research on medical humanities and medical humanities education to propel medical humanities in China.

  20. Defense Human Resources Activity > PERSEREC

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Defense Human Resources Activity Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Defense Human Resources Activity U.S. Department of Defense Defense Human Resources Activity Overview

  1. Human Rights and torture.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    1998 marks the 50th anniversary of the historic Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which proclaims that all peoples are born free and equal and sets out the basic principles of equality and nondiscrimination in the enjoyment of fundamental freedoms and human rights. Yet, despite the many covenants and conventions stemming from this declaration and signed by nations around the world, human rights continue to be violated by powerful groups, by individuals, often even by family members. On 26 June, which has been declared UN International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, attention will be focused on torture--a grave violation of a person's human rights still practised in its many insidious forms in many countries. INR reviews the work of the organizations trying to help stop the perpetrators and participation of health professionals; rehabilitate the survivors; and educate health professionals and the public.

  2. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  3. Biotechnology and human rights.

    PubMed

    Feuillet-Le Mintier, B

    2001-12-01

    Biotechnology permits our world to progress. It's a tool to better apprehend the human being, but as well to let him go ahead. Applied to the living, biotechnologies present the same finality. But since their matter concerns effectively the living, they are the sources of specific dangers and particularly of that one to use the improvements obtained on the human to modify the human species. The right of the persons has to find its place to avoid that the fundamental rights of the human personality shall undergo harm. This mission assigned to the right of the persons is as so much invaluable that the economical stakes are particularly important in the domain of the biotechnologies.

  4. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Dr. Joseph R. Fragola, Vice President, Valador, Inc., testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. OAS :: Accountability :: Human Resources

    Science.gov Websites

    Disarmament Drugs E e-Government Education Elections Environment Equity G General Assembly Governance H Human Management Public Security R Racism and Intolerance Refugees S Scholarships School of Governance Science and

  6. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... used for teaching, modeling radiation absorption and therapy, equipment design, surgical simulation, and simulation of diagnostic procedures, ….” ... Project ® " by Michael J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Projects Based on the Visible Human Data Set Applications for ...

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... to be used for women over 30 years old. It may find HPV even before there are ...

  8. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  9. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  10. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Vitale, Chiara; Moretta, Francesca; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    The interest in innate lymphoid cells (ILC) has rapidly grown during the last decade. ILC include distinct cell types that are collectively involved in host protection against pathogens and tumor cells and in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. Studies in mice enabled a broad characterization of ILC function and of their developmental requirements. In humans all mature ILC subsets have been characterized and their role in the pathogenesis of certain disease is emerging. Nonetheless, still limited information is available on human ILC development. Indeed, only the cell precursors committed toward NK cells or ILC3 have been described. Here, we review the most recent finding on human mature ILC, discussing their tissue localization and function. Moreover, we summarize the available data regarding human ILC development. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  12. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  13. Conducting Human Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-05

    Socio-cultural data acquisition, extraction, and management.??? First the idea of a theoretical framework will be very briefly discussed as well as...SUBJECT TERMS human behavior, theoretical framework , hypothesis development, experimental design, ethical research, statistical power, human laboratory...who throw rocks? • How can we make them stay too far away to throw rocks? UNCLASSIFIED – Approved for Public Release Theoretical Framework / Conceptual

  14. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  15. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth.

  16. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-22

    The scientific knowledge and technologies needed to make human exploration of Mars happen are within our reach. NASA 360 joins Dr. Jim Green, Director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, as he discusses how NASA is preparing for human exploration of the Red Planet. This video was created from a live recording at the Viking 40th Anniversary Symposium in July 2016. To watch the original talk please visit: http://bit.ly/2bk1PGk

  18. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Human Germline Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Kelly E; Mortlock, Douglas P; Scholes, Derek T; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C; Faucett, W Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E

    2017-08-03

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Genetic Counselors. These groups, as well as the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics, British Society for Genetic Medicine, Human Genetics Society of Australasia, Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia, and Southern African Society for Human Genetics, endorsed the final statement. The statement includes the following positions. (1) At this time, given the nature and number of unanswered scientific, ethical, and policy questions, it is inappropriate to perform germline gene editing that culminates in human pregnancy. (2) Currently, there is no reason to prohibit in vitro germline genome editing on human embryos and gametes, with appropriate oversight and consent from donors, to facilitate research on the possible future clinical applications of gene editing. There should be no prohibition on making public funds available to support this research. (3) Future clinical application of human germline genome editing should not proceed unless, at a minimum, there is (a) a compelling medical rationale, (b) an evidence base that supports its clinical use, (c) an ethical justification, and (d) a transparent public process to solicit and incorporate stakeholder input. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality and human society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  1. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  2. Cytokines in human milk.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breastfeeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult because of its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. However, a host of bioactive substances, including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines, have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk in the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system. Copyright 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  3. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  4. The Human Cell Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community. PMID:29206104

  5. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  6. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  7. Microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Murakami, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    In human fertilization, the sperm centrosome plays a crucial role as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). We studied microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis, which occurs when a human egg undergoes cleavage without a sperm centrosome. Multiple cytoplasmic asters were organized in the human oocyte after parthenogenetic activation, indicating that multiple MTOC are present in the human oocyte cytoplasm and function like a human sperm centrosome during parthenogenesis.

  8. Human dignity, humiliation, and torture.

    PubMed

    Luban, David

    2009-09-01

    Modern human rights instruments ground human rights in the concept of human dignity, without providing an underlying theory of human dignity. This paper examines the central importance of human dignity, understood as not humiliating people, in traditional Jewish ethics. It employs this conception of human dignity to examine and criticize U.S. use of humiliation tactics and torture in the interrogation of terrorism suspects.

  9. Nutritionally relevant concentrations of resveratrol and hydroxytyrosol mitigate oxidative burst of human granulocytes and monocytes and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Cinci, Lorenzo; Paccosi, Sara; Parenti, Astrid; D'Ambrosio, Mario; Luceri, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    The health benefits of bio-active phenolic compounds have been largely investigated in vitro at concentrations which exceed those reachable in vivo. We investigated and compared the anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein at physiologically relevant concentrations by using in vitro models of inflammation. Human granulocytes and monocytes were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the ability of resveratrol, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein to inhibit the oxidative burst and CD11b expression was measured. Nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels, COX-2, iNOS, TNFα, IL-1β and miR-146a expression and activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 were evaluated in macrophages RAW 264.7 stimulated with LPS (1μg/ml) for 18h, exposed to resveratrol, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein (5 and 10μM). Synergistic effects were explored as well, together with the levels of PGE2, COX-2 and IL-1β expression in macrophages after 6h of LPS stimulation. PGE2 and COX-2 expression were also assessed on human monocytes. All the tested compounds inhibited granulocytes oxidative burst in a concentration dependent manner and CD11b expression was also significantly counteracted by resveratrol and hydroxytyrosol. The measurement of oxidative burst in human monocytes produced similar effects being resveratrol more active. Hydroxytyrosol and resveratrol inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 but did not reduce iNOS, TNFα or IL-1β gene expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 for 18h. Resveratrol slightly decreased COX-2 expression after 18h but not after 6h, but reduced PGE2 levels after 6h. Resveratrol and hydroxytyrosol 10μM induced NRf2 nuclear translocation and reduced miR-146a expression in LPS treated RAW 264.7. Overall, we reported an anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol and hydroxytyrosol at low, nutritionally relevant concentrations, involving the inhibition of granulocytes and monocytes activation, the modulation of miR-146a

  10. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  11. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population. © 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  13. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  14. Human Skin Fungal Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Keisha; Oh, Julia; Yang, Joy; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Schoenfeld, Deborah; Nomicos, Effie; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H.; Segre, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional culture-based methods have incompletely defined the etiology of common recalcitrant human fungal skin diseases including athlete’s foot and toenail infections. Skin protects humans from invasion by pathogenic microorganisms, while providing a home for diverse commensal microbiota1. Bacterial genomic sequence data have generated novel hypotheses about species and community structures underlying human disorders2,3,4. However, microbial diversity is not limited to bacteria; microorganisms such as fungi also play major roles in microbial community stability, human health and disease5. Genomic methodologies to identify fungal species and communities have been limited compared with tools available for bacteria6. Fungal evolution can be reconstructed with phylogenetic markers, including ribosomal RNA gene regions and other highly conserved genes7. Here, we sequenced and analyzed fungal communities of 14 skin sites in 10 healthy adults. Eleven core body and arm sites were dominated by Malassezia fungi, with species-level classifications revealing greater topographical resolution between sites. By contrast, three foot sites, plantar heel, toenail, and toeweb, exhibited tremendous fungal diversity. Concurrent analysis of bacterial and fungal communities demonstrated that skin physiologic attributes and topography differentially shape these two microbial communities. These results provide a framework for future investigation of interactions between pathogenic and commensal fungal and bacterial communities in maintaining human health and contributing to disease pathogenesis. PMID:23698366

  15. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture mediummore » containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.« less

  16. Human neuroethology of emotion.

    PubMed

    Ploog, D

    1989-01-01

    1. Based on ethological theory, the question of what is the difference between human and nonhuman primate emotionality is investigated. 2. The anatomical basis for this difference is the greater number of neurons in the anterior thalamic nuclei in humans than in monkeys and apes. This may represent an increased differentiation of the limbic message being sent to the cortex. 3. Only humans can report about experiences and subjective feelings in certain motivational states. The two most general states are wakefulness and sleep. The subjective aspect of (desynchronized) sleep is dreaming. The causal relationship between dreaming and certain lower brain stem mechanisms is analysed. 4. Whereas the motor system is usually blocked during desynchronized sleep, there are individuals who voice their emotions and speak while sleeping. As there are essential differences in the substrates for the voluntary control of the voice in the human and nonhuman primates there are essential differences in the voluntary control of emotions. 5. Similar to the motor matching theory of speech perception a motor matching process of affect perception is suggested. 6. The evolutionary change in the human motivational system is thought to be one of several prerequisites for the evolution of language.

  17. Healthy human gut phageome

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20–50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  18. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  19. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  20. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  1. Human milk banking guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bharadva, Ketan; Tiwari, Satish; Mishra, Sudhir; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Yadav, Balraj; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    WHO and UNICEF state that the use of human milk from other sources should be the first alternative when it is not possible for the mother to breastfeed. Human milk banks should be made available in appropriate situations. The IYCF Chapter is actively concerned about the compelling use of formula feeds in the infants because of the non availability of human breast milk banks. A National Consultative Meet for framing guidelines was summoned by the IYCF Chapter and the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India on 30th June, 2013, with representations from various stakeholders. The guidelines were drafted after an extensive literature review and discussions. Though these guidelines are based on the experiences and guidelines from other countries, changes have been made to suit the Indian setup, culture and needs, without compromising scientific evidence. To ensure quality of donated breast milk as a safe end product. Human Milk Banking Association should be constituted, and human milk banks should be established across the country. National coordination mechanism should be developed with a secretariat and technical support to follow-up on action in States. Budgetary provisions should be made available for the activities.

  2. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  3. Healthy human gut phageome.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Young, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health.

  4. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting Akt–NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Hany A.; Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Akt–nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to studymore » the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Akt–NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of Akt–NF-κB and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: • The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. • OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. • OSU-A9

  5. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  6. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  7. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  8. Highest permanent human habitation.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine the altitude of the highest permanent human habitation in the hope that this will throw some light on what determines the highest altitude that a community can tolerate indefinitely. A number of places where people have lived at very high altitudes for long periods of time are reviewed. Individuals have lived for as long as 2 yr at an altitude of 5950 m, and there was a miner's camp at 5300 m for several years. The highest permanently inhabited town in the world at the present time appears to be La Rinconada, a mining village of over 7000 people in southern Peru at an altitude of up to 5100 m, which has been in existence for over 40 yr. The altitude of the highest permanent human habitation is determined partly by economic factors, rather than solely by human tolerance to hypoxia.

  9. Preparing for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Joosten, B. Kent

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise is defining architectures and requirements for human exploration that radically reduce the costs of such missions through the use of advanced technologies, commercial partnerships and innovative systems strategies. In addition, the HEDS Enterprise is collaborating with the Space Science Enterprise to acquire needed early knowledge about Mars and to demonstrate critical technologies via robotic missions. This paper provides an overview of the technological challenges facing NASA as it prepares for human exploration. Emphasis is placed on identifying the key technologies including those which will provide the most return in terms of reducing total mission cost and/or reducing potential risk to the mission crew. Top-level requirements are provided for those critical enabling technology options currently under consideration.

  10. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  11. On human parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jose de Carli, Gabriel; Campos Pereira, Tiago

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous parthenogenetic and androgenetic events occur in humans, but they result in tumours: the ovarian teratoma and the hydatidiform mole, respectively. However, the observation of fetiform (ovarian) teratomas, the serependious identification of several chimeric human parthenotes and androgenotes in the last two decades, along with the creation of viable bi-maternal mice in the laboratory based on minor genetic interferences, raises the question of whether natural cases of clinically healthy human parthenotes have gone unnoticed to science. Here we present a hypothesis based on three elements to support the existence of such elusive individuals: mutations affecting (i) genomic imprinting, (ii) meiosis and (iii) oocyte activation. Additionally, we suggest that the routine practice of whole genome sequencing on every single newborn worldwide will be the ultimate test to this controversial, yet astonishing hypothesis. Finally, several medical implications of such intriguing event are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  13. Highlights of human toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Lawrence T.; Dorchies, Philippe; Morassin, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a helminthozoonosis due to the migration of Toxocara species larvae through human organism. Humans become infected by ingesting either embryonated eggs from soil (geophagia, pica), dirty hands or raw vegetables, or larvae from undercooked giblets. The diagnosis relies upon sensitive immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot) which use Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens. Seroprevalence is high in developed countries, especially in rural areas, and also in some tropical islands. The clinical spectrum of the disease comprises four syndromes, namely visceral larva migrans, ocular larva migrans, and the more recently recognized "common" (in adults) and "covert" (in children) pictures. Therapy of ocular toxocariasis is primarily based upon corticosteroids use, when visceral larva migrans and few cases of common or covert toxocariasis can be treated by anthelmintics whose the most efficient appeared to be diethylcarbamazine. When diagnosed, all of these syndromes require thorough prevention of recontamination (especially by deworming pets) and sanitary education. PMID:11301585

  14. Possible human endogenous cryogens.

    PubMed

    Shido, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi

    2011-06-01

    Anapyrexia, which is a regulated fall in core temperature, is beneficial for animals and humans when the oxygen supply is limited, e.g., hypoxic, ischemic, or histotoxic hypoxia, since at low body temperature the tissues require less oxygen due to Q(10). Besides hypoxia, anapyrexia can be induced various exogenous and endogenous substances, named cryogens. However, there are only a few reports investigating endogenous cryogens in mammals. We have experienced one patient who suffered from severe hypothermia. The patient seemed to be excessively producing endogenous peptidergic cryogenic substances the molecular weight of which may be greater than 30 kDa. In animal studies, the patient's cryogen appeared to affect metabolic functions, including thermogenic threshold temperatures, and then to produce hypothermia. Since endogenous cryogenic substances may be regarded as useful tool in human activities, e.g., during brain hypothermia therapy or staying in a space station or spaceship, further studies may be needed to identify human endogenous cryogens.

  15. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  16. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  17. Seaweed and human health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma S; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Gill, Chris I R; Nitecki, Sonja; Strain, Conall R; McSorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    Seaweeds may have an important role in modulating chronic disease. Rich in unique bioactive compounds not present in terrestrial food sources, including different proteins (lectins, phycobiliproteins, peptides, and amino acids), polyphenols, and polysaccharides, seaweeds are a novel source of compounds with potential to be exploited in human health applications. Purported benefits include antiviral, anticancer, and anticoagulant properties as well as the ability to modulate gut health and risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Though the majority of studies have been performed in cell and animal models, there is evidence of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status. This review is the first to critically evaluate these human studies, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies.

  18. Human antirabies gamma globulin*

    PubMed Central

    Hosty, Thomas S.; Kissling, R. E.; Schaeffer, M.; Wallace, Gordon A.; Dibble, E. H.

    1959-01-01

    To obviate the foreign protein reactions experienced with the use of hyperimmune serum in rabies-exposed individuals, an attempt was made to produce a rabies antiserum of human origin. Five doses of an inactivated rabies virus duck-egg vaccine were administered to 34 volunteers at 4-day intervals (i.e., on days 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16). An additional dose of chick-embryo attenuated virus vaccine—Flury HEP (high egg passage)—was given on the 46th day, followed by a final booster dose of duck-egg vaccine on the 288th day. Twenty-four days later, i.e., on the 312th day after the first dose, the participants were bled and the serum pooled and converted to gamma globulin. These volunteers, having no initial antibody, responded with variable titres, the pooled serum having a titre of 1: 100 against 50 LD50 of rabies virus in neutralization tests and the gamma globulin prepared from this pool a titre of 1: 300. In five individuals inoculated with the antirabies gamma globulin, blood samples tested at intervals for residual antibody showed significant titres through 21 days. While the passive antibody levels resulting from the administration of a more potent immune horse serum were much higher than those achieved by the weaker human antirabies gamma globulin used, the decrease in titre was more gradual with the human globulin. With more booster inoculations in a larger group of human volunteers, it is believed that a human rabies immune gamma globulin could be produced which would be equal in effect to immune horse serum. The advantages of a human source of antibody in rabies prophylaxis are discussed. PMID:14403320

  19. The Human Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, which was a major factor especially when vertebrates emerged from water onto land in the late Devonian, some 375 million years ago. But how would nature have evolved on a larger planet? We are able to address this question simply in experiments using centrifuges. Based on these studies we have gained valuable insights in the physiological process in plants and animals. They adapt to a new steady state suitable for the high-g environments applied. Information on mammalian adaptations to hyper-g is interesting or may be even vital for human space exploration programs. It has been shown in long duration animal hypergravity studies, ranging from snails, rats to primates, that various structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardio-vascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Centrifuge studies involving humans are mostly in the order of hours. The current work on human centrifuges are all focused on short arm systems to apply short periods of artificial gravity in support of long duration space missions in ISS or to Mars. In this paper we will address the possible usefulness of a large human centrifuge on Earth. In such a centrifuge a group of humans can be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time like living on a larger planet. The input from a survey under scientists working in the field of gravitational physiology, but also other disciplines, will be discussed.

  20. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  1. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  2. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. On human health.

    PubMed

    van Spijk, Piet

    2015-05-01

    If it is true that health is a priority objective of medicine, then medical practice can only be successful if the meaning of the term "health" is known. Various attempts have been made over the years to define health. This paper proposes a new definition. In addition to current health concepts, it also takes into account the distinction between specifically human (great) health and health as the absence of disease and illness-i.e. small health. The feeling of leading a life that makes sense plays a key role in determining specifically human great health.

  4. Ayahuasca and human destiny.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2005-06-01

    In this essay, the author shares his personal reflections gleaned from a lifetime of research with ayahuasca, and speculates on the societal, political, planetary, and evolutionary implications of humanity's aeons-old symbiosis with this shamanic plant. The thesis is developed that at this critical historical juncture, ayahuasca has developed a strategy to broadcast its message to a wider world--a reflection of the urgent need to avert global ecological catastrophe. While ayahuasca has much to teach us, the critical question is, will humanity hear it, and heed it, in time?

  5. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  6. Protothecosis in human medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Daniela; Bergmann, Armin

    2002-02-01

    Prototheca spp. are ubiquitous achlorophyllous algae that produce disease in humans and animals. In the past years infections with Prototheca have obtained increasing importance in human medicine. The cases have been classified into three clinical forms: cutaneous and/or subcutaneous infection, synovitis of olecranon bursa or other fibrous tissue and systemic infection. Patients with a mild degree of immunosuppression may become colonized by Prototheca spp. with a subsequent worsening of their immune surveillance and spread of the disease. Among the numerous pharmacologic agents tried, amphotericin B is the most promising. Successful treatment of protothecosis involves radical excision of the involved structures.

  7. Human push capability.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  8. Biodemography of human ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vaupel, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival — and healthy survival — to even greater ages. PMID:20336136

  9. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  10. Human-human reliance in the context of automation.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph B; Stokes, Charlene K

    2012-02-01

    The current study examined human-human reliance during a computer-based scenario where participants interacted with a human aid and an automated tool simultaneously. Reliance on others is complex, and few studies have examined human-human reliance in the context of automation. Past research found that humans are biased in their perceived utility of automated tools such that they view them as more accurate than humans. Prior reviews have postulated differences in human-human versus human-machine reliance, yet few studies have examined such reliance when individuals are presented with divergent information from different sources. Participants (N = 40) engaged in the Convoy Leader experiment.They selected a convoy route based on explicit guidance from a human aid and information from an automated map. Subjective and behavioral human-human reliance indices were assessed. Perceptions of risk were manipulated by creating three scenarios (low, moderate, and high) that varied in the amount of vulnerability (i.e., potential for attack) associated with the convoy routes. Results indicated that participants reduced their behavioral reliance on the human aid when faced with higher risk decisions (suggesting increased reliance on the automation); however, there were no reported differences in intentions to rely on the human aid relative to the automation. The current study demonstrated that when individuals are provided information from both a human aid and automation,their reliance on the human aid decreased during high-risk decisions. This study adds to a growing understanding of the biases and preferences that exist during complex human-human and human-machine interactions.

  11. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  12. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  13. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  14. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  15. The Case for the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Michael S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the current impoverishment of the humanities and the gulf separating the humanities from the sciences. Discusses the need for adequate humanities instruction at the elementary-secondary level. Suggests that humanities teachers rediscover the Italian Renaissance spirit to improve their teaching. (SB)

  16. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  17. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  18. Humane Treatment of Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joan Smithey

    This booklet is designed to give teachers resource information about the humane treatment of and care for animals. The topics are presented as springboards for discussion and class activity. Topics include the care of dogs, cats, birds, horses, and fish; wildlife and ecological relationships; and careers with animals. Illustrations on some pages…

  19. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  20. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  1. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  2. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  3. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  4. Humans as Lie Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaulo, Bella; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses several studies of whether and how well humans can detect lies. Examines the accuracy of such persons as well as the process of how they actually detect lies, how they think they detect lies, and whether the actual and perceived processes of lie detection correspond to one another. (JMF)

  5. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., left, speaks with reitred astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford prior to the start of a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Human Babesiosis, Bolivia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Macchioni, Fabio; Zuñiga, Freddy; Rojas, Patricia; Lara, Yuni; Roselli, Mimmo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    To investigate human babesiosis in the Bolivian Chaco, in 2013 we tested blood samples from 271 healthy persons living in 2 rural communities in this region. Microscopy and PCR indicated that 3.3% of persons were positive for Babesia microti parasites (US lineage); seroprevalence was 45.7%. Appropriate screening should mitigate the risk for transfusion-associated babesiosis.

  7. Humanism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  8. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  9. Inconvenient Human Rights

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Natasha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Following an increase in Roma migration under the European “freedom of movement” laws, Swedish municipalities initiated more than 80 evictions of informal Roma settlements on the grounds of poor sanitation between 2013 and 2016. These evictions echo policies from earlier in the 20th century, when Roma living in Sweden were often marginalized through the denial of access to water and sanitation facilities. The recent Swedish evictions also follow similar government actions across Europe, where Roma settlements are controlled through the denial of access to water and sanitation. However, access to water and sanitation—central aspects of human health—are universal human rights that must be available to all people present in a jurisdiction, regardless of their legal status. The evictions described here violated Sweden’s obligations under both European and international human rights law. More positive government responses are required, such as providing shelters or camping sites, setting up temporary facilities, and directly engaging with communities to address water and sanitation issues. The authors conclude by providing guidance on how states and municipalities can meet their human rights obligations with respect to water and sanitation for vulnerable Roma individuals and informal settlements in their communities. PMID:29302163

  10. Television and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George; And Others

    To compile a comprehensive review of English language scientific literature regarding the effects of television on human behavior, the authors of this book evaluated more than 2,500 books, articles, reports, and other documents. Rather than taking a traditional approach, the authors followed a new model for the retrieval and synthesis of…

  11. Communicating with Virtual Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Nadia Magnenat

    The face is a small part of a human, but it plays an essential role in communication. An open hybrid system for facial animation is presented. It encapsulates a considerable amount of information regarding facial models, movements, expressions, emotions, and speech. The complex description of facial animation can be handled better by assigning…

  12. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, speaks during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Human perspectives in horticulture

    Treesearch

    Charles A. Lewis

    1977-01-01

    Gardening produces not only vegetables and flowers, but also social and behavioral benefits. In low-income housing sites in New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago, gardening programs have resulted in reduced vandalism, new neighborliness, cleaned and painted buildings and streets, and other improvements. The human response to plants, and the qualities of plants that...

  14. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  15. Human Ecology: Curriculum Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine commercially available programs which represent one aspect or a portion of the human ecology theme. Other information supplied for each program includes: program objectives; methods of instruction; specific subjects, grade, and ability levels; materials produced and purchasable; program implementation; teacher preparation; program…

  16. Designers of Human Settlements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  17. The Human Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Christina O.

    2005-01-01

    Without effective classroom management, teaching and learning cannot take place. The responsibility for a teacher's success in the classroom lies as much in the human connection between administrator and teacher as between teacher and student. In fact, it lies with all who work with schools: universities, school boards, administrators, and…

  18. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--‐ 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  19. Human Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Keturah E.

    This brief overview of some aspects of human development aims to enable paraprofessionals (teachers' aides) to work with teachers and children with greater understanding and effectiveness. Aspects discussed include heredity, IQ scores and learning ability assessment, principles of development, and principles of learning. (ED)

  20. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…