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Sample records for phosphatase shp-2 controls

  1. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  2. Coordinated regulation by Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase of signaling events controlling insulin biosynthesis in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sharon S; Hao, Ergeng; Yu, Jianxiu; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jing; Levine, Fred; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Intracellular signaling by which pancreatic beta-cells synthesize and secrete insulin in control of glucose homeostasis is not fully understood. Here we show that Shp2, a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase possessing 2 SH2 domains, coordinates signaling events required for insulin biosynthesis in beta-cells. Mice with conditional ablation of the Shp2/Ptpn11 gene in the pancreas exhibited defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. Consistently, siRNA-mediated Shp2-knockdown in rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cells resulted in decreased insulin production and secretion despite an increase in cellular ATP. Shp2 modulates the strength of signals flowing through Akt/FoxO1 and Erk pathways, culminating in control of Pdx1 expression and activity on Ins1 and Ins2 promoters, and forced Pdx1 expression rescued insulin production in Shp2-knockdown beta-cells. Therefore, Shp2 acts as a signal coordinator in beta-cells, orchestrating multiple pathways controlling insulin biosynthesis to maintain glucose homeostasis.

  3. SHP-2 Phosphatase Prevents Colonic Inflammation by Controlling Secretory Cell Differentiation and Maintaining Host-Microbiota Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, Geneviève; Langlois, Ariane; De Palma, Giada; Langlois, Marie-Josée; McCarville, Justin L; Gagné-Sanfaçon, Jessica; Perreault, Nathalie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Bercik, Premysl; Boudreau, François; Verdu, Elena F; Rivard, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    Polymorphisms in the PTPN11 gene encoding for the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 were described in patients with ulcerative colitis. We have recently demonstrated that mice with an intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of SHP-2 (SHP-2(IEC-KO) ) develop severe colitis 1 month after birth. However, the mechanisms by which SHP-2 deletion induces colonic inflammation remain to be elucidated. We generated SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice lacking Myd88 exclusively in the intestinal epithelium. The colonic phenotype was histologically analyzed and cell differentiation was determined by electron microscopy and lysozyme or Alcian blue staining. Microbiota composition was analyzed by 16S sequencing. Results show that innate defense genes including those specific to Paneth cells were strongly up-regulated in SHP-2-deficient colons. Expansion of intermediate cells (common progenitors of the Goblet and Paneth cell lineages) was found in the colon of SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice whereas Goblet cell number was clearly diminished. These alterations in Goblet/intermediate cell ratio were noticed 2 weeks after birth, before the onset of inflammation and were associated with significant alterations in microbiota composition. Indeed, an increase in Enterobacteriaceae and a decrease in Firmicutes were observed in the colon of these mice, indicating that dysbiosis also occurred prior to inflammation. Importantly, loss of epithelial Myd88 expression inhibited colitis development in SHP-2(IEC-KO) mice, rescued Goblet/intermediate cell ratio, and prevented NFκB hyperactivation and inflammation. These data indicate that SHP-2 is functionally important for the maintenance of appropriate barrier function and host-microbiota homeostasis in the large intestine. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2529-2540, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  5. Antagonism or Synergism: Role of Tyrosine Phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 in Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Li, Zhe; Ding, Ronghua; Frank, Gerald D.; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Landon, Erwin J.; Inagami, Tadashi; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2008-01-01

    SHP-1 and SHP-2 are two SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases with major pathological implications in cell growth regulating signaling. They share significant overall sequence identity, but their biological functions are often opposite. SHP-1 is generally considered as a negative signal transducer while SHP-2 as a positive one. However, the precise role of each enzyme in shared signaling pathways is not well defined. In this study, we investigated the interaction of these two enzymes in a single cell system by knocking down their expressions with siRNAs and analyzing the effects on epidermal growth factor signaling. Interestingly, knockdown of either SHP-1 or SHP-2 caused significant reduction in the activation of ERK1/2 but not Akt. Furthermore, SHP-1, SHP-2, and Gab1 formed a signaling complex, and SHP-1 and SHP-2 interact with each other. The interaction of SHP-1 with Gab1 is mediated by SHP-2 since it was abrogated by knockdown of SHP-2 and SHP-2, but not SHP-1, binds directly to tyrosine phosphorylated Gab1. Together, the data revealed that both SHP-1 and SHP-2 have a positive role in epidermal growth factor-induced ERK1/2 activation and that they act cooperatively rather than antagonistically. The interaction of SHP-1 and SHP-2 may be responsible for hitherto unexpected novel regulatory mechanism of cell signaling by tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:16762922

  6. SHP2 phosphatase promotes mast cell chemotaxis toward stem cell factor via enhancing activation of the Lyn/Vav/Rac signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namit; Everingham, Stephanie; Ramdas, Baskar; Kapur, Reuben; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-05-15

    SHP2 protein-tyrosine phosphatase (encoded by Ptpn11) positively regulates KIT (CD117) signaling in mast cells and is required for mast cell survival and homeostasis in mice. In this study, we uncover a role of SHP2 in promoting chemotaxis of mast cells toward stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for KIT receptor. Using an inducible SHP2 knockout (KO) bone marrow-derived mast cell (BMMC) model, we observed defects in SCF-induced cell spreading, polarization, and chemotaxis. To address the mechanisms involved, we tested whether SHP2 promotes activation of Lyn kinase that was previously shown to promote mast cell chemotaxis. In SHP2 KO BMMCs, SCF-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory C-terminal residue (pY507) was elevated compared with control cells, and phosphorylation of activation loop (pY396) was diminished. Because Lyn also was detected by substrate trapping assays, these results are consistent with SHP2 activating Lyn directly by dephosphorylation of pY507. Further analyses revealed a SHP2- and Lyn-dependent pathway leading to phosphorylation of Vav1, Rac activation, and F-actin polymerization in SCF-treated BMMCs. Treatment of BMMCs with a SHP2 inhibitor also led to impaired chemotaxis, consistent with SHP2 promoting SCF-induced chemotaxis of mast cells via a phosphatase-dependent mechanism. Thus, SHP2 inhibitors may be useful to limit SCF/KIT-induced mast cell recruitment to inflamed tissues or the tumor microenvironment.

  7. Epithelial Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-2 Protects against Intestinal Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Geneviève; Leblanc, Caroline; Cagnol, Sébastien; Maloum, Faiza; Lemieux, Étienne; Perreault, Nathalie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Boudreau, François

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms of PTPN11 encoding SHP-2 are biomarkers for ulcerative colitis (UC) susceptibility. However, their functional relevance is unknown. We thus investigated the role of epithelial SHP-2 in the control of intestinal homeostasis. Mice with an intestinal epithelial cell-specific SHP-2 deletion (SHP-2IEC-KO mice) were generated. Control and SHP-2IEC-KO mice were monitored for clinical symptoms and sacrificed for histological staining and Western blot analyses. Cytokines and chemokines, as well as intestinal permeability, were quantified. SHP-2 mRNA expression was evaluated in control and UC patients. SHP-2IEC-KO mice showed growth retardation compared to control littermates and rapidly developed severe colitis. Colon architecture was markedly altered with infiltration of immune cells, crypt abscesses, neutrophil accumulation, and reduced goblet cell numbers. Decreased expression of claudins was associated with enhanced intestinal permeability in mutant SHP-2IEC-KO mice. Inflammatory transcription factors Stat3 and NF-κB were hyperactivated early in the mutant colonic epithelium. Levels of several epithelial chemokines and cytokines were markedly enhanced in SHP-2IEC-KO mice. Of note, antibiotic treatment remarkably impaired the development of colitis in SHP-2IEC-KO mice. Finally, SHP-2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in intestinal biopsy specimens from UC patients. Our results establish intestinal epithelial SHP-2 as a critical determinant for prevention of gut inflammation. PMID:23530062

  8. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  9. Hematopoietic colony formation from human growth factor-dependent TF1 cells and human cord blood myeloid progenitor cells depends on SHP2 phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Gotoh, Akihiko; Braun, Stephen E; Lu, Li; Cooper, Scott; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Li, Xing Jun; Chan, Rebecca J

    2013-03-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP2, is widely expressed; however, previous studies demonstrated that hematopoietic cell development more stringently requires Shp2 expression compared to other tissues. Furthermore, somatic gain-of-function SHP2 mutants are commonly found in human myeloid leukemias. Given that pharmacologic inhibitors to SHP2 phosphatase activity are currently in development as putative antileukemic agents, we conducted a series of experiments examining the necessity of SHP2 phosphatase activity for human hematopoiesis. Anti-sense oligonucleotides to human SHP2 coding sequences reduced human cord blood- and human cell line, TF1-derived colony formation. Expression of truncated SHP2 bearing its Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, but lacking the phosphatase domain similarly reduced human cord blood- and TF1-derived colony formation. Mechanistically, expression of truncated SHP2 reduced the interaction between endogenous, full-length SHP2 with the adapter protein, Grb2. To verify the role of SHP2 phosphatase function in human hematopoietic cell development, human cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with a leukemia-associated phosphatase gain-of-function SHP2 mutant or with a phosphatase dead SHP2 mutant, which indicated that increased phosphatase function enhanced, while decreased SHP2 phosphatase function reduced, human cord blood-derived colonies. Collectively, these findings indicate that SHP2 phosphatase function regulates human hematopoietic cell development and imply that the phosphatase component of SHP2 may serve as a pharmacologic target in human leukemias bearing increased SHP2 phosphatase activity.

  10. A tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 gain-of-function mutation enhances malignancy of breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Haoshu; Liu, Yakun; Chen, Danlei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Xia; Wei, Daoyan; Qu, Chengkui; Wang, Siying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that Src homologous protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (SHP2) mutations promote cancer development in several solid tumours. In this study, we focused on the in vivo and in vitro effects of an SHP2 mutation on the breast cancer phenotype to determine whether this mutation is correlated with a malignant phenotype. Methods: Mutant PTPN11 cDNA (D61G) was transduced into MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 cells. The effects of the D61G mutation on tumourigenesis and malignant behaviours, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion, were examined. Potential underlying molecular mechanisms, i.e., activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis, were also examined. Results: In vitro experiments revealed that tumour adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly increased in the SHP2 D61G mutant groups. Consistently, in vivo experiments also showed that the tumour sizes and weights were increased significantly in the SHP2 D61G-MB231 group (p < 0.001) in association with tumour metastasis. Mechanistically, the PTPN11 mutation resulted in activation of the Ras-ErK pathway. The binding between Gab1 and mutant SHP2 was significantly increased. Conclusion: Mutant SHP2 significantly promotes tumour migration and invasion at least partially through activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis. This finding could have direct implications for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26673822

  11. A role for the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase in nerve growth-induced PC12 cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J H; Drueckes, P; Bartoe, J; Zhao, Z; Shen, S H; Krebs, E G

    1997-01-01

    SHP-1 and SHP-2 are intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatases containing two adjacent src homology 2 domains that target these phosphatases to cell surface receptor signaling complexes and play a role in receptor signal transduction. In this report the PC12 cell system was used to investigate the potential roles of SHP-1 and SHP-2 in the induction of neuronal differentiation by nerve growth factor (NGF). By using neurite outgrowth as a marker for differentiation, the effects of transfected constructs of SHP-1 and SHP-2 were assessed. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-2, but not a catalytically inactive SHP-1, blocked NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade is important for the morphological differentiation in PC12 cells, and both SHP-1 and SHP-2 have been implicated to act upstream of MAPK in other receptor signaling systems. A positive role for SHP-2 but not SHP-1 in the activation of MAPK by NGF was demonstrated by introduction of the SHP-2 phosphatase mutants along with hemagglutinin-tagged MAPK. Coexpression studies with the SHP-2 mutant along with mutant forms of MAPK kinase suggested that SHP-2 functions upstream of MAPK kinase and MAPK in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Images PMID:9285826

  12. Expression and clinical significance of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peifen; Guo, Wenjie; Yuan, Huaqin; Li, Qian; Wang, Weicheng; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiaomin; Gu, Yanhong

    2014-04-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, encoded by gene PTPN11, has been identified as a tumor-promoting factor in several types of leukemia and is hyper-activated by other mechanisms in some solid tumors including gastric cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), etc. But few were reported on the expression and significances of SHP-2 in colon cancer. Here, we detect SHP-2 expression in colon cancer cells, colon cancer-induced by AOM+DSS in mice and 232 human colon cancer specimens, including 58 groups of self-matched adjacent peritumor tissues and normal tissues. We found that compared to the normal colon tissues, SHP-2 significantly decreased in tumor tissues (P<0.001). The same results were got in colon tumor cells as well as mice colon tumors. And in humans samples, low SHP-2 expression showed a significantly correlation with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), late TNM stage (P=0.1666) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05).

  13. Salicylic Acid Based Small Molecule Inhibitor for the Oncogenic Src Homology-2 Domain Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 (SHP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xian; He, Yantao; Liu, Sijiu; Yu, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhenyun; Dong, Yuanshu; Nabinger, Sarah C.; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Wang, Lina; Chan, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2010-08-13

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) plays a pivotal role in growth factor and cytokine signaling. Gain-of-function SHP2 mutations are associated with Noonan syndrome, various kinds of leukemias, and solid tumors. Thus, there is considerable interest in SHP2 as a potential target for anticancer and antileukemia therapy. We report a salicylic acid based combinatorial library approach aimed at binding both active site and unique nearby subpockets for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the library led to the identification of a SHP2 inhibitor II-B08 (compound 9) with highly efficacious cellular activity. Compound 9 blocks growth factor stimulated ERK1/2 activation and hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, providing supporting evidence that chemical inhibition of SHP2 may be therapeutically useful for anticancer and antileukemia treatment. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the structure of SHP2 in complex with 9 reveals molecular determinants that can be exploited for the acquisition of more potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors.

  14. The tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 interacts with NPM-ALK and regulates anaplastic lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Conte, Chiara; Ambrogio, Chiara; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Boccalatte, Francesco; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jensen, Ole N; Palestro, Giorgio; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2007-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) are mainly characterized by the reciprocal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that involves the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene and generates the fusion protein NPM-ALK with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. NPM-ALK triggers several signaling cascades, leading to increased cell growth, resistance to apoptosis, and changes in morphology and migration of transformed cells. To search for new NPM-ALK interacting molecules, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach in HEK293 cells expressing an inducible NPM-ALK and identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 as a candidate substrate. We found that NPM-ALK was able to bind Shp2 in coprecipitation experiments and to induce its phosphorylation in the tyrosine residues Y542 and Y580 both in HEK293 cells and ALCL cell lines. In primary lymphomas, antibodies against the phosphorylated tyrosine Y542 of Shp2 mainly stained ALK-positive cells. In ALCL cell lines, Shp2-constitutive phosphorylation was dependent on NPM-ALK, as it significantly decreased after short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated NPM-ALK knock down. In addition, only the constitutively active NPM-ALK, but not the kinase dead NPM-ALK(K210R), formed a complex with Shp2, Gab2, and growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), where Grb2 bound to the phosphorylated Shp2 through its SH2 domain. Shp2 knock down by specific shRNA decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and of the tyrosine residue Y416 in the activation loop of Src, resulting in impaired ALCL cell proliferation and growth disadvantage. Finally, migration of ALCL cells was reduced by Shp2 shRNA. These findings show a direct involvement of Shp2 in NPM-ALK lymphomagenesis, highlighting its critical role in lymphoma cell proliferation and migration.

  15. Regulation of interleukin-3-induced substrate phosphorylation and cell survival by SHP-2 (Src-homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2).

    PubMed

    Wheadon, Helen; Edmead, Christine; Welham, Melanie J

    2003-11-15

    The cytosolic SHP-2 (Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) has previously been implicated in IL-3 (interleukin-3) signalling [Bone, Dechert, Jirik, Schrader and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 14470 -14476; Craddock and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29281-29289; Welham, Dechert, Leslie, Jirik and Schrader (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 23764-23768; Qu, Nguyen, Chen and Feng (2001) Blood 97, 911-914]. To investigate the role of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling in greater detail, we have inducibly expressed WT (wild-type) or two potentially substrate-trapping mutant forms of SHP-2, generated by mutation of Asp-425 to Ala (D425A) or Cyst-459 to Ser (C459S), in IL-3-dependent BaF/3 cells. Effects on IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, signal transduction and functional responses were examined. Expression of C459S SHP-2 protected the beta-chain of the murine IL-3R (IL-3 receptor), the adaptor protein Gab2 (Grb2-associated binder 2), and a cytosolic protein of 48 kDa from tyrosine dephosphorylation, consistent with them being bona fide substrates of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling. The tyrosine phosphorylation of a 135 kDa transmembrane protein was also protected upon expression of C459S SHP-2. We have identified the inhibitory immunoreceptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1)/CD31 (cluster determinant 31) as a component of this 135 kDa substrate and also show that IL-3 can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1. Expression of WT, C459S and D425A forms of SHP-2 had little effect on IL-3-driven proliferation or STAT5 (signal transduction and activators of transcription) phosphorylation or activation of protein kinase B. However, expression of WT SHP-2 increased ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation. Interestingly, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased ERK activation at later times after IL-3 stimulation, but potentiated IL-3-induced activation of Jun N-terminal kinases. In addition, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased cell survival in

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  17. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  18. Deletion of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in Sertoli cells causes infertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zhenzhou; Li, Yang; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Bingyan; Tian, Yingpu; Zhao, Yinan; Ran, Hao; Liu, Wenjie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Wang, Haibin; Lu, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The male’s ability to reproduce is completely dependent on Sertoli cells. However, the mechanisms governing the functional integrity of Sertoli cells have remained largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Shp2 in Sertoli cells results in infertility in mice. In Shp2 knockout mice (SCSKO), a normal population of Sertoli cells was observed, but the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was not formed. Shp2 ablation initiated the untimely and excessive differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by disturbing the expression of paracrine factors. As a consequence, the process of spermatogenesis was disrupted, and the germ cells were depleted. Furthermore, Shp2 deletion impaired the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and failed to support the clonal formation of SSCs co-cultured with SCSKO Sertoli cells. As expected, Shp2 restoration largely restores the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and the clonal formation of SSCs. To identify the underlying mechanism, we further demonstrated that the absence of Shp2 suppressed Erk phosphorylation, and thus, the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)- and testosterone-induced target genes. These results collectively suggest that Shp2 is a critical signaling protein that is required to maintain Sertoli cell function and could serve as a novel target for male infertility therapies. PMID:26265072

  19. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-01-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27101899

  20. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole-Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-01-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27101899

  1. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-04-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis.

  2. LRRK2 Inhibits FAK Activity by Promoting FERM-mediated Autoinhibition of FAK and Recruiting the Tyrosine Phosphatase, SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insup; Byun, Ji-won; Park, Sang Myun; Jou, Ilo

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) causes an autosomal dominant and late-onset familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, we reported that LRRK2 directly binds to and phosphorylates the threonine 474 (T474)-containing Thr-X-Arg(Lys) (TXR) motif of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), thereby inhibiting the phosphorylation of FAK at tyrosine (Y) 397 residue (pY397-FAK), which is a marker of its activation. Mechanistically, however, it remained unclear how T474-FAK phosphorylation suppressed FAK activation. Here, we report that T474-FAK phosphorylation could inhibit FAK activation via at least two different mechanisms. First, T474 phosphorylation appears to induce a conformational change of FAK, enabling its N-terminal FERM domain to autoinhibit Y397 phosphorylation. This is supported by the observation that the levels of pY397-FAK were increased by deletion of the FERM domain and/or mutation of the FERM domain to prevent its interaction with the kinase domain of FAK. Second, pT474-FAK appears to recruit SHP-2, which is a phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylating pY397-FAK. We found that mutation of T474 into glutamate (T474E-FAK) to mimic phosphorylation induced more strong interaction with SHP-2 than WT-FAK, and that pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 with NSC-87877 rescued the level of pY397 in HEK293T cells. These results collectively show that LRRK2 suppresses FAK activation through diverse mechanisms that include the promotion of autoinhibition and/or the recruitment of phosphatases, such as SHP-2. PMID:27790061

  3. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μM. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:23774838

  4. Importance of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha catalytic domains for interactions with SHP-2 and interleukin-1-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Laschinger, Carol; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2010-07-16

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) induces extracellular matrix degradation as a result of increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We examined adhesion-restricted signaling pathways that enable IL-1-induced MMP release in human gingival and murine fibroblasts. Of the seven MMPs and three tissue inhibitors of MMPs screened, IL-1 enhanced release only of MMP3 when cells formed focal adhesions. Inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enriched in focal adhesions, blocked IL-1-induced MMP3 release. Accordingly, in contrast to wild-type cells, fibroblasts null for PTPalpha did not exhibit IL-1-induced MMP3 release. IL-1 treatment enhanced the recruitment of SHP-2 and PTPalpha to focal adhesions and the association of PTPalpha with SHP-2. Pulldown assays confirmed a direct interaction between PTPalpha and SHP-2, which was dependent on the intact, membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPalpha. Interactions between SHP-2 and PTPalpha, recruitment of SHP-2 to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced ERK activation, and MMP3 expression were all blocked by point mutations in the phosphatase domains of PTPalpha. These data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions leading to MMP3 release and interactions between SHP-2 and PTPalpha are dependent on the integrity of the catalytic domains of PTPalpha.

  5. Importance of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase-α Catalytic Domains for Interactions with SHP-2 and Interleukin-1-induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Laschinger, Carol; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) induces extracellular matrix degradation as a result of increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We examined adhesion-restricted signaling pathways that enable IL-1-induced MMP release in human gingival and murine fibroblasts. Of the seven MMPs and three tissue inhibitors of MMPs screened, IL-1 enhanced release only of MMP3 when cells formed focal adhesions. Inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enriched in focal adhesions, blocked IL-1-induced MMP3 release. Accordingly, in contrast to wild-type cells, fibroblasts null for PTPα did not exhibit IL-1-induced MMP3 release. IL-1 treatment enhanced the recruitment of SHP-2 and PTPα to focal adhesions and the association of PTPα with SHP-2. Pulldown assays confirmed a direct interaction between PTPα and SHP-2, which was dependent on the intact, membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Interactions between SHP-2 and PTPα, recruitment of SHP-2 to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced ERK activation, and MMP3 expression were all blocked by point mutations in the phosphatase domains of PTPα. These data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions leading to MMP3 release and interactions between SHP-2 and PTPα are dependent on the integrity of the catalytic domains of PTPα. PMID:20472558

  6. Characterization of phosphotyrosine binding motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of B and T lymphocyte attenuator required for association with protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2.

    PubMed

    Gavrieli, Maya; Watanabe, Norihiko; Loftin, Susan K; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2003-12-26

    B and T lymphocytes express receptors providing positive and negative co-stimulatory signals. We recently identified a novel co-stimulatory molecule, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), which exerts inhibitory effects on B and T lymphocytes. The cytoplasmic domain of murine and human BTLA share three conserved tyrosine-based signaling motifs, a Grb-2 recognition consensus, and two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of BTLA induced the association with the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Association of SHP-1 and SHP-2 to other receptors can involve recruitment to either a single receptor ITIM or to two receptor ITIMs. Here, we analyzed the requirements of BTLA interaction with SHP-1 and SHP-2 in a series of murine and human BTLA mutants. For human BTLA, mutations of either Y257 or Y282, but not Y226, abrogated association with both SHP-1 and SHP-2. For murine BTLA, mutation of either Y274 or Y299, but not Y245, also abrogated association with both SHP-1 and SHP-2. These results indicate that for both murine and human BTLA, association with SHP-1 or SHP-2 requires both of conserved ITIM motifs and does not involve the conserved Grb-2 consensus. Thus, similar to the bisphosphoryl tyrosine-based activation motif (BTAM) by which the Grb-2 associated binder (Gab1), PDGF receptor, and PECAM-1 recruit SHP-2, BTLA also relies on dual ITIMs for its association with the phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. PMID:14652006

  7. Structural insights into Noonan/LEOPARD syndrome-related mutants of protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (PTPN11)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ubiquitous non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) plays a key role in RAS/ERK signaling downstream of most, if not all growth factors, cytokines and integrins, although its major substrates remain controversial. Mutations in PTPN11 lead to several distinct human diseases. Germ-line PTPN11 mutations cause about 50% of Noonan Syndrome (NS), which is among the most common autosomal dominant disorders. LEOPARD Syndrome (LS) is an acronym for its major syndromic manifestations: multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. Frequently, LS patients have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and they might also have an increased risk of neuroblastoma (NS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Consistent with the distinct pathogenesis of NS and LS, different types of PTPN11 mutations cause these disorders. Results Although multiple studies have reported the biochemical and biological consequences of NS- and LS-associated PTPN11 mutations, their structural consequences have not been analyzed fully. Here we report the crystal structures of WT SHP2 and five NS/LS-associated SHP2 mutants. These findings enable direct structural comparisons of the local conformational changes caused by each mutation. Conclusions Our structural analysis agrees with, and provides additional mechanistic insight into, the previously reported catalytic properties of these mutants. The results of our research provide new information regarding the structure-function relationship of this medically important target, and should serve as a solid foundation for structure-based drug discovery programs. PMID:24628801

  8. Shp2 suppresses the adipogenic differentiation of preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells at an early stage

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J; Zheng, L; Meng, M; Li, Y; Lu, Z

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatase protein Shp2 is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. However, the mechanism of Shp2 during adipogenesis is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of Shp2 in the terminal differentiation of preadipocytes. The results showed that Shp2 suppressed adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells; overexpression of Shp2 reduced lipid droplet production in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas Shp2 knockdown increased lipid droplet production in 3T3-L1 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Shp2 activity also enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Interestingly, Shp2 expression was specifically decreased early during differentiation in response to stimulation with the dexamethasone–methylisobutylxanthine–insulin (DMI) hormone cocktail. During the first 2 days of differentiation, Shp2 overexpression impaired the DMI-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in 3T3-L1 cells and blocked the peak expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins β and δ during preadipocyte differentiation. In conclusion, Shp2 downregulated the early stages of hormone-induced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and inhibited the expression of the first wave of transcription factors by suppressing the DMI-induced STAT3 signaling pathway. These discoveries point to a novel role of Shp2 during adipogenesis and support the hypothesis that Shp2 could be a therapeutic target for the control of obesity. PMID:27551539

  9. Inhibition of SHP2 ameliorates the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianxun; Zeng, Li-Fan; Bronson, Roderick; Finnell, Michele; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Kontaridis, Maria I.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a devastating multisystemic autoimmune disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain elusive. Some patients with Noonan syndrome, a congenital disorder predominantly caused by gain-of-function mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain–containing PTP (SHP2), have been shown to develop SLE, suggesting a functional correlation between phosphatase activity and systemic autoimmunity. To test this directly, we measured SHP2 activity in spleen lysates isolated from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and found it was markedly increased compared with that in control mice. Similar increases in SHP2 activity were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from lupus patients relative to healthy patients. To determine whether SHP2 alters autoimmunity and related immunopathology, we treated MRL/lpr mice with an SHP2 inhibitor and found increased life span, suppressed crescentic glomerulonephritis, reduced spleen size, and diminished skin lesions. SHP2 inhibition also reduced numbers of double-negative T cells, normalized ERK/MAPK signaling, and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, 2 cytokines involved in SLE-associated organ damage. Moreover, in cultured human lupus T cells, SHP2 inhibition reduced proliferation and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, further implicating SHP2 in lupus-associated immunopathology. Taken together, these data identify SHP2 as a critical regulator of SLE pathogenesis and suggest targeting of its activity as a potent treatment for lupus patients. PMID:27183387

  10. Induction of a tumor-associated activating mutation in protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn11 (Shp2) enhances mitochondrial metabolism, leading to oxidative stress and senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Shanhu; Hsu, Peter; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2013-09-01

    Activating mutations in Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in diverse cell signaling pathways, are associated with pediatric leukemias and solid tumors. However, the pathogenic effects of these mutations have not been fully characterized. Here, we report that induction of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation, the most common and active Ptpn11 mutation found in leukemias and solid tumors, in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in proliferative arrest and premature senescence. As a result, apoptosis was markedly increased. These cellular responses were accompanied and mediated by up-regulation of p53 and p21. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, were elevated in Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells. Since Shp2 is also distributed to the mitochondria (in addition to the cytosol), the impact of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation on mitochondrial function was analyzed. These analyses revealed that oxygen consumption of Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells and the respiratory function of Ptpn11(E76K/+) mitochondria were significantly increased. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of mitochondrial Stat3, one of the substrates of Shp2 phosphatase, was greatly decreased in the mutant cells with the activating mutation Ptpn11(E76K/+). This study provides novel insights into the initial effects of tumor-associated Ptpn11 mutations. PMID:23884424

  11. The Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase SHP-2 Participates in a Multimeric Signaling Complex and Regulates T Cell Receptor (TCR) coupling to the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frearson, Julie A.; Alexander, Denis R.

    1998-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domain–containing phosphotyrosine phosphatases (SHPs) are increasingly being shown to play critical roles in protein tyrosine kinase–mediated signaling pathways. The role of SHP-1 as a negative regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling has been established. To further explore the function of the other member of this family, SHP-2, in TCR-mediated events, a catalytically inactive mutant SHP-2 was expressed under an inducible promoter in Jurkat T cells. Expression of the mutant phosphatase significantly inhibited TCR-induced activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-2 member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, but had no effect on TCR-ζ chain tyrosine phosphorylation or TCR-elicited Ca2+ transients. Inactive SHP-2 was targeted to membranes resulting in the selective increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of three membrane-associated candidate SHP-2 substrates of 110 kD, 55-60 kD, and 36 kD, respectively. Analysis of immunoprecipitates containing inactive SHP-2 also indicated that the 110-kD and 36-kD Grb-2–associated proteins were putative substrates for SHP-2. TCR-stimulation of Jurkat T cells expressing wild-type SHP-2 resulted in the formation of a multimeric cytosolic complex composed of SHP-2, Grb-2, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3′-kinase, and p110. A significant proportion of this complex was shown to be membrane associated, presumably as a result of translocation from the cytosol. Catalytically inactive SHP-2, rather than the wild-type PTPase, was preferentially localized in complex with Grb-2 and the p85 subunit of PI 3′-kinase, suggesting that the dephosphorylating actions of SHP-2 may regulate the association of these signaling molecules to the p110 complex. Our results show that SHP-2 plays a critical role in linking the TCR to the Ras/MAPK pathway in Jurkat T cells, and also provide some insight into the molecular interactions of SHP-2 that form the basis of this signal transduction process

  12. Functions of Shp2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Fei; Niu, Ruifang

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostics and therapies have shown evident advances. Tumour surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the main techniques in treat cancers. Targeted therapy and drug resistance are the main focus in cancer research, but many molecular intracellular mechanisms remain unknown. Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) is associated with breast cancer, leukaemia, lung cancer, liver cancer, gastric cancer, laryngeal cancer, oral cancer and other cancer types. Signalling pathways involving Shp2 have also been discovered. Shp2 is related to many diseases. Mutations in the ptpn11 gene cause Noonan syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and childhood leukaemia. Shp2 is also involved in several cancer-related processes, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, DNA damage, cell proliferation, cell cycle and drug resistance. Based on the structure and function of Shp2, scientists have investigated specific mechanisms involved in cancer. Shp2 may be a potential therapeutic target because this phosphatase is implicated in many aspects. Furthermore, Shp2 inhibitors have been used in experiments to develop treatment strategies. However, conflicting results related to Shp2 functions have been presented in the literature, and such results should be resolved in future studies. PMID:26088100

  13. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection.

  14. Shp2 in forebrain neurons regulates synaptic plasticity, locomotion, and memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K(+)-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation.

  15. Shp2 in Forebrain Neurons Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, Locomotion, and Memory Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K+-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation. PMID:25713104

  16. Reactive oxygen species induce reversible PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding.

    PubMed

    Maas, Matthias; Wang, Ronggang; Paddock, Cathy; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) functions to control the activation and survival of the cells on which it is expressed. Many of the regulatory functions of PECAM-1 are dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent recruitment of the Src homology (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. The recent demonstration that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs in cells exposed to the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggested that this form of oxidative stress may also support PECAM-1/SHP-2 complex formation. In the present study, we show that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in response to exposure of cells to H2O2 is reversible, involves a shift in the balance between kinase and phosphatase activities, and supports binding of SHP-2 and recruitment of this phosphatase to cell-cell borders. We speculate, however, that the unique ability of H2O2 to reversibly oxidize the reactive site cysteine residues of protein tyrosine phosphatases may result in transient inactivation of the SHP-2 that is bound to PECAM-1 under these conditions. Finally, we provide evidence that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding in endothelial cells requires exposure to an "oxidative burst" of H2O2, but that exposure of these cells to sufficiently high concentrations of H2O2 for a sufficiently long period of time abrogates binding of SHP-2 to tyrosine-phosphorylated PECAM-1. These findings support a role for PECAM-1 as a sensor of oxidative stress, perhaps most importantly during the process of inflammation. PMID:12893640

  17. Antidepressant Activity of Enicostemma littorale Blume in Shp2 (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase)-inhibited Animal Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Doss, VA; Kuberapandian, Dharaniyambigai

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to develop a new animal model based on signaling pathways to understand the pathophysiology, therapy of depression, and to investigate the antidepressant activity of Enicostemma littorale which is not yet established. Methods: Animal models of depression were raised by physical methods and administration of methyl isobutyl ketone (100 mg/kg b.w., i.p.,) and a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (30 mg/kg b.w., i.p.,) to young Wistar rats. E. littorale aqueous extract (100 mg/kg b.w., oral) was administered. Forced swimming test (FST), biochemical, and histopathological parameters were performed with reference to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg b.w., oral) treatment. Results: High-performance thin-layer chromatography confirmed the presence of swertiamarin, a unique glycoside present in the Gentianaceae family. FST indicated high rates of immobility in depressed groups and low rates in plant extract-administered group with reference to fluoxetine. Biochemical assays indicated significantly (P < 0.05) increased levels of total protein, superoxide dismutase, triglycerides, and total serum cholesterol, whereas significant reduction (P < 0.05) of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in plant extract-administered groups in comparison to the depressed groups. Histopathological analysis indicated disorganized neuronal architecture during depression whereas rejuvenation of neuronal patterns was observed during treatment with plant extract and fluoxetine. Conclusions: This study shows that sodium orthovanadate induces depression in animals and also establishes the antidepressant activity of E. littorale. PMID:27761214

  18. Determination of the catalytic activity of LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutants toward parafibromin, a bona fide SHP2 substrate involved in Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Noda, Saori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takeru; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-22

    SHP2, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in the proliferation of cells via RAS-ERK activation. SHP2 also promotes Wnt signaling by dephosphorylating parafibromin. Germline missense mutations of PTPN11 are found in more than half of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), both of which are congenital developmental disorders with multiple common symptoms. However, whereas NS-associated PTPN11 mutations give rise to gain-of-function SHP2 mutants, LS-associated SHP2 mutants are reportedly loss-of-function mutants. To determine the phosphatase activity of LS-associated SHP2 more appropriately, we performed an in vitro phosphatase assay using tyrosine-phosphorylated parafibromin, a biologically relevant substrate of SHP2 and the positive regulator of Wnt signaling that is activated through SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation. We found that LS-associated SHP2 mutants (Y279C, T468M, Q506P, and Q510E) exhibited a substantially reduced phosphatase activity toward parafibromin when compared with wild-type SHP2. Furthermore, each of the LS-associated mutants displayed a differential degree of decrease in phosphatase activity. Deviation of the SHP2 catalytic activity from a certain range, either too strong or too weak, may therefore lead to similar clinical outcomes in NS and LS, possibly through an imbalanced Wnt signal caused by inadequate dephosphorylation of parafibromin.

  19. Tyrosine phosphatases as key regulators of StAR induction and cholesterol transport: SHP2 as a potential tyrosine phosphatase involved in steroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Mariana; Mele, Pablo; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Orlando, Ulises; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-04-10

    The phospho-dephosphorylation of intermediate proteins is a key event in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. In this regard, it is well accepted that steroidogenic hormones act through the activation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. Although many cellular processes can be regulated by a crosstalk between different kinases and phosphatases, the relationship of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and tyrosine (Tyr)-dephosphorylation is a recently explored field in the regulation of steroid synthesis. Indeed in steroidogenic cells, one of the targets of hormone-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation is a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Whereas protein tyrosine phosphatases were initially regarded as household enzymes with constitutive activity, dephosphorylating all the substrates they encountered, evidence is now accumulating that protein tyrosine phosphatases are tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Here, we will describe the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis, relating them to steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, arachidonic acid metabolism and mitochondrial rearrangement.

  20. SHP2 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting preosteoclast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Mohan, Aron; Moore, Douglas C.; Lin, Liangjun; Zhou, Frank Li; Cao, Jay; Wu, Qian; Qin, Yi-Xian; Reginato, Anthony M.; Ehrlich, Michael G.; Yang, Wentian

    2015-01-01

    Genes that regulate osteoclast (OC) development and function in both physiologic and disease conditions remain incompletely understood. Shp2 (the Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2), a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, is implicated in regulating M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)–evoked signaling; its role in osteoclastogenesis and bone homeostasis, however, remains unknown. Using a tissue-specific gene knockout approach, we inactivated Shp2 expression in murine OCs. Shp2 mutant mice are phenotypically osteopetrotic, featuring a marked increase of bone volume (BV)/total volume (TV) (+42.8%), trabeculae number (Tb.N) (+84.1%), structure model index (+119%), and a decrease of trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (−34.1%) and trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) (−41.0%). Biochemical analyses demonstrate that Shp2 is required for RANKL-induced formation of giant multinucleated OCs by up-regulating the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1), a master transcription factor that is indispensable for terminal OC differentiation. Shp2 deletion, however, has minimal effect on M-CSF–dependent survival and proliferation of OC precursors. Instead, its deficiency aborts the fusion of OC precursors and formation of multinucleated OCs and decreases bone matrix resorption. Moreover, pharmacological intervention of Shp2 is sufficient to prevent preosteoclast fusion in vitro. These findings uncover a novel mechanism through which Shp2 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting preosteoclast fusion. Shp2 or its signaling partners could potentially serve as pharmacological targets to regulate the population of OCs locally and/or systematically, and thus treat OC-related diseases, such as periprosthetic osteolysis and osteoporosis.—Zhou, Y., Mohan, A., Moore, D. C., Lin, L., Zhou, F. L., Cao, J., Wu, Q., Qin, Y.–X., Reginato, A. M., Ehrlich, M. G., Yang, W. SHP2

  1. Shp-2 contributes to anti-RSV activity in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with the IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Saisai; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Lifang; Xu, Feng; Qian, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including antiviral interferon signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of Shp-2 in the host cell interactions of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We report significant changes in the expression of Shp-2 in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (A549) upon RSV infection. We also report that blocking Shp-2 does not affect viral replication or virus-induced interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. Interestingly, whereas A549 cells were activated by IFN-α, the blocking of Shp-2 resulted in increased viral replication that was associated with the reduced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes of 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetases and Mx1, and the concomitant inhibition of Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that Shp-2 contributes to the control of RSV replication and progeny production in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway activation rather than by affecting the production of IFN-α itself. PMID:26119280

  2. SHP-2 expression negatively regulates NK cell function1,2

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Amanda K.; Campbell, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2)4 is required for full activation of Ras/ERK in many cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. In contrast, SHP-2 inhibits activation of human natural killer (NK) cells upon recruitment to killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR)4. To determine how SHP-2 impacts NK cell activation in KIR-dependent or KIR-independent signaling pathways, we employed knockdown and overexpression strategies in NK-like cell lines and analyzed the consequences on functional responses. In response to stimulation with susceptible target cells, SHP-2-silenced NK cells had elevated cytolytic activity and IFN-γ production, whereas cells overexpressing wild type or gain-of-function mutants of SHP-2 exhibited dampened activities. Increased levels of SHP-2 expression over this range significantly suppressed microtubule organizing center (MTOC)4 polarization and granzyme B release in response to target cells. Interestingly, NK-target cell conjugation was only reduced by overexpressing SHP-2, but not potentiated in SHP-2-silenced cells, indicating that conjugation is not influenced by physiological levels of SHP-2 expression. KIR-dependent inhibition of cytotoxicity was unaffected by significant reductions in SHP-2 levels, presumably because KIR were still capable of recruiting the phosphatase under these limiting conditions. In contrast, the general suppressive effect of SHP-2 on cytotoxicity and cytokine release was much more sensitive to changes in cellular SHP-2 levels. In summary, our studies have identified a new, KIR-independent role for SHP-2 in dampening NK cell activation in response to tumor target cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression of activation impacts MTOC-based cytoskeletal rearrangement and granule release. PMID:19915046

  3. [The Biological Function of SHP2 in Human Disease].

    PubMed

    Li, S M

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl phosphorylation participates in various pathological and physiological processes, which are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). The Src homology-2 domain containing phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) is an important phosphatase, which was found to be implicated in the regulation of genetic disease, development, metabolic, neurological, muscle, skeletal disease and cancer. Germline mutations in PTPN11 cause the Noonan Syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and metachondromatosis. Somatic PTPN11 mutations occur in hematologic malignancies and in solid tumors. SHP2 is also an important component in oncogenic signaling pathways. It may play different roles in different stages and positions of human cancers. Whether SHP2 is an oncogene or cancer suppressor gene remains to be elucidated. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of SHP2 in human disease will provide new insights into disease and new targets for therapy. Here, we summarized the structural basis and recent research progression on SHP2 in various human disease, including genetic and cancer diseases. PMID:27028808

  4. SHP2 positively regulates TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition modulated by its novel interacting protein Hook1.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuomin; Wang, Linrun; Zhao, Qingwei; Liu, Yu; He, Lingjuan; Xu, Qinqin; Sun, Xu; Teng, Li; Cheng, Hongqiang; Ke, Yuehai

    2014-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process for embryogenesis. It also plays a critical role in the initiation of tumor metastasis. Src homology 2 (SH2)-domain containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein-tyrosine phosphatase and is mutated in many tumors. However, its functional role in tumor metastasis remains largely unknown. We found that TGFβ1-induced EMT in lung epithelial A549 cells was partially blocked when SHP2 was decreased by transfected siRNA. The constitutively active form (E76V) promoted EMT while the phosphatase-dead mutation (C459S) and the SHP2 inhibitor PHPS1 blocked EMT, which further demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of SHP2 was required for promoting TGFβ1-induced EMT. Using the protein-tyrosine phosphatase domain of SHP2 as bait, we identified a novel SHP2-interacting protein Hook1. Hook1 was down-regulated during EMT in A549 cells. Overexpression of Hook1 inhibited EMT while knockdown of Hook1 promoted EMT. Moreover, both the protein-tyrosine phosphatase domain and N-terminal SH2 domain of SHP2 directly interacted with Hook1. Down-regulation of Hook1 increased SHP2 activity. These results suggested that Hook1 was an endogenous negative regulator of SHP2 phosphatase activity. Our data showed that the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 was involved in the process of EMT and Hook1 repressed EMT by regulating the activation of SHP2. SHP2-Hook1 complex may play important roles in tumor metastases by regulating EMT in cancer cells.

  5. SHP2 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting preosteoclast fusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes that regulate osteoclast development and function under physiological and disease conditions remain incompletely understood. Shp2, a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, was implicated in regulating M-CSF and RANKL-evoked signaling, its role in osteoclastogenesis an...

  6. Inhibition of cellular Shp2 activity by a methyl ester analog of SPI-112.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Pernazza, Daniele; Scott, Latanya M; Lawrence, Harshani R; Ren, Yuan; Luo, Yunting; Wu, Xin; Sung, Shen-Shu; Guida, Wayne C; Sebti, Said M; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Wu, Jie

    2010-09-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) Shp2 (PTPN11) is an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery because it mediates growth factor signaling and its gain-of-function mutants are causally linked to leukemias. We previously synthesized SPI-112 from a lead compound of Shp2 inhibitor, NSC-117199. In this study, we demonstrated that SPI-112 bound to Shp2 by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and displayed competitive inhibitor kinetics to Shp2. Like some other compounds in the PTP inhibitor discovery efforts, SPI-112 was not cell permeable, precluding its use in biological studies. To overcome the cell permeation issue, we prepared a methyl ester SPI-112 analog (SPI-112Me) that is predicted to be hydrolyzed to SPI-112 upon entry into cells. Fluorescence uptake assay and confocal imaging suggested that SPI-112Me was taken up by cells. Incubation of cells with SPI-112Me inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated Shp2 PTP activity and Shp2-mediated paxillin dephosphorylation, Erk1/2 activation, and cell migration. SPI-112Me treatment also inhibited Erk1/2 activation by a Gab1-Shp2 chimera. Treatment of Shp2(E76K) mutant-transformed TF-1 myeloid cells with SPI-112Me resulted in inhibition of Shp2(E76K)-dependent cell survival, which is associated with inhibition of Shp2(E76K) PTP activity, Shp2(E76K)-induced Erk1/2 activation, and Bcl-XL expression. Furthermore, SPI-112Me enhanced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, ISRE-luciferase reporter activity, p21 expression, and the anti-proliferative effect. Thus, the SPI-112 methyl ester analog was able to inhibit cellular Shp2 PTP activity.

  7. SHP2-interacting Transmembrane Adaptor Protein (SIT), A Novel Disulfide-linked Dimer Regulating Human T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Marie-Cardine, Anne; Kirchgessner, Henning; Bruyns, Eddy; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Autschbach, Frank; Ratnofsky, Sheldon; Meuer, Stefan; Schraven, Burkhart

    1999-01-01

    T lymphocytes express several low molecular weight transmembrane adaptor proteins that recruit src homology (SH)2 domain–containing intracellular molecules to the cell membrane via tyrosine-based signaling motifs. We describe here a novel molecule of this group termed SIT (SHP2 interacting transmembrane adaptor protein). SIT is a disulfide-linked homodimeric glycoprotein that is expressed in lymphocytes. After tyrosine phosphorylation by src and possibly syk protein tyrosine kinases SIT recruits the SH2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif. Overexpression of SIT in Jurkat cells downmodulates T cell receptor– and phytohemagglutinin-mediated activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) by interfering with signaling processes that are probably located upstream of activation of phospholipase C. However, binding of SHP2 to SIT is not required for inhibition of NF-AT induction, suggesting that SIT not only regulates NF-AT activity but also controls NF-AT unrelated pathways of T cell activation involving SHP2. PMID:10209036

  8. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides as inhibitors of cellular Shp2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiao-Li; Yin, Wen-Hui; Tian, Xia; Ma, Zhen-Jie; Fan, Shi-Ming; Han, Jian-Rong; Liu, Shouxin

    2015-05-15

    A series of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides was designed and synthesized using sansalvamide A as a model compound. All compounds exhibited low antitumor activity. Furthermore, the evaluation of their inhibitory potency toward IMPDH, SHP2, ACHE, proteasome, MAGL, and cathepsin B showed that all of the compounds were potent against protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Specifically, compounds 1a, 1d, 2b, and 2f were found to inhibit SHP2 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good selectivity. Based on the molecular docking results, the binding modes of the chain cyclic peptides in the active center of SHP2 were discussed. PMID:25865131

  10. Hepatic Src Homology Phosphatase 2 Regulates Energy Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoto; Matsuo, Kosuke; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Bakke, Jesse; Matsuo, Izumi; Graham, James; Xi, Yannan; Liu, Siming; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalia; Gray, Susan; Jung, Dae Young; Ramsey, Jon J.; Kim, Jason K.; Cortopassi, Gino; Havel, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase Src homology phosphatase 2 (Shp2) is a negative regulator of hepatic insulin action in mice fed regular chow. To investigate the role of hepatic Shp2 in lipid metabolism and energy balance, we determined the metabolic effects of its deletion in mice challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD). We analyzed body mass, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose tolerance in liver-specific Shp2-deficient mice (referred to herein as LSHKO) and control mice fed HFD. Hepatic Shp2 protein expression is regulated by nutritional status, increasing in mice fed HFD and decreasing during fasting. LSHKO mice gained less weight and exhibited increased energy expenditure compared with control mice. In addition, hepatic Shp2 deficiency led to decreased liver steatosis, enhanced insulin-induced suppression of hepatic glucose production, and impeded the development of insulin resistance after high-fat feeding. At the molecular level, LSHKO exhibited decreased hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation compared with control mice. In addition, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of total and mitochondrial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were enhanced in LSHKO compared with control mice. In line with this observation and the increased energy expenditure of LSHKO, oxygen consumption rate was higher in liver mitochondria of LSHKO compared with controls. Collectively, these studies identify hepatic Shp2 as a novel regulator of systemic energy balance under conditions of high-fat feeding. PMID:22619361

  11. Exploring the Existing Drug Space for Novel pTyr Mimetic and SHP2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are potential therapeutic targets for many diseases. Unfortunately, despite considerable drug discovery efforts devoted to PTPs, obtaining selective and cell permeable PTP inhibitors remains highly challenging. We describe a strategy to explore the existing drug space for previously unknown PTP inhibitory activities. This led to the discovery of cefsulodin as an inhibitor of SHP2, an oncogenic phosphatase in the PTP family. Crystal structure analysis of SHP2 interaction with cefsulodin identified sulfophenyl acetic amide (SPAA) as a novel phosphotyrosine (pTyr) mimetic. A structure-guided and SPAA fragment-based focused library approach produced several potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors. Notably, these inhibitors blocked SHP2-mediated signaling events and proliferation in several cancer cell lines. Thus, SPAA may serve as a new platform for developing chemical probes for other PTPs. PMID:26191366

  12. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  13. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Eunice A.; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M.; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  14. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Eunice A; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  15. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously ‘undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras. PMID:26617336

  16. New Approaches to Prevent LEOPARD Syndrome-associated Cardiac Hypertrophy by Specifically Targeting Shp2-dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Christine; Edwards, Michelle A.; Krenz, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In LEOPARD syndrome (LS) patients, mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The prohypertrophic effects of mutant Shp2 are mediated downstream by hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin. Our goal was to further define the signaling cascade that is essential for the underlying pathomechanism, thus expanding the list of potential future therapeutic targets. Using cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with adenoviral gene delivery and pharmacological inhibitors, we found that hypertrophy induced by a particularly aggressive LS mutation in Shp2 depends on hyperactivation of Akt and focal adhesion kinase as well as mammalian target of rapamycin. Dissecting domain-specific functions of Shp2 using double and truncation mutants, we determined that the hypertrophic effects of mutant Shp2 depend on the two SH2 domains and on an intact catalytic center. The latter finding prompted us to test the efficacy of a Shp2 inhibitor targeted directly at the catalytic pocket. This compound, PHPS1, effectively prevented mutant Shp2-induced hypertrophy. In summary, we identified three novel targets for pharmacological therapy of LS-associated cardiac hypertrophy. Of particular importance is the finding that intervention directly at the mutant Shp2 protein is effective because this would facilitate custom-tailored therapeutic approaches for patients carrying LS mutations in Shp2. PMID:23673659

  17. SHP-2 acts via ROCK to regulate the cardiac actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Yvette; Tandon, Panna; Paden, Erika; Duddy, Jennifer; Taylor, Joan M; Conlon, Frank L

    2012-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is one of the most common causes of human congenital heart disease and is frequently associated with missense mutations in the protein phosphatase SHP-2. Interestingly, patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) and LEOPARD syndrome frequently carry a second, somatically introduced subset of missense mutations in SHP-2. To determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which SHP-2 regulates heart development and, thus, understand how Noonan-associated mutations affect cardiogenesis, we introduced SHP-2 encoding the most prevalent Noonan syndrome and JMML mutations into Xenopus embryos. Resulting embryos show a direct relationship between a Noonan SHP-2 mutation and its ability to cause cardiac defects in Xenopus; embryos expressing Noonan SHP-2 mutations exhibit morphologically abnormal hearts, whereas those expressing an SHP-2 JMML-associated mutation do not. Our studies indicate that the cardiac defects associated with the introduction of the Noonan-associated SHP-2 mutations are coupled with a delay or arrest of the cardiac cell cycle in M-phase and a failure of cardiomyocyte progenitors to incorporate into the developing heart. We show that these defects are a result of an underlying malformation in the formation and polarity of cardiac actin fibers and F-actin deposition. We show that these defects can be rescued in culture and in embryos through the inhibition of the Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK), thus demonstrating a direct relationship between SHP-2(N308D) and ROCK activation in the developing heart.

  18. The use of SHP-2 gene transduced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to promote osteogenic differentiation and bone defect repair in rat.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dapeng; Liu, Shen; Jiang, Shichao; Li, Zhiwei; Mo, Xiumei; Ruan, Hongjiang; Zou, Gang-Ming; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-08-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising approach for bone regeneration, in which growth factors play an important role. The tyrosine phosphatase Src-homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2), encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is essential for the differentiation, proliferation and metabolism of osteoblasts. However, SHP-2 has never been systematically studied for its effect in osteogenesis. We predicted that overexpression of SHP-2 could promote bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)osteogenic differentiation and SHP-2 transduced BMSCs could enhance new bone formation, determined using the following study groups: (1) BMSCs transduced with SHP-2 and induced with osteoblast-inducing liquid (BMSCs/SHP-2/OL); (2) BMSCs transduced with SHP-2 (BMSCs/-SHP-2); (3) BMSCs induced with osteoblast-inducing liquid (BMSCs/OL) and (4) pure BMSCs. Cells were assessed for osteogenic differentiation by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blot analysis, alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red S staining. For in vivo assessment, cells were combined with beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds and transplanted into rat calvarial defects for 8 weeks. Following euthanasia, skull samples were explanted for osteogenic evaluation, including micro-computed tomography measurement, histology and immunohistochemistry staining. SHP-2 and upregulation of its gene promoted BMSC osteogenic differentiation and therefore represents a potential new therapeutic approach to bone repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1871-1881, 2016.

  19. Developmental SHP2 dysfunction underlies cardiac hypertrophy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines

    PubMed Central

    Lauriol, Jessica; Cabrera, Janel R.; Roy, Ashbeel; Keith, Kimberly; Hough, Sara M.; Damilano, Federico; Wang, Bonnie; Segarra, Gabriel C.; Flessa, Meaghan E.; Miller, Lauren E.; Das, Saumya; Bronson, Roderick; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Kontaridis, Maria I.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a common cause of mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD). Many gene abnormalities are associated with cardiac hypertrophy, but their function in cardiac development is not well understood. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11, which encodes the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) SHP2, are implicated in CHD and cause Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), a condition that often presents with cardiac hypertrophic defects. Here, we found that NSML-associated hypertrophy stems from aberrant signaling mechanisms originating in developing endocardium. Trabeculation and valvular hyperplasia were diminished in hearts of embryonic mice expressing a human NSML-associated variant of SHP2, and these defects were recapitulated in mice expressing NSML-associated SHP2 specifically in endothelial, but not myocardial or neural crest, cells. In contrast, mice with myocardial- but not endothelial-specific NSML SHP2 expression developed ventricular septal defects, suggesting that NSML-associated mutations have both cell-autonomous and nonautonomous functions in cardiac development. However, only endothelial-specific expression of NSML-associated SHP2 induced adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy. Further, embryos expressing the NSML-associated SHP2 mutation exhibited aberrant AKT activity and decreased downstream forkhead box P1 (FOXP1)/FGF and NOTCH1/EPHB2 signaling, indicating that SHP2 is required for regulating reciprocal crosstalk between developing endocardium and myocardium. Together, our data provide functional and disease-based evidence that aberrant SHP2 signaling during cardiac development leads to CHD and adult-onset heart hypertrophy. PMID:27348588

  20. Developmental SHP2 dysfunction underlies cardiac hypertrophy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    Lauriol, Jessica; Cabrera, Janel R; Roy, Ashbeel; Keith, Kimberly; Hough, Sara M; Damilano, Federico; Wang, Bonnie; Segarra, Gabriel C; Flessa, Meaghan E; Miller, Lauren E; Das, Saumya; Bronson, Roderick; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Kontaridis, Maria I

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a common cause of mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD). Many gene abnormalities are associated with cardiac hypertrophy, but their function in cardiac development is not well understood. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11, which encodes the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) SHP2, are implicated in CHD and cause Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), a condition that often presents with cardiac hypertrophic defects. Here, we found that NSML-associated hypertrophy stems from aberrant signaling mechanisms originating in developing endocardium. Trabeculation and valvular hyperplasia were diminished in hearts of embryonic mice expressing a human NSML-associated variant of SHP2, and these defects were recapitulated in mice expressing NSML-associated SHP2 specifically in endothelial, but not myocardial or neural crest, cells. In contrast, mice with myocardial- but not endothelial-specific NSML SHP2 expression developed ventricular septal defects, suggesting that NSML-associated mutations have both cell-autonomous and nonautonomous functions in cardiac development. However, only endothelial-specific expression of NSML-associated SHP2 induced adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy. Further, embryos expressing the NSML-associated SHP2 mutation exhibited aberrant AKT activity and decreased downstream forkhead box P1 (FOXP1)/FGF and NOTCH1/EPHB2 signaling, indicating that SHP2 is required for regulating reciprocal crosstalk between developing endocardium and myocardium. Together, our data provide functional and disease-based evidence that aberrant SHP2 signaling during cardiac development leads to CHD and adult-onset heart hypertrophy. PMID:27348588

  1. SHP-2 Mediates C-type Lectin Receptors-induced Syk Activation and Anti-fungal TH17 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zihou; Ma, Shixin; Zhou, Hao; Zang, Aiping; Fang, Yiyuan; Li, Tiantian; Shi, Huanjing; Liu, Mei; Du, Min; Taylor, Patricia R.; Zhu, Helen H.; Chen, Jiangye; Meng, Guangxun; Li, Fubin; Chen, Changbin; Zhang, Yan; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Pearlman, Eric; Li, Xiaoxia; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Xiao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fungal infection stimulates the canonical C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) signaling pathway via Syk activation. Here we show that SHP-2 plays a crucial role in mediating CLRs-induced Syk activation. Genetic ablation of Shp-2 (Ptpn11) in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages impaired Syk-mediated signaling and abrogated pro-inflammatory gene expression following fungal stimulation. Mechanistically, SHP-2 operates as a scaffold facilitating the recruitment of Syk to dectin-1 or FcRγ, through its N-SH2 domain and a previously unrecognized C-terminal ITAM motif. We demonstrate that DC-derived SHP-2 is crucial for the induction of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23, and anti-fungal TH17 cell responses to control Candida albicans infection. Together, these data reveal a mechanism by which SHP-2 mediates Syk activation in response to fungal infections PMID:25915733

  2. Targeted Disruption of Shp2 in Chondrocytes Leads to Metachondromatosis With Multiple Cartilaginous Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Harry KW; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; King, Philip D; Kamiya, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Metachondromatosis is a benign bone disease predominantly observed in the hands and feet of children or young adults demonstrating two different manifestations: a cartilage-capped bony outgrowth on the surface of the bone called exostosis and ectopic cartilaginous nodules inside the bone called enchondroma. Recently, it has been reported that loss-of-function mutations of the SHP2 gene, which encodes the SHP2 protein tyrosine phosphatase, are associated with metachondromatosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SHP2 in postnatal cartilage development, which is largely unknown. We disrupted Shp2 during the postnatal stage of mouse development in a chondrocyte-specific manner using a tamoxifen-inducible system. We found tumor-like nodules on the hands and feet within a month after the initial induction. The SHP2-deficient mice demonstrated an exostosis-like and enchondroma-like phenotype in multiple bones of the hands, feet, and ribs as assessed by X-ray and micro-computed tomography (CT). Histological assessment revealed the disorganization of the growth plate cartilage, a cartilaginous protrusion from the epiphyseal bone, and ectopic cartilage nodules within the bones, which is consistent with the pathological features of metachondromatosis in humans (ie, both exostosis and enchondroma). At molecular levels, we observed an abundant expression of Indian hedgehog protein (IHH) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and impaired expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the affected cartilage nodules in the SHP2-deficient mice. In summary, we have generated a mouse model of metachondromatosis that includes manifestations of exostosis and enchondroma. This study provides a novel model for the investigation of the pathophysiology of the disease and advances the understanding of metachondromatosis. This model will be useful to identify molecular mechanisms for the disease cause and progression as well as to develop new therapeutic

  3. Deletion of SHP-2 in mesenchymal stem cells causes growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lapinski, Philip E.; Meyer, Melissa F.; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; King, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In mice, induced global disruption of the Ptpn11 gene, which encodes the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase, results in severe skeletal abnormalities. To understand the extent to which skeletal abnormalities can be attributed to perturbation of SHP-2 function in bone-forming osteoblasts and chondrocytes, we generated mice in which disruption of Ptpn11 is restricted to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their progeny, which include both cell types. MSC-lineage-specific SHP-2 knockout (MSC SHP-2 KO) mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects. These skeletal abnormalities were associated with an absence of mature osteoblasts and massive chondrodysplasia with a vast increase in the number of terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes in affected bones. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and protein kinase B (PKB; also known as AKT) was impaired in bone-forming cells of MSC SHP-2 KO mice, which provides an explanation for the skeletal defects that developed. These findings reveal a cell-autonomous role for SHP-2 in bone-forming cells in mice in the regulation of skeletal development. The results add to our understanding of the pathophysiology of skeletal abnormalities observed in humans with germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene (e.g. Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome). PMID:24077964

  4. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus G Protein-Coupled Receptor Contains an Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-Based Inhibitory Motif That Activates Shp2

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Nicola; Bakken, Thomas; Pennell, Christopher; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Jie; Cannon, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is a constitutively active, highly angiogenic homologue of the interleukin-8 (IL-8) receptors that signals in part via the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. We show that vGPCR contains a bona fide immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that binds and constitutively activates Shp2. PMID:21047965

  5. PZR Coordinates Shp2 Noonan and LEOPARD Syndrome Signaling in Zebrafish and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paardekooper Overman, Jeroen; Yi, Jae-Sung; Bonetti, Monica; Soulsby, Matthew; Preisinger, Christian; Stokes, Matthew P.; Hui, Li; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Overvoorde, John; Giansanti, Piero; Heck, Albert J. R.; Kontaridis, Maria I.; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by activating mutations in the PTPN11 gene encoding Shp2, which manifests in congenital heart disease, short stature, and facial dysmorphia. The complexity of Shp2 signaling is exemplified by the observation that LEOPARD syndrome (LS) patients possess inactivating PTPN11 mutations yet exhibit similar symptoms to NS. Here, we identify “protein zero-related” (PZR), a transmembrane glycoprotein that interfaces with the extracellular matrix to promote cell migration, as a major hyper-tyrosyl-phosphorylated protein in mouse and zebrafish models of NS and LS. PZR hyper-tyrosyl phosphorylation is facilitated in a phosphatase-independent manner by enhanced Src recruitment to NS and LS Shp2. In zebrafish, PZR overexpression recapitulated NS and LS phenotypes. PZR was required for zebrafish gastrulation in a manner dependent upon PZR tyrosyl phosphorylation. Hence, we identify PZR as an NS and LS target. Enhanced PZR-mediated membrane recruitment of Shp2 serves as a common mechanism to direct overlapping pathophysiological characteristics of these PTPN11 mutations. PMID:24865967

  6. The Shp2-induced epithelial disorganization defect is reversed by HDAC6 inhibition independent of Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Sui-Chih; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Shp2, a tyrosine phosphatase, critically influences the development of various diseases. Its role in epithelial lumenogenesis is not clear. Here we show that oncogenic Shp2 dephosphorylates Tuba to decrease Cdc42 activation, leading to the abnormal multi-lumen formation of epithelial cells. HDAC6 suppression reverses oncogenic Shp2-induced multiple apical domains and spindle mis-orientation during division in cysts to acquire normal lumenogenesis. Intriguingly, Cdc42 activity is not restored in this rescued process. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction in myosin II and ERK1/2 activity by HDAC6 inhibition is responsible for the reversion. In HER2-positive breast cancer cells, Shp2 also mediates Cdc42 repression, and HDAC6 inhibition or co-suppression of ERK/myosin II promotes normal epithelial lumen phenotype without increasing Cdc42 activity. Our data suggest a mechanism of epithelial disorganization by Shp2 deregulation, and reveal the cellular context where HDAC6 suppression is capable of establishing normal epithelial lumenogenesis independent of Cdc42. PMID:26783207

  7. LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutation confers leanness and protection from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Tajan, Mylène; Batut, Aurélie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Deleruyelle, Simon; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Saint Laurent, Céline; Vomscheid, Maëlle; Wanecq, Estelle; Tréguer, Karine; De Rocca Serra-Nédélec, Audrey; Vinel, Claire; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Pozzo, Joffrey; Kunduzova, Oksana; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Tauber, Maithé; Raynal, Patrick; Cavé, Hélène; Edouard, Thomas; Valet, Philippe; Yart, Armelle

    2014-10-21

    LEOPARD syndrome (multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, sensorineural Deafness; LS), also called Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associating various developmental defects, notably cardiopathies, dysmorphism, and short stature. It is mainly caused by mutations of the PTPN11 gene that catalytically inactivate the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (Src-homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2). Besides its pleiotropic roles during development, SHP2 plays key functions in energetic metabolism regulation. However, the metabolic outcomes of LS mutations have never been examined. Therefore, we performed an extensive metabolic exploration of an original LS mouse model, expressing the T468M mutation of SHP2, frequently borne by LS patients. Our results reveal that, besides expected symptoms, LS animals display a strong reduction of adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity, associated with overall better metabolic profile. We provide evidence that LS mutant expression impairs adipogenesis, triggers energy expenditure, and enhances insulin signaling, three features that can contribute to the lean phenotype of LS mice. Interestingly, chronic treatment of LS mice with low doses of MEK inhibitor, but not rapamycin, resulted in weight and adiposity gains. Importantly, preliminary data in a French cohort of LS patients suggests that most of them have lower-than-average body mass index, associated, for tested patients, with reduced adiposity. Altogether, these findings unravel previously unidentified characteristics for LS, which could represent a metabolic benefit for patients, but may also participate to the development or worsening of some traits of the disease. Beyond LS, they also highlight a protective role of SHP2 global LS-mimicking modulation toward the development of obesity and associated disorders

  8. LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutation confers leanness and protection from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Tajan, Mylène; Batut, Aurélie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Deleruyelle, Simon; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Saint Laurent, Céline; Vomscheid, Maëlle; Wanecq, Estelle; Tréguer, Karine; De Rocca Serra-Nédélec, Audrey; Vinel, Claire; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Pozzo, Joffrey; Kunduzova, Oksana; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Tauber, Maithé; Raynal, Patrick; Cavé, Hélène; Edouard, Thomas; Valet, Philippe; Yart, Armelle

    2014-10-21

    LEOPARD syndrome (multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, sensorineural Deafness; LS), also called Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associating various developmental defects, notably cardiopathies, dysmorphism, and short stature. It is mainly caused by mutations of the PTPN11 gene that catalytically inactivate the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (Src-homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2). Besides its pleiotropic roles during development, SHP2 plays key functions in energetic metabolism regulation. However, the metabolic outcomes of LS mutations have never been examined. Therefore, we performed an extensive metabolic exploration of an original LS mouse model, expressing the T468M mutation of SHP2, frequently borne by LS patients. Our results reveal that, besides expected symptoms, LS animals display a strong reduction of adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity, associated with overall better metabolic profile. We provide evidence that LS mutant expression impairs adipogenesis, triggers energy expenditure, and enhances insulin signaling, three features that can contribute to the lean phenotype of LS mice. Interestingly, chronic treatment of LS mice with low doses of MEK inhibitor, but not rapamycin, resulted in weight and adiposity gains. Importantly, preliminary data in a French cohort of LS patients suggests that most of them have lower-than-average body mass index, associated, for tested patients, with reduced adiposity. Altogether, these findings unravel previously unidentified characteristics for LS, which could represent a metabolic benefit for patients, but may also participate to the development or worsening of some traits of the disease. Beyond LS, they also highlight a protective role of SHP2 global LS-mimicking modulation toward the development of obesity and associated disorders.

  9. Dramatic increase in SHP2 binding activity of Helicobacter pylori Western CagA by EPIYA-C duplication: its implications in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Lisa; Hayashi, Takeru; Senda, Toshiya; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is critically associated with the development of gastric cancer. The cagA-encoded CagA is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via type IV secretion, where it interacts with and thereby deregulates the pro-oncogenic phosphatase SHP2. East Asian CagA and Western CagA are two major CagA species produced by H. pylori circulating in East Asian countries and in the rest of the world, respectively. The SHP2 binding site of Western CagA, termed the EPIYA-C segment, variably duplicates and infection with H. pylori carrying Western CagA with multiple EPIYA-C segments is a distinct risk factor of gastric cancer. Here we show that duplication of EPIYA-C from one to two or more increases SHP2 binding of Western CagA by more than one hundredfold. Based on the decisive difference in SHP2 binding, Western CagA can be divided into two types: type I CagA carrying a single EPIYA-C segment and type II CagA carrying multiple EPIYA-C segments. Gastric epithelial cells expressing type II CagA acquire the ability to invade extracellular matrices, a malignant cellular trait associated with deregulated SHP2. A big leap in SHP2 binding activity may therefore provide molecular basis that makes type II Western CagA a distinct gastric cancer risk. PMID:26507409

  10. Involvement of an SHP-2-Rho small G protein pathway in hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-induced cell scattering.

    PubMed

    Kodama, A; Matozaki, T; Fukuhara, A; Kikyo, M; Ichihashi, M; Takai, Y

    2000-08-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) induces cell scattering through the tyrosine kinase-type HGF/SF receptor c-Met. We have previously shown that Rho small G protein (Rho) is involved in the HGF/SF-induced scattering of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by regulating at least the assembly and disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions, but it remains unknown how c-Met regulates Rho activity. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of c-Met consisting of SHP-2-Rho that regulates the assembly and disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions in MDCK cells. SHP-2 is a protein-tyrosine phosphatase that contains src homology-2 domains. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of SHP-2 (SHP-2-C/S) markedly increased the formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in MDCK cells and inhibited their scattering. C3, a Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase, and Y-27632, a specific inhibitor for ROCK, reversed the stimulatory effect of SHP-2-C/S on stress fiber formation and the inhibitory effect on cell scattering. Vav2 is a GDP/GTP exchange protein for Rho. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of Vav2 blocked the stimulatory effect of SHP-2-C/S on stress fiber formation. Conversely, expression of mutants of Vav2 that increased stress fiber formation inhibited HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. These results indicate that SHP-2 physiologically modulates the activity of Rho to form stress fibers and focal adhesions and thereby regulates HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. In addition, Vav2 may be involved in the SHP-2-Rho pathway.

  11. Shp2 Associates with and Enhances Nephrin Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Is Necessary for Foot Process Spreading in Mouse Models of Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rakesh; Venkatareddy, Madhusudan; Kalinowski, Anne; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.; Salant, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In most forms of glomerular diseases, loss of size selectivity by the kidney filtration barrier is associated with changes in the morphology of podocytes. The kidney filtration barrier is comprised of the endothelial lining, the glomerular basement membrane, and the podocyte intercellular junction, or slit diaphragm. The cell adhesion proteins nephrin and neph1 localize to the slit diaphragm and transduce signals in a Src family kinase Fyn-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Studies in cell culture suggest nephrin phosphorylation-dependent signaling events are primarily involved in regulation of actin dynamics and lamellipodium formation. Nephrin phosphorylation is a proximal event that occurs both during development and following podocyte injury. We hypothesized that abrogation of nephrin phosphorylation following injury would prevent nephrin-dependent actin remodeling and foot process morphological changes. Utilizing a biased screening approach, we found nonreceptor Src homology 2 (sh2) domain-containing phosphatase Shp2 to be associated with phosphorylated nephrin. We observed an increase in nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation in the presence of Shp2 in cell culture studies. In the human glomerulopathies minimal-change nephrosis and membranous nephropathy, there is an increase in Shp2 phosphorylation, a marker of increased Shp2 activity. Mouse podocytes lacking Shp2 do not develop foot process spreading when subjected to podocyte injury in vivo using protamine sulfate or nephrotoxic serum (NTS). In the NTS model, we observed a lack of foot process spreading in mouse podocytes with Shp2 deleted and smaller amounts of proteinuria. Taken together, these results suggest that Shp2-dependent signaling events are necessary for changes in foot process structure and function following injury. PMID:26644409

  12. CD99 inhibits CD98-mediated β1 integrin signaling through SHP2-mediated FAK dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Yoo, Yeon Ho; Kim, Min Seo; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Kim, Yuri; Lim, Dongyoung; Hwangbo, Cheol; Moon, Ki Won; Kim, Daejoong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Jeong-Hyung; Hahn, Jang-Hee

    2015-08-15

    The human CD99 protein is a 32-kDa type I transmembrane glycoprotein, while CD98 is a disulfide-linked 125-kDa heterodimeric type II transmembrane glycoprotein. It has been previously shown that CD99 and CD98 oppositely regulate β1 integrin signaling, though the mechanisms by which this regulation occurs are not known. Our results revealed that antibody-mediated crosslinking of CD98 induced FAK phosphorylation at Y397 and facilitated the formation of the protein kinase Cα (PKCα)-syntenin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK), focal adhesions (FAs), and IPP-Akt1-syntenin complex, which mediates β1 integrin signaling. In contrast, crosslinking of CD99 disrupted the formation of the PKCα-syntenin-FAK complex as well as FA via FAK dephosphorylation. The CD99-induced dephosphorylation of FAK was apparently mediated by the recruitment of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2 (SHP2) to the plasma membrane and subsequent activation of its phosphatase activity. Further consequences of the activation of SHP2 included the disruption of FAK-talin and talin-β1 integrin interactions and attenuation in the formation of the IPP-Akt1-syntenin complex at the plasma membrane, which resulted in reduced cell-ECM adhesion. This report uncovers the molecular mechanisms underlying the inverse regulation of β1 integrin signaling by CD99 and CD98 and may provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat inflammation and cancer.

  13. NOX4-dependent Hydrogen peroxide promotes shear stress-induced SHP2 sulfenylation and eNOS activation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Calvo, Enrique; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P; Vázquez, Jesús; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Laminar shear stress (LSS) triggers signals that ultimately result in atheroprotection and vasodilatation. Early responses are related to the activation of specific signaling cascades. We investigated the participation of redox-mediated modifications and in particular the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the sulfenylation of redox-sensitive phosphatases. Exposure of vascular endothelial cells to short periods of LSS (12 dyn/cm(2)) resulted in the generation of superoxide radical anion as detected by the formation of 2-hydroxyethidium by HPLC and its subsequent conversion to H2O2, which was corroborated by the increase in the fluorescence of the specific peroxide sensor HyPer. By using biotinylated dimedone we detected increased total protein sulfenylation in the bovine proteome, which was dependent on NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-mediated generation of peroxide. Mass spectrometry analysis allowed us to identify the phosphatase SHP2 as a protein susceptible to sulfenylation under LSS. Given the dependence of FAK activity on SHP2 function, we explored the role of FAK under LSS conditions. FAK activation and subsequent endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation were promoted by LSS and both processes were dependent on NOX4, as demonstrated in lung endothelial cells isolated from NOX4-null mice. These results support the idea that LSS elicits redox-sensitive signal transduction responses involving NOX4-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide, SHP2 sulfenylation, and ulterior FAK-mediated eNOS activation.

  14. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  15. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  16. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  17. Calpain-dependent cleavage of SHP-1 and SHP-2 is involved in the dephosphorylation of Jurkat T cells induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Kim, K A; Lee, Y A; Shin, M H

    2010-03-01

    Host cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica is an important mechanism for both host defence and microbial immune evasion during human amoebiasis. However, the signalling pathways underlying cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully understood. This study investigated the involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) SHP-1 and SHP-2 in the dephosphorylation associated with E. histolytica-induced host cell death. Incubation with E. histolytica resulted in a marked decrease in protein tyrosine phosphorylation levels and degradation of SHP-1 or SHP-2 in Jurkat cells. Pre-treatment of cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin, impeded the amoeba-induced dephosporylation and cleavage of SHP-1 or SHP-2. Additionally, inhibition of PTPs with phenylarsine oxide (PAO) attenuated Entamoeba-induced dephosphorylation and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat T cells. These results suggest that calpain-dependent cleavage of SHP-1 and SHP-2 may contribute to protein tyrosine dephosphorylation in Jurkat T cell death induced by E. histolytica. PMID:20398180

  18. Gain-of-function mutations of Ptpn11 (Shp2) cause aberrant mitosis and increase susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Zheng, Hong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Siying; Meyerson, Howard J; Yang, Wentian; Neel, Benjamin G; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2016-01-26

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase implicated in multiple cell signaling pathways, are associated with childhood leukemias and solid tumors. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report that Ptpn11 GOF mutations disturb mitosis and cytokinesis, causing chromosomal instability and greatly increased susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies. We find that Shp2 is distributed to the kinetochore, centrosome, spindle midzone, and midbody, all of which are known to play critical roles in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with Ptpn11 GOF mutations show a compromised mitotic checkpoint. Centrosome amplification and aberrant mitosis with misaligned or lagging chromosomes are significantly increased in Ptpn11-mutated mouse and patient cells. Abnormal cytokinesis is also markedly increased in these cells. Further mechanistic analyses reveal that GOF mutant Shp2 hyperactivates the Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) kinase by enhancing c-Src kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Plk1. This study provides novel insights into the tumorigenesis associated with Ptpn11 GOF mutations and cautions that DNA-damaging treatments in Noonan syndrome patients with germ-line Ptpn11 GOF mutations could increase the risk of therapy-induced malignancies.

  19. SHP2-Deficiency in Chondrocytes Deforms Orofacial Cartilage and Ciliogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shen, Jingling; Noda, Kazuo; Kitami, Megumi; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chen, Di; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Congenital orofacial abnormalities are clinically seen in human syndromes with SHP2 germline mutations such as LEOPARD and Noonan syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that SHP2-deficiency leads to skeletal abnormalities including scoliosis and cartilaginous benign tumor metachondromatosis, suggesting that growth plate cartilage is a key tissue regulated by SHP2. The role and cellular mechanism of SHP2 in the orofacial cartilage, however, remains unknown. Here, we investigated the postnatal craniofacial development by inducible disruption of Shp2 in chondrocytes. Shp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed severe deformity of the mandibular condyle accompanied by disorganized, expanded cartilage in the trabecular bone region, enhanced type X collagen, and reduced Erk production. Interestingly, the length of primary cilia, an antenna like organelle sensing environmental signaling, was significantly shortened, and the number of primary cilia was reduced in the cKO mice. The expression levels of intraflagellar transports (IFTs), essential molecules in the assembly and function of primary cilia, were significantly decreased. Taken together, lack of Shp2 in orofacial cartilage led to severe defects of ciliogenesis through IFT reduction, resulting in mandibular condyle malformation and cartilaginous expansion. Our study provides new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SHP2-deficiency in cartilage and helps to understand orofacial and skeletal manifestations seen in patients with SHP2 mutations.

  20. Light availability may control extracellular phosphatase production in turbid environments.

    PubMed

    Rychtecký, Pavel; Řeháková, Klára; Kozlíková, Eliška; Vrba, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular phosphatase production by phytoplankton was investigated in the moderately eutrophic Lipno reservoir, Czech Republic during 2009 and 2010. We hypothesized that production of extracellular phosphatases is an additional mechanism of phosphorus acquisition enabling producers to survive rather than to dominate the phytoplankton. Hence, we examined the relationship between light availability and phosphatase production, as light plays an important role in polymictic environments. Bulk phosphatase activity was measured using a common fluorometric assay, and the production of phosphatases was studied using the Fluorescently Labelled Enzyme Activity technique, which enabled direct microscopic detection of phosphatase-positive cells. In total, 29 taxa of phytoplankton were identified during both years. Only 17 taxa from the total number of 29 showed production of extracellular phosphatases. Species dominating the phytoplankton rarely produced extracellular phosphatases. In contrast, taxa exhibiting phosphatase activity were present in low biomass in the phytoplankton assemblage. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the proportion of phosphatase positive species in samples and the Z(eu):Z(mix) ratio (a proxy of light availability). A laboratory experiment with different light intensities confirmed the influence of light on production of phosphatases. Our seasonal study confirmed that extracellular phosphatase production is common in low-abundance populations but not in dominant taxa of the phytoplankton. It also suggested the importance of sufficient light conditions for the production of extracellular phosphatases.

  1. Aqueous extract of Arbutus unedo inhibits STAT1 activation in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and human fibroblasts through SHP2 activation.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, S; Ciampa, A R; de Prati, A Carcereri; Darra, E; Vincenzi, S; Sega, M; Cavalieri, E; Shoji, K; Suzuki, H

    2008-05-01

    Arbutus unedo L. has been for a long time employed in traditional and popular medicine as an astringent, diuretic, urinary anti-septic, and more recently, in the therapy of hypertension and diabetes. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a fascinating and complex protein with multiple yet contrasting transcriptional functions. Although activation of this nuclear factor is finely regulated in order to control the entire inflammatory process, its hyper-activation or time-spatially erroneous activation may lead to exacerbation of inflammation. The modulation of this nuclear factor, therefore, has recently been considered as a new strategy in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we present data showing that the aqueous extract of Arbutus unedo's leaves exerts inhibitory action on interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) elicited activation of STAT1, both in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and in human fibroblasts. This down-regulation of STAT1 is shown to result from a reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 protein. Evidence is also presented indicating that the inhibitory effect of this extract may be mediated through enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase. The modulation of this nuclear factor turns out into the regulation of the expression of a number of genes involved in the inflammatory response such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Taken together, our results suggest that the employment of the Arbutus unedo aqueous extract is promising, at least, as an auxiliary anti-inflammatory treatment of diseases in which STAT1 plays a critical role. PMID:18473914

  2. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  3. Spatial control of protein phosphatase 2A (de)methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Longin, Sari; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Martens, Ellen; Louis, Justin V.; Rondelez, Evelien; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Reversible methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A{sub C}) is an important regulatory mechanism playing a crucial role in the selective recruitment of regulatory B subunits. Here, we investigated the subcellular localization of leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1), the two enzymes catalyzing this process. The results show that PME-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors a functional nuclear localization signal, whereas LCMT1 is underrepresented in the nucleus and mainly localizes to the cytoplasm, Golgi region and late endosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence with methylation-sensitive anti-PP2A{sub C} antibodies revealed a good correlation with the methylation status of PP2A{sub C}, demethylated PP2A{sub C} being substantially nuclear. Throughout mitosis, demethylated PP2A{sub C} is associated with the mitotic spindle and during cytokinesis with the cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PME-1, but not of an inactive mutant, results in increased demethylation of PP2A{sub C} in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of a cytoplasmic PME-1 mutant lacking the NLS results in increased demethylation in the cytoplasm-in all cases, however, without any obvious functional consequences. PME-1 associates with an inactive PP2A population, regardless of its esterase activity or localization. We propose that stabilization of this inactive, nuclear PP2A pool is a major in vivo function of PME-1.

  4. Diverse driving forces underlie the invariant occurrence of the T42A, E139D, I282V and T468M SHP2 amino acid substitutions causing Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Simone; Torreri, Paola; Tinti, Michele; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Flex, Elisabetta; Grottesi, Alessandro; Ceccarini, Marina; Palleschi, Antonio; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Missense PTPN11 mutations cause Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes (NS and LS), two developmental disorders with pleiomorphic phenotypes. PTPN11 encodes SHP2, an SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase functioning as a signal transducer. Generally, different substitutions of a particular amino acid residue are observed in these diseases, indicating that the crucial factor is the residue being replaced. For a few codons, only one substitution is observed, suggesting the possibility of specific roles for the residue introduced. We analyzed the biochemical behavior and ligand-binding properties of all possible substitutions arising from single-base changes affecting codons 42, 139, 279, 282 and 468 to investigate the mechanisms underlying the invariant occurrence of the T42A, E139D and I282V substitutions in NS and the Y279C and T468M changes in LS. Our data demonstrate that the isoleucine-to-valine change at codon 282 is the only substitution at that position perturbing the stability of SHP2's closed conformation without impairing catalysis, while the threonine-to-alanine change at codon 42, but not other substitutions of that residue, promotes increased phosphopeptide-binding affinity. The recognition specificity of the C-SH2 domain bearing the E139D substitution differed substantially from its wild-type counterpart acquiring binding properties similar to those observed for the N-SH2 domain, revealing a novel mechanism of SHP2's functional dysregulation. Finally, while functional selection does not seem to occur for the substitutions at codons 279 and 468, we point to deamination of the methylated cytosine at nucleotide 1403 as the driving factor leading to the high prevalence of the T468M change in LS. PMID:18372317

  5. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection activates Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 to suppress IFN-γ signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chih; Chen, Chia-Ling; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Yang, Yao-Jong; Tseng, Po-Chun; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2014-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection not only induces gastric inflammation but also increases the risk of gastric tumorigenesis. IFN-γ has antimicrobial effects; however, H. pylori infection elevates IFN-γ-mediated gastric inflammation and may suppress IFN-γ signaling as a strategy to avoid immune destruction through an as-yet-unknown mechanism. This study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of H. pylori-induced IFN-γ resistance. Postinfection of viable H. pylori decreased IFN-γ-activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 and IFN regulatory factor 1 not only in human gastric epithelial MKN45 and AZ-521 but also in human monocytic U937 cells. H. pylori caused an increase in the C-terminal tyrosine phosphorylation of Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2. Pharmacologically and genetically inhibiting SHP2 reversed H. pylori-induced IFN-γ resistance. In contrast to a clinically isolated H. pylori strain HP238, the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) isogenic mutant strain HP238(CagAm) failed to induce IFN-γ resistance, indicating that CagA regulates this effect. Notably, HP238 and HP238(CagAm) differently caused SHP2 phosphorylation; however, imaging and biochemical analyses demonstrated CagA-mediated membrane-associated binding with phosphorylated SHP2. CagA-independent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributed to H. pylori-induced SHP2 phosphorylation; however, ROS/SHP2 mediated IFN-γ resistance in a CagA-regulated manner. This finding not only provides an alternative mechanism for how CagA and ROS coregulate SHP2 activation but may also explain their roles in H. pylori-induced IFN-γ resistance. PMID:25225672

  7. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  8. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  9. Shp2 promotes metastasis of prostate cancer by attenuating the PAR3/PAR6/aPKC polarity protein complex and enhancing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Zhao, H; Ji, Z; Zhang, C; Zhou, P; Wang, L; Chen, Q; Wang, J; Zhang, P; Chen, Z; Zhu, H H; Gao, W-Q

    2016-03-10

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), marked by the dissolution of cell-cell junctions, loss of cell polarity and increased cell motility, is one of the essential steps for prostate cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully explored. We report in this study that Shp2 is upregulated in prostate cancers and is associated with a poor disease outcome, namely tumor metastasis and shortened patient survival. Overexpression of wild-type Shp2 or an oncogenic Shp2 mutant leads to increased prostate cancer cell proliferation, colony and sphere formation, and in vivo tumor formation. Opposite effects are seen in Shp2-knockdown cells. Moreover, Shp2 promotes in vitro migration and in vivo metastasis of prostatic tumor cells. Mechanistically, Shp2 interacts with PAR3 (partitioning-defective 3) via its Src homology-2 domain. Ectopic expression of Shp2 attenuates the phosphorylation of PAR3 and the formation of the PAR3/PAR6/atypical protein kinase C polarity protein complex, resulting in disrupted cell polarity, dysregulated cell-cell junctions and increased EMT. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which oncogenic signal-transduction molecules regulate cell polarity and induction of EMT.

  10. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  11. A PTPN11 allele encoding a catalytically impaired SHP2 protein in a patient with a Noonan syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jonathan J.; Martinelli, Simone; Pannone, Luca; Lo, Ivan Fai-Man; Shi, Lisong; Edelmann, Lisa; Tartaglia, Marco; Luk, Ho-Ming; Gelb, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The RASopathies are a relatively common group of phenotypically similar and genetically related autosomal dominant genetic syndromes caused by missense mutations affecting genes participating in the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that include Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML, formerly LEOPARD syndrome). NS and NSML can be difficult to differentiate during infancy, but the presence of multiple lentigines, café au lait spots, and specific cardiac defects facilitate the diagnosis. Furthermore, individual PTPN11 missense mutations are highly specific to each syndrome and engender opposite biochemical alterations on the function of SHP-2, the protein product of that gene. Here, we report on a 5-year-old male with two de novo PTPN11 mutations in cis, c.1471C>T (p.Pro491Ser) and c.1492C>T (p.Arg498Trp), which are associated with NS and NSML, respectively. This boy’s phenotype is intermediate between NS and NSML with facial dysmorphism, short stature, mild global developmental delay, pulmonic stenosis and deafness but absence of café au lait spots or lentigines. The double-mutant SHP-2 was found to be catalytically impaired. This raises the question of whether clinical differences between NS and NSML can be ascribed solely to the relative SHP-2 catalytic activity. PMID:24891296

  12. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B’η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes. PMID:25085430

  13. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-01

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity. PMID:17105729

  14. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability: A DOMINANT ROLE FOR LYSINE 66.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-08-26

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys(66) is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys(13), Lys(80), and Lys(289)) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys(66) in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN. PMID:27405757

  15. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability: A DOMINANT ROLE FOR LYSINE 66.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-08-26

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys(66) is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys(13), Lys(80), and Lys(289)) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys(66) in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN.

  16. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-01

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity.

  17. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  18. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  19. Arabidopsis DELLA protein degradation is controlled by a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-07-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway.

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatase controls breast cancer invasion through the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bo-Mi; Chae, Hee Suk; Jeong, Young-Ju; Lee, Young-Rae; Noh, Eun-Mi; Youn, Hyun Zo; Jung, Sung Hoo; Yu, Hong-Nu; Chung, Eun Yong; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by cancer cells has been associated with the high potential of metastasis in several human carcinomas, including breast cancer. Several pieces of evidence demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) have functions that promote cell migration and metastasis in breast cancer. We analyzed whether PTP inhibitor might control breast cancer invasion through MMP expression. Herein, we investigate the effect of 4-hydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-2H benzo[g]indole-2,5(3H)-dione (BVT948), a novel PTP inhibitor, on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in MCF-7 cells. The expression of MMP-9 and cell invasion increased after TPA treatment, whereas TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion were decreased by BVT948 pretreatment. Also, BVT948 suppressed NF-κB activation in TPA-treated MCF-7 cells. However, BVT948 didn’t block TPA-induced AP-1 activation in MCF-7 cells. Our results suggest that the PTP inhibitor blocks breast cancer invasion via suppression of the expression of MMP-9. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(11): 533-538] PMID:24152909

  1. The inositol phosphatase SHIP controls Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Sly, Laura M; Krystal, Gerald; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-07-01

    The SH2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase, SHIP, negatively regulates various hematopoietic cell functions and is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis. However, whether SHIP plays a role in controlling bacterial infections in vivo remains unknown. Salmonella enterica causes human salmonellosis, a disease that ranges in severity from mild gastroenteritis to severe systemic illness, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The susceptibility of ship(+/+) and ship(-/-) mice and bone marrow-derived macrophages to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection was compared. ship(-/-) mice displayed an increased susceptibility to both oral and intraperitoneal serovar Typhimurium infection and had significantly higher bacterial loads in intestinal and systemic sites than ship(+/+) mice, indicating a role for SHIP in the gut-associated and systemic pathogenesis of serovar Typhimurium in vivo. Cytokine analysis of serum from orally infected mice showed that ship(-/-) mice produce lower levels of Th1 cytokines than do ship(+/+) animals at 2 days postinfection, and in vitro analysis of supernatants taken from infected bone marrow-derived macrophages derived to mimic the in vivo ship(-/-) alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotype correlated with these data. M2 macrophages were the predominant population in vivo in both oral and intraperitoneal infections, since tissue macrophages within the small intestine and peritoneal macrophages from ship(-/-) mice showed elevated levels of the M2 macrophage markers Ym1 and Arginase 1 compared to ship(+/+) cells. Based on these data, we propose that M2 macrophage skewing in ship(-/-) mice contributes to ineffective clearance of Salmonella in vivo.

  2. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed.

  3. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  4. Reversible oxidation controls the activity and oligomeric state of the mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase AUM.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Annegrit; Bergeron, Alexandre; Boivin, Benoit; Gohla, Antje

    2016-08-01

    Redox-dependent switches of enzyme activity are emerging as important fine-tuning mechanisms in cell signaling. For example, protein tyrosine phosphatases employ a conserved cysteine residue for catalysis, which also renders them highly susceptible to reversible inactivation by oxidation. In contrast, haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-type phosphatases perform catalysis via a phosphoaspartyltransferase reaction. The potential regulation of HAD phosphatases by reversible oxidation has not yet been explored. Here, we investigate the redox-sensitivity of the HAD-type phosphoglycolate phosphatase PGP, also known as AUM or glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase. We show that recombinant, purified murine PGP is inhibited by oxidation and re-activated by reduction. We identify three reactive cysteine residues in the catalytic core domain of PGP (Cys35, Cys104 and Cys243) that mediate the reversible inhibition of PGP activity and the associated, redox-dependent conformational changes. Structural analysis suggests that Cys35 oxidation weakens van-der-Waals interactions with Thr67, a conserved catalytic residue required for substrate coordination. Cys104 and Cys243 form a redox-dependent disulfide bridge between the PGP catalytic core and cap domains, which may impair the open/close-dynamics of the catalytic cycle. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys297 in the PGP cap domain is essential for redox-dependent PGP oligomerization, and that PGP oxidation/oligomerization occurs in response to stimulation of cells with EGF. Finally, employing a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay, we show that cysteines of cellular PGP are transiently oxidized to sulfenic acids. Taken together, our findings establish that PGP, an aspartate-dependent HAD phosphatase, is transiently inactivated by reversible oxidation in cells.

  5. Reversible oxidation controls the activity and oligomeric state of the mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase AUM.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Annegrit; Bergeron, Alexandre; Boivin, Benoit; Gohla, Antje

    2016-08-01

    Redox-dependent switches of enzyme activity are emerging as important fine-tuning mechanisms in cell signaling. For example, protein tyrosine phosphatases employ a conserved cysteine residue for catalysis, which also renders them highly susceptible to reversible inactivation by oxidation. In contrast, haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-type phosphatases perform catalysis via a phosphoaspartyltransferase reaction. The potential regulation of HAD phosphatases by reversible oxidation has not yet been explored. Here, we investigate the redox-sensitivity of the HAD-type phosphoglycolate phosphatase PGP, also known as AUM or glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase. We show that recombinant, purified murine PGP is inhibited by oxidation and re-activated by reduction. We identify three reactive cysteine residues in the catalytic core domain of PGP (Cys35, Cys104 and Cys243) that mediate the reversible inhibition of PGP activity and the associated, redox-dependent conformational changes. Structural analysis suggests that Cys35 oxidation weakens van-der-Waals interactions with Thr67, a conserved catalytic residue required for substrate coordination. Cys104 and Cys243 form a redox-dependent disulfide bridge between the PGP catalytic core and cap domains, which may impair the open/close-dynamics of the catalytic cycle. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys297 in the PGP cap domain is essential for redox-dependent PGP oligomerization, and that PGP oxidation/oligomerization occurs in response to stimulation of cells with EGF. Finally, employing a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay, we show that cysteines of cellular PGP are transiently oxidized to sulfenic acids. Taken together, our findings establish that PGP, an aspartate-dependent HAD phosphatase, is transiently inactivated by reversible oxidation in cells. PMID:27179418

  6. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  7. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tekleyohans, Dawit G.; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner. PMID:27776173

  8. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN4/PTP-MEG1, an enzyme capable of dephosphorylating the TCR ITAMs and regulating NF-κB, is dispensable for T cell development and/or T cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer A.; Becker, Amy M.; Medeiros, Jennifer J.; Shapiro, Virginia S.; Wang, Andrew; Farrar, J. David; Quill, Timothy A.; van Huijsduijnen, Rob Hooft; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2008-01-01

    T cell receptor signaling processes are controlled by the integrated actions of families of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Several distinct cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatases have been described that are able to negatively regulate TCR signaling pathways, including SHP-1, SHP-2, PTPH1, and PEP. Using PTPase substrate-trapping mutants and wild type enzymes, we determined that PTPN4/PTP-MEG1, a PTPH1-family member, could complex and dephosphorylate the ITAMs of the TCR ζ subunit. In addition, the substrate-trapping derivative augmented basal and TCR-induced activation of NF-κB in T cells. To characterize the contribution of this PTPase in T cells, we developed PTPN4-deficient mice. T cell development and TCR signaling events were comparable between wild type and PTPN4-deficient animals. The magnitude and duration of TCR-regulated ITAM phosphorylation, as well as overall protein phosphorylation, was unaltered in the absence of PTPN4. Finally, Th1- and Th2-derived cytokines and in vivo immune responses to Listeria monocytogeneswere equivalent between wild type and PTPN4-deficient mice. These findings suggest that additional PTPases are involved in controlling ITAM phosphorylations. PMID:18614237

  9. Identification of New Substrates of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B by Bayesian Integration of Proteome Evidence*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Emanuela; Tinti, Michele; Costa, Stefano; Corallino, Salvatore; Nardozza, Aurelio Pio; Chatraryamontri, Andrew; Ceol, Arnaud; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tyrosine phosphatases display an intrinsic enzymatic preference for the sequence context flanking the target phosphotyrosines. On the other hand, substrate selection in vivo is decisively guided by the enzyme-substrate connectivity in the protein interaction network. We describe here a system wide strategy to infer physiological substrates of protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we integrate, by a Bayesian model, proteome wide evidence about in vitro substrate preference, as determined by a novel high-density peptide chip technology, and “closeness” in the protein interaction network. This allows to rank candidate substrates of the human PTP1B phosphatase. Ultimately a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches were used to verify the prediction that the tyrosine phosphorylation levels of five high-ranking substrates, PLC-γ1, Gab1, SHP2, EGFR, and SHP1, are indeed specifically modulated by PTP1B. In addition, we demonstrate that the PTP1B-mediated dephosphorylation of Gab1 negatively affects its EGF-induced association with the phosphatase SHP2. The dissociation of this signaling complex is accompanied by a decrease of ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation. PMID:21123182

  10. Specific dephosphorylation of Janus Kinase 2 by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhuo; Liu, Xidong; Chu, Huiying; Fu, Xueqi; Li, Tianbao; Hu, Lianghai; Xing, Shu; Li, Guohui; Gu, Jingkai; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2015-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated through phosphorylation of an activation loop thereby turning on downstream signaling pathways. Activation of JAK2, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase with an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling, requires phosphorylation of the 1007 and 1008 tyrosyl residues. Dephosphorylation of these two sites by phosphatases presumably inactivates the enzyme, but the underlying mechanism is not known. In this study, we employed MALDI-TOF/TOF and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the dephosphorylation process by using synthetic peptides derived from the tandem autophosphorylation sites (Y1007 and Y1008) of human JAK2. We found that tyrosine phosphatases catalyzed the dephosphorylation reaction sequentially, but different enzymes exhibited different selectivity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B caused rapid dephosphorylation of Y1008 followed by Y1007, while SHP1 and SHP2 selectively dephosphorylated Y1008 only, and yet HePTP randomly removed a single phosphate from either Y1007 or Y1008, leaving behind mono-phosphorylated peptides. The specificity of dephosphorylation was further confirmed by molecular modeling. The data reveal multiple modes of JAK2 regulation by tyrosine phosphatases, reflecting a complex, and intricate interplay between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  11. Gibberellic acid controls specific acid-phosphatase isozymes in aleurone cells and protoplasts of Avena fatua L.

    PubMed

    Hooley, R

    1984-06-01

    In the presence of gibberellic acid (GA3) aleurone layers and isolated aleurone protoplasts of Avena fatua accumulate specific isozymes of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). Some of these may be involved in mobilizing aleurone-grain phosphate reserves during germination. The hormone also controls secretion of other specific molecular forms of the enzyme that probably assist in endosperm hydrolysis. The accumulation and secretion of putative cell-wall-associated isozymes are stimulated by the action of GA3 in isolated protoplasts. This effect however, is apparently over-ridden in the intact tissue, possibly by a cell-wall-based feedback mechanism.

  12. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg(2+) bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites. PMID:27322068

  13. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas W.; Abcouwer, Steven F.; Losiewicz, Mandy K.

    2015-01-01

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. PMID:26199279

  14. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Three Different Herbal Toothpastes on Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase and Salivary Acid Phosphatase - A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dodamani, Arun; Karibasappa, G. N.; Deshmukh, Manjiri; Naik, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Very few researches in the past have tried to evaluate the effect of herbal toothpaste on saliva and salivary constituents like alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase which play an important role in maintaining oral health. Aim To evaluate and compare the effect of three different herbal toothpastes on Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) and salivary Acid Phosphatase (ACP). Material and Methods The present study was a preliminary study conducted among 45 dental students (15 subjects in each group) in the age group of 19-21 years. Subjects in each group were randomly intervened with three different herbal toothpastes respectively (Group A – Patanjali Dant Kanti, Group B - Himalaya Complete Care and Group C – Vicco Vajradanti). Unstimulated saliva sample were collected before and after brushing and salivary ACP and salivary ALP levels were assessed at an interval of one week each for a period of four weeks starting from day one. Compiled data was analyzed using chi square test, paired t-test and ANOVA based on the nature of the obtained data. Results All the three toothpastes showed significant (p<0.001) reduction in ACP and ALP levels at each interval. For patanjali toothpaste, the mean reduction was in the range of 2.55 – 2.62 IU/L for ACP and 2.94 – 2.99 IU/L for ALP. For Himalaya toothpaste, the mean reduction was in the range of 1.39 – 1.47 IU/L for ACP and 1.55 – 1.61 IU/L for ALP. For Vicco toothpaste, the mean reduction was in the range of 2.46 – 2.50 IU/L for ACP and 2.64 – 2.77 IU/L for ALP. Patanjali and Vicco toothpaste were significantly effective in reducing the levels of salivary ACP and ALP more than Himalaya toothpaste (p<0.05). Conclusion Herbal toothpastes, especially Dant Kanti and Vicco Vajradanti, showed significant reduction in levels of ACP and ALP resulting in overall improvement towards the oral health. PMID:27790584

  16. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity.

  17. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  18. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity. PMID:26806547

  19. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  20. Regulation of CDX4 gene transcription by HoxA9, HoxA10, the Mll-Ell oncogene and Shp2 during leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bei, L; Shah, C; Wang, H; Huang, W; Platanias, L C; Eklund, E A

    2014-01-01

    Cdx and Hox proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that regulate hematopoiesis. Transcription of the HOX and CDX genes decreases during normal myelopoiesis, but is aberrantly sustained in leukemias with translocation or partial tandem duplication of the MLL1 gene. Cdx4 activates transcription of the HOXA9 and HOXA10 genes, and HoxA10 activates CDX4 transcription. The events that break this feedback loop, permitting a decreased Cdx4 expression during normal myelopoiesis, were previously undefined. In the current study, we find that HoxA9 represses CDX4 transcription in differentiating myeloid cells, antagonizing activation by HoxA10. We determine that tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA10 impairs transcriptional activation of CDX4, but tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 facilitates repression of this gene. As HoxA9 and HoxA10 are phosphorylated during myelopoiesis, this provides a mechanism for differentiation stage-specific Cdx4 expression. HoxA9 and HoxA10 are increased in cells expressing Mll-Ell, a leukemia-associated MLL1 fusion protein. We find that Mll-Ell induces a HoxA10-dependent increase in Cdx4 expression in myeloid progenitor cells. However, Cdx4 decreases in a HoxA9-dependent manner on exposure of Mll-Ell-expressing cells to differentiating cytokines. Leukemia-associated, constitutively active mutants of Shp2 block cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 and HoxA10. In comparison with myeloid progenitor cells that are expressing Mll-Ell alone, we find increased CDX4 transcription and Cdx4 expression in cells co-expressing Mll-Ell plus constitutively active Shp2. Increased Cdx4 expression is sustained on exposure of these cells to differentiating cytokines. Our results identify a mechanism for increased and sustained CDX4 transcription in leukemias co-overexpressing HoxA9 and HoxA10 in combination with constitutive activation of Shp2. This is clinically relevant, because MLL1 translocations and constitutive Shp2 activation co-exist in

  1. CDC25A phosphatase controls meiosis I progression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Solc, Petr; Saskova, Adela; Baran, Vladimir; Kubelka, Michal; Schultz, Richard M; Motlik, Jan

    2008-05-01

    CDK1 is a pivotal regulator of resumption of meiosis and meiotic maturation of oocytes. CDC25A/B/C are dual-specificity phosphatases and activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Although CDC25C is not essential for either mitotic or meiotic cell cycle regulation, CDC25B is essential for CDK1 activation during resumption of meiosis. Cdc25a -/- mice are embryonic lethal and therefore a role for CDC25A in meiosis is unknown. We report that activation of CDK1 results in a maturation-associated decrease in the amount of CDC25A protein, but not Cdc25a mRNA, such that little CDC25A is present by metaphase I. In addition, expression of exogenous CDC25A overcomes cAMP-mediated maintenance of meiotic arrest. Microinjection of Gfp-Cdc25a and Gpf-Cdc25b mRNAs constructs reveals that CDC25A is exclusively localized to the nucleus prior to nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). In contrast, CDC25B localizes to cytoplasm in GV-intact oocytes and translocates to the nucleus shortly before NEBD. Over-expressing GFP-CDC25A, which compensates for the normal maturation-associated decrease in CDC25A, blocks meiotic maturation at MI. This MI block is characterized by defects in chromosome congression and spindle formation and a transient reduction in both CDK1 and MAPK activities. Lastly, RNAi-mediated reduction of CDC25A results in fewer oocytes resuming meiosis and reaching MII. These data demonstrate that CDC25A behaves differently during female meiosis than during mitosis, and moreover, that CDC25A has a function in resumption of meiosis, MI spindle formation and the MI-MII transition. Thus, both CDC25A and CDC25B are critical for meiotic maturation of oocytes.

  2. CDC25A phosphatase controls meiosis I progression in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solc, Petr; Saskova, Adela; Baran, Vladimir; Kubelka, Michal; Schultz, Richard M.; Motlik, Jan

    2008-01-01

    CDK1 is a pivotal regulator of resumption of meiosis and meiotic maturation of oocytes. CDC25A/B/C are dual-specificity phosphatases and activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Although CDC25C is not essential for either mitotic or meiotic cell cycle regulation, CDC25B is essential for CDK1 activation during resumption of meiosis. Cdc25a −/− mice are embryonic lethal and therefore a role for CDC25A in meiosis is unknown. We report that activation of CDK1 results in a maturation-associated decrease in the amount of CDC25A protein, but not Cdc25a mRNA, such that little CDC25A is present by metaphase I. In addition, expression of exogenous CDC25A overcomes cAMP-mediated maintenance of meiotic arrest. Microinjection of Gfp-Cdc25a and Gpf-Cdc25b mRNAs constructs reveals that CDC25A is exclusively localized to the nucleus prior to nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). In contrast, CDC25B localizes to cytoplasm in GV-intact oocytes and translocates to the nucleus shortly before NEBD. Over-expressing GFP-CDC25A, which compensates for the normal maturation-associated decrease in CDC25A, blocks meiotic maturation at MI. This MI block is characterized by defects in chromosome congression and spindle formation and a transient reduction in both CDK1 and MAPK activities. Last, RNAi-mediated reduction of CDC25A results in fewer oocytes resuming meiosis and reaching MII. These data demonstrate that CDC25A behaves differently during female meiosis than during mitosis, and moreover, that CDC25A has a function in resumption of meiosis, MI spindle formation and the MI-MII transition. Thus, both CDC25A and CDC25B are critical for meiotic maturation of oocytes. PMID:18367163

  3. Targeted nanoconjugate co-delivering siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor to KRAS mutant NSCLC dissociates GAB1-SHP2 post oncogene knockdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikar, R.; Suresh, Dhananjay; Zambre, Ajit; Taylor, Kristen; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, Matthew; Upendran, Anandhi; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-08-01

    A tri-block nanoparticle (TBN) comprising of an enzymatically cleavable porous gelatin nanocore encapsulated with gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)) and surface functionalized with cetuximab-siRNA conjugate has been synthesized. Targeted delivery of siRNA to undruggable KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer cells would sensitize the cells to TKI drugs and offers an efficient therapy for treating cancer; however, efficient delivery of siRNA and releasing it in cytoplasm remains a major challenge. We have shown TBN can efficiently deliver siRNA to cytoplasm of KRAS mutant H23 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cells for oncogene knockdown; subsequently, sensitizing it to TKI. In the absence of TKI, the nanoparticle showed minimal toxicity suggesting that the cells adapt a parallel GAB1 mediated survival pathway. In H23 cells, activated ERK results in phosphorylation of GAB1 on serine and threonine residues to form GAB1-p85 PI3K complex. In the absence of TKI, knocking down the oncogene dephosphorylated ERK, and negated the complex formation. This event led to tyrosine phosphorylation at Tyr627 domain of GAB1 that regulated EGFR signaling by recruiting SHP2. In the presence of TKI, GAB1-SHP2 dissociation occurs, leading to cell death. The outcome of this study provides a promising platform for treating NSCLC patients harboring KRAS mutation.

  4. Targeted nanoconjugate co-delivering siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor to KRAS mutant NSCLC dissociates GAB1-SHP2 post oncogene knockdown.

    PubMed

    Srikar, R; Suresh, Dhananjay; Zambre, Ajit; Taylor, Kristen; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, Matthew; Upendran, Anandhi; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-01-01

    A tri-block nanoparticle (TBN) comprising of an enzymatically cleavable porous gelatin nanocore encapsulated with gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)) and surface functionalized with cetuximab-siRNA conjugate has been synthesized. Targeted delivery of siRNA to undruggable KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer cells would sensitize the cells to TKI drugs and offers an efficient therapy for treating cancer; however, efficient delivery of siRNA and releasing it in cytoplasm remains a major challenge. We have shown TBN can efficiently deliver siRNA to cytoplasm of KRAS mutant H23 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cells for oncogene knockdown; subsequently, sensitizing it to TKI. In the absence of TKI, the nanoparticle showed minimal toxicity suggesting that the cells adapt a parallel GAB1 mediated survival pathway. In H23 cells, activated ERK results in phosphorylation of GAB1 on serine and threonine residues to form GAB1-p85 PI3K complex. In the absence of TKI, knocking down the oncogene dephosphorylated ERK, and negated the complex formation. This event led to tyrosine phosphorylation at Tyr627 domain of GAB1 that regulated EGFR signaling by recruiting SHP2. In the presence of TKI, GAB1-SHP2 dissociation occurs, leading to cell death. The outcome of this study provides a promising platform for treating NSCLC patients harboring KRAS mutation. PMID:27530552

  5. Targeted nanoconjugate co-delivering siRNA and tyrosine kinase inhibitor to KRAS mutant NSCLC dissociates GAB1-SHP2 post oncogene knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Srikar, R.; Suresh, Dhananjay; Zambre, Ajit; Taylor, Kristen; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, Matthew; Upendran, Anandhi; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2016-01-01

    A tri-block nanoparticle (TBN) comprising of an enzymatically cleavable porous gelatin nanocore encapsulated with gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)) and surface functionalized with cetuximab-siRNA conjugate has been synthesized. Targeted delivery of siRNA to undruggable KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer cells would sensitize the cells to TKI drugs and offers an efficient therapy for treating cancer; however, efficient delivery of siRNA and releasing it in cytoplasm remains a major challenge. We have shown TBN can efficiently deliver siRNA to cytoplasm of KRAS mutant H23 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cells for oncogene knockdown; subsequently, sensitizing it to TKI. In the absence of TKI, the nanoparticle showed minimal toxicity suggesting that the cells adapt a parallel GAB1 mediated survival pathway. In H23 cells, activated ERK results in phosphorylation of GAB1 on serine and threonine residues to form GAB1-p85 PI3K complex. In the absence of TKI, knocking down the oncogene dephosphorylated ERK, and negated the complex formation. This event led to tyrosine phosphorylation at Tyr627 domain of GAB1 that regulated EGFR signaling by recruiting SHP2. In the presence of TKI, GAB1-SHP2 dissociation occurs, leading to cell death. The outcome of this study provides a promising platform for treating NSCLC patients harboring KRAS mutation. PMID:27530552

  6. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  7. Carboxyl-terminal receptor domains control the differential dephosphorylation of somatostatin receptors by protein phosphatase 1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs.

  8. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M.K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism. PMID:24532715

  9. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  10. Host SHP1 phosphatase antagonizes Helicobacter pylori CagA and can be downregulated by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Saju, Priya; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hayashi, Takeru; Senda, Yoshie; Nagase, Lisa; Noda, Saori; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Funata, Sayaka; Kunita, Akiko; Urabe, Masayuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kaneda, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Most if not all gastric cancers are associated with chronic infection of the stomach mucosa with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains(1-4). Approximately 10% of gastric cancers also harbour Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the cancer cells(5,6). Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells via type IV secretion(7,8), the cagA-encoded CagA protein undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation on the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs initially by Src family kinases (SFKs) and then by c-Abl(9,10). Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA binds to the pro-oncogenic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and thereby deregulates the phosphatase activity(11,12), which has been considered to play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis(13). Here we show that the SHP2 homologue SHP1 interacts with CagA independently of the EPIYA motif. The interaction potentiates the phosphatase activity of SHP1 that dampens the oncogenic action of CagA by dephosphorylating the CagA EPIYA motifs. In vitro infection of gastric epithelial cells with EBV induces SHP1 promoter hypermethylation, which strengthens phosphorylation-dependent CagA action via epigenetic downregulation of SHP1 expression. Clinical specimens of EBV-positive gastric cancers also exhibit SHP1 hypermethylation with reduced SHP1 expression. The results reveal that SHP1 is the long-sought phosphatase that can antagonize CagA. Augmented H. pylori CagA activity, via SHP1 inhibition, might also contribute to the development of EBV-positive gastric cancer. PMID:27572445

  11. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-07-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses.

  12. Comparison of levels of serum copper, zinc, albumin, globulin and alkaline phosphatase in psoriatic patients and controls: A hospital based casecontrol study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Gousia; Masood, Qazi; Majeed, Sabiya; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease with unknown etiology, with an epidermal turnover time of <10 days compared to a normal turnover time of 4-8 weeks. This epidermal hyperproliferation accounts for many of the metabolic abnormalities including alteration in the serum levels of proteins and some trace elements. Aim: The aim was to detect any statistically significant difference in the serum levels of zinc, copper, albumin, globulin and alkaline phosphatase between psoriasis patients and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Hundred cases of psoriasis and 100 age and sex matched controls were enrolled in a hospital based case-control study. The serum levels of zinc, copper, albumin, globulin and alkaline phosphatase were calculated and compared among the cases and controls and evaluated statistically. Results: Serum zinc levels were significantly low in the psoriasis group as compared with controls (mean 80.028 μg/dl vs. 109.179 μg/dl, P < 0.0001). Serum copper levels were significantly raised among cases as compared with controls (mean 167.317 μg/dl vs. 133.884 μg/dl P < 0.0001). Serum albumin levels were significantly decreased (3.762 g/dl vs. 4.103 g/dl, P < 0.001), whereas serum globulin levels were raised (3.296 g/dl vs. 2.596 g/dl, P = 0.0014) among cases as compared with controls, respectively. Serum alkaline phosphatase levels were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of this study show significant alterations in the serum levels of copper, zinc, albumin, and globulin in psoriatic patients. This paper aims at highlighting the possible role of trace metals copper and zinc in the aetiopathogenesis of psoriasis and also provides a proposed interplay of factors involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25821726

  13. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  14. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes in fungi isolated from diabetic pregnant women: is there any relationship between fungal alkaline and acid phosphatase activity and glycemic control?

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Dorota; Kurnatowska, Alicja; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Wilczyński, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Ability to respond to environmental changes and secretion of hydrolases are considered to be important for Candida virulence. In this study we determined and compared the activities of 19 different hydrolases of the fungal strains isolated from diabetic and non-diabetic pregnant women. We also looked for the presence of a relationship between hydrolase activities and glycemic control, and, furthermore, evaluated the influence of gestational age on the activity of hydrolases. Mycological examinations were performed for 119 diabetic pregnant women: 47 with diabetes mellitus type I (DM), 72 with gestational diabetes (GDM), and for 132 healthy women (CON). Samples were collected from the vagina, rectum and oral cavity and cultured on Sabouraud media. The fungal hydrolase activities were evaluated using the API ZYM test (bioMerieux). For the 19 different fungal hydrolases tested, 13 activities were present in the isolated fungal strains. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in vaginal strains (p=0.028) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in strains from the vagina (p=0.006) and rectum (p=0.049) was significantly lower in DM than in GDM and CON women. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that fungi isolated from pregnant diabetic women have lower activity of both phosphatases compared to fungi isolated from healthy women. Furthermore, similar differences of mean ALP and ACP activities were observed in the course of pregnancy in strains from the vagina and rectum of DM and CON women. However, strains from DM had lower activity at each stage of pregnancy. The highest activity of ALP and ACP was detected at the beginning, then declined, and had the lowest values between the 24(th) and 33(rd) week of gestation. After that period the activity of both phosphatases increased.

  15. MYC/MAX control ERK signaling and pluripotency by regulation of dual-specificity phosphatases 2 and 7.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James; Sun, Yuhua; Singh, Amar; Dalton, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling is an absolute requirement for the maintenance of murine pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) and requires the MYC-binding partner MAX. In this study, we define a mechanism for this by showing that MYC/MAX complexes suppress ERK activity by transcriptionally regulating two members of the dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) family. DUSPs function by binding and then inactivating ERK1,2 by dephosphorylating residues required for catalytic activity. MYC/MAX complexes achieve this by binding the promoters of DUSP2 and DUSP7, leading to their transcriptional activation, resulting in the attenuation of ERK activity. In the absence of MYC, ectopic DUSP2,7 expression severely delays differentiation, while loss of DUSP2,7 ectopically activates ERK, resulting in loss of pluripotency. These findings elucidate a novel regulatory role for MYC in PSC maintenance involving the stimulation of phosphatases that directly inhibit the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, it provides a mechanism for how leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)/STAT3 signaling reaches across to the MAPK/ERK pathway through MYC and MAX to sustain pluripotency.

  16. c-Jun controls the efficiency of MAP kinase signaling by transcriptional repression of MAP kinase phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprowles, Amy; Wu Yimi; Kung, H.-J.; Wisdom, Ron . E-mail: ronald.wisdom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-15

    The mammalian JNK signaling pathway regulates the transcriptional response of cells to environmental stress, including UV irradiation. This signaling pathway is composed of a classical MAP kinase cascade; activation results in phosphorylation of the transcription factor substrates c-Jun and ATF2, and leads to changes in gene expression. The defining components of this pathway are conserved in the fission yeast S. pombe, where the genetic studies have shown that the ability of the JNK homolog Spc1 to be activated in response to UV irradiation is dependent on the presence of the transcription factor substrate Atf1. We have used genetic analysis to define the role of c-Jun in activation of the mammalian JNK signaling pathway. Our results show that optimal activation of JNK requires the presence of its transcription factor substrate c-Jun. Mutational analysis shows that the ability of c-Jun to support efficient activation of JNK requires the ability of Jun to bind DNA, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with this, we show that c-Jun represses the expression of several MAP kinase phosphatases. In the absence of c-Jun, the increased expression of MAP kinase phosphatases leads to impaired activation of the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases after pathway activation. The results show that one function of c-Jun is to regulate the efficiency of signaling by the ERK, p38, and JNK MAP kinases, a function that is likely to affect cellular responses to many different stimuli.

  17. Selective Regulation of NR2B by Protein Phosphatase-1 for the Control of the NMDA Receptor in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2012-01-01

    An imbalance between pro-survival and pro-death pathways in brain cells can lead to neuronal cell death and neurodegeneration. While such imbalance is known to be associated with alterations in glutamatergic and Ca2+ signaling, the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We identified the protein Ser/Thr phosphatase protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), an enzyme associated with glutamate receptors, as a key trigger of survival pathways that can prevent neuronal death and neurodegeneration in the adult hippocampus. We show that PP1α overexpression in hippocampal neurons limits NMDA receptor overactivation and Ca2+ overload during an excitotoxic event, while PP1 inhibition favors Ca2+ overload and cell death. The protective effect of PP1 is associated with a selective dephosphorylation on a residue phosphorylated by CaMKIIα on the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B, which promotes pro-survival pathways and associated transcriptional programs. These results reveal a novel contributor to the mechanisms of neuroprotection and underscore the importance of PP1-dependent dephosphorylation in these mechanisms. They provide a new target for the development of potential therapeutic treatment of neurodegeneration. PMID:22479519

  18. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  19. Phosphoinositide Phosphatases in Cell Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are essential signaling molecules linked to a diverse array of cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. The metabolic interconversions of these phospholipids are subject to exquisite spatial and temporal regulation executed by arrays of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. These include PtdIns- and phosphoinositide-kinases that drive phosphoinositide synthesis, and phospholipases and phosphatases that regulate phosphoinositide degradation. In the past decade, phosphoinositide phosphatases have emerged as topics of particular interest. This interest is driven by the recent appreciation that these enzymes represent primary mechanisms for phosphoinositide degradation, and because of their ever-increasing connections with human diseases. Herein, we review the biochemical properties of six major phosphoinositide phosphatases, the functional involvements of these enzymes in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism, the pathologies that arise from functional derangements of individual phosphatases, and recent ideas concerning the involvements of phosphoinositide phosphatases in membrane traffic control. PMID:20043944

  20. Resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced platelet stimulation through suppressing NADPH oxidase and oxidative inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Yong; Min, Ji Hyun; Wang, Su Bin; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon collagen stimulation are implicated in propagating various platelet-activating pathways. Among ROS-producing enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) is largely responsible for collagen receptor-dependent ROS production. Therefore, NOX has been proposed as a novel target for the development of antiplatelet agent. We here investigate whether resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced NOX activation and further examine the effects of resveratrol on ROS-dependent signaling pathways in collagen-stimulated platelets. Collagen-induced superoxide anion production in platelets was inhibited by resveratrol. Resveratrol suppressed collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX. Correlated with the inhibitory effects on NOX, resveratrol protected SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) from ROS-mediated inactivation and subsequently attenuated the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (spleen tyrosine kinase, Vav1, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase Cγ2) for collagen receptor signaling cascades. Resveratrol also inhibited downstream responses such as cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen. The antiplatelet effects of resveratrol through the inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2 suggest that resveratrol is a potential compound for prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  1. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade. PMID:22215152

  2. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  3. The Tail of KdsC: Conformational Changes Control the Activity of a Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Yi, Li; Aggarwal, Parag; Wu, Jing; Rubin, John R.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Woodard, Ronald W.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2010-01-28

    The phosphatase KdsC cleaves 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of inorganic phosphate and Kdo. Kdo is an essential component of the lipopolysaccharide envelope in Gram-negative bacteria. Because lipopolysaccharide is an important determinant of bacterial resistance and toxicity, KdsC is a potential target for novel antibacterial agents. KdsC belongs to the broad haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. In haloacid dehalogenase superfamily enzymes, substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are generally dictated by a fold feature called the cap domain. It is therefore not clear why KdsC, which lacks a cap domain, is catalytically efficient and highly specific to 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate. Here, we present a set of seven structures of tetrameric Escherichia coli KdsC (ranging from 1.4 to 3.06 {angstrom} in resolution) that model different intermediate states in its catalytic mechanism. A crystal structure of product-bound E. coli KdsC shows how the interface between adjacent monomers defines the active site pocket. Kdo is engaged in a network of polar and nonpolar interactions with residues at this interface, which explains substrate specificity. Furthermore, this structural and kinetic analysis strongly suggests that the binding of the flexible C-terminal region (tail) to the active site makes KdsC catalytically efficient by facilitating product release.

  4. A novel double-negative feedback loop between miR-489 and the HER2-SHP2-MAPK signaling axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Shin; Markoutsa, Eleni; Jie, Chunfa; Liu, Shou; Botbyl, Rachel; Reisman, David; Xu, Peisheng; Chen, Hexin

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErBb2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers and associated with poor prognosis and outcome. Dysregulation of several microRNAs (miRNAs) plays a key role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we screened and identified miRNAs dysregualted in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Our molecular study demonstrated that miR-489 was specifically downregulated by the HER2-downstream signaling, especially through the MAPK pathway. Restoration or overexpression of miR-489 in HER2-positive breast cancer cells significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and decreased the tumorigenecity and tumor growth in xenograft mice. Mechanistically, we found that overexpression of miR-489 led to the decreased levels of HER2 and SHP2 and thus attenuated HER2-downstream signaling. Furthermore, we for the first time demonstrated that HER2 is a direct target of miR-489 and therefore HER2-SHP2-MAPK and miR-489 signaling pathways form a mutually inhibitory loop. Using quantitative real-time PCR analysis and Fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH), we found that miR-489 was expressed at significantly lower level in tumor tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues. Downregulation of miR-489 in breast cancers was associated with aggressive tumor phenotypes. Overall, our results define a double-negative feedback loop involving miR-489 and the HER2-SHP2-MAPK signaling axis that can regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor progression and might have therapeutic relevance for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26918448

  5. Calcineurin phosphatase as a negative regulator of fear memory in hippocampus: control on nuclear factor-κB signaling in consolidation and reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Fustiñana, María Sol; Zalcman, Gisela; Romano, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    Protein phosphatases are important regulators of neural plasticity and memory. Some studies support that the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) is, on the one hand, a negative regulator of memory formation and, on the other hand, a positive regulator of memory extinction and reversal learning. However, the signaling mechanisms by which CaN exerts its action in such processes are not well understood. Previous findings support that CaN negatively regulate the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway during extinction. Here, we have studied the role of CaN in contextual fear memory consolidation and reconsolidation in the hippocampus. We investigated the CaN control on the NF-κB signaling pathway, a key mechanism that regulates gene expression in memory processes. We found that post-training intrahippocampal administration of the CaN inhibitor FK506 enhanced memory retention one day but not two weeks after training. Accordingly, the inhibition of CaN by FK506 increased NF-κB activity in dorsal hippocampus. The administration of the NF-κB signaling pathway inhibitor sulfasalazine (SSZ) impeded the enhancing effect of FK506. In line with our findings in consolidation, FK506 administration before memory reactivation enhanced memory reconsolidation when tested one day after re-exposure to the training context. Strikingly, memory was also enhanced two weeks after training, suggesting that reinforcement during reconsolidation is more persistent than during consolidation. The coadministration of SSZ and FK506 blocked the enhancement effect in reconsolidation, suggesting that this facilitation is also dependent on the NF-κB signaling pathway. In summary, our results support a novel mechanism by which memory formation and reprocessing can be controlled by CaN regulation on NF-κB activity.

  6. Local control of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate signaling in the Golgi apparatus by Vps74 and Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher S.; Hung, Chia-Sui; Huoh, Yu-San; Mousley, Carl J.; Stefan, Christopher J.; Bankaitis, Vytas; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Burd, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    In the Golgi apparatus, lipid homeostasis pathways are coordinated with the biogenesis of cargo transport vesicles by phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) that produce phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P), a signaling molecule that is recognized by downstream effector proteins. Quantitative analysis of the intra-Golgi distribution of a PtdIns4P reporter protein confirms that PtdIns4P is enriched on the trans-Golgi cisterna, but surprisingly, Vps74 (the orthologue of human GOLPH3), a PI4K effector required to maintain residence of a subset of Golgi proteins, is distributed with the opposite polarity, being most abundant on cis and medial cisternae. Vps74 binds directly to the catalytic domain of Sac1 (KD = 3.8 μM), the major PtdIns4P phosphatase in the cell, and PtdIns4P is elevated on medial Golgi cisternae in cells lacking Vps74 or Sac1, suggesting that Vps74 is a sensor of PtdIns4P level on medial Golgi cisternae that directs Sac1-mediated dephosphosphorylation of this pool of PtdIns4P. Consistent with the established role of Sac1 in the regulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis, complex sphingolipid homeostasis is perturbed in vps74Δ cells. Mutant cells lacking complex sphingolipid biosynthetic enzymes fail to properly maintain residence of a medial Golgi enzyme, and cells lacking Vps74 depend critically on complex sphingolipid biosynthesis for growth. The results establish additive roles of Vps74-mediated and sphingolipid-dependent sorting of Golgi residents. PMID:22553352

  7. The bHLH Factors Extramacrochaetae and Daughterless Control Cell Cycle in Drosophila Imaginal Discs through the Transcriptional Regulation of the cdc25 Phosphatase string

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Zapata, Irene; Baonza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    One of the major issues in developmental biology is about having a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate organ growth. Identifying these mechanisms is essential to understand the development processes that occur both in physiological and pathological conditions, such as cancer. The E protein family of basic helix-loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and their inhibitors the Id proteins, regulate cell proliferation in metazoans. This notion is further supported because the activity of these factors is frequently deregulated in cancerous cells. The E protein orthologue Daughterless (Da) and the Id orthologue Extramacrochaetae (Emc) are the only members of these classes of bHLH proteins in Drosophila. Although these factors are involved in controlling proliferation, the mechanism underlying this regulatory activity is poorly understood. Through a genetic analysis, we show that during the development of epithelial cells in the imaginal discs, the G2/M transition, and hence cell proliferation, is controlled by Emc via Da. In eukaryotic cells, the main activator of this transition is the Cdc25 phosphatase, string. Our genetic analyses reveal that the ectopic expression of string in cells with reduced levels of Emc or high levels of Da is sufficient to rescue the proliferative defects seen in these mutant cells. Moreover, we present evidence demonstrating a role of Da as a transcriptional repressor of string. Taken together, these findings define a mechanism through which Emc controls cell proliferation by regulating the activity of Da, which transcriptionally represses string. PMID:24651265

  8. The bHLH factors extramacrochaetae and daughterless control cell cycle in Drosophila imaginal discs through the transcriptional regulation of the Cdc25 phosphatase string.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Zapata, Irene; Baonza, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    One of the major issues in developmental biology is about having a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate organ growth. Identifying these mechanisms is essential to understand the development processes that occur both in physiological and pathological conditions, such as cancer. The E protein family of basic helix-loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and their inhibitors the Id proteins, regulate cell proliferation in metazoans. This notion is further supported because the activity of these factors is frequently deregulated in cancerous cells. The E protein orthologue Daughterless (Da) and the Id orthologue Extramacrochaetae (Emc) are the only members of these classes of bHLH proteins in Drosophila. Although these factors are involved in controlling proliferation, the mechanism underlying this regulatory activity is poorly understood. Through a genetic analysis, we show that during the development of epithelial cells in the imaginal discs, the G2/M transition, and hence cell proliferation, is controlled by Emc via Da. In eukaryotic cells, the main activator of this transition is the Cdc25 phosphatase, string. Our genetic analyses reveal that the ectopic expression of string in cells with reduced levels of Emc or high levels of Da is sufficient to rescue the proliferative defects seen in these mutant cells. Moreover, we present evidence demonstrating a role of Da as a transcriptional repressor of string. Taken together, these findings define a mechanism through which Emc controls cell proliferation by regulating the activity of Da, which transcriptionally represses string.

  9. CRL4–DCAF1 ubiquitin E3 ligase directs protein phosphatase 2A degradation to control oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Ji, Shu-Yan; Sha, Qian-Qian; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiosis is a specialized cell cycle that gives rise to fertilizable haploid gametes and is precisely controlled in various dimensions. We recently found that E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4 is required for female fertility by regulating DNA hydroxymethylation to maintain oocyte survival and to promote zygotic genome reprogramming. However, not all phenotypes of CRL4-deleted oocytes could be explained by this mechanism. Here we show that CRL4 controls oocyte meiotic maturation by proteasomal degradation of protein phosphatase 2A scaffold subunit, PP2A-A. Oocyte-specific deletion of DDB1 or DCAF1 (also called VPRBP) results in delayed meiotic resumption and failure to complete meiosis I along with PP2A-A accumulation. DCAF1 directly binds to and results in the poly-ubiquitination of PP2A-A. Moreover, combined deletion of Ppp2r1a rescues the meiotic defects caused by DDB1/DCAF1 deficiency. These results provide in vivo evidence that CRL4-directed PP2A-A degradation is physiologically essential for regulating oocyte meiosis and female fertility. PMID:26281983

  10. The ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p controls lifespan, mitochondrial function and cell cycle progression by regulating hexokinase 2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, António Daniel; Pereira, Clara; Osório, Hugo; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Costa, Vítor

    2016-06-17

    Sit4p is the catalytic subunit of a ceramide-activated PP2A-like phosphatase that regulates cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan in yeast. In this study, we show that hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p) is hyperphosphorylated in sit4Δ mutants grown in glucose medium by a Snf1p-independent mechanism and Hxk2p-S15A mutation suppresses phenotypes associated with SIT4 deletion, namely growth arrest at G1 phase, derepression of mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 resistance and lifespan extension. Consistently, the activation of Sit4p in isc1Δ mutants, which has been associated with premature aging, leads to Hxk2p hypophosphorylation, and the expression of Hxk2p-S15E increases the lifespan of isc1Δ cells. The overall results suggest that Hxk2p functions downstream of Sit4p in the control of cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan.

  11. Extending the Mannose 6-Phosphate Glycoproteome by High Resolution/Accuracy Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Control and Acid Phosphatase 5-Deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sleat, David E.; Sun, Pengling; Wiseman, Jennifer A.; Huang, Ling; El-Banna, Mukarram; Zheng, Haiyan; Moore, Dirk F.; Lobel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, most newly synthesized lumenal lysosomal proteins are delivered to the lysosome by the mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) targeting pathway. Man6P -containing proteins can be affinity-purified and characterized using proteomic approaches, and such studies have led to the discovery of new lysosomal proteins and associated human disease genes. One limitation to this approach is that in most cell types the Man6P modification is rapidly removed by acid phosphatase 5 (ACP5) after proteins are targeted to the lysosome, and thus, some lysosomal proteins may escape detection. In this study, we have extended the analysis of the lysosomal proteome using high resolution/accuracy mass spectrometry to identify and quantify proteins in a combined analysis of control and ACP5-deficient mice. To identify Man6P glycoproteins with limited tissue distribution, we analyzed multiple tissues and used statistical approaches to identify proteins that are purified with high specificity. In addition to 68 known Man6P glycoproteins, 165 other murine proteins were identified that may contain Man6P and may thus represent novel lysosomal residents. For four of these lysosomal candidates, (lactoperoxidase, phospholipase D family member 3, ribonuclease 6, and serum amyloid P component), we demonstrate lysosomal residence based on the colocalization of fluorescent fusion proteins with a lysosomal marker. PMID:23478313

  12. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b in proopiomelanocortin neurons reduces neurogenic control of blood pressure and protects mice from leptin- and sympatho-mediated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Butler, Benjamin R; Herren, David J; Brands, Michael W; Bence, Kendra K; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (Ptp1b), which represses leptin signaling, is a promising therapeutic target for obesity. Genome wide deletion of Ptp1b, increases leptin sensitivity, protects mice from obesity and diabetes, but alters cardiovascular function by increasing blood pressure (BP). Leptin-control of metabolism is centrally mediated and involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Whether these neurons contribute to leptin-mediated increases in BP remain unclear. We hypothesized that increasing leptin signaling in POMC neurons with Ptp1b deletion will sensitize the cardiovascular system to leptin and enhance neurogenic control of BP. We analyzed the cardiovascular phenotype of Ptp1b+/+ and POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice, at baseline and after 7 days of leptin infusion or sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. POMCPtp1b deletion did not alter baseline cardiovascular hemodynamics (BP, heart rate) but reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade and plasma catecholamine levels that suggests a decreased neurogenic control of BP. In contrast, POMC-Ptp1b deletion increased vascular adrenergic reactivity and aortic α-adrenergic receptors expression. Chronic leptin treatment reduced vascular adrenergic reactivity and blunted diastolic and mean BP increases in POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice only. Similarly POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice exhibited a blunted increased in diastolic and mean BP accompanied by a gradual reduction in adrenergic reactivity in response to chronic vascular sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. Together these data rule out our hypothesis but suggest that deletion of Ptp1b in POMC neurons protects from leptin- and sympatho-mediated increases in BP. Vascular adrenergic desensitization appears as a protective mechanism against hypertension, and POMC-Ptp1b as a key therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    by G6PC (GSDIa) or SLC37A4 (GSDIb) gene analysis, and the indications of liver biopsy to measure G6P activity are getting rarer and rarer. Differential diagnoses include the other GSDs, in particular type III (see this term). However, in GSDIII, glycemia and lactacidemia are high after a meal and low after a fast period (often with a later occurrence than that of type I). Primary liver tumors and Pepper syndrome (hepatic metastases of neuroblastoma) may be evoked but are easily ruled out through clinical and ultrasound data. Antenatal diagnosis is possible through molecular analysis of amniocytes or chorionic villous cells. Pre-implantatory genetic diagnosis may also be discussed. Genetic counseling should be offered to patients and their families. The dietary treatment aims at avoiding hypoglycemia (frequent meals, nocturnal enteral feeding through a nasogastric tube, and later oral addition of uncooked starch) and acidosis (restricted fructose and galactose intake). Liver transplantation, performed on the basis of poor metabolic control and/or hepatocarcinoma, corrects hypoglycemia, but renal involvement may continue to progress and neutropenia is not always corrected in type Ib. Kidney transplantation can be performed in case of severe renal insufficiency. Combined liver-kidney grafts have been performed in a few cases. Prognosis is usually good: late hepatic and renal complications may occur, however, with adapted management, patients have almost normal life span. Disease name and synonyms Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency or G6P deficiency or glycogen storage disease type I or GSDI or type I glycogenosis or Von Gierke disease or Hepatorenal glycogenosis. PMID:21599942

  14. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  15. Protein phosphatases in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Ortsäter, Henrik; Grankvist, Nina; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjöholm1, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly world-wide. A cardinal feature of most forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin-producing capability, due to the loss of insulin-producing β-cells, impaired glucose-sensitive insulin secretion from the β-cell, or a combination thereof, the reasons for which largely remain elusive. Reversible phosphorylation is an important and versatile mechanism for regulating the biological activity of many intracellular proteins, which, in turn, controls a variety of cellular functions. For instance, significant changes in protein kinase activities and in protein phosphorylation patterns occur subsequent to stimulation of insulin release by glucose. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphorylation of proteins involved in the insulin secretory process by the β-cell have been extensively investigated. However, far less is known about the role and regulation of protein dephosphorylation by various protein phosphatases. Herein we review extant data implicating serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases in various aspects of healthy and diabetic islet biology, ranging from control of hormonal stimulus-secretion coupling to mitogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:24681827

  16. Molecular Analysis of Aedes aegypti Classical Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Uncovers an Ortholog of Mammalian PTP-1B Implicated in the Control of Egg Production in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Debora Monteiro; Ahuja, Lalima Gagan; Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato Oliveira; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Jablonka, Willy; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Senna, Raquel; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Hartfelder, Klaus; Capurro, Margareth; Atella, Georgia Correa; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that catalyze phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation and modulate cell differentiation, growth and metabolism. In mammals, PTPs play a key role in the modulation of canonical pathways involved in metabolism and immunity. PTP1B is the prototype member of classical PTPs and a major target for treating human diseases, such as cancer, obesity and diabetes. These signaling enzymes are, hence, targets of a wide array of inhibitors. Anautogenous mosquitoes rely on blood meals to lay eggs and are vectors of the most prevalent human diseases. Identifying the mosquito ortholog of PTP1B and determining its involvement in egg production is, therefore, important in the search for a novel and crucial target for vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an analysis to identify the ortholog of mammalian PTP1B in the Aedes aegypti genome. We identified eight genes coding for classical PTPs. In silico structural and functional analyses of proteins coded by such genes revealed that four of these code for catalytically active enzymes. Among the four genes coding for active PTPs, AAEL001919 exhibits the greatest degree of homology with the mammalian PTP1B. Next, we evaluated the role of this enzyme in egg formation. Blood feeding largely affects AAEL001919 expression, especially in the fat body and ovaries. These tissues are critically involved in the synthesis and storage of vitellogenin, the major yolk protein. Including the classical PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or the PTP substrate DiFMUP in the blood meal decreased vitellogenin synthesis and egg production. Similarly, silencing AAEL001919 using RNA interference (RNAi) assays resulted in 30% suppression of egg production. Conclusions/Significance The data reported herein implicate, for the first time, a gene that codes for a classical PTP in mosquito egg formation. These findings raise the possibility that this class of enzymes may be used as novel

  17. Regulation of synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tan, A W; Nuttall, F Q

    1976-08-12

    Using substrates purified from liver, the apparent Km values of synthase phosphatase ([UDPglucose--glycogen glucosyltransferase-D]phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.42) and phosphorylase phosphatase (phosphorylase a phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.17) were found to be 0.7 and 60 units/ml respectively. The maximal velocity of phosphorylase phosphatase was more than a 100 times that of synthase phosphatase. In adrenalectomized, fasted animals there was a complete loss of synthase phosphatase but only a slight decrease in phosphorylase phosphatase when activity was measured using endogenous substrates in a concentrated liver extract. When assayed under optimal conditions with purified substrates, both activities were present but had decreased to very low levels. Mixing experiments indicated that synthase D present in the extract of adrenalectomized fasted animals was altered such that it was no longer a substrate for synthase phosphatase from normal rats. Phosphorylase a substrate on the other hand was unaltered and readily converted. When glucose was given in vivo, no change in percent of synthase in the I form was seen in adrenalectomized rats but the percent of phosphorylase in the a form was reduced. Precipitation of protein from an extract of normal fed rats with ethanol produced a large activation of phosphorylase phosphatase activity with no corresponding increase in synthase phosphatase activity. Despite the low phosphorylase phosphatase present in extracts of adrenalectomized fasted animals, ethanol precipitation increased activity to the same high level as obtained in the normal fed rats. Synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase activities were also decreased in normal fasted, diabetic fed and fasted, and adrenalectomized fed rats. Both enzymes recovered in the same manner temporally after oral glucose administration to adrenalectomized, fasted rats. These results suggest an integrated regulatory mechanism for the two phosphatase.

  18. Inhibition of sucrose phosphatase by sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. Partially purified sucrose phosphatase from immature stem tissue of sugarcane is inhibited by sucrose. The enzyme was also inhibited by maltose, melezitose and 6-kestose but not by eight other sugars, including glucose and fructose. 2. The relative effectiveness of sucrose, maltose and melezitose as inhibitors is different for sucrose phosphatase from different plants. 3. The inhibition of the sugar-cane enzyme by sucrose was shown to be partially competitive. The Ki for sucrose is about 10mm. 4. Melezitose is also a partially competitive inhibitor of the enzyme but the inhibition by maltose is probably mixed. 5. The possibility that sucrose controls both the rate of accumulation of sucrose in stems of sugar-cane and sucrose synthesis in leaves by inhibiting sucrose phosphatase is discussed. PMID:4291490

  19. Diverse levels of sequence selectivity and catalytic efficiency of protein-tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Selner, Nicholas G; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Neel, Benjamin G; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Knapp, Stefan; Bell, Charles E; Pei, Dehua

    2014-01-21

    The sequence selectivity of 14 classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) (PTPRA, PTPRB, PTPRC, PTPRD, PTPRO, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, HePTP, PTP-PEST, TCPTP, PTPH1, PTPD1, and PTPD2) was systematically profiled by screening their catalytic domains against combinatorial peptide libraries. All of the PTPs exhibit similar preference for pY peptides rich in acidic amino acids and disfavor positively charged sequences but differ vastly in their degrees of preference/disfavor. Some PTPs (PTP-PEST, SHP-1, and SHP-2) are highly selective for acidic over basic (or neutral) peptides (by >10(5)-fold), whereas others (PTPRA and PTPRD) show no to little sequence selectivity. PTPs also have diverse intrinsic catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM values against optimal substrates), which differ by >10(5)-fold due to different kcat and/or KM values. Moreover, PTPs show little positional preference for the acidic residues relative to the pY residue. Mutation of Arg47 of PTP1B, which is located near the pY-1 and pY-2 residues of a bound substrate, decreased the enzymatic activity by 3-18-fold toward all pY substrates containing acidic residues anywhere within the pY-6 to pY+5 region. Similarly, mutation of Arg24, which is situated near the C-terminus of a bound substrate, adversely affected the kinetic activity of all acidic substrates. A cocrystal structure of PTP1B bound with a nephrin pY(1193) peptide suggests that Arg24 engages in electrostatic interactions with acidic residues at the pY+1, pY+2, and likely other positions. These results suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions between positively charged residues near the PTP active site and acidic residues on pY substrates allow a PTP to bind acidic substrates with similar affinities, and the varying levels of preference for acidic sequences by different PTPs are likely caused by the different electrostatic potentials near their active sites. The implications of the varying sequence selectivity and intrinsic catalytic

  20. Atomic structure of dual-specificity phosphatase 26, a novel p53 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lokareddy, Ravi Kumar; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Cingolani, Gino

    2013-02-01

    Regulation of p53 phosphorylation is critical to control its stability and biological activity. Dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a brain phosphatase highly overexpressed in neuroblastoma, which has been implicated in dephosphorylating phospho-Ser20 and phospho-Ser37 in the p53 transactivation domain. In this paper, we report the 1.68 Å crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (Cys152Ser) of DUSP26 lacking the first 60 N-terminal residues (ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26). This structure reveals the architecture of a dual-specificity phosphatase domain related in structure to Vaccinia virus VH1. DUSP26 adopts a closed conformation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-binding loop, which results in an unusually shallow active site pocket and buried catalytic cysteine. A water molecule trapped inside the PTP-binding loop makes close contacts both with main chain and with side chain atoms. The hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 measured from velocity sedimentation analysis (R(H) ∼ 22.7 Å) and gel filtration chromatography (R(H) ∼ 21.0 Å) is consistent with an ∼18 kDa globular monomeric protein. Instead in crystal, ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 is more elongated (R(H) ∼ 37.9 Å), likely because of the extended conformation of C-terminal helix α9, which swings away from the phosphatase core to generate a highly basic surface. As in the case of phosphatase MKP-4, we propose that a substrate-induced conformational change, possibly involving rearrangement of helix α9 with respect to the phosphatase core, allows DUSP26 to adopt a catalytically active conformation. The structural characterization of DUSP26 presented in this paper provides the first atomic insight into this disease-associated phosphatase.

  1. Plant resistance against the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii is mediated by MPK3 and MPK6 kinases, which are controlled by the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sidonskaya, Ekaterina; Schweighofer, Alois; Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Kammerhofer, Nina; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Meskiene, Irute

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes infect plants and form highly sophisticated feeding sites in roots. It is not known which plant cell signalling mechanisms trigger plant defence during the early stages of nematode parasitism. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are central components of protein phosphorylation cascades transducing extracellular signals to plant defence responses. MAPK phosphatases control kinase activities and the signalling outcome. The involvement and the role of MPK3 and MPK6, as well as the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1, is demonstrated during parasitism of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis. Our data reveal notable activation patterns of plant MAPKs and the induction of AP2C1 suggesting the attenuation of defence signalling in plant cells during early nematode infection. It is demonstrated that the ap2c1 mutant that is lacking AP2C1 is more attractive but less susceptible to nematodes compared with the AP2C1-overexpressing line. This implies that the function of AP2C1 is a negative regulator of nematode-induced defence. By contrast, the enhanced susceptibility of mpk3 and mpk6 plants indicates a positive role of stress-activated MAPKs in plant immunity against nematodes. Evidence is provided that phosphatase AP2C1, as well as AP2C1-targeted MPK3 and MPK6, are important regulators of plant–nematode interaction, where the co-ordinated action of these signalling components ensures the timely activation of plant defence. PMID:26438412

  2. Discovery of Protein Phosphatase 2C Inhibitors by Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jessica P.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Flajolet, Marc; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Olson, Arthur; Greengard, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) is an archetype of the PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases, characterized by dependence on divalent magnesium or manganese cofactors, absence of known regulatory proteins, and resistance to all known Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors. We have used virtual ligand screening with the AutoDock method and the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set to identify small molecule inhibitors of PP2Cα activity at a protein substrate. These inhibitors are active in the micromolar range, and represent the first non-phosphate-based molecules found to inhibit a type 2C phosphatase. The compounds docked to three recurrent binding sites near the PP2Cα active site and displayed novel Ser/Thr phosphatase selectivity profiles. Common chemical features of these compounds may form the basis for development of a PP2C inhibitor pharmacophore and may facilitate investigation of PP2C control and cellular function. PMID:16509582

  3. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  4. Metabolic Control of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated Caspase-2 Suppression by the B55β/Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bofu; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Wojton, Jeffrey; Huang, Nai-Jia; Chen, Chen; Soderblom, Erik J.; Zhang, Liguo; Kornbluth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    High levels of metabolic activity confer resistance to apoptosis. Caspase-2, an apoptotic initiator, can be suppressed by high levels of nutrient flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. This metabolic control is exerted via inhibitory phosphorylation of the caspase-2 prodomain by activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We show here that this activation of CaMKII depends, in part, on dephosphorylation of CaMKII at novel sites (Thr393/Ser395) and that this is mediated by metabolic activation of protein phosphatase 2A in complex with the B55β targeting subunit. This represents a novel locus of CaMKII control and also provides a mechanism contributing to metabolic control of apoptosis. These findings may have implications for metabolic control of the many CaMKII-controlled and protein phosphatase 2A-regulated physiological processes, because both enzymes appear to be responsive to alterations in glucose metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:25378403

  5. Dephosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin by latent phosphatase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.D.; Fong, Y.L.; Benovic, J.L.; Sibley, D.R.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1988-06-25

    Recent evidence suggests that the function of receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins may be controlled by highly specific protein kinases, e.g. rhodopsin kinase and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. In order to investigate the nature of the phosphatases which might be involved in controlling the state of receptor phosphorylation we studied the ability of four highly purified well characterized protein phosphatases to dephosphorylate preparations of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor which had been highly phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. These included: type 1 phosphatase, calcineurin phosphatase, type 2A phosphatase, and the high molecular weight latent phosphatase 2. Under conditions in which all the phosphatases could dephosphorylate such common substrates as (/sup 32/P)phosphorylase a and (/sup 32/P)myelin basic protein at similar rates only the latent phosphatase 2 was active on the phosphorylated receptors. Moreover, a latent phosphatase activity was found predominantly in a sequestered membrane fraction of frog erythrocytes. This parallels the distribution of a beta-adrenergic receptor phosphatase activity recently described in these cells. These data suggest a potential role for the latent phosphatase 2 as a specific receptor phosphatase.

  6. Stimulation of the alveolar macrophage respiratory burst by ADP causes selective glutathionylation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Torres, Martine; Forman, Henry Jay

    2006-07-01

    H(2)O(2) produced by stimulation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase is involved both in bacterial killing and as a second messenger in these cells. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are targets for H(2)O(2) signaling through oxidation of their catalytic cysteine, resulting in inhibition of their activity. Here, we show that, in the rat alveolar macrophage NR8383 cell line, H(2)O(2) produced through the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst induces the formation of a disulfide bond between PTP1B and GSH that was detectable with an antibody to glutathione-protein complexes and was reversed by DTT addition. PTP1B glutathionylation was dependent on H(2)O(2) as the presence of catalase at the time of ADP stimulation inhibited the formation of the conjugate. Interestingly, other PTPs, i.e., SHP-1 and SHP-2, did not undergo glutathionylation in response to ADP stimulation of the respiratory burst, although glutathionylation of these proteins could be shown by reaction with 25 mM glutathione disulfide in vitro. While previous studies have suggested the reversible oxidation of PTP1B during signaling or showed PTP1B glutathionylation in vitro, the present study directly demonstrates that physiological stimulation of H(2)O(2) production results in PTP1B glutathionylation in intact cells, which may affect downstream signaling.

  7. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  8. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  9. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  10. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  11. Differential control of the hyperpolarization-activated current (i(f)) by cAMP gating and phosphatase inhibition in rabbit sino-atrial node myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Accili, E A; Redaelli, G; DiFrancesco, D

    1997-01-01

    1. The actions of the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A on the hyperpolarization-activated cardiac 'pacemaker' current (i(f)) were determined in single cells isolated from the sino-atrial (SA) node of the rabbit. 2. Cells were incubated for 8 min in Tyrode solution containing calyculin A (0.5 microM) and then superfused with normal Tyrode solution. The mean normalized i(f) measured in eight cells at mid-activation voltages during and after exposure to calyculin A increased maximally by 47% with a time constant of 466 s, a time much longer than that required for cAMP-mediated i(f) stimulation (about 8 s). 3. In two-pulse protocols, calyculin A treatment increased i(f) at full as well as at mid-activation voltages, indicating a higher i(f) conductance. 4. Measurement of the conductance-voltage (gf(V)) relation by voltage ramp protocols confirmed a conductance increase by calyculin A, with no significant change in the position of the activation curve on the voltage axis. Data pooled together from ramp and two-pulse protocols yielded a calyculin A-induced increase in fully activated i(f) conductance of 39.6 +/- 6.4% (n = 16 cells). 5. The positive and negative shift of i(f) voltage dependence in response to beta-adrenergic (1 microM isoprenaline) and muscarinic stimulation (1 microM acetylcholine), respectively, was preserved after the calyculin A-induced increase in conductance. The shift of the i(f) activation curve induced by 1 microM isoprenaline was significantly larger in calyculin A-treated cells (8.8 vs. 5.8 mV). 6. These data indicate that phosphatase inhibition increases i(f) in a manner distinct from the direct cAMP pathway and potentiates the beta-adrenergic-mediated i(f) modulation. PMID:9161982

  12. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  13. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  14. Protein phosphatase 1 is a key player in nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sandra; Santos, Mariana; Martins, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2015-12-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation at serine (Ser), threonine (Thr) and tyrosine (Tyr) residues is among the major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. The eukaryotic genome encodes many protein kinases and protein phosphatases. However, the localization, activity and specificity towards phosphatase substrates are dictated by a large array of phosphatase binding and regulatory subunits. For protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) more than 200 binding subunits have been described. The various PP1 isoforms and the binding subunits can be located throughout the cell, including in the nucleus. It follows that several nuclear specific PP1 binding proteins (PIPs) have been described and these will be discussed. Among them are PNUTS (phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit), NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1) and CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), which have all been associated with transcription. In fact PP1 can associate with transcription factors fulfilling an important regulatory function, in this respect it can bind to Hox11, human factor C1 (HCF1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2). PP1 also regulates cell cycle progression and centrosome maturation and splitting, again by binding to specific regulatory proteins. Moreover, PP1 together with other protein phosphatases control the entry into mitosis by regulating the activity of mitotic kinases. Thus, PP1, its binding proteins and/or the phosphorylation states of both, directly control a vast array of cell nucleus associated functions, many of which are starting to be unraveled.

  15. Acid Phosphatase Development during Ripening of Avocado.

    PubMed

    Sacher, J A

    1975-02-01

    The activity and subcellular distribution of acid phosphatase were assayed during ethylene-induced ripening of whole fruit or thick slices of avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Fuerte and Hass). The activity increased up to 30-fold during ripening in both the supernatant fraction and the Triton X-100 extract of the precipitate of a 30,000g centrifugation of tissue homogenates from whole fruit or slices ripening in moist air. Enzyme activity in the residual precipitate after Triton extraction remained constant. The development of acid phosphatase in thick slices ripened in moist air was similar to that in intact fruit, except that enzyme development and ripening were accelerated about 24 hours in the slices. The increase in enzyme activity that occurs in slices ripening in moist air was inhibited when tissue sections were infiltrated with solutions, by aspiration for 2 minutes or by soaking for 2 hours, anytime 22 hours or more after addition of ethylene. This inhibition was independent of the presence or absence of cycloheximide or sucrose (0.3-0.5m). However, the large decline in enzyme activity in the presence of cycloheximide, as compared with the controls, indicated that synthesis of acid phosphatase was occurring at all stages of ripening.

  16. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  17. SHIP2 (SH2 Domain-containing Inositol Phosphatase 2) SH2 Domain Negatively Controls SHIP2 Monoubiquitination in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor*

    PubMed Central

    De Schutter, Julie; Guillabert, Aude; Imbault, Virginie; Degraef, Chantal; Erneux, Christophe; Communi, David; Pirson, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The SH2 domain containing inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP2 contains several interacting domains that are important for scaffolding properties. We and others have previously reported that SHIP2 interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. Here, we identified human SHIP2 monoubiquitination on lysine 315. SHIP2 could also be polyubiquitinated but was not degraded by the 26 S proteasome. Furthermore, we identified a ubiquitin-interacting motif at the C-terminal end of SHIP2 that confers ubiquitin binding capacity. However, this ubiquitin-interacting motif is dispensable for its monoubiquitination. We showed that neither c-Cbl nor Nedd4-1 play the role of ubiquitin ligase for SHIP2. Strikingly, monoubiquitination of the ΔSH2-SHIP2 mutant (lacking the N-terminal SH2 domain) is strongly increased, suggesting an intrinsic inhibitory effect of the SHIP2 SH2 domain on its monoubiquitination. Moreover, SHIP2 monoubiquitination was increased upon 30 min of epidermal growth factor stimulation. This correlates with the loss of interaction between the SHIP2 SH2 domain and c-Cbl. In this model, c-Cbl could mask the monoubiquitination site and thereby prevent SHIP2 monoubiquitination. The present study thus reveals an unexpected and novel role of SHIP2 SH2 domain in the regulation of its newly identified monoubiquitination. PMID:19880507

  18. Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A controls the innate antiviral and antibacterial response of macrophages during HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Speer, Alexander; Wagner, Frederic; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a major public health issue. While some research has described how each pathogen accelerates the course of infection of the other pathogen by compromising the immune system, very little is known about the molecular biology of HIV-1/Mtb co-infection at the host cell level. This is somewhat surprising, as both pathogens are known to replicate and persist in macrophages. We here identify Protein Phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent 1A (PPM1A) as a molecular link between Mtb infection and increased HIV-1 susceptibility of macrophages. We demonstrate that both Mtb and HIV-1 infection induce the expression of PPM1A in primary human monocyte/macrophages and THP-1 cells. Genetic manipulation studies revealed that increased PPMA1 expression rendered THP-1 cells highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, while depletion of PPM1A rendered them relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. At the same time, increased PPM1A expression abrogated the ability of THP-1 cells to respond to relevant bacterial stimuli with a proper cytokine/chemokine secretion response, blocked their chemotactic response and impaired their ability to phagocytose bacteria. These data suggest that PPM1A, which had previously been shown to play a role in the antiviral response to Herpes Simplex virus infection, also governs the antibacterial response of macrophages to bacteria, or at least to Mtb infection. PPM1A thus seems to play a central role in the innate immune response of macrophages, implying that host directed therapies targeting PPM1A could be highly beneficial, in particular for HIV/Mtb co-infected patients. PMID:27004401

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae TORC1 Controls Histone Acetylation by Signaling Through the Sit4/PP6 Phosphatase to Regulate Sirtuin Deacetylase Nuclear Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng; Laribee, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome responds to changes in the extracellular environment, yet how this information is transmitted to the epigenetic regulatory machinery is unclear. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model, we demonstrate that target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) signaling, which is activated by nitrogen metabolism and amino acid availability, promotes site-specific acetylation of histone H3 and H4 N-terminal tails by opposing the activity of the sirtuin deacetylases Hst3 and Hst4. TORC1 does so through suppression of the Tap42-regulated Sit4 (PP6) phosphatase complex, as sit4Δ rescues histone acetylation under TORC1-repressive conditions. We further demonstrate that TORC1 inhibition, and subsequent PP6 activation, causes a selective, rapid, nuclear accumulation of Hst4, which correlates with decreased histone acetylation. This increased Hst4 nuclear localization precedes an elevation in Hst4 protein expression, which is attributed to reduced protein turnover, suggesting that nutrient signaling through TORC1 may limit Hst4 nuclear accumulation to facilitate Hst4 degradation and maintain histone acetylation. This pathway is functionally relevant to TORC1 signaling since the stress sensitivity of a nonessential TORC1 mutant (tco89Δ) to hydroxyurea and arsenic can be reversed by combining tco89Δ with either hst3Δ, hst4Δ, or sit4Δ. Surprisingly, while hst3Δ or hst4Δ rescues the sensitivity tco89Δ has to low concentrations of the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, sit4Δ fails to do so. These results suggest Sit4 provides an additional function necessary for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation. Collectively, this study defines a novel mechanism by which TORC1 suppresses a PP6-regulated sirtuin deacetylase pathway to couple nutrient signaling to epigenetic regulation. PMID:27343235

  20. PECAM-1-regulated signalling thresholds control tolerance in anergic transgenic B-cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mae-Xhum; Hayball, John D; Jackson, Denise E

    2008-03-01

    Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-immunoreceptor tyrosine based inhibitory motif (Ig-ITIM) superfamily member that recruits and activates protein-tyrosine phosphatases, predominantly SHP-2 and to a lesser extent, SHP-1. Previously, we have shown that deletion of PECAM-1 results in a hyper-proliferative B-cell phenotype. We wanted to test whether the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, PECAM-1 maintains peripheral tolerance by regulating signalling thresholds of B-cells that control autoantibody production or relaxed negative selection of autoreactive B-cells in bone marrow. In order to address this issue, we utilised the classical model of lysozyme/immunoglobulin transgenic mouse model that defines thresholds for eliminating or inactivating self-reactive B-cells. In this study, we show that breeding of double transgenes: soluble hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and its corresponding high-affinity receptor (HEL-Ig) onto PECAM-1 null background resulted in a spontaneous loss of B-cell tolerance in vivo. The resultant PECAM-1(-/-) Dbl Tg mice displayed elevated levels of anti-HEL immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the serum compared to PECAM-1+/+ anergic counterparts. Dbl Tg B-cells lacking PECAM-1 showed enhanced B-cell proliferation and calcium flux responses to LPS, IL-4 alone, IgM cross-linking and IL-4 indicating augmentation of antigen-receptor signalling. Thus, PECAM-1 is important in maintaining peripheral tolerance in Dbl Tg B-cells. PMID:17977600

  1. MADS-Box Protein Complexes Control Carpel and Ovule Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Rebecca; Pinyopich, Anusak; Battaglia, Raffaella; Kooiker, Maarten; Borghi, Lorenzo; Ditta, Gary; Yanofsky, Martin F.; Kater, Martin M.; Colombo, Lucia

    2003-01-01

    The AGAMOUS (AG) gene is necessary for stamen and carpel development and is part of a monophyletic clade of MADS-box genes that also includes SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1), SHP2, and SEEDSTICK (STK). Here, we show that ectopic expression of either the STK or SHP gene is sufficient to induce the transformation of sepals into carpeloid organs bearing ovules. Moreover, the fact that these organ transformations occur when the STK gene is expressed ectopically in ag mutants shows that STK can promote carpel development in the absence of AG activity. We also show that STK, AG, SHP1, and SHP2 can form multimeric complexes and that these interactions require the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box proteins. We provide genetic evidence for this role of the SEP proteins by showing that a reduction in SEP activity leads to the loss of normal ovule development, similar to what occurs in stk shp1 shp2 triple mutants. Together, these results indicate that the SEP proteins, which are known to form multimeric complexes in the control of flower organ identity, also form complexes to control normal ovule development. PMID:14555696

  2. Cortisol modification of HeLa 65 alkaline phosphatase. Decreased phosphate content of the induced enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bazzell, K L; Price, G; Tu, S; Griffin, M

    1976-01-15

    Alkaline phosphatase activity of HeLa cells is increased 5-20-fold during growth in medium with cortisol. The increase in enzyme activity is due to an enhanced catalytic efficiency rather than an increase in alkaline phosphatase protein in induced cells. In the present study the chemical composition of control and induced forms of alkaline phosphatase were investigated to determine the enzyme modification that may be responsible for the increased catalytic activity. HeLa alkaline phosphatase is a phosphoprotein and the induced form of the enzyme has approximately one-half of the phosphate residues associated with control enzyme. The decrease in phosphate residues of the enzyme apparently alters its catalytic activity. Other chemical components of purified alkaline phosphatase from control and induced cells are similar; these include sialic acid, hexosamine and sulfhydryl residues. PMID:1248469

  3. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases PPEF interact with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Solov'eva, Olga V; Andreeva, Alexandra V; Bennett, Nelly

    2002-05-10

    Regulation of protein dephosphorylation by cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin (CaM) is well established and considered to be mediated solely by calcineurin. Yet, recent identification of protein phosphatases with EF-hand domains (PPEF/rdgC) point to the existence of another group of Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatases. We have recently hypothesised that PPEF/rdgC phosphatases might possess CaM-binding sites of the IQ-type in their N-terminal domains. We now employed yeast two-hybrid system and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to test this hypothesis. We found that entire human PPEF2 interacts with CaM in the in vivo tests and that its N-terminal domain binds to CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with nanomolar affinity in vitro. The fragments corresponding to the second exons of PPEF1 and PPEF2, containing the IQ motifs, are sufficient for specific Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CaM both in vivo and in vitro. These findings demonstrate the existence of mammalian CaM-binding protein Ser/Thr phosphatases distinct from calcineurin and suggest that the activity of PPEF phosphatases may be controlled by Ca(2+) in a dual way: via C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain and via interaction of the N-terminal domain with CaM.

  4. Myosin phosphatase is inactivated by caspase-3 cleavage and phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takahiro; Katayama, Takeshi; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2013-03-01

    In nonapoptotic cells, the phosphorylation level of myosin II is constantly maintained by myosin kinases and myosin phosphatase. During apoptosis, caspase-3-activated Rho-associated protein kinase I triggers hyperphosphorylation of myosin II, leading to membrane blebbing. Although inhibition of myosin phosphatase could also contribute to myosin II phosphorylation, little is known about the regulation of myosin phosphatase in apoptosis. In this study, we have demonstrated that, in apoptotic cells, the myosin-binding domain of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp-884, and the cleaved MYPT1 is strongly phosphorylated at Thr-696 and Thr-853, phosphorylation of which is known to inhibit myosin II binding. Expression of the caspase-3 cleaved form of MYPT1 that lacked the C-terminal end in HeLa cells caused the dissociation of MYPT1 from actin stress fibers. The dephosphorylation activity of myosin phosphatase immunoprecipitated from the apoptotic cells was lower than that from the nonapoptotic control cells. These results suggest that down-regulation of MYPT1 may play a role in promoting hyperphosphorylation of myosin II by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of myosin II during apoptosis.

  5. NUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN RAT CARDIAC MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    ESSNER, E; NOVIKOFF, A B; QUINTANA, N

    1965-05-01

    Localizations of aldehyde-resistant nucleoside phosphatase activities in frozen sections of rat cardiac muscle have been studied by electron microscopy. Activities are higher after fixation with formaldehyde than with glutaraldehyde. After incubation with adenosine triphosphate or inosine diphosphate at pH 7.2, reaction product is found in the "terminal cisternae" or "transverse sacs" of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which, together with the "intermediary vesicles" (T system), constitute the "dyads" or "triads". Reaction product is also present at the membranes of micropinocytotic vacuoles which apparently form from the plasma membrane of capillary endothelial cells and from the sarcolemma. In certain regions of the intercalated discs, reaction product is found within the narrow spaces between sarcolemmas of adjacent cells and within micropinocytotic vacuoles that seem to form from the sarcolemma. With inosine diphosphate, reaction product is also found in other parts of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After incubation with cytidine monophosphate at pH 5, reaction product is present in the transverse sacs of sarcoplasmic reticulum, in micropinocytotic vacuoles in capillary endothelium, and in lysosomes of muscle fibers and capillaries. The possible significance of the sarcoplasmic reticulum phosphatases is discussed in relation to the role the reticulum probably plays in moving calcium ions and thereby controlling contraction and relaxation of the muscle fiber.

  6. The DenA/DEN1 Interacting Phosphatase DipA Controls Septa Positioning and Phosphorylation-Dependent Stability of Cytoplasmatic DenA/DEN1 during Fungal Development

    PubMed Central

    Schinke, Josua; Kolog Gulko, Miriam; Christmann, Martin; Valerius, Oliver; Stumpf, Sina Kristin; Stirz, Margarita; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2016-01-01

    DenA/DEN1 and the COP9 signalosome (CSN) represent two deneddylases which remove the ubiquitin-like Nedd8 from modified target proteins and are required for distinct fungal developmental programmes. The cellular DenA/DEN1 population is divided into a nuclear and a cytoplasmatic subpopulation which is especially enriched at septa. DenA/DEN1 stability control mechanisms are different for the two cellular subpopulations and depend on different physical interacting proteins and the C-terminal DenA/DEN1 phosphorylation pattern. Nuclear DenA/DEN1 is destabilized during fungal development by five of the eight CSN subunits which target nuclear DenA/DEN1 for degradation. DenA/DEN1 becomes stabilized as a phosphoprotein at S243/S245 during vegetative growth, which is necessary to support further asexual development. After the initial phase of development, the newly identified cytoplasmatic DenA/DEN1 interacting phosphatase DipA and an additional developmental specific C-terminal phosphorylation site at serine S253 destabilize DenA/DEN1. Outside of the nucleus, DipA is co-transported with DenA/DEN1 in the cytoplasm between septa and nuclei. Deletion of dipA resulted in increased DenA/DEN1 stability in a strain which is unresponsive to illumination. The mutant strain is dysregulated in cytokinesis and impaired in asexual development. Our results suggest a dual phosphorylation-dependent DenA/DEN1 stability control with stabilizing and destabilizing modifications and physical interaction partner proteins which function as control points in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:27010942

  7. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Dephosphorylation by Rap Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    V Parashar; N Mirouze; D Dubnau; M Neiditch

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic 'switch' residue to an internal position when the {beta}4-{alpha}4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  8. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  9. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Biesterveld, Ben E.; Koehler, Shannon M.; Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R.; Gourlay, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. Materials and methods NEC was induced in Sprague–Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. Results NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). Conclusions This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. PMID:25840489

  10. Programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 modulates the regulatory T cells' capacity to repress shock/sepsis-induced indirect acute lung injury by recruiting phosphatase SRC homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild-type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis-induced experimental indirect acute lung injury (iALI), and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs' capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1 mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture. We found that in PD-L1-recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage, failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [myeloperoxidase activity], or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also, a significant increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, but no changes in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1(-/-) iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs' protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Tregs' ability to suppress iALI, and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation.

  11. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  12. TPIP: a novel phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S M; Downes, C P; Leslie, N R

    2001-01-01

    The PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) tumour suppressor is a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] 3-phosphatase that plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes by antagonizing the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway. We have identified and characterized two human homologues of PTEN, which differ with respect to their subcellular localization and lipid phosphatase activities. The previously cloned, but uncharacterized, TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology) is localized to the plasma membrane, but lacks detectable phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity. TPIP (TPTE and PTEN homologous inositol lipid phosphatase) is a novel phosphatase that occurs in several differentially spliced forms of which two, TPIP alpha and TPIP beta, appear to be functionally distinct. TPIP alpha displays similar phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase activity compared with PTEN against PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), PtdIns(3,5)P(2), PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3)P, has N-terminal transmembrane domains and appears to be localized on the endoplasmic reticulum. This is unusual as most signalling-lipid-metabolizing enzymes are not integral membrane proteins. TPIP beta, however, lacks detectable phosphatase activity and is cytosolic. TPIP has a wider tissue distribution than the testis-specific TPTE, with specific splice variants being expressed in testis, brain and stomach. TPTE and TPIP do not appear to be functional orthologues of the Golgi-localized and more distantly related murine PTEN2. We suggest that TPIP alpha plays a role in regulating phosphoinositide signalling on the endoplasmic reticulum, and might also represent a tumour suppressor and functional homologue of PTEN in some tissues. PMID:11716755

  13. Study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial: Safety, Tolerability, efficacy and quality of life Of a human recombinant alkaline Phosphatase in patients with sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury (STOP-AKI)

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Esther; Mehta, Ravindra L; Murray, Patrick T; Hummel, Jürgen; Joannidis, Michael; Kellum, John A; Arend, Jacques; Pickkers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 55–60% of critically ill patients, and sepsis is the most common underlying cause. No pharmacological treatment options are licensed to treat sepsis-associated AKI (SA-AKI); only supportive renal replacement therapy (RRT) is available. One of the limited number of candidate compounds in clinical development to treat SA-AKI is alkaline phosphatase (AP). The renal protective effect of purified bovine intestinal AP has been demonstrated in critically ill sepsis patients. To build on these observations, a human recombinant AP (recAP) was developed, of which safety and efficacy in patients with SA-AKI will be investigated in this trial. Methods This is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 4-arm, proof-of-concept, dose-finding adaptive phase IIa/IIb study, conducted in critically ill patients with SA-AKI. A minimum of 290 patients will be enrolled at ∼50 sites in the European Union and North America. The study involves 2 parts. Patients enrolled during Part 1 will be randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n=30) or 1 of 3 different doses of recAP (n=30 per group) once daily for 3 days (0.4, 0.8 or 1.6 mg/kg). In Part 2, patients will be randomly assigned to receive the most efficacious dose of recAP (n=85), selected during an interim analysis, or placebo (n=85). Treatment must be administered within 24 hours after SA-AKI is first diagnosed and within 96 hours from first diagnosis of sepsis. The primary end point is the area under the time-corrected endogenous creatinine clearance curve from days 1 to 7. The key secondary end point is RRT incidence during days 1–28. Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by the relevant institutional review boards/independent ethics committees and is conducted in accordance with the ethical principles of the Declaration of Helsinki, guidelines of Good Clinical Practice, Code of Federal Regulations and all other applicable regulations. Results of this

  14. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  15. Ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Naz, Christophe; Marsh, Barrie J; Frost, Christopher G

    2015-01-11

    A novel ferrocene-derived substrate for the ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was designed and synthesised. It was demonstrated to be an excellent electrochemical substrate for the ALP-labelled enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  16. Multiple Functions of the Eya Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eyes absent (Eya), a protein conserved from plants to humans and best characterized as a transcriptional coactivator, is also the prototype for a novel class of eukaryotic aspartyl protein tyrosine phosphatases. This minireview discusses recent breakthroughs in elucidating the substrates and cellular events regulated by Eya's tyrosine phosphatase function and highlights some of the complexities, new questions, and surprises that have emerged from efforts to understand how Eya's unusual multifunctionality influences developmental regulation and signaling. PMID:26667035

  17. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  18. Subcellular localization of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis 749/C by immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold

    SciTech Connect

    Tinglu, G.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.

    1984-08-01

    Subcellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C was determined by an immunoelectron microscopy method. Anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody labeled with 15- to 18-nm colloidal gold particles (gold-immunoglobulin G (IgG) complex) were used for the study. Both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic material were labeled with the gold-IgG particles. These particles formed clusters in association with the plasma membrane; in contrast, in the cytoplasm the particles were largely dispersed, and only a few clusters were found. The gold-IgG binding was quantitatively estimated by stereological analysis of labeled, frozen thin sections. This estimation of a variety of control samples showed that the labeling was specific for the alkaline phosphatase. Cluster formation of the gold -IgG particles in association with the plasma membrane suggests that existence of specific alkaline phosphatase binding sites (receptors) in the plasma membrane of B. licheniformis 749/C. 27 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  20. Assessing the Biological Activity of the Glucan Phosphatase Laforin.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin's unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Little, Sean C.; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Kline, Crystal F.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α+/− myocytes resulted in reduced Ca2+ waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca2+ regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  3. How Important Is the Phosphatase Activity of Sensor Kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    In two-component signaling systems, phosphorylated response regulators (RRs) are often dephosphorylated by their partner kinases in order to control the in vivo concentration of phospho-RR (RR~P). This activity is easily demonstrated in vitro, but these experiments have typically used very high concentrations of the histidine kinase (HK) compared to the RR~P. Many two-component systems exhibit exquisite control over the ratio of HK to RR in vivo. The question thus arises as to whether the phosphatase activity of HKs is significant in vivo. This topic will be explored in the present review. PMID:20223700

  4. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  5. Acid phosphatase/phosphotransferases from enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Y; Utagawa, T; Yamada, H; Asano, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the enzymatic phosphorylation of nucleosides and found that Morganella morganii phoC acid phosphatase exhibits regioselective pyrophosphate (PP(i))-nucleoside phosphotransferase activity. In this study, we isolated genes encoding an acid phosphatase with regioselective phosphotransferase activity (AP/PTase) from Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia blattae and Klebsiella planticola, and compared the primary structures and enzymatic characteristics of these enzymes with those of AP/PTase (PhoC acid phosphatase) from M. morganii. The enzymes were highly homologous in primary structure with M. morganii AP/PTase, and are classified as class A1 acid phosphatases. The synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) by E. coli overproducing each acid phosphatase was investigated. The P. stuartii enzyme, which is most closely related to the M. morganii enzyme, exhibited high 5'-IMP productivity, similar to the M. morganii enzyme. The 5'-IMP productivities of the E. aerogenes, E. blattae and K. planticola enzymes were inferior to those of the former two enzymes. This result underlines the importance of lower K(m) values for efficient nucleotide production. As these enzymes exhibited a very high degree of homology at the amino acid sequence level, it is likely that local sequence differences in the binding pocket are responsible for the differences in the nucleoside-PP(i) phosphotransferase reaction.

  6. Cloning, purification, crystallization and 1.57 Å resolution X-ray data analysis of AmsI, the tyrosine phosphatase controlling amylovoran biosynthesis in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Benini, Stefano; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele

    2014-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is a destructive pathogen of plants belonging to the Rosaceae family. Amongst its pathogenicity factors, E. amylovora produces the exopolysaccharide amylovoran, which contributes to the occlusion of plant vessels, causing wilting of shoots and eventually resulting in plant death. Amylovoran biosynthesis requires the presence of 12 genes (from amsA to amsL) clustered in the ams region of the E. amylovora genome. They mostly encode glycosyl transferases (AmsG, AmsB, AmsD, AmsE, AmsJ and AmsK), proteins involved in amylovoran translocation and assembly (AmsH, AmsL and AmsC), and also a tyrosine kinase (AmsA) and a tyrosine phosphatase (AmsI), which are both involved in the regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis. The low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase AmsI was overexpressed as a His6-tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.57 Å in space group P3121.

  7. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  8. A specific sucrose phosphatase from plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.; Hatch, M. D.

    1966-01-01

    1. A phosphatase that hydrolyses sucrose phosphate (phosphorylated at the 6-position of fructose) was isolated from sugar-cane stem and carrot roots. With partially purified preparations fructose 6-phosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate are hydrolysed at between 0 and 2% of the rate for sucrose phosphate. 2. The activity of the enzyme is increased fourfold by the addition of Mg2+ ions and inhibited by EDTA, fluoride, inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions. Sucrose (50mm) reduces activity by 60%. 3. The enzyme exhibits maximum activity between pH6·4 and 6·7. The Michaelis constant for sucrose phosphate is between 0·13 and 0·17mm. 4. At least some of the specific phosphatase is associated with particles having the sedimentation properties of mitochondria. 5. A similar phosphatase appears to be present in several other plant species. PMID:4290548

  9. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  10. Phosphatase activities as biosignatures of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Itoh, Y.; Edazawa, Y.; Moroi, A.; Takano, Y.

    It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere high temperature hot springs and stratosphere Possible extraterrestrial biospheres in Mars Europa and Titan are being discussed Many biosignatures or biomarkers have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments Phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life since they are constituents of nucleic acids and cell mebranes Thus all the terrestrial organisms have phosphatases that are enzymes catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphate esters We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in extreme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life Core samples and chimney samples were collected at the Suiyo Seamount Izu-Bonin Arc the Pacific Ocean in 2001 and 2002 and in South Mariana hydrothermal systems the Pacific Oceanas in 2003 both in a part of the Archaean Park Project Phosphatase activity in solid rock samples was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate pH 8 0 or pH 6 5 as a substrate as follows Pulverized samples were incuvated with substrate solution for an hour and then production rate of p-nitrophenol was calculated with absorbance at 410 nm Phosphatase activity in extracts was measured fluorometrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratio were determined by HPLC after HF digestion of the

  11. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  12. The microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, I D; Burchell, A

    1988-01-01

    Microsomal fractions isolated from pancreatic islet cells were shown to contain high specific glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The islet-cell glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme has the same Mr (36,500), similar immunological properties and kinetic characteristics to the hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2849415

  13. Phosphate solubilization potential and phosphatase activity of rhizospheric trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Anil, Kapri; Lakshmi, Tewari

    2010-07-01

    Trichoderma sp., a well known biological control agent against several phytopathogens, was tested for its phosphate (P) solubilizing potential. Fourteen strains of Trichoderma sp. were isolated from the forest tree rhizospheres of pinus, deodar, bamboo, guava and oak on Trichoderma selective medium. The isolates were tested for their in-vitro P-solubilizing potential using National Botanical Research Institute Phosphate (NBRIP) broth containing tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as the sole P source, and compared with a standard culture of T. harzianum. All the cultures were found to solubilize TCP but with varying potential. The isolate DRT-1 showed maximum amount of soluble phosphate (404.07 εg.ml(-1)), followed by the standard culture of T. harzianum (386.42 εg.ml(-1)) after 96 h of incubation at 30±1(0)C. Extra-cellular acid and alkaline phosphatases of the fungus were induced only in the presence of insoluble phosphorus source (TCP). High extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity was recorded for the isolate DRT-1 (14.50 U.ml(-1)) followed by the standard culture (13.41 U.ml(-1)) at 72h. The cultures showed much lesser acid phosphatase activities. Under glasshouse conditions, Trichoderma sp. inoculation increased chickpea (Cicer arietinum) growth parameters including shoot length, root length, fresh and dry weight of shoot as well as roots, in P-deficient soil containing only bound phosphate (TCP). Shoot weight was increased by 23% and 33% by inoculation with the isolate DRT-1 in the soil amended with 100 and 200 mg TCP kg(-1) soil, respectively, after 60 d of sowing. The study explores high P-solubilizing potential of Trichoderma sp., which can be exploited for the solubilization of fixed phosphates present in the soil, thereby enhancing soil fertility and plant growth.

  14. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae.

  15. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae. PMID:16350755

  16. Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Neha; Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T; Kunze, G

    2007-08-01

    Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans was carried out in submerged fermentation. Using the Plackett-Burman design, three fermentation variables (pH, sucrose concentration, and peptone concentration) were identified to significantly affect acid phosphatase and biomass production, and these were optimized using response surface methodology of central composite design. The highest enzyme yields were attained in the medium with 3.9% sucrose and 1.6% peptone at pH 3.8. Because of optimization, 3.86- and 4.19-fold enhancement in enzyme production was achieved in shake flasks (17,054 U g(-1) DYB) and laboratory fermenter (18,465 U g(-1) DYB), respectively. PMID:17541580

  17. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    precipitation of U(VI) must be mediated by biological activity as less than 3% soluble U(VI) was removed either from the abiotic or the heat-killed cell controls. Interestingly, the pH has a strong effect on growth and U(VI) biomineralization rates by Rahnella. Thermodynamic modeling identifies autunite-type minerals [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2] as the precipitate likely formed in the synthetic FRC groundwater conditions at all pH investigated. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements have recently confirmed that the precipitate found in these incubations is an autunite and meta-autunite-type mineral. A kinetic model of U biomineralization at the different pH indicates that hydrolysis of organophosphate can be described using simple Monod kinetics and that uranium precipitation is accelerated when monohydrogen phosphate is the main orthophosphate species in solution. Overall, these experiments and ongoing soil slurry incubations demonstrate that the biomineralization of U(VI) through the activity of phosphatase enzymes can be expressed in a wide range of geochemical conditions pertaining to the FRC site.

  18. Root surface acid phosphatases and their role in phosphorus assimilation by Eriophorum vaginatum

    SciTech Connect

    Kroehler, C.J.; Linkins, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eriophorum vaginatum is a dominant plant in much of the arctic tundra ecosystem where phosphorus is frequently a limiting nutrient. The mineralization of this organic phosphorus was thought to be principally controlled by microbial respiration, however, more recent work shows that extracellular soil phosphatases are the principal regulators. The existence of plant root and mycorrhizal surface phosphatases which are capable of hydrolyzing organic phosphorus compounds, suggests that soil organic phosphorus may be directly utilized by plants. Since E. vaginatum is a tussock forming sedge with a very dense annually produced rooting system which can exploit most of the tussock soil volume, its surface phosphatases may play a dominant role in organic phosphorus hydrolysis into inorganic phosphorus. Of equal significance would be the potential for this activity to contribute to the phosphorus nutrition through the coupling of phosphorus hydrolysis on the root and root uptake of the resultant inorganic phosphorus. Phosphatase activity was investigated and found to be uniformly distributed along the surface of the root. Kinetic analysis of the enzyme gave estimates of 9.23 mM for the apparent Km and 1.61 * 10/sup -3/ ..mu..moles mm-2 hr/sup -1/ for the apparent Vmax. Saturation values for E. vaginatum phosphatases are about 3 times higher than average soil solution organic phosphorus concentrations. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Demonstration of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in the second of two homologous domains of CD45.

    PubMed

    Tan, X; Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1993-04-01

    It has been reported that alteration of deletion of critical residues within one of the two homologous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase)-like domains of CD45 completely abolishes all activity, suggesting that only the more N-terminal domain is catalytically active. However, we now demonstrate, by two independent techniques, that the second (C-terminal) domain is also a viable phosphatase. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Lys-C or trypsin increased the phosphatase activity toward reduced, carboxymethylated, and maleylated lysozyme approximately 8-fold. A 50-kDa fragment, isolated by ion exchange chromatography, was found to be responsible for this activity. N-terminal sequencing revealed that this fragment includes less than half of the first phosphatase domain and most, if not all, of the second. In a second experiment, 109 residues, including the presumed catalytic region, were removed from domain I by site-directed mutagenesis. Expression of this construct in a mammalian cell line resulted in increased PTPase activity over nontransfected control cells. Isolation of the recombinant CD45 by immunoprecipitation and immunoaffinity chromatography revealed that it had phosphatase activity. Both of these experimental approaches demonstrate that the second conserved PTPase domain of CD45 is a functioning PTPase, but that external regulation may be required to express its activity in the context of the native molecule. PMID:8463207

  20. Regulatory Roles of MAPK Phosphatases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Low, Heng Boon

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of cell growth and survival in physiological and pathological processes. Aberrant MAPK signaling plays a critical role in the development and progression of human cancer, as well as in determining responses to cancer treatment. The MAPK phosphatases (MKPs), also known as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs), are a family of proteins that function as major negative regulators of MAPK activities in mammalian cells. Studies using mice deficient in specific MKPs including MKP1/DUSP1, PAC-1/DUSP2, MKP2/DUSP4, MKP5/DUSP10 and MKP7/DUSP16 demonstrated that these molecules are important not only for both innate and adaptive immune responses, but also for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the consequences of the gain or loss of function of the MKPs in normal and malignant tissues have highlighted the importance of these phosphatases in the pathogenesis of cancers. The involvement of the MKPs in resistance to cancer therapy has also gained prominence, making the MKPs a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the MKPs in cancer development, progression and treatment outcomes. PMID:27162525

  1. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  2. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  3. Effect of gingival application of melatonin on alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin in patients with diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Antonio; Gómez-de-Diego, Rafel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; de Vicente-Jiménez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of topical application of melatonin to the gingiva on salivary fluid concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. Study Design: Cross-sectional study of 30 patients with diabetes and periodontal disease and 30 healthy subjects. Diabetic patients were treated with topical application of melatonin (1% orabase cream formula) once daily for 20 days and controls with a placebo formulation. Results: Before treatment with melatonin, diabetic patients showed significantly higher mean salivary levels of alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin than healthy subjects (P < 0.01). After treatment with melatonin, there was a statistically significant decrease of the gingival index (15.84± 10.3 vs 5.6 ± 5.1) and pocket depth (28.3 ± 19.5 vs 11.9 ± 9.0) (P < 0.001). Also, use of melatonin was associated with a significant reduction of the four biomarkers. Changes of salivary acid phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the gingival index, whereas changes of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the pocket depth. Conclusions: Treatment with topical melatonin was associated with an improvement in the gingival index and pocket depth, a reduction in salivary concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Key words:Melatonin, diabetes mellitus, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin. PMID:23524437

  4. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  5. Multiple Phosphatases Regulate Carbon Source-Dependent Germination and Primary Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Leandro José; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taisa Magnani; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2015-03-11

    Aspergillus nidulans is an important mold and a model system for the study of fungal cell biology. In addition, invasive A. nidulans pulmonary infections are common in humans with chronic granulomatous disease. The morphological and biochemical transition from dormant conidia into active, growing, filamentous hyphae requires the coordination of numerous biosynthetic, developmental, and metabolic processes. The present study exhibited the diversity of roles performed by seven phosphatases in regulating cell cycle, development, and metabolism in response to glucose and alternative carbon sources. The identified phosphatases highlighted the importance of several signaling pathways regulating filamentous growth, the action of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a metabolic switch controlling carbon usage, and the identification of the key function performed by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase during germination. These novel insights into the fundamental roles of numerous phosphatases in germination and carbon sensing have provided new avenues of research into the identification of inhibitors of fungal germination, with implications for the food, feed, and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Allosteric Activation of the Phosphoinositide Phosphatase Sac1 by Anionic Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sac family phosphoinositide phosphatases comprise an evolutionarily conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes. Our recently determined crystal structure of the Sac phosphatase domain of yeast Sac1, the founding member of the Sac family proteins, revealed a unique conformation of the catalytic P-loop and a large positively charged groove at the catalytic site. We now report a unique mechanism for the regulation of its phosphatase activity. Sac1 is an allosteric enzyme that can be activated by its product phosphatidylinositol or anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine. The activation of Sac1 may involve conformational changes of the catalytic P-loop induced by direct binding with the regulatory anionic phospholipids in the large cationic catalytic groove. These findings highlight the fact that lipid composition of the substrate membrane plays an important role in the control of Sac1 function. PMID:22452743

  7. Cds1 Controls the Release of Cdc14-like Phosphatase Flp1 from the Nucleolus to Drive Full Activation of the Checkpoint Response to Replication Stress in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Cuervo, Helena

    2008-01-01

    The Cdc14p-like phosphatase Flp1p (also known as Clp1p) is regulated by cell cycle-dependent changes in its subcellular localization. Flp1p is restricted to the nucleolus and spindle pole body until prophase, when it is dispersed throughout the nucleus, mitotic spindle, and medial ring. Once released, Flp1p antagonizes Cdc2p/cyclin activity by reverting Cdc2p-phosphorylation sites on Cdc25p. On replication stress, ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/ATM/Rad3-related kinase Rad3p activates Cds1p, which phosphorylates key proteins ensuring the stability of stalled DNA replication forks. Here, we show that replication stress induces changes in the subcellular localization of Flp1p in a checkpoint-dependent manner. Active Cds1p checkpoint kinase is required to release Flp1p into the nucleus. Consistently, a Flp1p mutant (flp1-9A) lacking all potential Cds1p phosphorylation sites fails to relocate in response to replication blocks and, similarly to cells lacking flp1 (Δflp1), presents defects in checkpoint response to replication stress. Δflp1 cells accumulate reduced levels of a less active Cds1p kinase in hydroxyurea (HU), indicating that nuclear Flp1p regulates Cds1p full activation. Consistently, Δflp1 and flp1-9A have an increased percentage of Rad22p-recombination foci during HU treatment. Together, our data show that by releasing Flp1p into the nucleus Cds1p checkpoint kinase modulates its own full activation during replication stress. PMID:18385517

  8. Widespread presence of "bacterial-like" PPP phosphatases in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A

    2004-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes, PPP (protein phosphatase P) family is one of the two known protein phosphatase families specific for Ser and Thr. The role of PPP phosphatases in multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotic cell has been extensively studied. Unlike eukaryotic PPP phosphatases, bacterial members of the family have broad substrate specificity or may even be Tyr-specific. Moreover, one group of bacterial PPPs are diadenosine tetraphosphatases, indicating that bacterial PPP phosphatases may not necessarily function as protein phosphatases. Results We describe the presence in eukaryotes of three groups of expressed genes encoding "non-conventional" phosphatases of the PPP family. These enzymes are more closely related to bacterial PPP phosphatases than to the known eukaryotic members of the family. One group, found exclusively in land plants, is most closely related to PPP phosphatases from some α-Proteobacteria, including Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales and Rhodospirillaceae. This group is therefore termed Rhizobiales / Rhodobacterales / Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases, or Rhilphs. Phosphatases of the other group are found in Viridiplantae, Rhodophyta, Trypanosomatidae, Plasmodium and some fungi. They are structurally related to phosphatases from psychrophilic bacteria Shewanella and Colwellia, and are termed Shewanella-like phosphatases, or Shelphs. Phosphatases of the third group are distantly related to ApaH, bacterial diadenosine tetraphosphatases, and are termed ApaH-like phosphatases, or Alphs. Patchy distribution of Alphs in animals, plants, fungi, diatoms and kinetoplasts suggests that these phosphatases were present in the common ancestor of eukaryotes but were independently lost in many lineages. Rhilphs, Shelphs and Alphs form PPP clades, as divergent from "conventional" eukaryotic PPP phosphatases as they are from each other and from major bacterial clades. In addition, comparison of primary structures revealed a previously unrecognised (I

  9. Digestion and the distribution of acid phosphatase in Blepharisma.

    PubMed

    Dembitzer, H M

    1968-05-01

    Suspensions of Blepharisma intermedium were fed latex particles for 5 min and then were separated from the particles by filtration. Samples were fixed at intervals after separation and incubated to demonstrate acid phosphatase activity. They were subsequently embedded and sectioned for electron microscopy. During formation of the food vacuole, the vacuolar membrane is acid phosphatase-negative. Within 5 min, dumbbell-shaped acid phosphatase-positive bodies, possibly derived from the the acid phosphatase-positive Golgi apparatus, apparently fuse with the food vacuole and render it acid phosphatase-positive. A larger type of acid phosphatase-positive, vacuolated body may also fuse with the food vacuole at later stages. At about 20 min after formation, acid phosphatase-positive secondary pinocytotic vesicles pinch off from the food vacuoles and approach a separate system of membrane-bounded spaces. By 1 hr after formation, the food vacuole becomes acid phosphatase-negative, and the undigested latex particles are voided into the membrane-bounded spaces. The membrane-bounded spaces are closely associated with the food vacuole at all stages of digestion and are generally acid phosphatase-negative. Within the membrane-bounded spaces, dense, pleomorphic, granular bodies are found, in which are embedded mitochondria, paraglycogen granules, membrane-limited acid phosphatase-containing structures, and Golgi apparatuses. The granular bodies may serve as vehicles for the transport of organelles through the extensive, ramifying membrane-bounded spaces.

  10. DIGESTION AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ACID PHOSPHATASE IN BLEPHARISMA

    PubMed Central

    Dembitzer, Herbert M.

    1968-01-01

    Suspensions of Blepharisma intermedium were fed latex particles for 5 min and then were separated from the particles by filtration. Samples were fixed at intervals after separation and incubated to demonstrate acid phosphatase activity. They were subsequently embedded and sectioned for electron microscopy. During formation of the food vacuole, the vacuolar membrane is acid phosphatase-negative. Within 5 min, dumbbell-shaped acid phosphatase-positive bodies, possibly derived from the the acid phosphatase-positive Golgi apparatus, apparently fuse with the food vacuole and render it acid phosphatase-positive. A larger type of acid phosphatase-positive, vacuolated body may also fuse with the food vacuole at later stages. At about 20 min after formation, acid phosphatase-positive secondary pinocytotic vesicles pinch off from the food vacuoles and approach a separate system of membrane-bounded spaces. By 1 hr after formation, the food vacuole becomes acid phosphatase-negative, and the undigested latex particles are voided into the membrane-bounded spaces. The membrane-bounded spaces are closely associated with the food vacuole at all stages of digestion and are generally acid phosphatase-negative. Within the membrane-bounded spaces, dense, pleomorphic, granular bodies are found, in which are embedded mitochondria, paraglycogen granules, membrane-limited acid phosphatase-containing structures, and Golgi apparatuses. The granular bodies may serve as vehicles for the transport of organelles through the extensive, ramifying membrane-bounded spaces. PMID:4968524

  11. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC. PMID:25461266

  12. Potential Role for Purple Acid Phosphatase in the Dephosphorylation of Wall Proteins in Tobacco Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaida, Rumi; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Sampedro, Javier; Zarra, Ignacio; Hayashi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takako S.

    2010-01-01

    It is not yet known whether dephosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by phosphatases occurs in the apoplastic space. In this study, we found that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) purple acid phosphatase could dephosphorylate the phosphoryl residues of three apoplastic proteins, two of which were identified as α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase. The dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of recombinant α-xylosidase resulted in a decrease and an increase in its activity, respectively, when xyloglucan heptasaccharide was used as a substrate. Attempted overexpression of the tobacco purple acid phosphatase NtPAP12 in tobacco cells not only decreased the activity levels of the glycosidases but also increased levels of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the apoplast during the exponential phase. We suggest that purple acid phosphatase controls the activity of α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase, which are responsible for the degradation of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the cell walls. PMID:20357138

  13. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  14. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    SciTech Connect

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  15. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of organic P mineralization potential in soils. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment with precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three successional forests in southern China was carried out. The three forests include Masson pine forest (MPF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF). Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, soil acid phosphatase activity was depressed by no precipitation treatment in the three forests. However, doubled precipitation treatment exerted a significantly negative effect on it only in MEBF. These results indicate that the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. A decrease in organic P turnover would occur in the three forests if there was a drought in a whole year in the future. More rainfall in the wet season would also be adverse to organic P turnover in MEBF due to its high soil moisture.

  16. Protein Phosphatase 1-α Regulates AS160 Ser588 and Thr642 Dephosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragya; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on Thr(642) and Ser(588) by Akt is essential for insulin's full effect on glucose transport. However, protein phosphorylation is determined by the balance of actions by kinases and phosphatases, and the specific phosphatase(s) controlling AS160 dephosphorylation is (are) unknown. Accordingly, we assessed roles of highly expressed skeletal muscle serine/threonine phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) on AS160 dephosphorylation. Preliminary screening of candidate phosphatases used an AS160 dephosphorylation assay. Lysates from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle were treated with pharmacological phosphatase inhibitors and assessed for AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) dephosphorylation. AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites was unaltered by PP2B or PP2C inhibitors. Okadaic acid (low dose inhibits PP2A; high dose inhibits PP1) delayed AS160 Ser(588) (both doses) and Thr(642) (high dose only) dephosphorylation concomitant with greater Akt phosphorylation (both doses). AS160 was coimmunoprecipitated with PP1-α but not with PP1-β, PP1-γ1, or PP2A. Recombinant inhibitor-2 protein (a selective PP1 inhibitor) delayed AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites without altering Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, knockdown of PP1-α but not PP1-β or PP1-γ1 by small interfering RNA caused greater AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) phosphorylation concomitant with unaltered Akt phosphorylation. Together, these results identified PP1-α as a regulator of AS160 Thr(642) and Ser(588) dephosphorylation in skeletal muscle.

  17. Effect of Bacteria and Amoebae on Rhizosphere Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gould, W. Douglas; Coleman, David C.; Rubink, Amy J.

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of various components of soil microflora and microfauna to rhizosphere phosphatase activity were determined with hydroponic cultures. Three treatments were employed: (i) plants alone (Bouteloua gracilis (H.B.K.) Lag. ex Steud.) (ii) plants plus bacteria (Pseudomonas sp.), and (iii) plants plus bacteria plus amoebae (Acanthamoeba sp.). No alkaline phosphatase was detected, but an appreciable amount of acid phosphatase activity (120 to 500 nmol of p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolyzed per h per plant) was found in the root culture solutions. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased the amount of acid phosphatase in solution, and properties of additional activity were identical to properties of plant acid phosphatase. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased both solution and root phosphatase activities at most initial phosphate concentrations. PMID:16345390

  18. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  19. Phosphatase specificity and pathway insulation in signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Michael A; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J

    2015-02-17

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase's substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A's adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  20. Histochemical and electrophoretic studies on phosphatases of some Indian trematodes.

    PubMed

    Haque, M; Siddiqi, A H

    1982-06-01

    The isoenzymes of acid and alkaline phosphatases and their histochemical localization were studied by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis in four species of trematodes: Gigantocotyle explanatum from the liver and Gastrothylax crumenifer from the rumen of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciolopsis buski from the small intestine of the pig (Sus scrofa). Both acid and alkaline phosphatases were present in the tegument, gastrodermis, suckers, testes, ovary, eggs, vitellaria and uterus but alkaline phosphatase activity was demonstrated only in the parenchyma and excretory ducts. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed two to four isoenzymes for both acid and alkaline phosphatase.

  1. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  2. Establishing Quantitative Standards for Residual Alkaline Phosphatase in Pasteurized Milk

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Kwang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay is a rapid and convenient method for verifying milk pasteurization. Since colorimetric ALP assays rely on subjective visual assessments, their results are especially unreliable near the detection limits. In this study, we attempted to establish quantitative criteria for residual ALP in milk by using a more objective method based on spectrophotometric measurements. Raw milk was heat-treated for 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 min and then subjected to ALP assays. The quantitative criteria for residual ALP in the milk was determined as 2 μg phenol/mL of milk, which is just above the ALP value of milk samples heat-treated for 30 min. These newly proposed methodology and criteria could facilitate the microbiological quality control of milk. PMID:27194927

  3. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  4. Therapeutic strategies for anchored kinases and phosphatases: exploiting short linear motifs and intrinsic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation events that occur in response to the second messenger cAMP are controlled spatially and temporally by protein kinase A (PKA) interacting with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Recent advances in understanding the structural basis for this interaction have reinforced the hypothesis that AKAPs create spatially constrained signaling microdomains. This has led to the realization that the PKA/AKAP interface is a potential drug target for modulating a plethora of cell-signaling events. Pharmacological disruption of kinase–AKAP interactions has previously been explored for disease treatment and remains an interesting area of research. However, disrupting or enhancing the association of phosphatases with AKAPs is a therapeutic concept of equal promise, particularly since they oppose the actions of many anchored kinases. Accordingly, numerous AKAPs bind phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), calcineurin (PP2B), and PP2A. These multimodal signaling hubs are equally able to control the addition of phosphate groups onto target substrates, as well as the removal of these phosphate groups. In this review, we describe recent advances in structural analysis of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AKAPs, and suggest future possibilities for targeting these interactions for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26283967

  5. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  6. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  7. Mechanistic Insights into Glucan Phosphatase Activity against Polyglucan Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Meekins, David A.; Raththagala, Madushi; Auger, Kyle D.; Turner, Benjamin D.; Santelia, Diana; Kötting, Oliver; Gentry, Matthew S.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are central to the regulation of starch and glycogen metabolism. Plants contain two known glucan phosphatases, Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), which dephosphorylate starch. Starch is water-insoluble and reversible phosphorylation solubilizes its outer surface allowing processive degradation. Vertebrates contain a single known glucan phosphatase, laforin, that dephosphorylates glycogen. In the absence of laforin, water-soluble glycogen becomes insoluble, leading to the neurodegenerative disorder Lafora Disease. Because of their essential role in starch and glycogen metabolism glucan phosphatases are of significant interest, yet a comparative analysis of their activities against diverse glucan substrates has not been established. We identify active site residues required for specific glucan dephosphorylation, defining a glucan phosphatase signature motif (CζAGΨGR) in the active site loop. We further explore the basis for phosphate position-specific activity of these enzymes and determine that their diverse phosphate position-specific activity is governed by the phosphatase domain. In addition, we find key differences in glucan phosphatase activity toward soluble and insoluble polyglucan substrates, resulting from the participation of ancillary glucan-binding domains. Together, these data provide fundamental insights into the specific activity of glucan phosphatases against diverse polyglucan substrates. PMID:26231210

  8. Extracellular phosphatases of Chlamydomonas reinhardi and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Patni, N J; Dhawale, S W; Aaronson, S

    1977-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardi, cultured under normal growth conditions, secreted significant amounts of protein and carbohydrates but not lipids or nucleic acids. A fivefold increase in light intensity led to a tenfold increase in secreted protein and carbohydrate. Among the proteins secreted was acid phosphatase with a pH optimum at 4.8 like the enzyme in the cells. Phosphorus depleted algae grown on minimal orthophosphate contained and secreted both acid and alkaline phosphatase. The pH optimum of the intracellular alkaline phosphatase was 9.2. When phosphorus-depleted cells were grown with increasing orthophosphate, intra- and extracellular alkaline phosphatase was almost completely repressed and intra- and extracellular acid phosphatase was partially repressed. Extracellular acid and alkaline phosphatase increased with the age of the culture. Electrophoresis indicated only one acid and one alkaline phosphatase in phosphorus-satisfied and phosphorus-depleted cells. Chlamydomonas cells suspended in an inorganic salt solution secreted only acid phosphatase; the absence of any extr-cellular cytoplasmic marker enzyme indicated that there was little, if any, autolysis to account for the extracellular acid enzyme. Phosphorus-depleted cells were able to grow on organic phosphates as the sole source of orthophosphate. Ribose-5-phosphate was the best for cell multiplication, and its utility was shown to be due to the cell's ability to use the ribose as well as the orthophosphatase for cell multiplication.

  9. Reduced expression of PNUTS leads to activation of Rb-phosphatase and caspase-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Gabriel; Sherry, Tara C; Krucher, Nancy A

    2008-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that Retinoblastoma (Rb) activity is important in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Reversible phosphorylation of the Rb protein that is carried out by cyclin dependent kinases and Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates its functions. A PP1 interacting protein, PNUTS (Phosphatase Nuclear Targeting Subunit) is proposed to be a regulator of Rb phosphorylation. In this study, PNUTS knockdown in MCF7, SKA and HCT116 cancer cells causes a reduction in viability due to increased apoptosis. However, normal cells (MCF10A breast and CCD-18Co colon) do not exhibit reduced viability when PNUTS expression is diminished. PNUTS knockdown has no effect in Rb-null Saos-2 cells. However, when Rb is stably expressed in Saos-2 cells, PNUTS knockdown reduces cell number. Knockdown of PNUTS in p53-/- HCT116 cells indicates that p53 is dispensable for the induction of apoptosis. Loss of PNUTS expression results in increased Rb-phosphatase activity and Rb dephosphorylation. E2F1 dissociates from Rb in cells depleted of PNUTS and the resulting apoptosis is dependent on caspase-8. These results indicate that Rb phosphorylation state can be manipulated by targeting Rb phosphatase activity and suggest that PNUTS may be a potential target for therapeutic pro-apoptotic strategies. PMID:18360108

  10. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  11. Penicillin inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Hussein, Waleed M; Ul Islam, Nazar; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2012-04-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have a multitude of biological functions and are found in fungi, bacteria, plants and animals. In mammals, PAP activity is linked with bone resorption and over-expression can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis. PAP is therefore an attractive target for the development of drugs to treat this disease. A series of penicillin conjugates, in which 6-aminopenicillanic acid was acylated with aromatic acid chlorides, has been prepared and assayed against pig PAP. The binding mode of most of these conjugates is purely competitive, and some members of this class have potencies comparable to the best PAP inhibitors yet reported. The structurally related penicillin G was shown to be neither an inhibitor nor a substrate for pig PAP. Molecular modelling has been used to examine the binding modes of these compounds in the active site of the enzyme and to rationalise their activities.

  12. Determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zak, B; Epstein, E; Baginski, E S

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase is described. Homogenization and ultracentrifrigation were used to prepare a precipitate whose character was defined by monitoring the desire enzyme activity which serves as a marker. Activity of the enzyme was determined by means of a sensitive colorimetric reaction for the product, inorganic phosphate. Non-enzymatic hydrolysis problems with the substrate are minimized in this procedure by the masking action of citrate. The final heteropoly blue color appears to be considerably sensitized by interaction of phosphomolybdous ion with arsenite. The stability of the relatively labile enzyme was ensured by chelating any metals present with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. The overall results obtained by the procedure appear to be useful as an aid in the diagnosis of Type I glycogenosis, a glycogen storage disease called Von Gierke's disease. PMID:192125

  13. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  14. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  15. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  16. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  18. Resistance of leishmanial phosphatases to inactivation by oxygen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Saha, A K; Das, S; Glew, R H; Gottlieb, M

    1985-09-01

    Leishmania donovani promastigotes produce large quantities of two distinct acid phosphatases; a tartrate-resistant enzyme is localized to the external surface of the plasma membrane, and a tartrate-sensitive enzyme is secreted into the growth medium. It was shown previously that preincubation of human neutrophils and macrophages with the tartrate-resistant phosphatase markedly reduced the ability of these host cells to produce superoxide anions in response to stimulation with the activator formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The possibility that the cell surface acid phosphatase or the phosphatase that is secreted into the extracellular fluid might compromise other host cell functions, especially intracellular ones, depends on the ability of the enzyme to resist exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite) generated by phagocytic cells. In the present report, we show that both leishmanial acid phosphatases were relatively resistant to inactivation by oxygen metabolites. At pH 5.5, the activity of the tartrate-resistant phosphatase was reduced 50% by incubation for 1 h with each of the following: 30 mM O2-, 500 mM hydrogen peroxide, and 6 mM hypochlorite ion. These concentrations are many fold greater than the concentrations of these substances that are generated by stimulated polymorphonuclear phagocytes. The tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase differed markedly from the tartrate-resistant phosphatase in that the former was essentially insensitive to even very high concentrations of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, 50% inactivation of the tartrate-sensitive leishmanial phosphatase required exposure to 35 mM hypochlorite for 30 min. These results indicate that the catalytic potential of these two leishmanial acid phosphatases probably survives exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites generated by neutrophils and macrophages.

  19. Effects of phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitors (phenylarsine oxide and cantharidin) on Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Pintér, M

    2001-09-01

    The effects of phenylarsine oxide (PAO) (phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) and cantharidin (serine/threonine phosphatase [PP2A] inhibitor) treatments were analysed on the synthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids, and on the cytoskeletal elements (F-actin and tubulin containing structures) of Tetrahymena pyriformis. Both phosphatase inhibitors reduced the amount of incorporated 32P of the whole phospholipid content, but the ratio of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) to the total phospholipid content increased. Both treatments influenced the phosphatidylinositol (PI) system. These inhibitors also influenced the incorporation of palmitic acid into the phospholipids: in general PAO decreased, whereas cantharidin increased the amount of incorporated palmitic acid; 1 microM cantharidin significantly increased the labelling of PE and PA. The incorporation of mannose and glucosamine was influenced differently by PAO and cantharidin treatments: the latter elevated, while PAO decreased the labelling of glycolipids with these sugars. The effects of these treatments were visible also in the case of confocal scanning laser microscopic (CSLM) images: after treatments with both inhibitors, the F-actin containing cortical elements were destroyed, but the tubulin containing ones (longitudinal and transversal microtubules, oral apparatus and deep fibres) did not display significant alterations. The different effects of phosphatase inhibitors were visible also on the scanning electron microscopic (sEM) images: cantharidin treatments (1 microM) decreased the amount of dissolved membrane lipids after chemical dehydration of the cells with 2, 2-dimethoxy propane (DMP), but in the case of treatments with 10 microM, the surface pattern of cells was similar to the controls. On the other hand, after PAO treatments the surface pattern of Tetrahymena showed significant alterations. Both phosphatase inhibitors inhibited the phagocytotic activity of the cells. On the

  20. Increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in calvaria cells cultured with diphosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Felix, R; Fleisch, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Dichloromethanediphosphonate and to a lesser degree 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonate, two compounds characterized by a P-C-P bond, increased the alkaline phosphatase activity of cultured rat calvaria cells up to 30 times in a dose-dependent fashion. 2. Both diphosphonates also slightly inhibited the protein synthesis in these cells. 3. Thymidine, an inhibitor of cell division, did not inhibit the induction of the enzyme, indicating that the increase in enzyme activity was not due to the formation of a specific population of cells with high alkaline phosphatase activity. 4. The effect on alkaline phosphatase was suppressed by the addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. 5. After subculturing the stimulated cells in medium without diphosphonates, the enzyme activity fell almost to the control value. 6. Bovine parathyrin diminished the enzyme activity of the control cells and the cells treated with dichloromethanediphosphonate; however, at high concentration the effect of parathyrin was greater on the diphosphonate-treated cells than on the control cells. 7. The electrophoretic behaviour, heat inactivation, inhibition by bromotetramisole or by phenylalanine, and the Km value of the induced enzyme were identical with that of the control enzyme. PMID:534490

  1. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage sensing lipid phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sasha S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We find the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), to have not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage sensing domain (VSD). Using fast FRET reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we find that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This novel 2-step allosteric control over a dual specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility and endo/exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  2. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  3. Expression of a human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in transfected cells: Use as a reporter for studies of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.; Zervos, P.; Raducha, M.; Harris, H.; Kadesch, T.

    1988-09-01

    The human placental alkaline phosphatase gene has been cloned and reintroduced into mammalian cells. When a plasmid carrying the gene under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter (pSV2Apap) is transfected into a variety of different cell types, placental alkaline phosphatase activity can readily be detected by using whole cell suspensions or cell lysates. Alkaline phosphatase activity can also be visualized directly in individual transfected cells by histochemical staining. The gene is appropriate for use as a reporter in studies of gene regulation since its expression is dependent on the presence of exogenous transcription control elements. The overall assay to detect the expression of the gene is quantitative, very rapid, and inexpensive. Cotransfections of cells with pSV2Apap and a related plasmid carrying the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (pSV2Acat) indicate that transcription of these two genes is detected with roughly the same sensitivity.

  4. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  5. Elevation of serum acid phosphatase in cancers with bone metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Tavassoli, M.; Rizo, M.; Yam, L.T.

    1980-05-01

    In patients with nonprostatic cancer, serum acid phosphatase activity is usually elevated when bone metastasis is present but not when bone metastasis is absent. The fraction responsible for serum enzyme elevation is a normal component of serum; it appears in gel electrophoresis as band 5; and is tartrate-resistant. It is suggested that the origin of acid phosphatase elevation is bone osteoclasts rather than cancer tissue, as is the case with prostatic carcinoma. Determination of serum acid phosphatase activity may be useful in the detection of bone metastasis.

  6. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  7. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to model major aspects of development and disease as well as the mechanism of regeneration of limbs and vital organs, and most classical PTPs have been identified in zebrafish. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for biomedical research because the genome is sequenced, zebrafish produce a large number of offspring, the eggs develop outside the mother and are transparent, facilitating intravital imaging, and transgenesis and (site-directed) mutagenesis are feasible. Together, these traits make zebrafish amenable for the analysis of gene and protein function. In this chapter we cover three manipulations of zebrafish embryos that we have used to study the effects of PTPs in development, regeneration, and biochemistry. Microinjection at the one-cell stage is at the basis of many zebrafish experiments and is described first. This is followed by a description for measuring regeneration of the embryonic caudal fin, a powerful and robust physiological assay. Finally, the considerable but manageable troubleshooting of several complications associated with preparing zebrafish embryos for immunoblotting is explained. Overall, this chapter provides detailed protocols for manipulating zebrafish embryo samples with a compilation of tips collected through extensive experience from the zebrafish research community. PMID:27514815

  8. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  9. A study of substrate specificity for a CTD phosphatase, SCP1, by proteomic screening of binding partners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Bahk, Young Yil

    2014-05-30

    RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (RNAPII CTD) phosphatases are a newly emerging family of phosphatases. Recently a CTD-specific phosphatase, small CTD phosphatase 1 (SCP1), has shown to act as an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional corepressor for inhibiting neuronal gene transcription in non-neuronal cells. In this study, using the established NIH/3T3 and HEK293T cells, which are expressing human SCP1 proteins under the tight control of expression by doxycycline, a proteomic screening was conducted to identify the binding partners for SCP1. Although the present findings provide the possibility for new avenues to provide to a better understanding of cellular physiology of SCP1, now these proteomic and some immunological approaches for SCP1 interactome might not represent the accurate physiological relevance in vivo. In this presentation, we focus the substrate specificity to delineate an appearance of the dephosphorylation reaction catalyzed by SCP1 phosphatase. We compared the phosphorylated sequences of the immunologically confirmed binding partners with SCP1 searched in HPRD. We found the similar sequences from CdcA3 and validated the efficiency of enzymatic catalysis for synthetic phosphopeptides the recombinant SCP1. This approach led to the identification of several interacting partners with SCP1. We suggest that CdcA3 could be an enzymatic substrate for SCP1 and that SCP1 might have the relationship with cell cycle regulation through enzymatic activity against CdcA3. PMID:24769477

  10. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  11. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  12. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  13. A high-throughput screening for phosphatases using specific substrates.

    PubMed

    Senn, Alejandro M; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2005-04-01

    A high-throughput screening was developed for the detection of phosphatase activity in bacterial colonies. Unlike other methods, the current procedure can be applied to any phosphatase because it uses physiological substrates and detects the compelled product of all phosphatase reactions, that is, orthophosphate. In this method, substrates diffuse from a filter paper across a nitrocellulose membrane to bacterial colonies situated on the opposite face, and then reaction products flow back to the paper. Finally, a colorimetric reagent discloses the presence of orthophosphate in the filter paper. We validated the performance of this assay with several substrates and experimental conditions and with different phosphatases, including a library of randomly mutagenized rapeseed chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This procedure could be extended to other enzymatic activities provided that an appropriate detection of reaction products is available.

  14. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  15. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  16. PTP-ER, a novel tyrosine phosphatase, functions downstream of Ras1 to downregulate MAP kinase during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Karim, F D; Rubin, G M

    1999-06-01

    Activation of ERK/MAPK is a key event downstream of RAS. The duration, extent, and timing of MAPK activity is integral to signal specificity. Consequently, inactivation of MAPK by phosphatases has emerged as a critical element in the precise control of signal output. We have cloned and characterized a novel cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-ER, which is related to mammalian PCPTP1, LC-PTP/HePTP, and STEP tyrosine phosphatases. PTP-ER mutants produce extra R7 cells and enhance activated Ras1 signaling. Ectopic expression of PTP-ER dramatically inhibits RAS1/MAPK signaling. PTP-ER binds to and inactivates Drosophila ERK/MAPK; however, it is unable to dephosphorylate and downregulate Drosophila MAPKSevenmaker. Resistance to PTP-ER activity partially accounts for the Sevenmaker mutant phenotype.

  17. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 acts in skin cells to promote sensory dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianzhuang; Wang, Xiangming; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    Sensory dendrite morphogenesis is directed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The extracellular environment plays instructive roles in patterning dendrite growth and branching. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the proprioceptive neuron PVD forms highly branched sensory dendrites adjacent to the hypodermis. We report that receptor tyrosine phosphatase CLR-1 functions in the hypodermis to pattern the PVD dendritic branches. Mutations in clr-1 lead to loss of quaternary branches, reduced secondary branches and increased ectopic branches. CLR-1 is necessary for the dendrite extension but not for the initial filopodia formation. Its role is dependent on the intracellular phosphatase domain but not the extracellular adhesion domain, indicating that it functions through dephosphorylating downstream factors but not through direct adhesion with neurons. Genetic analysis reveals that clr-1 also functions in parallel with SAX-7/DMA-1 pathway to control PVD primary dendrite development. We provide evidence of a new environmental factor for PVD dendrite morphogenesis. PMID:26968353

  18. Elevated Nitrogen Deposition from Alberta Oil Sands Development Stimulates Phosphatase Activity in Dominant Sphagnum Moss Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, N. N.; Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions of NOx associated with Alberta oil sands (AOS) development are leading to locally elevated atmospheric N deposition, in a region where background N deposition has been historically quite low (< 1 kg/ha/yr). This elevated N deposition has the potential to alter the ecosystem structure and function of nutrient-poor boreal peatlands. Nitrogen enrichment may alter soil microbial activity, which could be manifested in changes in extracellular enzyme activities. Since 2011, we have been experimentally adding N as NH4NO3 in simulated precipitation at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kg N ha/yr/ plus no-water controls to a boreal bog and a poor fen (3 replicate plots per treatment). In 2013, acid phosphatase activities in living plant capitulum of Sphagnum angustifolium, Sphagnum fuscum, and Sphagnum magellanicum were quantified in June and July using 4-methyumbelliferylphosphate and fluorescence detection of the enzymatically released methylumbelliferone (MUF). Phosphatase activities did not differ with N treatment for S. angustifolium in the bog (p=0.3409) or the poor fen (p=0.0629), or for S. fuscum in the bog (p=0.1950), averaging 35.0 × 0.7, 61.6 × 1.2, and 41.6 × 0.9 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr, respectively. For S. fuscum in the poor fen, phosphatase activities differed between N treatments (p=0.0275), ranging 40.6 × 1.1 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the control plots to 73.7 × 2.0 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the 5 kg/ha/yr N treatment plots; increasing N deposition did not result in a gradual change in enzyme activity. On the other hand, S. magellanicum phosphatase activities differed between N treatments (p=0.0189) and showed a pattern of generally increasing activity with increasing N deposition (37.4 × 0.5 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in control plots; 97.9 × 4.5 μmol MUF/g DWT/hr in the 25 kg/ha/yr N treatment plots). The differing phosphatase responses between these dominant Sphagnum species suggest unique differences in nutrient balance and/or microbial activity. Combining the

  19. An essential developmental function for murine phosphoglycolate phosphatase in safeguarding cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Gabriela; Hadamek, Kerstin; Zundler, Matthias; Fekete, Agnes; Seifried, Annegrit; Mueller, Martin J.; Koentgen, Frank; Gessler, Manfred; Jeanclos, Elisabeth; Gohla, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP) is thought to target phosphoglycolate, a 2-deoxyribose fragment derived from the repair of oxidative DNA lesions. However, the physiological role of this activity and the biological function of the DNA damage product phosphoglycolate is unknown. We now show that knockin replacement of murine Pgp with its phosphatase-inactive PgpD34N mutant is embryonically lethal due to intrauterine growth arrest and developmental delay in midgestation. PGP inactivation attenuated triosephosphate isomerase activity, increased triglyceride levels at the expense of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, and inhibited cell proliferation. These effects were prevented under hypoxic conditions or by blocking phosphoglycolate release from damaged DNA. Thus, PGP is essential to sustain cell proliferation in the presence of oxygen. Collectively, our findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism coupling a DNA damage repair product to the control of intermediary metabolism and cell proliferation. PMID:27731369

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  2. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  4. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  5. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  6. Isolation and characterization of a neutral phosphatase from wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    A neutral phosphatase was purified to homogeneity from wheat seedlings. The enzyme was a monomeric glycoprotein exhibiting a molecular weight of 35,000, frictional ratio of 1.22, Stokes' radius of 26 A, and sedimentation coefficient of 3.2 S. That the enzyme was a glycoprotein was surmised from its chromatographic property on Concanavalin A-Sepharose column. The phosphatase activity was assayed using either fructose-2,6-bisphosphate or p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate. The phosphatase activity was not affected by high concentrations of chelating agents and did not require the addition of Mg{sup +2} or Ca{sup +2} for its activity. Molybdate, orthovanadate, Zn{sup +2}, and Hg{sup +2} were all potent inhibitors of the phosphatase activity. The inhibition by Hg{sup +2} was reversed by dithiothreitol. The enzyme activity was stimulated by Mn{sup +2} about 2-fold. On the other hand, 3-phosphoglycerate, fructose-6-P and Pi as well as polyamines inhibited the enzyme activity. The ability of the neutral phosphatase to dephosphorylate protein phosphotyrosine was also investigated. The phosphotyrosyl-substrates, such as ({sup 32}P) phosphotyrosyl-poly(Glu, Tyr)n, -alkylated bovine serum albumin, -angiotensin-1, and -band 3 of erythrocytes, were all substrates of the phosphatase. On the other hand, the enzyme had no activity toward protein phosphoserine and protein phosphothreonine.

  7. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  8. Lyn and PECAM-1 function as interdependent inhibitors of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zhangyin; Hu, Yu; Xiang, Jizhou; Polewski, Peter; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of platelet responsiveness is important to control pathologic thrombus formation. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and the Src family kinase Lyn inhibit platelet activation by the glycoprotein VI (GPVI) collagen receptor; however, it is not known whether PECAM-1 and Lyn function in the same or different inhibitory pathways. In these studies, we found that, relative to wild-type platelets, platelets derived from PECAM-1-deficient, Lyn-deficient, or PECAM-1/Lyn double-deficient mice were equally hyperresponsive to stimulation with a GPVI-specific agonist, indicating that PECAM-1 and Lyn participate in the same inhibitory pathway. Lyn was required for PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent binding of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2, SHP-2. These results support a model in which PECAM-1/SHP-2 complexes, formed in a Lyn-dependent manner, suppress GPVI signaling. PMID:21297004

  9. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  10. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  11. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  12. Sensing charges of the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Ludivine; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Voltage control over enzymatic activity in voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) is conferred by a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) located in the N terminus. These VSDs are constituted by four putative transmembrane segments (S1 to S4) resembling those found in voltage-gated ion channels. The putative fourth segment (S4) of the VSD contains positive residues that likely function as voltage-sensing elements. To study in detail how these residues sense the plasma membrane potential, we have focused on five arginines in the S4 segment of the Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). After implementing a histidine scan, here we show that four arginine-to-histidine mutants, namely R223H to R232H, mediate voltage-dependent proton translocation across the membrane, indicating that these residues transit through the hydrophobic core of Ci-VSP as a function of the membrane potential. These observations indicate that the charges carried by these residues are sensing charges. Furthermore, our results also show that the electrical field in VSPs is focused in a narrow hydrophobic region that separates the extracellular and intracellular space and constitutes the energy barrier for charge crossing. PMID:24127524

  13. Structural elucidation of the NADP(H) phosphatase activity of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirudha; Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    NADP(H)/NAD(H) homeostasis has long been identified to play a pivotal role in the mitigation of reactive oxygen stress (ROS) in the intracellular milieu and is therefore critical for the progression and pathogenesis of many diseases. NAD(H) kinases and NADP(H) phosphatases are two key players in this pathway. Despite structural evidence demonstrating the existence and mode of action of NAD(H) kinases, the specific annotation and the mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatases remains obscure. Here, structural evidence supporting the alternative role of inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) as an NADP(H) phosphatase is reported. Crystal structures of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase (SaIMPase-I) in complex with the substrates D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate and NADP(+) have been solved. The structure of the SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-NADP(+) ternary complex reveals the catalytic mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatase. Moreover, structures of SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-substrate complexes have reinforced the earlier proposal that the length of the active-site-distant helix α4 and its preceding loop are the predisposing factors for the promiscuous substrate specificity of SaIMPase-I. Altogether, the evidence presented suggests that IMPase-family enzymes with a shorter α4 helix could be potential candidates for previously unreported NADP(H) phosphatase activity.

  14. Phosphorylation of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Is Regulated by the Phototransduction Cascade and Involves Several Protein Kinases and Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Voolstra, Olaf; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Oberegelsbacher, Claudia; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a cardinal role in regulating cellular processes in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of proteins is controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously reported the light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel at multiple sites. TRP generates the receptor potential upon stimulation of the photoreceptor cell by light. An eye-enriched protein kinase C (eye-PKC) has been implicated in the phosphorylation of TRP by in vitro studies. Other kinases and phosphatases of TRP are elusive. Using phosphospecific antibodies and mass spectrometry, we here show that phosphorylation of most TRP sites depends on the phototransduction cascade and the activity of the TRP ion channel. A candidate screen to identify kinases and phosphatases provided in vivo evidence for an involvement of eye-PKC as well as other kinases and phosphatases in TRP phosphorylation. PMID:24040070

  15. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at low pH].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2009-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), three forms of tartrate-sensitive phosphatase were revealed using PAGE of the supernatant of ameba homogenates obtained with 1% Triton X-100 or distilled water and subsequent staining of gels with 2-naphthyl phosphate as substrate (pH 4.0). The form with the highest mobility in the ameba supernatant was sensitive to all tested phosphatase activity modulators. Two other forms with the lower mobilities were completely or significantly inactivated not only by sodium L-(+)-tartrate, but also by L-(+)-tartaric acid, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium molybdate, EDTA, EGTA, o-phospho-L-tyrosine, DL-dithiotreitol, H2O2, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ions of heavy metals - Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cu2+. Based on results of inhibitory analysis, lysosome location in the ameba cell, and wide substrate specificity of these two forms, it has been concluded that they belong to nonspecific acid phosphomonoesterases (AcP, EC 3.1.3.2). This AcP is suggested to have both phosphomonoesterase and phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activitis. Two ecto-phosphatases were revealed in the culture medium, in which amebas were cultivated. One of them was inhibited by the same reagents as the ameba tartrate-sensitive AcP and seems to be the AcP released into the culture medium in the process of exocytosis of the content of food vacuoles. In the culture medium, apart from this AcP, another phosphatase was revealed, which was not inhibited by any tested inhibitors of AcP and alkaline phosphatase. It cannot be ruled out that this phosphatase belong to the ecto-ATPases found in many protists; however, its ability to hydrolyze ATP has not yet been proven.

  16. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  17. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence.

    PubMed

    Keum, Dongil; Kruse, Martin; Kim, Dong-Il; Hille, Bertil; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-06-28

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  18. A Phosphatase Activity of Sts-1 Contributes to the Suppression of TCR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailik,A.; Ford, B.; Keller, J.; Chen, Y.; Nassar, N.; Carpino, N.

    2007-01-01

    Precise signaling by the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for a proper immune response. To ensure that T cells respond appropriately to antigenic stimuli, TCR signaling pathways are subject to multiple levels of regulation. Sts-1 negatively regulates signaling pathways downstream of the TCR by an unknown mechanism(s). Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 is a phosphatase that can target the tyrosine kinase Zap-70 among other proteins. The X-ray structure of the Sts-1 C terminus reveals that it has homology to members of the phosphoglycerate mutase/acid phosphatase (PGM/AcP) family of enzymes, with residues known to be important for PGM/AcP catalytic activity conserved in nature and position in Sts-1. Point mutations that impair Sts-1 phosphatase activity in vitro also impair the ability of Sts-1 to regulate TCR signaling in T cells. These observations reveal a PGM/AcP-like enzyme activity involved in the control of antigen receptor signaling.

  19. Cobalt(III), a probe of metal binding sites of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R A; Vallee, B L

    1975-01-01

    To facilitate the study of individual metal binding sites of polymeric metalloproteins, conversion of exchange-labile Co(II) in E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) to exchange-inert Co(III) was examined. Oxidation of Co(II) alkaline phosphatase with hydrogen peroxide results in a single absorption maximum at 530 nm and loss both of the characteristic electron paramagnetic signal and of enzymatic activity. Zinc neither reactivates this enzyme nor displaces the oxidized cobalt atoms. Metal and amino-acid analyses demonstrate that oxidation alters neither cobalt binding nor amino-acid composition of the enzyme. Al data are consistent with the conclusion that hydrogen peroxide oxidizes Co(II) in alkaline phosphatase to Co(III). Polymeric metalloenzymes can contain different categories of metal atoms serving in catalysis, structure stabilization, and/or control and exerting their effects independently or interdependently. The in situ conversion of exchange-labile Co(II) to exchange-stable (Co(III) offers a method to selectively and differentially "freeze" cobalt atoms at their respective binding sites. The accompanying spectral changes and concomitant retardation in ligand exchange reactions may be used to differentiate between specific metal binding sites that serve different roles in polymeric metalloenzymes. PMID:164026

  20. Effect of Lead stress on phosphatase activity and reducing power assay of Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Gubrelay, U; Agnihotri, R K; Shrotriya, S; Sharma, R

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals; the environment is increasingly polluted with heavy metals and reduces crop productivity. Plants possess homeostatic mechanisms that allow them to keep correct concentrations of essential metal ions in cellular compartments and to minimize the damaging effects of an excess of nonessential ones. One of their adverse effects on plants are the generation of harmful active oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress and the antioxidative activity seems to be of fundamental importance for adaptive response of plant against environmental stress. The present study explores the effects of lead (soil treated twice/ week) with (10, 30 and 60 mM) on the specific activities of phosphatases which might lead to reducing power assay in (Triticum aestivum PBW344) seedling. A significant decrease in the redox potential of shoot compared to root was observed at the similar concentration of lead. A similar trend on leaves was also noted. Acid and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher in roots than in shoot at all the three concentration of lead i.e. 10, 30 and 60 mM, compared to controls. The above mentioned changes were more pronounced at 60 mM concentration of lead than two other concentrations. These results lead us to suggest that increased lead concentration in soil might lead to adverse effects on plant growth and phosphatase activities. PMID:26107501

  1. Drosophila Dullard functions as a Mad phosphatase to terminate BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Hugo; Aleman, Abigail; Eivers, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that provide essential signals for normal embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A key step in initiating BMP signaling is ligand induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads (R-Smads) by type I receptor kinases, while linker phosphorylation of R-Smads has been shown to cause BMP signal termination. Here we present data demonstrating that the phosphatase Dullard is involved in dephosphorylating the Drosophila R-Smad, Mad, and is integral in controlling BMP signal duration. We show that a hypomorphic Dullard allele or Dullard knockdown leads to increased Mad phosphorylation levels, while Dullard overexpression resulted in reduced Mad phosphorylations. Co-immunoprecipitation binding assays demonstrate phosphorylated Mad and Dullard physically interact, while mutation of Dullard's phosphatase domain still allowed Mad-Dullard interactions but abolished its ability to regulate Mad phosphorylations. Finally, we demonstrate that linker and C-terminally phosphorylated Mad can be regulated by one of two terminating mechanisms, degradation by proteasomes or dephosphorylation by the phosphatase Dullard. PMID:27578171

  2. Drosophila Dullard functions as a Mad phosphatase to terminate BMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia, Hugo; Aleman, Abigail; Eivers, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that provide essential signals for normal embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A key step in initiating BMP signaling is ligand induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads (R-Smads) by type I receptor kinases, while linker phosphorylation of R-Smads has been shown to cause BMP signal termination. Here we present data demonstrating that the phosphatase Dullard is involved in dephosphorylating the Drosophila R-Smad, Mad, and is integral in controlling BMP signal duration. We show that a hypomorphic Dullard allele or Dullard knockdown leads to increased Mad phosphorylation levels, while Dullard overexpression resulted in reduced Mad phosphorylations. Co-immunoprecipitation binding assays demonstrate phosphorylated Mad and Dullard physically interact, while mutation of Dullard’s phosphatase domain still allowed Mad-Dullard interactions but abolished its ability to regulate Mad phosphorylations. Finally, we demonstrate that linker and C-terminally phosphorylated Mad can be regulated by one of two terminating mechanisms, degradation by proteasomes or dephosphorylation by the phosphatase Dullard. PMID:27578171

  3. Multiple Phosphatases Regulate Carbon Source-Dependent Germination and Primary Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Leandro José; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taisa Magnani; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is an important mold and a model system for the study of fungal cell biology. In addition, invasive A. nidulans pulmonary infections are common in humans with chronic granulomatous disease. The morphological and biochemical transition from dormant conidia into active, growing, filamentous hyphae requires the coordination of numerous biosynthetic, developmental, and metabolic processes. The present study exhibited the diversity of roles performed by seven phosphatases in regulating cell cycle, development, and metabolism in response to glucose and alternative carbon sources. The identified phosphatases highlighted the importance of several signaling pathways regulating filamentous growth, the action of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a metabolic switch controlling carbon usage, and the identification of the key function performed by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase during germination. These novel insights into the fundamental roles of numerous phosphatases in germination and carbon sensing have provided new avenues of research into the identification of inhibitors of fungal germination, with implications for the food, feed, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25762568

  4. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  5. Human prostatic acid phosphatase directly stimulates collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase content of isolated bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, M.; Rosier, R.N.; Puzas, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) directly enhances the differentiated characteristics of isolated bone cells in vitro. This enzyme, when added to cell cultures for 24 h in vitro stimulates collagen synthesis and the production of alkaline phosphatase. The effects are dose dependent, with statistically significant effects occurring from 0.1-100 nM hPAP. Concentrations higher than 100 nM do not evoke greater effects. The maximal effect of hPAP occurs between 12 and 24 h of exposure. The cells stimulated to the greatest degree are osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts. Fibroblasts isolated from the same tissue show a lesser sensitivity to hPAP. hPAP has no detectable effect on cell proliferation, as measured by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation or total DNA synthesis. None of the observations reported in this work can be attributed to contaminating proteins in the hPAP preparation. hPAP was radiolabeled with 125I and was used for affinity binding and cross-linking studies. Scatchard analysis of specific binding indicated the presence of 1.0 X 10(5) high affinity binding sites/cell, with a Kd of 6.5 nM. Cross-linking studies demonstrated the presence of one 320-kDa binding complex. The pH profile and kinetic determinations of Km and maximum velocity for hPAP were similar to those previously reported, except for the finding of positive cooperativity of the substrate with the enzyme under the conditions of our assay. We believe that the direct stimulation of bone-forming cells by hPAP may contribute to the sclerotic nature of skeletal bone around sites of neoplastic prostatic metastases and that the effect of the enzyme is probably mediated by a plasma membrane receptor.

  6. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  7. Thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Tarasevich, B. N.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2009-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli (ECAP), bovine intestines (bovine IAP), and chicken intestines (chicken IAP) was studied in different buffer solutions and in the solid state. The conclusion was made that these enzymes had maximum stability in the solid state, and, in a carbonate buffer solution, their activity decreased most rapidly. It was found that the bacterial enzyme was more stable than animal phosphatases. It was noted that, for ECAP, four intermediate stages preceded the loss of enzyme activity, and, for bovine and chicken IAPs, three intermediate stages were observed. The activation energy of thermal inactivation of ECAP over the range 25-70°C was determined to be 80 kJ/mol; it corresponded to the dissociation of active dimers into inactive monomers. Higher activation energies (˜200 kJ/mol) observed at the initial stage of thermal inactivation of animal phosphatases resulted from the simultaneous loss of enzyme activity caused by dimer dissociation and denaturation. It was shown that the activation energy of denaturation of monomeric animal alkali phosphatases ranged from 330 to 380 kJ/mol depending on buffer media. It was concluded that the inactivation of solid samples of alkali phosphatases at 95°C was accompanied by an about twofold decrease in the content of β structures in protein molecules.

  8. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  9. Role of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs of PECAM-1 in PECAM-1-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christopher D; Cao, Gaoyuan; Makrigiannakis, Antonis; DeLisser, Horace M

    2004-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1), a transmembrane glycoprotein, has been implicated in angiogenesis, with recent evidence indicating the involvement of PECAM-1 in endothelial cell motility. The cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues, Y663 and Y686, that each fall within an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). When phosphorylated, these residues together mediate the binding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. Because SHP-2 has been shown to be involved in the turnover of focal adhesions, a phenomenon required for efficient cell motility, the association of this phosphatase with PECAM-1 via its ITIMs may represent a mechanism by which PECAM-1 might facilitate cell migration. Studies were therefore done with cell transfectants expressing wild-type PECAM or mutant PECAM-1 in which residues Y663 and Y686 were mutated. These mutations eliminated PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the association of PECAM-1 with SHP-2 but did not impair the ability of the molecule to localize at intercellular junctions or to bind homophilically. However, in vitro cell motility and tube formation stimulated by the expression of wild-type PECAM-1 were abrogated by the mutation of these tyrosine residues. Importantly, during wound-induced migration, the number of focal adhesions as well as the level of tyrosine phosphorylated paxillin detected in cells expressing wild-type PECAM-1 were markedly reduced compared with control cells or transfectants with mutant PECAM-1. These data suggest that, in vivo, the binding of SHP-2 to PECAM-1, via PECAM-1's ITIM domains, promotes the turnover of focal adhesions and, hence, endothelial cell motility. PMID:15201144

  10. Downscaling Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in a Subtropical Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted by downscaling study to understand phosphorus (P)-deficient status of different plankton and the role of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in subtropical Feitsui Reservoir. Results from field survey showed that bulk APA (1.6~95.2 nM h-1) was widely observed in the epilimnion (0~20 m) with an apparent seasonal variations, suggesting that plankton in the system were subjected to P-deficient seasonally. Mixed layer depth (an index of phosphate availability) is the major factor influencing the variation of bulk APA and specific APA (124~1,253 nmol mg C-1 h-1), based on multiple linear regression analysis. Size-fractionated APA assays showed that picoplankton (size 0.2~3 um) contributed most of the bulk APA in the system. In addition, single-cell APA detected by enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assay indicated that heterotrophic bacteria are the major contributors of APA. Thus, we can infer that bacteria play an important role in accelerating P-cycle within P-deficient systems. Light/nutrient manipulation bioassays showed that bacterial growth was directly controlled by phosphate, while picocyanobacterial growth is controlled by light and can out-compete bacteria under P-limited condition with the aid of light. Further analysis revealed that the strength of summer typhoon is a factor responsible for the inter-annual variability of bulk and specific APA. APA study demonstrated the episodic events (e.g. strong typhoon and extreme precipitation) had significant influence on APA variability in sub-tropical to tropical aquatic ecosystems. Hence, the results herein will allow future studies on monitoring typhoon disturbance (intensity and frequency) as well as the APA of plankton during summer-to-autumn in subtropical systems.

  11. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  12. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  13. Ultrastructural localization of acid phosphatase in nonhuman primate vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    King, B F

    1985-01-01

    The vagina of the rhesus monkey is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. However, little is known regarding the cytochemical composition of its cell organelles and the substances found in the intercellular spaces. In this study we have examined the ultrastructural distribution of acid phosphatase in the vaginal epithelium. In basal and parabasal cells reaction product was found in some Golgi cisternae and vesicles and in a variety of cytoplasmic granules. Reaction product was also found in some, but not all, membrane-coating granules. In the upper layers of the epithelium, the membrane-coating granules extruded their contents and acid phosphatase was localized in the intercellular spaces. The possible roles of acid phosphatase in keratinization, desquamation, or modification of substances in the intercellular compartment are discussed.

  14. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  15. Phosphatase activity on the cell wall of Fonsecaea pedrosoi.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, L F; Palmeira, V F; Pinheiro, A A S; Alviano, C S; Rozental, S; Travassos, L R; Meyer-Fernandes, J R

    2003-12-01

    The activity of a phosphatase was characterized in intact mycelial forms of Fonsecaea pedrosoi, a pathogenic fungus that causes chromoblastomycosis. At pH 5.5, this fungus hydrolyzed p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) to p-nitrophenol (p-NP) at a rate of 12.78 +/- 0.53 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight. The values of Vmax and apparent Km for p-NPP hydrolyses were measured as 17.89 +/- 0.92 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight and 1.57 +/- 0.26 mmol/l, respectively. This activity was inhibited at increased pH, a finding compatible with an acid phosphatase. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by classical inhibitors of acid phosphatases such as sodium orthovanadate (Ki = 4.23 micromol/l), sodium molybdate (Ki = 7.53 micromol/l) and sodium fluoride (Ki = 126.78 micromol/l) in a dose-dependent manner. Levamizole (1 mmol/l) and sodium tartrate (10 mmol/l), had no effect on the enzyme activity. Cytochemical localization of the acid phosphatase showed electrondense cerium phosphate deposits on the cell wall, as visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Phosphatase activity in F. pedrosoi seems to be associated with parasitism, as sclerotic cells, which are the fungal forms mainly detected in chromoblastomycosis lesions, showed much higher activities than conidia and mycelia did. A strain of F. pedrosoi recently isolated from a human case of chromoblastomycosis also showed increased enzyme activity, suggesting that the expression of surface phosphatases may be stimulated by interaction with the host.

  16. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  17. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Carlos Eduardo; Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Beassoni, Paola Rita; Lisa, Angela Teresita

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) or phosphorylcholine (Pcho). The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs): one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O)2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure. PMID:21915373

  18. Cloning of the canine glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kishnani, P.; Bao, Y.; Brix, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two Maltese puppies with massive hepatomegaly and failure to thrive were found to have a markedly reduced Glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity in the liver and kidney. Deficiency of G-6-Pase activity causes type 1a glycogen storage disease in humans. To further study the mutation responsible for the disease in dog, we cloned G-6-Pase canine cDNA from normal mixed breed dog liver RNA using reverse transcriptase and PCR amplification using primers derived from the published murine G-6-Pase gene sequence. Sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1071 nucleotides that encodes a predicted 357 amino acid polypeptide in the canine G-6-Pase gene, same as mouse and human. We found more than 90% sequence homology between dog and human G-6-Pase sequence. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced canine G-6-Pase polypeptide shows six transmembrane-spanning segments similar to those seen in human and mouse. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization is similarly predicted by the presence of the ER protein retention signal KK positioned 3 and 4 amino acids from the carboxy terminal. Potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are identified at positions 96, 203, and 276. Northern blot analysis revealed increased G-6-Pase mRNA in the deficient dog liver compared to control. This could possibly reflect upregulation of transcription due to the persistent hypoglycemic state. Further studies are directed at the identification of the mutation involved in this deficient dog strain. Characterization of the G-6-Pase gene and protein in the deficient dog model can pave the way for new understanding in the pathophysiology of this disease and for the trials of novel therapeutic approaches including gene therapy.

  19. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the proinflammatory nucleotide uridine diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hamarneh, Sulaiman R.; Mohamed, Mussa M. Rafat; Ramasamy, Sundaram; Yammine, Halim; Patel, Palak; Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Alam, Sayeda N.; Muhammad, Nur; Moaven, Omeed; Teshager, Abeba; Malo, Nondita S.; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Warren, H. Shaw; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Malo, Madhu S.; Hodin, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate (UDP) is a proinflammatory nucleotide implicated in inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is a gut mucosal defense factor capable of inhibiting intestinal inflammation. We used the malachite green assay to show that IAP dephosphorylates UDP. To study the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP, UDP or other proinflammatory ligands (LPS, flagellin, Pam3Cys, or TNF-α) in the presence or absence of IAP were applied to cell cultures, and IL-8 was measured. UDP caused dose-dependent increase in IL-8 release by immune cells and two gut epithelial cell lines, and IAP treatment abrogated IL-8 release. Costimulation with UDP and other inflammatory ligands resulted in a synergistic increase in IL-8 release, which was prevented by IAP treatment. In vivo, UDP in the presence or absence of IAP was instilled into a small intestinal loop model in wild-type and IAP-knockout mice. Luminal contents were applied to cell culture, and cytokine levels were measured in culture supernatant and intestinal tissue. UDP-treated luminal contents induced more inflammation on target cells, with a greater inflammatory response to contents from IAP-KO mice treated with UDP than from WT mice. Additionally, UDP treatment increased TNF-α levels in intestinal tissue of IAP-KO mice, and cotreatment with IAP reduced inflammation to control levels. Taken together, these studies show that IAP prevents inflammation caused by UDP alone and in combination with other ligands, and the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP against UDP persists in mouse small intestine. The benefits of IAP in intestinal disease may be partly due to inhibition of the proinflammatory activity of UDP. PMID:23306083

  20. Diagnostic Utility of Heat Stable Alkaline Phosphatase in Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abu Raghavan, Srinivasan; Ghosh, Seethesh; Basu, Sharbari; Ramasamy, Ramesh; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) complicate 3-10% of all pregnancies. Though there are several biochemical parameters which aid in predicting hypertension of pregnancy, human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), synthesized in placenta during pregnancy by placental syncytiotrophoblast, assumes diagnostic relevance. The purpose of this study was to compare the total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and heat stable placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) levels in the serum of normotensive and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and to evaluate the clinical utility of ALP and PLAP as a reliable, sensitive, specific and economical biochemical marker of HDP. Materials and Methods: This was a case control study, carried out on pregnant women with hypertension, of south Indian population. Study included pregnant women, 60 patients with hypertension and 60 controls. Biochemical assays were carried out by the IFCC approved procedures based on spectrophotometric method and using fully automated random access chemistry analyser. Data was compared by using student t-test. ROC was drawn to find out optimum cut off for ALP, PLAP and PLAP/ALP ratio in HDP. Pearson’s correlation was performed to ascertain the association among markers. Results: Serum total ALP, PLAP and PLAP/ALP ratio levels were significantly higher in hypertensive pregnant women when compared to controls (p<0.05). There was significant correlation among ALP, PLAP and DBP. ROC analysis of ALP (169.5), PLAP (69) and PLAP/ALP (0.44) ratios showed optimum cut-offs in diagnosis of hypertension in pregnancy. Conclusion: Serum heat stable ALP isoenzyme and PLAP/ALP ratio could be useful adjuvant markers in diagnosis of HDP in association with other relevant and economically viable biochemical tests. PMID:25584211

  1. PTEN Increases Autophagy and Inhibits the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Glioma Cells Independently of its Lipid Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Errafiy, Rajaa; Aguado, Carmen; Ghislat, Ghita; Esteve, Juan M.; Gil, Anabel; Loutfi, Mohammed; Knecht, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Two major mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, operate in mammalian cells. PTEN, which is frequently mutated in glioblastomas, is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a dual specificity phosphatase that antagonizes the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is a key regulator of autophagy. Here, we investigated in U87MG human glioma cells the role of PTEN in the regulation of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, because both are functionally linked and are relevant in cancer progression. Since U87MG glioma cells lack a functional PTEN, we used stable clones that express, under the control of a tetracycline-inducible system (Tet-on), wild-type PTEN and two of its mutants, G129E-PTEN and C124S-PTEN, which, respectively, lack the lipid phosphatase activity only and both the lipid and the protein phosphatase activities of this protein. Expression of PTEN in U87MG glioma cells decreased proteasome activity and also reduced protein ubiquitination. On the contrary, expression of PTEN increased the autophagic flux and the lysosomal mass. Interestingly, and although PTEN negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by its lipid phosphatase activity, both effects in U87MG cells were independent of this activity. These results suggest a new mTOR-independent signaling pathway by which PTEN can regulate in opposite directions the main mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation. PMID:24349488

  2. Allosterically Regulated Phosphatase Activity from Peptide-PNA Conjugates Folded Through Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Machida, Takuya; Dutt, Som; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-07-18

    The importance of spatial organization in short peptide catalysts is well recognized. We synthesized and screened a library of peptides flanked by peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) such that the peptide would be constrained in a hairpin loop upon hybridization. A screen for phosphatase activity led to the discovery of a catalyst with >25-fold rate acceleration over the linear peptide. We demonstrated that the hybridization-enforced folding of the peptide is necessary for activity, and designed a catalyst that is allosterically controlled using a complementary PNA sequence. PMID:27320214

  3. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  4. Effects of organic dairy manure amendment on soil phosphatase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy production is increasing in the U.S. due to concerns over environmental, human, and animal health. It is well known that the application of livestock manure to soil can influence enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling and soil fertility, such as soil phosphatases; however, orga...

  5. Enzymatic method of determining lead using alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, T.N.; Kucheryaeva, V.V.; Dolmanova, I.F.

    1986-03-20

    The purpose of this work was to determine the possibility of using alkaline phosphatase to determine trace amounts of ions of a number of metals - Mg, Ba, Ca, Sr, Cd, Pb - for which there are virtually no sensitive and simple methods of determination.

  6. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  7. Biocatalysis with Sol-Gel Encapsulated Acid Phosphatase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Suhasini; Tran, Vu; Ho, Maggie K.-M.; Phan, Chieu; Chin, Elizabeth; Wemmer, Zeke; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was performed in an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Students learned how to immobilize an enzyme in a sol-gel matrix and how to perform and evaluate enzyme-activity measurements. The enzyme acid phosphatase (APase) from wheat germ was encapsulated in sol-gel beads that were prepared from the precursor…

  8. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  9. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M.; Woodford, Mark R.; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP–substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors. PMID:27466404

  10. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  11. Selective dephosphorylation of histone H1 by nuclear phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sites of H1 phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) and the CaS phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (kinase C) and to study their dephosphorylation by nuclear protein phosphatases. H1 was phosphorylated on a ser residue to approx. 1 mole (TSP)/mole H1 with either kinase A or C. The sites of phosphorylation were differentiated by digestion of the H1 by thrombin or N-bromosuccinimide. Phosphopeptide maps on reversed phase HPLC and gel filtration HPLC clearly showed that the kinase C phosphorylated a different site than the well characterized kinase A site. H1, phosphorylated by kinase C or kinase A, was used as a substrate for the nuclear phosphatases. The nuclear phosphatases were purified from salt extracted rat liver chromatin and separated into 2 forms based on heat-stable inhibitor sensitivity and polycation stimulation. Polycation-stimulated phosphatase rapidly dephosphorylated the kinase C site and slowly dephosphorylated the kinase A site. The inhibitor-sensitive enzyme showed little activity toward either site under standard assay conditions.

  12. Synthesis and secretion of alkaline phosphatase in vitro from first-trimester and term human placentas.

    PubMed Central

    Galski, H; Fridovich, S E; Weinstein, D; De Groot, N; Segal, S; Folman, R; Hochberg, A A

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis and secretion of alkaline phosphatases in vitro by human placental tissue incubated in organ culture were studied. First-trimester placenta synthesizes and secretes two different alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes (heat-labile and heat-stable), whereas in term placenta nearly all the alkaline phosphatase synthesized and secreted is heat-stable. The specific activities of alkaline phosphatases in first-trimester and term placental tissue remain constant throughout the time course of incubation. In the media, specific activities increase with time. Hence, alkaline phosphatase synthesis seems to be the driving force for its own secretion. The rates of synthesis de novo and of alkaline phosphatases were measured. The specific radioactivities of the secreted alkaline phosphatases were higher than the corresponding specific radioactivities in the tissue throughout the entire incubation period. The intracellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes was compared. PMID:7306029

  13. Phosphatase acitivity as biosignatures in terrestrial extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Jun; Nakamoto, Saki; Hara, Masashi; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    Since phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life, phosphatase activity can be a can-didate for biosignatures of biological activity. It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere, high temperature hot springs and stratosphere. We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in ex-treme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and Antarctica , and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life. Core samples and chimney samples were collected at Tarama Knoll in Okinawa Trough in 2009, both in a part of the Archaean Park Project. Surface soil samples are obtained at the Sites 1-8 near Showa Base in Antarctica during the 47th Japan Antarctic exploration mission in 2005-6. Alkaline Phosphatase activ-ity in sea water and in soil was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pH 8.0) as a substrate. Phosphatase activities in extracts were measured fluoro-metrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate. Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratios were also determined by HPLC . Significant enzymatic ac-tivities were revealed in both some of the hydrothermal sub-vent systems and Antarctica soils, which is crucial evidence of vigorous microbial oasis. It is consistent with the fact that large enantiomeric excess of L-form amino acids were found in the same core sequences. Optimum temperatures of ALP in the chimney, Antarctica soil and YNU campus soil were 353 K, 313 K, and 333 K, respectively. The present results suggested that phosphatase activities,, together with amino acids, can be used as possible biosignatures for extant life.

  14. Characterization of a PRL protein tyrosine phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Prakash Rao; Ayong, Lawrence; Eatrides, Jennifer; Schreiber, Melissa; Pham, Connie; Chakrabarti, Ratna; Fidock, David A; Allen, Charles M; Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenylated proteins have important functions in cell growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells. Inhibitors of protein prenylation in malaria have recently shown strong promise as effective antimalarials. In studying protein prenylation in the malaria protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have shown earlier that the incubation of P. falciparum cells with (3)H-prenol precursors resulted in various size classes of labeled proteins. To understand the physiological function of prenylated proteins of malaria parasites, that are targets of prenyltransferase inhibitors, we searched the PlasmoDB database for proteins containing the C-terminus prenylation motif. We have identified, among other potentially prenylated proteins, an orthologue of a PRL (protein of regenerating liver) subgroup protein tyrosine phosphatases, termed PfPRL. Here, we show that PfPRL is expressed in the parasite's intraerythrocytic stages, where it partially associates with endoplasmic reticulum and within a subcompartment of the food vacuole. Additionally, PfPRL targeting parallels that of apical membrane antigen-1 in developing merozoites. Recombinant PfPRL shows phosphatase activity that is preferentially inhibited by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor suggesting that PfPRL functions as a tyrosine phosphatase. Recombinant PfPRL can also be farnesylated in vitro. Inhibition of malarial farnesyltransferase activity can be achieved with the heptapetide RKCHFM, which corresponds to the C-terminus of PfPRL. This study provides the first evidence for expression of enzymatically active PRL-related protein tyrosine phosphatases in malarial parasites, and demonstrates the potential of peptides derived from Plasmodium prenylated proteins as malarial farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  15. The relationship between the MMP system, adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, A; Spiers, JP

    2012-01-01

    The MMPs and their inhibitors [tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMPs) ] form the mainstay of extracellular matrix homeostasis. They are expressed in response to numerous stimuli including cytokines and GPCR activation. This review highlights the importance of adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) in regulating MMPs in the cardiovascular system, which may help explain some of the beneficial effects of targeting the adrenoceptor system in tissue remodelling and will establish emerging crosstalk between these three systems. Although α- and β-adrenoceptor activation increases MMP but decreases TIMP expression, MMPs are implicated in the growth stimulatory effects of adrenoceptor activation through transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, they have recently been found to catalyse the proteolysis of β-adrenoceptors and modulate vascular tone. While the mechanisms underpinning these effects are not well defined, reversible protein phosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases may be key. In particular, PPP (Ser/Thr phosphatases) are not only critical in resensitization and internalization of adrenoceptors but also modulate MMP expression. The interrelationship is complex as isoprenaline (ISO) inhibits okadaic acid [phosphoprotein phosphatase type 1/phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor]-mediated MMP expression. While this may be simply due to its ability to transiently increase PP2A activity, there is evidence for MMP-9 that ISO prevents okadaic acid-mediated expression of MMP-9 through a β-arrestin, NF-κB-dependent pathway, which is abolished by knock-down of PP2A. It is essential that crosstalk between MMPs, adrenoceptors and PPP are investigated further as it will provide important insight into how adrenoceptors modulate cardiovascular remodelling, and may identify new targets for pharmacological manipulation of the MMP system. PMID:22364165

  16. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  17. Differential expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases accompanies the reorganisation of the retina upon laser lesion.

    PubMed

    Besser, Manuela; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Eysel, Ulf T; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    The regulation of protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in virtually all aspects of eukaryotic development. Beginning with the regulation of the cell cycle to cellular proliferation and differentiation, the delicate balance between the phosphorylating activity of kinases and the dephosphorylation by phosphatases controls the outcome of many signal transduction cascades. The generation of cellular diversity occurs in an environment that is structured by the extracellular matrix (ECM) which forms a surrounding niche for stem and progenitor cells. Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions elicit specific signaling pathways that control cellular behavior. In pathological situations such as neural degenerating diseases, gene expression patterns and finally the composition of the ECM change dramatically. This leads to changes of cell behavior and finally results in the failure of regeneration and functional restoration in the adult central nervous system. In order to study the roles of tyrosine phosphatases and ECM in this context, we analyzed the effects of laser-induced retinal injury on the regulation of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) RPTPBr7, Phogrin and RPTPbeta/zeta. The latter occurs in several isoforms, including the soluble released chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan that is expressed in the developing retina. The receptor variants RPTPbeta/zeta(long) and RPTPbeta/zeta(short) may serve as receptors of tenascin-proteins and serve as modulators of cell intrinsic signaling in response to the ECM. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, we show here a time-dependent pattern of gene expression of these molecules following laser lesions of the retina.

  18. The Yeast Ser/Thr Phosphatases Sit4 and Ppz1 Play Opposite Roles in Regulation of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Clotet, Josep; Garí, Eloi; Aldea, Martí; Ariño, Joaquín

    1999-01-01

    Yeast cells overexpressing the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase Ppz1 display a slow-growth phenotype. These cells recover slowly from α-factor or nutrient depletion-induced G1 arrest, showing a considerable delay in bud emergence as well as in the expression of the G1 cyclins Cln2 and Clb5. Therefore, an excess of the Ppz1 phosphatase interferes with the normal transition from G1 to S phase. The growth defect is rescued by overexpression of the HAL3/SIS2 gene, encoding a negative regulator of Ppz1. High-copy-number expression of HAL3/SIS2 has been reported to improve cell growth and to increase expression of G1 cyclins in sit4 phosphatase mutants. We show here that the described effects of HAL3/SIS2 on sit4 mutants are fully mediated by the Ppz1 phosphatase. The growth defect caused by overexpression of PPZ1 is intensified in strains with low G1 cyclin levels (such as bck2Δ or cln3Δ mutants), whereas mutation of PPZ1 rescues the synthetic lethal phenotype of sit4 cln3 mutants. These results reveal a role for Ppz1 as a regulatory component of the yeast cell cycle, reinforce the notion that Hal3/Sis2 serves as a negative modulator of the biological functions of Ppz1, and indicate that the Sit4 and Ppz1 Ser/Thr phosphatases play opposite roles in control of the G1/S transition. PMID:10022927

  19. Targeting PTPs with small molecule inhibitors in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major role in cellular signaling. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Disturbance of the normal balance between PTK and PTP activity results in aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, which has been linked to the etiology of several human diseases, including cancer. A number of PTPs have been implicated in oncogenesis and tumor progression and therefore are potential drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. These include PTP1B, which may augment signaling downstream of HER2/Neu; SHP2, which is the first oncogene in the PTP superfamily and is essential for growth factor-mediated signaling; the Cdc25 phosphatases, which are positive regulators of cell cycle progression; and the PRL phosphatases, which promote tumor metastases. As PTPs have emerged as drug targets for cancer, a number of strategies are currently been explored for the identification of various classes of PTP inhibitors. These efforts have resulted many potent, and in some cases selective, inhibitors for PTP1B, SHP2, Cdc25 and PRL phosphatases. Structural information derived from these compounds serves as a solid foundation upon which novel anti-cancer agents targeted to these PTPs can be developed. PMID:18259840

  20. Activation of protein phosphatase 1 by a small molecule designed to bind to the enzyme's regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Tappan, Erin; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2008-02-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine-threonine phosphatase that participates ubiquitously in cellular signaling, is controlled by a wide variety of regulatory proteins that interact with PP1 at an allosteric regulatory site that recognizes a "loose" consensus sequence (usually designated as RVXF) found in all such regulatory proteins. Peptides containing the regulatory consensus sequence have been found to recapitulate the binding and PP1 activity modulation of the regulatory proteins, suggesting that it might be possible to design small-molecule surrogates that activate PP1 rather than inhibiting it. This prospect constitutes a largely unexplored way of controlling signaling pathways that could be functionally complementary to the much more extensively explored stratagem of kinase inhibition. Based on these principles, we have designed a microcystin analog that activates PP1. PMID:18291321

  1. Detection of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity in intact cells by flow cytometry using the fluorogenic ELF-97 phosphatase substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telford, W. G.; Cox, W. G.; Stiner, D.; Singer, V. L.; Doty, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate 2-(5'-chloro-2'-phosphoryloxyphenyl)-6-chloro-4-(3H)-quinazolinone (ELF((R))-97 for enzyme-labeled fluorescence) has been found useful for the histochemical detection of endogenous AP activity and AP-tagged proteins and oligonucleotide probes. In this study, we evaluated its effectiveness at detecting endogenous AP activity by flow cytometry. METHODS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate was used to detect endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 rat osteosarcoma cells and primary cultures of chick chondrocytes. Cells were labeled with the ELF-97 reagent and analyzed by flow cytometry using an argon ultraviolet (UV) laser. For comparison purposes, cells were also assayed for AP using a Fast Red Violet LB azo dye assay previously described for use in detecting AP activity by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate effectively detected endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 cells, with over 95% of the resulting fluorescent signal resulting from AP-specific activity (as determined by levamisole inhibition of AP activity). In contrast, less than 70% of the fluorescent signal from the Fast Red Violet LB (FRV) assay was AP-dependent, reflecting the high intrinsic fluorescence of the unreacted components. The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was also able to detect very low AP activity in chick chondrocytes that was undetectable by the azo dye method. CONCLUSIONS: The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was able to detect endogenous AP activity in fixed mammalian and avian cells by flow cytometry with superior sensitivity to previously described assays. This work also shows the applicability of ELF-97 to flow cytometry, supplementing its previously demonstrated histochemical applications. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Alkaline phosphatase in osteoblasts is down-regulated by pulsatile fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    It is our hypothesis that interstitial fluid flow plays a role in the bone remodeling response to mechanical loading. The fluid flow-induced expression of three proteins (collagen, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in bone remodeling was investigated. Rat calvarial osteoblasts subjected to pulsatile fluid flow at an average shear stress of 5 dyne/cm2 showed decreased alkaline phosphatase (AP) mRNA expression after only 1 hour of flow. After 3 hours of flow, AP mRNA levels had decreased to 30% of stationary control levels and remained at this level for an additional 5 hours of flow. Steady flow (4 dyne/cm2 fluid shear stress), in contrast, resulted in a delayed and less dramatic decrease in AP mRNA expression to 63% of control levels after 8 hours of flow. The reduced AP mRNA expression under pulsatile flow conditions was followed by reduced AP enzyme activity after 24 hours. No changes in collagen or osteopontin mRNA expression were detected over 8 hours of pulsatile flow. This is the first time fluid flow has been shown to affect gene expression in osteoblasts.

  3. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  4. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-02-18

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  5. Identical phosphatase mechanisms achieved through distinct modes of binding phosphoprotein substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pazy, Y.; Motaleb, M.A.; Guarnieri, M.T.; Charon, N.W.; Zhao, R.; Silversmith, R.E.

    2010-04-05

    Two-component signal transduction systems are widespread in prokaryotes and control numerous cellular processes. Extensive investigation of sensor kinase and response regulator proteins from many two-component systems has established conserved sequence, structural, and mechanistic features within each family. In contrast, the phosphatases which catalyze hydrolysis of the response regulator phosphoryl group to terminate signal transduction are poorly understood. Here we present structural and functional characterization of a representative of the CheC/CheX/FliY phosphatase family. The X-ray crystal structure of Borrelia burgdorferi CheX complexed with its CheY3 substrate and the phosphoryl analogue BeF{sub 3}{sup -} reveals a binding orientation between a response regulator and an auxiliary protein different from that shared by every previously characterized example. The surface of CheY3 containing the phosphoryl group interacts directly with a long helix of CheX which bears the conserved (E - X{sub 2} - N) motif. Conserved CheX residues Glu96 and Asn99, separated by a single helical turn, insert into the CheY3 active site. Structural and functional data indicate that CheX Asn99 and CheY3 Thr81 orient a water molecule for hydrolytic attack. The catalytic residues of the CheX-CheY3 complex are virtually superimposable on those of the Escherichia coli CheZ phosphatase complexed with CheY, even though the active site helices of CheX and CheZ are oriented nearly perpendicular to one other. Thus, evolution has found two structural solutions to achieve the same catalytic mechanism through different helical spacing and side chain lengths of the conserved acid/amide residues in CheX and CheZ.

  6. Counter-regulatory phosphatases TNAP and NPP1 temporally regulate tooth root cementogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, Laura E; Patel, Mudita K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wimer, Helen F; Millán, Jose L; Somerman, Martha J; Foster, Brian L

    2015-03-23

    Cementum is critical for anchoring the insertion of periodontal ligament fibers to the tooth root. Several aspects of cementogenesis remain unclear, including differences between acellular cementum and cellular cementum, and between cementum and bone. Biomineralization is regulated by the ratio of inorganic phosphate (Pi) to mineral inhibitor pyrophosphate (PPi), where local Pi and PPi concentrations are controlled by phosphatases including tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1). The focus of this study was to define the roles of these phosphatases in cementogenesis. TNAP was associated with earliest cementoblasts near forming acellular and cellular cementum. With loss of TNAP in the Alpl null mouse, acellular cementum was inhibited, while cellular cementum production increased, albeit as hypomineralized cementoid. In contrast, NPP1 was detected in cementoblasts after acellular cementum formation, and at low levels around cellular cementum. Loss of NPP1 in the Enpp1 null mouse increased acellular cementum, with little effect on cellular cementum. Developmental patterns were recapitulated in a mouse model for acellular cementum regeneration, with early TNAP expression and later NPP1 expression. In vitro, cementoblasts expressed Alpl gene/protein early, whereas Enpp1 gene/protein expression was significantly induced only under mineralization conditions. These patterns were confirmed in human teeth, including widespread TNAP, and NPP1 restricted to cementoblasts lining acellular cementum. These studies suggest that early TNAP expression creates a low PPi environment promoting acellular cementum initiation, while later NPP1 expression increases PPi, restricting acellular cementum apposition. Alterations in PPi have little effect on cellular cementum formation, though matrix mineralization is affected.

  7. Dual-specific Phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK Mediate AMPA Receptor-induced Oligodendrocyte Death*

    PubMed Central

    Domercq, Maria; Alberdi, Elena; Sánchez-Gómez, Maria Victoria; Ariz, Usue; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter. PMID:21300799

  8. Acid and Alkaline Phosphatase Levels in GCF during Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mohammad; Safavi, Seyed Mohammadreza; Dianat, Omid; Khoramian Tusi, Somayeh; Younessian, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The present constituents of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can reflect the changes occurring in underlying tissues. Considering variety of biologic bone markers, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been examined as bone turn over markers in orthodontic tooth movement. Purpose The current study designed in a longitudinal pattern to determine the changes of acid and alkaline phosphatase (ACP & ALP) in GCF during orthodontic tooth movement. Materials and Method An upper canines from twelve patients (mean age: 14±2 years) undergoing extraction orthodontic treatment for distal movement served as the test tooth (DC), and its contralateral (CC) and antagonist (AC) canines were used as controls. The CC was included in orthodontic appliance without orthodontic force; the AC was free from any orthodontic appliance. The GCF around the experimental teeth was harvested from mesial and distal tooth sites immediately before appliance placement (T0), and 14 (T2) and 28 days (T3) after it and ALP and ACP concentration were determined spectrophotometrically. Results ALP concentration was elevated significantly in DC and CC groups at days 14 and 28 compared with the AC. In DC group, the ALP was significantly greater in mesial sites than distal site, while no significant changes were found between both sites of CC. The peak level of ALP was observed in mesial sites of DC at T2. Regarding ACP, significant elevation of this enzyme was seen in DC group both in mesial and distal sites at T2 and T3. The peak level of this enzyme was seen at T2. Conclusion Monitoring simultaneous changes of ALP and ACP levels in GCF can reflect the tissue responses occur in periodontium during bone formation and bone resorption during orthodontic tooth movement, respectively. PMID:26535403

  9. Counter-regulatory phosphatases TNAP and NPP1 temporally regulate tooth root cementogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, Laura E; Patel, Mudita K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wimer, Helen F; Millán, Jose L; Somerman, Martha J; Foster, Brian L

    2015-03-01

    Cementum is critical for anchoring the insertion of periodontal ligament fibers to the tooth root. Several aspects of cementogenesis remain unclear, including differences between acellular cementum and cellular cementum, and between cementum and bone. Biomineralization is regulated by the ratio of inorganic phosphate (Pi) to mineral inhibitor pyrophosphate (PPi), where local Pi and PPi concentrations are controlled by phosphatases including tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1). The focus of this study was to define the roles of these phosphatases in cementogenesis. TNAP was associated with earliest cementoblasts near forming acellular and cellular cementum. With loss of TNAP in the Alpl null mouse, acellular cementum was inhibited, while cellular cementum production increased, albeit as hypomineralized cementoid. In contrast, NPP1 was detected in cementoblasts after acellular cementum formation, and at low levels around cellular cementum. Loss of NPP1 in the Enpp1 null mouse increased acellular cementum, with little effect on cellular cementum. Developmental patterns were recapitulated in a mouse model for acellular cementum regeneration, with early TNAP expression and later NPP1 expression. In vitro, cementoblasts expressed Alpl gene/protein early, whereas Enpp1 gene/protein expression was significantly induced only under mineralization conditions. These patterns were confirmed in human teeth, including widespread TNAP, and NPP1 restricted to cementoblasts lining acellular cementum. These studies suggest that early TNAP expression creates a low PPi environment promoting acellular cementum initiation, while later NPP1 expression increases PPi, restricting acellular cementum apposition. Alterations in PPi have little effect on cellular cementum formation, though matrix mineralization is affected. PMID:25504209

  10. Counter-regulatory phosphatases TNAP and NPP1 temporally regulate tooth root cementogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zweifler, Laura E; Patel, Mudita K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wimer, Helen F; Millán, Jose L; Somerman, Martha J; Foster, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    Cementum is critical for anchoring the insertion of periodontal ligament fibers to the tooth root. Several aspects of cementogenesis remain unclear, including differences between acellular cementum and cellular cementum, and between cementum and bone. Biomineralization is regulated by the ratio of inorganic phosphate (Pi) to mineral inhibitor pyrophosphate (PPi), where local Pi and PPi concentrations are controlled by phosphatases including tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1). The focus of this study was to define the roles of these phosphatases in cementogenesis. TNAP was associated with earliest cementoblasts near forming acellular and cellular cementum. With loss of TNAP in the Alpl null mouse, acellular cementum was inhibited, while cellular cementum production increased, albeit as hypomineralized cementoid. In contrast, NPP1 was detected in cementoblasts after acellular cementum formation, and at low levels around cellular cementum. Loss of NPP1 in the Enpp1 null mouse increased acellular cementum, with little effect on cellular cementum. Developmental patterns were recapitulated in a mouse model for acellular cementum regeneration, with early TNAP expression and later NPP1 expression. In vitro, cementoblasts expressed Alpl gene/protein early, whereas Enpp1 gene/protein expression was significantly induced only under mineralization conditions. These patterns were confirmed in human teeth, including widespread TNAP, and NPP1 restricted to cementoblasts lining acellular cementum. These studies suggest that early TNAP expression creates a low PPi environment promoting acellular cementum initiation, while later NPP1 expression increases PPi, restricting acellular cementum apposition. Alterations in PPi have little effect on cellular cementum formation, though matrix mineralization is affected. PMID:25504209

  11. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dunster, Joanne L.; Mazet, Francoise; Fry, Michael J.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Tindall, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2), provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in controlling the rate

  12. The effect of hibernation on protein phosphatases from ground squirrel organs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2007-12-15

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a reversible mechanism for the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during mammalian hibernation. The effects of hibernation on the activity of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2C and PTPs) were assessed in five organs of Richardson's ground squirrel. Each phosphatase subfamily responded differently during torpor, and each showed organ-specific patterns of activity changes. The distribution of PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) isoforms (alpha, delta, gamma1) was assessed in five organs, and changes in the subcellular distribution of PP1 were observed during hibernation in liver and muscle. For example, in muscle, cytosolic PP1 content increased and myofibril-associated PP1 decreased during torpor. PP1c from ground squirrel liver was purified to homogeneity and characterized; temperature effects on PP1c maximal activity suggested that temperature had little or no effect on relative dephosphorylation potential at low temperatures. However, nucleotide inhibition of PP1c by ATP, ADP and AMP was much weaker at 5 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C assay temperatures. PP2A activity decreased in three organs (brown adipose, kidney, brain) during hibernation whereas PP2C activity was increased in liver and brain. PTPs were assessed using both a general substrate (ENDpYINASL) and a substrate (DADEpYLIPQQG) specific for PTPs containing the SH2-binding site; both revealed hibernation-associated changes in PTP activities. Changes in protein phosphatase activities suggest the relative importance of these modules in controlling metabolic function and cellular processes during mammalian hibernation.

  13. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Joanne L; Mazet, Francoise; Fry, Michael J; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Tindall, Marcus J

    2015-11-01

    We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2), provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in controlling the rate

  14. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  15. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  16. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  17. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  18. Cytochemical characterization of yolk granule acid phosphatase during early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Dongchun; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a cytochemical method and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine acid phosphatase activities of yolk granules throughout the early developmental stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic change of yolk granule acid phosphatase, and the mechanisms underlying its involvement in yolk degradation during the early developmental stages of molluscs. Three types of yolk granules (YGI, YGII, and YGIII) that differed in electron density and acid phosphatase reaction were identified in early cleavage, morula, blastula, gastrula, trochophore, and veliger stages. The morphological heterogeneities of the yolk granules were related to acid phosphatase activity and degrees of yolk degradation, indicating the association of acid phosphatase with yolk degradation in embryos and larvae of molluscs. Fusion of yolk granules was observed during embryogenesis and larval development of C. gigas. The fusion of YGI (free of acid phosphatase reaction) with YGII (rich in acid phosphatase reaction) could be the way by which yolk degradation is triggered.

  19. Alkaline Phosphatase-Mimicking Peptide Nanofibers for Osteogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gulseren, Gulcihan; Yasa, I Ceren; Ustahuseyin, Oya; Tekin, E Deniz; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2015-07-13

    Recognition of molecules and regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis are some of the functions of enzymes in addition to their catalytic activity. While a diverse array of enzyme-like materials have been developed, these efforts have largely been confined to the imitation of the chemical structure and catalytic activity of the enzymes, and it is unclear whether enzyme-mimetic molecules can also be used to replicate the matrix-regulatory roles ordinarily performed by natural enzymes. Self-assembled peptide nanofibers can provide multifunctional enzyme-mimetic properties, as the active sequences of the target enzymes can be directly incorporated into the peptides. Here, we report enhanced bone regeneration efficiency through peptide nanofibers carrying both catalytic and matrix-regulatory functions of alkaline phosphatase, a versatile enzyme that plays a critical role in bone formation by regulating phosphate homeostasis and calcifiable bone matrix formation. Histidine presenting peptide nanostructures were developed to function as phosphatases. These molecules are able to catalyze phosphate hydrolysis and serve as bone-like nodule inducing scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase-like peptide nanofibers enabled osteogenesis for both osteoblast-like and mesenchymal cell lines.

  20. An alkaline phosphatase reporter for use in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Pascual, Ricardo A; Childress, Kevin O; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes severe gastrointestinal disease in humans and other mammals. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to work with and, until recently, few tools were available for genetic manipulation and molecular analyses. Despite the recent advances in the field, there is no simple or cost-effective technique for measuring gene transcription in C. difficile other than direct transcriptional analyses (e.g., quantitative real-time PCR and RNA-seq), which are time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale-up. We describe the development of an in vivo reporter assay that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of C. difficile gene expression. Using the Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase gene, phoZ, we measured expression of C. difficile genes using a colorimetric alkaline phosphatase assay. We show that inducible alkaline phosphatase activity correlates directly with native gene expression. The ability to analyze gene expression using a standard reporter is an important and critically needed tool to study gene regulation and design genetic screens for C. difficile and other anaerobic clostridia.

  1. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  2. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule SHIP Phosphatase Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Viernes, Dennis R.; Choi, Lydia B.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids play an important role in the transfer of signaling information across the cell membrane in eukaryotes. These signals are often governed by the phosphorylation patterns on the inositols, which are mediated by a number of inositol kinases and phosphatases. The src homology 2 (SH2) – containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) plays a central role in these processes, influencing signals delivered through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. SHIP modulation by small molecules has been implicated as a treatment in a number of human disease states, including cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, alteration of SHIP phosphatase activity may provide a means to facilitate bone marrow transplantation and increase blood cell production. This review discusses the cellular signaling pathways and protein-protein interactions that provide the molecular basis for targeting the SHIP enzyme in these disease states. In addition, a comprehensive survey of small molecule modulators of SHIP1 and SHIP2 is provided, with a focus on the structure, potency, selectivity and solubility properties of these compounds. PMID:24302498

  3. The role of phosphatases in the initiation of skeletal mineralization.

    PubMed

    Millán, José Luis

    2013-10-01

    Endochondral ossification is a carefully orchestrated process mediated by promoters and inhibitors of mineralization. Phosphatases are implicated, but their identities and functions remain unclear. Mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) gene cause hypophosphatasia, a heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia, caused by an arrest in the propagation of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals onto the collagenous extracellular matrix due to accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a physiological TNAP substrate and a potent calcification inhibitor. However, TNAP knockout (Alpl(-/-)) mice are born with a mineralized skeleton and have HA crystals in their chondrocyte- and osteoblast-derived matrix vesicles (MVs). We have shown that PHOSPHO1, a soluble phosphatase with specificity for two molecules present in MVs, phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine, is responsible for initiating HA crystal formation inside MVs and that PHOSPHO1 and TNAP have nonredundant functional roles during endochondral ossification. Double ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function leads to the complete absence of skeletal mineralization and perinatal lethality, despite normal systemic phosphate and calcium levels. This strongly suggests that the Pi needed for initiation of MV-mediated mineralization is produced locally in the perivesicular space. As both TNAP and nucleoside pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) behave as potent ATPases and pyrophosphatases in the MV compartment, our current model of the mechanisms of skeletal mineralization implicate intravesicular PHOSPHO1 function and Pi influx into MVs in the initiation of mineralization and the functions of TNAP and NPP1 in the extravesicular progression of mineralization.

  4. Peptide Microarrays for Real-Time Kinetic Profiling of Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity of Recombinant Phosphatases and Phosphatases in Lysates of Cells or Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Hovestad-Bijl, Liesbeth; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Pijnenburg, Dirk; Hilhorst, Riet; Liskamp, Rob; Ruijtenbeek, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A high-throughput method for the determination of the kinetics of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in a microarray format is presented, allowing real-time monitoring of the dephosphorylation of a 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue. The 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue is incorporated in potential PTP substrates. The peptide substrates are immobilized onto a porous surface in discrete spots. After dephosphorylation by a PTP, a 3-nitrotyrosine residue is formed that can be detected by a specific, sequence-independent antibody. The rate of dephosphorylation can be measured simultaneously on 12 microarrays, each comprising three concentrations of 48 clinically relevant peptides, using 1.0-5.0 μg of protein from a cell or tissue lysate or 0.1-2.0 μg of purified phosphatase. The data obtained compare well with solution phase assays involving the corresponding unmodified phosphotyrosine substrates. This technology, characterized by high-throughput (12 assays in less than 2 h), multiplexing and low sample requirements, facilitates convenient and unbiased investigation of the enzymatic activity of the PTP enzyme family, for instance by profiling of PTP substrate specificities, evaluation of PTP inhibitors and pinpointing changes in PTP activity in biological samples related to diseases. PMID:27514800

  5. Inhibition of the Fc receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages by the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bliska, J B; Black, D S

    1995-01-01

    Suppression of host-cell-mediated immunity is a hallmark feature of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection. To better understand this process, the interaction of Y. pseudotuberculosis with macrophages and the effect of the virulence plasmid-encoded Yersinia tyrosine phosphatase (YopH) on the oxidative burst was analyzed in a chemiluminescence assay. An oxidative burst was generated upon infection of macrophages with a plasmid-cured strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis opsonized with immunoglobulin G antibody. Infection with plasmid-containing Y. pseudotuberculosis inhibited the oxidative burst triggered by secondary infection with opsonized bacteria. The tyrosine phosphatase activity of YopH was necessary for this inhibition. These results indicate that YopH inhibits Fc receptor-mediated signal transduction in macrophages in a global fashion. In addition, bacterial protein synthesis was not required for macrophage inhibition, suggesting that YopH export and translocation are controlled at the posttranslational level. PMID:7822039

  6. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  7. An ancient protein phosphatase, SHLP1, is critical to microneme development in Plasmodium ookinetes and parasite transmission.

    PubMed

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Guttery, David S; Poulin, Benoit; Ramakrishnan, Chandra; Ferguson, David J P; Wall, Richard J; Brady, Declan; Holder, Anthony A; Szöőr, Balázs; Tewari, Rita

    2013-03-28

    Signaling pathways controlled by reversible protein phosphorylation (catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium are of great interest, for both increased understanding of parasite biology and identification of novel drug targets. Here, we report a functional analysis in Plasmodium of an ancient bacterial Shewanella-like protein phosphatase (SHLP1) found only in bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. SHLP1 is abundant in asexual blood stages and expressed at all stages of the parasite life cycle. shlp1 deletion results in a reduction in ookinete (zygote) development, microneme formation, and complete ablation of oocyst formation, thereby blocking parasite transmission. This defect is carried by the female gamete and can be rescued by direct injection of mutant ookinetes into the mosquito hemocoel, where oocysts develop. This study emphasizes the varied functions of SHLP1 in Plasmodium ookinete biology and suggests that it could be a novel drug target for blocking parasite transmission.

  8. Serine/threonine phosphatases in socioeconomically important parasitic nematodes--prospects as novel drug targets?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bronwyn E; Hofmann, Andreas; McCluskey, Adam; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the fundamental biology of parasitic nematodes (=roundworms) that cause serious diseases, affecting literally billions of animals and humans worldwide. Unlocking the biology of these neglected pathogens using modern technologies will yield crucial and profound knowledge of their molecular biology, and could lead to new treatment and control strategies. Supported by studies in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, some recent investigations have provided improved insights into selected protein phosphatases (PPs) of economically important parasitic nematodes (Strongylida). In the present article, we review this progress and assess the potential of serine/threonine phosphatase (STP) genes and/or their products as targets for new nematocidal drugs. Current information indicates that some small molecules, known to specifically inhibit PPs, might be developed as nematocides. For instance, some cantharidin analogues are known to display exquisite PP-inhibitor activity, which indicates that some of them could be designed and tailored to specifically inhibit selected STPs of nematodes. This information provides prospects for the discovery of an entirely novel class of nematocides, which is of paramount importance, given the serious problems linked to anthelmintic resistance in parasitic nematode populations of livestock, and has the potential to lead to significant biotechnological outcomes. PMID:20732402

  9. Pyrophosphate Stimulates Differentiation, Matrix Gene Expression and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Lu, Xi; Lind, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Engstrand, Thomas; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Pyrophosphate is a potent mitogen, capable of stimulating proliferation in multiple cell types, and a critical participant in bone mineralization. Pyrophosphate can also affect the resorption rate and bioactivity of orthopedic ceramics. The present study investigated whether calcium pyrophosphate affected proliferation, differentiation and gene expression in early (MC3T3 pre-osteoblast) and late stage (SAOS-2 osteosarcoma) osteoblasts. Pyrophosphate stimulated peak alkaline phosphatase activity by 50% and 150% at 100μM and 0.1μM in MC3T3, and by 40% in SAOS-2. The expression of differentiation markers collagen 1 (COL1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN) were increased by an average of 1.5, 2, 2 and 3 fold, by high concentrations of sodium pyrophosphate (100μM) after 7 days of exposure in MC3T3. COX-2 and ANK expression did not differ significantly from controls in either treatment group. Though both high and low concentrations of pyrophosphate stimulate ALP activity, only high concentrations (100μM) stimulated osteogenic gene expression. Pyrophosphate did not affect proliferation in either cell type. The results of this study confirm that chronic exposure to pyrophosphate exerts a physiological effect upon osteoblast differentiation and ALP activity, specifically by stimulating osteoblast differentiation markers and extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:27701417

  10. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  11. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase DBP1 nucleates a protein network with a role in regulating plant defense.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, José Luis; Castelló, María José; Naumann, Kai; Lassowskat, Ines; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Scheel, Dierk; Vera, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6), a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK) MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis.

  12. Zein as biodegradable material for effective delivery of alkaline phosphatase and substrates in biokits and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Jornet-Martínez, N; Campíns-Falcó, P; Hall, E A H

    2016-12-15

    A biodegradable material, zein, is proposed as a reagent delivery platform for biokits and biosensors based on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/inhibition in the presence of phosphatase substrates. The immobilization and release of both the substrate and/or the active ALP, in a biodegradable and low-cost material such as zein, a prolamin from maize, and in combination with glycerol as plasticizer have been investigated. Three zein-based devices are proposed for several applications: (1) inorganic phosphorus estimation in water of different sources (river, lake, coastal water and tap water) with a detection limit of 0.2mg/L - compared to at least 1mg/L required by legislation, (2) estimation of ALP in saliva and (3) chlorpyrifos control in commercial preparations. The single-use kits developed are low cost, easy and fast to manufacture and are stable for at least 20 days at -20°C, so the zein film can preserve and deliver both the enzyme and substrates.

  13. Study of the docking-dependent PLK1 phosphorylation of the CDC25B phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Lobjois, Valerie; Froment, Carine; Braud, Emmanuelle; Grimal, Fanny; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Ducommun, Bernard; Bouche, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Phosphorylation of CDC25B by CDK1 enhances its substrate properties for PLK1 in vitro. {yields} Sequential phosphorylation of CDC25B is analyzed using {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O ATP. {yields} Thirteen sites phosphorylated by PLK1 have been identified. -- Abstract: CDC25 (A, B and C) phosphatases control cell cycle progression through the timely dephosphorylation and activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). At mitosis the CDC25B phosphatase activity is dependent on its phosphorylation by multiple kinases impinging on its localisation, stability and catalytic activity. Here we report that prior phosphorylation of CDC25B by CDK1 enhances its substrate properties for PLK1 in vitro, and we also show that phosphorylated S50 serves as a docking site for PLK1. Using a sophisticated strategy based on the sequential phosphorylation of CDC25B with {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O ATP prior to nanoLC-MS/MS analysis we identified 13 sites phosphorylated by PLK1. This study illustrates the complexity of the phosphorylation pattern and of the subsequent regulation of CDC25B activity.

  14. No obvious abnormality in mice deficient in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta.

    PubMed

    Harroch, S; Palmeri, M; Rosenbluth, J; Custer, A; Okigaki, M; Shrager, P; Blum, M; Buxbaum, J D; Schlessinger, J

    2000-10-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPbeta (RPTPbeta; also known as PTPzeta) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPbeta play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPbeta. RPTPbeta-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPbeta is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPbeta-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPbeta-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPbeta-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPbeta function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPbeta can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  15. A purple acid phosphatase plays a role in nodule formation and nitrogen fixation in Astragalus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Si, Zaiyong; Li, Fang; Xiong, Xiaobo; Lei, Lei; Xie, Fuli; Chen, Dasong; Li, Yixing; Li, Youguo

    2015-08-01

    The AsPPD1 gene from Astragalus sinicus encodes a purple acid phosphatase. To address the functions of AsPPD1 in legume-rhizobium symbiosis, its expression patterns, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and phenotypes associated with its over-expression and RNA interference (RNAi) were investigated. The expression of AsPPD1 was up-regulated in roots and nodules after inoculation with rhizobia. Phosphate starvation reduced the levels of AsPPD1 transcripts in roots while increased those levels in nodules. We confirmed the acid phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities of recombinant AsPPD1 purified from Pichia pastoris, and demonstrated its ability to hydrolyze ADP and ATP in vitro. Subcellular localization showed that AsPPD1 located on the plasma membranes in hairy roots and on the symbiosomes membranes in root nodules. Over-expression of AsPPD1 in hairy roots inhibited nodulation, while its silencing resulted in nodules early senescence and significantly decreased nitrogenase activity. Furthermore, HPLC measurement showed that AsPPD1 overexpression affects the ADP levels in the infected roots and nodules, AsPPD1 silencing affects the ratio of ATP/ADP and the energy charge in nodules, and quantitative observation demonstrated the changes of AsPPD1 transcripts level affected nodule primordia formation. Taken together, it is speculated that AsPPD1 contributes to symbiotic ADP levels and energy charge control, and this is required for effective nodule organogenesis and nitrogen fixation.

  16. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  17. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Is Protective to the Preterm Rat Pup Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Liedel, Jennifer L.; Welak, Scott R.; Fredrich, Katherine; Biesterveld, Ben E.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Gourlay, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common surgical emergency in neonates, with a mortality rate between 10 and 50%. The onset of necrotizing enterocolitis is highly variable and associated with numerous risk factors. Prior research has shown enteral supplementation with intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) decreases the severity of NEC. The aim of this study is to investigate whether IAP is protective to the preterm intestine in the presence of formula feeding and in the absence of NEC. Methods Preterm rat pups were fed formula with or without supplementation with IAP, and intestine was obtained on day of life 3 for analysis of IAP activity, mRNA expression of TNF-a, IL-6 and iNOS and permeability and cytokine expression after LPS. exposure. Results There was no difference in the absolute and intestine specific alkaline phosphatase activity in both groups. Rat pups fed IAP had decreased mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and iNOS. Pups supplemented with IAP had decreased permeability and inflammatory cytokine expression after exposure to LPS ex vivo when compared to formula fed controls. Conclusions Our results support that IAP is beneficial to preterm intestine and decreases intestinal injury and inflammation caused by LPS. PMID:24888842

  18. Tpd3-Pph21 phosphatase plays a direct role in Sep7 dephosphorylation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qizheng; Han, Qi; Wang, Na; Yao, Guangyin; Zeng, Guisheng; Wang, Yanming; Huang, Zhenxing; Sang, Jianli; Wang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Septins are a component of the cytoskeleton and play important roles in diverse cellular processes including cell cycle control, cytokinesis and polarized growth. In fungi, septin organization, dynamics and function are regulated by phosphorylation, and several kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of several septins have been identified. However, little is known about the phosphatases that dephosphorylate septins. Here, we report the characterization of Tpd3, a structural subunit of the PP2A family of phosphatases, in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We found that tpd3Δ/Δ cells are defective in hyphal growth and grow as pseudohyphae under yeast growth conditions with aberrant septin organization. Western blotting detected hyperphosphorylation of the septin Sep7 in cells lacking Tpd3. Tpd3 and Sep7 colocalize at the bud neck and can coimmunoprecipitate. Furthermore, we discovered similar defects in cells lacking Pph21, a catalytic subunit of the PP2A family, and its physical association with Tpd3. Importantly, purified Tpd3-Pph21 complexes can dephosphorylate Sep7 in vitro. Together, our findings strongly support the idea that the Tpd3-Pph21 complex dephosphorylates Sep7 and regulates morphogenesis and cytokinesis. The tpd3Δ/Δ mutant is greatly reduced in virulence in mice, providing a potential antifungal target.

  19. Uncoupling of 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase functions in budding yeast. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA 3'-phosphatase (TPP1).

    PubMed

    Vance, J R; Wilson, T E

    2001-05-01

    Polynucleotide kinase is a bifunctional enzyme containing both DNA 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase activities seemingly suited to the coupled repair of single-strand nicks in which the phosphate has remained with the 3'-base. We show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to repair transformed dephosphorylated linear plasmids by non-homologous end joining with considerable efficiency independently of the end-processing polymerase Pol4p. Homology searches and biochemical assays did not reveal a 5'-kinase that would account for this repair, however. Instead, open reading frame YMR156C (here named TPP1) is shown to encode only a polynucleotide kinase-type 3'-phosphatase. Tpp1p bears extensive similarity to the ancient L-2-halo-acid dehalogenase and DDDD phosphohydrolase superfamilies, but is specific for double-stranded DNA. It is present at high levels in cell extracts in a functional form and so does not represent a pseudogene. Moreover, the phosphatase-only nature of this gene is shared by Saccharomyces mikatae YMR156C and Arabidopsis thaliana K15M2.3. Repair of 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl lesions is thus uncoupled in budding yeast as compared with metazoans. Repair of transformed dephosphorylated plasmids, and 5'-hydroxyl blocking lesions more generally, likely proceeds by a cycle of base removal and resynthesis.

  20. Effects of extract of soapnut Sapindus emarginatus on esterases and phosphatases of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Koodalingam, Arunagirinathan; Mullainadhan, Periasamy; Arumugam, Munusamy

    2011-04-01

    and alkaline phosphatase activity between the control and exposed test organisms. Despite the fact that the soapnut kernel extract causes mortality of both the larvae and pupae of A. aegypti, the findings of this study demonstrate that the impact of this extract is most pronounced in various enzyme profiles of the larvae rather than the pupae. Such discrepancy implicates the presence of unique biochemical mechanisms in the pupae of mosquito for detoxification of botanical biocides. PMID:21251906

  1. An increase in galectin-3 causes cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ-induced signal transduction and growth inhibition in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Po-Chun; Chen, Chia-Ling; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β facilitates interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by inhibiting Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2. Mutated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) cause AKT activation and GSK-3β inactivation to induce SHP2-activated cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in human gastric cancer AGS cells. This study investigated the potential role of galectin-3, which acts upstream of AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2, in gastric cancer cells. Increasing or decreasing galectin-3 altered IFN-γ signaling. Following cisplatin-induced galectin-3 upregulation, surviving cells showed cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. Galectin-3 induced IFN-γ resistance independent of its extracellular β-galactoside-binding activity. Galectin-3 expression was not regulated by PI3K activation or by a decrease in PTEN. Increased galectin-3 may cause GSK-3β inactivation and SHP2 activation by promoting PDK1-induced AKT phosphorylation at a threonine residue. Overexpression of AKT, inactive GSK-3βR96A, SHP2, or active SHP2D61A caused cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in IFN-γ-sensitive MKN45 cells. IFN-γ-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in AGS cells were observed until galectin-3 expression was downregulated. These results demonstrate that an increase in galectin-3 facilitates AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2 signaling, causing cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. PMID:26934444

  2. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  3. Structural basis for the glucan phosphatase activity of Starch Excess4

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Taylor, Adam O.; Pace, Rachel M.; Meekins, David A.; Guo, Hou-Fu; Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2010-11-12

    Living organisms utilize carbohydrates as essential energy storage molecules. Starch is the predominant carbohydrate storage molecule in plants while glycogen is utilized in animals. Starch is a water-insoluble polymer that requires the concerted activity of kinases and phosphatases to solubilize the outer surface of the glucan and mediate starch catabolism. All known plant genomes encode the glucan phosphatase Starch Excess4 (SEX4). SEX4 can dephosphorylate both the starch granule surface and soluble phosphoglucans and is necessary for processive starch metabolism. The physical basis for the function of SEX4 as a glucan phosphatase is currently unclear. Herein, we report the crystal structure of SEX4, containing phosphatase, carbohydrate-binding, and C-terminal domains. The three domains of SEX4 fold into a compact structure with extensive interdomain interactions. The C-terminal domain of SEX4 integrally folds into the core of the phosphatase domain and is essential for its stability. The phosphatase and carbohydrate-binding domains directly interact and position the phosphatase active site toward the carbohydrate-binding site in a single continuous pocket. Mutagenesis of the phosphatase domain residue F167, which forms the base of this pocket and bridges the two domains, selectively affects the ability of SEX4 to function as a glucan phosphatase. Together, these results reveal the unique tertiary architecture of SEX4 that provides the physical basis for its function as a glucan phosphatase.

  4. Dephosphorylation of chicken cardiac myofibril C-protein by protein phosphatases 1 and 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Thysseril, T.J.; Hegazy, M.G.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    C-Protein, which is a regulatory component of cardiac muscle myofibrils, is phosphorylated in response to US -adrenergic agonists by a cAMP-dependent mechanism and dephosphorylated in response to cholinergic agonists. It is believed that the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation is due to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The protein phosphatase(s) involved in the dephosphorylation of C-protein has not been determined. In this study, chicken cardiac C-protein was phosphorylated with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase to about 3 mol phosphate/mol C-protein. Incubation of (TSP)C-protein with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 or 2A rapidly removed 30-40% of TS(P). Phosphopeptide maps and phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the major site(s) dephosphorylated by either phosphatase was a phosphothreonine residue(s) located on the same tryptic peptide and on the same CNBr fragment. Increasing the incubation period or the phosphatase concentration did not result in any further dephosphorylation of C-protein by phosphatase 1, but phosphatase 2A completely dephosphorylated C-protein. Preliminary studies showed that the major protein phosphatase associated with the myofibril was phosphatase 2A. These results indicate the phosphatase 2A may be important in the regulation of the phosphorylation state of C-protein.

  5. A toxin-binding alkaline phosphatase fragment synergizes Bt toxin Cry1Ac against susceptible and resistant Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbo; Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Zhang, Dandan; Zhang, Yongdong; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50) of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f) was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects.

  6. The growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene 3CH134 encodes a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C H; Sun, H; Lau, L F; Tonks, N K

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of fibroblasts with serum growth factors results in the rapid activation of a set of immediate-early genes, among them 3CH134. We have purified a bacterially expressed form of the 3CH134-encoded polypeptide and demonstrated that it has intrinsic protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48) activity in vitro. This activity is optimal at pH 7.5, is sensitive to vanadate and cysteinyl modifying agents, and is insensitive to a panel of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors. Purified 3CH134 protein displays a high degree of selectivity among the tyrosine-phosphorylated polypeptide substrates tested. Under our assay conditions, the rates of dephosphorylation are in the order EDNDYINASL peptide < myelin basic protein < reduced, carboxyamidomethylated, and maleylated lysozyme (RCML) < p42mapk. There is a 200-fold range in rates for these substrates, with p42mapk dephosphorylated 15-fold more rapidly than RCML. Although 3CH134 is most closely related to the tyrosine/serine dual-specificity phosphatase VH1, we failed to detect any 3CH134-directed activity on casein or RCML phosphorylated on serine/threonine residues by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since 3CH134 expression is controlled transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally, it may represent a class of PTPases whose activity is regulated at the level of protein synthesis and degradation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8389479

  7. KDEL receptor 1 regulates T-cell homeostasis via PP1 that is a key phosphatase for ISR

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Arima, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Toru; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hironao; Ogura, Hideki; Ueda, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Harada, Masaya; Kobayashi, Junya; Hasegawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishida, Keigo; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Toshio; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    KDEL receptors are responsible for retrotransporting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones from the Golgi complex to the ER. Here we describe a role for KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) that involves the regulation of integrated stress responses (ISR) in T cells. Designing and using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutant mouse line, T-Red (naïve T-cell reduced), we show that a point mutation in KDELR1 is responsible for the reduction in the number of naïve T cells in this model owing to an increase in ISR. Mechanistic analysis shows that KDELR1 directly regulates protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a key phosphatase for ISR in naïve T cells. T-Red KDELR1 does not associate with PP1, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity against eIF2α and subsequent expression of stress responsive genes including the proapoptotic factor Bim. These results demonstrate that KDELR1 regulates naïve T-cell homeostasis by controlling ISR. PMID:26081938

  8. A Toxin-Binding Alkaline Phosphatase Fragment Synergizes Bt Toxin Cry1Ac against Susceptible and Resistant Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yutao; Zhang, Dandan; Zhang, Yongdong; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50) of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f) was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects. PMID:25885820

  9. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of Plasmodium Protein Phosphatases Reveals Key Regulators of Parasite Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guttery, David S.; Poulin, Benoit; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Wall, Richard J.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Brady, Declan; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Whipple, Sarah; Straschil, Ursula; Wright, Megan H.; Mohamed, Alyaa M.A.H.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Arold, Stefan T.; Tate, Edward W.; Holder, Anthony A.; Wickstead, Bill; Pain, Arnab; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. PMID:25011111

  10. Assessment of the serum levels of bone alkaline phosphatase with a new immunoradiometric assay in patients with metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garnero, P.; Delmas, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    The authors measured serum bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) with a new immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in a large sample of healthy controls comprising 173 women and 180 men, 20-88 yr of age, and in patients with metabolic bone disease. Using serum samples from patients with liver disease and patients with Paget's disease with elevated total alkaline phosphatase (T-ALP) as a source of, respectively, liver and bone isoenyzmes, they determined a liver cross-reactivity of the IRMA of 16% that was confirmed by electrophoresis of the circulating alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes. The IRMA was linear for serial sample dilutions, the recovery ranged from 89-110%, and the intra- and interassay variations were below 7% and 9%, respectively. B-ALP increased linearly with age in both sexes, and the mean B-ALP serum levels were not significantly different for women and men (11.3 [+-] 4.8 ng/mL for women; 11.0 [+-] 4.0 ng/mL for men). The increase in B-ALP after the menopause was significantly higher than that in T-ALP (+77% vs. +24%; P<0.001). When the values of postmenopausal women were expressed as the SD from the mean of premenopausal women, the mean Z scores were 2.2[+-] 1.8 for B-ALP and 0.9 [+-] 1.3 for T-ALP (P<0.001 between the two).

  11. A toxin-binding alkaline phosphatase fragment synergizes Bt toxin Cry1Ac against susceptible and resistant Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbo; Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Zhang, Dandan; Zhang, Yongdong; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50) of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f) was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects. PMID:25885820

  12. Graphical techniques for kinetic data analyses of alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.W.; Brand, H.R.

    1980-09-01

    The use of an automated reactor for the experimentation and on-line graphics for the rapid and exhaustive analysis of experimental data is described. Traditional (linear) methods are used for selecting the most promising model for the alkaline phosphatase catalyzed reaction from a set of ten models under consideration. Then, nonlinear techniques for model selection are used and compared with traditional techniques. In both approaches, interactive graphics techniques are used to advantage for evaluating various models and for examining the quality of the experimental data.

  13. Structural Basis for Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulation and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Peti, Wolfgang; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. However, the free catalytic subunit of PP1, while an effective enzyme, lacks substrate specificity. Instead, it depends on a diverse set of regulatory proteins (≥200) to confer specificity towards distinct substrates. Here, we discuss recent advances in structural studies of PP1 holoenzyme complexes and summarize the new insights these studies have provided into the molecular basis of PP1 regulation and specificity. PMID:22284538

  14. A description of alkaline phosphatases from marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiyuan; Jia, Hongbing; Yu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are non-specific phosphohydrolases, and they are widely used in clinical diagnostics and biological studies. APs are widespread in nature and exhibit different structural formulations. Based on the diversity of biogenetic sources, APs exhibit temperature-propensity traits, and they are classified as psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic. In this article, the characteristics of psychrophilic APs from marine organisms were described, accompanied by a simple description of APs from other organisms. This review will facilitate better utilization of marine APs in the biotechnology field.

  15. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) isoenzymatic patterns in Iraqi children with visceral leishmaniasis before and after treatment with stibogluconate.

    PubMed

    Taher, Jasim Hameed; Al-Mulla Hummadi, Yassir Mustafa Kamal; Al-Bashir, Nada Muhammed Taha; Al-Araji, Ali Shaalan

    2016-06-01

    The mean levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase enzymes exhibited a significant elevation in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients compared to the control. There was no significant change in relation to the sex and age. ALP isoenzymes revealed three banding patterns which differ from the three zymodems which were obtained from control group. These differences may be due to isoenzymes activity of patients with VL before and after therapy. Lactate dehydrogenase (LD) isoenzymes revealed five banding patterns differ from the five normal zymodems. These differences mainly occurred due to LD isoenzymes activity in patients with VL before and after therapy. PMID:27413293

  17. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects.

  18. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects. PMID:26592247

  19. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  20. Regan isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase as a tumour marker for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, J; Pattman, S; Jenkinson, F; Quinton, R

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme present in all tissues of the human body. Several isoforms of this enzyme have been described with different catalytic nature, stability and antigenic structure. Rises in the activity of alkaline phosphatase are recognised in various states including bone diseases, liver disease, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and malignant processes. The Regan isoenzyme, a rare variant of placental alkaline phosphatase, has been identified circulating in association with various tumours. The reported case describes a rising Regan isoform of alkaline phosphatase concentrations that led to a new diagnosis of occult renal cell carcinoma and persistently elevated activity postoperatively signposting persistent or recurrent disease.

  1. Biochemical characterization of the extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Quisel, J D; Wykoff, D D; Grossman, A R

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the extracellular phosphatases produced by the terrestrial green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to phosphorus deprivation. Phosphorus-deprived cells increase extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity 300-fold relative to unstarved cells. The alkaline phosphatases are released into the medium by cell-wall-deficient strains and by wild-type cells after treatment with autolysin, indicating that they are localized to the periplasm. Anion-exchange chromatography and analysis by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that there are two major inducible alkaline phosphatases. A calcium-dependent enzyme composed of 190-kD glycoprotein subunits accounts for 85 to 95% of the Alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase has optimal activity at pH 9.5 and a Km of 120 to 262 microns for all physiological substrates tested, with the exception of phytic acid, which it cleaved with a 50-fold lower efficiency. An enzyme with optimal activity at pH 9 and no requirement for divalent cations accounts for 2 to 10% of the alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase was only able to efficiently hydrolyze arylphosphates. The information reported here, in conjunction with the results of previous studies, defines the complement of extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas cells. PMID:8754684

  2. Modulation of plant HMG-CoA reductase by protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Leivar, Pablo; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, critical not only for normal plant development, but also for the adaptation to demanding environmental conditions. Consistent with this notion, plant HMGR is modulated by many diverse endogenous signals and external stimuli. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene and brassinosteroid signaling and now emerges as a positive and negative multilevel regulator of plant HMGR, both during normal growth and in response to a variety of stress conditions. The interaction with HMGR is mediated by B″ regulatory subunits of PP2A, which are also calcium binding proteins. The new discoveries uncover the potential of PP2A to integrate developmental and calcium-mediated environmental signals in the control of plant HMGR. PMID:21701259

  3. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  4. Plastic responses of larval mass and alkaline phosphatase to cadmium in the gypsy moth larvae.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Lazarević, Jelica; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija

    2009-05-01

    Biochemical analyses can point to toxicant presence before its effects can be detected at higher organizational levels. We investigated responses of larval mass and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to different cadmium treatments in 4th instar gypsy moth larvae from 20 full-sib families. Changes in trait values and trait plasticities as well as their variation were monitored after acute and chronic exposure or recovery from two cadmium concentrations (Cd(1)=10microg and Cd(2)=30microg Cd/g dry food). Larval mass only decreased, without returning to the control level at recovery stage following chronic cadmium challenge. Acute stress did not change trait value but increased genetic variance of larval mass. Significant ALP activity changes, sensitivity of isozyme patterns (Mr of 60, 64, and 85kDa) and increased variation in ALP plasticity during acute exposure to cadmium point to its possible aplication as an exposure biomarker.

  5. Sequential processing of lysosomal acid phosphatase by a cytoplasmic thiol proteinase and a lysosomal aspartyl proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, S; Waheed, A; Schmidt, B; Laidler, P; von Figura, K

    1989-01-01

    BHK cells expressing human lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) transport LAP to lysosomes as an integral membrane protein. In lysosomes LAP is released from the membrane by proteolytic processing, which involves at least two cleavages at the C terminus of LAP. The first cleavage is catalysed by a thiol proteinase at the outside of the lysosomal membrane and removes the bulk of the cytoplasmic tail of LAP. The second cleavage is catalysed by an aspartyl proteinase inside the lysosomes and releases the luminal part of LAP from the membrane-spanning domain. The first cleavage at the cytoplasmic side of the lysosomal membrane depends on acidification of lysosomes and the second cleavage inside the lysosomes depends on prior processing of the cytoplasmic tail. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail controls the conformation of the luminal portion of LAP and vice versa. Images PMID:2684640

  6. Alkaline phosphatase induces the mineralization of sheets of collagen implanted subcutaneously in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Beertsen, W; van den Bos, T

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether alkaline phosphatase (ALP) can cause the mineralization of collagenous matrices in vivo, bovine intestinal ALP was covalently bound to slices of guanidine-extracted demineralized bovine dentin (DDS). The preparations were implanted subcutaneously over the right half of the rat skull. Control slices not treated with the enzyme were implanted over the left half of the skull of the same animals. Specimens were harvested after periods varying from 1 to 4 wk. It was shown that ALP-coupled DDS rapidly accumulated hydroxyapatite crystals. 4 wk after implantation, the content of calcium and phosphate per microgram of hydroxyproline amounted up to 80 and 60%, respectively, of that found in normal bovine dentin. Our observations present direct evidence that ALP may play a crucial role in the induction of hydroxyapatite deposition in collagenous matrices in vivo. Images PMID:1602003

  7. Phosphatase Wip1 as a new therapeutic target for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaofei; Du, Junfeng; Zhao, Yong; Guan, Wenxian

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a pathophysiology involving local tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Accumulating evidence has confirmed that the infiltration of neutrophils is of central importance in mediating intestinal I/R injury. On the other hand, adequate neutrophils in the intestine could also benefit the antibacterial translocation and tissue repair. Consequently, regulation of neutrophil immunity after intestinal I/R might be a promising therapy for controlling intestinal injury. Wip1 is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase that acts as the master regulator of tumorigenesis. However, emerging evidence highlights the importance of Wip1 in regulating neutrophil development, maturation, migration and neutrophil pro-inflammatory cytokine productions. Our recent studies showed that Wip1 negatively regulates neutrophil inflammatory responses and plays a protective role in intestinal I/R injury. In light of this discovery, we believe that Wip1 might be a new therapeutic target for treating intestinal I/R injury.

  8. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Inhibition of lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase by benzofuran salicylic acids.

    PubMed

    Vang, Torkel; Xie, Yuli; Liu, Wallace H; Vidović, Dusica; Liu, Yidong; Wu, Shuangding; Smith, Deborah H; Rinderspacher, Alison; Chung, Caty; Gong, Gangli; Mustelin, Tomas; Landry, Donald W; Rickert, Robert C; Schürer, Stephan C; Deng, Shi-Xian; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-01-27

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp, PTPN22) is a critical negative regulator of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ptpn22 gene correlates with the incidence of various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Since the disease-associated allele is a more potent inhibitor of TCR signaling, specific Lyp inhibitors may become valuable in treating autoimmunity. Using a structure-based approach, we synthesized a library of 34 compounds that inhibited Lyp with IC(50) values between 0.27 and 6.2 μM. A reporter assay was employed to screen for compounds that enhanced TCR signaling in cells, and several inhibitors displayed a dose-dependent, activating effect. Subsequent probing for Lyp's direct physiological targets by immunoblot analysis confirmed the ability of the compounds to inhibit Lyp in T cells. Selectivity profiling against closely related tyrosine phosphatases and in silico docking studies with the crystal structure of Lyp yielded valuable information for the design of Lyp-specific compounds. PMID:21190368

  10. Functional Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Souad; Hego, Alexandre; Delierneux, Céline; Wéra, Odile; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are small blood cells derived from cytoplasmic fragments of megakaryocytes and play an essential role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelet activation depends on the rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key signaling molecules, and a number of kinases and phosphatases have been identified as major regulators of platelet function. However, the investigation of novel signaling proteins has suffered from technical limitations due to the anucleate nature of platelets and their very limited levels of mRNA and de novo protein synthesis. In the past, experimental methods were restricted to the generation of genetically modified mice and the development of specific antibodies. More recently, novel (phospho)proteomic technologies and pharmacological approaches using specific small-molecule inhibitors have added additional capabilities to investigate specific platelet proteins.In this chapter, we report methods for using genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the function of platelet signaling proteins. While the described experiments focus on the role of the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling, the presented methods are applicable to any signaling enzyme. Specifically, we describe a testing strategy that includes (1) aggregation and secretion experiments with mouse and human platelets, (2) immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays to study platelet signaling events, (3) detailed protocols to use selected animal models in order to investigate thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo, and (4) strategies for utilizing pharmacological inhibitors on human platelets. PMID:27514813

  11. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  13. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  14. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  15. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  16. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  17. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  18. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The effect of pH and natural microbial phosphatase activity on the speciation of uranium in subsurface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beazley, Melanie J.; Martinez, Robert J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Sobecky, Patricia A.; Taillefert, Martial

    2011-10-01

    The biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate as a result of microbial phosphatase activity is a promising new bioremediation approach to immobilize uranium in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In contrast to reduced uranium minerals such as uraninite, uranium phosphate precipitates are not susceptible to changes in oxidation conditions and may represent a long-term sink for uranium in contaminated environments. So far, the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate has been demonstrated with pure cultures only. In this study, two uranium contaminated soils from the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) were amended with glycerol phosphate as model organophosphate source in small flow-through columns under aerobic conditions to determine whether natural phosphatase activity of indigenous soil bacteria was able to promote the precipitation of uranium(VI) at pH 5.5 and 7.0. High concentrations of phosphate (1-3 mM) were detected in the effluent of these columns at both pH compared to control columns amended with U(VI) only, suggesting that phosphatase-liberating microorganisms were readily stimulated by the organophosphate substrate. Net phosphate production rates were higher in the low pH soil (0.73 ± 0.17 mM d -1) compared to the circumneutral pH soil (0.43 ± 0.31 mM d -1), suggesting that non-specific acid phosphatase activity was expressed constitutively in these soils. A sequential solid-phase extraction scheme and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements were combined to demonstrate that U(VI) was primarily precipitated as uranyl phosphate minerals at low pH, whereas it was mainly adsorbed to iron oxides and partially precipitated as uranyl phosphate at circumneutral pH. These findings suggest that, in the presence of organophosphates, microbial phosphatase activity can contribute to uranium immobilization in both low and circumneutral pH soils through the formation of stable uranyl phosphate minerals.

  20. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor

  1. Environmental photoinactivation of extracellular phosphatases and the effects of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Elisabeth M L; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-01-20

    Alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous extracellular enzymes in aquatic systems and play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus. Yet, the photochemical stability of phosphatase and effects of natural organic matter (DOM) are not completely understood. We demonstrate that phosphatase activity in natural biofilm samples decreased during sunlight exposure similar to well-defined bacterial phosphatase solutions. Direct photoinactivation was slowed by more than 50% in the presence of redox-active dissolved organic matter (DOM, 10 mgC L(–1)) or a model antioxidant (esculetin, 50 μM), even after light screening effects had been accounted for. Thus, DOM can not only inhibit enzymes (in the dark) or sensitize photodegradation by producing photochemically produced reactive intermediates but can also significantly quench direct photoinactivation of phosphatase. Our data further suggest that direct photooxidation of tryptophan residues within the protein structure are significantly involved in the photoinactivation of phosphatase because a loss of tryptophan-like fluorescence paralleled photoinactivation kinetics and because DOM acted as an antioxidant toward photoinactivation, a phenomenon recently established for the photooxidation of freely dissolved tryptophan. Thus, photoinactivation of phosphatase can be significantly slowed in the presence of naturally occurring antioxidants like DOM. The mechanistic link between tryptophan photooxidation and inactivation of phosphatase may have applicability to other extracellular enzymes but remains to be established.

  2. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Płachno, B J; Adamec, L; Lichtscheidl, I K; Peroutka, M; Adlassnig, W; Vrba, J

    2006-11-01

    A new ELF (enzyme labelled fluorescence) assay was applied to detect phosphatase activity in glandular structures of 47 carnivorous plant species, especially Lentibulariaceae, in order to understand their digestive activities. We address the following questions: (1) Are phosphatases produced by the plants and/or by inhabitants of the traps? (2) Which type of hairs/glands is involved in the production of phosphatases? (3) Is this phosphatase production a common feature among carnivorous plants or is it restricted to evolutionarily advanced species? Our results showed activity of the phosphatases in glandular structures of the majority of the plants tested, both from the greenhouse and from sterile culture. In addition, extracellular phosphatases can also be produced by trap inhabitants. In Utricularia, activity of phosphatase was detected in internal glands of 27 species from both primitive and advanced sections and different ecological groups. Further positive reactions were found in Genlisea, Pinguicula, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Drosera, Drosophyllum, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus. In Utricularia and Genlisea, enzymatic secretion was independent of stimulation by prey. Byblis and Roridula are usually considered as "proto-carnivores", lacking digestive enzymes. However, we found high activity of phosphatases in both species. Thus, they should be classified as true carnivores. We suggest that the inflorescence of Byblis and some Pinguicula species might also be an additional "carnivorous organ", which can trap a prey, digest it, and finally absorb available nutrients.

  3. Conserved sequence motifs among bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphatases that define a new phosphohydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Thaller, M C; Schippa, S; Rossolini, G M

    1998-07-01

    Members of a new molecular family of bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs), indicated as class C, were found to share significant sequence similarities to bacterial class B NSAPs and to some plant acid phosphatases, representing the first example of a family of bacterial NSAPs that has a relatively close eukaryotic counterpart. Despite the lack of an overall similarity, conserved sequence motifs were also identified among the above enzyme families (class B and class C bacterial NSAPs, and related plant phosphatases) and several other families of phosphohydrolases, including bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatases, histidinol-phosphatase domains of the bacterial bifunctional enzymes imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratases, and bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphoserine phosphatases and threalose-6-phosphatases. These conserved motifs are clustered within two domains, separated by a variable spacer region, according to the pattern [FILMAVT]-D-[ILFRMVY]-D-[GSNDE]-[TV]-[ILVAM]-[AT S VILMC]-X-¿YFWHKR)-X-¿YFWHNQ¿-X( 102,191)-¿KRHNQ¿-G-D-¿FYWHILVMC¿-¿QNH¿-¿FWYGP¿-D -¿PSNQYW¿. The dephosphorylating activity common to all these proteins supports the definition of this phosphatase motif and the inclusion of these enzymes into a superfamily of phosphohydrolases that we propose to indicate as "DDDD" after the presence of the four invariant aspartate residues. Database searches retrieved various hypothetical proteins of unknown function containing this or similar motifs, for which a phosphohydrolase activity could be hypothesized.

  4. Identification of a Photosystem II Phosphatase Involved in Light Acclimation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Samol, Iga; Shapiguzov, Alexey; Ingelsson, Björn; Fucile, Geoffrey; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Vener, Alexander V.; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a major role in the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changes in light. Two paralogous kinases phosphorylate subsets of thylakoid membrane proteins. STATE TRANSITION7 (STN7) phosphorylates LHCII, the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII), to balance the activity of the two photosystems through state transitions. STN8, which is mainly involved in phosphorylation of PSII core subunits, influences folding of the thylakoid membranes and repair of PSII after photodamage. The rapid reversibility of these acclimatory responses requires the action of protein phosphatases. In a reverse genetic screen, we identified the chloroplast PP2C phosphatase, PHOTOSYSTEM II CORE PHOSPHATASE (PBCP), which is required for efficient dephosphorylation of PSII proteins. Its targets, identified by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, largely coincide with those of the kinase STN8. The recombinant phosphatase is active in vitro on a synthetic substrate or on isolated thylakoids. Thylakoid folding is affected in the absence of PBCP, while its overexpression alters the kinetics of state transitions. PBCP and STN8 form an antagonistic kinase and phosphatase pair whose substrate specificity and physiological functions are distinct from those of STN7 and the counteracting phosphatase PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE1/THYLAKOID-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHATASE38, but their activities may overlap to some degree. PMID:22706287

  5. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Crop Rotation Impacts on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a species with a low efficiency of acquiring soil P. Rotation crops may potentially influence P uptake by potato by increasing soil organic acids, phosphatase activity, and microbial biomass. However, this kind of information is very limited. We measured the activities of acid phosphatase,...

  6. Alterations in skeletal muscle protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity and expression in insulin-resistant human obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, F; Azevedo, J L; Cortright, R; Dohm, G L; Goldstein, B J

    1997-01-01

    Obese human subjects have increased protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity in adipose tissue that can dephosphorylate and inactivate the insulin receptor kinase. To extend these findings to skeletal muscle, we measured PTPase activity in the skeletal muscle particulate fraction and cytosol from a series of lean controls, insulin-resistant obese (body mass index > 30) nondiabetic subjects, and obese individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. PTPase activities in subcellular fractions from the nondiabetic obese subjects were increased to 140-170% of the level in lean controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, PTPase activity in both fractions from the obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes was significantly decreased to 39% of the level in controls (P < 0.05). By immunoblot analysis, leukocyte antigen related (LAR) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B had the greatest increase (threefold) in the particulate fraction from obese, nondiabetic subjects, and immunodepletion of this fraction using an affinity-purified antibody directed at the cytoplasmic domain of leukocyte antigen related normalized the PTPase activity when compared to the activity from control subjects. These findings provide further support for negative regulation of insulin action by specific PTPases in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in human obesity, while other regulatory mechanisms may be operative in the diabetic state. PMID:9218523

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E.; Goldman, Adrian

    2006-09-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.

  8. Phosphorylation of dis2 protein phosphatase at the C-terminal cdc2 consensus and its potential role in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, H; Ishii, K; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    We show that the fission yeast dis2 protein phosphatase, which is highly similar to mammalian type 1 phosphatase, is a phosphoprotein containing phosphoserine (phospho-S) and threonine (phospho-T). It has several phosphorylation sites, two of which locate in the C-terminus. Phospho-T was abolished in the alanine substitution mutant at the C-terminal T316, which is conserved as a residue in the cdc2 consensus, TPPR, in a number of type 1-like phosphatases. In G2-arrested cdc2-L7 cells, the degree of T316 phosphorylation was reduced, whereas it was enhanced in metaphase-arrested nuc2-663 mutant cells. Phospho-T was produced in dis2 by fission yeast cdc2 kinase, but not in the substitution mutant A316, indicating that the T316 residue was the site for cdc2 kinase in vitro. Phosphatase activity of wild type dis2 was reduced by incubation with cdc2 kinase, but that of mutant dis2-A316 was not. Phosphorylation of T316 hence has a potential significance in cell cycle control in conjunction with cdc2 kinase activation and inactivation. Overexpression phenotypes of wild type dis2+, sds21+ and mutant dis2-A316, sds21-TPPR genes were consistent with negative regulation of dis2 by phosphorylation. This type of regulation would explain why cells harboring the dis2-11 mutation enter mitosis but fail to exit from it. Images PMID:7957097

  9. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  10. The serine-threonine phosphatase calcineurin is a regulator of endothelial store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disruption of the endothelium leads to increased permeability, allowing extravasation of macromolecules and other solutes from blood vessels. Calcium entry through a calcium-selective, store-operated calcium (SOC) channel, Isoc, contributes to barrier disruption. An understanding of the mechanisms surrounding the regulation of Isoc is far from complete. We show that the calcium/calmodulin-activated phosphatase calcineurin (CN) plays a role in regulation of SOC entry, possibly through the dephosphorylation of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). Phosphorylation has been implicated as a regulatory mechanism of activity for a number of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) and SOC channels, including Isoc. Our results show that STIM1 phosphorylation increases in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) upon activation of SOC entry. However, the phosphatases involved in STIM1 dephosphorylation are unknown. We found that a CN inhibitor (calcineurin inhibitory peptide [CIP]) increases the phosphorylation pattern of STIM1. Using a fura 2-acetoxymethyl ester approach to measure cytosolic calcium in PAECs, we found that CIP decreases SOC entry following thapsigargin treatment in PAECs. Luciferase assays indicate that thapsigargin induces activation of CN activity and confirm inhibition of CN activity by CIP in PAECs. Also, Isoc is significantly attenuated in whole-cell patch-clamp studies of PAECs treated with CIP. Finally, PAECs pretreated with CIP exhibit decreased interendothelial cell gap formation in response to thapsigargin-induced SOC entry, as compared to control cells. Taken together, our data show that CN contributes to the phosphorylation status of STIM1, which is important in regulation of endothelial SOC entry and Isoc activity. PMID:25006427

  11. Histone H3 as a novel substrate for MAP kinase phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Corttrell M; Chandrasekharan, Unni M; Yang, Lin; Shen, Jianzhong; Kinter, Michael; McDermott, Michael S; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is a nuclear, dual-specificity phosphatase that has been shown to dephosphorylate MAP kinases. We used a "substrate-trap" technique involving a mutation in MKP-1 of the catalytically critical cysteine to a serine residue ("CS" mutant) to capture novel MKP-1 substrates. We transfected the MKP-1 (CS) mutant and control (wild-type, WT) constructs into phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated COS-1 cells. MKP-1-substrate complexes were immunoprecipitated, which yielded four bands of 17, 15, 14, and 10 kDa with the CS MKP-1 mutant but not the WT MKP-1. The bands were identified by mass spectrometry as histones H3, H2B, H2A, and H4, respectively. Histone H3 was phosphorylated, and purified MKP-1 dephosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) in vitro; whereas, histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) was unaffected. We have previously shown that thrombin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upregulated MKP-1 in human endothelial cells (EC). We now show that both thrombin and VEGF caused dephosphorylation of histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) and histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) in EC with kinetics consistent with MKP-1 induction. Furthermore, MKP-1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation but had no effect on H3 (phospho-Thr-3 or Thr-11) dephosphorylation. In summary, histone H3 is a novel substrate of MKP-1, and VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation requires MKP-1. We propose that MKP-1-mediated H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation is a key regulatory step in EC activation by VEGF and thrombin. PMID:19020052

  12. Intramolecular dynamics of structure of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, Vladimir M.; Mjakinnik, Igor V.; Volkova, Alena N.

    1995-01-01

    The luminescent analysis with nano- and millisecond time resolution of intramolecular dynamics of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase was carried out. The effect of pH within the range 7.2 - 9.0, thermal inactivation, limited proteolysis by trypsin, binding of pyrophosphate, interconversion of enzyme and apoenzyme, the replacement of Zn2+ and Mg2+ in the active site by Cd2+ and Ni2+ on the spectral and kinetic parameters of luminescence was investigated. The essential changes of the level of nano- and millisecond dynamics of protein structure were found to correlate with the shift of enzymatic activity. The importance of small- and large-scale flexibility of protein structure for the act of enzymatic catalysis realization was shown.

  13. The influence of complexing pharmaceutical compositions on alkaline phosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2011-06-01

    It is established that the pharmaceutical compositions xydiphon, medifon, succimer, and EDTA, which are used as complexing agents for accelerating the excretion of heavy metals from human organism, at certain concentrations inhibit enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP). It is concluded that xydiphon and EDTA have a noticeable effect on AP activity at concentrations over 0.01 mM; medifon and succimer, at concentrations of over 0.3-0.5 mM. The enzyme's inhibition constants and type of inhibition are determined. Xydiphon is found to manifest the highest affinity to AP ( K I = 0.35 mM). It is shown by kinetic analysis that dissociative chemoinactivation of the enzyme takes place under the action of complexing agents. The corresponding kinetic parameters are calculated.

  14. Significantly Elevated Liver Alkaline Phosphatase in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shamban, Leonid; Patel, Brijesh; Williams, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy can have a mildly elevated liver profile, which should normalize with appropriate therapy. Liver specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in decompensated heart failure (HF) can be mildly elevated. The levels exceeding beyond the expected rise should be a concern and lead to further investigation. The literature reports insubstantial number of cases regarding significantly elevated levels of ALP and congestive hepatopathy. We report a case of a 45-year-old female with known history of severe cardiomyopathy that had persistently elevated levels of ALP. The extensive workup was negative for any specific pathology. The liver biopsy was consistent with congestive hepatopathy. The patient’s ALP levels decreased with aggressive diuretic therapy but still remained elevated.

  15. Utilizing ultrafiltration to remove alkaline phosphatase from clinical analyzer water.

    PubMed

    Bôle, Julien; Mabic, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) conjugated to antibodies is often used in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). These assays are notably sensitive to experimental conditions. A possible source of interference is bacterial ALP, which is released when bacterial contamination occurs in clinical analyzers. Preliminary experiments led to the selection of a detection kit, ALP source, and specific types of tubes for collecting water samples and performing assays. The release of ALP from various strains of bacteria identified in pure water was demonstrated (10-30 x 10(6) cfu/mL released 6-10 microU/microL). It was shown that ultrafiltration is totally efficient in removing ALP from water, while residual ALP activity (2.21 microU/microL after filtration of an ALP solution of 6.22 microU/microL) was observed after filtration using a 0.22-mum filter.

  16. Covalent Docking Predicts Substrates for Haloalkanoate Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme function prediction remains an important open problem. Though structure-based modeling, such as metabolite docking, can identify substrates of some enzymes, it is ill-suited to reactions that progress through a covalent intermediate. Here we investigated the ability of covalent docking to identify substrates that pass through such a covalent intermediate, focusing particularly on the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily. In retrospective assessments, covalent docking recapitulated substrate binding modes of known cocrystal structures and identified experimental substrates from a set of putative phosphorylated metabolites. In comparison, noncovalent docking of high-energy intermediates yielded nonproductive poses. In prospective predictions against seven enzymes, a substrate was identified for five. For one of those cases, a covalent docking prediction, confirmed by empirical screening, and combined with genomic context analysis, suggested the identity of the enzyme that catalyzes the orphan phosphatase reaction in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway of Bacteroides. PMID:25513739

  17. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  18. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  19. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  20. Phosphatase Under-Producer Mutants Have Altered Phosphorus Relations1

    PubMed Central

    Tomscha, Jennifer L.; Trull, Melanie C.; Deikman, Jill; Lynch, Jonathan P.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) acquisition and partitioning are essential for plant homeostasis. P is available for plant uptake when in its inorganic form (H2PO4−, or Pi), but Pi is often limiting in soils. Plants secrete acid phosphatases (APases) into the apoplastic space, which may be important for obtaining Pi from organic P sources; however, the relative importance of these enzymes for plant P nutrition has yet to be determined. We demonstrate that the root-associated APase pool is increased in Arabidopsis when Pi is limiting and document five APase isoforms secreted from Arabidopsis roots. Previously, we presented the identification of the phosphatase under-producer (pup) mutants, which have decreased in vivo root APase staining when grown under low P conditions. Here, we present the characterization of one of these, pup3, and further studies with pup1. pup3 has 49%, 38%, and 37% less specific APase activity in exudates, roots, and shoots, respectively. Root-associated APase activity is decreased by 16% in pup1 and 25% in pup3, regardless of P treatment. Two APase activity isoforms are reduced in pup3 exudates, and root and shoot isoforms are also affected. One of the two exudate isoforms is recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised to an Arabidopsis purple APase recombinant protein (AtPAP12); however, AtPAP12 transcript levels are unaffected in the mutant. The pup3 mutation was mapped to 68.4 ± 6.0 centimorgans on chromosome 5. Although P concentrations were not altered in pup1 and pup3 tissues when grown in nutrient solution in which Pi was the sole source of P, the mutants had 10% (pup1) and 17% (pup3) lower shoot P concentrations when grown in a peat-vermiculite mix in which the majority of the total P was present as organic P. Therefore, the pup defects, which include secreted APases, are functionally important for plant P nutrition. PMID:15122033

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase regulation of endothelial cell apoptosis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Chang, J; Gorospe, M; Passaniti, A

    1996-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, occurs during development and may also be an important factor in many diseases. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways regulating apoptosis. In these studies, loss of endothelial cell-substrate attachment and apoptosis after removal of growth factors was associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues at the cell periphery. Dephosphorylation of total cellular proteins accompanied apoptosis and was reduced by orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Orthovanadate blocked the fragmentation of nuclear DNA, inhibited DNA laddering, and suppressed the expression of TRPM-2, an apoptosis-associated gene. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of FAK125, erk1 (mitogen-activated kinase kinase), and cdc-2 were reduced during apoptosis. FAK125 dephosphorylation was inhibited by orthovanadate, but premature activation (tyrosine dephosphorylation) of cdc-2 was not. Orthovanadate was as effective as basic fibroblast growth factor in activating erk1 without increasing cell proliferation and in preventing the apoptosis of endothelial cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha. Endothelial cell differentiation on extracellular matrix (Matrigel) was also stimulated by orthovanadate in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1) was down-regulated during the early stages of differentiation, remained low for at least 6 hours as differentiation proceeded, and increased upon completion of differentiation. Cells that failed to down-regulate p21 mRNA on Matrigel in the absence of angiogenic factors underwent apoptosis. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatases are actively involved in signal transduction during apoptosis and may regulate p21 expression to inhibit endothelial cell differentiation.

  2. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  3. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  4. Alkaline, acid, and neutral phosphatase activities are induced during development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, R A; Zusman, D R

    1990-01-01

    One of the signals that has been reported to be important in stimulating fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus is starvation for phosphate. We therefore chose to study phosphatase activity during M. xanthus development. Many phosphatases can cleave the substrate p-nitrophenol phosphate. Using this substrate in buffers at various pHs, we obtained a profile of phosphatase activities during development and germination of M. xanthus. These experiments indicated that there are five patterns of phosphatase activity in M. xanthus: two vegetative and three developmental. The two uniquely vegetative activities have pH optima at 7.2 and 8.5. Both require magnesium and both are inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The developmental (spores) patterns of activity have pH optima of 5.2, 7.2, and 8.5. All three activities are Mg independent. Only the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by dithiothreitol. The acid phosphatase activity is induced very early in development, within the first 2 to 4 h. Both the neutral and alkaline phosphatase Mg-independent activities are induced much later, about the time that myxospores become evident (24 to 30 h). The three activities are greatly diminished upon germination; however, the kinetics of loss differ for all three. The acid phosphatase activity declines very rapidly, the neutral activity begins to decline only after spores begin to convert to rods, and the alkaline phosphatase activity remains high until the time the cells begin to divide. All three developmental activities were measured in the developmental signalling mutants carrying asg, csg, and dsg. The pattern of expression obtained in the mutants was consistent with that of other developmentally regulated genes which exhibit similar patterns of expression during development. The ease with which phosphatases can be assayed should make the activities described in this report useful biochemical markers of stages of both fruiting body formation and

  5. Dephosphorylation of CDK9 by protein phosphatase 2A and protein phosphatase-1 in Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Washington, Kareem; Debebe, Zufan; Brady, John; Nekhai, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Tat protein recruits human positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb, consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T1, to HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. CDK9 is maintained in dephosphorylated state by TFIIH and undergo phosphorylation upon the dissociation of TFIIH. Thus, dephosphorylation of CDK9 prior to its association with HIV-1 preinitiation complex might be important for HIV-1 transcription. Others and we previously showed that protein phosphatase-2A and protein phosphatase-1 regulates HIV-1 transcription. In the present study we analyze relative contribution of PP2A and PP1 to dephosphorylation of CDK9 and to HIV-1 transcription in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, PP2A but not PP1 dephosphorylated autophosphorylated CDK9 and reduced complex formation between P-TEFb, Tat and TAR RNA. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid inhibited basal as well as Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription whereas inhibition of PP1 by recombinant nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) inhibited only Tat-induced transcription in vitro. In cultured cells, low concentration of okadaic acid, inhibitory for PP2A, only mildly inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription. In contrast Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription was strongly inhibited by expression of NIPP1. Okadaic acid induced phosphorylation of endogenous as well transiently expressed CDK9, but this induction was not seen in the cells expressing NIPP1. Also the okadaic acid did not induce phosphorylation of CDK9 with mutation of Thr 186 or with mutations in Ser-329, Thr-330, Thr-333, Ser-334, Ser-347, Thr-350, Ser-353, and Thr-354 residues involved in autophosphorylation of CDK9. Conclusion Our results indicate that although PP2A dephosphorylates autophosphorylated CDK9 in vitro, in cultured cells PP1 is likely to dephosphorylate CDK9 and contribute to the regulation of activated HIV-1 transcription. PMID:16048649

  6. Comparative evaluation of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium alkaline phosphatase antigenicity by the alkaline phosphatase immunoassay (APIA).

    PubMed

    Cesari, I M; Ballén, D E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, A; Pointier, J-P; Kombila, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Théron, A

    2014-04-01

    To know if alkaline phosphatase (AP) from schistosomes other than Schistosoma mansoni can be used as diagnostic marker for schistosomiasis in alkaline phosphatase immunocapture assay (APIA), we comparatively tested n-butanol extracts of adult worm membranes from a Venezuelan (JL) strain of S. mansoni (Ven/AWBE/Sm); a Cameroonian (EDEN) strain of Schistosoma intercalatum (Cam/AWBE/Si) and a Yemeni strain of Schistosoma haematobium (Yem/AWBE/Sh). APIA was evaluated with sera of patients from Venezuela, Senegal, and Gabon infected with S. mansoni, from Gabon infected with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium, from Chine infected with Schistosoma japonicum and from Cambodian patients infected with Schistosoma mekongi. Results indicate that 92.5% (37/40) of Venezuela sera, 75% (15/20) of Senegal sera, 39.5% (17/43) of S. haematobium sera, and 19.2% (5/26) S. intercalatum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm preparation. APIA with the Cam/AWBE/Si preparation showed that 53.8% of S. intercalatum-positive sera had anti-AP antibodies, and 51.2% S. haematobium-positive sera cross-immunocapturing the S. intercalatum AP. APIA performed with Yem/AWBE/Sh showed that 55.8% S. haematobium sera were positive. Only two out of nine S. japonicum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm and Cam/AWBE/Si, and no reaction was observed with Cambodian S. mekongi-positive sera. AP activity was shown to be present in all the schistosome species/strains studied. The use of APIA as a tool to explore the APs antigenicity and the presence of Schistosoma sp. infections through the detection of anti-Schistosoma sp. AP antibodies in a host, allowed us to demonstrate the antigenicity of APs of S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, and S. haematobium.

  7. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase PTPRO inhibits trigeminal axon growth and branching by repressing TrkB and Ret signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Graziana; Dudanova, Irina; Suetterlin, Philipp; Davies, Alun M.; Drescher, Uwe; Bixby, John L.; Klein, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Axonal branches of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) display characteristic growth and arborization patterns during development. Subsets of TG neurons express different receptors for growth factors, but these are unlikely to explain the unique patterns of axonal arborizations. Intrinsic modulators may restrict or enhance cellular responses to specific ligands and thereby contribute to the development of axon growth patterns. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) which is required for Eph receptor-dependent retinotectal development in chick and for development of subsets of trunk sensory neurons in mouse, may be such an intrinsic modulator of TG neuron development. PTPRO is expressed mainly in TrkB+ and Ret+ mechanoreceptors within the TG during embryogenesis. In PTPRO mutant mice, subsets of TG neurons grow longer and more elaborate axonal branches. Cultured PTPRO−/− TG neurons display enhanced axonal outgrowth and branching in response to BDNF and GDNF compared to control neurons, indicating that PTPRO negatively controls the activity of BDNF/TrkB and GDNF/Ret signaling. Mouse PTPRO fails to regulate Eph signaling in retinocollicular development and in hindlimb motor axon guidance, suggesting that chick and mouse PTPRO have different substrate specificities. PTPRO has evolved to fine tune growth factor signaling in a cell type specific fashion and to thereby increase the diversity of signaling output of a limited number of receptor tyrosine kinases to control the branch morphology of developing sensory neurons. The regulation of Eph receptor-mediated developmental processes by protein tyrosine phosphatases has diverged between chick and mouse. PMID:23516305

  8. Three new pigment protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors from the insect parasite fungus Cordyceps gracilioides: terreusinone A, pinophilin C and cryptosporioptide A.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pei-Yao; Liu, Lin-Xia; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Luo, Du-Qiang; Shi, Bao-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Three new pigment compounds--terreusinone A (1), pinophilin C (2) and cryptosporioptide A (3)-were isolated from a solid culture of Cordyceps gracilioides. The structures of these compounds were determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis including HRESIMS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. The structure of terreusinone A (1) was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallographic diffraction analysis. In an in vitro activity assay, 1, 2 and 3 exhibited high inhibitory activity against PTP1B, SHP2, CDC25B, LAR and SHP1. Terreusinone A (1) inhibited PTP1B, SHP2, CDC25B, LAR and SHP1 enzyme with IC50 values 12.5, >50, 4.1, 10.6, 5.6 µg/mL, respectively; pinophilin C (2) with IC50 values 6.8, 8.0, 4.5, 4.7, 3.4 µg/mL, respectively; and cryptosporioptide A (3) with IC50 values 7.3, 5.7, 7.6, >50, 4.9 µg/mL, respectively. PMID:25849805

  9. Okadaic acid indicates a major function for protein phosphatases in stimulus-response coupling of RINm5F rat insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Jochum, C; Schatz, H; Pfeiffer, A

    1994-01-01

    Stimulus-induced insulin secretion involves the activation of several protein kinases within the beta cell. Most prominent are protein kinase A, protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Protein kinase action is functionally antagonized by protein phosphatases. The four ubiquious serine/threonine protein phosphatases are termed PP-1, PP-2A, -2B and -2C. PP-1 and PP-2A are in vivo parts of major protein complexes. These complexes presumably regulate the phosphatase activity and direct the enzyme to its site of action. Therefore, PP-1 and -2A could play an important role in controlling intracellular signal transmission. Two different toxins, okadaic acid and calyculin A, both from marine invertebrates, were recently discovered and identified as potent and highly specific inhibitors of PP-1 and PP-2A. Both compounds emerged as very useful tools for studying intracellular phosphorylation events. We took advantage of these substances to investigate the significance of protein phosphatase action in stimulus-induced insulin secretion. To avoid major complexity, we confined our study to the cAMP and the phosphoinositide signal pathway. Okadaic acid alone evoked virtually no secretory response. cAMP-dependent secretion was markedly enhanced by 1 microM okadaic acid. The stimulatory effect of okadaic acid was strongly dependent on the concentration of cAMP analoga. In contrast, insulin release caused by the cholinergic agonist carbachol was not influenced by okadaic acid. Calyculin A (10 nM) slightly increased cAMP-induced secretion, but its high toxicity prohibited accurate interpretation of the data. Our findings support the idea that serine/threonine phosphatases act as important regulators in stimulus response coupling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  11. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  12. Phosphorylated TandeMBP: A unique protein substrate for protein phosphatase assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Yamashita, Sho; Uezato, Yuuki; Senga, Yukako; Katayama, Syouichi; Goshima, Naoki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2016-11-15

    To analyze a variety of protein phosphatases, we developed phosphorylated TandeMBP (P-TandeMBP), in which two different mouse myelin basic protein isoforms were fused in tandem, as a protein phosphatase substrate. P-TandeMBP was prepared efficiently in four steps: (1) phosphorylation of TandeMBP by a protein kinase mixture (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Iδ, casein kinase 1δ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2); (2) precipitation of both P-TandeMBP and protein kinases to remove ATP, Pi, and ADP; (3) acid extraction of P-TandeMBP with HCl to remove protein kinases; and (4) neutralization of the solution that contains P-TandeMBP with Tris. In combination with the malachite green assay, P-TandeMBP can be used to detect protein phosphatase activity without using radioactive materials. Moreover, P-TandeMBP served as an efficient substrate for PPM family phosphatases (PPM1A, PPM1B, PPM1D, PPM1F, PPM1G, PPM1H, PPM1K, and PPM1M) and PPP family phosphatase PP5. Various phosphatase activities were also detected with high sensitivity in gel filtration fractions from mouse brain using P-TandeMBP. These results indicate that P-TandeMBP might be a powerful tool for the detection of protein phosphatase activities. PMID:27565380

  13. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-07-29

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease.

  14. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease. PMID:27525888

  15. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Ser/Thr phosphatase T1 and comparison to its mammalian homolog PP5

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Johns, Jeremiah; Sinclair, Christopher; Park, Jung-Min; Rossie, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Background Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase 5 (PP5) and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog protein phosphatase T1 (Ppt1p) each contain an N-terminal domain consisting of several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and a C-terminal catalytic domain that is related to the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, and calcineurin. Analysis of yeast Ppt1p could provide important clues to the function of PP5 and its homologs, however it has not yet been characterized at the biochemical or cellular level. Results The specific activity of recombinant Ppt1p toward the artificial substrates 32P-myelin basic protein (MBP) and 32P-casein was similar to that of PP5. Dephosphorylation of 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein, was stimulated by unsaturated fatty acids and by arachidoyl coenzyme A. Limited proteolysis of Ppt1p removed the TPR domain and abrogated lipid stimulation. The remaining catalytic fragment exhibited a two-fold increase in activity toward 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein. Removal of the C terminus increased Ppt1p activity toward both substrates two fold, but did not prevent further stimulation of activity toward 32P-MBP by lipid treatment. Ppt1p was localized throughout the cell including the nucleus. Levels of PPT1 mRNA and protein peaked in early log phase growth. Conclusions Many characteristics of Ppt1p are similar to those of PP5, including stimulation of phosphatase activity with some substrates by lipids, and peak expression during periods of rapid cell growth. Unlike PP5, however, proteolytic removal of the TPR domain or C-terminal truncation only modestly increased its activity. In addition, C-terminal truncation did not prevent further activation by lipid. This suggests that these regions play only a minor role in controlling its activity compared to PP5. Ppt1p is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating that it may function in multiple compartments. The observation that Ppt1p is most highly expressed during early log phase growth suggests

  16. WIP1 phosphatase as a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Richter, Mark; Dayaram, Tajhal; Gilmartin, Aidan G; Ganji, Gopinath; Pemmasani, Sandhya Kiran; Van Der Key, Harjeet; Shohet, Jason M; Donehower, Lawrence A; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that negatively regulates multiple proteins involved in DNA damage response including p53, CHK2, Histone H2AX, and ATM, and it has been shown to be overexpressed or amplified in human cancers including breast and ovarian cancers. We examined WIP1 mRNA levels across multiple tumor types and found the highest levels in breast cancer, leukemia, medulloblastoma and neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is an exclusively TP53 wild type tumor at diagnosis and inhibition of p53 is required for tumorigenesis. Neuroblastomas in particular have previously been shown to have 17q amplification, harboring the WIP1 (PPM1D) gene and associated with poor clinical outcome. We therefore sought to determine whether inhibiting WIP1 with a selective antagonist, GSK2830371, can attenuate neuroblastoma cell growth through reactivation of p53 mediated tumor suppression. Neuroblastoma cell lines with wild-type TP53 alleles were highly sensitive to GSK2830371 treatment, while cell lines with mutant TP53 were resistant to GSK2830371. The majority of tested neuroblastoma cell lines with copy number gains of the PPM1D locus were also TP53 wild-type and sensitive to GSK2830371A; in contrast cell lines with no copy gain of PPM1D were mixed in their sensitivity to WIP1 inhibition, with the primary determinant being TP53 mutational status. Since WIP1 is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and drugs used in neuroblastoma treatment induce apoptosis through DNA damage, we sought to determine whether GSK2830371 could act synergistically with standard of care chemotherapeutics. Treatment of wild-type TP53 neuroblastoma cell lines with both GSK2830371 and either doxorubicin or carboplatin resulted in enhanced cell death, mediated through caspase 3/7 induction, as compared to either agent alone. Our data suggests that WIP1 inhibition represents a novel therapeutic approach to neuroblastoma that could be integrated with

  17. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  18. Reduced L/B/K alkaline phosphatase gene expression in renal cell carcinoma: plausible role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer in adults. Although several genes have been found to be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, more great efforts are needed to identify new genes which are responsible for the process. Clear cell RCC, originates from proximal tubule cells, is the most common pathological type of RCC. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a marker enzyme of brush border membrane of proximal tubular cells. Our previous studies showed a significant decreased activity of Liver/Bone/Kidney (L/B/K) alkaline phosphatase in RCC. In the present study, we explored the molecular basis of the decreased activity of ALP in RCC. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis showed decreased ALP protein in RCC. Additionally, real time PCR documented significantly reduced ALP gene expression (P = 0.009). Moreover, RCC cell lines (ACHN and A498) transfected with full length L/B/K cDNA showed decreased migratory property as well as viability of these cells as compared with controls (P = 0.000). Further, L/B/K ALP cDNA transfected cells (ACHN and A498) showed significant increased apoptosis as compared to control (P = 0.000). These findings suggest the new role of ALP in cell viability and apoptosis and involvement in RCC tumorigenesis. However, further studies are needed to explore the exact molecular mechanism.

  19. Identific