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Sample records for phosphatase non-receptor type

  1. Molecular Basis of the Interaction of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 4 (PTPN4) with the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Pierre; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bibi-Zainab, Edoo; Sawyer, Kristi; Raynal, Bertrand; Haouz, Ahmed; Delepierre, Muriel; Lafon, Monique; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The human protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) prevents cell death induction in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines in a PDZ·PDZ binding motifs-dependent manner, but the cellular partners of PTPN4 involved in cell protection are unknown. Here, we described the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38γ as a cellular partner of PTPN4. The main contribution to the p38γ·PTPN4 complex formation is the tight interaction between the C terminus of p38γ and the PDZ domain of PTPN4. We solved the crystal structure of the PDZ domain of PTPN4 bound to the p38γ C terminus. We identified the molecular basis of recognition of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ that displays the highest affinity among all endogenous partners of PTPN4. We showed that the p38γ C terminus is also an efficient inducer of cell death after its intracellular delivery. In addition to recruiting the kinase, the binding of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ to PTPN4 abolishes the catalytic autoinhibition of PTPN4 and thus activates the phosphatase, which can efficiently dephosphorylate the activation loop of p38γ. We presume that the p38γ·PTPN4 interaction promotes cellular signaling, preventing cell death induction.

  2. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick P L; Christodoulou, John

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype.

  3. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick PL; Christodoulou, John

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype. PMID:25424712

  4. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2).

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs. PMID:26040922

  5. Lack of association between the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 R263Q and R620W functional genetic variants and endogenous non-anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana; Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Fonollosa, Alejandro; Llorenç, Victor; Artaraz, Joseba; Valle, David Díaz; Blanco, Ricardo; Cañal, Joaquín; Salom, David; Serrano, José Luis García; de Ramón, Enrique; José del Rio, María; Gorroño-Echebarría, Marina Begoña; Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Molins, Blanca; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endogenous uveitis is a major cause of visual loss mediated by the immune system. The protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene encodes a lymphoid-specific phosphatase that plays a key role in T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Two independent functional missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the PTPN22 gene (R263Q and R620W) have been associated with different autoimmune disorders. We aimed to analyze for the first time the influence of these PTPN22 genetic variants on endogenous non-anterior uveitis susceptibility. Methods We performed a case-control study of 217 patients with endogenous non-anterior uveitis and 718 healthy controls from a Spanish population. The PTPN22 polymorphisms (rs33996649 and rs2476601) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The allele, genotype, carriers, and allelic combination frequencies were compared between cases and controls with χ2 analysis or Fisher’s exact test. Results Our results showed no influence of the studied SNPs in the global susceptibility analysis (rs33996649: allelic P-value=0.92, odds ratio=0.97, 95% confidence interval=0.54–1.75; rs2476601: allelic P-value=0.86, odds ratio=1.04, 95% confidence interval=0.68–1.59). Similarly, the allelic combination analysis did not provide additional information. Conclusions Our results suggest that the studied polymorphisms of the PTPN22 gene do not play an important role in the pathophysiology of endogenous non-anterior uveitis. PMID:23559857

  6. Genotype-Phenotype Associations of the CD-Associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphism within the Gene Locus Encoding Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 22 in Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Luc; Rossel, Jean-Benoit; Sulz, Michael C.; Frei, Pascal; Scharl, Sylvie; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) plays an important role in immune cell function and intestinal homeostasis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene locus results in aberrant function of PTPN22 protein and protects from Crohn’s disease (CD). Here, we investigated associations of PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS). Methods 2’028 SIBDCS patients (1173 CD and 855 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were included. The clinical characteristics were analysed for an association with the presence of the PTPN22 SNP rs2476601 genotypes ‘homozygous variant’ (AA), ‘heterozygous’ (GA) and ‘homozygous wild-type’ (GG). Results 13 patients (0.6%) were homozygous variant (AA) for the PTPN22 polymorphism, 269 (13.3%) heterozygous variant (GA) and 1’746 (86.1%) homozygous wild-type (GG). In CD, AA and GA genotypes were associated with less use of steroids and antibiotics, and reduced prevalence of vitamin D and calcium deficiency. In UC the AA and GA genotype was associated with increased use of azathioprine and anti-TNF antibodies, but significantly less patients with the PTPN22 variant featured malabsorption syndrome (p = 0.026). Conclusion Our study for the first time addressed how presence of SNP rs2476601 within the PTPN22 gene affects clinical characteristics in IBD-patients. Several factors that correlate with more severe disease were found to be less common in CD patients carrying the A-allele, pointing towards a protective role for this variant in affected CD patients. In UC patients however, we found the opposite trend, suggesting a disease-promoting effect of the A-allele. PMID:27467733

  7. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  8. Identification of the Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 as a Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility Locus in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Joanna E.; Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Tadjeddine, Meriem; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Krintel, Sophine B.; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M.; Hetland, Merete L.; Klareskog, Lars; Haeupl, Thomas; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D.; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; FitzGerald, Oliver; Veale, Douglas; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. Methods A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10−9). Conclusions This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase) with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene. PMID:23840476

  9. Role of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and PHOSPO1 in vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor; Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2014-01-01

    Matrix vesicle (MV)-mediated mineralization is important for bone ossification. However, under certain circumstances such as atherosclerosis, mineralization may occur in the arterial wall. Bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and generates inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is essential for MV-mediated hydroxyapatite formation. MVs contain another phosphatase, PHOSPHO1, that serves as an additional supplier of Pi. Activation of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in vascular smooth muscle cells precedes vascular calcification. By degrading PPi, TNAP plays a procalcific role changing the Pi/PPi ratio toward mineralization. A pathologic role of bone-type TNAP and PHOSPHO1 make them to be attractive targets for cardiovascular therapy.

  10. Developmental expression and function analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D in oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Tan, Z; Zhao, S; Huang, H; Zhao, X; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Shields, C B; Uetani, N; Qiu, M

    2015-11-12

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are extensively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and have distinct spatial and temporal patterns in different cell types during development. Previous studies have demonstrated possible roles for RPTPs in axon outgrowth, guidance, and synaptogenesis. In the present study, our results revealed that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D (PTPRD) was initially expressed in mature neurons in embryonic CNS, and later in oligodendroglial cells at postnatal stages when oligodendrocytes undergo active axonal myelination process. In PTPRD mutants, oligodendrocyte differentiation was normal and a transient myelination delay occurred at early postnatal stages, indicating the contribution of PTPRD to the initiation of axonal myelination. Our results also showed that the remyelination process was not affected in the absence of PTPRD function after a cuprizone-induced demyelination in adult animals.

  11. Glycogenosis type I (glucose 6-phosphatase deficiency): I. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis of juvenile liver cells.

    PubMed

    Riede, U N; Spycher, M A; Gitzelmann, R

    1980-05-01

    The essential biochemical characteristic of von Gierke's disease is an inborn glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency and glycogen storage in the liver and kidney. This expresses itself morphometrically as an increased volume of glycogen per unit volume of the hepatocellular cytoplasm. Since glucose-6-phosphatase activity in patients studied is practically at the zero level, and the endoplasmic reticulum loses a large part of its membrane values, we conclude that the remaining endoplasmic reticulum represents glucose-6-phosphatase free membranes. A typical structural feature of the endoplasmic reticulum in von Gieke's disease is the appearance of "double contoured vesicles" (= pockets). These vesicles comprise approximately 3,5% of the total membrane system. The mitochondria play an important role in glycolysis and glycogen synthesis. It is thus to be expected that these organelles change in terms of their morphometric parameters in the course of glycogenosis type I. An important point in this direction is numerical mitochondrion reduction in combination with an unchanged mitochondrial volume. PMID:6935637

  12. Crystal structures and biochemical studies of human lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase type 6.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Dong, Yu; Lü, Xingru; Wang, Lu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Xuejun C; Rao, Zihe

    2013-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive phospholipid involved in cell signaling through Gprotein-coupled receptors pathways. It is also involved in balancing the lipid composition inside the cell, and modulates the function of lipid rafts as an intermediate in phospholipid metabolism. Because of its involvement in these important processes, LPA degradation needs to be regulated as precisely as its production. Lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase type 6 (ACP6) is an LPA-specific acid phosphatase that hydrolyzes LPA to monoacylglycerol (MAG) and phosphate. Here, we report three crystal structures of human ACP6 in complex with malonate, L-(+)-tartrate and tris, respectively. Our analyses revealed that ACP6 possesses a highly conserved Rossmann-foldlike body domain as well as a less conserved cap domain. The vast hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket, which is located between those two domains, is suitable for accommodating LPA, and its shape is different from that of other histidine acid phosphatases, a fact that is consistent with the observed difference in substrate preferences. Our analysis of the binding of three molecules in the active site reveals the involvement of six conserved and crucial residues in binding of the LPA phosphate group and its catalysis. The structure also indicates a water-supplying channel for substrate hydrolysis. Our structural data are consistent with the fact that the enzyme is active as a monomer. In combination with additional mutagenesis and enzyme activity studies, our structural data provide important insights into substrate recognition and the mechanism for catalytic activity of ACP6.

  13. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  14. Changes in Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Procollagen Type-1 C-Peptide after Static and Dynamic Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yuki, Kazuhito; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two types of nonweight-bearing exercise on changes in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and pro-collagen type 1 C-peptide (P1P). BAP is a specific marker of bone synthesis, whereas P1P reflects synthesis of type 1 collagen in other organs as well as bone. Eight participants performed static and dynamic…

  15. Genetic association between a lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN22) and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weipeng; She, Jin-Xiong

    2005-03-01

    The lymphoid-specific phosphatase (LYP) encoded by PTPN22 is involved in preventing spontaneous T-cell activation by dephosphorylating and inactivating T-cell receptor-associated Csk kinase. We have genotyped 396 type 1 diabetic patients and 1,178 control subjects of Caucasian descent from north central Florida and report a strong association between type 1 diabetes and a polymorphism (R620W) in the PTPN22 gene. The homozygous genotype for the T allele encoding the 620W residue is associated with an increased risk for developing type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P < 0.008), and the heterozygous genotype C/T had an OR of 1.7 (P = 6 x 10(-6)). The C/C homozygous genotype is protective against type 1 diabetes (OR = 0.5, P = 6 x 10(-6)). Furthermore, transmission disequilibrium analysis of 410 affected sibpair and simplex families of Caucasian descent indicated that the type 1 diabetes-associated T allele is transmitted more often (57.2%) than randomly expected (P < 0.003). Together with previous reports of the association between PTPN22 and type 1 diabetes, as well as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, these results provide compelling evidence that LYP is a critical player in multiple autoimmune disorders. PMID:15734872

  16. Type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 is a negative regulator of strawberry fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hai-Feng; Lu, Dong; Sun, Jing-Hua; Li, Chun-Li; Xing, Yu; Qin, Ling; Shen, Yuan-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in fruit ripening, many components in the ABA signalling pathway remain to be elucidated. Here, a strawberry gene homologous to the Arabidopsis gene ABI1, named FaABI1, was isolated and characterized. The 1641bp cDNA includes an intact open reading frame that encodes a deduced protein of 546 amino acids, in which putative conserved domains were determined by homology analysis. Transcriptional analysis showed that the levels of FaABI1 mRNA expression declined rapidly during strawberry fruit development as evidenced by real-time PCR, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting analyses, suggesting that the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase PP2C1 encoded by FaABI1 may be involved in fruit ripening as a negative regulator. The results of Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and PBI121 vector-mediated overexpression suggested that the down- and up-regulation of FaABI1 mRNA expression levels in degreening strawberry fruit could promote and inhibit ripening, respectively. Furthermore, alteration of FaABI1 expression could differentially regulate the transcripts of a set of both ABA-responsive and ripening-related genes, including ABI3, ABI4, ABI5, SnRK2, ABRE1, CHS, PG1, PL, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, and UFGT. Taken together, the data provide new evidence for an important role for ABA in regulating strawberry fruit ripening in the processes of which the type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 serves as a negative regulator. Finally, a possible core mechanism underlying ABA perception and signalling transduction in strawberry fruit ripening is discussed.

  17. Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I.

    PubMed

    Halling Linder, Cecilia; Enander, Karin; Magnusson, Per

    2016-03-01

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein-protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone. PMID:26645431

  18. Identification of a mammalian-type phosphatidylglycerophosphate phosphatase in the Eubacterium Rhodopirellula baltica.

    PubMed

    Teh, Phildrich G; Chen, Mark J; Engel, James L; Worby, Carolyn A; Manning, Gerard; Dixon, Jack E; Zhang, Ji

    2013-02-15

    Cardiolipin is a glycerophospholipid found predominantly in the mitochondrial membranes of eukaryotes and in bacterial membranes. Cardiolipin interacts with protein complexes and plays pivotal roles in cellular energy metabolism, membrane dynamics, and stress responses. We recently identified the mitochondrial phosphatase, PTPMT1, as the enzyme that converts phosphatidylglycerolphosphate (PGP) to phosphatidylglycerol, a critical step in the de novo biosynthesis of cardiolipin. Upon examination of PTPMT1 evolutionary distribution, we found a PTPMT1-like phosphatase in the bacterium Rhodopirellula baltica. The purified recombinant enzyme dephosphorylated PGP in vitro. Moreover, its expression restored cardiolipin deficiency and reversed growth impairment in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking the yeast PGP phosphatase, suggesting that it is a bona fide PTPMT1 ortholog. When ectopically expressed, this bacterial PGP phosphatase was localized in the mitochondria of yeast and mammalian cells. Together, our results demonstrate the conservation of function between bacterial and mammalian PTPMT1 orthologs. PMID:23293031

  19. Blood groups and red cell acid phosphatase types in a Mixteca population resident in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Buentello, L.; García, P.; Lisker, R.; Salamanca, F.; Peñaloza, R.

    1999-01-01

    Several blood groups, ABO, Rh, Ss, Fy, Jk, and red cell acid phosphatase (ACP) types were studied in a native Mixteca population that has resided in Mexico City since 1950. Gene frequencies were obtained and used to establish admixture estimates with blacks and whites. The subjects came from three different geographical areas: High Mixteca, Low Mixteca, and Coast Mixteca. All frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The difference in the ABO frequencies was statistically significant when subjects from the three areas were compared simultaneously. Rh frequencies differed only between the High and the Low Mixteca populations. The ACP frequencies were similar between the Low Mixteca population and a previously reported Mestizo population. However, there were significant differences between the High Mixteca group and a Mestizo population, all the subjects being from Oaxaca. This is the first report of Ss, Fy, Jk, and ACP frequencies in a Mixteca population. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 11:525-529, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  1. Arabidopsis DELLA protein degradation is controlled by a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-07-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway.

  2. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  3. Molecular cloning of magnesium-independent type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatases from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tate, R J; Tolan, D; Pyne, S

    1999-07-01

    Members of the type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP2) family catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA), lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a Mg(2+)-independent and N-ethymaleimide-insensitive PAP2 activity in cultured guinea-pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Two PAP2 cDNAs of 923 and 926 base pairs were identified and subsequently cloned from these cells. The ORF of the 923 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 285 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa), which had 94% homology with human PAP2a (hPAP2a) and which probably represents a guinea-pig specific PAP2a (gpPAP2a1). The ORF of the 926 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 286 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa) which had 84% and 91% homology with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1, respectively. This protein, termed gpPAP2a2, has two regions (aa 21-33 and 51-74) of marked divergence and altered hydrophobicity compared with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1. This occurs in the predicted first and second transmembrane domains and at the extremes of the first outer loop. Other significant differences between gpPAP2a1/2 and hPAP2a, hPAP2b and hPAP2c occur at the cytoplasmic C-terminal. Transient expression of gpPAP2a2 in Cos-7 cells resulted in an approx. 4-fold increase in Mg(2+)-independent PAP activity, thereby confirming that gpPAP2a2 is another catalytically active member of an extended PAP2 family.

  4. Protein phosphatases type 2A mediate tuberization signaling in Solanum tuberosum L. leaves.

    PubMed

    País, Silvia Marina; García, María Noelia Muñiz; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Capiati, Daniela Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Tuber formation in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is regulated by hormonal and environmental signals that are thought to be integrated in the leaves. The molecular mechanisms that mediate the responses to tuberization-related signals in leaves remain largely unknown. In this study we analyzed the roles of protein phosphatase type 2A catalytic subunits (PP2Ac) in the leaf responses to conditions that affect tuberization. The responses were monitored by analyzing the expression of the "tuber-specific" genes Patatin and Pin2, which are induced in tubers and leaves during tuber induction. Experiments using PP2A inhibitors, together with PP2Ac expression profiles under conditions that affect tuberization indicate that high sucrose/nitrogen ratio, which promotes tuber formation, increases the transcript levels of Patatin and Pin2, by increasing the activity of PP2As without affecting PP2Ac mRNA or protein levels. Gibberellic acid (GA), a negative regulator of tuberization, down-regulates the transcription of catalytic subunits of PP2As from the subfamily I and decreases their enzyme levels. In addition, GA inhibits the expression of Patatin and Pin2 possibly by a PP2A-independent mechanism. PP2Ac down-regulation by GA may inhibit tuberization signaling downstream of the inductive effects of high sucrose/nitrogen ratio. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PP2As of the subfamily I may positively modulate the signaling pathways that lead to the transcriptional activation of "tuber-specific" genes in leaves, and act as molecular switches regulated by both positive and negative modulators of tuberization. PMID:20358221

  5. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  6. The role of the mammalian DNA end-processing enzyme polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arpita; Saha, Saikat; Chakraborty, Anirban; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Mandal, Santi M; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Liu, Yongping; Pandita, Raj K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Koeppen, Arnulf H; Pandita, Tej K; Maciel, Patricia; Sarkar, Partha S; Hazra, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand-breaks (SBs) with non-ligatable ends are generated by ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, various chemotherapeutic agents, and also as base excision repair (BER) intermediates. Several neurological diseases have already been identified as being due to a deficiency in DNA end-processing activities. Two common dirty ends, 3'-P and 5'-OH, are processed by mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase (PNKP), a bifunctional enzyme with 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase activities. We have made the unexpected observation that PNKP stably associates with Ataxin-3 (ATXN3), a polyglutamine repeat-containing protein mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD). This disease is one of the most common dominantly inherited ataxias worldwide; the defect in SCA3 is due to CAG repeat expansion (from the normal 14-41 to 55-82 repeats) in the ATXN3 coding region. However, how the expanded form gains its toxic function is still not clearly understood. Here we report that purified wild-type (WT) ATXN3 stimulates, and by contrast the mutant form specifically inhibits, PNKP's 3' phosphatase activity in vitro. ATXN3-deficient cells also show decreased PNKP activity. Furthermore, transgenic mice conditionally expressing the pathological form of human ATXN3 also showed decreased 3'-phosphatase activity of PNKP, mostly in the deep cerebellar nuclei, one of the most affected regions in MJD patients' brain. Finally, long amplicon quantitative PCR analysis of human MJD patients' brain samples showed a significant accumulation of DNA strand breaks. Our results thus indicate that the accumulation of DNA strand breaks due to functional deficiency of PNKP is etiologically linked to the pathogenesis of SCA3/MJD. PMID:25633985

  7. Opposite effects of phosphatase inhibitors on L-type calcium and delayed rectifier currents in frog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Frace, A M; Hartzell, H C

    1993-01-01

    1. Application of the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) to frog cardiomyocytes caused large increases in L-type calcium current (ICa) in the absence of beta-adrenergic agonists. The increase occurred without effects on the peak current-voltage relation or voltage-dependent inactivation. OA and MC caused a decrease in amplitude of delayed rectifier current (IK), which is opposite to the increase produced by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. The decrease occurred without effects on voltage-dependent activation or reversal potential. 2. Analysis of the dose-response relations for OA and MC on ventricular cell ICa were best fitted with a single-site relationship with a K1/2 of 1.58 microM and 0.81 microM, respectively. These data suggest the predominant form of phosphatase active on ICa in this cell type is produced by protein phosphatase 1. Inhibition of phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) was without appreciable effect. 3. Reducing intracellular ATP levels was without effect on basal ICa suggesting that calcium channels may not need to be phosphorylated to open. ATP depletion was able to block completely the ICa increase induced by OA or MC. This demonstrates that the effects of OA and MC on ICa are mediated by a phosphorylation reaction. In contrast, ATP depletion totally abolished IK, suggesting either a requirement for ATP or phosphorylation for basal function of the delayed rectifier channel. 4. Internal perfusion of a peptide inhibitor (PKI(5-22)) of protein kinase A (PK-A) was without effect on basal current levels of ICa or IK, suggesting that this kinase is not phosphorylating these channels under basal conditions. Furthermore, although PKI is capable of completely blocking the response of ICa to isoprenaline or forskolin, PKI does not affect the increase in ICa induced by MC or OA. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase with acetylcholine or inhibition of PK-A with adenosine cyclic 3',5'-(Rp)-phosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS) also had no effect on the

  8. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  9. Functional interaction between nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase type 1 (NIPP1) and protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) in Drosophila: consequences of over-expression of NIPP1 in flies and suppression by co-expression of PP1.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Gross, Sascha; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Bennett, Daimark; Alphey, Luke

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of type 1 Ser/Thr protein phosphatases (PP1c) forms complexes with many proteins that target it to particular subcellular locations and regulate its activity towards specific substrates. We report the identification of a Drosophila orthologue of nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1Dm) through interaction with PP1c in the yeast two-hybrid system. NIPP1Dm shares many properties with mammalian NIPP1 including inhibition of PP1c in vitro, binding to RNA and PP1c, and localization to nuclear speckles. However, the mechanism controlling interaction of PP1c with NIPP1 is not conserved in Drosophila. NIPP1 can function independently of PP1c as a splicing factor, but the relative importance of this function is unknown. Over-expression of NIPP1Dm in Drosophila is cell-lethal in a range of tissues and developmental stages. The effects of ectopic NIPP1Dm are suppressed by co-expression of PP1c, indicating that the only effect of ectopic NIPP1Dm is to affect PP1c function. Co-expression of NIPP1Dm and PP1c does not have any detectable physiological effect in vivo, suggesting that the NIPP1Dm-PP1c holoenzyme is not normally limiting in Drosophila. These data show that NIPP1Dm and PP1c interact in vivo and suggest that NIPP1's role as a phosphatase regulator is conserved in Drosophila. PMID:12358598

  10. Crystal Structures of Type-II Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatase INPP5B with Synthetic Inositol Polyphosphate Surrogates Reveal New Mechanistic Insights for the Inositol 5-Phosphatase Family

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase INPP5B hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate group from water- and lipid-soluble signaling messengers. Two synthetic benzene and biphenyl polyphosphates (BzP/BiPhPs), simplified surrogates of inositol phosphates and phospholipid headgroups, were identified by thermodynamic studies as potent INPP5B ligands. The X-ray structure of the complex between INPP5B and biphenyl 3,3′,4,4′,5,5′-hexakisphosphate [BiPh(3,3′,4,4′,5,5′)P6, IC50 5.5 μM] was determined at 2.89 Å resolution. One inhibitor pole locates in the phospholipid headgroup binding site and the second solvent-exposed ring binds to the His-Tag of another INPP5B molecule, while a molecule of inorganic phosphate is also present in the active site. Benzene 1,2,3-trisphosphate [Bz(1,2,3)P3] [one ring of BiPh(3,3′,4,4′,5,5′)P6] inhibits INPP5B ca. 6-fold less potently. Co-crystallization with benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate [Bz(1,2,4,5)P4, IC50 = 6.3 μM] yielded a structure refined at 2.9 Å resolution. Conserved residues among the 5-phosphatase family mediate interactions with Bz(1,2,4,5)P4 and BiPh(3,3′,4,4′,5,5′)P6 similar to those with the polar groups present in positions 1, 4, 5, and 6 on the inositol ring of the substrate. 5-Phosphatase specificity most likely resides in the variable zone located close to the 2- and 3-positions of the inositol ring, offering insights to inhibitor design. We propose that the inorganic phosphate present in the INPP5B–BiPh(3,3′,4,4′,5,5′)P6 complex mimics the postcleavage substrate 5-phosphate released by INPP5B in the catalytic site, allowing elucidation of two new key features in the catalytic mechanism proposed for the family of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases: first, the involvement of the conserved Arg-451 in the interaction with the 5-phosphate and second, identification of the water molecule that initiates 5-phosphate hydrolysis. Our model also has implications for the proposed “moving metal” mechanism

  11. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus.

    PubMed

    Lei, K J; Chen, Y T; Chen, H; Wong, L J; Liu, J L; McConkie-Rosell, A; Van Hove, J L; Ou, H C; Yeh, N J; Pan, L Y

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient's biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type 1a disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease.

  13. Metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma shows frequent deletion in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D gene.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sally R; Harwood, Catherine A; Purdie, Karin J; Gulati, Abha; Matin, Rubeta N; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Cerio, Rino; Kelsell, David P; Leigh, Irene M; Proby, Charlotte M

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and its incidence is increasing rapidly. Metastatic cSCC accounts for the majority of deaths associated with NMSC, but the genetic basis for cSCC progression remains poorly understood. A previous study identified small deletions (typically <1 Mb) in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D (PTPRD) gene that segregated with more aggressive cSCC. To investigate the apparent association between deletion within PTPRD and cSCC metastasis, a series of 74 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors from 31 patients was analyzed using a custom Illumina 384 SNP microarray. Deletions were found in 37% of patients with metastatic cSCC and were strongly associated with metastatic tumors when compared to those that had not metastasized (p = 0.007). Subsequent mutation analysis revealed a higher mutation rate for PTPRD than has been reported in any other cancer type, with 37% of tumors harboring a somatic mutation. Conversely, bisulfite sequencing showed that methylation was not a mechanism of PTPRD disruption in cSCC. This is the first report to observe an association between deletion within PTPRD and metastatic disease and highlights the potential use of these deletions as a diagnostic biomarker for tumor progression. Combined with the high mutation rate observed in our study, PTPRD is one of the most commonly altered genes in cSCC and warrants further investigation to determine its significance for metastasis in other tumor types.

  14. Up-regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in tobacco cells constitutively expressing the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, Imara Y.; Love, John; Heilmann, Ingo; Thompson, William F.; Boss, Wendy F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of suppressing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) in plants, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells were transformed with the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (InsP 5-ptase), an enzyme which specifically hydrolyzes InsP(3). The transgenic cell lines showed a 12- to 25-fold increase in InsP 5-ptase activity in vitro and a 60% to 80% reduction in basal InsP(3) compared with wild-type cells. Stimulation with Mas-7, a synthetic analog of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan, resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase in InsP(3) in both wild-type and transgenic cells. However, even with stimulation, InsP(3) levels in the transgenic cells did not reach wild-type basal values, suggesting that InsP(3) signaling is compromised. Analysis of whole-cell lipids indicated that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdInsP(2)), the lipid precursor of InsP(3), was greatly reduced in the transgenic cells. In vitro assays of enzymes involved in PtdInsP(2) metabolism showed that the activity of the PtdInsP(2)-hydrolyzing enzyme phospholipase C was not significantly altered in the transgenic cells. In contrast, the activity of the plasma membrane PtdInsP 5 kinase was increased by approximately 3-fold in the transgenic cells. In vivo labeling studies revealed a greater incorporation of (32)P into PtdInsP(2) in the transgenic cells compared with the wild type, indicating that the rate of PtdInsP(2) synthesis was increased. These studies show that the constitutive expression of the human type I InsP 5-ptase in tobacco cells leads to an up-regulation of the phosphoinositide pathway and highlight the importance of PtdInsP(2) synthesis as a regulatory step in this system.

  15. Polymorphism of the phosphoserine phosphatase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus and its potential use for typing and monitoring of population diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Annamaria; De Filippis, Francesca; Zotta, Teresa; Facchiano, Angelo; Ercolini, Danilo; Parente, Eugenio

    2016-11-01

    The phosphoserine phosphatase gene (serB) of Streptococcus thermophilus is the most polymorphic gene among those used in Multilocus Sequence Typing schemes for this species and has been used for both genotyping of isolates and for evaluation of population diversity. However, the information on the potential of this gene as a marker for diversity in S. thermophilus species is still fragmentary. In this study, we evaluated serB nucleotide polymorphism and its potential impact on protein structure using data from traditional sequencing. In addition we evaluated the ability of serB targeted high-throughput sequencing in studying the diversity of S. thermophilus populations in cheese and starter cultures. Data based on traditional cultivation based techniques and sequencing provided evidence that the distribution of serB alleles varies significantly in some environments (commercial starter cultures, traditional starter cultures, cheese). Mutations had relatively little impact on predicted protein structure and were not found in domains that are predicted to be important for its functionality. Cultivation independent, serB targeted high-throughput sequencing provided evidence for significantly different alleles distribution in different cheese types and detected fluctuations in alleles abundance in a mixed strain starter reproduced by backslopping. Notwithstanding some shortcomings of this method that are discussed here, the cultivation independent approach appears to be more sensitive than cultivation based approaches based on isolation and traditional sequencing. PMID:27497152

  16. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David M.; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C.; Bunt, Joy C.; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = −0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:18056794

  17. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mott, David M; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C; Bunt, Joy C; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism.

  18. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum Translation Initiation eIF2β Subunit: Direct Interaction with Protein Phosphatase Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Géraldine; Lenne, Astrid; Cailliau-Maggio, Katia; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J.; Martoriati, Alain; Aliouat, El M.; Gosset, Pierre; Delaire, Baptiste; Fréville, Aline; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is one of the main phosphatases whose function is shaped by many regulators to confer a specific location and a selective function for this enzyme. Here, we report that eukaryotic initiation factor 2β of Plasmodium falciparum (PfeIF2β) is an interactor of PfPP1c. Sequence analysis of PfeIF2β revealed a deletion of 111 amino acids when compared to its human counterpart and the presence of two potential binding motifs to PfPP1 (29FGEKKK34, 103KVAW106). As expected, we showed that PfeIF2β binds PfeIF2γ and PfeIF5, confirming its canonical interaction with partners of the translation complex. Studies of the PfeIF2β-PfPP1 interaction using wild-type, single and double mutated versions of PfeIF2β revealed that both binding motifs are critical. We next showed that PfeIF2β is able to induce Germinal Vesicle Break Down (GVBD) when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, an indicator of its capacity to regulate PP1. Only combined mutations of both binding motifs abolished the interaction with PP1 and the induction of GVBD. In P. falciparum, although the locus is accessible for genetic manipulation, PfeIF2β seems to play an essential role in intraerythrocytic cycle as no viable knockout parasites were detectable. Interestingly, as for PfPP1, the subcellular fractionation of P. falciparum localized PfeIF2β in cytoplasm and nuclear extracts, suggesting a potential effect on PfPP1 in both compartments and raising the question of a non-canonical function of PfeIf2β in the nucleus. Hence, the role played by PfeIF2β in blood stage parasites could occur at multiple levels involving the binding to proteins of the translational complex and to PfPP1. PMID:27303372

  19. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum Translation Initiation eIF2β Subunit: Direct Interaction with Protein Phosphatase Type 1.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Géraldine; Lenne, Astrid; Cailliau-Maggio, Katia; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Martoriati, Alain; Aliouat, El M; Gosset, Pierre; Delaire, Baptiste; Fréville, Aline; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is one of the main phosphatases whose function is shaped by many regulators to confer a specific location and a selective function for this enzyme. Here, we report that eukaryotic initiation factor 2β of Plasmodium falciparum (PfeIF2β) is an interactor of PfPP1c. Sequence analysis of PfeIF2β revealed a deletion of 111 amino acids when compared to its human counterpart and the presence of two potential binding motifs to PfPP1 ((29)FGEKKK(34), (103)KVAW(106)). As expected, we showed that PfeIF2β binds PfeIF2γ and PfeIF5, confirming its canonical interaction with partners of the translation complex. Studies of the PfeIF2β-PfPP1 interaction using wild-type, single and double mutated versions of PfeIF2β revealed that both binding motifs are critical. We next showed that PfeIF2β is able to induce Germinal Vesicle Break Down (GVBD) when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, an indicator of its capacity to regulate PP1. Only combined mutations of both binding motifs abolished the interaction with PP1 and the induction of GVBD. In P. falciparum, although the locus is accessible for genetic manipulation, PfeIF2β seems to play an essential role in intraerythrocytic cycle as no viable knockout parasites were detectable. Interestingly, as for PfPP1, the subcellular fractionation of P. falciparum localized PfeIF2β in cytoplasm and nuclear extracts, suggesting a potential effect on PfPP1 in both compartments and raising the question of a non-canonical function of PfeIf2β in the nucleus. Hence, the role played by PfeIF2β in blood stage parasites could occur at multiple levels involving the binding to proteins of the translational complex and to PfPP1. PMID:27303372

  20. A High Level of Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Is Protective Against Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Irrespective of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malo, Madhu S

    2015-12-01

    Mice deficient in intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We hypothesized that a high level of IAP might be protective against T2DM in humans. We determined IAP levels in the stools of 202 diabetic patients and 445 healthy non-diabetic control people. We found that compared to controls, T2DM patients have approx. 50% less IAP (mean +/- SEM: 67.4 +/- 3.2 vs 35.3 +/- 2.5 U/g stool, respectively; p < 0.000001) indicating a protective role of IAP against T2DM. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed an independent association between the IAP level and diabetes status. With each 25 U/g decrease in stool IAP, there is a 35% increased risk of diabetes. The study revealed that obese people with high IAP (approx. 65 U/g stool) do not develop T2DM. Approx. 65% of the healthy population have < 65.0 U/g stool IAP, and predictably, these people might have 'the incipient metabolic syndrome', including 'incipient diabetes', and might develop T2DM and other metabolic disorders in the near future. In conclusion, high IAP levels appear to be protective against diabetes irrespective of obesity, and a 'temporal IAP profile' might be a valuable tool for predicting 'the incipient metabolic syndrome', including 'incipient diabetes'.

  1. Mice deficient for wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 display elevated anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C S; Zhou, F H; He, Z Y; Wang, S F; Yang, C R; Shen, Y J; Guo, Y; Zhao, H B; Chen, L; Liu, D; Liu, J; Baune, B T; Xiao, Z C; Zhou, X F

    2015-05-01

    Mood disorders are a severe health burden but molecular mechanisms underlying mood dysfunction remain poorly understood. Here, we show that wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) negatively responds to the stress-induced negative mood-related behaviors. Specifically, we show that Wip1 protein but not its mRNA level was downregulated in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex after 4 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in mice. Moreover, the CUMS-responsive WIP1 downregulation in the hippocampus was restored by chronic treatment of fluoxetine (i.p. 20 mg/kg) along with the CUMS procedure. In addition, Wip1 knockout mice displayed decreased exploratory behaviors as well as increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in mice without impaired motor activities under the non-CUMS condition. Furthermore, the Wip1 deficiency-responsive anxiety-like but not depression-like behaviors were further elevated in mice under CUMS. Although limitations like male-alone sampling and multiply behavioral testing exist, the present study suggests a potential protective function of Wip1 in mood stabilization. PMID:25732137

  2. The role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase in the actin cytoskeleton and in entry into mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, F C; Arndt, K T

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a temperature-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 2A phosphatase (PP2A) mutant, pph21-102. At the restrictive temperature, the pph21-102 cells arrested predominantly with small or aberrant buds, and their actin cytoskeleton and chitin deposition were abnormal. The involvement of PP2A in bud growth may be due to the role of PP2A in actin distribution during the cell cycle. Moreover, after a shift to the non-permissive temperature, the pph21-102 cells were blocked in G2 and had low activity of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase. Expression of Clb2 from the S.cerevisiae ADH promoter in pph21-102 cells was able to partially bypass the G2 arrest in the first cell cycle, but was not able to stimulate passage through a second mitosis. These cells had higher total amounts of Clb2-Cdc28 kinase activity, but the Clb2-normalized specific activity was lower in the pph21-102 cells compared with wild-type cells. Unlike wild-type strains, a PP2A-deficient strain was sensitive to the loss of MIH1, which is a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic inducer cdc25+. Furthermore, the cdc28F19 mutation cured the synthetic defects of a PP2A-deficient strain containing a deletion of MIH1. These results suggest that PP2A is required during G2 for the activation of Clb-Cdc28 kinase complexes for progression into mitosis. Images PMID:7796803

  3. Overexpression of a phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 leads to an increase in triacylglycerol production in oleaginous Rhodococcus strains.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Martín A; Comba, Santiago; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2015-03-01

    Oleaginous Rhodococcus strains are able to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG). Phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to yield diacylglycerol (DAG), a key precursor for TAG biosynthesis. Studies to establish its role in lipid metabolism have been mainly focused in eukaryotes but not in bacteria. In this work, we identified and characterized a putative PAP type 2 (PAP2) encoded by the ro00075 gene in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. Heterologous expression of ro00075 in Escherichia coli resulted in a fourfold increase in PAP activity and twofold in DAG content. The conditional deletion of ro00075 in RHA1 led to a decrease in the content of DAG and TAG, whereas its overexpression in both RHA1 and Rhodococcus opacus PD630 promoted an increase up to 10 to 15 % by cellular dry weight in TAG content. On the other hand, expression of ro00075 in the non-oleaginous strain Rhodococcus fascians F7 promoted an increase in total fatty acid content up to 7 % at the expense of free fatty acid (FFA), DAG, and TAG fractions. Moreover, co-expression of ro00075/atf2 genes resulted in a fourfold increase in total fatty acid content by a further increase of the FFA and TAG fractions. The results of this study suggest that ro00075 encodes for a PAP2 enzyme actively involved in TAG biosynthesis. Overexpression of this gene, as single one or with an atf gene, provides an alternative approach to increase the biosynthesis and accumulation of bacterial oils as a potential source of raw material for biofuel production.

  4. Phosphatase inhibitors remove the run-down of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the human epileptic brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Ragozzino, D. A.; Di Angelantonio, S.; Spinelli, G.; Trettel, F.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Torchia, G.; Arcella, A.; Di Gennaro, G.; Quarato, P. P.; Esposito, V.; Cantore, G.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAA receptors) microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes were compared with those recorded directly from neurons, or glial cells, in human brains slices. Cell membranes isolated from brain specimens, surgically obtained from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were injected into frog oocytes. Within a few hours, these oocytes acquired GABAA receptors that generated GABA currents with an unusual run-down, which was inhibited by orthovanadate and okadaic acid. In contrast, receptors derived from membranes of a nonepileptic hippocampal uncus, membranes from mouse brain, or recombinant rat α1β2γ2-GABA receptors exhibited a much less pronounced GABA-current run-down. Moreover, the GABAA receptors of pyramidal neurons in temporal neocortex slices from the same six epileptic patients exhibited a stronger run-down than the receptors of rat pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the GABAA receptors of neighboring glial cells remained substantially stable after repetitive activation. Therefore, the excessive GABA-current run-down observed in the membrane-injected oocytes recapitulates essentially what occurs in neurons, rather than in glial cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses from the same TLE neocortex specimens revealed that GABAA-receptor β1, β2, β3, and γ2 subunit mRNAs were significantly overexpressed (8- to 33-fold) compared with control autopsy tissues. Our results suggest that an abnormal GABA-receptor subunit transcription in the TLE brain leads to the expression of run-down-enhanced GABAA receptors. Blockage of phosphatases stabilizes the TLE GABAA receptors and strengthens GABAergic inhibition. It may be that this process can be targeted to develop new treatments for intractable epilepsy. PMID:15218107

  5. TYPE-ONE PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE4 Regulates Pavement Cell Interdigitation by Modulating PIN-FORMED1 Polarity and Trafficking in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaola; Qin, Qianqian; Yan, Jia; Niu, Yali; Huang, Bingyao; Guan, Liping; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, cell morphogenesis is dependent on intercellular auxin accumulation. The polar subcellular localization of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein is crucial for this process. Previous studies have shown that the protein kinase PINOID (PID) and protein phosphatase6-type phosphatase holoenzyme regulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1 in root tips and shoot apices. Here, we show that a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4, is essential for the formation of interdigitated pavement cell (PC) pattern in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf. The dominant-negative mutant topp4-1 showed severely inhibited interdigitated PC growth. Expression of topp4-1 gene in wild-type plants recapitulated the PC defects in the mutant. Genetic analyses suggested that TOPP4 and PIN1 likely function in the same pathway to regulate PC morphogenesis. Furthermore, colocalization, in vitro and in vivo protein interaction studies, and dephosphorylation assays revealed that TOPP4 mediated PIN1 polar localization and endocytic trafficking in PCs by acting antagonistically with PID to modulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1. In addition, TOPP4 affects the cytoskeleton pattern through the Rho of Plant GTPase-dependent auxin-signaling pathway. Therefore, we conclude that TOPP4-regulated PIN1 polar targeting through direct dephosphorylation is crucial for PC morphogenesis in the Arabidopsis leaf. PMID:25560878

  6. TYPE-ONE PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE4 regulates pavement cell interdigitation by modulating PIN-FORMED1 polarity and trafficking in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaola; Qin, Qianqian; Yan, Jia; Niu, Yali; Huang, Bingyao; Guan, Liping; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2015-03-01

    In plants, cell morphogenesis is dependent on intercellular auxin accumulation. The polar subcellular localization of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein is crucial for this process. Previous studies have shown that the protein kinase PINOID (PID) and protein phosphatase6-type phosphatase holoenzyme regulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1 in root tips and shoot apices. Here, we show that a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4, is essential for the formation of interdigitated pavement cell (PC) pattern in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf. The dominant-negative mutant topp4-1 showed severely inhibited interdigitated PC growth. Expression of topp4-1 gene in wild-type plants recapitulated the PC defects in the mutant. Genetic analyses suggested that TOPP4 and PIN1 likely function in the same pathway to regulate PC morphogenesis. Furthermore, colocalization, in vitro and in vivo protein interaction studies, and dephosphorylation assays revealed that TOPP4 mediated PIN1 polar localization and endocytic trafficking in PCs by acting antagonistically with PID to modulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1. In addition, TOPP4 affects the cytoskeleton pattern through the Rho of Plant GTPase-dependent auxin-signaling pathway. Therefore, we conclude that TOPP4-regulated PIN1 polar targeting through direct dephosphorylation is crucial for PC morphogenesis in the Arabidopsis leaf.

  7. FERONIA interacts with ABI2-type phosphatases to facilitate signaling cross-talk between abscisic acid and RALF peptide in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Yu, Feng; Liu, Ying; Du, Changqing; Li, Xiushan; Zhu, Sirui; Wang, Xianchun; Lan, Wenzhi; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Liu, Xuanming; Li, Dongping; Chen, Liangbi; Luan, Sheng

    2016-09-13

    Receptor-like kinase FERONIA (FER) plays a crucial role in plant response to small molecule hormones [e.g., auxin and abscisic acid (ABA)] and peptide signals [e.g., rapid alkalinization factor (RALF)]. It remains unknown how FER integrates these different signaling events in the control of cell growth and stress responses. Under stress conditions, increased levels of ABA will inhibit cell elongation in the roots. In our previous work, we have shown that FER, through activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1)/4/10-Rho of Plant 11 (ROP11) pathway, enhances the activity of the phosphatase ABA Insensitive 2 (ABI2), a negative regulator of ABA signaling, thereby inhibiting ABA response. In this study, we found that both RALF and ABA activated FER by increasing the phosphorylation level of FER. The FER loss-of-function mutant displayed strong hypersensitivity to both ABA and abiotic stresses such as salt and cold conditions, indicating that FER plays a key role in ABA and stress responses. We further showed that ABI2 directly interacted with and dephosphorylated FER, leading to inhibition of FER activity. Several other ABI2-like phosphatases also function in this pathway, and ABA-dependent FER activation required PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/PYR1-LIKE (PYL)/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTORS (RCAR)-A-type protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2CA) modules. Furthermore, suppression of RALF1 gene expression, similar to disruption of the FER gene, rendered plants hypersensitive to ABA. These results formulated a mechanism for ABA activation of FER and for cross-talk between ABA and peptide hormone RALF in the control of plant growth and responses to stress signals. PMID:27566404

  8. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  9. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  10. Estimation of the rate constants associated with the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on type 2A protein phosphatase by time-course analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Ohno, Y; Yasumoto, T; Mieskes, G

    1992-01-01

    As is often the case with tightly binding inhibitors, okadaic acid produces its inhibitory effect on type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) in a time-dependent manner. We measured the rate constants associated with the binding of okadaic acid to PP2A by analysing the time-course of the reduction of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) phosphatase activity of the enzyme after application of okadaic acid. The rate constants for dissociation of okadaic acid from PP2A were also estimated from the time-course of the recovery of the activity from inhibition by okadaic acid after addition of a mouse IgG1 monoclonal antibody raised against the inhibitor. Our results show that the rate constants for the binding of okadaic acid and PP2A are of the order of 10(7) M-1.s-1, a typical value for reactions involving relatively large molecules, whereas those for their dissociation are in the range 10(-4)-10(-3) s-1. The very low values of the latter seems to be the determining factor for the exceedingly high affinity of okadaic acid for PP2A. The dissociation constants for the interaction of okadaic acid with the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex, estimated as the ratio of the rate constants, are both in the range 30-40 pM, in agreement with the results of previous dose-inhibition analyses. PMID:1329723

  11. The kinetic analysis of the substrate specificity of motif 5 in a HAD hydrolase-type phosphosugar phosphatase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, José A; McCarthy-Suárez, Iva; Culiáñez-Macià, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtSgpp (locus tag At2g38740), encodes a protein whose sequence motifs and expected structure reveal that it belongs to the HAD hydrolases subfamily I, with the C1-type cap domain (Caparrós-Martín et al. in Planta 237:943-954, 2013). In the presence of Mg(2+) ions, the enzyme has a phosphatase activity over a wide range of phosphosugar substrates. AtSgpp promiscuity is preferentially detectable on D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate, D-mannose-6-phosphate, D-fructose-1-phosphate, D-glucose-6-phosphate, DL-glycerol-3-phosphate, and D-fructose-6-phosphate. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the putative signature sequence motif-5 (IAGKH), which defines its specific chemistry, brings to light the active-site residues Ala-69 and His-72. Mutation A69M, changes the pH dependence of AtSgpp catalysis, and mutant protein AtSgpp-H72K was inactive in phosphomonoester dephosphorylation. It was also observed that substitutions I68M and K71R slightly affect the substrate specificity, while the replacement of the entire motif for that of homologous DL-glycerol-3-phosphatase AtGpp (MMGRK) does not switch AtSgpp activity to the specific targeting for DL-glycerol-3-phosphate. PMID:24915748

  12. Oxidative inhibition of receptor-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase kappa by ultraviolet irradiation activates epidermal growth factor receptor in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiru; Shao, Yuan; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2006-09-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation rapidly increases tyrosine phosphorylation (i.e. activates) of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in human skin. EGFR-dependent signaling pathways drive increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, whose actions fragment collagen and elastin fibers, the primary structural protein components in skin connective tissue. Connective tissue fragmentation, which results from chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation, is a major determinant of premature skin aging (photoaging). UV irradiation generates reactive oxygen species, which readily react with conserved cysteine residues in the active site of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). We report here that EGFR activation by UV irradiation results from oxidative inhibition of receptor type PTP-kappa (RPTP-kappa). RPTP-kappa directly counters intrinsic EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, thereby maintaining EGFR in an inactive state. Reversible, oxidative inactivation of RPTP-kappa activity by UV irradiation shifts the kinase-phosphatase balance in favor of EGFR activation. These data delineate a novel mechanism of EGFR regulation and identify RPTP-kappa as a key molecular target for antioxidant protection against skin aging.

  13. The kinetic analysis of the substrate specificity of motif 5 in a HAD hydrolase-type phosphosugar phosphatase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, José A; McCarthy-Suárez, Iva; Culiáñez-Macià, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtSgpp (locus tag At2g38740), encodes a protein whose sequence motifs and expected structure reveal that it belongs to the HAD hydrolases subfamily I, with the C1-type cap domain (Caparrós-Martín et al. in Planta 237:943-954, 2013). In the presence of Mg(2+) ions, the enzyme has a phosphatase activity over a wide range of phosphosugar substrates. AtSgpp promiscuity is preferentially detectable on D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate, 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate, D-mannose-6-phosphate, D-fructose-1-phosphate, D-glucose-6-phosphate, DL-glycerol-3-phosphate, and D-fructose-6-phosphate. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the putative signature sequence motif-5 (IAGKH), which defines its specific chemistry, brings to light the active-site residues Ala-69 and His-72. Mutation A69M, changes the pH dependence of AtSgpp catalysis, and mutant protein AtSgpp-H72K was inactive in phosphomonoester dephosphorylation. It was also observed that substitutions I68M and K71R slightly affect the substrate specificity, while the replacement of the entire motif for that of homologous DL-glycerol-3-phosphatase AtGpp (MMGRK) does not switch AtSgpp activity to the specific targeting for DL-glycerol-3-phosphate.

  14. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1 negatively regulates Dictyostelium STATa and is required for proper cell-type proportioning.

    PubMed

    Early, A; Gamper, M; Moniakis, J; Kim, E; Hunter, T; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    2001-04-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1, which mediates reversible phosphorylation on tyrosine, has been shown to play an important regulatory role during Dictyostelium development. Mutants lacking PTP1 develop more rapidly than normal, while strains that overexpress PTP1 display aberrant morphology. However, the signalling pathways involved have not been characterised. In reexamining these strains, we have found that there is an inverse correlation between levels of PTP1 activity, the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation on Dictyostelium STATa after treatment with cAMP, and the proportion of the slug population exhibiting STATa nuclear enrichment in vivo. This suggests that PTP1 acts to attenuate the tyrosine phosphorylation of STATa and downstream STATa-mediated pathways. Consistent with this, we show that when PTP1 is overexpressed, there is increased expression of a prestalk cell marker at the slug posterior, a phenocopy of STATa null slugs. In ptp1 null strains, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear enrichment in the slug anterior is increased. There is also a change in the prestalk to prespore cell ratio. Synergy experiments suggest that this is due to a cell-autonomous defect in forming the subset of prespore cells that are located in the anterior prespore region.

  16. Pepper protein phosphatase type 2C, CaADIP1 and its interacting partner CaRLP1 antagonistically regulate ABA signalling and drought response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone that regulates plant growth and developmental processes, including seed germination and stomatal closing. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel type 2C protein phosphatase, CaADIP1 (Capsicum annuum ABA and Drought-Induced Protein phosphatase 1). The expression of CaADIP1 was induced in pepper leaves by ABA, drought and NaCl treatments. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CaADIP1 (CaADIP1-OX) exhibited an ABA-hyposensitive and drought-susceptible phenotype. We used a yeast two-hybrid screening assay to identify CaRLP1 (Capsicum annuum RCAR-Like Protein 1), which interacts with CaADIP1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast to CaADIP1-OX plants, CaRLP1-OX plants displayed an ABA-hypersensitive and drought-tolerant phenotype, which was characterized by low levels of transpirational water loss and increased expression of stress-responsive genes relative to those of wild-type plants. In CaADIP1-OX/CaRLP1-OX double transgenic plants, ectopic expression of the CaRLP1 gene led to strong suppression of CaADIP1-induced ABA hyposensitivity during the germinative and post-germinative stages, indicating that CaADIP1 and CaRLP1 act in the same signalling pathway and CaADIP1 functions downstream of CaRLP1. Our results indicate that CaADIP1 and its interacting partner CaRLP1 antagonistically regulate the ABA-dependent defense signalling response to drought stress. PMID:26825039

  17. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  18. Functional Analysis of the Yeast Glc7-Binding Protein Reg1 Identifies a Protein Phosphatase Type 1-Binding Motif as Essential for Repression of ADH2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dombek, Kenneth M.; Voronkova, Valentina; Raney, Alexa; Young, Elton T.

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1)-binding protein Reg1 is required to maintain complete repression of ADH2 expression during growth on glucose. Surprisingly, however, mutant forms of the yeast PP1 homologue Glc7, which are unable to repress expression of another glucose-regulated gene, SUC2, fully repressed ADH2. Constitutive ADH2 expression in reg1 mutant cells did require Snf1 protein kinase activity like constitutive SUC2 expression and was inhibited by unregulated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity like ADH2 expression in derepressed cells. To further elucidate the functional role of Reg1 in repressing ADH2 expression, deletions scanning the entire length of the protein were analyzed. Only the central region of the protein containing the putative PP1-binding sequence RHIHF was found to be indispensable for repression. Introduction of the I466M F468A substitutions into this sequence rendered Reg1 almost nonfunctional. Deletion of the central region or the double substitution prevented Reg1 from significantly interacting with Glc7 in two-hybrid analyses. Previous experimental evidence had indicated that Reg1 might target Glc7 to nuclear substrates such as the Snf1 kinase complex. Subcellular localization of a fully functional Reg1-green fluorescent protein fusion, however, indicated that Reg1 is cytoplasmic and excluded from the nucleus independently of the carbon source. When the level of Adr1 was modestly elevated, ADH2 expression was no longer fully repressed in glc7 mutant cells, providing the first direct evidence that Glc7 can repress ADH2 expression. These results suggest that the Reg1-Glc7 phosphatase is a cytoplasmic component of the machinery responsible for returning Snf1 kinase activity to its basal level and reestablishing glucose repression. This implies that the activated form of the Snf1 kinase complex must cycle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:10454550

  19. Effects of protein phosphatase and kinase inhibitors on the cardiac L- type Ca current suggest two sites are phosphorylated by protein kinase A and another protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously showed (Frace, A.M. and H.C. Hartzell. 1993. Journal of Physiology. 472:305-326) that internal perfusion of frog atrial myocytes with the nonselective protein phosphatase inhibitors microcystin or okadaic acid produced an increase in the L-type Ca current (ICa) and a decrease in the delayed rectifier K current (IK). We hypothesized that microcystin revealed the activity of a protein kinase (PKX) that was basally active in the cardiac myocyte that could phosphorylate the Ca and K channels or regulators of the channels. The present studies were aimed at determining the nature of PKX and its phosphorylation target. The effect of internal perfusion with microcystin on ICa or IK was not attenuated by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the effect of microcystin on ICa was largely blocked by the nonselective protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (10- 30 nM), K252a (250 nM), and H-7 (10 microM). Staurosporine and H-7 also decreased the stimulation of ICa by isoproterenol, but K252a was more selective and blocked the ability of microcystin to stimulate ICa without significantly reducing isoproterenol-stimulated current. Internal perfusion with selective inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), including the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate PKC peptide (PKC(19-31)) and a myristoylated derivative of this peptide had no effect. External application of several PKC inhibitors had negative side effects that prevented their use as selective PKC inhibitors. Nevertheless, we conclude that PKX is not PKC. PKA and PKX phosphorylate sites with different sensitivities to the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and microcystin. In contrast to the results with ICa, the effect of microcystin on IK was not blocked by any of the kinase inhibitors tested, suggesting that the effect of microcystin on IK may not be mediated by a protein kinase but may be due to a direct effect of microcystin on the IK channel. PMID:8786340

  20. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases.

  1. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  2. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  3. Stabilization of Different Types of Transition States in a Single Enzyme Active Site: QM/MM Analysis of Enzymes in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua; Cui, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The first step for the hydrolysis of a phosphate monoester (pNPP2−) in enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily, R166S AP and wild type NPP, is studied using QM/MM simulations based on an approximate density functional theory (SCC-DFTBPR) and a recently introduced QM/MM interaction Hamiltonian. The calculations suggest that similar loose transition states are involved in both enzymes, despite the fact that phosphate monoesters are the cognate substrates for AP but promiscuous substrates for NPP. The computed loose transition states are clearly different from the more synchronous ones previously calculated for diester reactions in the same AP enzymes. Therefore, our results explicitly support the proposal that AP enzymes are able to recognize and stabilize different types of transition states in a single active site. Analysis of the structural features of computed transition states indicates that the plastic nature of the bi-metallic site plays a minor role in accommodating multiple types of transition states, and that the high degree of solvent accessibility of the AP active site also contributes to its ability to stabilize diverse transition state structures without the need of causing large structural distortions of the bimetallic motif. The binding mode of the leaving group in the transition state highlights that vanadate may not always be an ideal transition state analog for loose phosphoryl transfer transition states. PMID:23786365

  4. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C ABI1 interacts with type I ACC synthases and is involved in the regulation of ozone-induced ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwików, Agnieszka; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Mituła, Filip; Tajdel, Małgorzata; Gałgański, Łukasz; Ziółkowski, Piotr A; Kubiak, Piotr; Małecka, Arleta; Piechalak, Aneta; Szabat, Marta; Górska, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Ibragimow, Izabela; Sadowski, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Ethylene plays a crucial role in various biological processes and therefore its biosynthesis is strictly regulated by multiple mechanisms. Posttranslational regulation, which is pivotal in controlling ethylene biosynthesis, impacts 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) protein stability via the complex interplay of specific factors. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling, is involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis under oxidative stress conditions. We found that ABI1 interacts with ACS6 and dephosphorylates its C-terminal fragment, a target of the stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase, MPK6. In addition, ABI1 controls MPK6 activity directly and by this means also affects the ACS6 phosphorylation level. Consistently with this, ozone-induced ethylene production was significantly higher in an ABI1 knockout strain (abi1td) than in wild-type plants. Importantly, an increase in stress-induced ethylene production in the abi1td mutant was compensated by a higher ascorbate redox state and elevated antioxidant activities. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence that ABI1 restricts ethylene synthesis by affecting the activity of ACS6. The ABI1 contribution to stress phenotype underpins its role in the interplay between the abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathways. PMID:24637173

  6. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2015-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) activity. In a previous 70-90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc (-/-) mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc (-/-) mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63-65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5-1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice) sustain 4-6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75-90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia.

  7. In Vivo Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Targeted Integration of a Glucose-6-phosphatase Transgene Promotes Survival in Mice With Glycogen Storage Disease Type IA.

    PubMed

    Landau, Dustin J; Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Mefferd, Adam; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Gersbach, Charles A; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2016-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is caused by glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency in association with severe, life-threatening hypoglycemia that necessitates lifelong dietary therapy. Here we show that use of a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) targeted to the ROSA26 safe harbor locus and a ROSA26-targeting vector containing a G6PC donor transgene, both delivered with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, markedly improved survival of G6Pase knockout (G6Pase-KO) mice compared with mice receiving the donor vector alone (P < 0.04). Furthermore, transgene integration has been confirmed by sequencing in the majority of the mice treated with both vectors. Targeted alleles were 4.6-fold more common in livers of mice with GSD Ia, as compared with normal littermates, at 8 months following vector administration (P < 0.02). This suggests a selective advantage for vector-transduced hepatocytes following ZFN-mediated integration of the G6Pase vector. A short-term experiment also showed that 3-month-old mice receiving the ZFN had significantly-improved biochemical correction, in comparison with mice that received the donor vector alone. These data suggest that the use of ZFNs to drive integration of G6Pase at a safe harbor locus might improve vector persistence and efficacy, and lower mortality in GSD Ia.

  8. Inositol Polyphosphate-4-Phosphatase Type I Negatively Regulates Phagocytosis via Dephosphorylation of Phagosomal PtdIns(3,4)P2.

    PubMed

    Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Hazeki, Kaoru; Sasaki, Junko; Omori, Yumio; Miyake, Mikiko; Morioka, Shin; Guo, Ying; Sasaki, Takehiko; Hazeki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a highly conserved process whereby phagocytic cells engulf pathogens and apoptotic bodies. The present study focused on the role of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase type I (Inpp4a) in phagocytosis. Raw264.7 cells that express shRNA against Inpp4a (shInpp4a cells) showed significantly increased phagocytic activity. The introduction of shRNA-resistant human Inpp4a abolished this increase. Macrophages from Inpp4a knockout mice showed similar increases in the phagocytic activity. Inpp4a was recruited to the phagosome membrane by a mechanism other than the direct interaction with Rab5. PtdIns(3,4)P2 increased on the phagosome of shInpp4a cells, while PtdIns(3)P significantly decreased. The results indicate that Inpp4a negatively regulates the phagocytic activity of macrophages as a member of the sequential dephosphorylation system that metabolizes phagosomal PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to PtdIns(3)P.

  9. Potential Utility of Sodium Selenate as an Adjunct to Metformin in Treating Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Rats: A Perspective on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rania M.; Schaalan, Mona F.; Elkoussi, Alaaeldin A.; Khalifa, Amani E.

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is widely regarded as the standard first-line antidiabetic agent, in terms of efficacy and safety profiles. However, in most patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), it was found that metformin alone is not enough to adequately control hyperglycemia. Thus, we designed this study with the aim to investigate the effect of sodium selenate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor, individually and as an adjunct to metformin, on a rat model that simulates the metabolic characteristics of human T2DM. T2DM model was achieved by feeding the rats with high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) for 8 weeks followed by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Changes in serum glucose, insulin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and the lipid profile were assessed. In addition, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of PTP were determined in the liver. Results showed that the addition of sodium selenate to metformin was able to restore hepatic GSH back to normal levels. Also, this combination therapy corrected the altered serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and adiponectin levels. In conclusion, additive therapeutic effect was recorded when sodium selenate was used as an adjunct to metformin. PMID:24106697

  10. Potential utility of sodium selenate as an adjunct to metformin in treating type II diabetes mellitus in rats: a perspective on protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Salama, Rania M; Schaalan, Mona F; Elkoussi, Alaaeldin A; Khalifa, Amani E

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is widely regarded as the standard first-line antidiabetic agent, in terms of efficacy and safety profiles. However, in most patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), it was found that metformin alone is not enough to adequately control hyperglycemia. Thus, we designed this study with the aim to investigate the effect of sodium selenate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor, individually and as an adjunct to metformin, on a rat model that simulates the metabolic characteristics of human T2DM. T2DM model was achieved by feeding the rats with high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) for 8 weeks followed by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Changes in serum glucose, insulin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and the lipid profile were assessed. In addition, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of PTP were determined in the liver. Results showed that the addition of sodium selenate to metformin was able to restore hepatic GSH back to normal levels. Also, this combination therapy corrected the altered serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and adiponectin levels. In conclusion, additive therapeutic effect was recorded when sodium selenate was used as an adjunct to metformin.

  11. The polymorphisms of protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta gene and its association with pediatric asthma in the Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Lin, Cherry Guan-Ju; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Liou, Ya-Huei; Wu, Ying-Jye; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2008-10-01

    We previously reported an association between genetic differences of pediatric asthma subtypes and a short tandem repeat (STR) marker, D9S286. It has been known that the protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta (PTPRD) gene is located downstream of D9S286 and that the physical distance between them is about 0.25 Mb. We selected and conducted genotyping on 76 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that encircle the genomic region of PTPRD in Taiwanese children with or without asthma. A total of 996 subjects were divided into testing group (674 subjects) and validation group (322 subjects). The results were further validated with the third subject group (611 subjects) recruited from different geographical regions. After Bonferroni correction, 3 out of 80 SNPs were found to be strongly significant (P < 0.05/76 = 0.000658) in the allele frequency test. This association was confirmed by validation groups. The results indicate that polymorphisms of PTPRD are strongly associated with pediatric bronchial asthma in the Taiwanese population.

  12. Mutations in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Type 2a Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Reveal Roles in Cell Wall Integrity, Actin Cytoskeleton Organization and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, DRH.; Stark, MJR.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations were generated in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPH22 gene that, together with its homologue PPH21, encode the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A). At the restrictive temperature (37°), cells dependent solely on pph22(ts) alleles for PP2A function displayed a rapid arrest of proliferation. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells underwent lysis at 37°, showing an accompanying viability loss that was suppressed by inclusion of 1 M sorbitol in the growth medium. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also displayed defects in bud morphogenesis and polarization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton at 37°. PP2A is therefore required for maintenance of cell integrity and polarized growth. On transfer from 24° to 37°, Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells accumulated a 2N DNA content indicating a cell cycle block before completion of mitosis. However, during prolonged incubation at 37°, many Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells progressed through an aberrant nuclear division and accumulated multiple nuclei. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also accumulated aberrant microtubule structures at 37°, while under semi-permissive conditions they were sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent benomyl, suggesting that PP2A is required for normal microtubule function. Remarkably, the multiple defects of Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells were suppressed by a viable allele (SSD1-v1) of the polymorphic SSD1 gene. PMID:9071579

  13. MicroRNA-194 promotes the growth, migration, and invasion of ovarian carcinoma cells by targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 12

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tian; Li, Liru; Cheng, Yan; Ren, Chengcheng; Zhang, Guangmei

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy among women. Ovarian cancer metastasis is the main reason for poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis in various cancers by affecting the expression of their targets. In this study, we explored the role of miR-194 in ovarian cancer. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays showed that miR-194 was significantly upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues. Overexpression of miR-194 in ovarian cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion; in contrast, inhibition of the expression of miR-194 has the opposite effects. Meanwhile, bioinformatics tools were used to identify protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 12 (PTPN12) as a potential target of miR-194. The luciferase assay showed that miR-194 directly binds to the 3′-untranslated region of PTPN12. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that PTPN12 expression was negatively associated with miR-194 expression in both ovarian cancer tissues and cells. Thus, we conclude that miR-194 targets PTPN12 and functions as an oncogene in ovarian cancer cells. This novel pathway may provide a new insight to explain ovarian cancer development and metastasis. PMID:27486333

  14. Substrate stiffness and the receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase alpha regulate spreading of colon cancer cells through cytoskeletal contractility.

    PubMed

    Krndija, D; Schmid, H; Eismann, J-L; Lother, U; Adler, G; Oswald, F; Seufferlein, T; von Wichert, G

    2010-05-01

    Microenvironmental clues are critical to cell behavior. One of the key elements of migration is the generation and response to forces. Up to now, there is no definitive concept on how the generation and responses to cellular forces influence cancer-cell behavior. Here, we show that expression of receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human SW480 colon cancer cells sets a threshold for the response to matrix forces by changing cellular contractility. This can be explained as an RPTPalpha-mediated increase in contractility with a consecutive increase in number and size of adhesion sites and stress fibers. These effects are mediated through myosin light chain kinase and largely independent of Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling. In addition, we report that RPTPalpha influences spreading on low-rigidity surfaces, binding of collagen-coated beads and expression of RPTPalpha is required for invasion into the chorioallantoic membrane. These data suggest that force-responsive proteins such as RPTPalpha can influence cancer-cell behavior and identify potential targets for cancer therapy.

  15. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on the expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen type I in human periodontal ligament cells induced by tension force stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Hua, Yongmei

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) are important in homeostasis and remodeling in the mechanically‑stimulated periodontium. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on periodontal tissue remodeling by examining the mRNA and protein expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN) and collagen type I (COL‑1) in human (h)PDLCs induced by tension force application. Cultured hPDLCs were treated with H2S for 24 h, followed by application of a tension force for 1, 3 and 6 h. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using a Cell Counting Kit 8 assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, and western blot analysis was used to detect the protein levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1. The results demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 increased with H2S treatment in a concentration‑dependent manner, which was enhanced by the application of tension force in a relatively short period of time. These findings suggested that H2S may be important in periodontal tissue remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement via increasing hPDLC differentiation, tissue mineralization, bone formation and collagen synthesis. PMID:27573279

  16. T-cell epitopes in type 1 diabetes autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase IA-2: potential for mimicry with rotavirus and other environmental agents.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, M C; Stone, N L; Harrison, L C

    1998-04-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 is a molecular target of pancreatic islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. T-cell epitope peptides in autoantigens have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and they may hold clues to environmental agents with similar sequences that could trigger or exacerbate autoimmune disease. We identified 13 epitope peptides in IA-2 by measuring peripheral blood T-cell proliferation to 68 overlapping, synthetic peptides encompassing the intracytoplasmic domain of IA-2 in six at-risk type 1 diabetes relatives selected for HLA susceptibility haplotypes. The dominant epitope, VIVMLTPLVEDGVKQC (aa 805-820), which elicited the highest T-cell responses in all at-risk relatives, has 56% identity and 100% similarity over 9 amino acids (aa) with a sequence in VP7, a major immunogenic protein of human rotavirus. Both peptides bind to HLA-DR4(*0401) and are deduced to present identical aa to the T-cell receptor. The contiguous sequence of VP7 has 75% identity and 92% similarity over 12 aa with a known T-cell epitope in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), another autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. This dominant IA-2 epitope peptide also has 75-45% identity and 88-64% similarity over 8-14 aa to sequences in Dengue, cytomegalovirus, measles, hepatitis C, and canine distemper viruses, and the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae. Three other IA-2 epitope peptides are 71-100% similar over 7-12 aa to herpes, rhino-, hanta- and flaviviruses. Two others are 80-82% similar over 10-11 aa to sequences in milk, wheat, and bean proteins. Further studies should now be carried out to directly test the hypothesis that T-cell activation by rotavirus and possibly other viruses, and dietary proteins, could trigger or exacerbate beta-cell autoimmunity through molecular mimicry with IA-2 and (for rotavirus) GAD.

  17. Role of the inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase type II Inpp4b in the generation of ovarian teratomas

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Chaillet, J. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Teratomas are a unique class of tumors composed of ecto- meso- and endodermal tissues, all foreign to the site of origin. In humans, the most common teratoma is the ovarian teratoma. Not much is known about the molecular and genetic etiologies of these tumors. Female carriers of the Tgkd transgene are highly susceptible to developing teratomas. Ovaries of Tgkd/+ hemizygous female mice exhibit defects in luteinization, with numerous corpora lutea, some of which contain central trapped, fully-grown oocytes. Genetically, Tgkd teratomas originate from mature oocytes that have completed meiosis I, suggesting that Tgkd teratomas originate from these trapped oocytes. The insertion of Tgkd 3′ of the Inpp4b gene is associated with decreased expression of Inpp4b and changes in intracellular PI3 Kinase/AKT signaling in follicular granulosa cells. Because Inpp4b is not expressed in fully-grown wild-type or Tgkd oocytes, these findings suggest that hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway caused by the decrease in INPP4B in granulosa cells promotes an ovarian environment defective in folliculogenesis and conducive to teratoma formation. PMID:23078915

  18. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  19. Relationship of spermatoscopy, prostatic acid phosphatase activity and prostate-specific antigen (p30) assays with further DNA typing in forensic samples from rape cases.

    PubMed

    Romero-Montoya, Lydia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Hugo; Pérez, Miguel Antonio; Argüello-García, Raúl

    2011-03-20

    In the forensic laboratory the biological analyses for rape investigation commonly include vaginal swabs as sample material combined to biochemical tests including sperm cytology (SC) and detection of acid phosphatase activity (AP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, p30) for the conclusive identification of semen components. Most reports comparing these tests relied on analysis of semen samples or donor swabs taken under controlled conditions; however their individual or combined efficacy under real live sampling conditions in different laboratories is largely unknown. We carried out SC, APA and PSA analyses in vaginal swabs collected from casework rapes submitted to Mexican Forensic Laboratories at Texcoco and Toluca. On the basis of positive and negative results from each assay and sample, data were classified into eight categories (I-VIII) and compared with those obtained in the two only similar studies reported in Toronto, Canada and Hong Kong, China. SC and APA assays had the higher overall positivity in Toluca and Texcoco samples respectively and otherwise PSA had a lower but very similar positivity between these two laboratories. When compared to the previous studies some similarities were found, namely similar frequencies (at a ratio of approximately 1 out of 3) of samples being positive or negative by all techniques (Categories I and VI respectively) and a comparable overall positivity of APA and SC but higher than that of PSA. Indeed the combined results of using SC, APA and PSA tests was considered as conclusive for semen detection from approximately 1 out of 3 cases (Category I) to approximately 1 out of 2 cases in a scenario where at least SC is positive, strongly presumptive in 2 out of 3 cases (with at least one test positive) and the remainder 1 out of 3 cases (Category VI) suggested absence of semen. By determining Y-STR polymorphisms (12-loci) in additional samples obtained at Toluca laboratory, complete DNA profiles were determined from all

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-D-Glycero-D-Galacto-Nononate-9-Phosphate Phosphatase Defines Specificity Elements in Type C0 had Family Members

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Wang, L; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2009-01-01

    The phosphotransferases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) act upon a wide range of metabolites in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes and thus constitute a significant force in cell function. The challenge posed for biochemical function assignment of HADSF members is the identification of the structural determinants that target a specific metabolite. The '8KDOP' subfamily of the HADSF is defined by the known structure and catalytic activity of 2-keto-3-deoxy-8-phospho-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO-8-P) phosphatase. Homologues of this enzyme have been uniformly annotated as KDO-8-P phosphatase. One such gene, BT1713, from the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome was recently found to encode the enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-9-phosphonononic acid (KDN-9-P) phosphatase in the biosynthetic pathway of the 9-carbon ?-keto acid, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (KDN). To find the structural elements that provide substrate-specific interactions and to allow identification of genomic sequence markers, the x-ray crystal structures of BT1713 liganded to the cofactor Mg2+and complexed with tungstate or Formula/Neu5Ac were determined to 1.1, 1.85, and 1.63 A resolution, respectively. The structures define the active site to be at the subunit interface and, as confirmed by steady-state kinetics and site-directed mutagenesis, reveal Arg-64*, Lys-67*, and Glu-56 to be the key residues involved in sugar binding that are essential for BT1713 catalytic function. Bioinformatic analyses of the differentially conserved residues between BT1713 and KDO-8-P phosphatase homologues guided by the knowledge of the structure-based specificity determinants define Glu-56 and Lys-67* to be the key residues that can be used in future annotations.

  1. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  2. Digestion and the distribution of acid phosphatase in Blepharisma.

    PubMed

    Dembitzer, H M

    1968-05-01

    Suspensions of Blepharisma intermedium were fed latex particles for 5 min and then were separated from the particles by filtration. Samples were fixed at intervals after separation and incubated to demonstrate acid phosphatase activity. They were subsequently embedded and sectioned for electron microscopy. During formation of the food vacuole, the vacuolar membrane is acid phosphatase-negative. Within 5 min, dumbbell-shaped acid phosphatase-positive bodies, possibly derived from the the acid phosphatase-positive Golgi apparatus, apparently fuse with the food vacuole and render it acid phosphatase-positive. A larger type of acid phosphatase-positive, vacuolated body may also fuse with the food vacuole at later stages. At about 20 min after formation, acid phosphatase-positive secondary pinocytotic vesicles pinch off from the food vacuoles and approach a separate system of membrane-bounded spaces. By 1 hr after formation, the food vacuole becomes acid phosphatase-negative, and the undigested latex particles are voided into the membrane-bounded spaces. The membrane-bounded spaces are closely associated with the food vacuole at all stages of digestion and are generally acid phosphatase-negative. Within the membrane-bounded spaces, dense, pleomorphic, granular bodies are found, in which are embedded mitochondria, paraglycogen granules, membrane-limited acid phosphatase-containing structures, and Golgi apparatuses. The granular bodies may serve as vehicles for the transport of organelles through the extensive, ramifying membrane-bounded spaces.

  3. DIGESTION AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ACID PHOSPHATASE IN BLEPHARISMA

    PubMed Central

    Dembitzer, Herbert M.

    1968-01-01

    Suspensions of Blepharisma intermedium were fed latex particles for 5 min and then were separated from the particles by filtration. Samples were fixed at intervals after separation and incubated to demonstrate acid phosphatase activity. They were subsequently embedded and sectioned for electron microscopy. During formation of the food vacuole, the vacuolar membrane is acid phosphatase-negative. Within 5 min, dumbbell-shaped acid phosphatase-positive bodies, possibly derived from the the acid phosphatase-positive Golgi apparatus, apparently fuse with the food vacuole and render it acid phosphatase-positive. A larger type of acid phosphatase-positive, vacuolated body may also fuse with the food vacuole at later stages. At about 20 min after formation, acid phosphatase-positive secondary pinocytotic vesicles pinch off from the food vacuoles and approach a separate system of membrane-bounded spaces. By 1 hr after formation, the food vacuole becomes acid phosphatase-negative, and the undigested latex particles are voided into the membrane-bounded spaces. The membrane-bounded spaces are closely associated with the food vacuole at all stages of digestion and are generally acid phosphatase-negative. Within the membrane-bounded spaces, dense, pleomorphic, granular bodies are found, in which are embedded mitochondria, paraglycogen granules, membrane-limited acid phosphatase-containing structures, and Golgi apparatuses. The granular bodies may serve as vehicles for the transport of organelles through the extensive, ramifying membrane-bounded spaces. PMID:4968524

  4. Phosphoryl Transfer from α-d-Glucose 1-Phosphate Catalyzed by Escherichia coli Sugar-Phosphate Phosphatases of Two Protein Superfamily Types

    PubMed Central

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s−1) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys189 and Cys195. Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H218O solvent proceeded with complete 18O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1–P, but not C-1–O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  5. Phospholemman-dependent regulation of the cardiac Na/K-ATPase activity is modulated by inhibitor-1 sensitive type-1 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    El-Armouche, Ali; Wittköpper, Katrin; Fuller, William; Howie, Jacqueline; Shattock, Michael J; Pavlovic, Davor

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac Na/K-ATPase (NKA) is regulated by its accessory protein phospholemman (PLM). Whereas kinase-induced PLM phosphorylation has been shown to mediate NKA stimulation, the role of endogenous phosphatases is presently unknown. We investigated the role of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) on PLM phosphorylation and NKA activity in rat cardiomyocytes and failing human hearts. Incubation of rat cardiomyocytes with the chemical PP-1/PP-2A inhibitor okadaic acid or the specific PP-1-inhibitor peptide (I-1ct) identified PLM phosphorylation at Ser-68 as the main substrate for PP-1. Moreover, myocytes adenovirally overexpressing PP-1 inhibitor-1 protein (I-1,Ad-I-1/eGFP) showed a 70% increase in PLM Ser-68 phosphorylation and 65% increase in NKA current, compared with enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-infected controls (Ad-eGFP), using Western blotting and voltage clamping, respectively. Notably, in left ventricular myocardium from patients with heart failure, PLM Ser-68 phosphorylation was ≈ 50% lower (n=7) than in nonfailing controls (n=7). We provide the first physiological and biochemical evidence that PLM phosphorylation and cardiac Na/K-ATPase activity are negatively regulated by PP-1 and that this regulatory mechanism could be counteracted by I-1. This novel mechanism is markedly perturbed in failing hearts favoring PLM dephosphorylation and NKA deactivation and thus may contribute to maladaptive hypertrophy and arrhythmogenesis via chronically higher intracellular Na and Ca concentrations.

  6. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptc1Δptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions.

  7. Regulation of synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tan, A W; Nuttall, F Q

    1976-08-12

    Using substrates purified from liver, the apparent Km values of synthase phosphatase ([UDPglucose--glycogen glucosyltransferase-D]phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.42) and phosphorylase phosphatase (phosphorylase a phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.17) were found to be 0.7 and 60 units/ml respectively. The maximal velocity of phosphorylase phosphatase was more than a 100 times that of synthase phosphatase. In adrenalectomized, fasted animals there was a complete loss of synthase phosphatase but only a slight decrease in phosphorylase phosphatase when activity was measured using endogenous substrates in a concentrated liver extract. When assayed under optimal conditions with purified substrates, both activities were present but had decreased to very low levels. Mixing experiments indicated that synthase D present in the extract of adrenalectomized fasted animals was altered such that it was no longer a substrate for synthase phosphatase from normal rats. Phosphorylase a substrate on the other hand was unaltered and readily converted. When glucose was given in vivo, no change in percent of synthase in the I form was seen in adrenalectomized rats but the percent of phosphorylase in the a form was reduced. Precipitation of protein from an extract of normal fed rats with ethanol produced a large activation of phosphorylase phosphatase activity with no corresponding increase in synthase phosphatase activity. Despite the low phosphorylase phosphatase present in extracts of adrenalectomized fasted animals, ethanol precipitation increased activity to the same high level as obtained in the normal fed rats. Synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase activities were also decreased in normal fasted, diabetic fed and fasted, and adrenalectomized fed rats. Both enzymes recovered in the same manner temporally after oral glucose administration to adrenalectomized, fasted rats. These results suggest an integrated regulatory mechanism for the two phosphatase.

  8. Genetic Variations of PTPN2 and PTPN22: Role in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Robert C.; Abdulrahim, Muna; Naser, Ebraheem S.; Naser, Saleh A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified several genes that might be associated with increase susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and Crohn's disease. Both Crohn's disease and T1D have a profound impact on the lives of patients and it is pivotal to investigate the genetic role in patients acquiring these diseases. Understanding the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) in key genes in patients suffering from T1D and Crohn's disease is crucial to finding an effective treatment and generating novel therapeutic drugs. This review article is focused on the impact of SNP's in PTPN2 (protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 2) and PTPN22 (protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22) on the development of Crohn's disease and T1D. The PTPN2 gene mutation in T1D patients play a direct role in the destruction of beta cells while in Crohn's disease patients, it modulates the innate immune responses. The PTPN22 gene mutations also play a role in both diseases by modulating intracellular signaling. Examining the mechanism through which these genes increase the susceptibility to both diseases and gaining a better understanding of their structure and function is of vital importance to understand the etiology and pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes and Crohn's disease. PMID:26734582

  9. Discovery of Protein Phosphatase 2C Inhibitors by Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jessica P.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Flajolet, Marc; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Olson, Arthur; Greengard, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) is an archetype of the PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases, characterized by dependence on divalent magnesium or manganese cofactors, absence of known regulatory proteins, and resistance to all known Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors. We have used virtual ligand screening with the AutoDock method and the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set to identify small molecule inhibitors of PP2Cα activity at a protein substrate. These inhibitors are active in the micromolar range, and represent the first non-phosphate-based molecules found to inhibit a type 2C phosphatase. The compounds docked to three recurrent binding sites near the PP2Cα active site and displayed novel Ser/Thr phosphatase selectivity profiles. Common chemical features of these compounds may form the basis for development of a PP2C inhibitor pharmacophore and may facilitate investigation of PP2C control and cellular function. PMID:16509582

  10. Deletion of PHO13, encoding haloacid dehalogenase type IIA phosphatase, results in upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Rin; Xu, Haiqing; Lesmana, Anastashia; Kuzmanovic, Uros; Au, Matthew; Florencia, Clarissa; Oh, Eun Joong; Zhang, Guochang; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-03-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is one of the largest enzyme families, consisting mainly of phosphatases. Although intracellular phosphate plays important roles in many cellular activities, the biological functions of HAD enzymes are largely unknown. Pho13 is 1 of 16 putative HAD enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pho13 has not been studied extensively, but previous studies have identified PHO13 to be a deletion target for the generation of industrially attractive phenotypes, namely, efficient xylose fermentation and high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the improved xylose-fermenting phenotype produced by deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ), we investigated the response of S. cerevisiae to pho13Δ at the transcriptomic level when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. Transcriptome sequencing analysis revealed that pho13Δ resulted in upregulation of the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. We also found that the transcriptional changes induced by pho13Δ required the transcription factor Stb5, which is activated specifically under NADPH-limiting conditions. Thus, pho13Δ resulted in the upregulation of the PP pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes as a part of an oxidative stress response mediated by activation of Stb5. Because the PP pathway is the primary pathway for xylose, its upregulation by pho13Δ might explain the improved xylose metabolism. These findings will be useful for understanding the biological function of S. cerevisiae Pho13 and the HAD superfamily enzymes and for developing S. cerevisiae strains with industrially attractive phenotypes.

  11. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis RnhC (MSMEG_4305), a Bifunctional Enzyme Composed of Autonomous N-Terminal Type I RNase H and C-Terminal Acid Phosphatase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jacewicz, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes several DNA repair polymerases that are adept at incorporating ribonucleotides, which raises questions about how ribonucleotides in DNA are sensed and removed. RNase H enzymes, of which M. smegmatis encodes four, are strong candidates for a surveillance role. Here, we interrogate the biochemical activity and nucleic acid substrate specificity of M. smegmatis RnhC, a bifunctional RNase H and acid phosphatase. We report that (i) the RnhC nuclease is stringently specific for RNA:DNA hybrid duplexes; (ii) RnhC does not selectively recognize and cleave DNA-RNA or RNA-DNA junctions in duplex nucleic acid; (iii) RnhC cannot incise an embedded monoribonucleotide or diribonucleotide in duplex DNA; (iv) RnhC can incise tracts of 4 or more ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA, leaving two or more residual ribonucleotides at the cleaved 3′-OH end and at least one or two ribonucleotides on the 5′-PO4 end; (v) the RNase H activity is inherent in an autonomous 140-amino-acid (aa) N-terminal domain of RnhC; and (vi) the C-terminal 211-aa domain of RnhC is an autonomous acid phosphatase. The cleavage specificity of RnhC is clearly distinct from that of Escherichia coli RNase H2, which selectively incises at an RNA-DNA junction. Thus, we classify RnhC as a type I RNase H. The properties of RnhC are consistent with a role in Okazaki fragment RNA primer removal or in surveillance of oligoribonucleotide tracts embedded in DNA but not in excision repair of single misincorporated ribonucleotides. IMPORTANCE RNase H enzymes help cleanse the genome of ribonucleotides that are present either as ribotracts (e.g., RNA primers) or as single ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes four RNase H proteins, including RnhC, which is characterized in this study. The nucleic acid substrate and cleavage site specificities of RnhC are consistent with a role in initiating the removal of ribotracts but not in single

  12. Dephosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin by latent phosphatase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.D.; Fong, Y.L.; Benovic, J.L.; Sibley, D.R.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1988-06-25

    Recent evidence suggests that the function of receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins may be controlled by highly specific protein kinases, e.g. rhodopsin kinase and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. In order to investigate the nature of the phosphatases which might be involved in controlling the state of receptor phosphorylation we studied the ability of four highly purified well characterized protein phosphatases to dephosphorylate preparations of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor which had been highly phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. These included: type 1 phosphatase, calcineurin phosphatase, type 2A phosphatase, and the high molecular weight latent phosphatase 2. Under conditions in which all the phosphatases could dephosphorylate such common substrates as (/sup 32/P)phosphorylase a and (/sup 32/P)myelin basic protein at similar rates only the latent phosphatase 2 was active on the phosphorylated receptors. Moreover, a latent phosphatase activity was found predominantly in a sequestered membrane fraction of frog erythrocytes. This parallels the distribution of a beta-adrenergic receptor phosphatase activity recently described in these cells. These data suggest a potential role for the latent phosphatase 2 as a specific receptor phosphatase.

  13. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  14. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  15. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  16. Pez: a novel human cDNA encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase- and ezrin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Mitchell, P J; Shipley, J; Gusterson, B A; Rogers, M V; Crompton, M R

    1995-04-26

    We have isolated cDNAs from normal human breast tissue and breast tumour cells that encode a protein (pez) with features of a novel non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase possessing N-terminal sequence homology to the ezrin-band 4.1-merlin-radixin protein family. Northern blot analysis indicates that pez is expressed in a variety of human tissues including kidney, skeletal muscle, lung and placenta. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has mapped pez to chromosome 1 region q32.2-41. Sequence identity to a characterized polymorphic marker confirms this localization. PMID:7733990

  17. Cytochemical characterization of yolk granule acid phosphatase during early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Dongchun; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a cytochemical method and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine acid phosphatase activities of yolk granules throughout the early developmental stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic change of yolk granule acid phosphatase, and the mechanisms underlying its involvement in yolk degradation during the early developmental stages of molluscs. Three types of yolk granules (YGI, YGII, and YGIII) that differed in electron density and acid phosphatase reaction were identified in early cleavage, morula, blastula, gastrula, trochophore, and veliger stages. The morphological heterogeneities of the yolk granules were related to acid phosphatase activity and degrees of yolk degradation, indicating the association of acid phosphatase with yolk degradation in embryos and larvae of molluscs. Fusion of yolk granules was observed during embryogenesis and larval development of C. gigas. The fusion of YGI (free of acid phosphatase reaction) with YGII (rich in acid phosphatase reaction) could be the way by which yolk degradation is triggered.

  18. Role of non-receptor protein kinases in spermatid transport during spermatogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. T.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Xiao, Xiang; Cheng, Yan-ho; Wong, Elissa W.P.; Wong, Chris K. C.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    Non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases are cytoplasmic kinases that activate proteins by phosphorylating target protein tyrosine residues, in turn affecting multiple functions in eukaryotic cells. Herein, we focus on the role of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases, most notably, FAK, c-Yes and c-Src, in the transport of spermatids across the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis. Since spermatids, which are formed from spermatocytes via meiosis, are immotile haploid cells, they must be transported by Sertoli cells across the seminiferous epithelium during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids across the epithelium, the release of sperms at spermiation fails to occur, leading to infertility. Thus, the molecular event pertinent to spermatid transport is crucial to spermatogenesis. Herein, we provide a critical discussion based on recent findings in the field. We also provide a hypothetical model on spermatid transport, and the role of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases in this event. We also highlight areas of research that deserve attention by investigators in the field. PMID:24727349

  19. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  20. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney. PMID:16010976

  1. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  2. Role of Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) Modification in the Regulation of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Type Z (PTPRZ) Activity: PLEIOTROPHIN-PTPRZ-A SIGNALING IS INVOLVED IN OLIGODENDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION.

    PubMed

    Kuboyama, Kazuya; Fujikawa, Akihiro; Suzuki, Ryoko; Tanga, Naomi; Noda, Masaharu

    2016-08-26

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (PTPRZ) is predominantly expressed in the developing brain as a CS proteoglycan. PTPRZ has long (PTPRZ-A) and short type (PTPRZ-B) receptor forms by alternative splicing. The extracellular CS moiety of PTPRZ is required for high-affinity binding to inhibitory ligands, such as pleiotrophin (PTN), midkine, and interleukin-34; however, its functional significance in regulating PTPRZ activity remains obscure. We herein found that protein expression of CS-modified PTPRZ-A began earlier, peaking at approximately postnatal days 5-10 (P5-P10), and then that of PTN peaked at P10 at the developmental stage corresponding to myelination onset in the mouse brain. Ptn-deficient mice consistently showed a later onset of the expression of myelin basic protein, a major component of the myelin sheath, than wild-type mice. Upon ligand application, PTPRZ-A/B in cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells exhibited punctate localization on the cell surface instead of diffuse distribution, causing the inactivation of PTPRZ and oligodendrocyte differentiation. The same effect was observed with the removal of CS chains with chondroitinase ABC but not polyclonal antibodies against the extracellular domain of PTPRZ. These results indicate that the negatively charged CS moiety prevents PTPRZ from spontaneously clustering and that the positively charged ligand PTN induces PTPRZ clustering, potentially by neutralizing electrostatic repulsion between CS chains. Taken altogether, these data indicate that PTN-PTPRZ-A signaling controls the timing of oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation in vivo, in which the CS moiety of PTPRZ receptors maintains them in a monomeric active state until its ligand binding. PMID:27445335

  3. Involvement of two type 2C protein phosphatases BcPtc1 and BcPtc3 in the regulation of multiple stress tolerance and virulence of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Jiang, Jinhua; Mayr, Christiane; Hahn, Matthias; Ma, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    Type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatases (PP2Cs) are involved in various cellular processes in many eukaryotes, but little has been known about their functions in filamentous fungi. Botrytis cinerea contains four putative PP2C genes, named BcPTC1, -3, -5, and -6. Biological functions of these genes were analysed by gene deletion and complementation. While no phenotypes aberrant from the wild type were observed with mutants of BcPTC5 and BcPTC6, mutants of BcPTC1 and BcPTC3 had reduced hyphal growth, increased conidiation, and impaired sclerotium development. Additionally, BcPTC1 and BcPTC3 mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, and to cell wall degrading enzymes. Both mutants exhibited dramatically decreased virulence on host plant tissues. All of the defects were restored by genetic complementation of the mutants with wild-type BcPTC1 and BcPTC3 respectively. Different from what is known in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BcPtc3, but not BcPtc1, negatively regulates phosphorylation of BcSak1 (the homologue of S. cerevisiae Hog1) in B. cinerea, although both BcPTC1 and BcPTC3 were able to rescue the growth defects of a yeast PTC1 deletion mutant under various stress conditions. These results demonstrated that BcPtc1 and BcPtc3 play important roles in the regulation of multiple stress tolerance and virulence of B. cinerea. PMID:23601355

  4. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  5. Endocytosis and the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, James; Caplan, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The regulated intracellular transport of nutrient, adhesion, and growth factor receptors is crucial for maintaining cell and tissue homeostasis. Endocytosis, or endocytic membrane trafficking, involves the steps of intracellular transport that include, but are not limited to, internalization from the plasma membrane, sorting in early endosomes, transport to late endosomes/lysosomes followed by degradation, and/or recycling back to the plasma membrane through tubular recycling endosomes. In addition to regulating the localization of transmembrane receptor proteins, the endocytic pathway also controls the localization of non-receptor molecules. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src (Src) and its closely related family members Yes and Fyn represent three proteins whose localization and signaling activities are tightly regulated by endocytic trafficking. Here, we provide a brief overview of endocytosis, Src function and its biochemical regulation. We will then concentrate on recent advances in understanding how Src intracellular localization is regulated and how its subcellular localization ultimately dictates downstream functioning. As Src kinases are hyperactive in many cancers, it is essential to decipher the spatiotemporal regulation of this important family of tyrosine kinases. PMID:25372749

  6. Effects of overexpression of PTP36, a putative protein tyrosine phosphatase, on cell adhesion, cell growth, and cytoskeletons in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Takada, T; Mori, Y; Oh-hora, M; Uchida, Y; Kosugi, A; Miyake, K; Hamaoka, T

    1999-04-30

    Non-receptor-type putative protein tyrosine phosphatase-36 (PTP36), also known as PTPD2/Pez, possesses a domain homologous to the N-terminal half of band 4.1 protein. To gain insight into the biological function of PTP36, we established a HeLa cell line, HtTA/P36-9, in which the overexpression of PTP36 was inducible. PTP36 expressed in HeLa cells was enriched in the cytoskeleton near the plasma membrane. There was little endogenous PTP36 detectable in uninduced HtTA/P36-9 cells or in the parental HeLa cells. Upon induction of PTP36 overexpression, HtTA/P36-9 cells spread less well, grew more slowly, and adhered to the extracellular matrix proteins less well than uninduced cells. Moreover, decreases in the actin stress fibers and the number of focal adhesions were observed. The tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase induced by lysophosphatidic acid was suppressed in the HtTA/P36-9 cells overexpressing PTP36. These results indicate that PTP36 affects cytoskeletons, cell adhesion, and cell growth, thus suggesting that PTP36 is involved in their regulatory processes. PMID:10212280

  7. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases PPEF interact with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Solov'eva, Olga V; Andreeva, Alexandra V; Bennett, Nelly

    2002-05-10

    Regulation of protein dephosphorylation by cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin (CaM) is well established and considered to be mediated solely by calcineurin. Yet, recent identification of protein phosphatases with EF-hand domains (PPEF/rdgC) point to the existence of another group of Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatases. We have recently hypothesised that PPEF/rdgC phosphatases might possess CaM-binding sites of the IQ-type in their N-terminal domains. We now employed yeast two-hybrid system and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to test this hypothesis. We found that entire human PPEF2 interacts with CaM in the in vivo tests and that its N-terminal domain binds to CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with nanomolar affinity in vitro. The fragments corresponding to the second exons of PPEF1 and PPEF2, containing the IQ motifs, are sufficient for specific Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CaM both in vivo and in vitro. These findings demonstrate the existence of mammalian CaM-binding protein Ser/Thr phosphatases distinct from calcineurin and suggest that the activity of PPEF phosphatases may be controlled by Ca(2+) in a dual way: via C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain and via interaction of the N-terminal domain with CaM.

  8. Biochemical characterization of the extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Quisel, J D; Wykoff, D D; Grossman, A R

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the extracellular phosphatases produced by the terrestrial green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to phosphorus deprivation. Phosphorus-deprived cells increase extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity 300-fold relative to unstarved cells. The alkaline phosphatases are released into the medium by cell-wall-deficient strains and by wild-type cells after treatment with autolysin, indicating that they are localized to the periplasm. Anion-exchange chromatography and analysis by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that there are two major inducible alkaline phosphatases. A calcium-dependent enzyme composed of 190-kD glycoprotein subunits accounts for 85 to 95% of the Alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase has optimal activity at pH 9.5 and a Km of 120 to 262 microns for all physiological substrates tested, with the exception of phytic acid, which it cleaved with a 50-fold lower efficiency. An enzyme with optimal activity at pH 9 and no requirement for divalent cations accounts for 2 to 10% of the alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase was only able to efficiently hydrolyze arylphosphates. The information reported here, in conjunction with the results of previous studies, defines the complement of extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas cells. PMID:8754684

  9. Structural insights into Noonan/LEOPARD syndrome-related mutants of protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (PTPN11)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ubiquitous non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) plays a key role in RAS/ERK signaling downstream of most, if not all growth factors, cytokines and integrins, although its major substrates remain controversial. Mutations in PTPN11 lead to several distinct human diseases. Germ-line PTPN11 mutations cause about 50% of Noonan Syndrome (NS), which is among the most common autosomal dominant disorders. LEOPARD Syndrome (LS) is an acronym for its major syndromic manifestations: multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. Frequently, LS patients have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and they might also have an increased risk of neuroblastoma (NS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Consistent with the distinct pathogenesis of NS and LS, different types of PTPN11 mutations cause these disorders. Results Although multiple studies have reported the biochemical and biological consequences of NS- and LS-associated PTPN11 mutations, their structural consequences have not been analyzed fully. Here we report the crystal structures of WT SHP2 and five NS/LS-associated SHP2 mutants. These findings enable direct structural comparisons of the local conformational changes caused by each mutation. Conclusions Our structural analysis agrees with, and provides additional mechanistic insight into, the previously reported catalytic properties of these mutants. The results of our research provide new information regarding the structure-function relationship of this medically important target, and should serve as a solid foundation for structure-based drug discovery programs. PMID:24628801

  10. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  11. Phosphatase production and activity in Citrobacter freundii and a naturally occurring, heavy-metal-accumulating Citrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, D M; Dean, A C; Wiffen, P; Macaskie, L E

    1995-10-01

    The ability of a naturally occurring Citrobacter sp. to accumulate cadmium has been attributed to cellular precipitation of CdHPO4, utilizing HPO4(2-) liberated via the activity of an overproduced, Cd-resistant acid-type phosphatase. Phosphatase production and heavy metal accumulation by batch cultures of this strain (N14) and a phosphatase-deficient mutant were compared with two reference strains of Citrobacter freundii. Only strain N14 expressed a high level of acid phosphatase and accumulated lanthanum and uranyl ion enzymically. Acid phosphatase is regulated via carbon-starvation; although the C. freundii strains overexpressed phosphatase activity in carbon-limiting continuous culture, this was approximately 20-fold less than the activity of strain N14 grown similarly. Citrobacter strain N14 was originally isolated from a metal-contaminated soil environment; phosphatase overproduction and metal accumulation were postulated as a detoxification mechanism. However, application of Cd-stress, and enrichment for Cd-resistant C. freundii ('training'), reduced the phosphatase activity of this organism by about 50% as compared to Cd-unstressed cultures. The acid phosphatase of C. freundii and Citrobacter N14 had a similar pattern of resistance to some diagnostic reagents. The enzyme of the latter is similar to the PhoN acid phosphatase of Salmonella typhimurium described by other workers; the results are discussed with respect to the known phosphatases of the enterobacteria.

  12. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  13. Determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zak, B; Epstein, E; Baginski, E S

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase is described. Homogenization and ultracentrifrigation were used to prepare a precipitate whose character was defined by monitoring the desire enzyme activity which serves as a marker. Activity of the enzyme was determined by means of a sensitive colorimetric reaction for the product, inorganic phosphate. Non-enzymatic hydrolysis problems with the substrate are minimized in this procedure by the masking action of citrate. The final heteropoly blue color appears to be considerably sensitized by interaction of phosphomolybdous ion with arsenite. The stability of the relatively labile enzyme was ensured by chelating any metals present with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. The overall results obtained by the procedure appear to be useful as an aid in the diagnosis of Type I glycogenosis, a glycogen storage disease called Von Gierke's disease. PMID:192125

  14. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  15. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Płachno, B J; Adamec, L; Lichtscheidl, I K; Peroutka, M; Adlassnig, W; Vrba, J

    2006-11-01

    A new ELF (enzyme labelled fluorescence) assay was applied to detect phosphatase activity in glandular structures of 47 carnivorous plant species, especially Lentibulariaceae, in order to understand their digestive activities. We address the following questions: (1) Are phosphatases produced by the plants and/or by inhabitants of the traps? (2) Which type of hairs/glands is involved in the production of phosphatases? (3) Is this phosphatase production a common feature among carnivorous plants or is it restricted to evolutionarily advanced species? Our results showed activity of the phosphatases in glandular structures of the majority of the plants tested, both from the greenhouse and from sterile culture. In addition, extracellular phosphatases can also be produced by trap inhabitants. In Utricularia, activity of phosphatase was detected in internal glands of 27 species from both primitive and advanced sections and different ecological groups. Further positive reactions were found in Genlisea, Pinguicula, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Drosera, Drosophyllum, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus. In Utricularia and Genlisea, enzymatic secretion was independent of stimulation by prey. Byblis and Roridula are usually considered as "proto-carnivores", lacking digestive enzymes. However, we found high activity of phosphatases in both species. Thus, they should be classified as true carnivores. We suggest that the inflorescence of Byblis and some Pinguicula species might also be an additional "carnivorous organ", which can trap a prey, digest it, and finally absorb available nutrients.

  16. Protein phosphatases in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Ortsäter, Henrik; Grankvist, Nina; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjöholm1, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly world-wide. A cardinal feature of most forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin-producing capability, due to the loss of insulin-producing β-cells, impaired glucose-sensitive insulin secretion from the β-cell, or a combination thereof, the reasons for which largely remain elusive. Reversible phosphorylation is an important and versatile mechanism for regulating the biological activity of many intracellular proteins, which, in turn, controls a variety of cellular functions. For instance, significant changes in protein kinase activities and in protein phosphorylation patterns occur subsequent to stimulation of insulin release by glucose. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphorylation of proteins involved in the insulin secretory process by the β-cell have been extensively investigated. However, far less is known about the role and regulation of protein dephosphorylation by various protein phosphatases. Herein we review extant data implicating serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases in various aspects of healthy and diabetic islet biology, ranging from control of hormonal stimulus-secretion coupling to mitogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:24681827

  17. The relationship between the MMP system, adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, A; Spiers, JP

    2012-01-01

    The MMPs and their inhibitors [tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMPs) ] form the mainstay of extracellular matrix homeostasis. They are expressed in response to numerous stimuli including cytokines and GPCR activation. This review highlights the importance of adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) in regulating MMPs in the cardiovascular system, which may help explain some of the beneficial effects of targeting the adrenoceptor system in tissue remodelling and will establish emerging crosstalk between these three systems. Although α- and β-adrenoceptor activation increases MMP but decreases TIMP expression, MMPs are implicated in the growth stimulatory effects of adrenoceptor activation through transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, they have recently been found to catalyse the proteolysis of β-adrenoceptors and modulate vascular tone. While the mechanisms underpinning these effects are not well defined, reversible protein phosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases may be key. In particular, PPP (Ser/Thr phosphatases) are not only critical in resensitization and internalization of adrenoceptors but also modulate MMP expression. The interrelationship is complex as isoprenaline (ISO) inhibits okadaic acid [phosphoprotein phosphatase type 1/phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor]-mediated MMP expression. While this may be simply due to its ability to transiently increase PP2A activity, there is evidence for MMP-9 that ISO prevents okadaic acid-mediated expression of MMP-9 through a β-arrestin, NF-κB-dependent pathway, which is abolished by knock-down of PP2A. It is essential that crosstalk between MMPs, adrenoceptors and PPP are investigated further as it will provide important insight into how adrenoceptors modulate cardiovascular remodelling, and may identify new targets for pharmacological manipulation of the MMP system. PMID:22364165

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  19. AN ANALYSIS OF CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR SYSTEMS WHICH TRANSFORM THE SPECIES CHARACTER OF ACID PHOSPHATASE IN ACETABULARIA.

    PubMed

    KECK, K; CHOULES, E A

    1963-08-01

    Several species-specific molecular forms of acid phosphatase are known to exist in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia. In graft combinations between cells of Acetabularia mediterranea (med) and Acicularia Schenckii (acic) the expression of the med phosphatase is dominant over acic phosphatase. There is good evidence that in such grafts the preexisting acic phosphatase is converted on the molecular level via an intermediate form to the med phosphatase. This conversion can be initiated by the transplantation of a med cell nucleus to an anucleate acic cell, but will also take place in grafts between anucleate med and anucleate acic cells, indicating that the direct participation of a cell nucleus is not required. An incomplete conversion of acic phosphatase, which terminates at the intermediate stage, is induced in acic cells by injection of a concentrated homogenate of med cytoplasm. A similar partial conversion occurs in vitro in a mixture of homogenates from med and acic cells. Subcellular particles, such as chloroplasts or mitochondria, can be removed from the homogenates by centrifugation without impairing the reactions leading to the intermediate phosphatase type. Experimental evidence suggests that the transformation of phosphatase types is enzymatically catalyzed and may involve the conjugation of small molecules with the phosphatase protein. It was shown, however, that sialic acid is not involved, since the incubation of med or acic homogenates with neuraminidase did not modify the electrophoretic mobility of either enzyme type. Another type of phosphatase, which occurs in Acetabularia erenulata (cren) and can be distinguished electrophoretically from the aforementioned types, is not subject to interaction. In various mono- and multi-nucleate graft combinations between cren cells on one hand, and med or acic cells on the other hand, the cren phosphatase is synthesized independently of the enzyme of the graft partner.

  20. Phosphoinositide Phosphatases in Cell Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are essential signaling molecules linked to a diverse array of cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. The metabolic interconversions of these phospholipids are subject to exquisite spatial and temporal regulation executed by arrays of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. These include PtdIns- and phosphoinositide-kinases that drive phosphoinositide synthesis, and phospholipases and phosphatases that regulate phosphoinositide degradation. In the past decade, phosphoinositide phosphatases have emerged as topics of particular interest. This interest is driven by the recent appreciation that these enzymes represent primary mechanisms for phosphoinositide degradation, and because of their ever-increasing connections with human diseases. Herein, we review the biochemical properties of six major phosphoinositide phosphatases, the functional involvements of these enzymes in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism, the pathologies that arise from functional derangements of individual phosphatases, and recent ideas concerning the involvements of phosphoinositide phosphatases in membrane traffic control. PMID:20043944

  1. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  2. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  3. TPIP: a novel phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S M; Downes, C P; Leslie, N R

    2001-01-01

    The PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) tumour suppressor is a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] 3-phosphatase that plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes by antagonizing the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway. We have identified and characterized two human homologues of PTEN, which differ with respect to their subcellular localization and lipid phosphatase activities. The previously cloned, but uncharacterized, TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology) is localized to the plasma membrane, but lacks detectable phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity. TPIP (TPTE and PTEN homologous inositol lipid phosphatase) is a novel phosphatase that occurs in several differentially spliced forms of which two, TPIP alpha and TPIP beta, appear to be functionally distinct. TPIP alpha displays similar phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity compared with PTEN against PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), PtdIns(3,5)P(2), PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3)P, has N-terminal transmembrane domains and appears to be localized on the endoplasmic reticulum. This is unusual as most signalling-lipid-metabolizing enzymes are not integral membrane proteins. TPIP beta, however, lacks detectable phosphatase activity and is cytosolic. TPIP has a wider tissue distribution than the testis-specific TPTE, with specific splice variants being expressed in testis, brain and stomach. TPTE and TPIP do not appear to be functional orthologues of the Golgi-localized and more distantly related murine PTEN2. We suggest that TPIP alpha plays a role in regulating phosphoinositide signalling on the endoplasmic reticulum, and might also represent a tumour suppressor and functional homologue of PTEN in some tissues. PMID:11716755

  4. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  5. Characterization of the major phosphofructokinase-dephosphorylating protein phosphatases from Ascaris suum muscle.

    PubMed

    Daum, G; Schmid, B; MacKintosh, C; Cohen, P; Hofer, H W

    1992-07-13

    In contrast to the mammalian enzyme, PFK from the nematode Ascaris suum is activated following phosphorylation (Daum et al. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 139, 215-221) catalyzed by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Thalhofer et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 952-957). In the present report, we describe the characterization of the major PFK dephosphorylating phosphatases from Ascaris muscle. Two of these phosphatases exhibit apparent M(r) values of 174,000 and 126,000, respectively, and are dissociated to active 33 kDa proteins by ethanol precipitation. Denaturing electrophoresis of each of the enzyme preparations showed two bands of M(r) 33,000 and 63,000. The enzymes are classified as type 2A phosphatases according to their inhibition by subnanomolar concentrations of okadaic acid, the lack of inhibition by heat-stable phosphatase inhibitors 1 and 2, and their preference for the alpha- rather than for the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase. Like other type 2A phosphatases, they exhibit broad substrate specificities, are activated by divalent cations and polycations, and inhibited by fluoride, inorganic phosphate and adenine nucleotides. In addition, we have found that PFK is also dephosphorylated by an unusual protein phosphatase. This exhibits kinetic properties similar to type 2A protein phosphatases, but has a distinctly lower sensitivity towards inhibition by okadaic acid (IC50 approx. 20 nM). Partial purification of the enzyme provided evidence that it is composed of a 30 kDa catalytic subunit and probably two other subunits (molecular masses 66 and 72 kDa). The dephosphorylation of PFK by protein phosphatases is strongly inhibited by heparin. This effect, however, is substrate-specific and does not occur with Ascaris phosphorylase a. PMID:1321672

  6. Ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Naz, Christophe; Marsh, Barrie J; Frost, Christopher G

    2015-01-11

    A novel ferrocene-derived substrate for the ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was designed and synthesised. It was demonstrated to be an excellent electrochemical substrate for the ALP-labelled enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  7. Multiple Functions of the Eya Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eyes absent (Eya), a protein conserved from plants to humans and best characterized as a transcriptional coactivator, is also the prototype for a novel class of eukaryotic aspartyl protein tyrosine phosphatases. This minireview discusses recent breakthroughs in elucidating the substrates and cellular events regulated by Eya's tyrosine phosphatase function and highlights some of the complexities, new questions, and surprises that have emerged from efforts to understand how Eya's unusual multifunctionality influences developmental regulation and signaling. PMID:26667035

  8. Phosphatase-mediated heavy metal accumulation by a Citrobacter sp. and related enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Macaskie, L E; Bonthrone, K M; Rouch, D A

    1994-08-15

    A Citrobacter sp. was reported previously to accumulate heavy metals as cell-bound heavy metal phosphates. Metal uptake is mediated by the activity of a periplasmic acid-type phosphatase that liberates inorganic phosphate to provide the precipitant ligand for heavy metals presented to the cells. Amino acid sequencing of peptide fragments of the purified enzyme revealed significant homology to the phoN product (acid phosphatase) of some other enterobacteria. These organisms, together with Klebsiella pneumoniae, previously reported to produce acid phosphatase, were tested for their ability to remove uranium and lanthanum from challenge solutions supplemented with phosphatase substrate. The coupling of phosphate liberation to metal bioaccumulation was limited to the metal accumulating Citrobacter sp.; therefore the participation of species-specific additional factors in metal bioaccumulation was suggested.

  9. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  10. Assessing the Biological Activity of the Glucan Phosphatase Laforin.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin's unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  11. Influence of protein tyrosine phosphatase gene (PTPN22) polymorphisms on rheumatic heart disease susceptibility in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, U; Mir, S S; Chauhan, T; Garg, N; Agarwal, S K; Pande, S; Mittal, B

    2014-11-01

    This study was aimed to assess the association of Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor22 (PTPN22) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) susceptibility in 400 RHD patients and 300 controls. The PTPN22 polymorphisms (rs2476601, rs1217406 and rs3789609) were genotyped using Taqman probes (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). Statistical analysis was performed by spss and haplotype analysis by snpstat. The frequencies of variant alleles were not different between controls and cases (rs2476601: 2.00% & 1.05%; rs1217406: 36.33% & 34.75%; and rs3789609: 38.17% & 40.00%, respectively]. However, G rs2476601 A rs1217406 T rs3789609 haplotype turned out to be a low risk factor for RHD (P = 0.0042) predisposition in females and adult patients. This study suggests PTPN22 haplotype may modulate the risk to RHD in North Indians.

  12. Uncoupling of 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase functions in budding yeast. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA 3'-phosphatase (TPP1).

    PubMed

    Vance, J R; Wilson, T E

    2001-05-01

    Polynucleotide kinase is a bifunctional enzyme containing both DNA 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase activities seemingly suited to the coupled repair of single-strand nicks in which the phosphate has remained with the 3'-base. We show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to repair transformed dephosphorylated linear plasmids by non-homologous end joining with considerable efficiency independently of the end-processing polymerase Pol4p. Homology searches and biochemical assays did not reveal a 5'-kinase that would account for this repair, however. Instead, open reading frame YMR156C (here named TPP1) is shown to encode only a polynucleotide kinase-type 3'-phosphatase. Tpp1p bears extensive similarity to the ancient L-2-halo-acid dehalogenase and DDDD phosphohydrolase superfamilies, but is specific for double-stranded DNA. It is present at high levels in cell extracts in a functional form and so does not represent a pseudogene. Moreover, the phosphatase-only nature of this gene is shared by Saccharomyces mikatae YMR156C and Arabidopsis thaliana K15M2.3. Repair of 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl lesions is thus uncoupled in budding yeast as compared with metazoans. Repair of transformed dephosphorylated plasmids, and 5'-hydroxyl blocking lesions more generally, likely proceeds by a cycle of base removal and resynthesis.

  13. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  14. Acid phosphatase/phosphotransferases from enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Y; Utagawa, T; Yamada, H; Asano, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the enzymatic phosphorylation of nucleosides and found that Morganella morganii phoC acid phosphatase exhibits regioselective pyrophosphate (PP(i))-nucleoside phosphotransferase activity. In this study, we isolated genes encoding an acid phosphatase with regioselective phosphotransferase activity (AP/PTase) from Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia blattae and Klebsiella planticola, and compared the primary structures and enzymatic characteristics of these enzymes with those of AP/PTase (PhoC acid phosphatase) from M. morganii. The enzymes were highly homologous in primary structure with M. morganii AP/PTase, and are classified as class A1 acid phosphatases. The synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) by E. coli overproducing each acid phosphatase was investigated. The P. stuartii enzyme, which is most closely related to the M. morganii enzyme, exhibited high 5'-IMP productivity, similar to the M. morganii enzyme. The 5'-IMP productivities of the E. aerogenes, E. blattae and K. planticola enzymes were inferior to those of the former two enzymes. This result underlines the importance of lower K(m) values for efficient nucleotide production. As these enzymes exhibited a very high degree of homology at the amino acid sequence level, it is likely that local sequence differences in the binding pocket are responsible for the differences in the nucleoside-PP(i) phosphotransferase reaction.

  15. Dairy products and the French paradox: Could alkaline phosphatases play a role?

    PubMed

    Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-01

    The French paradox - high saturated fat consumption but low incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality - is still unresolved and continues to be a matter of debate and controversy. Recently, it was hypothesised that the high consumption of dairy products, and especially cheese by the French population might contribute to the explanation of the French paradox, in addition to the "(red) wine" hypothesis. Most notably this would involve milk bioactive peptides and biomolecules from cheese moulds. Here, we support the "dairy products" hypothesis further by proposing the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis. First, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a potent endogenous anti-inflammatory enzyme, is directly stimulated by various components of milk (e.g. casein, calcium, lactose and even fat). This enzyme dephosphorylates and thus detoxifies pro-inflammatory microbial components like lipopolysaccharide, making them unable to trigger inflammatory responses and generate chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity, known risk factors for CVD. Various vitamins present in high amounts in dairy products (e.g. vitamins A and D; methyl-donors: folate and vitamin B12), and also fermentation products such as butyrate and propionate found e.g. in cheese, all stimulate intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Second, moulded cheeses like Roquefort contain fungi producing an alkaline phosphatase. Third, milk itself contains a tissue nonspecific isoform of alkaline phosphatase that may function as IAP. Milk alkaline phosphatase is present in raw milk and dairy products increasingly consumed in France. It is deactivated by pasteurization but it can partially reactivate after thermal treatment. Experimental consolidation of the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis will require further work including: systematic alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in dairy products, live dairy ferments and

  16. Dairy products and the French paradox: Could alkaline phosphatases play a role?

    PubMed

    Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-01

    The French paradox - high saturated fat consumption but low incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality - is still unresolved and continues to be a matter of debate and controversy. Recently, it was hypothesised that the high consumption of dairy products, and especially cheese by the French population might contribute to the explanation of the French paradox, in addition to the "(red) wine" hypothesis. Most notably this would involve milk bioactive peptides and biomolecules from cheese moulds. Here, we support the "dairy products" hypothesis further by proposing the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis. First, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a potent endogenous anti-inflammatory enzyme, is directly stimulated by various components of milk (e.g. casein, calcium, lactose and even fat). This enzyme dephosphorylates and thus detoxifies pro-inflammatory microbial components like lipopolysaccharide, making them unable to trigger inflammatory responses and generate chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity, known risk factors for CVD. Various vitamins present in high amounts in dairy products (e.g. vitamins A and D; methyl-donors: folate and vitamin B12), and also fermentation products such as butyrate and propionate found e.g. in cheese, all stimulate intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Second, moulded cheeses like Roquefort contain fungi producing an alkaline phosphatase. Third, milk itself contains a tissue nonspecific isoform of alkaline phosphatase that may function as IAP. Milk alkaline phosphatase is present in raw milk and dairy products increasingly consumed in France. It is deactivated by pasteurization but it can partially reactivate after thermal treatment. Experimental consolidation of the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis will require further work including: systematic alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in dairy products, live dairy ferments and

  17. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  18. Inhibition of sucrose phosphatase by sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. Partially purified sucrose phosphatase from immature stem tissue of sugarcane is inhibited by sucrose. The enzyme was also inhibited by maltose, melezitose and 6-kestose but not by eight other sugars, including glucose and fructose. 2. The relative effectiveness of sucrose, maltose and melezitose as inhibitors is different for sucrose phosphatase from different plants. 3. The inhibition of the sugar-cane enzyme by sucrose was shown to be partially competitive. The Ki for sucrose is about 10mm. 4. Melezitose is also a partially competitive inhibitor of the enzyme but the inhibition by maltose is probably mixed. 5. The possibility that sucrose controls both the rate of accumulation of sucrose in stems of sugar-cane and sucrose synthesis in leaves by inhibiting sucrose phosphatase is discussed. PMID:4291490

  19. A specific sucrose phosphatase from plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.; Hatch, M. D.

    1966-01-01

    1. A phosphatase that hydrolyses sucrose phosphate (phosphorylated at the 6-position of fructose) was isolated from sugar-cane stem and carrot roots. With partially purified preparations fructose 6-phosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate are hydrolysed at between 0 and 2% of the rate for sucrose phosphate. 2. The activity of the enzyme is increased fourfold by the addition of Mg2+ ions and inhibited by EDTA, fluoride, inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions. Sucrose (50mm) reduces activity by 60%. 3. The enzyme exhibits maximum activity between pH6·4 and 6·7. The Michaelis constant for sucrose phosphate is between 0·13 and 0·17mm. 4. At least some of the specific phosphatase is associated with particles having the sedimentation properties of mitochondria. 5. A similar phosphatase appears to be present in several other plant species. PMID:4290548

  20. Generic phosphatase activity detection using zinc mediated aggregation modulation of polypeptide-modified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selegård, Robert; Enander, Karin; Aili, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme. Phosphatase activity generates inorganic phosphate that forms an insoluble complex with Zn2+. In a sample containing a preset concentration of Zn2+, phosphatase activity will markedly reduce the concentration of dissolved Zn2+ from the original value, which in turn affects the aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a designed Zn2+ responsive polypeptide. The change in nanoparticle stability thus provides a rapid and sensitive readout of the phosphatase activity. The assay is not limited to a particular enzyme or enzyme substrate, which is demonstrated using three completely different phosphatases and five different substrates, and thus constitutes a highly interesting system for drug screening and diagnostics.A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  2. Light availability may control extracellular phosphatase production in turbid environments.

    PubMed

    Rychtecký, Pavel; Řeháková, Klára; Kozlíková, Eliška; Vrba, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular phosphatase production by phytoplankton was investigated in the moderately eutrophic Lipno reservoir, Czech Republic during 2009 and 2010. We hypothesized that production of extracellular phosphatases is an additional mechanism of phosphorus acquisition enabling producers to survive rather than to dominate the phytoplankton. Hence, we examined the relationship between light availability and phosphatase production, as light plays an important role in polymictic environments. Bulk phosphatase activity was measured using a common fluorometric assay, and the production of phosphatases was studied using the Fluorescently Labelled Enzyme Activity technique, which enabled direct microscopic detection of phosphatase-positive cells. In total, 29 taxa of phytoplankton were identified during both years. Only 17 taxa from the total number of 29 showed production of extracellular phosphatases. Species dominating the phytoplankton rarely produced extracellular phosphatases. In contrast, taxa exhibiting phosphatase activity were present in low biomass in the phytoplankton assemblage. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the proportion of phosphatase positive species in samples and the Z(eu):Z(mix) ratio (a proxy of light availability). A laboratory experiment with different light intensities confirmed the influence of light on production of phosphatases. Our seasonal study confirmed that extracellular phosphatase production is common in low-abundance populations but not in dominant taxa of the phytoplankton. It also suggested the importance of sufficient light conditions for the production of extracellular phosphatases.

  3. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  4. Cdi1, a human G1 and S phase protein phosphatase that associates with Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Gyuris, J; Golemis, E; Chertkov, H; Brent, R

    1993-11-19

    We used the interaction trap, a yeast genetic selection for interacting proteins, to isolate human cyclin-dependent kinase interactor 1 (Cdi1). In yeast, Cdi1 interacts with cyclin-dependent kinases, including human Cdc2, Cdk2, and Cdk3, but not with Ckd4. In HeLa cells, Cdi1 is expressed at the G1 to S transition, and the protein forms stable complexes with Cdk2. Cdi1 bears weak sequence similarity to known tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. In vitro, Cdi1 removes phosphate from tyrosine residues in model substrates, but a mutant protein that bears a lesion in the putative active site cysteine does not. Overexpression of wild-type Cdi1 delays progression through the cell cycle in yeast and HeLa cells; delay is dependent on Cdi1 phosphatase activity. These experiments identify Cdi1 as a novel type of protein phosphatase that forms complexes with cyclin-dependent kinases. PMID:8242750

  5. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  6. Phosphatase activities as biosignatures of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Itoh, Y.; Edazawa, Y.; Moroi, A.; Takano, Y.

    It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere high temperature hot springs and stratosphere Possible extraterrestrial biospheres in Mars Europa and Titan are being discussed Many biosignatures or biomarkers have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments Phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life since they are constituents of nucleic acids and cell mebranes Thus all the terrestrial organisms have phosphatases that are enzymes catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphate esters We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in extreme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life Core samples and chimney samples were collected at the Suiyo Seamount Izu-Bonin Arc the Pacific Ocean in 2001 and 2002 and in South Mariana hydrothermal systems the Pacific Oceanas in 2003 both in a part of the Archaean Park Project Phosphatase activity in solid rock samples was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate pH 8 0 or pH 6 5 as a substrate as follows Pulverized samples were incuvated with substrate solution for an hour and then production rate of p-nitrophenol was calculated with absorbance at 410 nm Phosphatase activity in extracts was measured fluorometrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratio were determined by HPLC after HF digestion of the

  7. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orphanet: Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (7 links) ... JY, Mansfield BC. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6PC) gene that cause type Ia glycogen ...

  8. Atomic structure of dual-specificity phosphatase 26, a novel p53 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lokareddy, Ravi Kumar; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Cingolani, Gino

    2013-02-01

    Regulation of p53 phosphorylation is critical to control its stability and biological activity. Dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a brain phosphatase highly overexpressed in neuroblastoma, which has been implicated in dephosphorylating phospho-Ser20 and phospho-Ser37 in the p53 transactivation domain. In this paper, we report the 1.68 Å crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (Cys152Ser) of DUSP26 lacking the first 60 N-terminal residues (ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26). This structure reveals the architecture of a dual-specificity phosphatase domain related in structure to Vaccinia virus VH1. DUSP26 adopts a closed conformation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-binding loop, which results in an unusually shallow active site pocket and buried catalytic cysteine. A water molecule trapped inside the PTP-binding loop makes close contacts both with main chain and with side chain atoms. The hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 measured from velocity sedimentation analysis (R(H) ∼ 22.7 Å) and gel filtration chromatography (R(H) ∼ 21.0 Å) is consistent with an ∼18 kDa globular monomeric protein. Instead in crystal, ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 is more elongated (R(H) ∼ 37.9 Å), likely because of the extended conformation of C-terminal helix α9, which swings away from the phosphatase core to generate a highly basic surface. As in the case of phosphatase MKP-4, we propose that a substrate-induced conformational change, possibly involving rearrangement of helix α9 with respect to the phosphatase core, allows DUSP26 to adopt a catalytically active conformation. The structural characterization of DUSP26 presented in this paper provides the first atomic insight into this disease-associated phosphatase.

  9. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    precipitation of U(VI) must be mediated by biological activity as less than 3% soluble U(VI) was removed either from the abiotic or the heat-killed cell controls. Interestingly, the pH has a strong effect on growth and U(VI) biomineralization rates by Rahnella. Thermodynamic modeling identifies autunite-type minerals [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2] as the precipitate likely formed in the synthetic FRC groundwater conditions at all pH investigated. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements have recently confirmed that the precipitate found in these incubations is an autunite and meta-autunite-type mineral. A kinetic model of U biomineralization at the different pH indicates that hydrolysis of organophosphate can be described using simple Monod kinetics and that uranium precipitation is accelerated when monohydrogen phosphate is the main orthophosphate species in solution. Overall, these experiments and ongoing soil slurry incubations demonstrate that the biomineralization of U(VI) through the activity of phosphatase enzymes can be expressed in a wide range of geochemical conditions pertaining to the FRC site.

  10. The microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, I D; Burchell, A

    1988-01-01

    Microsomal fractions isolated from pancreatic islet cells were shown to contain high specific glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The islet-cell glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme has the same Mr (36,500), similar immunological properties and kinetic characteristics to the hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2849415

  11. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  12. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  13. Stereochemistry of phospho group transfer catalyzed by a mutant alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Butler-Ransohoff, J.E.; Kendall, D.A.; Freeman, S.; Knowles, J.R.; Kaiser, E.T.

    1988-06-28

    The stereochemical course of the phospho group transfer catalyzed by mutant (S102C) alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli was investigated by using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transphosphorylation from 4-nitrophenyl (R/sub P/)-/sup 17/O, /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O)phosphate to (S)-propane-1,2-diol occurs with overall retention of configuration at phosphorus. This result is consistent with the view that the hydrolysis of substrates by this mutant enzyme proceeds by way of a covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate in the same manner as the wild-type alkaline phosphatase.

  14. [Appearance of phosphatase reticular cells in the spleen parenchyme of normal and tumor-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Catayée, G; Chalet, M

    1976-01-01

    The splenic mouse parenchyma presents 3 reticular cells types revealed by histo-enzymatic technics: the phagocytic cells show a strong phosphatasic acid activity, the endothelial cells possess a phosphatasic alcalin or adenosine-triphosphatasic reaction, the perithelial cells are 5' nucleotidasic. These different cells are distributed by forming specific topographic structures in the splenic tissue. The phosphatasic alcalin reticular cells seem to be, with their distribution, characteristic elements of mouse spleen. Indeed the modifications in tumoral animal interest chiefly this cell category. In this case, the reticular cells form a deep and large membrane between marginal zone and perivascular lymphoid sheath of the white pulp. These different reticular cells probably react for the defense system of the animal.

  15. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae.

  16. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae. PMID:16350755

  17. Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Neha; Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T; Kunze, G

    2007-08-01

    Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans was carried out in submerged fermentation. Using the Plackett-Burman design, three fermentation variables (pH, sucrose concentration, and peptone concentration) were identified to significantly affect acid phosphatase and biomass production, and these were optimized using response surface methodology of central composite design. The highest enzyme yields were attained in the medium with 3.9% sucrose and 1.6% peptone at pH 3.8. Because of optimization, 3.86- and 4.19-fold enhancement in enzyme production was achieved in shake flasks (17,054 U g(-1) DYB) and laboratory fermenter (18,465 U g(-1) DYB), respectively. PMID:17541580

  18. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  19. Reversible oxidation controls the activity and oligomeric state of the mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase AUM.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Annegrit; Bergeron, Alexandre; Boivin, Benoit; Gohla, Antje

    2016-08-01

    Redox-dependent switches of enzyme activity are emerging as important fine-tuning mechanisms in cell signaling. For example, protein tyrosine phosphatases employ a conserved cysteine residue for catalysis, which also renders them highly susceptible to reversible inactivation by oxidation. In contrast, haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-type phosphatases perform catalysis via a phosphoaspartyltransferase reaction. The potential regulation of HAD phosphatases by reversible oxidation has not yet been explored. Here, we investigate the redox-sensitivity of the HAD-type phosphoglycolate phosphatase PGP, also known as AUM or glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase. We show that recombinant, purified murine PGP is inhibited by oxidation and re-activated by reduction. We identify three reactive cysteine residues in the catalytic core domain of PGP (Cys35, Cys104 and Cys243) that mediate the reversible inhibition of PGP activity and the associated, redox-dependent conformational changes. Structural analysis suggests that Cys35 oxidation weakens van-der-Waals interactions with Thr67, a conserved catalytic residue required for substrate coordination. Cys104 and Cys243 form a redox-dependent disulfide bridge between the PGP catalytic core and cap domains, which may impair the open/close-dynamics of the catalytic cycle. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys297 in the PGP cap domain is essential for redox-dependent PGP oligomerization, and that PGP oxidation/oligomerization occurs in response to stimulation of cells with EGF. Finally, employing a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay, we show that cysteines of cellular PGP are transiently oxidized to sulfenic acids. Taken together, our findings establish that PGP, an aspartate-dependent HAD phosphatase, is transiently inactivated by reversible oxidation in cells.

  20. Reversible oxidation controls the activity and oligomeric state of the mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase AUM.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Annegrit; Bergeron, Alexandre; Boivin, Benoit; Gohla, Antje

    2016-08-01

    Redox-dependent switches of enzyme activity are emerging as important fine-tuning mechanisms in cell signaling. For example, protein tyrosine phosphatases employ a conserved cysteine residue for catalysis, which also renders them highly susceptible to reversible inactivation by oxidation. In contrast, haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-type phosphatases perform catalysis via a phosphoaspartyltransferase reaction. The potential regulation of HAD phosphatases by reversible oxidation has not yet been explored. Here, we investigate the redox-sensitivity of the HAD-type phosphoglycolate phosphatase PGP, also known as AUM or glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase. We show that recombinant, purified murine PGP is inhibited by oxidation and re-activated by reduction. We identify three reactive cysteine residues in the catalytic core domain of PGP (Cys35, Cys104 and Cys243) that mediate the reversible inhibition of PGP activity and the associated, redox-dependent conformational changes. Structural analysis suggests that Cys35 oxidation weakens van-der-Waals interactions with Thr67, a conserved catalytic residue required for substrate coordination. Cys104 and Cys243 form a redox-dependent disulfide bridge between the PGP catalytic core and cap domains, which may impair the open/close-dynamics of the catalytic cycle. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys297 in the PGP cap domain is essential for redox-dependent PGP oligomerization, and that PGP oxidation/oligomerization occurs in response to stimulation of cells with EGF. Finally, employing a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay, we show that cysteines of cellular PGP are transiently oxidized to sulfenic acids. Taken together, our findings establish that PGP, an aspartate-dependent HAD phosphatase, is transiently inactivated by reversible oxidation in cells. PMID:27179418

  1. Inhibition of lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase by benzofuran salicylic acids.

    PubMed

    Vang, Torkel; Xie, Yuli; Liu, Wallace H; Vidović, Dusica; Liu, Yidong; Wu, Shuangding; Smith, Deborah H; Rinderspacher, Alison; Chung, Caty; Gong, Gangli; Mustelin, Tomas; Landry, Donald W; Rickert, Robert C; Schürer, Stephan C; Deng, Shi-Xian; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-01-27

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp, PTPN22) is a critical negative regulator of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ptpn22 gene correlates with the incidence of various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Since the disease-associated allele is a more potent inhibitor of TCR signaling, specific Lyp inhibitors may become valuable in treating autoimmunity. Using a structure-based approach, we synthesized a library of 34 compounds that inhibited Lyp with IC(50) values between 0.27 and 6.2 μM. A reporter assay was employed to screen for compounds that enhanced TCR signaling in cells, and several inhibitors displayed a dose-dependent, activating effect. Subsequent probing for Lyp's direct physiological targets by immunoblot analysis confirmed the ability of the compounds to inhibit Lyp in T cells. Selectivity profiling against closely related tyrosine phosphatases and in silico docking studies with the crystal structure of Lyp yielded valuable information for the design of Lyp-specific compounds. PMID:21190368

  2. Regulatory Roles of MAPK Phosphatases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Low, Heng Boon

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of cell growth and survival in physiological and pathological processes. Aberrant MAPK signaling plays a critical role in the development and progression of human cancer, as well as in determining responses to cancer treatment. The MAPK phosphatases (MKPs), also known as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs), are a family of proteins that function as major negative regulators of MAPK activities in mammalian cells. Studies using mice deficient in specific MKPs including MKP1/DUSP1, PAC-1/DUSP2, MKP2/DUSP4, MKP5/DUSP10 and MKP7/DUSP16 demonstrated that these molecules are important not only for both innate and adaptive immune responses, but also for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the consequences of the gain or loss of function of the MKPs in normal and malignant tissues have highlighted the importance of these phosphatases in the pathogenesis of cancers. The involvement of the MKPs in resistance to cancer therapy has also gained prominence, making the MKPs a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the MKPs in cancer development, progression and treatment outcomes. PMID:27162525

  3. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  4. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  5. Acid Phosphatase Development during Ripening of Avocado.

    PubMed

    Sacher, J A

    1975-02-01

    The activity and subcellular distribution of acid phosphatase were assayed during ethylene-induced ripening of whole fruit or thick slices of avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Fuerte and Hass). The activity increased up to 30-fold during ripening in both the supernatant fraction and the Triton X-100 extract of the precipitate of a 30,000g centrifugation of tissue homogenates from whole fruit or slices ripening in moist air. Enzyme activity in the residual precipitate after Triton extraction remained constant. The development of acid phosphatase in thick slices ripened in moist air was similar to that in intact fruit, except that enzyme development and ripening were accelerated about 24 hours in the slices. The increase in enzyme activity that occurs in slices ripening in moist air was inhibited when tissue sections were infiltrated with solutions, by aspiration for 2 minutes or by soaking for 2 hours, anytime 22 hours or more after addition of ethylene. This inhibition was independent of the presence or absence of cycloheximide or sucrose (0.3-0.5m). However, the large decline in enzyme activity in the presence of cycloheximide, as compared with the controls, indicated that synthesis of acid phosphatase was occurring at all stages of ripening.

  6. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  7. Widespread presence of "bacterial-like" PPP phosphatases in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A

    2004-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes, PPP (protein phosphatase P) family is one of the two known protein phosphatase families specific for Ser and Thr. The role of PPP phosphatases in multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotic cell has been extensively studied. Unlike eukaryotic PPP phosphatases, bacterial members of the family have broad substrate specificity or may even be Tyr-specific. Moreover, one group of bacterial PPPs are diadenosine tetraphosphatases, indicating that bacterial PPP phosphatases may not necessarily function as protein phosphatases. Results We describe the presence in eukaryotes of three groups of expressed genes encoding "non-conventional" phosphatases of the PPP family. These enzymes are more closely related to bacterial PPP phosphatases than to the known eukaryotic members of the family. One group, found exclusively in land plants, is most closely related to PPP phosphatases from some α-Proteobacteria, including Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales and Rhodospirillaceae. This group is therefore termed Rhizobiales / Rhodobacterales / Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases, or Rhilphs. Phosphatases of the other group are found in Viridiplantae, Rhodophyta, Trypanosomatidae, Plasmodium and some fungi. They are structurally related to phosphatases from psychrophilic bacteria Shewanella and Colwellia, and are termed Shewanella-like phosphatases, or Shelphs. Phosphatases of the third group are distantly related to ApaH, bacterial diadenosine tetraphosphatases, and are termed ApaH-like phosphatases, or Alphs. Patchy distribution of Alphs in animals, plants, fungi, diatoms and kinetoplasts suggests that these phosphatases were present in the common ancestor of eukaryotes but were independently lost in many lineages. Rhilphs, Shelphs and Alphs form PPP clades, as divergent from "conventional" eukaryotic PPP phosphatases as they are from each other and from major bacterial clades. In addition, comparison of primary structures revealed a previously unrecognised (I

  8. Receptor and non-receptor mediated formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils of intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Manhart, N; Oismüller, C; Lassnig, A; Spittler, A; Sautner, T; Götzinger, P; Függer, R; Roth, E

    1998-11-27

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) has been implicated in tissue damage in a variety of disease states including sepsis and trauma. On the other hand, generation of ROI in polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) presents a crucial element in the defence of the host against invading microorganisms. In the present study we investigated the generation of superoxide anions (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by neutrophils (PMN)5 of 17 critically ill patients treated at a intensive care unit (ICU) after polytrauma (n = 6), heart operation (n = 6) or during septic shock (n = 5) using flow cytometry. O2- production of PMN from ICU patients was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than that in healthy volunteers (HV) during non-receptor mediated stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA) but higher (p < 0.001) during receptor mediated stimulation with formylmethionine-leucine-phenylalanine (FMLP). H2O2 generation of PMN from ICU patients was increased after stimulation with FMLP (p < 0.01) and remained unchanged after stimulation with PMA. Patients in septic shock had lower O2(-)-generation of PMN than did injured patients and patients after heart operations. We conclude that receptor mediated formation of O2- and H2O2 is stimulated in ICU patients. However, in patients in septic shock O2(-)-generation decreases, which potentially might contribute to the immunoparalysis present in septic shock.

  9. Probing Mechanistic Similarities between Response Regulator Signaling Proteins and Haloacid Dehalogenase Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Starbird, Chrystal A; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Response regulator signaling proteins and phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily share strikingly similar folds, active site geometries, and reaction chemistry. Proteins from both families catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from a substrate to one of their own aspartyl residues, and subsequent hydrolysis of the phosphoprotein. Notable differences include an additional Asp that functions as an acid/base catalyst and an active site well-structured prior to phosphorylation in HAD phosphatases. Both features contribute to reactions substantially faster than those for response regulators. To investigate mechanisms underlying the functional differences between response regulators and HAD phosphatases, we characterized five double mutants of the response regulator CheY designed to mimic HAD phosphatases. Each mutant contained the extra Asp paired with a phosphatase-inspired substitution to potentially position the Asp properly. Only CheY DR (Arg as the anchor) exhibited enhanced rates of both autophosphorylation with phosphoramidate and autodephosphorylation compared to those of wild-type CheY. Crystal structures of CheY DR complexed with MoO4(2-) or WO4(2-) revealed active site hydrogen bonding networks similar to those in HAD·substrate complexes, with the extra Asp positioned for direct interaction with the leaving group (phosphorylation) or nucleophile (dephosphorylation). However, CheY DR reaction kinetics did not exhibit the pH sensitivities expected for acid/base catalysis. Biochemical analysis indicated CheY DR had an enhanced propensity to adopt the active conformation without phosphorylation, but a crystal structure revealed unphosphorylated CheY DR was not locked in the active conformation. Thus, the enhanced reactivity of CheY DR reflected partial acquisition of catalytic and structural features of HAD phosphatases. PMID:25928369

  10. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor

  11. The influence of complexing pharmaceutical compositions on alkaline phosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2011-06-01

    It is established that the pharmaceutical compositions xydiphon, medifon, succimer, and EDTA, which are used as complexing agents for accelerating the excretion of heavy metals from human organism, at certain concentrations inhibit enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP). It is concluded that xydiphon and EDTA have a noticeable effect on AP activity at concentrations over 0.01 mM; medifon and succimer, at concentrations of over 0.3-0.5 mM. The enzyme's inhibition constants and type of inhibition are determined. Xydiphon is found to manifest the highest affinity to AP ( K I = 0.35 mM). It is shown by kinetic analysis that dissociative chemoinactivation of the enzyme takes place under the action of complexing agents. The corresponding kinetic parameters are calculated.

  12. Utilizing ultrafiltration to remove alkaline phosphatase from clinical analyzer water.

    PubMed

    Bôle, Julien; Mabic, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) conjugated to antibodies is often used in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). These assays are notably sensitive to experimental conditions. A possible source of interference is bacterial ALP, which is released when bacterial contamination occurs in clinical analyzers. Preliminary experiments led to the selection of a detection kit, ALP source, and specific types of tubes for collecting water samples and performing assays. The release of ALP from various strains of bacteria identified in pure water was demonstrated (10-30 x 10(6) cfu/mL released 6-10 microU/microL). It was shown that ultrafiltration is totally efficient in removing ALP from water, while residual ALP activity (2.21 microU/microL after filtration of an ALP solution of 6.22 microU/microL) was observed after filtration using a 0.22-mum filter.

  13. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  14. Effect of Bacteria and Amoebae on Rhizosphere Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gould, W. Douglas; Coleman, David C.; Rubink, Amy J.

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of various components of soil microflora and microfauna to rhizosphere phosphatase activity were determined with hydroponic cultures. Three treatments were employed: (i) plants alone (Bouteloua gracilis (H.B.K.) Lag. ex Steud.) (ii) plants plus bacteria (Pseudomonas sp.), and (iii) plants plus bacteria plus amoebae (Acanthamoeba sp.). No alkaline phosphatase was detected, but an appreciable amount of acid phosphatase activity (120 to 500 nmol of p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolyzed per h per plant) was found in the root culture solutions. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased the amount of acid phosphatase in solution, and properties of additional activity were identical to properties of plant acid phosphatase. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased both solution and root phosphatase activities at most initial phosphate concentrations. PMID:16345390

  15. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  16. Phosphatase specificity and pathway insulation in signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Michael A; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J

    2015-02-17

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase's substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A's adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  17. Utilization of alkaline phosphatase PhoA in the bioproduction of geraniol by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Rubing; Tian, Ning; Xu, Xin; Cao, Yujing; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol is a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol and has many applications in the perfume industries, pharmacy and others. It has been hypothesized that phosphatases can convert geranyl diphosphate (GPP) into geraniol. However, whether and which phosphatases can transform GPP to geraniol has remained unanswered up till now. In this paper, the catalysis abilities of 4 different types of phosphatases were studied with GPP as substrate in vitro. They are bifunctional diacylglycerol diphosphate phosphatase (DPP1) and lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (NudF) and alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) from Escherichia coli. The results show that just PhoA from E. coli can convert GPP into geraniol. Moreover, in order to confirm the ability of PhoA in vivo, the heterologous mevalonate pathway and geranyl diphosphate synthase gene from Abies grandis were co-overexpressed in E. coli with PhoA gene and 5.3 ± 0.2 mg/l geraniol was produced from glucose in flask-culture. Finally, we also evaluated the fed-batch fermentation of this engineered E. coli and a maximum concentration of 99.3 mg/l geraniol was produced while the conversion efficiency of glucose to geranoid (gram to gram) was 0.51%. Our results offer a new option for geraniol biosynthesis and promote the industrial bio-production of geraniol.

  18. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  19. Utilization of alkaline phosphatase PhoA in the bioproduction of geraniol by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Rubing; Tian, Ning; Xu, Xin; Cao, Yujing; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol is a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol and has many applications in the perfume industries, pharmacy and others. It has been hypothesized that phosphatases can convert geranyl diphosphate (GPP) into geraniol. However, whether and which phosphatases can transform GPP to geraniol has remained unanswered up till now. In this paper, the catalysis abilities of 4 different types of phosphatases were studied with GPP as substrate in vitro. They are bifunctional diacylglycerol diphosphate phosphatase (DPP1) and lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (NudF) and alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) from Escherichia coli. The results show that just PhoA from E. coli can convert GPP into geraniol. Moreover, in order to confirm the ability of PhoA in vivo, the heterologous mevalonate pathway and geranyl diphosphate synthase gene from Abies grandis were co-overexpressed in E. coli with PhoA gene and 5.3 ± 0.2 mg/l geraniol was produced from glucose in flask-culture. Finally, we also evaluated the fed-batch fermentation of this engineered E. coli and a maximum concentration of 99.3 mg/l geraniol was produced while the conversion efficiency of glucose to geranoid (gram to gram) was 0.51%. Our results offer a new option for geraniol biosynthesis and promote the industrial bio-production of geraniol. PMID:26091008

  20. Utilization of alkaline phosphatase PhoA in the bioproduction of geraniol by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Rubing; Tian, Ning; Xu, Xin; Cao, Yujing; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol is a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol and has many applications in the perfume industries, pharmacy and others. It has been hypothesized that phosphatases can convert geranyl diphosphate (GPP) into geraniol. However, whether and which phosphatases can transform GPP to geraniol has remained unanswered up till now. In this paper, the catalysis abilities of 4 different types of phosphatases were studied with GPP as substrate in vitro. They are bifunctional diacylglycerol diphosphate phosphatase (DPP1) and lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (NudF) and alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) from Escherichia coli. The results show that just PhoA from E. coli can convert GPP into geraniol. Moreover, in order to confirm the ability of PhoA in vivo, the heterologous mevalonate pathway and geranyl diphosphate synthase gene from Abies grandis were co-overexpressed in E. coli with PhoA gene and 5.3 ± 0.2 mg/l geraniol was produced from glucose in flask-culture. Finally, we also evaluated the fed-batch fermentation of this engineered E. coli and a maximum concentration of 99.3 mg/l geraniol was produced while the conversion efficiency of glucose to geranoid (gram to gram) was 0.51%. Our results offer a new option for geraniol biosynthesis and promote the industrial bio-production of geraniol. PMID:26091008

  1. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  2. Histochemical and electrophoretic studies on phosphatases of some Indian trematodes.

    PubMed

    Haque, M; Siddiqi, A H

    1982-06-01

    The isoenzymes of acid and alkaline phosphatases and their histochemical localization were studied by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis in four species of trematodes: Gigantocotyle explanatum from the liver and Gastrothylax crumenifer from the rumen of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciolopsis buski from the small intestine of the pig (Sus scrofa). Both acid and alkaline phosphatases were present in the tegument, gastrodermis, suckers, testes, ovary, eggs, vitellaria and uterus but alkaline phosphatase activity was demonstrated only in the parenchyma and excretory ducts. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed two to four isoenzymes for both acid and alkaline phosphatase.

  3. WIP1 phosphatase as a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Richter, Mark; Dayaram, Tajhal; Gilmartin, Aidan G; Ganji, Gopinath; Pemmasani, Sandhya Kiran; Van Der Key, Harjeet; Shohet, Jason M; Donehower, Lawrence A; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that negatively regulates multiple proteins involved in DNA damage response including p53, CHK2, Histone H2AX, and ATM, and it has been shown to be overexpressed or amplified in human cancers including breast and ovarian cancers. We examined WIP1 mRNA levels across multiple tumor types and found the highest levels in breast cancer, leukemia, medulloblastoma and neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is an exclusively TP53 wild type tumor at diagnosis and inhibition of p53 is required for tumorigenesis. Neuroblastomas in particular have previously been shown to have 17q amplification, harboring the WIP1 (PPM1D) gene and associated with poor clinical outcome. We therefore sought to determine whether inhibiting WIP1 with a selective antagonist, GSK2830371, can attenuate neuroblastoma cell growth through reactivation of p53 mediated tumor suppression. Neuroblastoma cell lines with wild-type TP53 alleles were highly sensitive to GSK2830371 treatment, while cell lines with mutant TP53 were resistant to GSK2830371. The majority of tested neuroblastoma cell lines with copy number gains of the PPM1D locus were also TP53 wild-type and sensitive to GSK2830371A; in contrast cell lines with no copy gain of PPM1D were mixed in their sensitivity to WIP1 inhibition, with the primary determinant being TP53 mutational status. Since WIP1 is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and drugs used in neuroblastoma treatment induce apoptosis through DNA damage, we sought to determine whether GSK2830371 could act synergistically with standard of care chemotherapeutics. Treatment of wild-type TP53 neuroblastoma cell lines with both GSK2830371 and either doxorubicin or carboplatin resulted in enhanced cell death, mediated through caspase 3/7 induction, as compared to either agent alone. Our data suggests that WIP1 inhibition represents a novel therapeutic approach to neuroblastoma that could be integrated with

  4. NUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN RAT CARDIAC MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    ESSNER, E; NOVIKOFF, A B; QUINTANA, N

    1965-05-01

    Localizations of aldehyde-resistant nucleoside phosphatase activities in frozen sections of rat cardiac muscle have been studied by electron microscopy. Activities are higher after fixation with formaldehyde than with glutaraldehyde. After incubation with adenosine triphosphate or inosine diphosphate at pH 7.2, reaction product is found in the "terminal cisternae" or "transverse sacs" of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which, together with the "intermediary vesicles" (T system), constitute the "dyads" or "triads". Reaction product is also present at the membranes of micropinocytotic vacuoles which apparently form from the plasma membrane of capillary endothelial cells and from the sarcolemma. In certain regions of the intercalated discs, reaction product is found within the narrow spaces between sarcolemmas of adjacent cells and within micropinocytotic vacuoles that seem to form from the sarcolemma. With inosine diphosphate, reaction product is also found in other parts of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After incubation with cytidine monophosphate at pH 5, reaction product is present in the transverse sacs of sarcoplasmic reticulum, in micropinocytotic vacuoles in capillary endothelium, and in lysosomes of muscle fibers and capillaries. The possible significance of the sarcoplasmic reticulum phosphatases is discussed in relation to the role the reticulum probably plays in moving calcium ions and thereby controlling contraction and relaxation of the muscle fiber.

  5. Evaluating transition state structures of vanadium-phosphatase protein complexes using shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lombardo, Irma; Alvarez, Santiago; McLauchlan, Craig C; Crans, Debbie C

    2015-06-01

    Shape analysis of coordination complexes is well-suited to evaluate the subtle distortions in the trigonal bipyramidal (TBPY-5) geometry of vanadium coordinated in the active site of phosphatases and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Recent studies using the tau (τ) analysis support the assertion that vanadium is best described as a trigonal bipyramid, because this geometry is the ideal transition state geometry of the phosphate ester substrate hydrolysis (C.C. McLauchlan, B.J. Peters, G.R. Willsky, D.C. Crans, Coord. Chem. Rev. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.12.012 ; D.C. Crans, M.L. Tarlton, C.C. McLauchlan, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 4450-4468). Here we use continuous shape measures (CShM) analysis to investigate the structural space of the five-coordinate vanadium-phosphatase complexes associated with mechanistic transformations between the tetrahedral geometry and the five-coordinate high energy TBPY-5 geometry was discussed focusing on the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme. No evidence for square pyramidal geometries was observed in any vanadium-protein complexes. The shape analysis positioned the metal ion and the ligands in the active site reflecting the mechanism of the cleavage of the organic phosphate in a phosphatase. We identified the umbrella distortions to be directly on the reaction path between tetrahedral phosphate and the TBPY-5-types of high-energy species. The umbrella distortions of the trigonal bipyramid are therefore identified as being the most relevant types of transition state structures for the phosphoryl group transfer reactions for phosphatases and this may be related to the possibility that vanadium is an inhibitor for enzymes that support both exploded and five-coordinate transition states.

  6. Purification and characterization of a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase in an anoxia tolerant animal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1996-05-01

    A protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase (PK) in vitro was purified and characterized from the foot muscle of the anoxia tolerant gastropod mollusc Busycon canaliculatum. Purification involved three steps: negative chromatography through Blue Dextran and CM Sephadex, affinity chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and gel exclusion chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. Pyruvate kinase phosphatase (PK-Pase) activity was monitored by following changes in PK I50 values for L-alanine that had previously been linked to changes in the degree of PK phosphorylation. The purified PK-Pase gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 41 +/- 1 kdaltons. Isoelectric focusing analysis showed that the PK-Pase had an isoelectric point of 4.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme was a Type 2C protein phosphatase with a pH optimum of 6.5. Maximal activity required the presence of magnesium ions (KM = 7.9 +/- 0.6 microM) although high concentrations of Mg2+ were inhibitory (I50 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 mM). The protein phosphatase activity was not affected by either spermine, cAMP, cGMP, potassium phosphate, tartrate, NaF, HgCl2, citrate or concentrations of CaCl2 less than 10 mM. The enzyme could also use ATP, ADP, and GTP as substrates. PMID:8739044

  7. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  8. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  9. Mechanistic Insights into Glucan Phosphatase Activity against Polyglucan Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Meekins, David A.; Raththagala, Madushi; Auger, Kyle D.; Turner, Benjamin D.; Santelia, Diana; Kötting, Oliver; Gentry, Matthew S.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are central to the regulation of starch and glycogen metabolism. Plants contain two known glucan phosphatases, Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), which dephosphorylate starch. Starch is water-insoluble and reversible phosphorylation solubilizes its outer surface allowing processive degradation. Vertebrates contain a single known glucan phosphatase, laforin, that dephosphorylates glycogen. In the absence of laforin, water-soluble glycogen becomes insoluble, leading to the neurodegenerative disorder Lafora Disease. Because of their essential role in starch and glycogen metabolism glucan phosphatases are of significant interest, yet a comparative analysis of their activities against diverse glucan substrates has not been established. We identify active site residues required for specific glucan dephosphorylation, defining a glucan phosphatase signature motif (CζAGΨGR) in the active site loop. We further explore the basis for phosphate position-specific activity of these enzymes and determine that their diverse phosphate position-specific activity is governed by the phosphatase domain. In addition, we find key differences in glucan phosphatase activity toward soluble and insoluble polyglucan substrates, resulting from the participation of ancillary glucan-binding domains. Together, these data provide fundamental insights into the specific activity of glucan phosphatases against diverse polyglucan substrates. PMID:26231210

  10. Extracellular phosphatases of Chlamydomonas reinhardi and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Patni, N J; Dhawale, S W; Aaronson, S

    1977-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardi, cultured under normal growth conditions, secreted significant amounts of protein and carbohydrates but not lipids or nucleic acids. A fivefold increase in light intensity led to a tenfold increase in secreted protein and carbohydrate. Among the proteins secreted was acid phosphatase with a pH optimum at 4.8 like the enzyme in the cells. Phosphorus depleted algae grown on minimal orthophosphate contained and secreted both acid and alkaline phosphatase. The pH optimum of the intracellular alkaline phosphatase was 9.2. When phosphorus-depleted cells were grown with increasing orthophosphate, intra- and extracellular alkaline phosphatase was almost completely repressed and intra- and extracellular acid phosphatase was partially repressed. Extracellular acid and alkaline phosphatase increased with the age of the culture. Electrophoresis indicated only one acid and one alkaline phosphatase in phosphorus-satisfied and phosphorus-depleted cells. Chlamydomonas cells suspended in an inorganic salt solution secreted only acid phosphatase; the absence of any extr-cellular cytoplasmic marker enzyme indicated that there was little, if any, autolysis to account for the extracellular acid enzyme. Phosphorus-depleted cells were able to grow on organic phosphates as the sole source of orthophosphate. Ribose-5-phosphate was the best for cell multiplication, and its utility was shown to be due to the cell's ability to use the ribose as well as the orthophosphatase for cell multiplication.

  11. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  12. Penicillin inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Hussein, Waleed M; Ul Islam, Nazar; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2012-04-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have a multitude of biological functions and are found in fungi, bacteria, plants and animals. In mammals, PAP activity is linked with bone resorption and over-expression can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis. PAP is therefore an attractive target for the development of drugs to treat this disease. A series of penicillin conjugates, in which 6-aminopenicillanic acid was acylated with aromatic acid chlorides, has been prepared and assayed against pig PAP. The binding mode of most of these conjugates is purely competitive, and some members of this class have potencies comparable to the best PAP inhibitors yet reported. The structurally related penicillin G was shown to be neither an inhibitor nor a substrate for pig PAP. Molecular modelling has been used to examine the binding modes of these compounds in the active site of the enzyme and to rationalise their activities.

  13. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Biesterveld, Ben E.; Koehler, Shannon M.; Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R.; Gourlay, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. Materials and methods NEC was induced in Sprague–Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. Results NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). Conclusions This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. PMID:25840489

  14. Ozone inhalation in rats: effects on alkaline phosphatase and lactic dehydrogenase isoenzymes in lavage and plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtman, J.P.; Moon, H.L.; Miles, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    Ozone is found in urban and rural atmospheres and is produced from a variety of natural and man-made sources. Animal studies conducted at typical ambient levels result in reproducible morphological, biochemical and functional effects. Ozone damages type I epithelial cells, induces proliferation of type II cells and produces inflammation of the terminal bronchiolar-alveolar duct region. Ozone increases lung oxygen utilization and increases glutathione metabolism. Ozone increases airway resistance. The authors measured lactic dehydrogenase (LD) isoenzymes to ascertain the tissue giving rise to the increased LD activity in lavage. They also assayed acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase activities, and protein levels since these parameters were increased in rat lung lavage after particulate exposure. They determined white cell differential and red cell morphology parameters because previous investigators reported that ozone increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio.

  15. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  16. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  17. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  18. Resistance of leishmanial phosphatases to inactivation by oxygen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Saha, A K; Das, S; Glew, R H; Gottlieb, M

    1985-09-01

    Leishmania donovani promastigotes produce large quantities of two distinct acid phosphatases; a tartrate-resistant enzyme is localized to the external surface of the plasma membrane, and a tartrate-sensitive enzyme is secreted into the growth medium. It was shown previously that preincubation of human neutrophils and macrophages with the tartrate-resistant phosphatase markedly reduced the ability of these host cells to produce superoxide anions in response to stimulation with the activator formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The possibility that the cell surface acid phosphatase or the phosphatase that is secreted into the extracellular fluid might compromise other host cell functions, especially intracellular ones, depends on the ability of the enzyme to resist exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite) generated by phagocytic cells. In the present report, we show that both leishmanial acid phosphatases were relatively resistant to inactivation by oxygen metabolites. At pH 5.5, the activity of the tartrate-resistant phosphatase was reduced 50% by incubation for 1 h with each of the following: 30 mM O2-, 500 mM hydrogen peroxide, and 6 mM hypochlorite ion. These concentrations are many fold greater than the concentrations of these substances that are generated by stimulated polymorphonuclear phagocytes. The tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase differed markedly from the tartrate-resistant phosphatase in that the former was essentially insensitive to even very high concentrations of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, 50% inactivation of the tartrate-sensitive leishmanial phosphatase required exposure to 35 mM hypochlorite for 30 min. These results indicate that the catalytic potential of these two leishmanial acid phosphatases probably survives exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites generated by neutrophils and macrophages.

  19. Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 by Protein Kinase C*s

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Nairn, Angus C.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr35. Moreover, Ser67 of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser65 in vitro. In contrast, Ser67 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser65. Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser65 and Ser67, but not Ser65 alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser67 protects phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser65 and/or Ser67 did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser67 and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:16772299

  20. Novel monofunctional histidinol-phosphate phosphatase of the DDDD superfamily of phosphohydrolases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Cho, Yona; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2008-04-01

    The TON_0887 gene was identified as the missing histidinol-phosphate phosphatase (HolPase) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon "Thermococcus onnurineus" NA1. The protein contained conserved motifs of the DDDD superfamily of phosphohydrolase, and the recombinantly expressed protein exhibited strong HolPase activity. In this study, we functionally assessed for the first time the monofunctional DDDD-type HolPase, which is organized in the gene cluster.

  1. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  2. Elevation of serum acid phosphatase in cancers with bone metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Tavassoli, M.; Rizo, M.; Yam, L.T.

    1980-05-01

    In patients with nonprostatic cancer, serum acid phosphatase activity is usually elevated when bone metastasis is present but not when bone metastasis is absent. The fraction responsible for serum enzyme elevation is a normal component of serum; it appears in gel electrophoresis as band 5; and is tartrate-resistant. It is suggested that the origin of acid phosphatase elevation is bone osteoclasts rather than cancer tissue, as is the case with prostatic carcinoma. Determination of serum acid phosphatase activity may be useful in the detection of bone metastasis.

  3. Attenuation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphatase activity in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Belandia, B; Brautigan, D; Martín-Pérez, J

    1994-01-01

    In chicken embryo fibroblasts, phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 increases during G1 but returns to basal level by mitosis. In contrast, in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts, S6 remains highly phosphorylated throughout mitosis. This study investigated the mechanism by which RSV alters the pattern of S6 phosphorylation. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that phosphate turnover in S6 is rapid in normal cells and in cells infected with an RSV transformation-defective virus. In contrast, phosphate turnover in S6 is severely reduced in cells infected with temperature-sensitive RSV at a temperature permissive for transformation, indicating a diminished S6 phosphatase activity. Fractionation of cell lysates by DEAE chromatography showed an almost threefold lower S6 phosphatase activity in RSV-transformed versus normal cells. The S6 phosphatase was sensitive to inhibitor 2 and specifically recognized by an antibody to type 1 phosphatase (PP1). The S6 phosphatase activity recovered by immunoprecipitation of PP1 was threefold lower in transformed cells, but the steady-state level of expression and the rate of synthesis of PP1 were not altered by oncogenic transformation. Together, the results show that transformation by RSV reduced the S6-PP1 activity. Images PMID:8264587

  4. Timely Degradation of Wip1 Phosphatase by APC/C Activator Protein Cdh1 is Necessary for Normal Mitotic Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Gil, Na-Yeon; Lee, Ho-Soo; Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, Kyungtae; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Wip1 belongs to the protein phosphatase C (PP2C) family, of which expression is up-regulated by a number of external stresses, and serves as a stress modulator in normal physiological conditions. When overexpressed, premature dephosphorylation of stress-mediators by Wip1 results in abrogation of tumor surveillance, thus Wip1 acts as an oncogene. Previously, the functional regulation of Wip1 in cell-cycle progression by counteracting cellular G1 and G2/M checkpoint activity in response to DNA damage was reported. However, other than in stress conditions, the function and regulatory mechanism of Wip1 has not been fully determined. Herein, we demonstrated that protein regulation of Wip1 occurs in a cell cycle-dependent manner, which is directly governed by APC/C(Cdh1) at the end of mitosis. In particular, we also showed evidence that Wip1 phosphatase activity is closely associated with its own protein stability, suggesting that reduced phosphatase activity of Wip1 during mitosis could trigger its degradation. Furthermore, to verify the physiological role of its phosphatase activity during mitosis, we established doxycycline-inducible cell models, including a Wip1 wild type (WT) and phosphatase dead mutant (Wip1 DA). When ectopically expressing Wip1 WT, we observed a delay in the transition from metaphase to anaphase. In conclusion, these studies show that mitotic degradation of Wip1 by APC/C(Cdh1) is important for normal mitotic progression.

  5. Expression of a human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in transfected cells: Use as a reporter for studies of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.; Zervos, P.; Raducha, M.; Harris, H.; Kadesch, T.

    1988-09-01

    The human placental alkaline phosphatase gene has been cloned and reintroduced into mammalian cells. When a plasmid carrying the gene under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter (pSV2Apap) is transfected into a variety of different cell types, placental alkaline phosphatase activity can readily be detected by using whole cell suspensions or cell lysates. Alkaline phosphatase activity can also be visualized directly in individual transfected cells by histochemical staining. The gene is appropriate for use as a reporter in studies of gene regulation since its expression is dependent on the presence of exogenous transcription control elements. The overall assay to detect the expression of the gene is quantitative, very rapid, and inexpensive. Cotransfections of cells with pSV2Apap and a related plasmid carrying the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (pSV2Acat) indicate that transcription of these two genes is detected with roughly the same sensitivity.

  6. A novel and essential mechanism determining specificity and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Thomas; Lackner, Daniel H; Hombauer, Hans; Piribauer, Patrick; Mudrak, Ingrid; Zaragoza, Katrin; Juno, Claudia; Ogris, Egon

    2003-09-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an essential intracellular serine/threonine phosphatase containing a catalytic subunit that possesses the potential to dephosphorylate promiscuously tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates in vitro. How PP2A acquires its intracellular specificity and activity for serine/threonine-phosphorylated substrates is unknown. Here we report a novel and phylogenetically conserved mechanism to generate active phospho-serine/threonine-specific PP2A in vivo. Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), a protein of so far unknown intracellular function, is required for the biogenesis of active and specific PP2A. Deletion of the yeast PTPA homologs generated a PP2A catalytic subunit with a conformation different from the wild-type enzyme, as indicated by its altered substrate specificity, reduced protein stability, and metal dependence. Complementation and RNA-interference experiments showed that PTPA fulfills an essential function conserved from yeast to man.

  7. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  8. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to model major aspects of development and disease as well as the mechanism of regeneration of limbs and vital organs, and most classical PTPs have been identified in zebrafish. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for biomedical research because the genome is sequenced, zebrafish produce a large number of offspring, the eggs develop outside the mother and are transparent, facilitating intravital imaging, and transgenesis and (site-directed) mutagenesis are feasible. Together, these traits make zebrafish amenable for the analysis of gene and protein function. In this chapter we cover three manipulations of zebrafish embryos that we have used to study the effects of PTPs in development, regeneration, and biochemistry. Microinjection at the one-cell stage is at the basis of many zebrafish experiments and is described first. This is followed by a description for measuring regeneration of the embryonic caudal fin, a powerful and robust physiological assay. Finally, the considerable but manageable troubleshooting of several complications associated with preparing zebrafish embryos for immunoblotting is explained. Overall, this chapter provides detailed protocols for manipulating zebrafish embryo samples with a compilation of tips collected through extensive experience from the zebrafish research community. PMID:27514815

  9. Mutational spectra of PTEN/MMAC1 gene: a tumor suppressor with lipid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, I U; Schriml, L M; Dean, M

    1999-11-17

    PTEN/MMAC1 (phosphatase, tensin homologue/mutated in multiple advanced cancers) is a tumor suppressor protein that has sequence homology with dual-specificity phosphatases, which are capable of dephosphorylating both tyrosine phosphate and serine/threonine phosphate residues on proteins. The in vivo function of PTEN/MMAC1 appears to be dephosphorylation of phosphotidylinositol 3,4, 5-triphosphate. The PTEN/MMAC1 gene is mutated in the germline of patients with rare autosomal dominant cancer syndromes and in subsets of specific cancers. Here we review the mutational spectra of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene in tumors from various tissues, especially endometrium, brain, prostate, and ovary, in which the gene is inactivated very frequently. Germline and somatic mutations in the PTEN/MMAC1 gene occur mostly in the protein coding region and involve the phosphatase domain and poly(A)(6) stretches. Compared with germline alterations found in the PTEN/MMAC1 gene, there is a substantially increased frequency of frameshift mutations in tumors. Glioblastomas and endometrial carcinomas appear to have distinct mutational spectra, probably reflecting differences in the underlying mechanisms of inactivation of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene in the two tissue types. Also, depending on the tissue type, the gene appears to be involved in the initiation or the progression of cancers. Further understanding of PTEN/MMAC1 gene mutations in different tumors and the physiologic consequences of these mutations is likely to open up new therapeutic opportunities for targeting this critical gene.

  10. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  11. Molecular Mimicry Regulates ABA Signaling by SnRK2 Kinases and PP2C Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tan, M.H. Eileen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; He, Yuanzheng; Xu, Yong; Chalmers, Michael J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhang, Huiming; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Cutler, Sean; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-10-02

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.

  12. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  13. Molecular Mimicry Regulates ABA Signaling by SnRK2 Kinases and PP2C Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; He, Yuanzheng; Xu, Yong; Chalmers, Michael J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhang, Huiming; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Cutler, Sean; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites. PMID:22116026

  14. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  15. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  16. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  17. A high-throughput screening for phosphatases using specific substrates.

    PubMed

    Senn, Alejandro M; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2005-04-01

    A high-throughput screening was developed for the detection of phosphatase activity in bacterial colonies. Unlike other methods, the current procedure can be applied to any phosphatase because it uses physiological substrates and detects the compelled product of all phosphatase reactions, that is, orthophosphate. In this method, substrates diffuse from a filter paper across a nitrocellulose membrane to bacterial colonies situated on the opposite face, and then reaction products flow back to the paper. Finally, a colorimetric reagent discloses the presence of orthophosphate in the filter paper. We validated the performance of this assay with several substrates and experimental conditions and with different phosphatases, including a library of randomly mutagenized rapeseed chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This procedure could be extended to other enzymatic activities provided that an appropriate detection of reaction products is available.

  18. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  19. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  20. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  1. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  2. Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue: Novel Regulation by Developmental Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jerde, Travis J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a critical cell endogenous inhibitor of phosphoinositide signaling in mammalian cells. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphoinositide trisphosphate (PIP3), and by so doing PTEN has the function of negative regulation of Akt, thereby inhibiting this key intracellular signal transduction pathway. In numerous cell types, PTEN loss-of-function mutations result in unopposed Akt signaling, producing numerous effects on cells. Numerous reports exist regarding mutations in PTEN leading to unregulated Akt and human disease, most notably cancer. However, less is commonly known about nonmutational regulation of PTEN. This review focuses on an emerging literature on the regulation of PTEN at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. Specifically, a focus is placed on the role developmental signaling pathways play in PTEN regulation; this includes insulin-like growth factor, NOTCH, transforming growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, wnt, and hedgehog signaling. The regulation of PTEN by developmental mediators affects critical biological processes including neuronal and organ development, stem cell maintenance, cell cycle regulation, inflammation, response to hypoxia, repair and recovery, and cell death and survival. Perturbations of PTEN regulation consequently lead to human diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes, developmental abnormalities, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. PMID:26339505

  3. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  4. Protein phosphatase 1 is a key player in nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sandra; Santos, Mariana; Martins, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2015-12-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation at serine (Ser), threonine (Thr) and tyrosine (Tyr) residues is among the major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. The eukaryotic genome encodes many protein kinases and protein phosphatases. However, the localization, activity and specificity towards phosphatase substrates are dictated by a large array of phosphatase binding and regulatory subunits. For protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) more than 200 binding subunits have been described. The various PP1 isoforms and the binding subunits can be located throughout the cell, including in the nucleus. It follows that several nuclear specific PP1 binding proteins (PIPs) have been described and these will be discussed. Among them are PNUTS (phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit), NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1) and CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), which have all been associated with transcription. In fact PP1 can associate with transcription factors fulfilling an important regulatory function, in this respect it can bind to Hox11, human factor C1 (HCF1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2). PP1 also regulates cell cycle progression and centrosome maturation and splitting, again by binding to specific regulatory proteins. Moreover, PP1 together with other protein phosphatases control the entry into mitosis by regulating the activity of mitotic kinases. Thus, PP1, its binding proteins and/or the phosphorylation states of both, directly control a vast array of cell nucleus associated functions, many of which are starting to be unraveled.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a neutral phosphatase from wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    A neutral phosphatase was purified to homogeneity from wheat seedlings. The enzyme was a monomeric glycoprotein exhibiting a molecular weight of 35,000, frictional ratio of 1.22, Stokes' radius of 26 A, and sedimentation coefficient of 3.2 S. That the enzyme was a glycoprotein was surmised from its chromatographic property on Concanavalin A-Sepharose column. The phosphatase activity was assayed using either fructose-2,6-bisphosphate or p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate. The phosphatase activity was not affected by high concentrations of chelating agents and did not require the addition of Mg{sup +2} or Ca{sup +2} for its activity. Molybdate, orthovanadate, Zn{sup +2}, and Hg{sup +2} were all potent inhibitors of the phosphatase activity. The inhibition by Hg{sup +2} was reversed by dithiothreitol. The enzyme activity was stimulated by Mn{sup +2} about 2-fold. On the other hand, 3-phosphoglycerate, fructose-6-P and Pi as well as polyamines inhibited the enzyme activity. The ability of the neutral phosphatase to dephosphorylate protein phosphotyrosine was also investigated. The phosphotyrosyl-substrates, such as ({sup 32}P) phosphotyrosyl-poly(Glu, Tyr)n, -alkylated bovine serum albumin, -angiotensin-1, and -band 3 of erythrocytes, were all substrates of the phosphatase. On the other hand, the enzyme had no activity toward protein phosphoserine and protein phosphothreonine.

  6. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  7. Structural elucidation of the NADP(H) phosphatase activity of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirudha; Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    NADP(H)/NAD(H) homeostasis has long been identified to play a pivotal role in the mitigation of reactive oxygen stress (ROS) in the intracellular milieu and is therefore critical for the progression and pathogenesis of many diseases. NAD(H) kinases and NADP(H) phosphatases are two key players in this pathway. Despite structural evidence demonstrating the existence and mode of action of NAD(H) kinases, the specific annotation and the mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatases remains obscure. Here, structural evidence supporting the alternative role of inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) as an NADP(H) phosphatase is reported. Crystal structures of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase (SaIMPase-I) in complex with the substrates D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate and NADP(+) have been solved. The structure of the SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-NADP(+) ternary complex reveals the catalytic mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatase. Moreover, structures of SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-substrate complexes have reinforced the earlier proposal that the length of the active-site-distant helix α4 and its preceding loop are the predisposing factors for the promiscuous substrate specificity of SaIMPase-I. Altogether, the evidence presented suggests that IMPase-family enzymes with a shorter α4 helix could be potential candidates for previously unreported NADP(H) phosphatase activity.

  8. Chemiluminescence-based pesticide biosensor utilizing the intelligent evolved properties of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, M.; Kamtekar, S.; Pande, R.; Marx, K.; Kumar, J.

    1994-12-31

    A methodology is described for immobilizing the enzyme alkaline phosphatase onto a glass surface using a novel biotinylated copolymer, poly(3-undecylthiophene-co-3- methanoithiophene). A streptavidin conjugate of alkaline phosphatase is used in this study. The biotinylated polymer is attached to the silanized glass surface via hydrophobic interactions and the enzyme is interfaced with the polymer through the classical biotin- streptavidin interaction. Alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of a macrocyclic compound, chloro-3-(4-methoxy spiro) (1,2 dioxetane-3-2`-tricyclo-) (3.3.1.1 )-(decani-4-yl) phenyl phosphate, to a species which emits energy by chemiluminescence. This chemiluminescence signal can be detected with a photomultiplier tube for enzymatic catalysis with the biocatalyst both in solution and immobilized on a glass surface. The signal generation is inhibited by the organophosphorus based insecticides such as paraoxon as well as nerve agents. We demonstrate in this study that a number of organophosphorus based insecticides inhibit the enzyme-mediated generation of chemiluminescence signal. This is true for the enzyme conjugate both free in solution and immobilized on a glass surface. In solution, the inhibition resembles the case of a partially uncompetitive system. By this type of inhibition we are able to detect pesticides down to about 50 ppb for the enzyme in solution. The pesticide detection limit of immobilized enzyme is currently being investigated. The enzyme is capable of a number of measurement cycles without significant loss of signal level.

  9. Drosophila Dullard functions as a Mad phosphatase to terminate BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Hugo; Aleman, Abigail; Eivers, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that provide essential signals for normal embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A key step in initiating BMP signaling is ligand induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads (R-Smads) by type I receptor kinases, while linker phosphorylation of R-Smads has been shown to cause BMP signal termination. Here we present data demonstrating that the phosphatase Dullard is involved in dephosphorylating the Drosophila R-Smad, Mad, and is integral in controlling BMP signal duration. We show that a hypomorphic Dullard allele or Dullard knockdown leads to increased Mad phosphorylation levels, while Dullard overexpression resulted in reduced Mad phosphorylations. Co-immunoprecipitation binding assays demonstrate phosphorylated Mad and Dullard physically interact, while mutation of Dullard's phosphatase domain still allowed Mad-Dullard interactions but abolished its ability to regulate Mad phosphorylations. Finally, we demonstrate that linker and C-terminally phosphorylated Mad can be regulated by one of two terminating mechanisms, degradation by proteasomes or dephosphorylation by the phosphatase Dullard. PMID:27578171

  10. Drosophila Dullard functions as a Mad phosphatase to terminate BMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia, Hugo; Aleman, Abigail; Eivers, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that provide essential signals for normal embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A key step in initiating BMP signaling is ligand induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads (R-Smads) by type I receptor kinases, while linker phosphorylation of R-Smads has been shown to cause BMP signal termination. Here we present data demonstrating that the phosphatase Dullard is involved in dephosphorylating the Drosophila R-Smad, Mad, and is integral in controlling BMP signal duration. We show that a hypomorphic Dullard allele or Dullard knockdown leads to increased Mad phosphorylation levels, while Dullard overexpression resulted in reduced Mad phosphorylations. Co-immunoprecipitation binding assays demonstrate phosphorylated Mad and Dullard physically interact, while mutation of Dullard’s phosphatase domain still allowed Mad-Dullard interactions but abolished its ability to regulate Mad phosphorylations. Finally, we demonstrate that linker and C-terminally phosphorylated Mad can be regulated by one of two terminating mechanisms, degradation by proteasomes or dephosphorylation by the phosphatase Dullard. PMID:27578171

  11. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 2 Regulates the Inflammatory Response in Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Timothy T.; Rodenhouse, Paul; Cai, Qing; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis results from a dysregulation of the regulatory mechanisms of the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to invading pathogens. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are key signal transduction pathways involved in the cellular production of cytokines. The dual-specific phosphatase 1 (DUSP 1), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), has been shown to be an important negative regulator of the inflammatory response by regulating the p38 and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) MAP kinase pathways to influence pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. MKP-2, also a dual-specific phosphatase (DUSP 4), is a phosphatase highly homologous with MKP-1 and is known to regulate MAP kinase signaling; however, its role in regulating the inflammatory response is not known. We hypothesized a regulatory role for MKP-2 in the setting of sepsis. Mice lacking the MKP-2 gene had a survival advantage over wild-type mice when challenged with intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a polymicrobial infection via cecal ligation and puncture. The MKP-2−/− mice also exhibited decreased serum levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) following endotoxin challenge. Isolated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from MKP-2−/− mice showed increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased induction of MKP-1 following LPS stimulation. The capacity for cytokine production increased in MKP-2−/− BMDMs following MKP-1 knockdown. These data support a mechanism by which MKP-2 targets ERK deactivation, thereby decreasing MKP-1 and thus removing the negative inhibition of MKP-1 on cytokine production. PMID:20351138

  13. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at low pH].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2009-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), three forms of tartrate-sensitive phosphatase were revealed using PAGE of the supernatant of ameba homogenates obtained with 1% Triton X-100 or distilled water and subsequent staining of gels with 2-naphthyl phosphate as substrate (pH 4.0). The form with the highest mobility in the ameba supernatant was sensitive to all tested phosphatase activity modulators. Two other forms with the lower mobilities were completely or significantly inactivated not only by sodium L-(+)-tartrate, but also by L-(+)-tartaric acid, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium molybdate, EDTA, EGTA, o-phospho-L-tyrosine, DL-dithiotreitol, H2O2, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ions of heavy metals - Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cu2+. Based on results of inhibitory analysis, lysosome location in the ameba cell, and wide substrate specificity of these two forms, it has been concluded that they belong to nonspecific acid phosphomonoesterases (AcP, EC 3.1.3.2). This AcP is suggested to have both phosphomonoesterase and phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activitis. Two ecto-phosphatases were revealed in the culture medium, in which amebas were cultivated. One of them was inhibited by the same reagents as the ameba tartrate-sensitive AcP and seems to be the AcP released into the culture medium in the process of exocytosis of the content of food vacuoles. In the culture medium, apart from this AcP, another phosphatase was revealed, which was not inhibited by any tested inhibitors of AcP and alkaline phosphatase. It cannot be ruled out that this phosphatase belong to the ecto-ATPases found in many protists; however, its ability to hydrolyze ATP has not yet been proven.

  14. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence.

    PubMed

    Keum, Dongil; Kruse, Martin; Kim, Dong-Il; Hille, Bertil; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-06-28

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  15. Human prostatic acid phosphatase directly stimulates collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase content of isolated bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, M.; Rosier, R.N.; Puzas, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) directly enhances the differentiated characteristics of isolated bone cells in vitro. This enzyme, when added to cell cultures for 24 h in vitro stimulates collagen synthesis and the production of alkaline phosphatase. The effects are dose dependent, with statistically significant effects occurring from 0.1-100 nM hPAP. Concentrations higher than 100 nM do not evoke greater effects. The maximal effect of hPAP occurs between 12 and 24 h of exposure. The cells stimulated to the greatest degree are osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts. Fibroblasts isolated from the same tissue show a lesser sensitivity to hPAP. hPAP has no detectable effect on cell proliferation, as measured by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation or total DNA synthesis. None of the observations reported in this work can be attributed to contaminating proteins in the hPAP preparation. hPAP was radiolabeled with 125I and was used for affinity binding and cross-linking studies. Scatchard analysis of specific binding indicated the presence of 1.0 X 10(5) high affinity binding sites/cell, with a Kd of 6.5 nM. Cross-linking studies demonstrated the presence of one 320-kDa binding complex. The pH profile and kinetic determinations of Km and maximum velocity for hPAP were similar to those previously reported, except for the finding of positive cooperativity of the substrate with the enzyme under the conditions of our assay. We believe that the direct stimulation of bone-forming cells by hPAP may contribute to the sclerotic nature of skeletal bone around sites of neoplastic prostatic metastases and that the effect of the enzyme is probably mediated by a plasma membrane receptor.

  16. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Little, Sean C.; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Kline, Crystal F.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α+/− myocytes resulted in reduced Ca2+ waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca2+ regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  18. Phosphatase activity in Antarctica soil samples as a biosignature of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Itoh, Yuki; Takano, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei

    Microbial activities have been detected in such extreme terrestrial environments as deep lithosphere, a submarine hydrothermal systems, stratosphere, and Antarctica. Microorganisms have adapted to such harsh environments by evolving their biomolecules. Some of these biomolecules such as enzymes might have different characteristics from those of organisms in ordinary environments. Many biosignatures (or biomarkers) have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments. A number of techniques are proposed to evaluate biological activities in extreme environments including cultivation methods, assay of metabolism, and analysis of bioorganic compounds like amino acids and DNA. Enzyme activities are useful signature of extant life in extreme environments. Among many enzymes, phosphatase could be a good indicator of biological activities, since phosphate esters are essential for all the living terrestrial organisms. In addition, alkaline phosphatase is known as a typical zinc-containing metalloenzyme and quite stable in environments. We analyzed phosphatase activities in Antarctica soil samples to see whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life. In addition, we characterized phosphatases extracted from the Antarctica soil samples, and compared with those obtained from other types of environments. Antarctica surface environments are quite severe environments for life since it is extremely cold and dry and exposed to strong UV and cosmic rays. We tried to evaluate biological activities in Antarctica by measuring phosphatase activities. Surface soil samples are obtained at the Sites 1-8 near Showa Base in Antarctica during the 47th Japan Antarctic exploration mission in 2005-6. Activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are measured spectrophotometrically after mixing the powdered sample and p-nitrophenyl phosphate solution (pH 6.5 for ACP, pH 8.0 for ALP). ALP was characterized after extraction from soils with

  19. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  20. Thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Tarasevich, B. N.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2009-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli (ECAP), bovine intestines (bovine IAP), and chicken intestines (chicken IAP) was studied in different buffer solutions and in the solid state. The conclusion was made that these enzymes had maximum stability in the solid state, and, in a carbonate buffer solution, their activity decreased most rapidly. It was found that the bacterial enzyme was more stable than animal phosphatases. It was noted that, for ECAP, four intermediate stages preceded the loss of enzyme activity, and, for bovine and chicken IAPs, three intermediate stages were observed. The activation energy of thermal inactivation of ECAP over the range 25-70°C was determined to be 80 kJ/mol; it corresponded to the dissociation of active dimers into inactive monomers. Higher activation energies (˜200 kJ/mol) observed at the initial stage of thermal inactivation of animal phosphatases resulted from the simultaneous loss of enzyme activity caused by dimer dissociation and denaturation. It was shown that the activation energy of denaturation of monomeric animal alkali phosphatases ranged from 330 to 380 kJ/mol depending on buffer media. It was concluded that the inactivation of solid samples of alkali phosphatases at 95°C was accompanied by an about twofold decrease in the content of β structures in protein molecules.

  1. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  2. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  3. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  4. Ultrastructural localization of acid phosphatase in nonhuman primate vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    King, B F

    1985-01-01

    The vagina of the rhesus monkey is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. However, little is known regarding the cytochemical composition of its cell organelles and the substances found in the intercellular spaces. In this study we have examined the ultrastructural distribution of acid phosphatase in the vaginal epithelium. In basal and parabasal cells reaction product was found in some Golgi cisternae and vesicles and in a variety of cytoplasmic granules. Reaction product was also found in some, but not all, membrane-coating granules. In the upper layers of the epithelium, the membrane-coating granules extruded their contents and acid phosphatase was localized in the intercellular spaces. The possible roles of acid phosphatase in keratinization, desquamation, or modification of substances in the intercellular compartment are discussed.

  5. Cloning of the canine glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kishnani, P.; Bao, Y.; Brix, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two Maltese puppies with massive hepatomegaly and failure to thrive were found to have a markedly reduced Glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity in the liver and kidney. Deficiency of G-6-Pase activity causes type 1a glycogen storage disease in humans. To further study the mutation responsible for the disease in dog, we cloned G-6-Pase canine cDNA from normal mixed breed dog liver RNA using reverse transcriptase and PCR amplification using primers derived from the published murine G-6-Pase gene sequence. Sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1071 nucleotides that encodes a predicted 357 amino acid polypeptide in the canine G-6-Pase gene, same as mouse and human. We found more than 90% sequence homology between dog and human G-6-Pase sequence. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced canine G-6-Pase polypeptide shows six transmembrane-spanning segments similar to those seen in human and mouse. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization is similarly predicted by the presence of the ER protein retention signal KK positioned 3 and 4 amino acids from the carboxy terminal. Potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are identified at positions 96, 203, and 276. Northern blot analysis revealed increased G-6-Pase mRNA in the deficient dog liver compared to control. This could possibly reflect upregulation of transcription due to the persistent hypoglycemic state. Further studies are directed at the identification of the mutation involved in this deficient dog strain. Characterization of the G-6-Pase gene and protein in the deficient dog model can pave the way for new understanding in the pathophysiology of this disease and for the trials of novel therapeutic approaches including gene therapy.

  6. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  7. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the proinflammatory nucleotide uridine diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hamarneh, Sulaiman R.; Mohamed, Mussa M. Rafat; Ramasamy, Sundaram; Yammine, Halim; Patel, Palak; Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Alam, Sayeda N.; Muhammad, Nur; Moaven, Omeed; Teshager, Abeba; Malo, Nondita S.; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Warren, H. Shaw; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Malo, Madhu S.; Hodin, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate (UDP) is a proinflammatory nucleotide implicated in inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is a gut mucosal defense factor capable of inhibiting intestinal inflammation. We used the malachite green assay to show that IAP dephosphorylates UDP. To study the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP, UDP or other proinflammatory ligands (LPS, flagellin, Pam3Cys, or TNF-α) in the presence or absence of IAP were applied to cell cultures, and IL-8 was measured. UDP caused dose-dependent increase in IL-8 release by immune cells and two gut epithelial cell lines, and IAP treatment abrogated IL-8 release. Costimulation with UDP and other inflammatory ligands resulted in a synergistic increase in IL-8 release, which was prevented by IAP treatment. In vivo, UDP in the presence or absence of IAP was instilled into a small intestinal loop model in wild-type and IAP-knockout mice. Luminal contents were applied to cell culture, and cytokine levels were measured in culture supernatant and intestinal tissue. UDP-treated luminal contents induced more inflammation on target cells, with a greater inflammatory response to contents from IAP-KO mice treated with UDP than from WT mice. Additionally, UDP treatment increased TNF-α levels in intestinal tissue of IAP-KO mice, and cotreatment with IAP reduced inflammation to control levels. Taken together, these studies show that IAP prevents inflammation caused by UDP alone and in combination with other ligands, and the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP against UDP persists in mouse small intestine. The benefits of IAP in intestinal disease may be partly due to inhibition of the proinflammatory activity of UDP. PMID:23306083

  8. Myosin phosphatase is inactivated by caspase-3 cleavage and phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takahiro; Katayama, Takeshi; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2013-03-01

    In nonapoptotic cells, the phosphorylation level of myosin II is constantly maintained by myosin kinases and myosin phosphatase. During apoptosis, caspase-3-activated Rho-associated protein kinase I triggers hyperphosphorylation of myosin II, leading to membrane blebbing. Although inhibition of myosin phosphatase could also contribute to myosin II phosphorylation, little is known about the regulation of myosin phosphatase in apoptosis. In this study, we have demonstrated that, in apoptotic cells, the myosin-binding domain of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp-884, and the cleaved MYPT1 is strongly phosphorylated at Thr-696 and Thr-853, phosphorylation of which is known to inhibit myosin II binding. Expression of the caspase-3 cleaved form of MYPT1 that lacked the C-terminal end in HeLa cells caused the dissociation of MYPT1 from actin stress fibers. The dephosphorylation activity of myosin phosphatase immunoprecipitated from the apoptotic cells was lower than that from the nonapoptotic control cells. These results suggest that down-regulation of MYPT1 may play a role in promoting hyperphosphorylation of myosin II by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of myosin II during apoptosis.

  9. Phosphatase activity on the cell wall of Fonsecaea pedrosoi.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, L F; Palmeira, V F; Pinheiro, A A S; Alviano, C S; Rozental, S; Travassos, L R; Meyer-Fernandes, J R

    2003-12-01

    The activity of a phosphatase was characterized in intact mycelial forms of Fonsecaea pedrosoi, a pathogenic fungus that causes chromoblastomycosis. At pH 5.5, this fungus hydrolyzed p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) to p-nitrophenol (p-NP) at a rate of 12.78 +/- 0.53 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight. The values of Vmax and apparent Km for p-NPP hydrolyses were measured as 17.89 +/- 0.92 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight and 1.57 +/- 0.26 mmol/l, respectively. This activity was inhibited at increased pH, a finding compatible with an acid phosphatase. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by classical inhibitors of acid phosphatases such as sodium orthovanadate (Ki = 4.23 micromol/l), sodium molybdate (Ki = 7.53 micromol/l) and sodium fluoride (Ki = 126.78 micromol/l) in a dose-dependent manner. Levamizole (1 mmol/l) and sodium tartrate (10 mmol/l), had no effect on the enzyme activity. Cytochemical localization of the acid phosphatase showed electrondense cerium phosphate deposits on the cell wall, as visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Phosphatase activity in F. pedrosoi seems to be associated with parasitism, as sclerotic cells, which are the fungal forms mainly detected in chromoblastomycosis lesions, showed much higher activities than conidia and mycelia did. A strain of F. pedrosoi recently isolated from a human case of chromoblastomycosis also showed increased enzyme activity, suggesting that the expression of surface phosphatases may be stimulated by interaction with the host.

  10. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Dephosphorylation by Rap Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    V Parashar; N Mirouze; D Dubnau; M Neiditch

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic 'switch' residue to an internal position when the {beta}4-{alpha}4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  11. PSTPIP: A Tyrosine Phosphorylated Cleavage Furrow–associated Protein that Is a Substrate for a PEST Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Susan; Dowbenko, Donald; Cheng, Jill; Li, Wenlu; Brush, Jennifer; Utzig, Suzan; Simanis, Viesturs; Lasky, Laurence A.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated proteins which interact with the PEST-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF), using the yeast two-hybrid system. This resulted in the identification of proline, serine, threonine phosphatase interacting protein (PSTPIP), a novel member of the actin- associated protein family that is homologous to Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC15p, a phosphorylated protein involved with the assembly of the actin ring in the cytokinetic cleavage furrow. The binding of PTP HSCF to PSTPIP was induced by a novel interaction between the putative coiled-coil region of PSTPIP and the COOH-terminal, proline-rich region of the phosphatase. PSTPIP is tyrosine phosphorylated both endogenously and in v-Src transfected COS cells, and cotransfection of dominant-negative PTP HSCF results in hyperphosphorylation of PSTPIP. This dominant-negative effect is dependent upon the inclusion of the COOH-terminal, proline-rich PSTPIP-binding region of the phosphatase. Confocal microscopy analysis of endogenous PSTPIP revealed colocalization with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and actin-rich cytokinetic cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PSTPIP in 3T3 cells resulted in the formation of extended filopodia, consistent with a role for this protein in actin reorganization. Finally, overexpression of mammalian PSTPIP in exponentially growing S. pombe results in a dominant-negative inhibition of cytokinesis. PSTPIP is therefore a novel actin-associated protein, potentially involved with cytokinesis, whose tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by PTP HSCF. PMID:9265651

  12. PTEN Increases Autophagy and Inhibits the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Glioma Cells Independently of its Lipid Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Errafiy, Rajaa; Aguado, Carmen; Ghislat, Ghita; Esteve, Juan M.; Gil, Anabel; Loutfi, Mohammed; Knecht, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Two major mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, operate in mammalian cells. PTEN, which is frequently mutated in glioblastomas, is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a dual specificity phosphatase that antagonizes the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is a key regulator of autophagy. Here, we investigated in U87MG human glioma cells the role of PTEN in the regulation of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, because both are functionally linked and are relevant in cancer progression. Since U87MG glioma cells lack a functional PTEN, we used stable clones that express, under the control of a tetracycline-inducible system (Tet-on), wild-type PTEN and two of its mutants, G129E-PTEN and C124S-PTEN, which, respectively, lack the lipid phosphatase activity only and both the lipid and the protein phosphatase activities of this protein. Expression of PTEN in U87MG glioma cells decreased proteasome activity and also reduced protein ubiquitination. On the contrary, expression of PTEN increased the autophagic flux and the lysosomal mass. Interestingly, and although PTEN negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by its lipid phosphatase activity, both effects in U87MG cells were independent of this activity. These results suggest a new mTOR-independent signaling pathway by which PTEN can regulate in opposite directions the main mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation. PMID:24349488

  13. Placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme expression by the non-HeLa DoT cervical-carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Expression of the oncodevelopmental protein, placental alkaline phosphatase, was observed in DoT cells, an epidermoid cell line derived from cervical carcinoma. Under normal conditions of growth in vitro, biochemical inhibition, cytochemical and immunological studies revealed that these cells express the term-placental (Regan) isoenzyme. Thus alkaline phosphatase activity was observed to be heat-stable and inhibited by L-phenylalanine. These properties, supported by immunoelectrophoretic analysis using antisera specific for liver, intestinal or term-placental isoenzymes, identified the isoenzyme as placental type. DoT cells treated with prednisolone (1 microgram/ml) increased total alkaline phosphatase specific activity. This activity was also identified as term-placental phosphatase isoenzyme. On the other hand, treatment of the same cells with sodium butyrate (1 mM) did not induce increased activity of the term-placental isoenzyme, an unexpected observation. As a result of these studies, DoT cells are proposed as a representative cell line for studies of the regulation of oncodevelopmental gene expression in human tumour cells of cervical origin. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7342975

  14. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  15. Attenuated virulence of a Francisella mutant lacking the lipid A 4′-phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Abraham, Soman N.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a highly contagious disease of animals and humans, but the virulence features of F. tularensis are poorly defined. F. tularensis and the related mouse pathogen Francisella novicida synthesize unusual lipid A molecules lacking the 4′-monophosphate group typically found in the lipid A of Gram-negative bacteria. LpxF, a selective phosphatase located on the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, removes the 4′-phosphate moiety in the late stages of F. novicida lipid A assembly. To evaluate the relevance of the 4′-phosphatase to pathogenesis, we constructed a deletion mutant of lpxF and compared its virulence with wild-type F. novicida. Intradermal injection of 106 wild-type but not 108 mutant F. novicida cells is lethal to mice. The rapid clearance of the lpxF mutant is associated with a stronger local cytokine response and a greater influx of neutrophils compared with wild-type. The F. novicida mutant was highly susceptible to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin. LpxF therefore represents a kind of virulence factor that confers a distinct lipid A phenotype, preventing Francisella from activating the host innate immune response and preventing the bactericidal actions of cationic peptides. Francisella lpxF mutants may be useful for immunization against tularemia. PMID:17360489

  16. DNA polymorphism of alkaline phosphatase isozyme genes: Linkage disequilibria between placental and germ-cell alkaline phosphotase alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, G.; Beckman, L.; Sikstroem, C. ); Millan, J.L. )

    1992-11-01

    The use of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) cDNA as a probe allows the detection and identification of restriction DNA fragments derived from three homologous genes, i.e., intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP), germ-cell AP (GCAP), and PLAP. In previous RFLP studies the authors have reported linkage disequilibria between an RsaI and two PstI (a and b) polymorphic restriction sites and electrophoretic types of PLAP. In this report they present evidence that, in spite of the strong correlation with PLAP types, PstI(b) is an RFLP of GCAP. The data indicate close linkage between the PLAP and GCAP loci. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of organic dairy manure amendment on soil phosphatase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy production is increasing in the U.S. due to concerns over environmental, human, and animal health. It is well known that the application of livestock manure to soil can influence enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling and soil fertility, such as soil phosphatases; however, orga...

  18. Enzymatic method of determining lead using alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, T.N.; Kucheryaeva, V.V.; Dolmanova, I.F.

    1986-03-20

    The purpose of this work was to determine the possibility of using alkaline phosphatase to determine trace amounts of ions of a number of metals - Mg, Ba, Ca, Sr, Cd, Pb - for which there are virtually no sensitive and simple methods of determination.

  19. Biocatalysis with Sol-Gel Encapsulated Acid Phosphatase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Suhasini; Tran, Vu; Ho, Maggie K.-M.; Phan, Chieu; Chin, Elizabeth; Wemmer, Zeke; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was performed in an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Students learned how to immobilize an enzyme in a sol-gel matrix and how to perform and evaluate enzyme-activity measurements. The enzyme acid phosphatase (APase) from wheat germ was encapsulated in sol-gel beads that were prepared from the precursor…

  20. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M.; Woodford, Mark R.; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP–substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors. PMID:27466404

  1. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  2. Specific dephosphorylation of Janus Kinase 2 by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhuo; Liu, Xidong; Chu, Huiying; Fu, Xueqi; Li, Tianbao; Hu, Lianghai; Xing, Shu; Li, Guohui; Gu, Jingkai; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2015-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated through phosphorylation of an activation loop thereby turning on downstream signaling pathways. Activation of JAK2, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase with an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling, requires phosphorylation of the 1007 and 1008 tyrosyl residues. Dephosphorylation of these two sites by phosphatases presumably inactivates the enzyme, but the underlying mechanism is not known. In this study, we employed MALDI-TOF/TOF and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the dephosphorylation process by using synthetic peptides derived from the tandem autophosphorylation sites (Y1007 and Y1008) of human JAK2. We found that tyrosine phosphatases catalyzed the dephosphorylation reaction sequentially, but different enzymes exhibited different selectivity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B caused rapid dephosphorylation of Y1008 followed by Y1007, while SHP1 and SHP2 selectively dephosphorylated Y1008 only, and yet HePTP randomly removed a single phosphate from either Y1007 or Y1008, leaving behind mono-phosphorylated peptides. The specificity of dephosphorylation was further confirmed by molecular modeling. The data reveal multiple modes of JAK2 regulation by tyrosine phosphatases, reflecting a complex, and intricate interplay between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  3. Selective dephosphorylation of histone H1 by nuclear phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sites of H1 phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) and the CaS phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (kinase C) and to study their dephosphorylation by nuclear protein phosphatases. H1 was phosphorylated on a ser residue to approx. 1 mole (TSP)/mole H1 with either kinase A or C. The sites of phosphorylation were differentiated by digestion of the H1 by thrombin or N-bromosuccinimide. Phosphopeptide maps on reversed phase HPLC and gel filtration HPLC clearly showed that the kinase C phosphorylated a different site than the well characterized kinase A site. H1, phosphorylated by kinase C or kinase A, was used as a substrate for the nuclear phosphatases. The nuclear phosphatases were purified from salt extracted rat liver chromatin and separated into 2 forms based on heat-stable inhibitor sensitivity and polycation stimulation. Polycation-stimulated phosphatase rapidly dephosphorylated the kinase C site and slowly dephosphorylated the kinase A site. The inhibitor-sensitive enzyme showed little activity toward either site under standard assay conditions.

  4. Characterization of PTPRG in Knockdown and Phosphatase-Inactive Mutant Mice and Substrate Trapping Analysis of PTPRG in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wandong; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Tran, David T.; Pogorelov, Vladimir M.; Cullinan, Emily B.; Baker, Kevin B.; Platt, Kenneth A.; Hu, Sean; Rajan, Indrani; Xu, Nianhua; Lanthorn, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatase gamma (PTPRG, or RPTPγ) is a mammalian receptor-like tyrosine phosphatase which is highly expressed in the nervous system as well as other tissues. Its function and biochemical characteristics remain largely unknown. We created a knockdown (KD) line of this gene in mouse by retroviral insertion that led to 98–99% reduction of RPTPγ gene expression. The knockdown mice displayed antidepressive-like behaviors in the tail-suspension test, confirming observations by Lamprianou et al. 2006. We investigated this phenotype in detail using multiple behavioral assays. To see if the antidepressive-like phenotype was due to the loss of phosphatase activity, we made a knock-in (KI) mouse in which a mutant, RPTPγ C1060S, replaced the wild type. We showed that human wild type RPTPγ protein, expressed and purified, demonstrated tyrosine phosphatase activity, and that the RPTPγ C1060S mutant was completely inactive. Phenotypic analysis showed that the KI mice also displayed some antidepressive-like phenotype. These results lead to a hypothesis that an RPTPγ inhibitor could be a potential treatment for human depressive disorders. In an effort to identify a natural substrate of RPTPγ for use in an assay for identifying inhibitors, “substrate trapping” mutants (C1060S, or D1028A) were studied in binding assays. Expressed in HEK293 cells, these mutant RPTPγs retained a phosphorylated tyrosine residue, whereas similarly expressed wild type RPTPγ did not. This suggested that wild type RPTPγ might auto-dephosphorylate which was confirmed by an in vitro dephosphorylation experiment. Using truncation and mutagenesis studies, we mapped the auto-dephosphorylation to the Y1307 residue in the D2 domain. This novel discovery provides a potential natural substrate peptide for drug screening assays, and also reveals a potential functional regulatory site for RPTPγ. Additional investigation of RPTPγ activity and regulation may lead to a better

  5. Characterization of PTPRG in knockdown and phosphatase-inactive mutant mice and substrate trapping analysis of PTPRG in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wandong; Savelieva, Katerina V; Tran, David T; Pogorelov, Vladimir M; Cullinan, Emily B; Baker, Kevin B; Platt, Kenneth A; Hu, Sean; Rajan, Indrani; Xu, Nianhua; Lanthorn, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatase gamma (PTPRG, or RPTPγ) is a mammalian receptor-like tyrosine phosphatase which is highly expressed in the nervous system as well as other tissues. Its function and biochemical characteristics remain largely unknown. We created a knockdown (KD) line of this gene in mouse by retroviral insertion that led to 98-99% reduction of RPTPγ gene expression. The knockdown mice displayed antidepressive-like behaviors in the tail-suspension test, confirming observations by Lamprianou et al. 2006. We investigated this phenotype in detail using multiple behavioral assays. To see if the antidepressive-like phenotype was due to the loss of phosphatase activity, we made a knock-in (KI) mouse in which a mutant, RPTPγ C1060S, replaced the wild type. We showed that human wild type RPTPγ protein, expressed and purified, demonstrated tyrosine phosphatase activity, and that the RPTPγ C1060S mutant was completely inactive. Phenotypic analysis showed that the KI mice also displayed some antidepressive-like phenotype. These results lead to a hypothesis that an RPTPγ inhibitor could be a potential treatment for human depressive disorders. In an effort to identify a natural substrate of RPTPγ for use in an assay for identifying inhibitors, "substrate trapping" mutants (C1060S, or D1028A) were studied in binding assays. Expressed in HEK293 cells, these mutant RPTPγs retained a phosphorylated tyrosine residue, whereas similarly expressed wild type RPTPγ did not. This suggested that wild type RPTPγ might auto-dephosphorylate which was confirmed by an in vitro dephosphorylation experiment. Using truncation and mutagenesis studies, we mapped the auto-dephosphorylation to the Y1307 residue in the D2 domain. This novel discovery provides a potential natural substrate peptide for drug screening assays, and also reveals a potential functional regulatory site for RPTPγ. Additional investigation of RPTPγ activity and regulation may lead to a better understanding

  6. Synthesis and secretion of alkaline phosphatase in vitro from first-trimester and term human placentas.

    PubMed Central

    Galski, H; Fridovich, S E; Weinstein, D; De Groot, N; Segal, S; Folman, R; Hochberg, A A

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis and secretion of alkaline phosphatases in vitro by human placental tissue incubated in organ culture were studied. First-trimester placenta synthesizes and secretes two different alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes (heat-labile and heat-stable), whereas in term placenta nearly all the alkaline phosphatase synthesized and secreted is heat-stable. The specific activities of alkaline phosphatases in first-trimester and term placental tissue remain constant throughout the time course of incubation. In the media, specific activities increase with time. Hence, alkaline phosphatase synthesis seems to be the driving force for its own secretion. The rates of synthesis de novo and of alkaline phosphatases were measured. The specific radioactivities of the secreted alkaline phosphatases were higher than the corresponding specific radioactivities in the tissue throughout the entire incubation period. The intracellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes was compared. PMID:7306029

  7. Phosphatase acitivity as biosignatures in terrestrial extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Jun; Nakamoto, Saki; Hara, Masashi; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    Since phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life, phosphatase activity can be a can-didate for biosignatures of biological activity. It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere, high temperature hot springs and stratosphere. We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in ex-treme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and Antarctica , and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life. Core samples and chimney samples were collected at Tarama Knoll in Okinawa Trough in 2009, both in a part of the Archaean Park Project. Surface soil samples are obtained at the Sites 1-8 near Showa Base in Antarctica during the 47th Japan Antarctic exploration mission in 2005-6. Alkaline Phosphatase activ-ity in sea water and in soil was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pH 8.0) as a substrate. Phosphatase activities in extracts were measured fluoro-metrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate. Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratios were also determined by HPLC . Significant enzymatic ac-tivities were revealed in both some of the hydrothermal sub-vent systems and Antarctica soils, which is crucial evidence of vigorous microbial oasis. It is consistent with the fact that large enantiomeric excess of L-form amino acids were found in the same core sequences. Optimum temperatures of ALP in the chimney, Antarctica soil and YNU campus soil were 353 K, 313 K, and 333 K, respectively. The present results suggested that phosphatase activities,, together with amino acids, can be used as possible biosignatures for extant life.

  8. Characterization of a PRL protein tyrosine phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Prakash Rao; Ayong, Lawrence; Eatrides, Jennifer; Schreiber, Melissa; Pham, Connie; Chakrabarti, Ratna; Fidock, David A; Allen, Charles M; Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenylated proteins have important functions in cell growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells. Inhibitors of protein prenylation in malaria have recently shown strong promise as effective antimalarials. In studying protein prenylation in the malaria protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have shown earlier that the incubation of P. falciparum cells with (3)H-prenol precursors resulted in various size classes of labeled proteins. To understand the physiological function of prenylated proteins of malaria parasites, that are targets of prenyltransferase inhibitors, we searched the PlasmoDB database for proteins containing the C-terminus prenylation motif. We have identified, among other potentially prenylated proteins, an orthologue of a PRL (protein of regenerating liver) subgroup protein tyrosine phosphatases, termed PfPRL. Here, we show that PfPRL is expressed in the parasite's intraerythrocytic stages, where it partially associates with endoplasmic reticulum and within a subcompartment of the food vacuole. Additionally, PfPRL targeting parallels that of apical membrane antigen-1 in developing merozoites. Recombinant PfPRL shows phosphatase activity that is preferentially inhibited by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor suggesting that PfPRL functions as a tyrosine phosphatase. Recombinant PfPRL can also be farnesylated in vitro. Inhibition of malarial farnesyltransferase activity can be achieved with the heptapetide RKCHFM, which corresponds to the C-terminus of PfPRL. This study provides the first evidence for expression of enzymatically active PRL-related protein tyrosine phosphatases in malarial parasites, and demonstrates the potential of peptides derived from Plasmodium prenylated proteins as malarial farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  9. Pyrophosphate Stimulates Differentiation, Matrix Gene Expression and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Lu, Xi; Lind, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Engstrand, Thomas; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Pyrophosphate is a potent mitogen, capable of stimulating proliferation in multiple cell types, and a critical participant in bone mineralization. Pyrophosphate can also affect the resorption rate and bioactivity of orthopedic ceramics. The present study investigated whether calcium pyrophosphate affected proliferation, differentiation and gene expression in early (MC3T3 pre-osteoblast) and late stage (SAOS-2 osteosarcoma) osteoblasts. Pyrophosphate stimulated peak alkaline phosphatase activity by 50% and 150% at 100μM and 0.1μM in MC3T3, and by 40% in SAOS-2. The expression of differentiation markers collagen 1 (COL1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN) were increased by an average of 1.5, 2, 2 and 3 fold, by high concentrations of sodium pyrophosphate (100μM) after 7 days of exposure in MC3T3. COX-2 and ANK expression did not differ significantly from controls in either treatment group. Though both high and low concentrations of pyrophosphate stimulate ALP activity, only high concentrations (100μM) stimulated osteogenic gene expression. Pyrophosphate did not affect proliferation in either cell type. The results of this study confirm that chronic exposure to pyrophosphate exerts a physiological effect upon osteoblast differentiation and ALP activity, specifically by stimulating osteoblast differentiation markers and extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:27701417

  10. Characterization and genomic mapping of genes and pseudogenes of a new human protein tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-07-01

    Previously described protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are classified into three types according to their sequence homology and structural features. Here we describe the characterization of genes and pseudogenes of a member of a fourth type of PTP, designated protein tyrosine phosphatase 4A (PTP4A). The 167-amino-acid human PTPs, but does not show any other sequence homology to any of the previously described PTPs. Two cDNA encoding PTP4A that differed in their noncoding regions were isolated. Another cDNA that has a high level of sequence identity with these two cDNAs and a deletion in the coding region was also isolated. Northern analysis using a probe from a common 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNAs recognized mRNAs of about 2 and 4 kb. Both species of mRNA were seen in all human adult and fetal tissues tested. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones and sequence-tagged site analysis suggested that one of the PTP4A coding genes is located at 1p35 and the other is on chromosome 11. A processed pseudogene for PTP4A was found in the BRCA1 region of 17q21 and shares 96% sequence identity to one of the PTP4A coding cDNAs. Our studies also suggest the existence of another processed pseudogene on chromosome 11. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Phosphorylation of dis2 protein phosphatase at the C-terminal cdc2 consensus and its potential role in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, H; Ishii, K; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    We show that the fission yeast dis2 protein phosphatase, which is highly similar to mammalian type 1 phosphatase, is a phosphoprotein containing phosphoserine (phospho-S) and threonine (phospho-T). It has several phosphorylation sites, two of which locate in the C-terminus. Phospho-T was abolished in the alanine substitution mutant at the C-terminal T316, which is conserved as a residue in the cdc2 consensus, TPPR, in a number of type 1-like phosphatases. In G2-arrested cdc2-L7 cells, the degree of T316 phosphorylation was reduced, whereas it was enhanced in metaphase-arrested nuc2-663 mutant cells. Phospho-T was produced in dis2 by fission yeast cdc2 kinase, but not in the substitution mutant A316, indicating that the T316 residue was the site for cdc2 kinase in vitro. Phosphatase activity of wild type dis2 was reduced by incubation with cdc2 kinase, but that of mutant dis2-A316 was not. Phosphorylation of T316 hence has a potential significance in cell cycle control in conjunction with cdc2 kinase activation and inactivation. Overexpression phenotypes of wild type dis2+, sds21+ and mutant dis2-A316, sds21-TPPR genes were consistent with negative regulation of dis2 by phosphorylation. This type of regulation would explain why cells harboring the dis2-11 mutation enter mitosis but fail to exit from it. Images PMID:7957097

  12. Detection of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity in intact cells by flow cytometry using the fluorogenic ELF-97 phosphatase substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telford, W. G.; Cox, W. G.; Stiner, D.; Singer, V. L.; Doty, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate 2-(5'-chloro-2'-phosphoryloxyphenyl)-6-chloro-4-(3H)-quinazolinone (ELF((R))-97 for enzyme-labeled fluorescence) has been found useful for the histochemical detection of endogenous AP activity and AP-tagged proteins and oligonucleotide probes. In this study, we evaluated its effectiveness at detecting endogenous AP activity by flow cytometry. METHODS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate was used to detect endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 rat osteosarcoma cells and primary cultures of chick chondrocytes. Cells were labeled with the ELF-97 reagent and analyzed by flow cytometry using an argon ultraviolet (UV) laser. For comparison purposes, cells were also assayed for AP using a Fast Red Violet LB azo dye assay previously described for use in detecting AP activity by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate effectively detected endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 cells, with over 95% of the resulting fluorescent signal resulting from AP-specific activity (as determined by levamisole inhibition of AP activity). In contrast, less than 70% of the fluorescent signal from the Fast Red Violet LB (FRV) assay was AP-dependent, reflecting the high intrinsic fluorescence of the unreacted components. The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was also able to detect very low AP activity in chick chondrocytes that was undetectable by the azo dye method. CONCLUSIONS: The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was able to detect endogenous AP activity in fixed mammalian and avian cells by flow cytometry with superior sensitivity to previously described assays. This work also shows the applicability of ELF-97 to flow cytometry, supplementing its previously demonstrated histochemical applications. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  14. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  15. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction. PMID:26304848

  16. The activity and stability of the intrinsically disordered Cip/Kip protein family are regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Steve; Lelli, Moreno; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors includes p21Cip1, p27Kip1 and p57Kip2. Their kinase inhibitory activities are mediated by a homologous N-terminal kinase-inhibitory domain (KID). The Cdk inhibitory activity and stability of p27 have been shown to be regulated by a two-step phosphorylation mechanism involving a tyrosine residue within the KID and a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus. We show that these residues are conserved in p21 and p57, suggesting that a similar phosphorylation cascade regulates these Cdk inhibitors. However, the presence of a cyclin binding motif within its C-terminus alters the regulatory interplay between p21 and Cdk2/cyclin A, and its responses to tyrosine phosphorylation and altered p21:Cdk2/cyclin A stoichiometry. We also show that the Cip/Kip proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by representatives of many non-receptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) sub-families, suggesting that NRTKs may generally regulate the activity and stability of these Cdk inhibitors. Our results further suggest that the Cip/Kip proteins integrate signals from various NRTK pathways and cell cycle regulation. PMID:25463440

  17. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a high-affinity phosphate-binding protein endowed with phosphatase activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Djeghader, Ahmed; Gotthard, Guillaume; Suh, Andrew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    In prokaryotes, phosphate starvation induces the expression of numerous phosphate-responsive genes, such as the pst operon including the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP or pstS) and alkaline phosphatases such as PhoA. This response increases the cellular inorganic phosphate import efficiency. Notably, some Pseudomonas species secrete, via a type-2 secretion system, a phosphate-binding protein dubbed LapA endowed with phosphatase activity. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray data collection at 0.87 Å resolution of LapA are described. Combined with biochemical and enzymatic characterization, the structure of this intriguing phosphate-binding protein will help to elucidate the molecular origin of its phosphatase activity and to decipher its putative role in phosphate uptake.

  19. Applying a Targeted Label-free Approach using LC-MS AMT Tags to Evaluate Changes in Protein Phosphorylation Following Phosphatase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jayachandran, Hemalatha; Lou, Quanzhou; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, David J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Moore, Ronald J.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ding, Shi-Jian; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.; Rossie, Sandra S.

    2007-10-12

    To identify phosphoproteins regulated by the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family of S/T phosphatases, we performed a large-scale characterization of changes in protein phosphorylation on extracts from HeLa cells treated with or without calyculin A, a potent PPP enzyme inhibitor. A label-free comparative Phosphoproteomics approach using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and targeted tandem mass spectrometry was employed to discover and identify signatures based upon distinctive changes in abundance. Overall, 232 proteins were identified as either direct or indirect targets for PPP enzyme regulation. Most of the present identifications represent novel PPP enzyme targets at the level of both phosphorylation site and protein. These include phosphorylation sites within signaling proteins such as p120 Catenin, A Kinase Anchoring Protein 8, JunB, and Type II Phosphatidyl Inositol 4 Kinase. These data can be used to define underlying signaling pathways and events regulated by the PPP family of S/T phosphatases.

  20. Yeast has homologs (CNA1 and CNA2 gene products) of mammalian calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Kunisawa, R; Kaim, D; Thorner, J

    1991-01-01

    Calcineurin, or phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase. We isolated a gene encoding a yeast PP2B homolog (CNA1) by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11, first with 125I-labeled yeast calmodulin and then with a human cDNA encoding the catalytic (or A) subunit of calcineurin. The predicted CNA1 gene product is 54% identical to its mammalian counterpart. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with oligonucleotide primers based on sequences conserved between CNA1 and mammalian PP2B genes, we isolated a second gene, CNA2. CNA2 is identical to PP2Bw, a partial cDNA clone previously described by others as originating from rabbit brain tissue. Our findings demonstrate that a unicellular eukaryote contains phosphoprotein phosphatases of the 2B class. Haploid cells containing a single cna1 or cna2 null mutation, or both mutations, were viable. MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants were more sensitive than wild-type cells or either single mutant to growth arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha factor and failed to resume growth during continuous exposure to alpha factor. Thus, calcineurin action antagonizes the mating-pheromone response pathway. Images PMID:1651503

  1. Functional characterization of the PP2C phosphatase CaPtc2p in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinrong; Zhao, Jingwen; Li, Jing; Zhang, Lilin; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-09-01

    Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) are monomeric enzymes and their activities require the presence of magnesium or manganese ion. There are seven PP2C-like genes in Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that CaPtc2p is a PP2C phosphatase. Surprisingly, in addition to the cytoplasmic localization, CaPtc2p is partially associated with mitochondria in yeast-form and filamentous cells of C. albicans. Expression of CaPTC2 is developmentally regulated during the serum-induced filamentation. Deletion of CaPTC2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to SDS and azole antifungals, as well as the DNA methylation agent methylmethane sulphonate and the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. Therefore, CaPtc2p might fulfil multiple functions, including the regulation of mitochondrial physiology and checkpoint recovery from DNA damage in C. albicans cells. PMID:20641018

  2. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  3. Tailor-Made Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: In Vitro Site-Directed Mutagenesis of PTEN and PTPRZ-B.

    PubMed

    Luna, Sandra; Mingo, Janire; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Blanco, Lorena; Amo, Laura; Schepens, Jan; Hendriks, Wiljan J; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In vitro site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) is a commonly used approach to experimentally analyze PTP functions at the molecular and cellular level and to establish functional correlations with PTP alterations found in human disease. Here, using the tumor-suppressor PTEN and the receptor-type PTPRZ-B (short isoform from PTPRZ1 gene) phosphatases as examples, we provide a brief insight into the utility of specific mutations in the experimental analysis of PTP functions. We describe a standardized, rapid, and simple method of mutagenesis to perform single and multiple amino acid substitutions, as well as deletions of short nucleotide sequences, based on one-step inverse PCR and DpnI restriction enzyme treatment. This method of SDM is generally applicable to any other protein of interest. PMID:27514801

  4. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Green, Samuel; Leith, Ian D; Sheppard, Lucy J

    2010-10-01

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components.

  5. Tyrosine phosphatase PTPRD suppresses colon cancer cell migration in coordination with CD44.

    PubMed

    Funato, Kosuke; Yamazumi, Yusuke; Oda, Takeaki; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2011-05-01

    PTPRD is a receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase. Recent analyses of comprehensive mutations and copy numbers have revealed that PTPRD is frequently mutated and homozygously deleted in various types of cancer, including glioblastoma, melanoma, breast and colon cancer. However, the molecular functions of PTPRD in cancer progression have yet to be elucidated. Herein, PTPRD suppressed colon cancer cell migration and was required for appropriate cell-cell adhesion. In addition, PTPRD regulated cell migration in cooperation with β-catenin/TCF signaling and its target CD44. Furthermore, expression levels of PTPRD were down-regulated in highly invasive cancers and were significantly correlated with patient survival. Our findings suggest that PTPRD is required for colon cancer invasion and progression.

  6. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  7. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  8. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  9. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  10. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  11. Modification of human placental alkaline phosphatase by periodate-oxidized 1,N6-ethenoadenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G G; Shiao, M S; Lee, K R; Wu, J J

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of 1,N6-ethenoadenosine monophosphate (epsilon AMP) with periodate cleaved the cis-diol of the ribose ring and resulted in the formation of a dialdehyde derivative (epsilon AMP-dial). At room temperature epsilon AMP-dial was unstable and underwent beta-elimination to give 4',5'-anhydro-1,N6-ethenoadenosine dialdehyde acetal (A epsilon Ado-dial). These nucleotide analogues were found to inactivate human placental alkaline phosphatase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. epsilon AMP-dial was shown to be an affinity label for the enzyme on the basis of the following criteria. (a) Kinetics of the enzyme activity loss over a wide range of epsilon AMP-dial concentration showed a saturating phenomenon. Removal of the phosphate group made the reagent (A epsilon Ado-dial) become a general chemical modifying reagent. (b) The artificial substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate gave substantial protection of the enzyme against inactivation. (c) epsilon AMP-dial was a substrate and a partial mixed-type inhibitor for the enzyme. Results of the inhibition and protection studies indicated that the reagent and substrate could combine with the enzyme simultaneously. Besides the phosphate-binding domain, an induced hydrophobic region is proposed for the substrate-binding site for human placental alkaline phosphatase. PMID:2176472

  12. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B’η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes. PMID:25085430

  13. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-01

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity. PMID:17105729

  14. Loss of the tyrosine phosphatase PTPRD leads to aberrant STAT3 activation and promotes gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Berenice; Fabius, Armida W M; Wu, Wei H; Pedraza, Alicia; Brennan, Cameron W; Schultz, Nikolaus; Pitter, Kenneth L; Bromberg, Jacqueline F; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Chan, Timothy A

    2014-06-01

    PTPRD, which encodes the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-δ, is one of the most frequently inactivated genes across human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). PTPRD undergoes both deletion and mutation in cancers, with copy number loss comprising the primary mode of inactivation in GBM. However, it is unknown whether loss of PTPRD promotes tumorigenesis in vivo, and the mechanistic basis of PTPRD function in tumors is unclear. Here, using genomic analysis and a glioma mouse model, we demonstrate that loss of Ptprd accelerates tumor formation and define the oncogenic context in which Ptprd loss acts. Specifically, we show that in human GBMs, heterozygous loss of PTPRD is the predominant type of lesion and that loss of PTPRD and the CDKN2A/p16(INK4A) tumor suppressor frequently co-occur. Accordingly, heterozygous loss of Ptprd cooperates with p16 deletion to drive gliomagenesis in mice. Moreover, loss of the Ptprd phosphatase resulted in phospho-Stat3 accumulation and constitutive activation of Stat3-driven genetic programs. Surprisingly, the consequences of Ptprd loss are maximal in the heterozygous state, demonstrating a tight dependence on gene dosage. Ptprd loss did not increase cell proliferation but rather altered pathways governing the macrophage response. In total, we reveal that PTPRD is a bona fide tumor suppressor, pinpoint PTPRD loss as a cause of aberrant STAT3 activation in gliomas, and establish PTPRD loss, in the setting of CDKN2A/p16(INK4A) deletion, as a driver of glioma progression.

  15. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S.; Grajkowska, Lucja T.; Hou, Z. Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L.; Haecker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M.; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS– pDCs produced IFN-α. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  16. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  17. HSP105 Recruits Protein Phosphatase 2A To Dephosphorylate β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nancy; Kakunda, Michael; Pham, Victoria; Lill, Jennie R.; Du, Pan; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Firestein, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway causes accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus to initiate the transcription of the target genes. Without Wnt stimulation, β-catenin forms a complex with axin (axis inhibitor), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and undergoes phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), interestingly, also are components of this degradation complex; therefore, a balance must be reached between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. How this balance is regulated is largely unknown. Here we show that a heat shock protein, HSP105, is a previously unidentified component of the β-catenin degradation complex. HSP105 is required for Wnt signaling, since depletion of HSP105 compromises β-catenin accumulation and target gene transcription upon Wnt stimulation. Mechanistically, HSP105 depletion disrupts the integration of PP2A into the β-catenin degradation complex, favoring the hyperphosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. HSP105 is overexpressed in many types of tumors, correlating with increased nuclear β-catenin protein levels and Wnt target gene upregulation. Furthermore, overexpression of HSP105 is a prognostic biomarker that correlates with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients as well as melanoma patients participating in the BRIM2 clinical study. PMID:25645927

  18. A tumor suppressor function for the lipid phosphatase INPP4B in melanocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lorenzo, Rolando; Gill, Kamraan Z; Shen, Che-Hung; Zhao, Feng X; Zheng, Bin; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Silvers, David N; Brunner, Georg; Horst, Basil A

    2014-05-01

    The phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is deregulated in a significant proportion of melanomas, and PI3K pathway activation in combination with constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling shows synergistic effects in the process of melanoma tumorigenesis. Recently, a tumor suppressor function for the lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) has been described in breast and prostate cancers, with impact on PI3K signaling output. Given the importance of PI3K pathway activity for melanoma formation and growth, we aimed to assess the role of INPP4B in melanocytic tumors. Our studies in native tumors suggest that decreased INPP4B expression is an event correlating with tumor progression in melanocytic neoplasms. We further demonstrate that INPP4B regulates PI3K/Akt signaling and exerts a tumor suppressor effect, impacting the proliferative, invasive, and tumorigenic capacity of melanoma cells. INPP4B expression in melanocytic neoplasms may therefore have potential as a biomarker for disease progression and as a modulator for the prediction of treatment outcome.

  19. Enhanced insulin signaling in density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Brachs, Sebastian; Trappiel, Manuela; Kintscher, Ulrich; Meyborg, Heike; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Stawowy, Philipp; Östman, Arne; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Böhmer, Frank D.; Kappert, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance can be triggered by enhanced dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor or downstream components in the insulin signaling cascade through protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Downregulating density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) resulted in an improved metabolic status in previous analyses. This phenotype was primarily caused by hepatic DEP-1 reduction. Methods Here we further elucidated the role of DEP-1 in glucose homeostasis by employing a conventional knockout model to explore the specific contribution of DEP-1 in metabolic tissues. Ptprj−/− (DEP-1 deficient) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet. Metabolic phenotyping was combined with analyses of phosphorylation patterns of insulin signaling components. Additionally, experiments with skeletal muscle cells and muscle tissue were performed to assess the role of DEP-1 for glucose uptake. Results High-fat diet fed-Ptprj−/− mice displayed enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, leptin levels and blood pressure were reduced in Ptprj−/− mice. DEP-1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of components of the insulin signaling cascade in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue after insulin challenge. The beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis in vivo was corroborated by increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells in which DEP-1 was downregulated, and in skeletal muscle of Ptprj−/− mice. Conclusion Together, these data establish DEP-1 as novel negative regulator of insulin signaling. PMID:25830095

  20. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-01

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity.

  1. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of purple acid phosphatase gene from pearl oyster Pinctada martensii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q H; Jiao, Y; Du, X D; Zhao, X X; Huang, R L; Deng, Y W; Yan, F

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), also known as type 5 acid phosphatases, are widely present in animals, plants, and fungi. In mammal, PAP was reported to participate in immune defense and bone resorption. In this study, the characteristics and potential functions of a PAP gene from pearl oyster Pinctada martensii (pm-PAP) were examined. The Pm-PAP cDNA was found to be 2777 base pairs, containing a 1581-base pair open reading fragment encoding for 526 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 60.1 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 5.82. One signal peptide and five conserved motifs [GDXX/GDXXY/GNH(D/E)/XXXH/(A/G)HXH] were present in the entire sequence. Tissue expression profile analysis showed that pm-PAP mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues studied with abundant mRNA found in mollusk defense system, including hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes. After lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the expression of pm-PAP mRNA in hemocytes was dramatically upregulated at 2 h and achieved the highest level at 36 h. Additionally, pm-PAP mRNA expression was significantly increased and achieved the highest level at 2 days after the surgical implantation during pearl production. These results suggest that pm-PAP is a constitutive and inducible protein that may be involved in the immune defense of pearl oyster. PMID:25729991

  2. Alkaline Phosphatase-Mimicking Peptide Nanofibers for Osteogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gulseren, Gulcihan; Yasa, I Ceren; Ustahuseyin, Oya; Tekin, E Deniz; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2015-07-13

    Recognition of molecules and regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis are some of the functions of enzymes in addition to their catalytic activity. While a diverse array of enzyme-like materials have been developed, these efforts have largely been confined to the imitation of the chemical structure and catalytic activity of the enzymes, and it is unclear whether enzyme-mimetic molecules can also be used to replicate the matrix-regulatory roles ordinarily performed by natural enzymes. Self-assembled peptide nanofibers can provide multifunctional enzyme-mimetic properties, as the active sequences of the target enzymes can be directly incorporated into the peptides. Here, we report enhanced bone regeneration efficiency through peptide nanofibers carrying both catalytic and matrix-regulatory functions of alkaline phosphatase, a versatile enzyme that plays a critical role in bone formation by regulating phosphate homeostasis and calcifiable bone matrix formation. Histidine presenting peptide nanostructures were developed to function as phosphatases. These molecules are able to catalyze phosphate hydrolysis and serve as bone-like nodule inducing scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase-like peptide nanofibers enabled osteogenesis for both osteoblast-like and mesenchymal cell lines.

  3. An alkaline phosphatase reporter for use in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Pascual, Ricardo A; Childress, Kevin O; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes severe gastrointestinal disease in humans and other mammals. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to work with and, until recently, few tools were available for genetic manipulation and molecular analyses. Despite the recent advances in the field, there is no simple or cost-effective technique for measuring gene transcription in C. difficile other than direct transcriptional analyses (e.g., quantitative real-time PCR and RNA-seq), which are time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale-up. We describe the development of an in vivo reporter assay that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of C. difficile gene expression. Using the Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase gene, phoZ, we measured expression of C. difficile genes using a colorimetric alkaline phosphatase assay. We show that inducible alkaline phosphatase activity correlates directly with native gene expression. The ability to analyze gene expression using a standard reporter is an important and critically needed tool to study gene regulation and design genetic screens for C. difficile and other anaerobic clostridia.

  4. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  5. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  6. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule SHIP Phosphatase Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Viernes, Dennis R.; Choi, Lydia B.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids play an important role in the transfer of signaling information across the cell membrane in eukaryotes. These signals are often governed by the phosphorylation patterns on the inositols, which are mediated by a number of inositol kinases and phosphatases. The src homology 2 (SH2) – containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) plays a central role in these processes, influencing signals delivered through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. SHIP modulation by small molecules has been implicated as a treatment in a number of human disease states, including cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, alteration of SHIP phosphatase activity may provide a means to facilitate bone marrow transplantation and increase blood cell production. This review discusses the cellular signaling pathways and protein-protein interactions that provide the molecular basis for targeting the SHIP enzyme in these disease states. In addition, a comprehensive survey of small molecule modulators of SHIP1 and SHIP2 is provided, with a focus on the structure, potency, selectivity and solubility properties of these compounds. PMID:24302498

  7. The role of phosphatases in the initiation of skeletal mineralization.

    PubMed

    Millán, José Luis

    2013-10-01

    Endochondral ossification is a carefully orchestrated process mediated by promoters and inhibitors of mineralization. Phosphatases are implicated, but their identities and functions remain unclear. Mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) gene cause hypophosphatasia, a heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia, caused by an arrest in the propagation of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals onto the collagenous extracellular matrix due to accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a physiological TNAP substrate and a potent calcification inhibitor. However, TNAP knockout (Alpl(-/-)) mice are born with a mineralized skeleton and have HA crystals in their chondrocyte- and osteoblast-derived matrix vesicles (MVs). We have shown that PHOSPHO1, a soluble phosphatase with specificity for two molecules present in MVs, phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine, is responsible for initiating HA crystal formation inside MVs and that PHOSPHO1 and TNAP have nonredundant functional roles during endochondral ossification. Double ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function leads to the complete absence of skeletal mineralization and perinatal lethality, despite normal systemic phosphate and calcium levels. This strongly suggests that the Pi needed for initiation of MV-mediated mineralization is produced locally in the perivesicular space. As both TNAP and nucleoside pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) behave as potent ATPases and pyrophosphatases in the MV compartment, our current model of the mechanisms of skeletal mineralization implicate intravesicular PHOSPHO1 function and Pi influx into MVs in the initiation of mineralization and the functions of TNAP and NPP1 in the extravesicular progression of mineralization.

  8. Peptide Microarrays for Real-Time Kinetic Profiling of Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity of Recombinant Phosphatases and Phosphatases in Lysates of Cells or Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Hovestad-Bijl, Liesbeth; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Pijnenburg, Dirk; Hilhorst, Riet; Liskamp, Rob; Ruijtenbeek, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A high-throughput method for the determination of the kinetics of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in a microarray format is presented, allowing real-time monitoring of the dephosphorylation of a 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue. The 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue is incorporated in potential PTP substrates. The peptide substrates are immobilized onto a porous surface in discrete spots. After dephosphorylation by a PTP, a 3-nitrotyrosine residue is formed that can be detected by a specific, sequence-independent antibody. The rate of dephosphorylation can be measured simultaneously on 12 microarrays, each comprising three concentrations of 48 clinically relevant peptides, using 1.0-5.0 μg of protein from a cell or tissue lysate or 0.1-2.0 μg of purified phosphatase. The data obtained compare well with solution phase assays involving the corresponding unmodified phosphotyrosine substrates. This technology, characterized by high-throughput (12 assays in less than 2 h), multiplexing and low sample requirements, facilitates convenient and unbiased investigation of the enzymatic activity of the PTP enzyme family, for instance by profiling of PTP substrate specificities, evaluation of PTP inhibitors and pinpointing changes in PTP activity in biological samples related to diseases. PMID:27514800

  9. Purple acid phosphatase of the human macrophage and osteoclast. Characterization, molecular properties, and crystallization of the recombinant di-iron-oxo protein secreted by baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Hayman, A R; Cox, T M

    1994-01-14

    The purple phosphatases catalyze hydrolysis of phosphate esters (optimum pH approximately 5) and are resistant to inhibition by dextro-rotatory tartrate; their distinctive color is due to Fe(III)-phenolate charge-transfer transitions at their active site. Expression of human purple phosphatase, designated type 5 acid phosphatase, is restricted to osteoclasts and other activated cells of monohistiocytic lineage, but its biological rôle in relation to bone resorption and phagocytosis is unknown. To characterize this enzyme further, we have engineered the human type 5 acid phosphatase into a baculovirus vector expression system that enabled milligram quantities of purple protein to be purified from medium containing Sf9 host cells. The phosphatase cDNA was transcribed as a single RNA species of 1.5 kilobases as in human tissues. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity reacting with uteroferrin antisera appeared in the culture medium, from which up to 8 mg/liter was purified by two-step cation-exchange chromatography at pH 8.0. Two isoforms of approximately 36 kDa were identified by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis and were converted to a single species of apparent molecular size 34 kDa upon treatment with N-glycosidase F, indicating secreted glycoforms of a single polypeptide. Mass spectroscopy showed that the mean molecular mass of the active, secreted glycoprotein was 35849 Da. The recombinant enzyme (specific activity, 190 mumol p-nitrophenol/min/mg at 37 degrees C) contained 2 iron atoms/molecule and formed purple, monoclinic crystals. Exposure to the ferric chelator, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one, rapidly inactivated the enzyme, which was not inhibited by alpha, alpha'-bipyridyl, a ferrous chelator. That ferric iron is essential for enzymatic catalysis, was further indicated by the synergistic effects of the reductant, dithiothreitol, and bipyridyl on phosphatase activity. The recombinant purple phosphatase catalyzed the peroxidation of 5

  10. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Ack1 regulates the fate of activated EGFR by inducing trafficking to the p62/NBR1 pre-autophagosome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Cunningham, Debbie L; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Heath, John K

    2014-03-01

    Growth factor signalling regulates multiple cellular functions and its misregulation has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. Ack1 (activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1, also known as TNK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that has been implicated in trafficking and degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), yet its precise functions remain elusive. In this report, we investigate the role of Ack1 in EGFR trafficking and show that Ack1 partially colocalises to Atg16L-positive structures upon stimulation with EGF. These structures are proposed to be the isolation membranes that arise during formation of autophagosomes. In addition, we find that Ack1 colocalises and interacts with sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1), a receptor for selective autophagy, through a ubiquitin-associated domain, and this interaction decreases upon treatment with EGF, thus suggesting that Ack1 moves away from p62/SQSTM1 compartments. Furthermore, Ack1 interacts and colocalises with NBR1, another autophagic receptor, and this colocalisation is enhanced in the presence of ectopically expressed p62/SQSTM1. Finally, knockdown of Ack1 results in accelerated localisation of EGFR to lysosomes upon treatment with EGF. Structure-function analyses of a panel of Ack1 deletion mutants revealed key mechanistic aspects of these relationships. The Mig6-homology domain and clathrin-binding domain both contribute to colocalisation with EGFR, whereas the UBA domain is essential for colocalisation with p62/SQSTM1, but not NBR1. Taken together, our studies demonstrate a novel role for Ack1 in diverting activated EGFR into a non-canonical degradative pathway, marked by association with p62/SQSTM1, NBR1 and Atg16L.

  11. Tyrosine phosphatases as key regulators of StAR induction and cholesterol transport: SHP2 as a potential tyrosine phosphatase involved in steroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Mariana; Mele, Pablo; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Orlando, Ulises; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-04-10

    The phospho-dephosphorylation of intermediate proteins is a key event in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. In this regard, it is well accepted that steroidogenic hormones act through the activation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. Although many cellular processes can be regulated by a crosstalk between different kinases and phosphatases, the relationship of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and tyrosine (Tyr)-dephosphorylation is a recently explored field in the regulation of steroid synthesis. Indeed in steroidogenic cells, one of the targets of hormone-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation is a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Whereas protein tyrosine phosphatases were initially regarded as household enzymes with constitutive activity, dephosphorylating all the substrates they encountered, evidence is now accumulating that protein tyrosine phosphatases are tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Here, we will describe the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis, relating them to steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, arachidonic acid metabolism and mitochondrial rearrangement.

  12. Structural basis for the glucan phosphatase activity of Starch Excess4

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Taylor, Adam O.; Pace, Rachel M.; Meekins, David A.; Guo, Hou-Fu; Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2010-11-12

    Living organisms utilize carbohydrates as essential energy storage molecules. Starch is the predominant carbohydrate storage molecule in plants while glycogen is utilized in animals. Starch is a water-insoluble polymer that requires the concerted activity of kinases and phosphatases to solubilize the outer surface of the glucan and mediate starch catabolism. All known plant genomes encode the glucan phosphatase Starch Excess4 (SEX4). SEX4 can dephosphorylate both the starch granule surface and soluble phosphoglucans and is necessary for processive starch metabolism. The physical basis for the function of SEX4 as a glucan phosphatase is currently unclear. Herein, we report the crystal structure of SEX4, containing phosphatase, carbohydrate-binding, and C-terminal domains. The three domains of SEX4 fold into a compact structure with extensive interdomain interactions. The C-terminal domain of SEX4 integrally folds into the core of the phosphatase domain and is essential for its stability. The phosphatase and carbohydrate-binding domains directly interact and position the phosphatase active site toward the carbohydrate-binding site in a single continuous pocket. Mutagenesis of the phosphatase domain residue F167, which forms the base of this pocket and bridges the two domains, selectively affects the ability of SEX4 to function as a glucan phosphatase. Together, these results reveal the unique tertiary architecture of SEX4 that provides the physical basis for its function as a glucan phosphatase.

  13. Dephosphorylation of chicken cardiac myofibril C-protein by protein phosphatases 1 and 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Thysseril, T.J.; Hegazy, M.G.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    C-Protein, which is a regulatory component of cardiac muscle myofibrils, is phosphorylated in response to US -adrenergic agonists by a cAMP-dependent mechanism and dephosphorylated in response to cholinergic agonists. It is believed that the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation is due to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The protein phosphatase(s) involved in the dephosphorylation of C-protein has not been determined. In this study, chicken cardiac C-protein was phosphorylated with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase to about 3 mol phosphate/mol C-protein. Incubation of (TSP)C-protein with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 or 2A rapidly removed 30-40% of TS(P). Phosphopeptide maps and phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the major site(s) dephosphorylated by either phosphatase was a phosphothreonine residue(s) located on the same tryptic peptide and on the same CNBr fragment. Increasing the incubation period or the phosphatase concentration did not result in any further dephosphorylation of C-protein by phosphatase 1, but phosphatase 2A completely dephosphorylated C-protein. Preliminary studies showed that the major protein phosphatase associated with the myofibril was phosphatase 2A. These results indicate the phosphatase 2A may be important in the regulation of the phosphorylation state of C-protein.

  14. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25±5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  15. Significance of the photosystem II core phosphatase PBCP for plant viability and protein repair in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Woodiwiss, Timothy; Knoerdel, Ryan; Zia, Ahmad; Wood, Magnus; Hoehner, Ricarda; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    PSII undergoes photodamage, which results in photoinhibition-the light-induced loss of photosynthetic activity. The main target of damage in PSII is the reaction center protein D1, which is buried in the massive 1.4 MDa PSII holocomplex. Plants have evolved a PSII repair cycle that degrades the damaged D1 subunit and replaces it with a newly synthesized copy. PSII core proteins, including D1, are phosphorylated in high light. This phosphorylation is important for the mobilization of photoinhibited PSII from stacked grana thylakoids to the repair machinery in distant unstacked stroma lamellae. It has been recognized that the degradation of the damaged D1 is more efficient after its dephosphorylation by a protein phosphatase. Recently a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C)-type PSII core phosphatase (PBCP) has been discovered, which is involved in the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. Its role in PSII repair, however, is unknown. Using a range of spectroscopic and biochemical techniques, we report that the inactivation of the PBCP gene affects the growth characteristic of plants, with a decreased biomass and altered PSII functionality. PBCP mutants show increased phosphorylation of core subunits in dark and photoinhibitory conditions and a diminished degradation of the D1 subunit. Our results on D1 turnover in PBCP mutants suggest that dephosphorylation of PSII subunits is required for efficient D1 degradation. PMID:24793754

  16. Calpain-catalyzed cleavage and subcellular relocation of protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Frangioni, J V; Oda, A; Smith, M; Salzman, E W; Neel, B G

    1993-01-01

    The non-transmembrane phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) is an abundant enzyme, normally localized to the cytosolic face of the endoplasmic reticulum via a C-terminal targeting sequence. We have found that agonist-induced platelet activation results in proteolytic cleavage of PTP-1B at a site upstream from this targeting sequence, causing subcellular relocation of its catalytic domain from membranes to the cytosol. PTP-1B cleavage is catalyzed by the calcium-dependent neutral protease calpain and is a general feature of platelet agonist-induced aggregation. Moreover, PTP-1B cleavage correlates with the transition from reversible to irreversible platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma. Engagement of gpIIb-IIIa is necessary for inducing PTP-1B cleavage, suggesting that integrins regulate tyrosine phosphatases as well as tyrosine kinases. PTP-1B cleavage is accompanied by a 2-fold stimulation of its enzymatic activity, as measured by immune complex phosphatase assay, and correlates with discrete changes in the pattern of tyrosyl phosphorylation. Cleavage and subcellular relocation of PTP-1B represents a novel mechanism for altering tyrosyl phosphorylation that may have important physiological implications in cell types other than platelets. Images PMID:8223493

  17. Host SHP1 phosphatase antagonizes Helicobacter pylori CagA and can be downregulated by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Saju, Priya; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hayashi, Takeru; Senda, Yoshie; Nagase, Lisa; Noda, Saori; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Funata, Sayaka; Kunita, Akiko; Urabe, Masayuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kaneda, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Most if not all gastric cancers are associated with chronic infection of the stomach mucosa with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains(1-4). Approximately 10% of gastric cancers also harbour Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the cancer cells(5,6). Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells via type IV secretion(7,8), the cagA-encoded CagA protein undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation on the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs initially by Src family kinases (SFKs) and then by c-Abl(9,10). Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA binds to the pro-oncogenic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and thereby deregulates the phosphatase activity(11,12), which has been considered to play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis(13). Here we show that the SHP2 homologue SHP1 interacts with CagA independently of the EPIYA motif. The interaction potentiates the phosphatase activity of SHP1 that dampens the oncogenic action of CagA by dephosphorylating the CagA EPIYA motifs. In vitro infection of gastric epithelial cells with EBV induces SHP1 promoter hypermethylation, which strengthens phosphorylation-dependent CagA action via epigenetic downregulation of SHP1 expression. Clinical specimens of EBV-positive gastric cancers also exhibit SHP1 hypermethylation with reduced SHP1 expression. The results reveal that SHP1 is the long-sought phosphatase that can antagonize CagA. Augmented H. pylori CagA activity, via SHP1 inhibition, might also contribute to the development of EBV-positive gastric cancer. PMID:27572445

  18. MAPK Phosphatase AP2C3 Induces Ectopic Proliferation of Epidermal Cells Leading to Stomata Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kazanaviciute, Vaiva; Magyar, Zoltan; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Unterwurzacher, Verena; Choopayak, Chonnanit; Boniecka, Justyna; Murray, James A. H.; Bogre, Laszlo; Meskiene, Irute

    2010-01-01

    In plant post-embryonic epidermis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes differentiation of pavement cells and inhibits initiation of stomata. Stomata are cells specialized to modulate gas exchange and water loss. Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3 and MPK6 are at the core of the signaling cascade; however, it is not well understood how the activity of these pleiotropic MAPKs is constrained spatially so that pavement cell differentiation is promoted only outside the stomata lineage. Here we identified a PP2C-type phosphatase termed AP2C3 (Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C) that is expressed distinctively during stomata development as well as interacts and inactivates MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. AP2C3 co-localizes with MAPKs within the nucleus and this localization depends on its N-terminal extension. We show that other closely related phosphatases AP2C2 and AP2C4 are also MAPK phosphatases acting on MPK6, but have a distinct expression pattern from AP2C3. In accordance with this, only AP2C3 ectopic expression is able to stimulate cell proliferation leading to excess stomata development. This function of AP2C3 relies on the domains required for MAPK docking and intracellular localization. Concomitantly, the constitutive and inducible AP2C3 expression deregulates E2F-RB pathway, promotes the abundance and activity of CDKA, as well as changes of CDKB1;1 forms. We suggest that AP2C3 downregulates the MAPK signaling activity to help maintain the balance between differentiation of stomata and pavement cells. PMID:21203456

  19. The Wip1 Phosphatase acts as a gatekeeper in the p53-Mdm2 autoregulatory loop.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongbin; Ma, Ou; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai; Jones, Stephen N; Oren, Moshe; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2007-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that responds to cellular stresses by initiating cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. One transcriptional target of p53 is Mdm2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that interacts with p53 to promote its proteasomal degradation in a negative feedback regulatory loop. Here we show that the wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1), or PPM1D, downregulates p53 protein levels by stabilizing Mdm2 and facilitating its access to p53. Wip1 interacts with and dephosphorylates Mdm2 at serine 395, a site phosphorylated by the ATM kinase. Dephosphorylated Mdm2 has increased stability and affinity for p53, facilitating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. Thus, Wip1 acts as a gatekeeper in the Mdm2-p53 regulatory loop by stabilizing Mdm2 and promoting Mdm2-mediated proteolysis of p53.

  20. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  1. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  2. Phosphate solubilization potential and phosphatase activity of rhizospheric trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Anil, Kapri; Lakshmi, Tewari

    2010-07-01

    Trichoderma sp., a well known biological control agent against several phytopathogens, was tested for its phosphate (P) solubilizing potential. Fourteen strains of Trichoderma sp. were isolated from the forest tree rhizospheres of pinus, deodar, bamboo, guava and oak on Trichoderma selective medium. The isolates were tested for their in-vitro P-solubilizing potential using National Botanical Research Institute Phosphate (NBRIP) broth containing tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as the sole P source, and compared with a standard culture of T. harzianum. All the cultures were found to solubilize TCP but with varying potential. The isolate DRT-1 showed maximum amount of soluble phosphate (404.07 εg.ml(-1)), followed by the standard culture of T. harzianum (386.42 εg.ml(-1)) after 96 h of incubation at 30±1(0)C. Extra-cellular acid and alkaline phosphatases of the fungus were induced only in the presence of insoluble phosphorus source (TCP). High extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity was recorded for the isolate DRT-1 (14.50 U.ml(-1)) followed by the standard culture (13.41 U.ml(-1)) at 72h. The cultures showed much lesser acid phosphatase activities. Under glasshouse conditions, Trichoderma sp. inoculation increased chickpea (Cicer arietinum) growth parameters including shoot length, root length, fresh and dry weight of shoot as well as roots, in P-deficient soil containing only bound phosphate (TCP). Shoot weight was increased by 23% and 33% by inoculation with the isolate DRT-1 in the soil amended with 100 and 200 mg TCP kg(-1) soil, respectively, after 60 d of sowing. The study explores high P-solubilizing potential of Trichoderma sp., which can be exploited for the solubilization of fixed phosphates present in the soil, thereby enhancing soil fertility and plant growth.

  3. Graphical techniques for kinetic data analyses of alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.W.; Brand, H.R.

    1980-09-01

    The use of an automated reactor for the experimentation and on-line graphics for the rapid and exhaustive analysis of experimental data is described. Traditional (linear) methods are used for selecting the most promising model for the alkaline phosphatase catalyzed reaction from a set of ten models under consideration. Then, nonlinear techniques for model selection are used and compared with traditional techniques. In both approaches, interactive graphics techniques are used to advantage for evaluating various models and for examining the quality of the experimental data.

  4. Structural Basis for Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulation and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Peti, Wolfgang; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. However, the free catalytic subunit of PP1, while an effective enzyme, lacks substrate specificity. Instead, it depends on a diverse set of regulatory proteins (≥200) to confer specificity towards distinct substrates. Here, we discuss recent advances in structural studies of PP1 holoenzyme complexes and summarize the new insights these studies have provided into the molecular basis of PP1 regulation and specificity. PMID:22284538

  5. A description of alkaline phosphatases from marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiyuan; Jia, Hongbing; Yu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are non-specific phosphohydrolases, and they are widely used in clinical diagnostics and biological studies. APs are widespread in nature and exhibit different structural formulations. Based on the diversity of biogenetic sources, APs exhibit temperature-propensity traits, and they are classified as psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic. In this article, the characteristics of psychrophilic APs from marine organisms were described, accompanied by a simple description of APs from other organisms. This review will facilitate better utilization of marine APs in the biotechnology field.

  6. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  7. How Important Is the Phosphatase Activity of Sensor Kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    In two-component signaling systems, phosphorylated response regulators (RRs) are often dephosphorylated by their partner kinases in order to control the in vivo concentration of phospho-RR (RR~P). This activity is easily demonstrated in vitro, but these experiments have typically used very high concentrations of the histidine kinase (HK) compared to the RR~P. Many two-component systems exhibit exquisite control over the ratio of HK to RR in vivo. The question thus arises as to whether the phosphatase activity of HKs is significant in vivo. This topic will be explored in the present review. PMID:20223700

  8. Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Barrozo, Alexandre; Duarte, Fernanda; Bauer, Paul; Carvalho, Alexandra T P; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2015-07-22

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design.

  9. Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design. PMID:26091851

  10. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects.

  11. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects. PMID:26592247

  12. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  13. Regan isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase as a tumour marker for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, J; Pattman, S; Jenkinson, F; Quinton, R

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme present in all tissues of the human body. Several isoforms of this enzyme have been described with different catalytic nature, stability and antigenic structure. Rises in the activity of alkaline phosphatase are recognised in various states including bone diseases, liver disease, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and malignant processes. The Regan isoenzyme, a rare variant of placental alkaline phosphatase, has been identified circulating in association with various tumours. The reported case describes a rising Regan isoform of alkaline phosphatase concentrations that led to a new diagnosis of occult renal cell carcinoma and persistently elevated activity postoperatively signposting persistent or recurrent disease.

  14. Hepatic Src Homology Phosphatase 2 Regulates Energy Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoto; Matsuo, Kosuke; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Bakke, Jesse; Matsuo, Izumi; Graham, James; Xi, Yannan; Liu, Siming; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalia; Gray, Susan; Jung, Dae Young; Ramsey, Jon J.; Kim, Jason K.; Cortopassi, Gino; Havel, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase Src homology phosphatase 2 (Shp2) is a negative regulator of hepatic insulin action in mice fed regular chow. To investigate the role of hepatic Shp2 in lipid metabolism and energy balance, we determined the metabolic effects of its deletion in mice challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD). We analyzed body mass, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose tolerance in liver-specific Shp2-deficient mice (referred to herein as LSHKO) and control mice fed HFD. Hepatic Shp2 protein expression is regulated by nutritional status, increasing in mice fed HFD and decreasing during fasting. LSHKO mice gained less weight and exhibited increased energy expenditure compared with control mice. In addition, hepatic Shp2 deficiency led to decreased liver steatosis, enhanced insulin-induced suppression of hepatic glucose production, and impeded the development of insulin resistance after high-fat feeding. At the molecular level, LSHKO exhibited decreased hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation compared with control mice. In addition, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of total and mitochondrial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were enhanced in LSHKO compared with control mice. In line with this observation and the increased energy expenditure of LSHKO, oxygen consumption rate was higher in liver mitochondria of LSHKO compared with controls. Collectively, these studies identify hepatic Shp2 as a novel regulator of systemic energy balance under conditions of high-fat feeding. PMID:22619361

  15. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Functional Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Souad; Hego, Alexandre; Delierneux, Céline; Wéra, Odile; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are small blood cells derived from cytoplasmic fragments of megakaryocytes and play an essential role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelet activation depends on the rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key signaling molecules, and a number of kinases and phosphatases have been identified as major regulators of platelet function. However, the investigation of novel signaling proteins has suffered from technical limitations due to the anucleate nature of platelets and their very limited levels of mRNA and de novo protein synthesis. In the past, experimental methods were restricted to the generation of genetically modified mice and the development of specific antibodies. More recently, novel (phospho)proteomic technologies and pharmacological approaches using specific small-molecule inhibitors have added additional capabilities to investigate specific platelet proteins.In this chapter, we report methods for using genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the function of platelet signaling proteins. While the described experiments focus on the role of the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling, the presented methods are applicable to any signaling enzyme. Specifically, we describe a testing strategy that includes (1) aggregation and secretion experiments with mouse and human platelets, (2) immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays to study platelet signaling events, (3) detailed protocols to use selected animal models in order to investigate thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo, and (4) strategies for utilizing pharmacological inhibitors on human platelets. PMID:27514813

  17. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  18. Spatial control of protein phosphatase 2A (de)methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Longin, Sari; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Martens, Ellen; Louis, Justin V.; Rondelez, Evelien; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Reversible methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A{sub C}) is an important regulatory mechanism playing a crucial role in the selective recruitment of regulatory B subunits. Here, we investigated the subcellular localization of leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1), the two enzymes catalyzing this process. The results show that PME-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors a functional nuclear localization signal, whereas LCMT1 is underrepresented in the nucleus and mainly localizes to the cytoplasm, Golgi region and late endosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence with methylation-sensitive anti-PP2A{sub C} antibodies revealed a good correlation with the methylation status of PP2A{sub C}, demethylated PP2A{sub C} being substantially nuclear. Throughout mitosis, demethylated PP2A{sub C} is associated with the mitotic spindle and during cytokinesis with the cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PME-1, but not of an inactive mutant, results in increased demethylation of PP2A{sub C} in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of a cytoplasmic PME-1 mutant lacking the NLS results in increased demethylation in the cytoplasm-in all cases, however, without any obvious functional consequences. PME-1 associates with an inactive PP2A population, regardless of its esterase activity or localization. We propose that stabilization of this inactive, nuclear PP2A pool is a major in vivo function of PME-1.

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  20. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  1. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  2. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  3. The tyrosine phosphatase PTPRO sensitizes colon cancer cells to anti-EGFR therapy through activation of SRC-mediated EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Asbagh, Layka Abbasi; Vazquez, Iria; Vecchione, Loredana; Budinska, Eva; De Vriendt, Veerle; Baietti, Maria Francesca; Steklov, Mikhail; Jacobs, Bart; Hoe, Nicholas; Singh, Sharat; Imjeti, Naga-Sailaja; Zimmermann, Pascale; Sablina, Anna; Tejpar, Sabine

    2014-10-30

    Inappropriate activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a causal role in many cancers including colon cancer. The activation of EGFR by phosphorylation is balanced by receptor kinase and protein tyrosine phosphatase activities. However, the mechanisms of negative EGFR regulation by tyrosine phosphatases remain largely unexplored. Our previous results indicate that protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) is down-regulated in a subset of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with a poor prognosis. Here we identified PTPRO as a phosphatase that negatively regulates SRC by directly dephosphorylating Y416 phosphorylation site. SRC activation triggered by PTPRO down-regulation induces phosphorylation of both EGFR at Y845 and the c-CBL ubiquitin ligase at Y731. Increased EGFR phosphorylation at Y845 promotes its receptor activity, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of c-CBL triggers its degradation promoting EGFR stability. Importantly, hyperactivation of SRC/EGFR signaling triggered by loss of PTPRO leads to high resistance of colon cancer to EGFR inhibitors. Our results not only highlight the PTPRO contribution in negative regulation of SRC/EGFR signaling but also suggest that tumors with low PTPRO expression may be therapeutically targetable by anti-SRC therapies. PMID:25301722

  4. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  5. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. SAC phosphoinositide phosphatases at the tonoplast mediate vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Petra; Hirsch, Sibylle; Feraru, Elena; Tejos, Ricardo; van Wijk, Ringo; Viaene, Tom; Heilmann, Mareike; Lerche, Jennifer; De Rycke, Riet; Feraru, Mugurel I.; Grones, Peter; Van Montagu, Marc; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is a structural phospholipid that can be phosphorylated into various lipid signaling molecules, designated polyphosphoinositides (PPIs). The reversible phosphorylation of PPIs on the 3, 4, or 5 position of inositol is performed by a set of organelle-specific kinases and phosphatases, and the characteristic head groups make these molecules ideal for regulating biological processes in time and space. In yeast and mammals, PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P2 play crucial roles in trafficking toward the lytic compartments, whereas the role in plants is not yet fully understood. Here we identified the role of a land plant-specific subgroup of PPI phosphatases, the suppressor of actin 2 (SAC2) to SAC5, during vacuolar trafficking and morphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. SAC2–SAC5 localize to the tonoplast along with PtdIns3P, the presumable product of their activity. In SAC gain- and loss-of-function mutants, the levels of PtdIns monophosphates and bisphosphates were changed, with opposite effects on the morphology of storage and lytic vacuoles, and the trafficking toward the vacuoles was defective. Moreover, multiple sac knockout mutants had an increased number of smaller storage and lytic vacuoles, whereas extralarge vacuoles were observed in the overexpression lines, correlating with various growth and developmental defects. The fragmented vacuolar phenotype of sac mutants could be mimicked by treating wild-type seedlings with PtdIns(3,5)P2, corroborating that this PPI is important for vacuole morphology. Taken together, these results provide evidence that PPIs, together with their metabolic enzymes SAC2–SAC5, are crucial for vacuolar trafficking and for vacuolar morphology and function in plants. PMID:24550313

  7. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  8. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  9. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Knockout Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Cardiac Depression: Role of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Byra, Emily A.; Yu, Lu; Hu, Nan; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction possibly due to the toxicity of ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the influence of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) knockout (KO) on acute ethanol exposure-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to acute ethanol (3 g/kg, i.p.) challenge and cardiomyocyte contractile function was assessed 24 hrs later using an IonOptix® edge-detection system. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate ALDH2, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). ALDH2 KO accentuated ethanol-induced elevation in cardiac acetaldehyde levels. Ethanol exposure depressed cardiomyocyte contractile function including decreased cell shortening amplitude and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening as well as prolonged relengthening duration and a greater decline in peak shortening in response to increasing stimulus frequency, the effect of which was significantly exaggerated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO also unmasked an ethanol-induced prolongation of shortening duration. In addition, short-term in vitro incubation of ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte mechanical defects were exacerbated by the ALDH inhibitor cyanamide. Ethanol treatment dampened phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β associated with up-regulated PP2A, which was accentuated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO aggravated ethanol-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results suggested that ALDH2 deficiency led to worsened ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte function, possibly due to upregulated expression of protein phosphatase, depressed Akt activation and subsequently impaired mitochondrial function. These findings depict a critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:20362583

  10. Histone H3 as a novel substrate for MAP kinase phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Corttrell M; Chandrasekharan, Unni M; Yang, Lin; Shen, Jianzhong; Kinter, Michael; McDermott, Michael S; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is a nuclear, dual-specificity phosphatase that has been shown to dephosphorylate MAP kinases. We used a "substrate-trap" technique involving a mutation in MKP-1 of the catalytically critical cysteine to a serine residue ("CS" mutant) to capture novel MKP-1 substrates. We transfected the MKP-1 (CS) mutant and control (wild-type, WT) constructs into phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated COS-1 cells. MKP-1-substrate complexes were immunoprecipitated, which yielded four bands of 17, 15, 14, and 10 kDa with the CS MKP-1 mutant but not the WT MKP-1. The bands were identified by mass spectrometry as histones H3, H2B, H2A, and H4, respectively. Histone H3 was phosphorylated, and purified MKP-1 dephosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) in vitro; whereas, histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) was unaffected. We have previously shown that thrombin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upregulated MKP-1 in human endothelial cells (EC). We now show that both thrombin and VEGF caused dephosphorylation of histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) and histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) in EC with kinetics consistent with MKP-1 induction. Furthermore, MKP-1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation but had no effect on H3 (phospho-Thr-3 or Thr-11) dephosphorylation. In summary, histone H3 is a novel substrate of MKP-1, and VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation requires MKP-1. We propose that MKP-1-mediated H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation is a key regulatory step in EC activation by VEGF and thrombin. PMID:19020052

  11. Knockout of Density-Enhanced Phosphatase-1 Impairs Cerebrovascular Reserve Capacity in an Arteriogenesis Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hackbusch, Daniel; Dülsner, André; Gatzke, Nora; Krüger, Janine; Hillmeister, Philipp; Nagorka, Stephanie; Blaschke, Florian; Ritter, Zully; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Böhmer, Frank-D.; Buschmann, Ivo; Kappert, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Collateral growth, arteriogenesis, represents a proliferative mechanism involving endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Here we investigated the role of Density-Enhanced Phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) in arteriogenesis in vivo, a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase that has controversially been discussed with regard to vascular cell biology. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice subjected to permanent left common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO) developed a significant diameter increase in distinct arteries of the circle of Willis, especially in the anterior cerebral artery. Analyzing the impact of loss of DEP-1 function, induction of collateralization was quantified after CCAO and hindlimb femoral artery ligation comparing wild-type and DEP-1−/− mice. Both cerebral collateralization assessed by latex perfusion and peripheral vessel growth in the femoral artery determined by microsphere perfusion and micro-CT analysis were not altered in DEP-1−/− compared to wild-type mice. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity, however, was significantly impaired in DEP-1−/− mice. Cerebrovascular transcriptional analysis of proarteriogenic growth factors and receptors showed specifically reduced transcripts of PDGF-B. SiRNA knockdown of DEP-1 in endothelial cells in vitro also resulted in significant PDGF-B downregulation, providing further evidence for DEP-1 in PDGF-B gene regulation. In summary, our data support the notion of DEP-1 as positive functional regulator in vascular cerebral arteriogenesis, involving differential PDGF-B gene expression. PMID:24027763

  12. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E; Gunn, John S

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  13. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G.; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E.; Gunn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  14. Environmental photoinactivation of extracellular phosphatases and the effects of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Elisabeth M L; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-01-20

    Alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous extracellular enzymes in aquatic systems and play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus. Yet, the photochemical stability of phosphatase and effects of natural organic matter (DOM) are not completely understood. We demonstrate that phosphatase activity in natural biofilm samples decreased during sunlight exposure similar to well-defined bacterial phosphatase solutions. Direct photoinactivation was slowed by more than 50% in the presence of redox-active dissolved organic matter (DOM, 10 mgC L(–1)) or a model antioxidant (esculetin, 50 μM), even after light screening effects had been accounted for. Thus, DOM can not only inhibit enzymes (in the dark) or sensitize photodegradation by producing photochemically produced reactive intermediates but can also significantly quench direct photoinactivation of phosphatase. Our data further suggest that direct photooxidation of tryptophan residues within the protein structure are significantly involved in the photoinactivation of phosphatase because a loss of tryptophan-like fluorescence paralleled photoinactivation kinetics and because DOM acted as an antioxidant toward photoinactivation, a phenomenon recently established for the photooxidation of freely dissolved tryptophan. Thus, photoinactivation of phosphatase can be significantly slowed in the presence of naturally occurring antioxidants like DOM. The mechanistic link between tryptophan photooxidation and inactivation of phosphatase may have applicability to other extracellular enzymes but remains to be established.

  15. Conserved sequence motifs among bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphatases that define a new phosphohydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Thaller, M C; Schippa, S; Rossolini, G M

    1998-07-01

    Members of a new molecular family of bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs), indicated as class C, were found to share significant sequence similarities to bacterial class B NSAPs and to some plant acid phosphatases, representing the first example of a family of bacterial NSAPs that has a relatively close eukaryotic counterpart. Despite the lack of an overall similarity, conserved sequence motifs were also identified among the above enzyme families (class B and class C bacterial NSAPs, and related plant phosphatases) and several other families of phosphohydrolases, including bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatases, histidinol-phosphatase domains of the bacterial bifunctional enzymes imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratases, and bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphoserine phosphatases and threalose-6-phosphatases. These conserved motifs are clustered within two domains, separated by a variable spacer region, according to the pattern [FILMAVT]-D-[ILFRMVY]-D-[GSNDE]-[TV]-[ILVAM]-[AT S VILMC]-X-¿YFWHKR)-X-¿YFWHNQ¿-X( 102,191)-¿KRHNQ¿-G-D-¿FYWHILVMC¿-¿QNH¿-¿FWYGP¿-D -¿PSNQYW¿. The dephosphorylating activity common to all these proteins supports the definition of this phosphatase motif and the inclusion of these enzymes into a superfamily of phosphohydrolases that we propose to indicate as "DDDD" after the presence of the four invariant aspartate residues. Database searches retrieved various hypothetical proteins of unknown function containing this or similar motifs, for which a phosphohydrolase activity could be hypothesized.

  16. Identification of a Photosystem II Phosphatase Involved in Light Acclimation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Samol, Iga; Shapiguzov, Alexey; Ingelsson, Björn; Fucile, Geoffrey; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Vener, Alexander V.; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a major role in the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changes in light. Two paralogous kinases phosphorylate subsets of thylakoid membrane proteins. STATE TRANSITION7 (STN7) phosphorylates LHCII, the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII), to balance the activity of the two photosystems through state transitions. STN8, which is mainly involved in phosphorylation of PSII core subunits, influences folding of the thylakoid membranes and repair of PSII after photodamage. The rapid reversibility of these acclimatory responses requires the action of protein phosphatases. In a reverse genetic screen, we identified the chloroplast PP2C phosphatase, PHOTOSYSTEM II CORE PHOSPHATASE (PBCP), which is required for efficient dephosphorylation of PSII proteins. Its targets, identified by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, largely coincide with those of the kinase STN8. The recombinant phosphatase is active in vitro on a synthetic substrate or on isolated thylakoids. Thylakoid folding is affected in the absence of PBCP, while its overexpression alters the kinetics of state transitions. PBCP and STN8 form an antagonistic kinase and phosphatase pair whose substrate specificity and physiological functions are distinct from those of STN7 and the counteracting phosphatase PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE1/THYLAKOID-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHATASE38, but their activities may overlap to some degree. PMID:22706287

  17. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Crop Rotation Impacts on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a species with a low efficiency of acquiring soil P. Rotation crops may potentially influence P uptake by potato by increasing soil organic acids, phosphatase activity, and microbial biomass. However, this kind of information is very limited. We measured the activities of acid phosphatase,...

  18. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  19. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  20. Intramolecular dynamics of structure of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, Vladimir M.; Mjakinnik, Igor V.; Volkova, Alena N.

    1995-01-01

    The luminescent analysis with nano- and millisecond time resolution of intramolecular dynamics of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase was carried out. The effect of pH within the range 7.2 - 9.0, thermal inactivation, limited proteolysis by trypsin, binding of pyrophosphate, interconversion of enzyme and apoenzyme, the replacement of Zn2+ and Mg2+ in the active site by Cd2+ and Ni2+ on the spectral and kinetic parameters of luminescence was investigated. The essential changes of the level of nano- and millisecond dynamics of protein structure were found to correlate with the shift of enzymatic activity. The importance of small- and large-scale flexibility of protein structure for the act of enzymatic catalysis realization was shown.

  1. Establishing Quantitative Standards for Residual Alkaline Phosphatase in Pasteurized Milk

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Kwang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay is a rapid and convenient method for verifying milk pasteurization. Since colorimetric ALP assays rely on subjective visual assessments, their results are especially unreliable near the detection limits. In this study, we attempted to establish quantitative criteria for residual ALP in milk by using a more objective method based on spectrophotometric measurements. Raw milk was heat-treated for 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 min and then subjected to ALP assays. The quantitative criteria for residual ALP in the milk was determined as 2 μg phenol/mL of milk, which is just above the ALP value of milk samples heat-treated for 30 min. These newly proposed methodology and criteria could facilitate the microbiological quality control of milk. PMID:27194927

  2. Significantly Elevated Liver Alkaline Phosphatase in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shamban, Leonid; Patel, Brijesh; Williams, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy can have a mildly elevated liver profile, which should normalize with appropriate therapy. Liver specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in decompensated heart failure (HF) can be mildly elevated. The levels exceeding beyond the expected rise should be a concern and lead to further investigation. The literature reports insubstantial number of cases regarding significantly elevated levels of ALP and congestive hepatopathy. We report a case of a 45-year-old female with known history of severe cardiomyopathy that had persistently elevated levels of ALP. The extensive workup was negative for any specific pathology. The liver biopsy was consistent with congestive hepatopathy. The patient’s ALP levels decreased with aggressive diuretic therapy but still remained elevated.

  3. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  4. Covalent Docking Predicts Substrates for Haloalkanoate Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme function prediction remains an important open problem. Though structure-based modeling, such as metabolite docking, can identify substrates of some enzymes, it is ill-suited to reactions that progress through a covalent intermediate. Here we investigated the ability of covalent docking to identify substrates that pass through such a covalent intermediate, focusing particularly on the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily. In retrospective assessments, covalent docking recapitulated substrate binding modes of known cocrystal structures and identified experimental substrates from a set of putative phosphorylated metabolites. In comparison, noncovalent docking of high-energy intermediates yielded nonproductive poses. In prospective predictions against seven enzymes, a substrate was identified for five. For one of those cases, a covalent docking prediction, confirmed by empirical screening, and combined with genomic context analysis, suggested the identity of the enzyme that catalyzes the orphan phosphatase reaction in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway of Bacteroides. PMID:25513739

  5. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  6. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  7. Phosphatase Under-Producer Mutants Have Altered Phosphorus Relations1

    PubMed Central

    Tomscha, Jennifer L.; Trull, Melanie C.; Deikman, Jill; Lynch, Jonathan P.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) acquisition and partitioning are essential for plant homeostasis. P is available for plant uptake when in its inorganic form (H2PO4−, or Pi), but Pi is often limiting in soils. Plants secrete acid phosphatases (APases) into the apoplastic space, which may be important for obtaining Pi from organic P sources; however, the relative importance of these enzymes for plant P nutrition has yet to be determined. We demonstrate that the root-associated APase pool is increased in Arabidopsis when Pi is limiting and document five APase isoforms secreted from Arabidopsis roots. Previously, we presented the identification of the phosphatase under-producer (pup) mutants, which have decreased in vivo root APase staining when grown under low P conditions. Here, we present the characterization of one of these, pup3, and further studies with pup1. pup3 has 49%, 38%, and 37% less specific APase activity in exudates, roots, and shoots, respectively. Root-associated APase activity is decreased by 16% in pup1 and 25% in pup3, regardless of P treatment. Two APase activity isoforms are reduced in pup3 exudates, and root and shoot isoforms are also affected. One of the two exudate isoforms is recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised to an Arabidopsis purple APase recombinant protein (AtPAP12); however, AtPAP12 transcript levels are unaffected in the mutant. The pup3 mutation was mapped to 68.4 ± 6.0 centimorgans on chromosome 5. Although P concentrations were not altered in pup1 and pup3 tissues when grown in nutrient solution in which Pi was the sole source of P, the mutants had 10% (pup1) and 17% (pup3) lower shoot P concentrations when grown in a peat-vermiculite mix in which the majority of the total P was present as organic P. Therefore, the pup defects, which include secreted APases, are functionally important for plant P nutrition. PMID:15122033

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase regulation of endothelial cell apoptosis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Chang, J; Gorospe, M; Passaniti, A

    1996-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, occurs during development and may also be an important factor in many diseases. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways regulating apoptosis. In these studies, loss of endothelial cell-substrate attachment and apoptosis after removal of growth factors was associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues at the cell periphery. Dephosphorylation of total cellular proteins accompanied apoptosis and was reduced by orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Orthovanadate blocked the fragmentation of nuclear DNA, inhibited DNA laddering, and suppressed the expression of TRPM-2, an apoptosis-associated gene. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of FAK125, erk1 (mitogen-activated kinase kinase), and cdc-2 were reduced during apoptosis. FAK125 dephosphorylation was inhibited by orthovanadate, but premature activation (tyrosine dephosphorylation) of cdc-2 was not. Orthovanadate was as effective as basic fibroblast growth factor in activating erk1 without increasing cell proliferation and in preventing the apoptosis of endothelial cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha. Endothelial cell differentiation on extracellular matrix (Matrigel) was also stimulated by orthovanadate in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1) was down-regulated during the early stages of differentiation, remained low for at least 6 hours as differentiation proceeded, and increased upon completion of differentiation. Cells that failed to down-regulate p21 mRNA on Matrigel in the absence of angiogenic factors underwent apoptosis. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatases are actively involved in signal transduction during apoptosis and may regulate p21 expression to inhibit endothelial cell differentiation.

  9. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  10. Cortisol modification of HeLa 65 alkaline phosphatase. Decreased phosphate content of the induced enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bazzell, K L; Price, G; Tu, S; Griffin, M

    1976-01-15

    Alkaline phosphatase activity of HeLa cells is increased 5-20-fold during growth in medium with cortisol. The increase in enzyme activity is due to an enhanced catalytic efficiency rather than an increase in alkaline phosphatase protein in induced cells. In the present study the chemical composition of control and induced forms of alkaline phosphatase were investigated to determine the enzyme modification that may be responsible for the increased catalytic activity. HeLa alkaline phosphatase is a phosphoprotein and the induced form of the enzyme has approximately one-half of the phosphate residues associated with control enzyme. The decrease in phosphate residues of the enzyme apparently alters its catalytic activity. Other chemical components of purified alkaline phosphatase from control and induced cells are similar; these include sialic acid, hexosamine and sulfhydryl residues. PMID:1248469

  11. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  12. Alkaline, acid, and neutral phosphatase activities are induced during development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, R A; Zusman, D R

    1990-01-01

    One of the signals that has been reported to be important in stimulating fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus is starvation for phosphate. We therefore chose to study phosphatase activity during M. xanthus development. Many phosphatases can cleave the substrate p-nitrophenol phosphate. Using this substrate in buffers at various pHs, we obtained a profile of phosphatase activities during development and germination of M. xanthus. These experiments indicated that there are five patterns of phosphatase activity in M. xanthus: two vegetative and three developmental. The two uniquely vegetative activities have pH optima at 7.2 and 8.5. Both require magnesium and both are inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The developmental (spores) patterns of activity have pH optima of 5.2, 7.2, and 8.5. All three activities are Mg independent. Only the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by dithiothreitol. The acid phosphatase activity is induced very early in development, within the first 2 to 4 h. Both the neutral and alkaline phosphatase Mg-independent activities are induced much later, about the time that myxospores become evident (24 to 30 h). The three activities are greatly diminished upon germination; however, the kinetics of loss differ for all three. The acid phosphatase activity declines very rapidly, the neutral activity begins to decline only after spores begin to convert to rods, and the alkaline phosphatase activity remains high until the time the cells begin to divide. All three developmental activities were measured in the developmental signalling mutants carrying asg, csg, and dsg. The pattern of expression obtained in the mutants was consistent with that of other developmentally regulated genes which exhibit similar patterns of expression during development. The ease with which phosphatases can be assayed should make the activities described in this report useful biochemical markers of stages of both fruiting body formation and

  13. Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C contributes to glucose regulation of SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Amparo; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2013-10-25

    The SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) function in energy regulation in eukaryotic cells. SNF1/AMPKs are αβγ heterotrimers that are activated by phosphorylation of the activation loop Thr on the catalytic subunit. Protein kinases that activate SNF1/AMPK have been identified, but the protein phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of the activation loop are less well defined. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1/AMPK, Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase 1 and Sit4 type 2A-related phosphatase function together to dephosphorylate Thr-210 on the Snf1 catalytic subunit during growth on high concentrations of glucose; reg1Δ and sit4Δ single mutations do not impair dephosphorylation when inappropriate glycogen synthesis, also caused by these mutations, is blocked. We here present evidence that Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C also has a role in dephosphorylation of Snf1 Thr-210 in vivo. The sit4Δ ptc1Δ mutant exhibited partial defects in regulation of the phosphorylation state of Snf1. The reg1Δ ptc1Δ mutant was viable only when expressing mutant Snf1 proteins with reduced kinase activity, and Thr-210 phosphorylation of the mutant SNF1 heterotrimers was substantially elevated during growth on high glucose. This evidence, together with findings on the reg1Δ sit4Δ mutant, indicates that although Reg1-Glc7 plays the major role, all three phosphatases contribute to maintenance of the Snf1 activation loop in the dephosphorylated state during growth on high glucose. Ptc1 has overlapping functions with Reg1-Glc7 and Sit4 in glucose regulation of SNF1/AMPK and cell viability.

  14. Regulation of avoidant behaviors and pain by the anti-inflammatory tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    HUDSON, CHAD A.; CHRISTOPHI, GEORGE P.; CAO, LING; GRUBER, ROSS C.

    2007-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is a critical regulator of cytokine signaling and inflammation. Mice homozygous for a null allele at the SHP-1 locus have a phenotype of severe inflammation and are hyper-responsive to the TLR4 ligand LPS. TLR4 stimulation in the CNS has been linked to both neuropathic pain and sickness behaviors. To determine if reduction in SHP-1 expression affects LPS-induced behaviors, responses of heterozygous SHP-1-deficient (me/+) and wild-type (+/+) mice to LPS were measured. Chronic (4-week) treatment with LPS induced avoidant behaviors indicative of fear/anxiety in me/+, but not +/+, mice. These behaviors were correlated with a LPS-induced type 2 cytokine, cytokine receptor, and immune effector arginase profile in the brains of me/+ mice not found in +/+ mice. Me/+ mice also had a constitutively greater level of TLR4 in the CNS than +/+ mice. Additionally, me/+ mice displayed constitutively increased thermal sensitivity compared to +/+ mice, measured by the tail-flick test. Moreover, me/+ glial cultures were more responsive to LPS than +/+ glia. Therefore, the reduced expression of SHP-1 in me/+ imparts haploinsufficiency with respect to the control of CNS TLR4 and pain signaling. Furthermore, type 2 cytokines become prevalent during chronic TLR4 hyperstimulation in the CNS and are associated positively with behaviors that are usually linked to type 1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings question the notion that type 2 immunity is solely anti-inflammatory in the CNS and indicate that type 2 immunity induces/potentiates CNS inflammatory processes. PMID:18250891

  15. Dephosphorylation of CDK9 by protein phosphatase 2A and protein phosphatase-1 in Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Washington, Kareem; Debebe, Zufan; Brady, John; Nekhai, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Tat protein recruits human positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb, consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T1, to HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. CDK9 is maintained in dephosphorylated state by TFIIH and undergo phosphorylation upon the dissociation of TFIIH. Thus, dephosphorylation of CDK9 prior to its association with HIV-1 preinitiation complex might be important for HIV-1 transcription. Others and we previously showed that protein phosphatase-2A and protein phosphatase-1 regulates HIV-1 transcription. In the present study we analyze relative contribution of PP2A and PP1 to dephosphorylation of CDK9 and to HIV-1 transcription in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, PP2A but not PP1 dephosphorylated autophosphorylated CDK9 and reduced complex formation between P-TEFb, Tat and TAR RNA. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid inhibited basal as well as Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription whereas inhibition of PP1 by recombinant nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) inhibited only Tat-induced transcription in vitro. In cultured cells, low concentration of okadaic acid, inhibitory for PP2A, only mildly inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription. In contrast Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription was strongly inhibited by expression of NIPP1. Okadaic acid induced phosphorylation of endogenous as well transiently expressed CDK9, but this induction was not seen in the cells expressing NIPP1. Also the okadaic acid did not induce phosphorylation of CDK9 with mutation of Thr 186 or with mutations in Ser-329, Thr-330, Thr-333, Ser-334, Ser-347, Thr-350, Ser-353, and Thr-354 residues involved in autophosphorylation of CDK9. Conclusion Our results indicate that although PP2A dephosphorylates autophosphorylated CDK9 in vitro, in cultured cells PP1 is likely to dephosphorylate CDK9 and contribute to the regulation of activated HIV-1 transcription. PMID:16048649

  16. Comparative evaluation of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium alkaline phosphatase antigenicity by the alkaline phosphatase immunoassay (APIA).

    PubMed

    Cesari, I M; Ballén, D E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, A; Pointier, J-P; Kombila, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Théron, A

    2014-04-01

    To know if alkaline phosphatase (AP) from schistosomes other than Schistosoma mansoni can be used as diagnostic marker for schistosomiasis in alkaline phosphatase immunocapture assay (APIA), we comparatively tested n-butanol extracts of adult worm membranes from a Venezuelan (JL) strain of S. mansoni (Ven/AWBE/Sm); a Cameroonian (EDEN) strain of Schistosoma intercalatum (Cam/AWBE/Si) and a Yemeni strain of Schistosoma haematobium (Yem/AWBE/Sh). APIA was evaluated with sera of patients from Venezuela, Senegal, and Gabon infected with S. mansoni, from Gabon infected with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium, from Chine infected with Schistosoma japonicum and from Cambodian patients infected with Schistosoma mekongi. Results indicate that 92.5% (37/40) of Venezuela sera, 75% (15/20) of Senegal sera, 39.5% (17/43) of S. haematobium sera, and 19.2% (5/26) S. intercalatum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm preparation. APIA with the Cam/AWBE/Si preparation showed that 53.8% of S. intercalatum-positive sera had anti-AP antibodies, and 51.2% S. haematobium-positive sera cross-immunocapturing the S. intercalatum AP. APIA performed with Yem/AWBE/Sh showed that 55.8% S. haematobium sera were positive. Only two out of nine S. japonicum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm and Cam/AWBE/Si, and no reaction was observed with Cambodian S. mekongi-positive sera. AP activity was shown to be present in all the schistosome species/strains studied. The use of APIA as a tool to explore the APs antigenicity and the presence of Schistosoma sp. infections through the detection of anti-Schistosoma sp. AP antibodies in a host, allowed us to demonstrate the antigenicity of APs of S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, and S. haematobium.

  17. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26755581

  18. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase PTPRO inhibits trigeminal axon growth and branching by repressing TrkB and Ret signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Graziana; Dudanova, Irina; Suetterlin, Philipp; Davies, Alun M.; Drescher, Uwe; Bixby, John L.; Klein, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Axonal branches of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) display characteristic growth and arborization patterns during development. Subsets of TG neurons express different receptors for growth factors, but these are unlikely to explain the unique patterns of axonal arborizations. Intrinsic modulators may restrict or enhance cellular responses to specific ligands and thereby contribute to the development of axon growth patterns. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) which is required for Eph receptor-dependent retinotectal development in chick and for development of subsets of trunk sensory neurons in mouse, may be such an intrinsic modulator of TG neuron development. PTPRO is expressed mainly in TrkB+ and Ret+ mechanoreceptors within the TG during embryogenesis. In PTPRO mutant mice, subsets of TG neurons grow longer and more elaborate axonal branches. Cultured PTPRO−/− TG neurons display enhanced axonal outgrowth and branching in response to BDNF and GDNF compared to control neurons, indicating that PTPRO negatively controls the activity of BDNF/TrkB and GDNF/Ret signaling. Mouse PTPRO fails to regulate Eph signaling in retinocollicular development and in hindlimb motor axon guidance, suggesting that chick and mouse PTPRO have different substrate specificities. PTPRO has evolved to fine tune growth factor signaling in a cell type specific fashion and to thereby increase the diversity of signaling output of a limited number of receptor tyrosine kinases to control the branch morphology of developing sensory neurons. The regulation of Eph receptor-mediated developmental processes by protein tyrosine phosphatases has diverged between chick and mouse. PMID:23516305

  19. Structural characterization of the reaction pathway in phosphoserine phosphatase: Crystallographic 'snapshots' of intermediate states.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiru; Cho, Ho S.; Kim, Rosalind; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao; Nguyen, Henry H.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wemmer, David E.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2004-04-12

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) is a member of a large class of enzymes that catalyze phosphoester hydrolysis using a phosphoaspartate enzyme intermediate. PSP is a likely regulator of the steady-state-serine level in the brain, which is a critical co-agonist of the N-methyl--aspartate type of glutamate receptors. Here, we present high-resolution (1.5 1.9 Angstrom) structures of PSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, which define the open state prior to substrate binding, the complex with phosphoserine substrate bound (with a D to N mutation in the active site), and the complex with AlF3, a transition-state analog for the phospho-transfer steps in the reaction. These structures, together with those described for the BeF3- complex (mimicking the phospho-enzyme) and the enzyme with phosphate product in the active site, provide a detailed structural picture of the full reaction cycle. The structure of the apostate indicates partial unfolding of the enzyme to allow substrate binding, with refolding in the presence of substrate to provide specificity. Interdomain and active-site conformational changes are identified. The structure with the transition state analog bound indicates a ''tight'' intermediate. A striking structure homology, with significant sequence conservation, among PSP, P-type ATPases and response regulators suggests that the knowledge of the PSP reaction mechanism from the structures determined will provide insights into the reaction mechanisms of the other enzymes in this family.

  20. Regulation of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S J; Lafyatis, R; Kim, K Y; Angel, P; Fujiki, H; Karin, M; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1990-01-01

    Human collagenase gene expression is regulated transcriptionally and is inducible by various mitogens in many cell types. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this response, we examined the effects on collagenase gene expression of okadaic acid, a non-12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoter, which induces apparent "activation" of protein kinases by inhibition of protein phosphatases. Steady state levels of collagenase mRNA were markedly increased by okadaic acid treatment. We show that the AP-1 consensus sequence in the collagenase promoter is required for the induction of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, even though sequences upstream of the AP-1 consensus site have an additive effect. We also examined the regulation by okadaic acid of expression of the components of the AP-1 complex, c-fos and c-jun. c-fos expression is dramatically stimulated by okadaic acid, whereas c-jun expression is stimulated to a lesser extent. Induction of c-fos gene mRNA occurs through a region known to contain multiple regulatory elements. These results suggest that phosphorylation regulates collagenase gene expression mediated by an AP-1 binding site. Images PMID:1966042

  1. WNK3 bypasses the tonicity requirement for K-Cl cotransporter activation via a phosphatase-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    de los Heros, Paola; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Rinehart, Jesse; Bobadilla, Norma A.; Vázquez, Norma; San Cristobal, Pedro; Mount, David B.; Lifton, Richard P.; Hebert, Steven C.; Gamba, Gerardo

    2006-01-01

    SLC12A cation/Cl− cotransporters are mutated in human disease, are targets of diuretics, and are collectively involved in the regulation of cell volume, neuronal excitability, and blood pressure. This gene family has two major branches with different physiological functions and inverse regulation: K-Cl cotransporters (KCC1–KCC4) mediate cellular Cl− efflux, are inhibited by phosphorylation, and are activated by dephosphorylation; Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters (NCC and NKCC1/2) mediate cellular Cl− influx and are activated by phosphorylation. A single kinase/phosphatase pathway is thought to coordinate the activities of these cotransporters in a given cell; however, the mechanisms involved are as yet unknown. We previously demonstrated that WNK3, a paralog of serine-threonine kinases mutated in hereditary hypertension, is coexpressed with several cation/Cl− cotransporters and regulates their activity. Here, we show that WNK3 completely prevents the cell swelling-induced activation of KCC1–KCC4 in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, catalytically inactive WNK3 abolishes the cell shrinkage-induced inhibition of KCC1–KCC4, resulting in a >100-fold stimulation of K-Cl cotransport during conditions in which transport is normally inactive. This activation is completely abolished by calyculin A and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 and 2B, respectively. Wild-type WNK3 activates Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters by increasing their phosphorylation, and catalytically inactive kinase inhibits Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters by decreasing their phosphorylation, such that our data suggest that WNK3 is a crucial component of the kinase/phosphatase signaling pathway that coordinately regulates the Cl− influx and efflux branches of the SLC12A cotransporter family. PMID:16446421

  2. Structure of the Trehalose-6-phosphate Phosphatase from Brugia malayi Reveals Key Design Principles for Anthelmintic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farelli, Jeremiah D.; Galvin, Brendan D.; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E.; Causey, Thomas B.; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible. PMID:24992307

  3. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  4. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed

    Farelli, Jeremiah D; Galvin, Brendan D; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E; Causey, Thomas B; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2014-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  5. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  6. Phosphorylated TandeMBP: A unique protein substrate for protein phosphatase assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Yamashita, Sho; Uezato, Yuuki; Senga, Yukako; Katayama, Syouichi; Goshima, Naoki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2016-11-15

    To analyze a variety of protein phosphatases, we developed phosphorylated TandeMBP (P-TandeMBP), in which two different mouse myelin basic protein isoforms were fused in tandem, as a protein phosphatase substrate. P-TandeMBP was prepared efficiently in four steps: (1) phosphorylation of TandeMBP by a protein kinase mixture (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Iδ, casein kinase 1δ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2); (2) precipitation of both P-TandeMBP and protein kinases to remove ATP, Pi, and ADP; (3) acid extraction of P-TandeMBP with HCl to remove protein kinases; and (4) neutralization of the solution that contains P-TandeMBP with Tris. In combination with the malachite green assay, P-TandeMBP can be used to detect protein phosphatase activity without using radioactive materials. Moreover, P-TandeMBP served as an efficient substrate for PPM family phosphatases (PPM1A, PPM1B, PPM1D, PPM1F, PPM1G, PPM1H, PPM1K, and PPM1M) and PPP family phosphatase PP5. Various phosphatase activities were also detected with high sensitivity in gel filtration fractions from mouse brain using P-TandeMBP. These results indicate that P-TandeMBP might be a powerful tool for the detection of protein phosphatase activities. PMID:27565380

  7. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-07-29

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease.

  8. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease. PMID:27525888

  9. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  10. The use of the tyrosine phosphatase antagonist orthovanadate in the study of a cell proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Hanek, G.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of murine fibroblasts with orthovanadate, a global tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, was shown to confer a "pseudo-transformed" phenotype with regard to cell morphology and growth characteristics. This alteration was manifested by both an increasing refractile appearance of the cells, consistent with many transformed cell lines, as well as an increase in maximum cell density was attained. Despite the abrogation of cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity, orthovanadate-treated cells remained sensitive to the biological activity of a naturally occurring sialoglycopeptide (SGP) cell surface proliferation inhibitor. The results indicated that tyrosine phosphatase activity, inhibited by orthovanadate, was not involved in the signal transduction pathway of the SGP.

  11. Purification of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) for structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Herrala, Annakaisa M; Quintero, Ileana B; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    High-scale purification methods are required for several protein studies such as crystallography, mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, and function. Here we describe a purification method for PAP based on anion exchange, L-(+)-tartrate affinity, and gel filtration chromatographies. Acid phosphatase activity and protein concentration were measured for each purification step, and to collect the fractions with the highest acid phosphatase activity the p-nitrophenyl phosphate method was used. The purified protein obtained by the procedure described here was used for the determination of the first reported three-dimensional structure of prostatic acid phosphatase.

  12. Phosphatidylcholine affects the secretion of the alkaline phosphatase PhoA in Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Long, Deliang; You, Heng; Yang, Dingpeng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Shuting; Li, Mengqiu; He, Miao; Xiong, Min; Wang, Xingguo

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Pseudomonas sp. 593 use the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs-pathway) for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Both bacterial strains contain the phoA and lapA genes encoding alkaline phosphatases (ALP) and display strong ALP activities. The PhoA and LapA enzymes are thought to be independently secreted via the Xcp and Hxc type II secretion system (T2SS) subtypes, in which the Hxc system may act as a complementary mechanism when the Xcp pathway becomes limiting. Inactivation of the pcs gene in both bacteria abolished PC synthesis and resulted in approximately 50% less ALP activity in the cell-free culture. Analysis by western blotting showed that LapA protein content in the wild type and the pcs- mutant was unchanged in the cytoplasmic, periplasmic or extracellular protein fractions. In contrast, the PhoA protein in the pcs- mutant was less prevalent among extracellular proteins but was more abundant in the periplasmic protein fraction compared to the wild type. Semi- quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that phoA, lapA and 12 xcp genes were equally expressed at the transcriptional level in both the wild types and the pcs- mutants. Our results demonstrate that the absence of PC in bacterial membrane phospholipids does not interfere with the transcription of the phoA and lapA genes but primarily affects the export of PhoA from the cytoplasm to the extracellular environment via the Xcp T2SS.

  13. Phosphatidylcholine affects the secretion of the alkaline phosphatase PhoA in Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Long, Deliang; You, Heng; Yang, Dingpeng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Shuting; Li, Mengqiu; He, Miao; Xiong, Min; Wang, Xingguo

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Pseudomonas sp. 593 use the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs-pathway) for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Both bacterial strains contain the phoA and lapA genes encoding alkaline phosphatases (ALP) and display strong ALP activities. The PhoA and LapA enzymes are thought to be independently secreted via the Xcp and Hxc type II secretion system (T2SS) subtypes, in which the Hxc system may act as a complementary mechanism when the Xcp pathway becomes limiting. Inactivation of the pcs gene in both bacteria abolished PC synthesis and resulted in approximately 50% less ALP activity in the cell-free culture. Analysis by western blotting showed that LapA protein content in the wild type and the pcs- mutant was unchanged in the cytoplasmic, periplasmic or extracellular protein fractions. In contrast, the PhoA protein in the pcs- mutant was less prevalent among extracellular proteins but was more abundant in the periplasmic protein fraction compared to the wild type. Semi- quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that phoA, lapA and 12 xcp genes were equally expressed at the transcriptional level in both the wild types and the pcs- mutants. Our results demonstrate that the absence of PC in bacterial membrane phospholipids does not interfere with the transcription of the phoA and lapA genes but primarily affects the export of PhoA from the cytoplasm to the extracellular environment via the Xcp T2SS. PMID:27664720

  14. A one-day double-labelling technique for tissue specimens: immunogold-silver staining for in situ hybridization combined with alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) immunohistochemistry for antigens.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, U; Kriegsmann, J; Gay, R E; Gay, S

    1996-02-01

    An improved technique is described that addresses the problems of sensitivity, specificity, the use of hazardous radioactive equipment and time consumption in immunohistochemical labelling and double labelling of in situ hybridization of tissue specimens. It consists of a two-step protocol in which digoxigenin-uridine triphosphate (UTP) labelled riboprobes in the in situ hybridization step are visualized by the immunogold-silver staining method, and double labelling of tissue antigens is achieved by the application of an alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase staining step. We tested this protocol using snap-frozen tissue sections of synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The target mRNA was detected by perforin or cathepsin D riboprobes, the double labelling was performed using anti-collagen type IV and alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies. It is concluded that, in comparison with an established three- to four-day double-labelling protocol used in many laboratories, this one-day combination is currently the most rapid assay of reliable quality for double labelling of in situ hybridization products and tissue antigens.

  15. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5. PMID:25383722

  16. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5.

  17. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  18. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage sensing lipid phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sasha S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We find the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), to have not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage sensing domain (VSD). Using fast FRET reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we find that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This novel 2-step allosteric control over a dual specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility and endo/exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  19. Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in an early ptolemeic mummy.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Y; Baumer, U; Koller, J; Hedges, R E; Werner, H; Hartmann, H J; Etspüler, H; Weser, U

    1994-01-01

    Bone samples of a ptolemeic mummy have been employed to study the mode of conservation on the intactness of Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in both structure and catalytic activity. A protein of M(r) = 190 +/- 10 kDa being identical to the 200 kDa enzyme of fresh human bones was successfully isolated. Regardless of age 200 kDa protein bands and a distinct subunit at 60 kDa were seen in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The 200 kDa band was also monitored by activity staining. The specific activity was 120 mU/mg and 65% of the respective activity obtained in the identical preparation using fresh human tibia or rib. The enzymic activity was inhibited in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and L-homoarginine. Radiocarbon dating supported the assignment of the mummy to the early ptolemeic period. Among the many bactericidal and fungicidal components employed for mummification were aromatic alcohols, mono- and sesquiterpenes. Pistachio resin was the major balm resin used. The microbiological sterility of the bone surface was ascertained by independent bacterial and fungal examinations.

  20. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function.

    PubMed

    Kamceva, Marija; Benedict, Jessie; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington's chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:27190655

  1. Sensing charges of the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Ludivine; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Voltage control over enzymatic activity in voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) is conferred by a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) located in the N terminus. These VSDs are constituted by four putative transmembrane segments (S1 to S4) resembling those found in voltage-gated ion channels. The putative fourth segment (S4) of the VSD contains positive residues that likely function as voltage-sensing elements. To study in detail how these residues sense the plasma membrane potential, we have focused on five arginines in the S4 segment of the Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). After implementing a histidine scan, here we show that four arginine-to-histidine mutants, namely R223H to R232H, mediate voltage-dependent proton translocation across the membrane, indicating that these residues transit through the hydrophobic core of Ci-VSP as a function of the membrane potential. These observations indicate that the charges carried by these residues are sensing charges. Furthermore, our results also show that the electrical field in VSPs is focused in a narrow hydrophobic region that separates the extracellular and intracellular space and constitutes the energy barrier for charge crossing. PMID:24127524

  2. Expression of acid phosphatase in the seminiferous epithelium of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Peruquetti, R L; Taboga, S R; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2010-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (AcPs) are known to provide phosphate to tissues that have high energy requirements, especially during development, growth and maturation. During spermatogenesis AcP activity is manifested in heterophagous lysosomes of Sertoli cells. This phagocytic function appears to be hormone-independent. We examined the expression pattern of AcP during the reproductive period of four species belonging to different vertebrate groups: Tilapia rendalli (Teleostei, Cichlidae), Dendropsophus minutus (Amphibia, Anura), Meriones unguiculatus (Mammalia, Rodentia), and Oryctolagus cuniculus (Mammalia, Lagomorpha). To demonstrate AcP activity, cryosections were processed for enzyme histochemistry by a modification of the method of Gömöri. AcP activity was similar in the testes of these four species. Testes of T. rendalli, D. minutus and M. unguiculatus showed an intense reaction in the Sertoli cell region. AcP activity was detected in the testes of D. minutus and O. cuniculus in seminiferous epithelium regions, where cells are found in more advanced stages of development. The seminiferous epithelium of all four species exhibited AcP activity, mainly in the cytoplasm of either Sertoli cells or germ cells. These findings reinforce the importance of AcP activity during the spermatogenesis process in vertebrates. PMID:20391346

  3. Reliable Digital Single Molecule Electrochemistry for Ultrasensitive Alkaline Phosphatase Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Zhou, Chuan-Hua; Pan, Liang-Jun; Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Lian; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2016-09-20

    Single molecule electrochemistry (SME) has gained much progress in fundamental studies, but it is difficult to use in practice due to its less reliability. We have solved the reliability of single molecule electrochemical detection by integration of digital analysis with efficient signal amplification of enzyme-induced metallization (EIM) together with high-throughput parallelism of microelectrode array (MA), establishing a digital single molecule electrochemical detection method (dSMED). Our dSMED has been successfully used for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) detection in the complex sample of liver cancer cells. Compared to direct measurement of the oxidation current of enzyme products, EIM can enhance signals by about 100 times, achieving signal-to-background ratio high enough for single molecule detection. The integration of digital analysis with SME can further decrease the detection limit of ALP to 1 aM relative to original 50 aM, enabling dSMED to be sensitively, specifically and reliably applied in liver cancer cells. The presented dSMED is enormously promising in exploring physical and chemical properties of single molecules, single biomolecular detection, or single-cell analysis.

  4. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  5. Structural basis of protein phosphatase 2A stable latency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Stanevich, Vitali; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Kong, Mei; Watkins, Guy R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Sengupta, Rituparna; Xing, Yongna

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac) is stabilized in a latent form by α4, a regulatory protein essential for cell survival and biogenesis of all PP2A complexes. Here we report the structure of α4 bound to the N-terminal fragment of PP2Ac. This structure suggests that α4 binding to the full-length PP2Ac requires local unfolding near the active site, which perturbs the scaffold subunit binding site at the opposite surface via allosteric relay. These changes stabilize an inactive conformation of PP2Ac and convert oligomeric PP2A complexes to the α4 complex upon perturbation of the active site. The PP2Ac–α4 interface is essential for cell survival and sterically hinders a PP2A ubiquitination site, important for the stability of cellular PP2Ac. Our results show that α4 is a scavenger chaperone that binds to and stabilizes partially folded PP2Ac for stable latency, and reveal a mechanism by which α4 regulates cell survival, and biogenesis and surveillance of PP2A holoenzymes. PMID:23591866

  6. Structure of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Fan, E.; Yu, J.; Strack, S.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular physiology. The PP2A holoenzyme consists of a heterodimeric core enzyme, which comprises a scaffolding subunit and a catalytic subunit, and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B'/B56/PR61. Surprisingly, the B'/PR61 subunit has a HEAT-like (huntingtin-elongation-A subunit-TOR-like) repeat structure, similar to that of the scaffolding subunit. The regulatory B'/B56/PR61 subunit simultaneously interacts with the catalytic subunit as well as the conserved ridge of the scaffolding subunit. The carboxyterminus of the catalytic subunit recognizes a surface groove at the interface between the B'/B56/PR61 subunit and the scaffolding subunit. Compared to the scaffolding subunit in the PP2A core enzyme, formation of the holoenzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced conformational rearrangements. This structure reveals significant ramifications for understanding the function and regulation of PP2A.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  8. An efficient, multiply promiscuous hydrolase in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Bert; Jonas, Stefanie; Babtie, Ann C.; Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier; Hyvönen, Marko; Hollfelder, Florian

    2010-01-01

    We report a catalytically promiscuous enzyme able to efficiently promote the hydrolysis of six different substrate classes. Originally assigned as a phosphonate monoester hydrolase (PMH) this enzyme exhibits substantial second-order rate accelerations ((kcat/KM)/kw), ranging from 107 to as high as 1019, for the hydrolyses of phosphate mono-, di-, and triesters, phosphonate monoesters, sulfate monoesters, and sulfonate monoesters. This substrate collection encompasses a range of substrate charges between 0 and -2, transition states of a different nature, and involves attack at two different reaction centers (P and S). Intrinsic reactivities (half-lives) range from 200 days to 105 years under near neutrality. The substantial rate accelerations for a set of relatively difficult reactions suggest that efficient catalysis is not necessarily limited to efficient stabilization of just one transition state. The crystal structure of PMH identifies it as a member of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMH encompasses four of the native activities previously observed in this superfamily and extends its repertoire by two further activities, one of which, sulfonate monoesterase, has not been observed previously for a natural enzyme. PMH is thus one of the most promiscuous hydrolases described to date. The functional links between superfamily activities can be presumed to have played a role in functional evolution by gene duplication. PMID:20133613

  9. Nanoceria particles as catalytic amplifiers for alkaline phosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2013-11-01

    We propose a novel system to enhance detection sensitivity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in electrochemical assays by using nanoceria particles as redox active catalytic amplifiers of ALP signals. The catalytic activity of nanoceria particles attributed to their dual oxidation state Ce(4+)/Ce(3+) and high oxygen mobility enabled oxidation of the products of the ALP-catalyzed reaction. A suite of spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, including UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to characterize the interaction of nanoceria with the ALP-generated products. Spectrometric experiments demonstrate change in the oxidation state of nanoceria upon exposure to the hydrolytic products of ALP. Three enzymatically generated products of commonly used ALP substrates were detected at a screen printing electrode surface in the presence of nanoceria. Electrochemical experiments demonstrate signal amplification of the ALP activity assay by nanoceria for all three products, demonstrating remarkable sensitivity of this assay. The assay was optimized with respect to pH and buffer composition. Analytical characterization of the nanoceria-based ALP activity assay was established using a 1-naphthyl phosphate substrate. The proposed strategy can find widespread applications in sensing schemes involving ALP. PMID:24053108

  10. Interplay between intestinal alkaline phosphatase, diet, gut microbes and immunity.

    PubMed

    Estaki, Mehrbod; DeCoffe, Daniella; Gibson, Deanna L

    2014-11-14

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an essential role in intestinal homeostasis and health through interactions with the resident microbiota, diet and the gut. IAP's role in the intestine is to dephosphorylate toxic microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharides, unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides and flagellin as well as extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate. IAP's ability to detoxify these ligands is essential in protecting the host from sepsis during acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Also important in these complications is IAP's ability to regulate the microbial ecosystem by forming a complex relationship between microbiota, diet and the intestinal mucosal surface. Evidence reveals that diet alters IAP expression and activity and this in turn can influence the gut microbiota and homeostasis. IAP's ability to maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract has accelerated research on its potential use as a therapeutic agent against a multitude of diseases. Exogenous IAP has been shown to have beneficial effects when administered during ulcerative colitis, coronary bypass surgery and sepsis. There are currently a handful of human clinical trials underway investigating the effects of exogenous IAP during sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and heart surgery. In light of these findings IAP has been marked as a novel agent to help treat a variety of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the essential characteristics of IAP in protection and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis while addressing the intricate interplay between IAP, diet, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium.

  11. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  12. Regulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase dimerization.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Thea; Blanchetot, Christophe; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are single membrane spanning proteins belonging to the family of PTPs that, together with the antagonistically acting protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), regulate the protein phosphotyrosine levels in cells. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that has a major role in cell signaling by affecting protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Increasing evidence indicates that RPTPs, like RPTKs, are regulated by dimerization. For RPTPalpha, we have shown that rotational coupling of the constitutive dimers in the cell membrane determines enzyme activity. Furthermore, oxidative stress, identified as an important second messenger during the past decade, is a regulator of rotational coupling of RPTPalpha dimers. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and cell biological techniques that we use to study the regulation of RPTPs by dimerization. These techniques include (co-) immunoprecipitation, RPTP activity assays, chemical and genetic cross-linking, detection of cell surface proteins by biotinylation, and analysis of RPTPalpha dimers, using conformation-sensitive antibody binding.

  13. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase of spinach acts as a phosphoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Z.B.; Seal, S.N.

    1987-05-01

    When /sup 32/P-glycolate and phosphoglycolate phosphatase from spinach are mixed, /sup 32/P is incorporated into acid precipitated protein. Properties that relate this phosphorylation to the enzyme are: The K/sub m/ value for P-glycolate is similar for protein phosphorylation and substrate hydrolysis; the /sup 32/P appearing in the phosphoenzyme is diluted by unlabeled P-glycolate or the alternative substrate, ethyl-P; the activator Cl/sup -/ enhances the effectiveness of ethyl-P as a substrate and as an inhibitor of the formation of /sup 32/P-enzyme; and /sup 32/P is lost from the enzyme when /sup 32/P-glycolate is consumed. The acid denatured phosphorylated protein is a molecule of 34,000 Da, which is half of the molecular weight of the native protein and is similar in size to the labeled band that is seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The enzyme-bound phosphoryl group appears to be an acyl-phosphate from its pH stability, being quite stable at pH 1, less stable at pH 5, and very unstable above pH 5. The bond is readily hydrolyzed in acid molybdate and it is sensitive to cleavage by hydroxylamine at pH 6.8. The demonstration of enzyme phosphorylation by /sup 32/P-glycolate resolves the dilemma presented by initial rate studies in which alternative substrates appeared to have different mechanisms.

  14. Pregnancy-secreted Acid phosphatase, uteroferrin, enhances fetal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Wang, Haiqing; Bazer, Fuller W; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-11-01

    Uteroferrin (UF) is a progesterone-induced acid phosphatase produced by uterine glandular epithelia in mammals during pregnancy and targeted to sites of hematopoiesis throughout pregnancy. The expression pattern of UF is coordinated with early fetal hematopoietic development in the yolk sac and then liver, spleen, and bone to prevent anemia in fetuses. Our previous studies suggested that UF exerts stimulatory impacts on hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, the precise role and thereby the mechanism of action of UF on hematopoiesis have not been investigated previously. Here, we report that UF is a potent regulator that can greatly enhance fetal erythropoiesis. Using primary fetal liver hematopoietic cells, we observed a synergistic stimulatory effect of UF with erythropoietin and other growth factors on both burst-forming unit-erythroid and colony-forming unit-erythroid formation. Further, we demonstrated that UF enhanced erythropoiesis at terminal stages using an in vitro culture system. Surveying genes that are crucial for erythrocyte formation at various stages revealed that UF, along with erythropoietin, up-regulated transcription factors required for terminal erythrocyte differentiation and genes required for synthesis of hemoglobin. Collectively, our results demonstrate that UF is a cytokine secreted by uterine glands in response to progesterone that promotes fetal erythropoiesis at various stages of pregnancy, including burst-forming unit-erythroid and colony-forming unit-erythroid progenitor cells and terminal stages of differentiation of hematopoietic cells in the erythroid lineage. PMID:25093463

  15. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  16. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  17. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Lombroso, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington's chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:27190655

  18. Visualizing and Quantitating the Spatiotemporal Regulation of Ras/ERK Signaling by Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Caunt, Christopher J; Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway is critical in determining the physiological and pathophysiological outcome of signaling. Dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (DUSPs or MKPs) are key regulators of pathway activity and may also localize ERK to distinct subcellular locations. Here we present methods largely based on the use of high content microscopy to both visualize and quantitate the subcellular distribution of activated (p-ERK) and total ERK in populations of mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice lacking DUSP5, a nuclear ERK-specific MKP. Such methods in combination with rescue experiments using adenoviral vectors encoding wild-type and mutant forms of DUSP5 have allowed us to visualize specific defects in ERK regulation in these cells thus confirming the role of this phosphatase as both a nuclear regulator of ERK activity and localization. PMID:27514808

  19. Modulation of Spc1 stress-activated protein kinase activity by methylglyoxal through inhibition of protein phosphatase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-11-30

    Methylglyoxal, a ubiquitous metabolite derived from glycolysis has diverse physiological functions in yeast cells. Previously, we have reported that extracellularly added methylglyoxal activates Spc1, a stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe [Y. Takatsume, S. Izawa, Y. Inoue, J. Biol. Chem. 281 (2006) 9086-9092]. Phosphorylation of Spc1 by treatment with methylglyoxal in S. pombe cells defective in glyoxalase I, an enzyme crucial for the metabolism of methylglyoxal, continues for a longer period than in wild-type cells. Here we show that methylglyoxal inhibits the activity of the protein phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation of Spc1 in vitro. In addition, we found that methylglyoxal inhibits human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) also. We propose a model for the regulation of the activity of the Spc1-SAPK signaling pathway by methylglyoxal in S. pombe.

  20. Triterpenoids from the leaves of Diospyros kaki (persimmon) and their inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Thuong, Phuong Thien; Lee, Chul Ho; Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Kim, Wan Gi; Lee, Sang Jun; Oh, Won Keun

    2008-10-01

    Phytochemical study on a methanol-soluble extract of the leaves of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) resulted in the isolation of two new ursane-type triterpenoids, 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12,20(30)-dien-24,28-dioic acid (1) and 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12-en-24,28-dioic acid (2), together with 12 known ursane- and oleanane-type triterpenoids (3-14). Triterpenoids with a 3beta-hydroxy group were found to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity, with IC50 values ranging from 3.1+/-0.2 to 18.8+/-1.3 microM, whereas those with a 3alpha-hydroxy moiety were not active.

  1. Alterations in activities of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, ATPase and ATP content in response to seasonally varying Pi status in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus).

    PubMed

    Sen, Supatra; Mukherji, S

    2004-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the second most important macronutrient for plant growth. Plants exhibit numerous physiological and metabolic adaptations in response to seasonal variations in phosphorus content. Activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases, ATPase and ATP content were studied in summer, rainy and winter seasons at two different developmental stages (28 and 58 days after sowing) in Okra. Activities of both acid and alkaline phosphatases increased manifold in winter to cope up with low phosphorus content. ATP content and ATPase activity were high in summer signifying an active metabolic period. Phosphorus deficiency is characterized by low ATP content and ATPase activity (which are in turn partly responsible for a drastic reduction in growth and yield) and enhanced activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases which increase the availability of P in P-deficient seasons.

  2. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  4. Reduced L/B/K alkaline phosphatase gene expression in renal cell carcinoma: plausible role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer in adults. Although several genes have been found to be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, more great efforts are needed to identify new genes which are responsible for the process. Clear cell RCC, originates from proximal tubule cells, is the most common pathological type of RCC. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a marker enzyme of brush border membrane of proximal tubular cells. Our previous studies showed a significant decreased activity of Liver/Bone/Kidney (L/B/K) alkaline phosphatase in RCC. In the present study, we explored the molecular basis of the decreased activity of ALP in RCC. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis showed decreased ALP protein in RCC. Additionally, real time PCR documented significantly reduced ALP gene expression (P = 0.009). Moreover, RCC cell lines (ACHN and A498) transfected with full length L/B/K cDNA showed decreased migratory property as well as viability of these cells as compared with controls (P = 0.000). Further, L/B/K ALP cDNA transfected cells (ACHN and A498) showed significant increased apoptosis as compared to control (P = 0.000). These findings suggest the new role of ALP in cell viability and apoptosis and involvement in RCC tumorigenesis. However, further studies are needed to explore the exact molecular mechanism.

  5. The tyrosine phosphatase PTPRD is a tumor suppressor that is frequently inactivated and mutated in glioblastoma and other human cancers.

    PubMed

    Veeriah, Selvaraju; Brennan, Cameron; Meng, Shasha; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Fagin, James A; Solit, David B; Paty, Philip B; Rohle, Dan; Vivanco, Igor; Chmielecki, Juliann; Pao, William; Ladanyi, Marc; Gerald, William L; Liau, Linda; Cloughesy, Timothy C; Mischel, Paul S; Sander, Chris; Taylor, Barry; Schultz, Nikolaus; Major, John; Heguy, Adriana; Fang, Fang; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Chan, Timothy A

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating cellular function and is a central feature in signaling cascades involved in oncogenesis. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is coordinately controlled by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). Whereas activation of tyrosine kinases has been shown to play vital roles in tumor development, the role of PTPs is much less well defined. Here, we show that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase delta (PTPRD) is frequently inactivated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a deadly primary neoplasm of the brain. PTPRD is a target of deletion in GBM, often via focal intragenic loss. In GBM tumors that do not possess deletions in PTPRD, the gene is frequently subject to cancer-specific epigenetic silencing via promoter CpG island hypermethylation (37%). Sequencing of the PTPRD gene in GBM and other primary human tumors revealed that the gene is mutated in 6% of GBMs, 13% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, and in 9% of lung cancers. These mutations were deleterious. In total, PTPRD inactivation occurs in >50% of GBM tumors, and loss of expression predicts for poor prognosis in glioma patients. Wild-type PTPRD inhibits the growth of GBM and other tumor cells, an effect not observed with PTPRD alleles harboring cancer-specific mutations. Human astrocytes lacking PTPRD exhibited increased growth. PTPRD was found to dephosphorylate the oncoprotein STAT3. These results implicate PTPRD as a tumor suppressor on chromosome 9p that is involved in the development of GBMs and multiple human cancers.

  6. Expression and function of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta and its ligand pleiotrophin in human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ulrike; Brockmann, Marc A; Aigner, Achim; Eckerich, Carmen; Müller, Sabine; Fillbrandt, Regina; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin

    2003-12-01

    Using subtractive cloning combined with cDNA array analysis, we previously identified the genes encoding for the protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta/receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (PTPzeta/RPTPbeta) and its ligand pleiotrophin (PTN) as overexpressed in human glioblastomas compared to normal brain. Both molecules have been implicated in neuronal migration during central nervous system development, and PTN is known to be involved in tumor growth and angiogenesis. We confirm overexpression of both molecules at the protein level in astrocytic gliomas of different malignancy grades. PTPzeta/RPTPbeta immunoreactivity was associated with increasing malignancy grade and localized predominantly to the tumor cells. PTN immunoreactivity as determined by ELISA and immunohistochemistry analysis was increased in low-grade astrocytomas compared to normal brain. Further increase in malignant gliomas was marginal, and thus no correlation with malignancy grade or microvessel density was present. However, PTN levels were significantly associated with those of fibroblast growth factor-2, suggesting co-regulation of both factors. Functionally, PTN induced weak chemotactic and strong haptotactic migration of glioblastoma and cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Haptotaxis of glioblastoma cells towards PTN was specifically inhibited by an anti-PTPzeta/RPTPbeta antibody. Our findings suggest that upregulated expression of PTN and PTPzeta/RPTPbeta in human astrocytic tumor cells can create an autocrine loop that is important for glioma cell migration. Although PTN is a secreted growth factor, it appears to exert its mitogenic effects mostly in a matrix-immobilized form, serving as a substrate for migrating tumor cells.

  7. Loss of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPN22 Reduces Mannan-Induced Autoimmune Arthritis in SKG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Shatakshi; Brownlie, Rebecca J.; Garcia, Celine; Cowan, Graeme; Salmond, Robert J.; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic phosphatase, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22), is a negative regulator of T cell signaling. Genome-wide association studies have shown that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in PTPN22 confer an increased risk of developing multiple autoimmune diseases in humans. The precise function of PTPN22 and how the variant protein contributes to autoimmunity is not well understood. To address this issue, we investigated the effect of PTPN22 deficiency on disease susceptibility in a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis. The SKG mouse expresses a hypomorphic mutant allele of ZAP70, which, upon exposure to fungal Ags, predisposes the mice to a CD4+ T cell–mediated autoimmune arthritis that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Surprisingly, SKG Ptpn22−/− mice developed less severe mannan-induced arthritis compared with SKG mice. Diminution of disease was not due to significant alterations in thymocyte development or repertoire selection in SKG Ptpn22−/− mice, even though T cell–mediated signal transduction was improved. Instead, Ptpn22 deficiency appeared to bias CD4 Th cell differentiation away from the Th17 lineage, which is pathogenic in this setting, to a more Th1/T regulatory–focused response. These data show that even small perturbations in TCR signal transduction pathways can have profound consequences on the differentiation of T cell lineages and thus for the development of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27288531

  8. Domains involved in calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and nuclear localisation in the African swine fever virus A238L protein

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Charles C.; Chapman, Dave A.G.; Silk, Rhiannon; Liverani, Elisabetta; Dixon, Linda K.

    2008-05-10

    The African swine fever virus A238L protein inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity and activation of NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator. An 82 amino acid domain containing residues 157 to 238 at the C-terminus of A238L was expressed in E. coli and purified. This purified A238L fragment acted as a potent inhibitor of calcineurin phosphatase in vitro with an IC{sub 50} of approximately 70 nM. Two putative nuclear localisation signals were identified between residues 80 to 86 (NLS-1) and between residues 203 to 207 overlapping with the N-terminus of the calcineurin docking motif (NLS-2). Mutation of these motifs independently did not reduce nuclear localisation compared to the wild type A238L protein, whereas mutation of both motifs significantly reduced nuclear localisation of A238L. Mutation of the calcineurin docking motif resulted in a dramatic increase in the nuclear localisation of A238L provided an intact NLS was present. We propose that binding of calcineurin to A238L masks NLS-2 contributing to the cytoplasmic retention of A238L.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity. PMID:26195794

  10. Human lysosomal acid phosphatase is transported as a transmembrane protein to lysosomes in transfected baby hamster kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, A; Gottschalk, S; Hille, A; Krentler, C; Pohlmann, R; Braulke, T; Hauser, H; Geuze, H; von Figura, K

    1988-01-01

    BHK cells transfected with human lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) cDNA (CT29) expressed 70-fold higher enzyme activities of acid phosphatase than non-transfected BHK cells. The CT29-LAP was synthesized in BHK cells as a heterogeneously glycosylated precursor that was tightly membrane associated. Transfer to the trans-Golgi was associated with a small increase in size (approximately 7 kd) and partial processing of the oligosaccharides to complex type structures. CT29-LAP was transferred into lysosomes as shown by subcellular fractionation, immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Lack of mannose-6-phosphate residues suggested that transport does not involve mannose-6-phosphate receptors. Part of the membrane-associated CT29-LAP was processed to a soluble form. The mechanism that converts CT29-LAP into a soluble form was sensitive to NH4Cl, and reduced the size of the polypeptide by 7 kd. In vitro translation of CT29-derived cRNA in the presence of microsomal membranes yielded a CT29-LAP precursor that is protected from proteinase K except for a small peptide of approximately 2 kd. In combination with the sequence data available for LAP, these observations suggest that CT29-LAP is synthesized and transported to lysosomes as a transmembrane protein. In the lysosomes, CT29-LAP is released from the membrane by proteolytic cleavage, which removes a C-terminal peptide including the transmembrane domain and the cytosolic tail of 18 amino acids. Images PMID:3056714

  11. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-01

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  12. Structural analysis of human dual-specificity phosphatase 22 complexed with a phosphotyrosine-like substrate.

    PubMed

    Lountos, George T; Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E; Waugh, David S

    2015-02-01

    4-Nitrophenyl phosphate (p-nitrophenyl phosphate, pNPP) is widely used as a small molecule phosphotyrosine-like substrate in activity assays for protein tyrosine phosphatases. It is a colorless substrate that upon hydrolysis is converted to a yellow 4-nitrophenolate ion that can be monitored by absorbance at 405 nm. Therefore, the pNPP assay has been widely adopted as a quick and simple method to assess phosphatase activity and is also commonly used in assays to screen for inhibitors. Here, the first crystal structure is presented of a dual-specificity phosphatase, human dual-specificity phosphatase 22 (DUSP22), in complex with pNPP. The structure illuminates the molecular basis for substrate binding and may also facilitate the structure-assisted development of DUSP22 inhibitors.

  13. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 at 2.38 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 (DUSP27) is reported at 2.38 Å resolution. There are over 100 genes in the human genome that encode protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and approximately 60 of these are classified as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Although many dual-specificity phosphatases are still not well characterized, novel functions have been discovered for some of them that have led to new insights into a variety of biological processes and the molecular basis for certain diseases. Indeed, as the functions of DUSPs continue to be elucidated, a growing number of them are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Here, the overexpression, purification and structure determination of DUSP27 at 2.38 Å resolution are presented.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.; Garattini, E.; Hua, J.C.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-02-01

    Partial protein sequence data obtained on intestinal alkaline phosphatase indicated a high degree of homology with the reported sequence of the placental isoenzyme. Accordingly, placental alkaline phosphatase cDNA was cloned and used as a probe to clone intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA. The latter is somewhat larger (3.1 kilobases) than the cDNA for the placental isozyme (2.8 kilobases). Although the 3' untranslated regions are quite different, there is almost 90% homology in the translated regions of the two isozymes. There are, however, significant differences at their amino and carboxyl termini and a substitution of an alanine in intestinal alkaline phosphatase for a glycine in the active site of the placental isozyme.

  15. Characterization of the phosphatidylinositol-glycan membrane anchor of human placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.; Berger, J.; Gerber, L.; Familletti, P.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-09-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) is a member of a diverse group of membrane proteins whose attachment to the lipid bilayer is mediated by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan. To investigate structural aspects of the glycolipid anchor, cultured WISH cells were used because, they produce the enzyme in abundant quantities. When cell suspensions were incubated with purified phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, most of the placental alkaline phosphatase was released from membranes in a hydrophilic form. On incubation of the cells with (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine, (/sup 14/C)myristic acid, or myo(/sup 3/H)inositol, each was incorporated into the phosphatase near the carboxyl terminus, showing that these components, which are found in other phosphatidylinositol membrane-linked proteins, are also present in placental alkaline phosphatase.

  16. Subcellular localization of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis 749/C by immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold

    SciTech Connect

    Tinglu, G.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.

    1984-08-01

    Subcellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C was determined by an immunoelectron microscopy method. Anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody labeled with 15- to 18-nm colloidal gold particles (gold-immunoglobulin G (IgG) complex) were used for the study. Both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic material were labeled with the gold-IgG particles. These particles formed clusters in association with the plasma membrane; in contrast, in the cytoplasm the particles were largely dispersed, and only a few clusters were found. The gold-IgG binding was quantitatively estimated by stereological analysis of labeled, frozen thin sections. This estimation of a variety of control samples showed that the labeling was specific for the alkaline phosphatase. Cluster formation of the gold -IgG particles in association with the plasma membrane suggests that existence of specific alkaline phosphatase binding sites (receptors) in the plasma membrane of B. licheniformis 749/C. 27 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  18. Metal ion-mediated polymer superquenching for highly sensitive detection of kinase and phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Rininsland, Frauke; Xia, Wensheng; Wittenburg, Shannon; Shi, Xiaobo; Stankewicz, Casey; Achyuthan, Komandoor; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2004-10-26

    An assay technology for high-throughput screening of kinase and phosphatase activities is introduced. The format is based upon superquenching of fluorescent-conjugated polymers by dye-labeled kinase/phosphatase peptide substrates. The sensor platform is composed of highly fluorescent-conjugated polyelectrolytes colocated with the phosphate coordinating metal ion gallium on microspheres. Phosphorylated peptide substrates containing a quencher bind specifically to the metal ions by means of phosphate groups, resulting in quench of polymer fluorescence. The modulation of fluorescence signal is proportional to kinase or phosphatase activity and is monitored as a turn-off or turn-on signal, respectively. The assay is homogeneous and simple and can be run either as an endpoint measurement or in a kinetic mode. The assay meets the sensitivity required for high-throughput screening of kinase or phosphatase inhibitors and is a valuable tool for drug discovery. A modified version of the assay allows for the detection of protein phosphorylation.

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  20. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 7, a potential cancer drug target

    PubMed Central

    Lountos, George T.; Austin, Brian P.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 7 (DUSP7/Pyst2) is a 320-residue protein that belongs to the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) subfamily of dual-specificity phosphatases. Although its precise biological function is still not fully understood, previous reports have demonstrated that DUSP7 is overexpressed in myeloid leukemia and other malignancies. Therefore, there is interest in developing DUSP7 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents, especially for cancer. Here, the purification, crystallization and structure determination of the catalytic domain of DUSP7 (Ser141–Ser289/C232S) at 1.67 Å resolution are reported. The structure described here provides a starting point for structure-assisted inhibitor-design efforts and adds to the growing knowledge base of three-dimensional structures of the dual-specificity phosphatase family. PMID:26057789

  1. Stabilization of human prostate acid phosphatase by cross-linking with diimidoesters.

    PubMed

    Wasylewska, E; Dulińska, J; Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Ostrowski, W S

    1987-01-01

    1. Modification of dimeric human prostate acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) by diimidoesters leads to the formation of water-soluble preparations of high enzymatic activity, resistant to denaturing agents. 2. Monomeric, dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric species were found in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the phosphatase cross-linked with dimethyl-suberimidate, and dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzymatically active species on thin-layer Sephadex 200 gel filtration. This molecular pattern evidenced formation of the inter-subunit covalent linkages. All molecular forms are immunoreactive against the polyclonal rabbit anti-phosphatase antibodies. 3. The catalytic properties of the modified phosphatase are almost the same as those of the native enzyme. Differences in the optical properties between the modified and the native enzymes point to slight conformational transitions in the modified enzyme.

  2. EX VIVIO DETECTION OF KINASE AND PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL BIOPSIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification involved in every aspect cellular function. Levels of protein phosphotyrosine, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are regulated by the opposing activities of kinases and phosphatases, the expression of which can be alt...

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative In Vitro Analysis of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphatase Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura Ren Huey; Gewinner, Christina Anja

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides compromise a family of eight membrane lipids which play important roles in many cellular signaling pathways. Signaling through phosphoinositides has been shown in a variety of cellular functions such cell proliferation, cell growth, apoptosis, and vesicle trafficking. Phospholipid phosphatases regulate cell signaling by modifying the concentration of phosphoinositides and their dephosphorylated products. To understand the role of individual lipid phosphatases in phosphoinositide turnover and functional signaling, it is crucial to determine the substrate specificity of the lipid phosphatase of interest. In this chapter we describe how the substrate specificity of an individual lipid phosphatase can be qualitatively and quantitatively measured in an in vitro radiometric assay. In addition, we specify the different expression systems and purification methods required to produce the necessary yield and functionality in order to further characterize these enzymes. The outstanding versatility and sensitivity of this assay system are yet unmatched and are therefore currently considered the standard of the field.

  4. An overlapping kinase and phosphatase docking site regulates activity of the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Cecchini, Matthew; Steinhardt, Rachel C; Schamber, Michael R; Dick, Frederick A; Rubin, Seth M

    2010-09-01

    The phosphorylation state and corresponding activity of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) are modulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Here we characterize the association of Rb with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). A crystal structure identifies an enzyme docking site in the Rb C-terminal domain that is required for efficient PP1c activity toward Rb. The phosphatase docking site overlaps with the known docking site for cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and PP1 competition with Cdk-cyclins for Rb binding is sufficient to retain Rb activity and block cell-cycle advancement. These results provide the first detailed molecular insights into Rb activation and establish a novel mechanism for Rb regulation in which kinase and phosphatase compete for substrate docking. PMID:20694007

  5. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  6. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  7. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is a major phosphatase of adherens junctions and dephosphorylates beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer R; Vadas, Mathew A; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2003-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion regulates processes important in embryonal development, normal physiology, and cancer progression. It is regulated by various mechanisms including tyrosine phosphorylation. We have previously shown that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is concentrated at intercellular junctions in confluent, quiescent monolayers but is nuclear in cells lacking cell-cell contacts. We show here with an epithelial cell model that Pez localizes to the adherens junctions in confluent monolayers. A truncation mutant lacking the catalytic domain acts as a dominant negative mutant to upregulate tyrosine phosphorylation at adherens junctions. We identified beta-catenin, a component of adherens junctions, as a substrate of Pez by a "substrate trapping" approach and by in vitro dephosphorylation with recombinant Pez. Consistent with this, ectopic expression of the dominant negative mutant caused an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, demonstrating that Pez regulates the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins, including beta-catenin. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins has been shown to decrease cell-cell adhesion, promoting cell migration as a result. Accordingly, the dominant negative Pez mutant enhanced cell motility in an in vitro "wound" assay. This suggests that Pez is also a regulator of cell motility, most likely through its action on cell-cell adhesion. PMID:12808048

  8. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; P<0.001), and this association was independent (r=−0.61; P<0.001) of demographic and classical risk factors, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus and calcium, C-reactive protein, and albuminuria. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of endothelial dysfunction was ≈3-fold higher in patients in the third tertile than that of patients in the first tertile. We also tested the combined role of alkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (P<0.001) in patients with serum phosphorus above the median value when compared with patients with serum phosphorus below the median (−5.0% versus −10.2% per alkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (P<0.001) after adjustment of all the previously mentioned risk factors. Our data support a strong and significant inverse relationship between alkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels.

  9. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  10. Effects of multivalent cations on cell wall-associated acid phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.I.; Brouillette, J.N.; Nagahashi, G.; Kumosinski, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    Primary cell walls, free from cytoplasmic contamination were prepared from corn (Zea mays L.) roots and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. After EDTA treatment, the bound acid phosphatase activities were measured in the presence of various multivalent cations. Under the conditions of minimized Donnan effect and at pH 4.2, the bound enzyme activity of potato tuber cell walls (PCW) was stimulated by Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Za/sup 2 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/; unaffected by Ba/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; and inhibited by Al/sup 3 +/. The bound acid phosphatase of PCW was stimulated by a low concentration but inhibited by a higher concentration of Hg/sup 2 +/. On the other hand, in the case of corn root cells walls (CCW), only inhibition of the bound acid phosphatase by Al/sup 3 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ was observed. Kinetic analyses revealed that PCW acid phosphatase exhibited a negative cooperativity under all employed experimental conditions except in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. In contrast, CCW acid phosphatase showed no cooperative behavior. The presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ significantly reduced the effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/, but not Mg/sup 2 +/, to the bound cell wall acid phosphatases. The salt solubilized (free) acid phosphatases from both PCW and CCW were not affected by the presence of tested cations except for Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/ which caused a Ca/sup 2 +/-insensitive inhibition of the enzymes. The induced stimulation or inhibition of bound acid phosphatases was quantitatively related to cation binding in the cell wall structure.

  11. Functional characterization of two members of histidine phosphatase superfamily in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional characterization of genes in important pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis is imperative. Rv2135c, which was originally annotated as conserved hypothetical, has been found to be associated with membrane protein fractions of H37Rv strain. The gene appears to contain histidine phosphatase motif common to both cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutases and acid phosphatases in the histidine phosphatase superfamily. The functions of many of the members of this superfamily are annotated based only on similarity to known proteins using automatic annotation systems, which can be erroneous. In addition, the motif at the N-terminal of Rv2135c is ‘RHA’ unlike ‘RHG’ found in most members of histidine phosphatase superfamily. These necessitate the need for its experimental characterization. The crystal structure of Rv0489, another member of the histidine phosphatase superfamily in M. tuberculosis, has been previously reported. However, its biochemical characteristics remain unknown. In this study, Rv2135c and Rv0489 from M. tuberculosis were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with 6 histidine residues tagged at the C terminal. Results Characterization of the purified recombinant proteins revealed that Rv0489 possesses phosphoglycerate mutase activity while Rv2135c does not. However Rv2135c has an acid phosphatase activity with optimal pH of 5.8. Kinetic parameters of Rv2135c and Rv0489 are studied, confirming that Rv0489 is a cofactor dependent phosphoglycerate mutase of M. tuberculosis. Additional characterization showed that Rv2135c exists as a tetramer while Rv0489 as a dimer in solution. Conclusion Most of the proteins orthologous to Rv2135c in other bacteria are annotated as phosphoglycerate mutases or hypothetical proteins. It is possible that they are actually phosphatases. Experimental characterization of a sufficiently large number of bacterial histidine phosphatases will increase the accuracy of the automatic

  12. Release of alkaline phosphatase from membranes by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Low, M G; Finean, J B

    1977-10-01

    Purified phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Staphylococcus aureus released a substantial proportion of the total alkaline phosphatase activity from a wide range of tissues from several mammalian species. Co-purification of the phospholipase C and alkaline phosphatase-releasing activities and the inhibition of both these activities by iso-osmotic salt solutions suggested that the releasing effect was unlikely to be due to a contaminant.

  13. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases: biological function, structural characteristics, and mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y

    1998-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) superfamily consists of tyrosine-specific phosphatases, dual specificity phosphatases, and the low-molecular-weight phosphatases. They are modulators of signal transduction pathways that regulate numerous cell functions. Malfunction of PTPases have been linked to a number of oncogenic and metabolic disease states, and PTPases are also employed by microbes and viruses for pathogenicity. There is little sequence similarity among the three subfamilies of phosphatases. Yet, three-dimensional structural data show that they share similar conserved structural elements, namely, the phosphate-binding loop encompassing the PTPase signature motif (H/V)C(X)5R(S/T) and an essential general acid/base Asp residue on a surface loop. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that phosphatases in the PTPase superfamily utilize a common mechanism for catalysis going through a covalent thiophosphate intermediate that involves the nucleophilic Cys residue in the PTPase signature motif. The transition states for phosphoenzyme intermediate formation and hydrolysis are dissociative in nature and are similar to those of the solution phosphate monoester reactions. One strategy used by these phosphatases for transition state stabilization is to neutralize the developing negative charge in the leaving group. A conformational change that is restricted to the movement of a flexible loop occurs during the catalytic cycle of the PTPases. However, the relationship between loop dynamics and enzyme catalysis remains to be established. The nature and identity of the rate-limiting step in the PTPase catalyzed reaction requires further investigation and may be dependent on the specific experimental conditions such as temperature, pH, buffer, and substrate used. In-depth kinetic and structural analysis of a representative number of phosphatases from each group of the PTPase superfamily will most likely continue to yield insightful mechanistic information that may be

  14. Activation of WIP1 Phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax Mitigates the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dayaram, Tajhal; Lemoine, Francene J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Marriott, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR) is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL) can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX) and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome. PMID:23405243

  15. Specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with a biarsenical probe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver B.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key regulator of the insulin-receptor and leptin-receptor signaling pathways, and it has therefore emerged as a critical anti-type-II-diabetes and anti-obesity drug target. Toward the goal of generating a covalent modulator of PTP1B activity that can be used for investigating its roles in cell signaling and disease progression, we report that the biarsenical probe FlAsH-EDT2 can be used to inhibit PTP1B variants that contain cysteine point mutations in a key catalytic loop of the enzyme. The site-specific cysteine mutations have little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the absence of FlAsH-EDT2. Upon addition of FlAsH-EDT2, however, the activity of the engineered PTP1B is strongly inhibited, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that the cysteine-rich PTP1B variants can be targeted with the biarsenical probe in either whole-cell lysates or intact cells. Together, our data provide an example of a biarsenical probe controlling the activity of a protein that does not contain the canonical tetra-cysteine biarsenical-labeling sequence CCXXCC. The targeting of “incomplete” cysteine-rich motifs could provide a general means for controlling protein activity by targeting biarsenical compounds to catalytically important loops in conserved protein domains. PMID:22263876

  16. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  17. Expression and clinical significance of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peifen; Guo, Wenjie; Yuan, Huaqin; Li, Qian; Wang, Weicheng; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiaomin; Gu, Yanhong

    2014-04-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, encoded by gene PTPN11, has been identified as a tumor-promoting factor in several types of leukemia and is hyper-activated by other mechanisms in some solid tumors including gastric cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), etc. But few were reported on the expression and significances of SHP-2 in colon cancer. Here, we detect SHP-2 expression in colon cancer cells, colon cancer-induced by AOM+DSS in mice and 232 human colon cancer specimens, including 58 groups of self-matched adjacent peritumor tissues and normal tissues. We found that compared to the normal colon tissues, SHP-2 significantly decreased in tumor tissues (P<0.001). The same results were got in colon tumor cells as well as mice colon tumors. And in humans samples, low SHP-2 expression showed a significantly correlation with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), late TNM stage (P=0.1666) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05).

  18. SCP phosphatases suppress renal cell carcinoma by stabilizing PML and inhibiting mTOR/HIF signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Lu, Li-Ting; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Duan, Xueyan; Lin, Xia; Feng, Xin-Hua; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chen, Ruey-Hwa

    2014-12-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein promyelocytic leukemia (PML) is aberrantly degraded in multiple types of human cancers through mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the phosphatase SCP1 and its isoforms SCP2/3 dephosphorylate PML at S518, thereby blocking PML ubiquitination and degradation mediated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1 and the ubiquitin ligase KLHL20. Clinically, SCP1 and SCP3 are downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and these events correlated with PMLS518 phosphorylation, PML turnover, and high-grade tumors. Restoring SCP1-mediated PML stabilization not only inhibited malignant features of ccRCC, including proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor growth, and tumor angiogenesis, but also suppressed the mTOR-HIF pathway. Furthermore, blocking PML degradation in ccRCC by SCP1 overexpression or Pin1 inhibition enhanced the tumor-suppressive effects of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Taken together, our results define a novel pathway of PML degradation in ccRCC that involves SCP downregulation, revealing contributions of this pathway to ccRCC progression and offering a mechanistic rationale for combination therapies that jointly target PML degradation and mTOR inhibition for ccRCC treatment.

  19. Positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation through kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Mustelin, Tomas; Taskén, Kjetil

    2003-01-01

    The sequence of events in T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling leading to T-cell activation involves regulation of a number of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and the phosphorylation status of many of their substrates. Proximal signalling pathways involve PTKs of the Src, Syk, Csk and Tec families, adapter proteins and effector enzymes in a highly organized tyrosine-phosphorylation cascade. In intact cells, tyrosine phosphorylation is rapidly reversible and generally of a very low stoichiometry even under induced conditions due to the fact that the enzymes removing phosphate from tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), have a capacity that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the PTKs. It follows that a relatively minor change in the PTK/PTPase balance can have a major impact on net tyrosine phosphorylation and thereby on activation and proliferation of T-cells. This review focuses on the involvement of PTKs and PTPases in positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation, the emerging theme of reciprocal regulation of each type of enzyme by the other, as well as regulation of phosphotyrosine turnover by Ser/Thr phosphorylation and regulation of localization of signal components. PMID:12485116

  20. The SAP, a new family of proteins, associate and function positively with the SIT4 phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Luke, M M; Della Seta, F; Di Como, C J; Sugimoto, H; Kobayashi, R; Arndt, K T

    1996-01-01

    SIT4 is the catalytic subunit of a type 2A-related protein phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is required for G1 cyclin transcription and for bud formation. SIT4 associates with several high-molecular-mass proteins in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. We purified two SIT4-associated proteins, SAP155 and SAP190, and cloned the corresponding genes. By sequence homology, we isolated two additional SAP genes, SAP185 and SAP4. Through such an association is not yet proven for SAP4, each of SAP155, SAP185, and SAP190 physically associates with SIT4 in separate complexes. The SAPs function positively with SIT4, and by several criteria, the loss of all four SAPs is equivalent to the loss of SIT4. The data suggest that the SAPs are not functional in the absence of SIT4 and likewise that SIT4 is not functional in the absence of the SAPs. The SAPs are hyperphoshorylated in cells lacking SIT4, raising the possibility that the SAPs are substrates of SIT4. By sequence similarity, the SAPs fall into two groups, the SAP4/SAP155 group and the SAP185/SAP190 group. Overexpression of a SAP from one group does not suppress the defects due to the loss of the other group. These findings and others indicate that the SAPs have distinct functions. PMID:8649382

  1. Brevis plant1, a putative inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, is required for internode elongation in maize

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Luis M.; Cerrudo, Diego; Swanton, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays L.), as in other grass species, stem elongation occurs during growth and most noticeably upon the transition to flowering. Genes that reduce stem elongation have been important to reduce stem breakage, or lodging. Stem elongation has been mediated by dwarf and brachytic/brevis plant mutants that affect giberellic acid and auxin pathways, respectively. Maize brevis plant1 (bv1) mutants, first identified over 80 years ago, strongly resemble brachytic2 mutants that have shortened internodes, short internode cells, and are deficient in auxin transport. Here, we characterized two novel bv1 maize mutants. We found that an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase orthologue of the rice gene dwarf50 was the molecular basis for the bv1 phenotype, implicating auxin-mediated inositol polyphosphate and/or phosphoinositide signalling in stem elongation. We suggest that auxin-mediated internode elongation involves processes that also contribute to stem gravitropism. Genes misregulated in bv1 mutants included genes important for cell wall synthesis, transmembrane transport, and cytoskeletal function. Mutant and wild-type plants were indistinguishable early in development, responded similarly to changes in light quality, had unaltered flowering times, and had normal flower development. These attributes suggest that breeding could utilize bv1 alleles to increase crop grain yields. PMID:26767748

  2. Enzymatically Triggered, Isothermally Responsive Polymers: Reprogramming Poly(oligoethylene glycols) To Respond to Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Daniel J; Wilde, Marleen; Greco, Francesca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Polymers which can respond to externally applied stimuli have found much application in the biomedical field due to their (reversible) coil-globule transitions. Polymers displaying a lower critical solution temperature are the most commonly used, but for blood-borne (i.e., soluble) biomedical applications the application of heat is not always possible, nor practical. Here we report the design and synthesis of poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate)-based polymers whose cloud points are easily varied by alkaline phosphatase-mediated dephosphorylation. By fine-tuning the density of phosphate groups on the backbone, it was possible to induce an isothermal transition: A change in solubility triggered by removal of a small number of phosphate esters from the side chains activating the LCST-type response. As there was no temperature change involved, this serves as a model of a cell-instructed polymer response. Finally, it was found that both polymers were non cytotoxic against MCF-7 cells (at 1 mg·mL(-1)), which confirms promise for biomedical applications.

  3. A highly fluorescent simultaneous azo dye technique for demonstration of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, C A; Lepire, M L; Torres, I

    1990-03-01

    We describe a fluorescent histochemical technique for detection of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (APase) in cells. The technique utilizes standard azo dye chemistry with naphthol AS-MX phosphate as substrate and fast red TR as the diazonium salt. The reaction product is a highly fluorescent red precipitate. Pre-implantation mouse embryos were used to establish optimal fixation and staining protocols and the specificity and sensitivity of the method. Fixation was in 4% paraformaldehyde for 1 hr, as glutaraldehyde induced autofluorescence of the cells. Maximal discriminable staining was detected after 15-20 min in the stain solution. The stain solution itself proved to be non-fluorescent, thus allowing visual observation of the progress of the staining reaction by fluorescence microscopy in its presence. To test the specificity of this fluorescent APase stain, a variety of cell types of known APase reactivity were stained by this protocol. Mouse lymphocytes and STO fibroblasts were negative, whereas F9 teratocarcinoma cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and rat fetal primordial germ cells were all found to be highly positive for APase activity, in agreement with published results on APase localization in these cells.

  4. Purification and characterization of an acid phosphatase from the commercial mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Wannet, W J; Wassenaar, R W; Jorissen, H J; van der Drift, C; Op den Camp, H J

    2000-04-01

    Acid phosphatase [AP; EC 3.1.3.2], a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of mannitol in Agaricus bisporus, was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The native enzyme appeared to be a high molecular weight type glycoprotein. It has a molecular weight of 145 kDa and consists of four identical 39-kDa subunits. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was found at 4.7. Maximum activity occurred at 65 degrees C. The optimum pH range was between 3.5 and 5.5, with maximum activity at pH 4.75. The enzyme was unaffected by EDTA, and inhibited by tartrate and inorganic phosphate. The enzyme exhibits a Km for p-nitrophenylphosphate and fructose-6-phosphate of 370 microM and 3.1 mM, respectively. A broad substrate specificity was observed with significant activities for fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, mannitol-1-phosphate, AMP and beta-glycerol phosphate. Only phosphomonoesters were dephosphorylated. Antibodies raised against the purified enzyme could precipitate AP activity from a cell-free extract in an anticatalytic immunoprecipitation test.

  5. The wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 alleviates salt stress and increases antioxidant activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Ikram; Ebel, Chantal; Belgaroui, Nibras; Ghorbel, Mouna; Amara, Imène; Hanin, Moez

    2016-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are important negative regulators in the MAPK signaling pathways, which play crucial roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. We have previously shown that the heterologous expression of a durum wheat MKP, TMKP1, results in increased tolerance to salt stress in yeast but its particular contribution in salt stress tolerance in plants was not investigated. Here, TMKP1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana and physiological changes were assessed in transgenic plants exposed to stress conditions. Under salt stress and especially LiCl, the TMKP1 overexpressors displayed higher germination rates in comparison to wild type plants. The enhancement of salt stress tolerance was accompanied by increased antioxidant enzyme activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxydases. Such increases in antioxidant activities were concomitant with lower malondialdehyde, superoxide anion O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide levels in the TMKP1 transgenic seedlings. Moreover, we provide evidence that, in contrast to the Arabidopsis ortholog AtMKP1, TMKP1 acts as a positive regulator of salt stress tolerance via its ectopic expression in the Arabidopsis mkp1 mutant. PMID:26927025

  6. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  7. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  8. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  9. Dehydroepiandrosterone-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase (DDSP) prevents diet-induced and genetic obesity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tetsuhiro; Ashida, Kenji; Goto, Kiminobu; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yanase, Toshihiko; Nomura, Masatoshi

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts a wide variety of therapeutic effects against medical disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular basis of DHEA action remains to be clarified. Previously, we reported that DHEA-enhanced dual specificity protein phosphatase, designated DDSP, is one of the target molecules of DHEA. To examine the role of DDSP in DHEA signaling, we generated mice that carry a DDSP transgene in which expression is driven by the CAG promoter (DDSP-Tg). DDSP-Tg mice weighed significantly less than wild-type (WT) control mice when a high fat diet was supplied (p < 0.01). No difference in food-intake or locomotor activity was found between DDSP-Tg and WT mice. Oxygen consumption of DDSP-Tg mice was higher than that of WT mice (p < 0.01), which suggested an increase in basal metabolism in DDSP-Tg mice. To further investigate the role of DDSP in genetic obese mice, DDSP-Tg mice with a db/db background were generated (DDSP-Tg db/db). We observed cancellation of obesity by the db/db mutation and development of a cachexic phenotype in DDSP-Tg db/db mice. In conclusion, our study shows that expression of DDSP leads to prevention of diet-induced and genetic (db/db) obesity. Anti-obese effects of DHEA might be mediated through DDSP, which might be a therapeutic target for intervention of obesity.

  10. PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta) is associated with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schormair, Barbara; Kemlink, David; Roeske, Darina; Eckstein, Gertrud; Xiong, Lan; Lichtner, Peter; Ripke, Stephan; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Zimprich, Alexander; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Oertel, Wolfgang; Bachmann, Cornelius G; Paulus, Walter; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Gschliesser, Viola; Poewe, Werner; Peglau, Ines; Vodicka, Pavel; Vávrová, Jana; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Montplaisir, Jacques; Turecki, Gustavo; Rouleau, Guy; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Meitinger, Thomas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2008-08-01

    We identified association of restless legs syndrome (RLS) with PTPRD at 9p23-24 in 2,458 affected individuals and 4,749 controls from Germany, Austria, Czechia and Canada. Two independent SNPs in the 5' UTR of splice variants expressed predominantly in the central nervous system showed highly significant P values (rs4626664, P(nominal/lambda corrected) = 5.91 x 10(-10), odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; rs1975197, P(nominal/lambda corrected) = 5.81 x 10(-9), OR = 1.31). This work identifies PTPRD as the fourth genome-wide significant locus for RLS.

  11. Comparative characterization of pulmonary surfactant aggregates and alkaline phosphatase isozymes in human lung carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Iino, Nozomi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Seiji; Koyama, Iwao; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2007-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes are surfactant-associated proteins (SPs). Since several different AP isozymes have been detected in the pneumocytes of lung cancer patients, we attempted to identify the relationship between pulmonary surfactant aggregate subtypes and AP isozymes. Pulmonary surfactant aggregates were isolated from carcinoma and non-carcinoma tissues of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Upon analysis, ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates were detected in the non-carcinoma tissues, but no ultraheavy surfactant aggregates were found in the carcinoma tissues. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) was detected as two bands (a 27-kDa band and a 54-kDa band) in the ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates found in the non-carcinoma tissues. Although both SP-A bands were detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues, the 54-kDa band was not detected in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Liver AP (LAP) was detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from both non-carcinoma and squamous carcinoma tissues, but not in heavy surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues. A larger amount of bone type AP (BAP) was found in light surfactant aggregate fractions from squamous cell carcinomas than those from adenocarcinoma tissues or non-carcinoma tissues from patients with either type of cancer. LAP, BAP, and SP-A were identified immunohistochemically in type II pneumocytes from non-carcinoma tissues and adenocarcinoma cells, but no distinct SP-A staining was observed in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. The present study has thus revealed several differences in pulmonary surfactant aggregates and AP isozymes between adenocarcinoma tissue and squamous cell carcinoma tissue.

  12. [Influences of uncommon isoenzymes on determination of alkaline phosphatase activity by dry-chemistry analyzers].

    PubMed

    Tozawa, T; Hashimoto, M

    2001-04-01

    Dry-chemistry(DC) analysis may be influenced by some matrix effects for measuring uncommon isoenzyme forms. Placental and intestinal alkaline phosphatase(AP) are overestimated by the VITROS DC, compared with results obtained with the wet-chemistry(WC) method of Bretaudiere, et al. using 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) buffer, however, no such discrepancy between AP results in any DC method and that with a routine WC method recommended by Japanese Society of Clinical Chemistry in that 2-ethylaminoethanol(EAE) buffer is used, has been demonstrated. The type of buffer used affects differently the rates of AP isoenzymes activities. We therefore examined whether the presence of uncommon AP isoenzyme forms in serum caused aberrant DC results for AP in comparison with a routine WC method using EAE buffer. Here, serum samples with only liver AP and bone AP(n : 32); high-molecular-mass AP(n : 11); placental AP(n : 12); intestinal AP(n : 13) and immunoglobulin (Ig) bound AP(n : 12) were analyzed for total AP activity on three different DC analyzers: VITROS 700XR, FUJIDRYCHEM 5000, SPOTCHEM 4410 and a WC analyzer: HITACHI 7350. Values obtained in all of the DCs for sera containing only liver/bone AP agreed with those with the WC method. For sera containing placental AP, the VITROS values were higher than those with the WC method, while the FUJIDRYCHEM values and the SPOTCHEM values were lower. The VITROS values and the FUJIDRYCHEM values for sera containing intestinal AP were lower than those with the WC method, while the SPOTCHEM values were higher. All of the DCs did not affect high-molecular-mass AP and Ig bound liver/bone AP types of macro AP, but underestimated Ig bound intestinal type. Ig bound intestinal AP may be sieved by DC multilayer elements. PMID:11391954

  13. Insight into the redox regulation of the phosphoglucan phosphatase SEX4 involved in starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Dylan M; Silva, Leslie P; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Glaring, Mikkel A; Schriemer, David C; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2013-01-01

    Starch is the major carbohydrate reserve in plants, and is degraded for growth at night. Starch breakdown requires reversible glucan phosphorylation at the granule surface by novel dikinases and phosphatases. The dual-specificity phosphatase starch excess 4 (SEX4) is required for glucan desphosphorylation; however, regulation of the enzymatic activity of SEX4 is not well understood. We show that SEX4 switches between reduced (active) and oxidized (inactive) states, suggesting that SEX4 is redox-regulated. Although only partial reactivation of SEX4 was achieved using artificial reductants (e.g. dithiothreitol), use of numerous chloroplastic thioredoxins recovered activity completely, suggesting that thioredoxins could reduce SEX4 in vivo. Analysis of peptides from oxidized and reduced SEX4 identified a disulfide linkage between the catalytic cysteine at position 198 (Cys198) and the cysteine at position 130 (Cys130) within the phosphatase domain. The position of these cysteines was structurally analogous to that for known redox-regulated dual-specificity phosphatases, suggesting a common mechanism of reversible oxidation amongst these phosphatases. Mutation of Cys130 renders SEX4 more sensitive to oxidative inactivation and less responsive to reductive reactivation. Together, these results provide the first biochemical evidence for a redox-dependent structural switch that regulates SEX4 activity, which represents the first plant phosphatase known to undergo reversible oxidation via disulfide bond formation like its mammalian counterparts.

  14. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests. PMID:24823652

  15. The development of ribonuclease and acid phosphatase during germination of Pisum arvense.

    PubMed

    Barker, G R; Bray, C M; Walter, T J

    1974-08-01

    1. Development of ribonuclease activity in the cotyledons of germinating peas is biphasic, the time of appearance of the two phases depending on the conditions of growth. 2. Acid phosphatase exhibits a single phase of development. 3. Cycloheximide inhibits development of ribonuclease activity in phase II but not in phase I. 4. (14)C-labelled amino acids are not incorporated into ribonuclease isolated during phase I. 5. The buoyant density of ribonuclease isolated during phase I is not affected by imbibition of the seed in 80% deuterium oxide. 6. Acid phosphatase was isolated from the supernatant fraction of the cotyledons of germinating peas and partially purified. 7. Development of acid phosphatase activity during germination is inhibited by treatment of the seed with cycloheximide or actinomycin D. 8. Partial purification of acid phosphatase from peas germinated in the presence of (14)C-labelled amino acids suggests that the enzyme is radioactively labelled. 9. Germination of peas in the presence of 80% deuterium oxide results in an increase in the buoyant density of acid phosphatase. 10. The results suggest that increase in ribonuclease activity during the first 4 days of germination does not result from synthesis of protein de novo, but that the corresponding increase in acid phosphatase activity does result from synthesis de novo.

  16. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractio