Science.gov

Sample records for phosphatases tc-ptp shp1

  1. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, TC-PTP, SHP1, and SHP2, Cooperate in Rapid Dephosphorylation of Stat3 in Keratinocytes Following UVB Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Joon; Tremblay, Michel L.; DiGiovanni, John

    2010-01-01

    Stat3 is initially dephosphorylated in murine keratinocytes in response to UVB irradiation. Treatment with Na3VO4 desensitized keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis with the recovery of phosphorylated Stat3 protein levels, implying that a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) is involved in this mechanism. In the current work, we report that three PTPs including TC45 (the nuclear form of TC-PTP), SHP1, and SHP2 are involved in this rapid dephosphorylation of Stat3 in keratinocytes induced by UVB irradiation. Dephosphorylation of Stat3 was increased rapidly after UVB irradiation of cultured keratinocytes. Knockdown of TC-PTP, SHP1, or SHP2 using RNAi showed that these PTPs are likely responsible for most of the rapid Stat3 dephosphorylation observed following UVB irradiation. The level of phosphorylated Stat3 was significantly higher in keratinocytes transfected with TC-PTP, SHP1, or SHP2 siRNA in the presence or absence of UVB compared with keratinocytes transfected with control siRNA. TC45 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes and translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus upon UVB irradiation. Stat3 dephosphorylation was associated with nuclear translocation of TC45. Further studies revealed that knockdown of all three phosphatases, using RNAi, prevented the rapid dephosphorylation of Stat3 following UVB irradiation. In mouse epidermis, the level of phosphorylated Stat3 was initially decreased, followed by a significant increase at later time points after UVB exposure. The levels of Stat3 target genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc, followed the changes in activated Stat3 in response to UVB irradiation. Collectively, these results suggest that three phosphatases, TC45, SHP1, and SHP2, are primarily responsible for UVB-mediated Stat3 dephosphorylation and may serve as part of an initial protective mechanism against UV skin carcinogenesis. PMID:20421975

  2. A nuclear protein tyrosine phosphatase TC-PTP is a potential negative regulator of the PRL-mediated signaling pathway: dephosphorylation and deactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a and 5b by TC-PTP in nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naohito; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we examined involvement of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphatase TC-PTP in PRL-mediated signaling. TC-PTP could dephosphorylate signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (STAT5a) and STAT5b, but the apparent dephosphorylation activity of TC-PTP was weaker than that of cytosolic PTP1B 30 min after PRL stimulation in transfected COS-7 cells, whereas both STAT5a and STAT5b were dephosphorylated to the same extent by recombinant TC-PTP and PTP1B in vitro. Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 was coimmunoprecipitated with substrate trapping mutants of TC-PTP, suggesting that STAT5 is a specific substrate of TC-PTP. These observations were further extended in mammary epithelial COMMA-1D cells stably expressing TC-PTP. A time-course study revealed that dephosphorylation of STAT5 by TC-PTP was delayed compared with that by cytosolic PTP1B due to nuclear localization of TC-PTP throughout PRL stimulation in mammary epithelial cells. Endogenous beta-casein gene expression and beta-casein gene promoter activation in COS-7 cells were largely suppressed by TC-PTP wild type as well as catalytically inactive mutants, suggesting that stable complexes formed between STAT5 and TC-PTP in the nucleus. Taken together, we conclude that TC-PTP is catalytically competent with respect to dephosphorylation and deactivation of PRL-activated STAT5 in the nucleus.

  3. Structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1, a potential therapeutic target for Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2013-06-05

    Chagas’ disease, a neglected tropical affliction transmitted by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is prevalent in Latin America and affects nearly 18 million people worldwide, yet few approved drugs are available to treat the disease. Moreover, the currently available drugs exhibit severe toxicity or are poorly effective in the chronic phase of the disease. This limitation, along with the large population at risk, underscores the urgent need to discover new molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents. Recently, the T. cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1 has been implicated in the cellular differentiation and infectivity of the parasite and is therefore a promising target for the design of novel anti-parasitic drugs. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of TcPTP1 refined to a resolution of 2.18 Å, which provides structural insights into the active site environment that can be used to initiate structure-based drug design efforts to develop specific TcPTP1 inhibitors. Potential strategies to develop such inhibitors are also discussed.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 modulates osteoblast differentiation through direct association with and dephosphorylation of GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Lu; Wang, Chang-Nan; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ni, Xin

    2017-01-05

    SHP-1, the Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 1, is a cytosolic protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) predominantly expressed in hematopoietic-derived cells. Previous studies have focused on the involvement of SHP-1 in osteoclastogenesis. Using primary cultured mouse fetal calvaria-derived osteoblasts as a model, this study aims to investigate the effects of SHP-1 on differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts and elucidate the signaling pathways responsible for these effects. We found that osteoblasts treated by osteogenic media showed significant increase in SHP-1 expression, which contributed to osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization. Using immunoprecipitation assay, we found that a direct association between SHP-1 and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β could be detected in differentiated osteoblasts and was significantly inhibited by SHP-1 inhibitor NSC87877. Inhibition of SHP-1 activated GSK3β, thereby leading to suppression of osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, which could be rescued by the inhibitor of GSK3β. In addition, we found that rosiglitazone (RSG) treatment led to significant decrease in SHP-1 expression. Overexpression of SHP-1 reversed RSG-induced GSK3β activation, thus rescuing the inhibitory effect of RSG on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 may act as a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation through direct association with and dephosphorylation of GSK3β. Downregulation of SHP-1 may contribute to RSG-induced inhibition of mouse calvaria osteoblast differentiation by activating GSK3β-dependent pathway.

  5. The tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, is involved in bronchial mucin production during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Kyoung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Keun Ae; Park, Chan Sun; Bae, Yun Jeong; Zhu, Zhou; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2010-02-26

    Mucus hypersecretion is a clinically important manifestation of chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucin production in airway epithelia is increased under conditions of oxidative stress. Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 suppression is related to the development of airway inflammation and increased ROS levels. In this study, we investigated the role of SHP-1 in mucin secretion triggered by oxidative stress. Human lung mucoepidermoid H292 carcinoma cells were transfected with specific siRNA to eliminate SHP-1 gene expression. Cultured cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and Mucin 5AC(MUC5AC) gene expression and mucin production were determined. Activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in association with MUC5AC production was evaluated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was employed to determine whether antioxidants could block MUC5AC production. To establish the precise role of p38, mucin expression was observed after pre-treatment of SHP-1-depleted H292 cells with the p38 chemical blocker. We investigated the in vivo effects of oxidative stress on airway mucus production in SHP-1-deficient heterozygous (mev/+) mice. MUC5AC expression was enhanced in SHP-1 knockdown H292 cells exposed to H(2)O(2), compared to that in control cells. The ratio between phosphorylated and total p38 was significantly increased in SHP-1-deficient cells under oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with NAC suppressed both MUC5AC production and p38 activation. Blockage of p38 MAPK led to suppression of MUC5AC mRNA expression. Notably, mucin production was enhanced in the airway epithelia of mev/+ mice exposed to oxidative stress. Our results clearly indicate that SHP-1 plays an important role in airway mucin production through regulating oxidative stress.

  6. The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 modulates the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Tessy; Sankarshanan, Mohan; Mauldin, Ileana S.; Mullins, David W.; Lorenz, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The importance of regulatory T cells (Treg) for immune tolerance is well recognized, yet the signaling molecules influencing their suppressive activity are relatively poorly understood. Here, through in vivo studies and complementary ex vivo studies, we make several important observations. First, we identify the cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 as a novel ‘endogenous brake’ and modifier of the suppressive ability of Treg cells; consistent with this notion, loss of SHP-1 expression strongly augments the ability of Treg cells to suppress inflammation in a mouse model. Second, specific pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 enzymatic activity via the cancer drug sodium stibogluconate (SSG) potently augmented Treg cell suppressor activity both in vivo and ex vivo. Finally, through a quantitative imaging approach, we directly demonstrate that Treg cells prevent the activation of conventional T cells, and that SHP-1-deficient Treg cells are more efficient suppressors. Collectively, our data reveal SHP-1 as a critical modifier of Treg cell function, and a potential therapeutic target for augmenting Treg cell-mediated suppression in certain disease states. PMID:20952680

  7. Targeted disruption of TC-PTP in the proliferative compartment augments STAT3 and AKT signaling and skin tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Mihwa; Baek, Minwoo; Morales, Liza D.; Jang, Ik-Soon; Slaga, Thomas J.; DiGiovanni, John; Kim, Dae Joon

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a vital mechanism that contributes to skin carcinogenesis. It is regulated by the counter-activities of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, we report the critical role of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP), encoded by Ptpn2, in chemically-induced skin carcinogenesis via the negative regulation of STAT3 and AKT signaling. Using epidermal specific TC-PTP knockout (K14Cre.Ptpn2fl/fl) mice, we demonstrate loss of TC-PTP led to a desensitization to tumor initiator 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced apoptosis both in vivo epidermis and in vitro keratinocytes. TC-PTP deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in epidermal thickness and hyperproliferation following exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Western blot analysis showed that both phosphorylated STAT3 and phosphorylated AKT expressions were significantly increased in epidermis of TC-PTP-deficient mice compared to control mice following TPA treatment. Inhibition of STAT3 or AKT reversed the effects of TC-PTP deficiency on apoptosis and proliferation. Finally, TC-PTP knockout mice showed a shortened latency of tumorigenesis and significantly increased numbers of tumors during two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Our findings reveal that TC-PTP has potential as a novel target for the prevention of skin cancer through its role in the regulation of STAT3 and AKT signaling. PMID:28322331

  8. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling.

  9. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A.; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling. PMID:28378014

  10. The Endothelial Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 Plays an Important Role for Vascular Haemostasis in TNFα-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Elisabeth; Pircher, Joachim; Czermak, Thomas; Gaitzsch, Erik; Alig, Stefan; Mannell, Hanna; Niemeyer, Markus; Krötz, Florian; Wörnle, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Inflammation and endothelium-derived superoxides are important pathomechanisms in atherothrombotic diseases. We could previously show that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 acts as a negative regulator in endothelial superoxide production. In this study we investigated the influence of SHP-1 on platelet-endothelium interaction and arterial thrombosis in TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation in vivo. Methods. Arteriolar thrombosis and platelet rolling in vivo were investigated in C57BL/6 mice using intravital microscopy in the dorsal skinfold chamber microcirculation model. Results. Inhibition of SHP-1 by the specific pharmacological inhibitor sodium stibogluconate did not significantly enhance platelet-endothelium interaction in vivo under physiological conditions but led to an augmented fraction of rolling platelets in TNFα-induced systemic inflammation. Accordingly, ferric-chloride-induced arteriolar thrombus formation, which was already increased by SHP-1 inhibition, was further enhanced in the setting of TNFα-induced inflammation. Platelet aggregation in vitro as well as ex vivo was not influenced by SHP-1-inhibition. In cultured endothelial cells, sodium stibogluconate increased TNFα-induced surface expression of p-selectin and von Willebrand factor. Additionally, TNFα increased SHP-1 activity and protein expression. Conclusions. The endothelial tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 plays an important role for vascular hemostasis in vivo, which is crucial in TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation where it may serve as an autoinhibitory molecule to prevent excess inflammatory response and thrombus formation. PMID:23766558

  11. Role of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (Src homology phosphatase-1) in the regulation of interleukin-3-induced survival, proliferation and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Paling, Nicholas R D; Welham, Melanie J

    2002-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (Src homology phosphatase-1) has been widely implicated as a negative regulator of signalling in immune cells. We have investigated in detail the role of SHP-1 in interleukin-3 (IL-3) signal transduction by inducibly expressing wild-type (WT), C453S (substrate-trapping) and R459M (catalytically inactive) forms of SHP-1 in the IL-3-dependent cell line BaF/3. Expression of WT SHP-1 had little impact on IL-3-induced proliferation, but enhanced apoptosis following IL-3 withdrawal. Expression of R459M SHP-1 increased the proliferative response of BaF/3 cells to IL-3 and increased cell survival at low doses of IL-3 and following IL-3 withdrawal. Investigation into the biochemical consequences resulting from expression of these SHP-1 variants demonstrated that the beta chain of the IL-3 receptor (Aic2A) was hypo-phosphorylated in cells expressing WT SHP-1 and hyper-phosphorylated in those expressing R459M SHP-1. Further, ectopic expression of the trapping mutant, C453S SHP-1, protected Aic2A from dephosphorylation, suggesting that Aic2A is a SHP-1 substrate in BaF/3 cells. Examination of overall levels of tyrosine phosphorylation demonstrated that they were not perturbed in these transfectants. Activation-specific phosphorylation of STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) 5a/b, protein kinase B and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase)-1 and -2 was also unaffected by expression of WT or R459M SHP-1. However, overall levels of IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5 were reduced upon expression of WT SHP-1 and increased when R459M SHP-1 was expressed, consistent with STAT5 being a potential SHP-1 substrate. These results demonstrate that SHP-1 acts to negatively regulate IL-3-driven survival and proliferation, potentially via regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of Aic2A and STAT5. PMID:12220225

  12. SHP-1 and SHP-2 in T cells: two phosphatases functioning at many levels

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins play a critical role for many T-cell functions. The opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) determine the level of tyrosine phosphorylation at any time. It is well accepted that PTKs are essential during T-cell signaling; however, the role and importance of PTPs are much less known and appreciated. Both transmembrane and cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatases have been identified in T cells and shown to regulate T-cell responses. This review focuses on the roles of the two cytoplasmic PTPs, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2)-containing SHP-1 and SHP-2, in T-cell signaling, development, differentiation, and function. PMID:19290938

  13. Expression of SHP-1 phosphatase indicates post-germinal center cell derivation of B-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Michele; Kossev, Plamen; Tsai, Donald; Raghunath, Puthiaveetil; Majewski, Miroslaw; Zhang, Qian; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schuster, Stephen; Tomaszewski, John; Arber, Daniel A; Hsi, Eric; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2002-11-01

    SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase acts as a negative regulator of signaling by receptors for growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines and by receptors involved in immune response. Our recent study showed that SHP-1 is tightly regulated at various stages of B-cell differentiation and is expressed in the mantle and marginal zones, interfollicular B cells, and plasma cells, whereas it is nondetectable in germinal center cells. In this study we evaluated expression of SHP-1 in vitro and in vivo in nine cell lines representing three different types of EBV+ B-cell populations closely resembling or derived from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). Furthermore, we examined tissue samples from 58 patients with B-cell PTLDs, both EBV+ (85% of the cases analyzed) and EBV- (15%). SHP-1 protein was strongly expressed in all cell lines and PTLD cases. In addition, the PTLD cases were essentially negative for germinal center B-cell markers: none expressed CD10 and only one expressed BCL-6. More than 40% expressed a late post-germinal B-cell marker, CD138. The universal expression of SHP-1, lack of expression of CD10 and BCL-6, and frequent expression of CD138 suggest that PTLDs are derived from post-germinal center B cells regardless of the EBV cell infection status. Based on the immunophenotype, B-cell PTLDs could be divided into two broad categories corresponding to the early (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138-) and late (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138+) post-germinal center cells. By being expressed earlier, SHP-1 is a more sensitive marker of post-germinal center B cells than CD138, which is seen on the terminally differentiated immunoblasts and plasma cells.

  14. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Fc gamma RIIa to modulate signaling events in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Latha P; Fang, Huiqing; Marsh, Clay B; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2003-09-12

    Fc gamma RIIa is a low affinity IgG receptor uniquely expressed in human cells that promotes phagocytosis of immune complexes and induces inflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis initiated by Fc gamma RIIa is tightly controlled by the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1, and the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Whereas the molecular nature of SHIP-1 involvement with Fc gamma RIIa has been well studied, it is not clear how SHP-1 is activated by Fc gamma RIIa to mediate its regulatory effect. Here we report that Fc gamma RIIa clustering induces SHP-1 phosphatase activity in THP-1 cells. Using synthetic phosphopeptides, and stable transfectants expressing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) tyrosine mutants of Fc gamma RIIa, we demonstrate that SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated amino-terminal ITAM tyrosine of Fc gamma RIIa, whereas the tyrosine kinase Syk associates with the carboxyl-terminal ITAM tyrosine. Association of SHP-1 with Fc gamma RIIa ITAM appears to suppress total cellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, Fc gamma RIIa clustering results in the association of SHP-1 with key signaling molecules such as Syk, p85 subunit of PtdIns 3-kinase, and p62dok, suggesting that these molecules may be substrates of SHP-1 in this system. Finally, overexpression of wild-type SHP-1 but not catalytically deficient SHP-1 led to a down-regulation of NF kappa B-dependent gene transcription in THP-1 cells activated by clustering Fc gamma RIIa.

  15. Inhibition of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, SHP-1, in Dendritic Cells to Enhance their Efficacy as Cell-Based Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    hypothesis that the Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), is a global inhibitor of DC activation and that by blocking SHP-1 in... inhibitor of DC function and that its inhibition in DCs enhances the strength of immune responses. Finally, using 2 ectopic mouse tumor models (B16 melanoma...enhance function and to overcome the limitations of the "first-generation vaccines". Our specific approach is to inhibit inhibitors of DC function

  16. A SHPing tale: perspectives on the regulation of SHP-1 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatases by the C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Poole, Alastair W; Jones, Matthew L

    2005-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a ubiquitous signalling mechanism and is regulated by a balance between the action of kinases and phosphatases. The SH2 domain-containing phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 are the best studied of the classical non-receptor tyrosine phosphatases, but it is intriguing that despite their close sequence and structural homology these two phosphatases play quite different cellular roles. In particular, whereas SHP-1 plays a largely negative signalling role suppressing cellular activation, SHP-2 plays a largely positive signalling role. Major sequence differences between the two molecules are apparent in the approximately 100 amino acid residues at the extreme C-terminus of the proteins, beyond the phosphatase catalytic domain. Here we review how the differences in the tails of these proteins may regulate their activities and explain some of their functional differences.

  17. Involvement of c-Src tyrosine kinase in SHP-1 phosphatase activation by Ang II AT2 receptors in rat fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sergio E; Seguin, Leonardo R; Villarreal, Rodrigo S; Nahmias, Clara; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-10-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) AT(2) receptors are abundantly expressed in rat fetal tissues where they probably contribute to development. In the present study we examine the effects of Ang II type 2 receptor stimulation on SHP-1 activation. Ang II (10(-7) M) elicits a rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-1, maximal at 1 min, in a dose-dependent form, blocked by the AT(2) antagonist, PD123319. SHP-1 phosphorylation is followed in time by tyrosine dephosphorylation of different proteins, suggesting a sequence of events. Ang II induces association of SHP-1 to AT(2) receptors as shown by co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot and binding assays. SHP-1 activity was determined in immunocomplexes obtained with either anti-AT(2) or anti-SHP-1 antibodies, after Ang II stimulation (1 min), in correlation with the maximal level of SHP-1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, following receptor stimulation (1 min) c-Src was associated to AT(2) or SHP-1 immunocomplexes. Preincubation with the c-Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited SHP-1 activation and c-Src association, thus confirming the participation of c-Src in this pathway. We demonstrated here for the first time the involvement of c-Src in SHP-1 activation via AT(2) receptors present in an ex vivo model expressing both receptor subtypes. In this model, AT(2) receptors are not constitutively associated to SHP-1 and SHP-1 is not constitutively activated. Thus, we clearly establish that SHP-1 activation, mediated by the AT(2) subtype, involves c-Src and precedes protein tyrosine dephosphorylation, in rat fetal membranes.

  18. Inhibition of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, SHP-1, in Dendritic Cells to Enhance their Efficacy as Cell-Based Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    inhibitor of DC activation and that by blocking SHP-1in DC would induce stronger anti-tumor immunity. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of SHP...observations suggest that SHP-1 is a pleiotropic inhibitor ofDC function and that its inhibition in DCs enhances the strength of immune responses...approach is to inhibit inhibitors of DC function that normally serve to regulate the initiation of immune responses. We hypothesized that the Src

  19. γ-Tocotrienol but not γ-tocopherol blocks STAT3 cell signaling pathway through induction of protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and sensitizes tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-10-22

    Although γ-tocotrienol (T3), a vitamin E isolated primarily from palm and rice bran oil, has been linked with anticancer activities, the mechanism of this action is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether γ-T3 can modulate the STAT3 cell signaling pathway, closely linked to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We found that γ-T3 but not γ-tocopherol, the most common saturated form of vitamin E, inhibited constitutive activation of STAT3 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and this inhibition was not cell type-specific. γ-T3 also inhibited STAT3 DNA binding. This correlated with inhibition of Src kinase and JAK1 and JAK2 kinases. Pervanadate reversed the γ-T3-induced down-regulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein-tyrosine phosphatase. When examined further, we found that γ-T3 induced the expression of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, and gene silencing of the SHP-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the ability of γ-T3 to inhibit STAT3 activation, suggesting a vital role for SHP-1 in the action of γ-T3. Also γ-T3 down-modulated activation of STAT3 and induced SHP-1 in vivo. Eventually, γ-T3 down-regulated the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), proliferative (cyclin D1), and angiogenic (VEGF) gene products; and this correlated with suppression of proliferation, the accumulation of cells in sub-G(1) phase of the cell cycle, and induction of apoptosis. This vitamin also sensitized the tumor cells to the apoptotic effects of thalidomide and bortezomib. Overall, our results suggest that γ-T3 is a novel blocker of STAT3 activation pathway both in vitro and in vivo and thus may have potential in prevention and treatment of cancers.

  20. SHP-1 inhibition by 4-hydroxynonenal activates Jun N-terminal kinase and glutamate cysteine ligase.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-07-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major lipid peroxidation product, is toxic at high concentrations, but at near-physiological concentrations it induces detoxifying enzymes. Previous data established that in human bronchial epithelial (HBE1) cells, both genes for glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) are induced by HNE through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is thought to play a role as a negative regulator of cell signaling, and has been implicated as such in the JNK pathway. In the present study, SHP-1 was demonstrated to contribute to HNE-induced-gclc expression via regulation of the JNK pathway in HBE1 cells. Treatment of HBE1 cells with HNE induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4), JNK, and c-Jun. HNE was able to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase activity of SHP-1 through increased degradation of the protein. Furthermore, transfection with small interference RNA SHP-1 showed an enhancement of JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation, but not of MKK4, leading to increased gclc expression. These results demonstrate that SHP-1 plays a role as a negative regulator of the JNK pathway and that HNE activated the JNK pathway by inhibiting SHP-1. Thus, SHP-1 acts as a sensor for HNE and is responsible for an important adaptive response to oxidative stress.

  1. Pharmacological Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 Signaling Is a Promising Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-01-01

    STAT3 activation is associated with poor prognosis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data demonstrated that regorafenib (Stivarga) is a pharmacological agonist of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) that enhances SHP-1 activity and induces apoptosis by targeting STAT3 signals in CRC. This study aimed to find a therapeutic drug that is more effective than regorafenib for CRC treatment. Here, we showed that SC-43 was more effective than regorafenib at inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. SC-43 significantly increased SHP-1 activity, downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 level, and induced apoptosis in CRC cells. An SHP-1 inhibitor or knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA both significantly rescued the SC-43–induced apoptosis and decreased p-STAT3Tyr705 level. Conversely, SHP-1 overexpression increased the effects of SC-43 on apoptosis and p-STAT3Tyr705 level. These data suggest that SC-43–induced apoptosis mediated through the loss of p-STAT3Tyr705 was dependent on SHP-1 function. Importantly, SC-43–enhanced SHP-1 activity was because of the docking potential of SC-43, which relieved the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 and inhibited p-STAT3Tyr705 signals. Importantly, we observed that a significant negative correlation existed between SHP-1 and p-STAT3Tyr705expression in CRC patients (P = .038). Patients with strong SHP-1 and weak p-STAT3Tyr705 expression had significantly higher overall survival compared with patients with weak SHP-1 and strong p-STAT3Tyr705 expression (P = .029). In conclusion, SHP-1 is suitable to be a useful prognostic marker and a pharmacological target for CRC treatment. Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 signaling by SC-43 may serve as a promising pharmacotherapy for CRC. PMID:26476076

  2. Expression of SHP-1 and SOCS6 in patients with acute leukemia and their clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinmei; Zheng, Yurong; Gao, Ju; Zhu, Guimei; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Wenzhen; Shi, Fangyan; Zhang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the expression and clinical relevance of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) in acute leukemia (AL). Patients and methods The enrolled AL patients were divided into three groups (newly diagnosed, relapsed, and complete remission [CR]). Healthy donors were also included as a control group in this study. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of SHP-1 and SOCS6. Statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the correlation between mRNA levels of SHP-1 and SOCS6 with patient outcomes. Results mRNA expression of SHP-1 was significantly lower in AL patients than that in healthy donors. The newly diagnosed or relapsed AL patients had lower mRNA levels of SHP-1 than the patients in CR. In contrast, SOCS6 mRNA expression was significantly higher in newly diagnosed or relapsed patients than that in patients in CR as well as healthy donors. However, mRNA levels of both SHP-1 and SOCS6 were positively correlated with the patient remission. The chemotherapy-induced remission rate was higher in patients with detectable SHP-1 or SOCS6 expression than in patients with undetectable SHP-1 or SOCS6 expression. Furthermore, the AL patients with detectable SHP-1 mRNA expression had lower incidence rate of invasive fungal infection. Conclusion The results suggest that expression patterns of SHP-1 and SOCS6 differ in AL patients. Despite the difference, expression of SHP-1 and SOCS6 is associated with favorable outcomes, suggesting an anticancer property of these two genes in AL.

  3. CD5-mediated inhibition of TCR signaling proceeds normally in the absence of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    DONG, BAOXIA; SOMANI, ALLY-KHAN; LOVE, PAUL E.; ZHENG, XUAN; CHEN, XIEQUN; ZHANG, JINYI

    2016-01-01

    The CD5 transmembrane glycoprotein functions as a co-receptor in the signaling pathway linking T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement to activation and differentiation. Although CD5 effects on TCR signaling have been shown to be primarily inhibitory, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In view of recent data revealing the ability of CD5 to associate with the SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase, a protein that also downregulates TCR signaling, we examined the role of SHP-1 in modulating CD5 function using thymocytes from SHP-1-deficient viable motheaten (mev) mice. The results revealed the association of SHP-1 with CD5 to be markedly increased following TCR stimulation and indicated that this interaction was enhanced by and was dependent on CD5 tyrosine phosphorylation. However, there was no difference of the tyrosine phosphorylation status of CD5 between resting and TCR-stimulated cells in SHP-1-deficient compared to wild-type thymocytes. Lack of SHP-1 activity did not affect the levels of CD5 surface expression, CD5 co-immunoprecipitable tyrosine phosphatase activity and intracellular calcium increase following co-crosslinking of the TCR and CD5. Similarly, an analysis of T-cell thymocyte populations in mev mice expressing an H-Y transgene as well as a construct mediating T-cell restricted CD5 overexpression, revealed that the reduction in the positive selection conferred by CD5 overexpression was unaffected by SHP-1 deficiency. CD5 is not a SHP-1 substrate and SHP-1 is not required for and possibly not involved in the CD5-mediated modulation of TCR signaling. PMID:27221212

  4. CD5-mediated inhibition of TCR signaling proceeds normally in the absence of SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Baoxia; Somani, Ally-Khan; Love, Paul E; Zheng, Xuan; Chen, Xiequn; Zhang, Jinyi

    2016-07-01

    The CD5 transmembrane glycoprotein functions as a co-receptor in the signaling pathway linking T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement to activation and differentiation. Although CD5 effects on TCR signaling have been shown to be primarily inhibitory, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In view of recent data revealing the ability of CD5 to associate with the SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase, a protein that also downregulates TCR signaling, we examined the role of SHP-1 in modulating CD5 function using thymocytes from SHP-1‑deficient viable motheaten (mev) mice. The results revealed the association of SHP-1 with CD5 to be markedly increased following TCR stimulation and indicated that this interaction was enhanced by and was dependent on CD5 tyrosine phosphorylation. However, there was no difference of the tyrosine phosphorylation status of CD5 between resting and TCR-stimulated cells in SHP-1‑deficient compared to wild-type thymocytes. Lack of SHP-1 activity did not affect the levels of CD5 surface expression, CD5 co-immunoprecipitable tyrosine phosphatase activity and intracellular calcium increase following co-crosslinking of the TCR and CD5. Similarly, an analysis of T‑cell thymocyte populations in mev mice expressing an H-Y transgene as well as a construct mediating T‑cell restricted CD5 overexpression, revealed that the reduction in the positive selection conferred by CD5 overexpression was unaffected by SHP-1 deficiency. CD5 is not a SHP-1 substrate and SHP-1 is not required for and possibly not involved in the CD5-mediated modulation of TCR signaling.

  5. Sorafenib analogue SC-60 induces apoptosis through the SHP-1/STAT3 pathway and enhances docetaxel cytotoxicity in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Su, Jung-Chen; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Chu, Pei-Yi; Huang, Chun-Teng; Wang, Wan-Lun; Lee, Chia-Han; Lau, Ka-Yi; Tsai, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hsiu-Ping; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) needs new therapeutic targets. Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) can act as a tumor suppressor by dephosphorylating oncogenic kinases. One major target of SHP-1 is STAT3, which is highly activated in TNBC. In this study, we tested a sorafenib analogue SC-60, which lacks angiokinase inhibition activity, but acts as a SHP-1 agonist, in TNBC cells. SC-60 inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis by dephosphorylating STAT3 in both a dose- and time-dependent manner in TNBC cells (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and HCC1937). By contrast, ectopic expression of STAT3 rescued the anticancer effect induced by SC-60. SC-60 also increased the SHP-1 activity, but this effect was inhibited when the N-SH2 domain (DN1) was deleted or with SHP-1 point mutation (D61A), implying that SHP-1 is the major target of SC-60 in TNBC. The use of SC-60 in combination with docetaxel synergized the anticancer effect induced by SC-60 through the SHP-1/STAT3 pathway in TNBC cells. Importantly, SC-60 also displayed a significant antitumor effect in an MDA-MB-468 xenograft model by modulating the SHP-1/STAT3 axis, indicating the anticancer potential of SC-60 in TNBC treatment. Targeting SHP-1/p-STAT3 and the potential combination of SHP-1 agonist with chemotherapeutic docetaxel is a feasible therapeutic strategy for TNBC.

  6. Targeted loss of SHP1 in murine thymocytes dampens TCR signaling late in selection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ryan J; Morris, Anna B; Neeld, Dennis K; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-09-01

    SHP1 is a tyrosine phosphatase critical to proximal regulation of TCR signaling. Here, analysis of CD4-Cre SHP1(fl/fl) conditional knockout thymocytes using CD53, TCRβ, CD69, CD4, and CD8α expression demonstrates the importance of SHP1 in the survival of post selection (CD53(+) ), single-positive thymocytes. Using Ca(2+) flux to assess the intensity of TCR signaling demonstrated that SHP1 dampens the signal strength of these same mature, postselection thymocytes. Consistent with its dampening effect, TCR signal strength was also probed functionally using peptides that can mediate selection of the OT-I TCR, to reveal increased negative selection mediated by lower-affinity ligand in the absence of SHP1. Our data show that SHP1 is required for the survival of mature thymocytes and the generation of the functional T-cell repertoire, as its absence leads to a reduction in the numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naïve T cells in the peripheral lymphoid compartments.

  7. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia.

  8. Implication of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in MCF-7 cell proliferation and resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, Christophe; Karouri, Salah-Eddine; Issad, Tarik

    2009-10-02

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) were initially thought to be mainly anti-oncogenic. However, overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP has been observed in human tumors, and recent studies have demonstrated that PTP1B contributes to the appearance of breast tumors by modulating ERK pathway. In the present work, we observed that decreasing the expression of TC-PTP or PTP1B in MCF-7 cells using siRNA reduced cell proliferation without affecting cell death. This reduction in proliferation was associated with decreased ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, selection of tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells, by long-term culture in presence of 4-OH tamoxifen, resulted in cells that display overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP, and concomitant increase in ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation. siRNA experiments showed that PTP1B, but not TC-PTP, is necessary for resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen. Therefore, our work indicates that PTP1B could be a relevant therapeutic target for treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers.

  9. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-05-24

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells.

  10. Protein kinase D regulates positive selection of CD4+ thymocytes through phosphorylation of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Eri; Kosako, Hidetaka; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Araki, Kimi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Takashi; Yamasaki, Sho

    2016-01-01

    Thymic selection shapes an appropriate T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire during T cell development. Here, we show that a serine/threonine kinase, protein kinase D (PKD), is crucial for thymocyte positive selection. In T cell-specific PKD-deficient (PKD2/PKD3 double-deficient) mice, the generation of CD4 single positive thymocytes is abrogated. This defect is likely caused by attenuated TCR signalling during positive selection and incomplete CD4 lineage specification in PKD-deficient thymocytes; however, TCR-proximal tyrosine phosphorylation is not affected. PKD is activated in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes on stimulation with positively selecting peptides. By phosphoproteomic analysis, we identify SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) as a direct substrate of PKD. Substitution of wild-type SHP-1 by phosphorylation-defective mutant (SHP-1S557A) impairs generation of CD4+ thymocytes. These results suggest that the PKD–SHP-1 axis positively regulates TCR signalling to promote CD4+ T cell development. PMID:27670070

  11. Obatoclax analog SC-2001 inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation through enhancing SHP-1 expression and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Su, Jung-Chen; Ni, Mei-Huei; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wang, Duen-Shian; Tai, Wei-Tien; Kao, Yuan-Ping; Hung, Man-Hsin; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2014-07-01

    Interfering oncogenic STAT3 signaling is a promising anti-cancer strategy. We examined the efficacy and drug mechanism of an obatoclax analog SC-2001, a novel STAT3 inhibitor, in human breast cancer cells. Human breast cancer cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Apoptosis was examined by both flow cytometry and western blot. Signaling pathways were assessed by western blot. In vivo efficacy of SC-2001 was tested in xenograft nude mice. SC-2001 inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in association with downregulation of p-STAT3 (Tyr 705) in breast cancer cells. STAT3-regulated proteins, including Mcl-1, survivin, and cyclin D1, were repressed by SC-2001. Over-expression of STAT3 in MDA-MB-468 cells protected cells from SC-2001-induced apoptosis. Moreover, SC-2001 enhanced the expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, a negative regulator of STAT3. Furthermore, the enhanced SHP-1 expression, in conjunction with increased SHP-1 phosphatase activity, was mediated by upregulated transcription by RFX-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that SC-2001 increased the binding capacity of RFX-1 to the SHP-1 promoter. Knockdown of either RFX-1 or SHP-1 reduced SC-2001-induced apoptosis, whereas ectopic expression of RFX-1 increased SHP-1 expression and enhanced the apoptotic effect of SC-2001. Importantly, SC-2001 suppressed tumor growth in association with enhanced RFX-1 and SHP-1 expression and p-STAT3 downregulation in MDA-MB-468 xenograft tumors. SC-2001 induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, an effect that was mediated by RFX-1 upregulated SHP-1 expression and SHP-1-dependent STAT3 inactivation. Our study indicates targeting STAT3 signaling pathway may be a useful approach for the development of targeted agents for anti-breast cancer.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  13. Leishmania infantum-chagasi activates SHP-1 and reduces NFAT5/TonEBP activity in the mouse kidney inner medulla.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Wang, Hong; Koles, Nancy L; Zhang, Aihong; Aronson, Naomi E

    2014-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis patients have been reported to have a urine concentration defect. Concentration of urine by the renal inner medulla is essentially dependent on a transcription factor, NFAT5/TonEBP, because it activates expression of osmoprotective genes betaine/glycine transporter 1 (BGT1) and sodium/myo-inositol transporter (SMIT), and water channel aquaporin-2, all of which are imperative for concentrating urine. Leishmania parasites evade macrophage immune defenses by activating protein tyrosine phosphatases, among which SHP-1 is critical. We previously demonstrated that SHP-1 inhibits tonicity-dependent activation of NFAT5/TonEBP in HEK293 cells through screening a genome-wide small interfering (si) RNA library against phosphatases (Zhou X, Gallazzini M, Burg MB, Ferraris JD. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107: 7072-7077, 2010). We sought to examine whether Leishmania can activate SHP-1 and inhibit NFAT5/TonEBP activity in the renal inner medulla in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis by injection of female BALB/c mice with a single intravenous dose of 5 × 10(5) L. chagasi metacyclic promastigotes. We found that SHP-1 is expressed in the kidney inner medulla. L. chagasi activates SHP-1 with an increase in stimulatory phosphorylation of SHP-1-Y536 in the region. L. chagasi reduces expression of NFAT5/TonEBP mRNA and protein as well as expression of its targeted genes: BGT1, SMIT, and aquaporin-2. The culture supernatant from L. chagasi metacyclic promastigotes increases SHP-1 protein abundance and potently inhibits NFAT5 transcriptional activity in mIMCD3 cells. However, L. chagasi in our animal model has no significant effect on urinary concentration. We conclude that L. chagasi, most likely through its secreted virulence factors, activates SHP-1 and reduces NFAT5/TonEBP gene expression, which leads to reduced NFAT5/TonEBP transcriptional activity in the kidney inner medulla.

  14. Lyn- and PLC-beta3-dependent regulation of SHP-1 phosphorylation controls Stat5 activity and myelomonocytic leukemia-like disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenbin; Ando, Tomoaki; Wang, Huan-You; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2010-12-23

    Hyperactivation of the transcription factor Stat5 leads to various leukemias. Stat5 activity is regulated by the protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a phospholipase C (PLC)-β3-dependent manner. Thus, PLC-β3-deficient mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, like Lyn (Src family kinase)- deficient mice. Here we show that Lyn/PLC-β3 doubly deficient lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice develop a Stat5-dependent, fatal myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, similar to human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). In hematopoietic stem cells of lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice that cause the CMML-like disease, phosphorylation of SHP-1 at Tyr(536) and Tyr(564) is abrogated, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity and constitutive activation of Stat5. Furthermore, SHP-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(564) by Lyn is indispensable for maximal phosphatase activity and for suppression of the CMML-like disease in these mice. On the other hand, Tyr(536) in SHP-1 can be phosphorylated by Lyn and another kinase(s) and is necessary for efficient interaction with Stat5. Therefore, we identify a novel Lyn/PLC-β3-mediated regulatory mechanism of SHP-1 and Stat5 activities.

  15. The NF-kB regulates the SHP-1 expression in monocytes in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Mirko; Franceschelli, Sara; Ferrone, Alessio; Patruno, Antonia; Grilli, Alfredo; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Bergante, Sonia; Tettamanti, Guido; Riccioni, Graziano; Felaco, Mario; Speranza, Lorenza

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that functional recovery of patients with acute congestive heart failure (ACHF) after treatment with conventional drugs (CD) is mediated by suppression of inflammation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we analyzed gene expression profiles of monocytes from symptomatic ACHF patients (NYHA Class III-IV) before and after pharmacological treatment with CD. The treatment was associated with selective down-regulation of "TNFR signaling" and pro-inflammatory mediators CCL5, MIP-1α receptor, CD14, ITGAM, and significant up-regulation of "TNFR signaling" as evidenced by increase in anti-inflammatory factors including NF-kBIA, TNFAIP3 and SHP-1. In monocyte TNF-alpha-stimulated there is a down-regulation of the phosphatase SHP-1 which induces a significant activation of TAK-1/IKK/NF-kB signaling. These findings suggest that the therapeutic impact of CD treatment in symptomatic ACHF includes negative regulation of the NF-kB signaling in monocytes and the improvement of the SHP-1 activity.

  16. Akt and SHP-1 are DC-intrinsic checkpoints for tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Prestwood, Tyler R.; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Chabon, Jonathan; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangyue; Basto, Pamela A.; Burt, Bryan M.; Alonso, Michael N.; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2016-01-01

    BM-derived DC (BMDC) are powerful antigen-presenting cells. When loaded with immune complexes (IC), consisting of tumor antigens bound to antitumor antibody, BMDC induce powerful antitumor immunity in mice. However, attempts to employ this strategy clinically with either tumor-associated DC (TADC) or monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) have been disappointing. To investigate the basis for this phenomenon, we compared the response of BMDC, TADC, and MoDC to tumor IgG-IC. Our findings revealed, in both mice and humans, that upon exposure to IgG-IC, BMDC internalized the IC, increased costimulatory molecule expression, and stimulated autologous T cells. In contrast, TADC and, surprisingly, MoDC remained inert upon contact with IC due to dysfunctional signaling following engagement of Fcγ receptors. Such dysfunction is associated with elevated levels of the Src homology region 2 domain–containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and phosphatases regulating Akt activation. Indeed, concomitant inhibition of both SHP-1 and phosphatases that regulate Akt activation conferred upon TADC and MoDC the capacity to take up and process IC and induce antitumor immunity in vivo. This work identifies the molecular checkpoints that govern activation of MoDC and TADC and their capacity to elicit T cell immunity. PMID:27812544

  17. Disrupting VEGF-A paracrine and autocrine loops by targeting SHP-1 suppresses triple negative breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jung-Chen; Mar, Ai-Chung; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Chia-Yun; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Kuen-Feng; Liu, Chun-Yu; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Shiau, Chung-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) had an increased likelihood of distant recurrence and death, as compared with those with non-TNBC subtype. Regorafenib is a multi-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor targeting oncogenesis and has been approved for metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Recent studies suggest regorafenib acts as a SHP-1 phosphatase agonist. Here, we investigated the potential of regorafenib to suppress metastasis of TNBC cells through targeting SHP-1/p-STAT3/VEGF-A axis. We found a significant correlation between cancer cell migration and SHP-1/p-STAT3/VEGF-A expression in human TNBC cells. Clinically, high VEGF-A expression is associated with worse disease-free and distant metastasis-free survival. Regorafenib induced significant anti-migratory effects, in association with downregulation of p-STAT3 and VEGF-A. To exclude the role of RTK inhibition in regorafenib-induced anti-metastasis, we synthesized a regorafenib derivative, SC-78, that had minimal effect on VEGFR2 and PDGFR kinase inhibition, while having more potent effects on SHP-1 activation. SC-78 demonstrated superior in vitro and in vivo anti-migration to regorafenib. Furthermore, VEGF-A dependent autocrine/paracrine loops were disrupted by regorafenib and SC-78. This study implies that SHP-1/p-STAT3/VEGF-A axis is a potential therapeutic target for metastatic TNBC, and the more potent SC-78 may be a promising lead for suppressing metastasis of TNBC. PMID:27364975

  18. Novel sorafenib analogues induce apoptosis through SHP-1 dependent STAT3 inactivation in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is constitutively activated in various cancers including breast cancer and has emerged as a novel potential anti-cancer target. STAT3 has been demonstrated to be a target of sorafenib, and a protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2-domain containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) has been demonstrated to downregulate p-STAT3 via its phosphatase activity. Here, we tested the efficacy of two sorafenib analogues, SC-1 and SC-43, in breast cancer cells and examined the drug mechanism. Methods Breast cancer cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Cell viability was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry and western blot. Signal transduction pathways in cells were assessed by western blot. In vivo efficacy of sorafenib, SC-1 and SC-43 was tested in xenografted nude mice. Results SC-1 and SC-43 induced more potent apoptosis than sorafenib, in association with downregulation of p-STAT3 and its downstream proteins cyclin D1 and survivin in a dose-dependent manner in breast cancer cell lines (HCC-1937, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453, SK-BR3, MCF-7). Overexpression of STAT3 in MDA-MB-468 cells protected the cells from apoptosis induced by sorafenib, SC-1 and SC-43. Moreover, SC-1 and SC-43 upregulated SHP-1 activity to a greater extent than sorafenib as measured by in vitro phosphatase assays. Knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA reduced apoptosis induced by SC-1 and SC-43. Importantly, SC-1 and SC-43 showed more efficacious antitumor activity and p-STAT3 downregulation than sorafenib in MDA-MB-468 xenograft tumors. Conclusions Novel sorafenib analogues SC-1 and SC-43 induce apoptosis through SHP-1 dependent STAT3 inactivation and demonstrate greater potency than sorafenib in human breast cancer cells. PMID:23938089

  19. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  20. Spontaneous follicular exclusion of SHP1-deficient B cells is conditional on the presence of competitor wild-type B cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K N; Hsu, C W; Griffin, C T; Goodnow, C C; Cyster, J G

    1998-03-16

    Engagement of antigen receptors on mature B lymphocytes is known to block cell entry into lymphoid follicles and promote accumulation in T cell zones, yet the molecular basis for this change in cell distribution is not understood. Previous studies have shown that follicular exclusion requires a threshold level of antigen receptor engagement combined with occupancy of follicles by B cells without equivalent receptor engagement. The possibility has been raised that follicular composition affects B cell positioning by altering the amount of available antigen and the degree of receptor occupancy. Here we show that follicular composition affects migration of mature B cells under conditions that are independent of antigen receptor occupancy. B cells deficient in the negative regulatory protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP1, which have elevated intracellular signaling by the B cell receptor, are shown to accumulate in the T zone in the absence of their specific antigen. Follicular exclusion of SHP1-deficient B cells was found to be conditional on the presence of excess B cells that lack elevated intracellular signaling, and was not due to a failure of SHP-1-deficient cells to mature and express the follicle-homing chemokine receptor Burkitt's lymphoma receptor 1. These findings strongly suggest that signals that are negatively regulated by SHP1 promote B cell localization in T cell zones by reducing competitiveness for follicular entry, and provide further evidence that follicular composition influences the positioning of antigen-engaged B cells.

  1. Anti-apoptotic cardioprotective effects of SHP-1 gene silencing against ischemia-reperfusion injury: use of deoxycholic acid-modified low molecular weight polyethyleneimine as a cardiac siRNA-carrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongkyu; Hong, Jueun; Moon, Hyung-Ho; Nam, Hye Yeong; Mok, Hyejung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sung Wan; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2013-06-10

    The cardiomyocyte apoptosis plays a critical role in the development of myocardial injury after ischemia and reperfusion. Thus, alteration of the major apoptosis-regulatory factors during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is expected to have favorable cardioprotective effects. Herein, we report ischemic-reperfused myocardial infarction (MI) repair with siRNA against Src homology region 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), which is known as a key factor involved in regulating the progress of apoptosis in many cell types. A low molecular weight polyethyleneimine modified with deoxycholic acid (PEI1.8-DA)-based delivery strategy was suggested for the cardiac application of SHP-1 siRNA to overcome the poor gene delivery efficiency to myocardium due to the highly charged structures of the compact cardiac muscles. The PEI1.8-DA conjugates formed stable nanocomplexes with SHP-1 siRNA via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The PEI1.8-DA/SHP-1 siRNA polyplexes effectively silenced SHP-1 gene expression in cardiomyocytes, leading to a significant inhibition of cardiomyocyte apoptosis under hypoxia. In comparison to conventional gene carriers, relatively large amounts of siRNA molecules remained after treatment with the PEI1.8-DA/SHP-1 siRNA polyplexes. Cardiac administration of the PEI1.8-DA/SHP-1 siRNA polyplexes resulted in substantial improvement in SHP-1 gene silencing, which can be explained by the enhancement of cardiac delivery efficiency of the PEI1.8-DA conjugates. In addition, in vivo treatment with the PEI1.8-DA/SHP-1 siRNA polyplexes induced a highly significant reduction in myocardial apoptosis and infarct size in rat MI models. These results demonstrate that the PEI1.8-DA/SHP-1 siRNA polyplex formulation is a useful system for efficient gene delivery into the compact myocardium that provides a fundamental advantage in treating ischemic-reperfused MI.

  2. [Effect of arsenic trioxide and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine on SHP-1, JAK3, TYK2 gene expression in K562 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Luo, Jian-Min; Sun, Jie

    2014-04-01

    This study was purposed to explore the effects of a methylation inhibitor arsenic trioxide (As2O3, ATO) and 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) on the expression of JAK-STAT signal transduction pathway in family members JAK3, TYK2 and hematopoietic cell phosphatase SHP-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 and their roles in pathogenesis of leukemia. The K562 cells were divided into 3 groups:single drug-treated group, combined 2 drugs-treated group, group without drug treatment as control. The concentration of 5-aza-CdR were 0.5, 1, 2 µmol/L; the concentration of ATO was 1, 2.5, 5 µmol/L; the concentration of combined drugs was ATO 1 µmol/L + 5-aza-CdR 0.5 µmol/L, ATO 2.5 µmol/L + 5-aza-CdR 1 µmol/L, and ATO 5 µmol/L + 5-aza-CdR 2 µmol/L. The K562 cells were treated with above-mentioned concentration of drugs for 24, 48 and 72 hours, then the total RNA of cells was extracted, the JAK3, TYK2 and SHP-1 expressions were detected by real-time quantitative-PCR. The results showed that after the K562 cells were treated with ATO and 5-aza-CdR alone and their combination, the expression of SHP-1 mRNA increased, the expressions of JAK3 mRNA and TYK2 mRNA decreased along with increasing of concentration and prolonging of time, displaying the concentration and time-dependency. The SHP-1 negatively related with JAK3 and TYK2. The effect of SHP-1 on JAK3 was significantly higher than that on TYK2. It is concluded that when the K562 cells are treated with ATO and 5-aza-CdR alone and their combination, the expression of SHP-1 is up-regulated and the expressions of JAK3, TYK2 are down-regulated in concentration-and time-dependent manners, moreover the ATO and 5-aza-CdR show synergies demethylation effect. The SHP-1 gene exert effect possibly through inhibiting the JAK/STAT pathway, the JAK3 is affected more than TYK2, the JAK3 may exert more important role in TAK/STAT pathway.

  3. A derivative of epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis via SHP-1-mediated suppression of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Yun, Miyong; Choo, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Myoung-Seok; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Eun-Ok; Kato, Nobuo; Kim, Bonglee; Srivastava, Sanjay K; Kaihatsu, Kunihiro; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component of green tea known to have chemo-preventative effects on several cancers. However, EGCG has limited clinical application, which necessitates the development of a more effective EGCG prodrug as an anticancer agent. Experimental Approach Derivatives of EGCG were evaluated for their stability and anti-tumour activity in human chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) K562 and KBM5 cells. Key Results EGCG-mono-palmitate (EGCG-MP) showed most prolonged stability compared with other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP exerted greater cytotoxicity and apoptosis in K562 and KBM5 cells than the other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP induced Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) leading decreased oncogenic protein BCR-ABL and STAT3 phosphorylation in CML cells, compared with treatment with EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG-MP reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and survival genes in K562 cells, compared with EGCG. Conversely, depletion of SHP-1 or application of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate blocked the ability of EGCG-MP to suppress phosphorylation of BCR-ABL and STAT3, and the expression of survival genes downstream of STAT3. In addition, EGCG-MP treatment more effectively suppressed tumour growth in BALB/c athymic nude mice compared with untreated controls or EGCG treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased caspase 3 and SHP-1 activity and decreased phosphorylation of BCR-ABL in the EGCG-MP-treated group relative to that in the EGCG-treated group. Conclusions and Implications EGCG-MP induced SHP-1-mediated inhibition of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in vitro and in vivo more effectively than EGCG. This derivative may be a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CML treatment. PMID:25825203

  4. Besides an ITIM/SHP-1-dependent pathway, CD22 collaborates with Grb2 and plasma membrane calcium-ATPase in an ITIM/SHP-1-independent pathway of attenuation of Ca2+i signal in B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei-Ping; Wei, Si-Si; Li, Hui Joyce; Mei, Yun-Qing; Li, Yi-Gang; Wang, Yue-Peng

    2016-08-30

    CD22 is a surface immunoglobulin implicated in negative regulation of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling; particularly inhibiting intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i)signals. Its cytoplasmic tail contains six tyrosine residues (Y773/Y783/Y817/Y828/Y843/Y863, designated Y1~Y6 respectively), including three (Y2/5/6) lying within immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that serve to recruit the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 after BCR activation-induced phosphorylation. The mechanism of inhibiting Ca2+i by CD22 has been poorly understood. Previous study demonstrated that CD22 associated with plasma membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) and enhanced its activity (Chen, J. et al. Nat Immunol 2004;5:651-7). The association is dependent on BCR activation-induced cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphorylation, because CD22 with either all six tyrosines mutated to phenylalanines or cytoplasmic tail truncated loses its ability to associate with PMCA. However, which individual or a group of tyrosine residues determine the association and how CD22 and PMCA interacts, are still unclear. In this study, by using a series of CD22 tyrosine mutants, we found that ITIM Y2/5/6 accounts for 34.3~37.1% Ca2+i inhibition but is irrelevant for CD22/PMCA association. Non-ITIM Y4 and its YEND motif contribute to the remaining 69.4~71.7% Ca2+i inhibition and is the binding site for PMCA-associated Grb2. Grb2, independently of BCR cross-linking, is constitutively associated with and directly binds to PMCA in both chicken and human B cells. Knockout of Grb2 by CRISPR/Cas9 completely disrupted the CD22/PMCA association. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that in addition to previously-identified ITIM/SHP-1-dependent pathway, CD22 holds a major pathway of negative regulation of Ca2+i signal, which is ITIM/SHP-1-independent, but Y4/Grb2/PMCA-dependent.

  5. Besides an ITIM/SHP-1-dependent pathway, CD22 collaborates with Grb2 and plasma membrane calcium-ATPase in an ITIM/SHP-1-independent pathway of attenuation of Ca2+i signal in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei-Ping; Wei, Si-Si; Li, Hui Joyce; Mei, Yun-Qing; Li, Yi-Gang; Wang, Yue-Peng

    2016-01-01

    CD22 is a surface immunoglobulin implicated in negative regulation of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling; particularly inhibiting intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i)signals. Its cytoplasmic tail contains six tyrosine residues (Y773/Y783/Y817/Y828/Y843/Y863, designated Y1~Y6 respectively), including three (Y2/5/6) lying within immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that serve to recruit the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 after BCR activation-induced phosphorylation. The mechanism of inhibiting Ca2+i by CD22 has been poorly understood. Previous study demonstrated that CD22 associated with plasma membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) and enhanced its activity (Chen, J. et al. Nat Immunol 2004;5:651-7). The association is dependent on BCR activation-induced cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphorylation, because CD22 with either all six tyrosines mutated to phenylalanines or cytoplasmic tail truncated loses its ability to associate with PMCA. However, which individual or a group of tyrosine residues determine the association and how CD22 and PMCA interacts, are still unclear. In this study, by using a series of CD22 tyrosine mutants, we found that ITIM Y2/5/6 accounts for 34.3~37.1% Ca2+i inhibition but is irrelevant for CD22/PMCA association. Non-ITIM Y4 and its YEND motif contribute to the remaining 69.4~71.7% Ca2+i inhibition and is the binding site for PMCA-associated Grb2. Grb2, independently of BCR cross-linking, is constitutively associated with and directly binds to PMCA in both chicken and human B cells. Knockout of Grb2 by CRISPR/Cas9 completely disrupted the CD22/PMCA association. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that in addition to previously-identified ITIM/SHP-1-dependent pathway, CD22 holds a major pathway of negative regulation of Ca2+i signal, which is ITIM/SHP-1-independent, but Y4/Grb2/PMCA-dependent. PMID:27276708

  6. Regulation of tyrosine phosphatases in the adventitia during vascular remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Patrick; Hackbusch, Daniel; Mercan, Sibel; Stawowy, Philipp; Ostman, Arne; Kappert, Kai

    2009-05-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are regulators of growth factor signalling in vascular remodelling. The aim of this study was to evaluate PTP expression in the context of PDGF-signalling in the adventitia after angioplasty. Utilising a rat carotid artery model, the adventitial layers of injured and non-injured vessels were laser microdissected. The mRNA expression of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, the ligands PDGF-A/B/C/D and the receptor-antagonising PTPs (DEP-1, TC-PTP, SHP-2, PTP1B) were determined and correlated to vascular morphometrics, proliferation markers and PDGF {beta}-receptor phosphorylation. The levels of the PDGF {beta}-receptor, PDGF-C and PDGF-D were upregulated concurrently with the antagonising PTPs DEP-1 and TC-PTP at day 8, and normalised at day 14 after vessel injury. Although the proliferation parameters were time-dependently altered in the adventitial layer, the phosphorylation of the PDGF {beta}-receptor remained unchanged. The expression dynamics of specific PTPs indicate a regulatory role of PDGF-signalling also in the adventitia during vascular remodelling.

  7. The Novel Organic Arsenical Darinaparsin Induces MAPK-Mediated and SHP1-Dependent Cell Death in T-cell Lymphoma and Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Cells and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Bhalla, Savita; Gartenhaus, Ronald B; Crombie, Jennifer; Kandela, Irawati; Sharma, Jaya; Mazar, Andrew; Evens, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Darinaparsin (Zio-101) is a novel organic arsenical compound with encouraging clinical activity in relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma (TCL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), however little is known regarding its mechanism of action. Experimental Design TCL cell lines (Jurkat, Hut78, and HH) and HL cell lines (L428, L540, and L1236) were examined for in vitro cell death by MTT assay and Annexin-V based flow cytometry. Jurkat and L540-derived xenografts in SCID mice were examined for in vivo tumor inhibition and survival. Biological effects of darinaparsin on MAPK pathway were investigated using pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference (RNAi) and transient transfection for overexpression for SHP1 and MEK. Results Darinaparsin treatment resulted in dose-dependent cytotoxicity and apoptosis in all TCL and HL cell lines. Additionally, darinaparsin had more rapid, higher, and sustained intracellular arsenic levels compared with arsenic trioxide via mass spectrometry. In vivo experiments with Jurkat (TCL) and L540 (HL)-derived lymphoma xenografts showed significant inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival in darinaparsin-treated SCID mice. Biologically, darinaparsin caused phosphorylation of ERK (and relevant downstream substrates) primarily by decreasing the inhibitory SHP1 phosphatase and co-immunoprecipitation showed significant ERK/SHP1 interaction. Furthermore, ERK shRNA knockdown or constitutive overexpression of SHP1 resulted in increased apoptosis, while co-treatment with pharmacologic MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic cell death. Conversely, SHP1 blockade (via pharmacologic inhibition or RNAi) as well as MEK constitutive activation decreased darinaparsin-related cell death. Conclusions Altogether, these data show that darinaparsin is highly active in HL and TCL and its activity is dependent primarily on MAPK mechanisms. PMID:25316819

  8. Lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis promotes protein tyrosine dephosphorylation and inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase in human mononuclear phagocytes. Role of the Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Knutson, K L; Hmama, Z; Herrera-Velit, P; Rochford, R; Reiner, N E

    1998-01-02

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a putative virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that inhibits monocyte functions, and this may involve antagonism of cell signaling pathways. The effects of LAM on protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cells of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 were examined. LAM promoted tyrosine dephosphorylation of multiple cell proteins and attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. To examine whether these effects of LAM could be related to activation of a phosphatase, fractions from LAM-treated cells were analyzed for dephosphorylation of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The data show that LAM induced increased phosphatase activity associated with the membrane fraction. The Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) is important for signal termination and was examined as a potential target of LAM. Exposure of cells to LAM brought about (i) an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-1, and (ii) translocation of the phosphatase to the membrane. Phosphatase assay of SHP-1 immunoprecipitated from LAM-treated cells, using phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase as substrate, indicated that LAM promoted increased activity of SHP-1 in vivo. LAM also activated SHP-1 directly in vitro. Exposure of cells to LAM also attenuated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12, and major histocompatibility class II molecules. These results suggest that one mechanism by which LAM deactivates monocytes involves activation of SHP-1.

  9. SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 regulates pyruvate kinase M2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Yao-Li; Chen, Li-Ju; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Min-Husan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Boo, Yin-Pin; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is known to promote tumourigenesis through dimer formation of p-PKM2Y105. Here, we investigated whether SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) decreases p-PKM2Y105 expression and, thus, determines the sensitivity of sorafenib through inhibiting the nuclear-related function of PKM2. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot confirmed the effect of SHP-1 on PKM2Y105 dephosphorylation. Lactate production was assayed in cells and tumor samples to determine whether sorafenib reversed the Warburg effect. Clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor samples were assessed for PKM2 expression. SHP-1 directly dephosphorylated PKM2 at Y105 and further decreased the proliferative activity of PKM2; similar effects were found in sorafenib-treated HCC cells. PKM2 was also found to determine the sensitivity of targeted drugs, such as sorafenib, brivanib, and sunitinib, by SHP-1 activation. Significant sphere-forming activity was found in HCC cells stably expressing PKM2. Clinical findings suggest that PKM2 acts as a predicting factor of early recurrence in patients with HCC, particularly those without known risk factors (63.6%). SHP-1 dephosphorylates PKM2 at Y105 to inhibit nuclear function of PKM2 and determines the efficacy of targeted drugs. Targeting PKM2 by SHP-1 might provide new therapeutic insights for patients with HCC. PMID:26959741

  10. A novel obatoclax derivative, SC-2001, induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells through SHP-1-dependent STAT3 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuen-Feng; Su, Jung-Chen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Huang, Jui-Wen; Chen, Kuei-Chiu; Chen, Wei-Lin; Tai, Wei-Tien; Shiau, Chung-Wai

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effects of a novel compound, SC-2001, on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SC-2001, which is structurally related to the Mcl-1 inhibitor obatoclax, showed better antitumor effects than obatoclax in HCC cell lines, including HepG2, PLC5 and Huh-7. Like obatoclax, SC-2001 inhibited the protein-protein interactions between Mcl-1 and Bak. However, SC-2001 downregulated the protein levels of Mcl-1 by reducing its transcription whereas obatoclax had no significant effect on Mcl-1 expression. As Mcl-1 is regulated by signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), we found that SC-2001 downregulated the phosphorylation of STAT3 (Tyr 705) and subsequently inhibited transcriptional activities of STAT3 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition to Mcl-1, STAT3-regulated proteins, including survivin and cyclin D1, were also repressed by SC-2001. Notably, SC-2001 reduced IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in HepG2 and PLC5 cells. Ectopic expression of STAT3 abolished the prominent apoptotic death in SC-2001-treated PLC5 cells, indicating that STAT3 is indispensable in mediating the effects of SC-2001. Importantly, SC-2001 enhanced the expression of SHP1, a negative regulator of STAT3. Inhibition of SHP-1 by either specific inhibitor or small interference RNA reduced the apoptotic effects of SC-2001, indicating that SHP-1 plays a key role in mediating SC2001-induced cell death. SC-2001 enhanced the activity of SHP-1 in all tested HCC cells including HepG2, PLC5 and Huh-7. Finally, SC-2001 reduced PLC5 tumor growth, downregulated p-STAT3 and upregulated SHP-1 expression and activity in vivo. In conclusion, our results suggest that SC-2001 induces apoptosis in HCC, and that this effect is mediated through SHP-1-dependent STAT3 inactivation.

  11. [Effect of 5-aza-CdR demethylation on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in leukemia HL-60 cells].

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Li, Ying-Hua; Wang, Dong-Mei; Luo, Jian-Min

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in acute leukemia HL-60 cells and effect of 5-aza-CdR demethylation on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit genes. RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit mRNA in HL-60 cells of the drug-treated group and control group.The methylation specific PCR (MSP) was applied to measure the methylation status of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in HL-60 cells.The results showed that after being treated with 5-aza-CdR, the recovery of SHP-1 gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells in which SHP-1 mRNA originally was not expressed. Meanwhile, the high expression level of C-kit mRNA in HL-60 cells was decreased. When HL-60 cells were treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 µmol/L 5-aza-CdR, the demethylation effect was enhanced, the expression of SHP-1 mRNA displayed an ascending tendency, and the expression of C-kit mRNA showed an descending tendency in dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05) . It is concluded that the absence of SHP-1 mRNA expression in HL-60 cells and recovery of expression after treatment with 5-aza-CdR suggest that the hypermethylation of SHP-1 gene relates with pathogenesis of leukemia, and the abnormal increase of C-kit mRNA expression maybe exist in formation of leukemia. The effect of 5-aza-CdR on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit shows dose-dependency, the higher the 5-aza-CdR concentration, the higher the SHP-1 expression and the lower the C-kit expression, moreover, the effect of 5-aza-CdR shows time-dependency in specific concentration.The SHP-1 mRNA expression negatively correlates with C-kit mRNA expression, suggesting that the decrease or absence of SHP-1 expression in leukemia cells weakens the negative regulation on C-kit signaling pathway, thus plays a role in the formation of leukemia.

  12. [Demethylation effect of inhibitor As2O3 on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in leukemia HL-60 cells].

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Wang, Dong-Mei; Li, Ying-Hua; Liu, Xiao; Guo, Su-Qing; Luo, Jian-Min

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in acute leukemia HL-60 cells and effect of inhibitor As2O3 demethylation on SHP-1 and C-kit genes expression. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit mRNA in drug-treated cell group and control group. The methylation specific PCR (MSP) was applied to measure the methylation status of SHP-1 gene in HL-60 cells. The results showed that after being treated with As2O3 the recovery of SHP-1 gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells in which SHP-1 mRNA originally did not expressed, meanwhile the expression level of C-kit mRNA in HL-60 cells with high expression decreased. When HL-60 cells were treated with As2O3 of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 µmol/L, the demethylation effects was enhanced, the expression of SHP-1 mRNA displayed an ascending tendency, and expression of C-kit mRNA showed an descending tendency in dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the absence of SHP-1 mRNA expression in HL-60 cells and recovery of expression after treatment with As2O3 suggest the hypermethylation of SHP-1 gene related with pathogenesis of leukemia, and the abnormal increase of C-kit mRNA expression maybe exist in formation of leukemia. The effect of As2O3 on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit shows dose-dependency, the higher the As2O3 concentration, the higher the SHP-1 expression and the lower the C-kit expression, moreover, the effect of As2O3 shows time-dependency in specific concentration. The SHP-1 mRNA expression negatively relates with C-kit mRNA expression, suggesting that the decrease or absence of SHP-1 expression in leukemia cells weakens the negative regulation on C-kit signaling pathway, thus plays a role in the formation of leukemia.

  13. SC-2001 Overcomes STAT3-mediated Sorafenib Resistance through RFX-1/SHP-1 Activation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jung-Chen; Tseng, Ping-Hui; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Hsu, Cheng-Yi; Tai, Wei-Tien; Li, Yong-Shi; Chen, I-Ting; Liu, Chun-Yu; Chen, Kuen-Feng; Shiau, Chung-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide. Sorafenib, a small multikinase inhibitor, is the only approved therapy for advanced HCC. The clinical benefit of sorafenib is offset by the acquisition of sorafenib resistance. Understanding of the molecular mechanism of STAT3 overexpression in sorafenib resistance is critical if the clinical benefits of this drug are to be improved. In this study, we explored our hypothesis that loss of RFX-1/SHP-1 and further increase of p-STAT3 as a result of sorafenib treatment induces sorafenib resistance as a cytoprotective response effect, thereby, limiting sorafenib sensitivity and efficiency. We found that knockdown of RFX-1 protected HCC cells against sorafenib-induced cell apoptosis and SHP-1 activity was required for the process. SC-2001, a molecule with similar structure to obatoclax, synergistically suppressed tumor growth when used in combination with sorafenib in vitro and overcame sorafenib resistance through up-regulating RFX-1 and SHP-1 resulting in tumor suppression and mediation of dephosphorylation of STAT3. In addition, sustained sorafenib treatment in HCC led to increased p-STAT3 which was a key mediator of sorafenib sensitivity. The combination of SC-2001 and sorafenib strongly inhibited tumor growth in both wild-type and sorafenib-resistant HCC cell bearing xenograft models. These results demonstrate that inactivation of RFX/SHP-1 induced by sustained sorafenib treatment confers sorafenib resistance to HCC through p-STAT3 up-regulation. These effects can be overcome by SC-2001 through RFX-1/SHP-1 dependent p-STAT3 suppression. In conclusion, the use of SC-2001 in combination with sorafenib may constitute a new strategy for HCC therapy. PMID:25047655

  14. AT₂receptors recruit c-Src, SHP-1 and FAK upon activation by Ang II in PND15 rat hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Leonardo R; Villarreal, Rodrigo S; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2012-01-01

    The functional role of AT(2) receptors is unclear and it activates unconventional signaling pathways, which in general do not involve a classical activation of a G-protein. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the transduction mechanism of AT(2) Ang II receptors in PND15 rat hindbrain membrane preparations, which represents a physiological developmental condition. To determine whether Ang II AT(2) receptors induced association to SHP-1 in rat hindbrain, co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed. Stimulation of Ang II AT(2) receptors induced both a transient tyr-phosphorylation and activation of SHP-1. The possible participation of c-Src in Ang II-mediated SHP-1 activation, we demonstrated by recruitment of c-Src in immunocomplexes obtained with anti AT(2) or anti-SHP-1 antibodies. The association of SHP-1 to c-Src was inhibited by PD123319 and the c-Src inhibitor PP2. Similarly, SHP-1 activity determined in AT(2)-immunocomplexes was inhibited by PD123319 and the c-Src inhibitor PP2. Following stimulation with Ang II, AT(2) receptors recruit c-Src, which was responsible for SHP-1 tyr-phosphorylation and activation. Since AT(2) receptors are involved in neuron migration, we tested the presence of FAK in immunocomplexes. Surprisingly, AT(2)-immunocomplexes contained mainly the 85kDa fragment of FAK. Besides, p125FAK associated to SHP-1. In summary, we demonstrated the presence of an active signal transduction mechanism in PND15 rat hindbrain, a developmental stage critical for cerebellar development. In this model, we showed a complex containing AT(2)/SHP-1/c-Src/p85FAK, suggesting a potential role of Ang II AT(2) receptors in cerebellar development and neuronal differentiation.

  15. Reduced expression of CD45 Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Pr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-08

    complex ( MHC ) I (28-14-8), MHC II (M5/114.15.2), CD44 (IM7), and Ly6G (1A8). Cells (1 106) were resuspended in Fc block (anti CD16/CD32 antibody diluted...enzyme (supplemental Fig. 3). Themajority of the phosphatases tested in this panel belong to the class of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHP-1, SHP- 2 ...and Sina Bavari‡ 2 From the ‡United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland 21702-5011, §Target Structure

  16. Nucleotide diversity of a genomic sequence similar to SHATTERPROOF (PvSHP1) in domesticated and wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanni, L; Bitocchi, E; Bellucci, E; Rossi, M; Rau, D; Attene, G; Gepts, P; Papa, R

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary studies in plant and animal breeding are aimed at understanding the structure and organization of genetic variations of species. We have identified and characterized a genomic sequence in Phaseolus vulgaris of 1,200 bp (PvSHP1) that is homologous to SHATTERPROOF-1 (SHP1), a gene involved in control of fruit shattering in Arabidopsis thaliana. The PvSHP1 fragment was mapped to chromosome Pv06 in P. vulgaris and is linked to the flower and seed color gene V. Amplification of the PvSHP1 sequence from the most agronomically important legume species showed a high degree of interspecies diversity in the introns within the Phaseoleae, while the coding region was conserved across distant taxa. Sequencing of the PvSHP1 sequence in a sample of 91 wild and domesticated genotypes that span the geographic distribution of this species in the centers of origin showed that PvSHP1 is highly polymorphic and, therefore, particularly useful to further investigate the origin and domestication history of P. vulgaris. Our data confirm the gene pool structure seen in P. vulgaris along with independent domestication processes in the Andes and Mesoamerica; they provide additional evidence for a single domestication event in Mesoamerica. Moreover, our results support the Mesoamerican origin of this species. Finally, we have developed three indel-spanning markers that will be very useful for bean germplasm characterization, and particularly to trace the distribution of the domesticated Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools.

  17. Modulation in the expression of SHP-1, SHP-2 and PTP1B due to the inhibition of MAPKs, cAMP and neutrophils early on in the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Violeta; Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Matellán, Laura; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) SHP-1, SHP-2 and PTP1B are overexpressed early on during the development of cerulein -induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in rats, and their levels can be modulated by some species of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the intracellular levels of cAMP and by general leukocyte infiltration, the latter at least for SHP-2 and PTP1B. In this study we show that cerulein treatment activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 MAPK during the early phase of cerulein-induced AP (2h after the first injection of cerulein). Therefore, by using the MAPK inhibitors SP600125 (a specific JNK inhibitor) and PD98059 (a specific ERK inhibitor), we have unmasked the particular MAPK that underlies the modulation of the expression levels of these PTPs. JNK would act by preventing SHP-1 protein expression from increasing beyond a certain level. ERK 1/2 was the main MAPK involved in the increase in SHP-2 protein expression due to cerulein. JNK negatively modulated the SH2-domain containing PTPs. Both MAPKs played a role in the increase in PTP1B protein expression due to cerulein. Finally, by using the white blood cell inhibitors vinblastine sulfate, gadolinium chloride and FK506 (tacrolimus), we show that the macrophage activity or T-lymphocytes does not modulate the expression of any of the PTPs, although neutrophil infiltration was found to be a regulator of SHP-2 and PTP1B protein expression due to cerulein.

  18. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  19. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tekleyohans, Dawit G.; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner. PMID:27776173

  20. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Katrin; Bhide, Amey S; Tekleyohans, Dawit G; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Becker, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  1. SHP-1 overexpression increases the radioresistance of NPC cells by enhancing DSB repair, increasing S phase arrest and decreasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofen; Mou, Jingjing; Liu, Sha; Sun, Ziyi; Meng, Rui; Zhou, Zhenwei; Wu, Gang; Peng, Gang

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of SHP-1 on the radioresistance of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line CNE-2 and the relevant underlying mechanisms. The human NPC cell line CNE-2 was transfected with a lentivirus that contained the SHP-1 gene or a nonsense sequence (referred to as LP-H1802Lv201 and LP-NegLv201 cells, respectively). Cells were irradiated with different ionizing radiation (IR) doses. Cell survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, and the expression of related proteins were assessed using colony formation assay, immunofluorescent assays (IFAs), flow cytometry (FCM) and western blot analyses, respectively. Compared with the control (CNE-2 cells) and LP-NegLv201 cells, LP-H1802Lv201 cells were more resistant to IR. IFAs showed that IR caused less histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and RAD51 foci in the LP-H1802Lv201 cells. Compared with the control and LP-NegLv201 cells, LP-H1802Lv201 cells showed increased S phase arrest. After IR, the apoptotic rate of the LP-H1802Lv201 cells was lower in contrast to the control and LP-NegLv201 cells. Western blot analyses showed that IR increased the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2), ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) protein, checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) and p53. In LP-H1802Lv201 cells, the phosphorylation levels of ATM and CHK2 were significantly increased while the p53 phosphorylation level was decreased compared to these levels in the control and LP-NegLv201 cells. Phosphorylation of ATR and CHK1 did not show significant differences in the three cell groups. Overexpression of SHP-1 in the CNE-2 cells led to radioresistance and the radioresistance was related to enhanced DNA DSB repair, increased S phase arrest and decreased cell apoptosis.

  2. Mononuclear copper(II) complexes with 3,5-substituted-4-salicylidene-amino-3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole: synthesis, structure and potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Li, Ying; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui

    2011-06-28

    Six copper complexes of Schiff base ligands containing 3,5-substituted-4-salicylideneamino-3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole have been synthesized and well characterized. The structures of complexes 1 and 2 were determined by X-ray crystal analysis. Fluorescence and potentiometric study indicated that in the physiological pH range, one ligand was dissociated from the complexes to form 1:1 mononucleus copper complexes. The complexes potently inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2) and Src homology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) with 3-4 fold selectivity against PTP1B over TCPTP and PTP-MEG2, and 3-9 fold over SHP-1, but display almost no inhibition against Src homology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2). Complex 1 inhibits PTP1B with a competitive model with K(i) of 30 nM. Substitution with small groups at the phenyl of the ligand does not obviously influence the inhibitory ability of the complexes.

  3. Death Receptor 5—Targeted Depletion of Interleukin-23—Producing Macrophages, Th17, and Th1/17 Associated With Defective Tyrosine Phosphatase in Mice and Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yang, PingAr; Wu, Qi; Li, Hao; Ding, Yana; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Spalding, David M.; Mountz, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Bidirectional interactions between granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor–positive (GM-CSF+) T cell and interferon regulatory factor 5–positive (IRF-5+) macrophages play a major role in autoimmunity. In the absence of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), GM-CSF–stimulated cells are resistant to death receptor (DR)–mediated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether TRA-8, an anti-DR5 agonistic antibody, can eliminate inflammatory macrophages and CD4 T cells in the SHP-1–defective condition. Methods. Ubiquitous Cre (Ubc.Cre) human/mouse-chimeric DR5-transgenic mice were crossed with viable SHP-1–defective motheaten (mev/mev) mice. TRA-8 was administered weekly for up to 4 weeks. The clinical scores, histopathologic severity, and macrophage and CD4 T cell phenotypes were evaluated. The role of TRA-8 in depleting inflammatory macrophages and CD4 T cells was also evaluated, using synovial fluid obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results. The levels of Inflammatory macrophages (interleukine-23–positive [IL-23+] IRF5+) and CD4 T (IL-17+GM-CSF+) cells were elevated in mev/mev mice. In DR5-transgenic mev/mev mice, DR5 expression was up-regulated in these 2 cell populations. TRA-8 treatment depleted these cells and resulted in a significant reduction of inflammation and in the titers of autoantibodies. In synovial cells from patients with RA, the expression of IRF5 and DR5 was negatively correlated with the expression of PTPN6. TRA-8, but not TRAIL, suppressed RA inflammatory macrophages and Th17 cells under conditions in which the expression of SHP-1is low. Conclusion. In contrast with TRAIL, which lacks the capability to counteract the survival signal in the absence of SHP-1, TRA-8 eliminated both IRF5+ IL-23+ M1 macrophages and pathogenic GM-CSF+ IL-17+ CD4 T cells in a SHP-1-independent manner. The results of the current study suggest that TRA-8 can deplete inflammatory cell populations

  4. Abnormal repression of SHP-1, SHP-2 and SOCS-1 transcription sustains the activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway and the progression of the disease in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Skouri, Nour; Ben Ali, Cyrine; Safra, Ines; Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Ladeb, Saloua; Mrad, Karima; Ben Othman, Tarek; Ben Ahmed, Mélika

    2017-01-01

    Sustained activation of JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway is classically described in Multiple Myeloma (MM). One explanation could be the silencing of the JAK/STAT suppressor genes, through the hypermethylation of SHP-1 and SOCS-1, previously demonstrated in MM cell lines or in whole bone marrow aspirates. The link between such suppressor gene silencing and the degree of bone marrow invasion or the treatment response has not been evaluated in depth. Using real-time RT-PCR, we studied the expression profile of three JAK/STAT suppressor genes: SHP-1, SHP-2 and SOCS-1 in plasma cells freshly isolated from the bone marrows of MM patients and healthy controls. Our data demonstrated an abnormal repression of such genes in malignant plasma cells and revealed a significant correlation between such defects and the sustained activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway during MM. The repressed expression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 correlated significantly with a high initial degree of bone marrow infiltration but was, unexpectedly, associated with a better response to the induction therapy. Collectively, our data provide new evidences that substantiate the contribution of JAK/STAT suppressor genes in the pathogenesis of MM. They also highlight the possibility that the decreased gene expression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 could be of interest as a new predictive factor of a favorable treatment response, and suggest new potential mechanisms of action of the therapeutic molecules. Whether such defect helps the progression of the disease from monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance to MM remains, however, to be determined. PMID:28369102

  5. STING Negatively Regulates Double-Stranded DNA-Activated JAK1-STAT1 Signaling via SHP-1/2 in B Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Ding, Liang; Fan, Hongye; Liu, Fei; Ren, Deshan; Hou, Yayi

    2015-05-01

    Recognition of cytosolic DNA initiates a series of innate immune responses by inducing IFN-I production and subsequent triggering JAK1-STAT1 signaling which plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of infection, inflammation and autoimmune diseases through promoting B cell activation and antibody responses. The stimulator of interferon genes protein (STING) has been demonstrated to be a critical hub of type I IFN induction in cytosolic DNA-sensing pathways. However, it still remains unknown whether cytosolic DNA can directly activate the JAK1-STAT1 signaling or not. And the role of STING is also unclear in this response. In the present study, we found that dsDNA directly triggered the JAK1-STAT1 signaling by inducing phosphorylation of the Lyn kinase. Moreover, this response is not dependent on type I IFN receptors. Interestingly, STING could inhibit dsDNA-triggered activation of JAK1-STAT1 signaling by inducing SHP-1 and SHP-2 phosphorylation. In addition, compared with normal B cells, the expression of STING was significantly lower and the phosphorylation level of JAK1 was significantly higher in B cells from MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice, highlighting the close association between STING low-expression and JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation in B cells in autoimmune diseases. Our data provide a molecular insight into the novel role of STING in dsDNA-mediated inflammatory disorders.

  6. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  7. Teaching resources. Protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Salton, Stephen R

    2005-03-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein phosphatases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the importance of phosphatases in physiology, recognized by the award of a Nobel Prize in 1992, and then proceeds to describe the two types of protein phosphatases: serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases. The information covered includes the structure, regulation, and substrate specificity of protein phosphatases, with an emphasis on their importance in disease and clinical settings.

  8. Programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 modulates the regulatory T cells' capacity to repress shock/sepsis-induced indirect acute lung injury by recruiting phosphatase SRC homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild-type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis-induced experimental indirect acute lung injury (iALI), and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs' capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1 mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture. We found that in PD-L1-recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage, failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [myeloperoxidase activity], or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also, a significant increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, but no changes in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1(-/-) iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs' protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Tregs' ability to suppress iALI, and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation.

  9. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  10. An epigenetic modifier induces production of (10'S)-verruculide B, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases by Phoma sp. nov. LG0217, a fungal endophyte of Parkinsonia microphylla.

    PubMed

    Gubiani, Juliana R; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Shi, Taoda; Araujo, Angela R; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Chapman, Eli; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2017-03-15

    Incorporation of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to a culture broth of the endophytic fungus Phoma sp. nov. LG0217 isolated from Parkinsonia microphylla changed its metabolite profile and resulted in the production of (10'S)-verruculide B (1), vermistatin (2) and dihydrovermistatin (3). When cultured in the absence of the epigenetic modifier, it produced a new metabolite, (S,Z)-5-(3',4'-dihydroxybutyldiene)-3-propylfuran-2(5H)-one (4) together with nafuredin (5). The structure of 4 was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and its absolute configuration was determined by application of the modified Mosher's ester method. The absolute structure of (10'S)-verruculide B was determined as 5-[(10'S,2'E,6'E)-10',11'-dihydroxy-3',7',11'-trimethyldodeca-2',6'-dien-1'-yl]-(3R)-6,8-dihydroxy-3-methylisochroman-1-one (1) with the help of CD and NOE data. Compound 1 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) 1B (PTP1B), Src homology 2-containing PTP 1 (SHP1) and T-cell PTP (TCPTP) with IC50 values of 13.7±3.4, 8.8±0.6, and 16.6±3.8μM, respectively. Significance of these activities and observed modest selectivity of 1 for SHP1 over PTP1B and TCPTP is discussed.

  11. Diverse Levels of Sequence Selectivity and Catalytic Efficiency of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Selner, Nicholas G.; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Neel, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Knapp, Stefan; Bell, Charles E.; Pei, Dehua

    2014-01-01

    The sequence selectivity of 14 classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) (PTPRA, PTPRB, PTPRC, PTPRD, PTPRO, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, HePTP, PTP-PEST, TCPTP, PTPH1, PTPD1, and PTPD2) was systematically profiled by screening their catalytic domains against combinatorial peptide libraries. All of the PTPs exhibit similar preference for pY peptides rich in acidic amino acids and disfavor positively charged sequences, but differ vastly in their degrees of preference/disfavor. Some PTPs (PTP-PEST, SHP-1, and SHP-2) are highly selective for acidic over basic (or neutral) peptides (by >105-fold), whereas others (PTPRA and PTPRD) show no to little sequence selectivity. PTPs also have diverse intrinsic catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM values against optimal substrates), which differ by >105-fold due to different kcat and/or KM values. Moreover, PTPs show little positional preference for the acidic residues relative to the pY residue. Mutation of Arg47 of PTP1B, which is located near the pY-1 and pY-2 residues of a bound substrate, decreased the enzymatic activity by 3–18-fold toward all pY substrates containing acidic residues anywhere within the pY-6 to pY+5 region. Similarly, mutation of Arg24, which is situated near the C-terminus of a bound substrate, adversely affected the kinetic activity of all acidic substrates. A co-crystal structure of PTP1B bound with a nephrin pY1193 peptide suggests that Arg24 engages in electrostatic interactions with acidic residues at the pY+1, pY+2, and likely other positions. These results suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions between positively charged residues near the PTP active site and acidic residues on pY substrates allow a PTP to bind acidic substrates with similar affinities and the varying levels of preference for acidic sequences by different PTPs are likely caused by the different electrostatic potentials near their active sites. The implications of the varying sequence selectivity and intrinsic catalytic

  12. Phosphatidyl glycerophosphate phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y Y; Kennedy, E P

    1967-09-01

    An enzyme (phosphatidyl glycerophosphate phosphatase) that catalyzes the formation of phosphatidyl glycerol from phosphatidyl glycerophosphate has been rendered soluble by treatment of the particulate fraction of E. coli with Triton X-100 in the presence of EDTA, and has been partially purified. The enzyme is specific for phosphatidyl glycerophosphate and does not catalyze the hydrolysis of other simple phosphomonoesters. It requires Mg(++) for activity and is inhibited by sulfhydryl agents. Some other properties of the enzyme are also described.

  13. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  14. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  15. Crystal structure of lipid phosphatase Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerophosphate phosphatase B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junping; Jiang, Daohua; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xuejun Cai

    2014-05-27

    Membrane-integrated type II phosphatidic acid phosphatases (PAP2s) are important for numerous bacterial to human biological processes, including glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and signaling. Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase B (ecPgpB) catalyzes removing the terminal phosphate group from a lipid carrier, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, and is essential for transport of many hydrophilic small molecules across the membrane. We determined the crystal structure of ecPgpB at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shares a similar folding topology and a nearly identical active site with soluble PAP2 enzymes. However, the substrate binding mechanism appears to be fundamentally different from that in soluble PAP2 enzymes. In ecPgpB, the potential substrate entrance to the active site is located in a cleft formed by a V-shaped transmembrane helix pair, allowing lateral movement of the lipid substrate entering the active site from the membrane lipid bilayer. Activity assays of point mutations confirmed the importance of the catalytic residues and potential residues involved in phosphate binding. The structure also suggests an induced-fit mechanism for the substrate binding. The 3D structure of ecPgpB serves as a prototype to study eukaryotic PAP2 enzymes, including human glucose-6-phosphatase, a key enzyme in the homeostatic regulation of blood glucose concentrations.

  16. Alkaline phosphatase of Physarum polycephalum is insoluble.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    The plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum grow as multinucleated cells in the presence of sufficient humidity and nutriment. Under non-illuminating conditions, stresses such as low temperature or high concentrations of salts transform the plasmodia into spherules whereas dehydration induces sclerotization. Some phosphatases including protein phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been purified from the plasmodia, but alkaline phosphatase remains to be elucidated. Phosphatase of the plasmodia, spherules and sclerotia was visualized by electrophoresis gel-staining assay using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. Insoluble fractions of the sclerotia were abundant in phosphatase activity. The phosphatase which was extracted by nonionic detergent was subjected to column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Purified phosphatase showed the highest activity at pH 8.8, indicating that this enzyme belongs to alkaline phosphatase. The apparent molecular mass from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing condition was estimated to be 100 kDa whereas that under reducing was 105 kDa. An amount of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 0.5 M NaCl had no effects on the activity although the phosphatase showed heat instability, Mg(2+)-dependency and sensitivity to 2-glycerophosphate or NaF. The extracting conditions and enzymatic properties suggest that this alkaline phosphatase which is in a membrane-bound form plays important roles in phosphate metabolism.

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase: enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Montalibet, Jacqueline; Skorey, Kathryn I; Kennedy, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Activity assays for tyrosine phosphatases are based on the hydrolysis of a arylphosphate moiety from a synthetic substrate yielding a spectroscopically active product. Many different substrates can be used for these assays with p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), fluorescein diphosphate (FDP), and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbellyferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) being the most efficient and versatile. Equally, larger molecules such as phosphotyrosyl peptides can also be used to mimic more natural substrates. Activity assays include the determinations of the rate of dephosphorylation and calculations of kinetic constants such as k(cat) and K(M). These assays are useful to identify and characterize tyrosine phosphatases and are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of inhibitors.

  18. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  19. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-07-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses.

  20. Inositol polyphosphate phosphatases in human disease.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Sandra; Bertucci, Micka C; Conduit, Sarah E; Vuong, David L; Mitchell, Christina A

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide signalling molecules interact with a plethora of effector proteins to regulate cell proliferation and survival, vesicular trafficking, metabolism, actin dynamics and many other cellular functions. The generation of specific phosphoinositide species is achieved by the activity of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases, which phosphorylate and dephosphorylate, respectively, the inositol headgroup of phosphoinositide molecules. The phosphoinositide phosphatases can be classified as 3-, 4- and 5-phosphatases based on their specificity for dephosphorylating phosphates from specific positions on the inositol head group. The SAC phosphatases show less specificity for the position of the phosphate on the inositol ring. The phosphoinositide phosphatases regulate PI3K/Akt signalling, insulin signalling, endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis. Mouse knockout models of several of the phosphoinositide phosphatases have revealed significant physiological roles for these enzymes, including the regulation of embryonic development, fertility, neurological function, the immune system and insulin sensitivity. Importantly, several phosphoinositide phosphatases have been directly associated with a range of human diseases. Genetic mutations in the 5-phosphatase INPP5E are causative of the ciliopathy syndromes Joubert and MORM, and mutations in the 5-phosphatase OCRL result in Lowe's syndrome and Dent 2 disease. Additionally, polymorphisms in the 5-phosphatase SHIP2 confer diabetes susceptibility in specific populations, whereas reduced protein expression of SHIP1 is reported in several human leukaemias. The 4-phosphatase, INPP4B, has recently been identified as a tumour suppressor in human breast and prostate cancer. Mutations in one SAC phosphatase, SAC3/FIG4, results in the degenerative neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Indeed, an understanding of the precise functions of phosphoinositide phosphatases is not only

  1. [Protein phosphatases: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagian, V M

    1994-01-01

    The process of protein and enzyme systems phosphorylation is necessary for cell growth, differentiation and preparation for division and mitosis. The conformation changes of protein as a result of phosphorylation lead to increased enzyme activity and enhanced affinity to substrates. A large group of enzymes--protein kinases--is responsible for phosphorylation process in cell, which are divided into tyrosine- and serine-threonine-kinases depending on their ability to phosphorylate appropriate amino acid residues. In this review has been considered the functional importance and structure of protein phosphatases--enzymes, which are functional antagonists of protein kinases.

  2. Phosphatidylinositolphosphate phosphatase activities and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, Simon A.; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways mediates the actions of a plethora of hormones, growth factors, cytokines, and neurotransmitters upon their target cells following receptor occupation. Overactivation of these pathways has been implicated in a number of pathologies, in particular a range of malignancies. The tight regulation of signaling pathways necessitates the involvement of both stimulatory and terminating enzymes; inappropriate activation of a pathway can thus result from activation or inhibition of the two signaling arms. The focus of this review is to discuss, in detail, the activities of the identified families of phosphoinositide phosphatase expressed in humans, and how they regulate the levels of phosphoinositides implicated in promoting malignancy. PMID:26302980

  3. Biochemistry and structure of phosphoinositide phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jahan, Nusrat; Bahk, Young Yil

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are the phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol, and play a very significant role in a diverse range of signaling processes in eukaryotic cells. A number of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes, including phosphoinositide-kinases and phosphatases are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these phospholipids. Recently, the function of various phosphatases in the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway has been of great interest. In the present review we summarize the structural insights and biochemistry of various phosphatases in regulating phosphoinositide metabolism.

  4. Insulin-receptor phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase has been proposed to be an important phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase. The ability of the enzyme to attack autophosphorylated insulin receptor was examined and compared with the known ability of the enzyme to act on autophosphorylated epidermal-growth-factor (EGF) receptor. Purified calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase was shown to catalyse the complete dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosyl-(insulin receptor). When compared at similar concentrations, 32P-labelled EGF receptor was dephosphorylated at greater than 3 times the rate of 32P-labelled insulin receptor; both dephosphorylations exhibited similar dependence on metal ions and calmodulin. Native phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases in cell extracts were also characterized. With rat liver, heart or brain, most (75%) of the native phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors was recovered in the particulate fraction of the cell, with only 25% in the soluble fraction. This subcellular distribution contrasts with results of previous studies using artificial substrates, which found most of the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in the soluble fraction of the cell. Properties of particulate and soluble phosphatase activity against 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors are reported. The contribution of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase activity to phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in cell fractions was determined by utilizing the unique metal-ion dependence of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase. Whereas Ni2+ (1 mM) markedly activated the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, it was found to inhibit potently both particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity. In fractions from rat liver, brain and heart, total phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled receptors was inhibited by 99.5 +/- 6% (mean +/- S.E.M., 30 observations) by Ni2+. Results of Ni2+ inhibition

  5. IGF-1R modulation of acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling: role of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yujun; Zhang, Yue; Buckels, Ashiya; Paterson, Andrew J; Jiang, Jing; Clemens, Thomas L; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Du, Keyong; Chang, Yingzi; Frank, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    GH is a potent anabolic and metabolic factor that binds its cell surface receptor (GHR), activating the GHR-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2, which phosphorylates and activates the latent transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Some GH actions are mediated by the elaboration of IGF-1, which exerts effects by binding and activating the heterotetrameric tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, IGF-1R. In addition to this GH-GHR-IGF-1-IGF-1R scheme, we have demonstrated in primary osteoblasts and in islet β-cells that then deletion or silencing of IGF-1R results in diminished GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting that the presence of IGF-1R may facilitate GH signaling. In this study, we explore potential roles for protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in modulating GH-induced signaling, comparing conditions in which IGF-1R is present or diminished. We confirm that in mouse primary osteoblasts harboring loxP sites flanking the IGF-1R gene, infection with an adenovirus that expresses the Cre recombinase results in IGF-1R deletion and diminished acute GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we present a new model of IGF-1R silencing, in which expression of short hairpin RNA directed at IGF-1R greatly reduces IGF-1R abundance in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. In both models, treatment with a chemical inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B), but not one of src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphotase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, reverses the loss of GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in cells lacking IGF-1R but has no effect in cells with intact IGF-1R. Furthermore, expression of either a dominant-negative PTP-1B or the PTP-1B-interacting inhibitory protein, constitutive photomorphogenesis 1, also rescues acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling in IGF-1R-deficient cells but has no effect in IGF-1R replete cells. By expressing a substrate-trapping mutant PTP-1B, we demonstrate that tyrosine

  6. HuPho: the human phosphatase portal.

    PubMed

    Liberti, Susanna; Sacco, Francesca; Calderone, Alberto; Perfetto, Livia; Iannuccelli, Marta; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Palma, Anita; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases and kinases contribute to the regulation of protein phosphorylation homeostasis in the cell. Phosphorylation is a key post-translational modification underlying the regulation of many cellular processes. Thus, a comprehensive picture of phosphatase function and the identification of their target substrates would aid a systematic approach to a mechanistic description of cell signalling. Here we present a website designed to facilitate the retrieval of information about human protein phosphatases. To this end we developed a search engine to recover and integrate information annotated in several publicly available web resources. In addition we present a text-mining-assisted annotation effort aimed at extracting phosphatase related data reported in the scientific literature. The HuPho (human phosphatases) website can be accessed at http://hupho.uniroma2.it.

  7. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-jun; Yu, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Ruo-yu; Zhang, Zhong-yin

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs. PMID:25220640

  9. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  10. Multiple Functions of the Eya Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eyes absent (Eya), a protein conserved from plants to humans and best characterized as a transcriptional coactivator, is also the prototype for a novel class of eukaryotic aspartyl protein tyrosine phosphatases. This minireview discusses recent breakthroughs in elucidating the substrates and cellular events regulated by Eya's tyrosine phosphatase function and highlights some of the complexities, new questions, and surprises that have emerged from efforts to understand how Eya's unusual multifunctionality influences developmental regulation and signaling. PMID:26667035

  11. Analysis of Smad Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Qin, Lan; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 at the C-terminal SXS motif by BMP type I receptors is one of the most critical events in BMP signaling. Conversely, protein phosphatases that dephosphorylate phospho-Smad1/5/8 can consequently prevent or terminate BMP signaling. PPM1H is an undercharacterized phosphatase in the PPM family. We recently demonstrated that PPM1H can dephosphorylate Smad1 in the cytoplasm and block BMP signaling responses in cellular assays. Here we describe in vitro method showing that PPM1H is a bona fide phosphatase for Smad1/5/8. PPM1H is produced as GST fusion protein in E. coli, and purified against glutathione sepharose beads. Bacterially purified recombinant PPM1H possesses phosphatase activity toward artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Recombinant PPM1H also dephosphorylates immuno-purified phosphorylated Smad1 in test tubes. These direct in vitro phosphatase assays provide convincing evidence demonstrating the role of PPM1H as a specific phosphatase for P-Smad1.

  12. Assessing the biological activity of the glucan phosphatase laforin

    PubMed Central

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S.; Sanz, Pascual

    2017-01-01

    Summary Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin’s unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  13. Identification of the adipocyte acid phosphatase as a PAO-sensitive tyrosyl phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Shekels, L. L.; Smith, A. J.; Van Etten, R. L.; Bernlohr, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have partially purified an 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein from 3T3-L1 cells, which dephosphorylates pNPP and the phosphorylated adipocyte lipid binding protein (ALBP), and have identified it by virtue of kinetic and immunological criteria as an acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). The cytoplasmic acid phosphatase was inactivated by phenylarsine oxide (PAO) (Kinact = 10 microM), and the inactivation could be reversed by the dithiol, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol (Kreact = 23 microM), but not the monothiol, 2-mercaptoethanol. Cloning of the human adipocyte acid phosphatase revealed that two isoforms exist, termed HAAP alpha and HAAP beta (human adipocyte acid phosphatase), which are distinguished by a 34-amino acid isoform-specific domain. Sequence analysis shows HAAP alpha and HAAP beta share 74% and 90% identity with the bovine liver acid phosphatase, respectively, and 99% identity with both isoenzymes of the human red cell acid phosphatase but no sequence similarity to the protein tyrosine phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.48). HAAP beta has been cloned into Escherichia coli, expressed, and purified as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Recombinant HAAP beta was shown to dephosphorylate pNPP and phosphoALBP and to be inactivated by PAO and inhibited by vanadate (Ki = 17 microM). These results describe the adipocyte acid phosphatase as a cytoplasmic enzyme containing conformationally vicinal cysteine residues with properties that suggest it may dephosphorylate tyrosyl phosphorylated cellular proteins. PMID:1304913

  14. Acid phosphatase/phosphotransferases from enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Y; Utagawa, T; Yamada, H; Asano, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the enzymatic phosphorylation of nucleosides and found that Morganella morganii phoC acid phosphatase exhibits regioselective pyrophosphate (PP(i))-nucleoside phosphotransferase activity. In this study, we isolated genes encoding an acid phosphatase with regioselective phosphotransferase activity (AP/PTase) from Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia blattae and Klebsiella planticola, and compared the primary structures and enzymatic characteristics of these enzymes with those of AP/PTase (PhoC acid phosphatase) from M. morganii. The enzymes were highly homologous in primary structure with M. morganii AP/PTase, and are classified as class A1 acid phosphatases. The synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) by E. coli overproducing each acid phosphatase was investigated. The P. stuartii enzyme, which is most closely related to the M. morganii enzyme, exhibited high 5'-IMP productivity, similar to the M. morganii enzyme. The 5'-IMP productivities of the E. aerogenes, E. blattae and K. planticola enzymes were inferior to those of the former two enzymes. This result underlines the importance of lower K(m) values for efficient nucleotide production. As these enzymes exhibited a very high degree of homology at the amino acid sequence level, it is likely that local sequence differences in the binding pocket are responsible for the differences in the nucleoside-PP(i) phosphotransferase reaction.

  15. The histidine phosphatase superfamily: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2008-01-15

    The histidine phosphatase superfamily is a large functionally diverse group of proteins. They share a conserved catalytic core centred on a histidine which becomes phosphorylated during the course of the reaction. Although the superfamily is overwhelmingly composed of phosphatases, the earliest known and arguably best-studied member is dPGM (cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase). The superfamily contains two branches sharing very limited sequence similarity: the first containing dPGM, fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, PhoE, SixA, TIGAR [TP53 (tumour protein 53)-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator], Sts-1 and many other activities, and the second, smaller, branch composed mainly of acid phosphatases and phytases. Human representatives of both branches are of considerable medical interest, and various parasites contain superfamily members whose inhibition might have therapeutic value. Additionally, several phosphatases, notably the phytases, have current or potential applications in agriculture. The present review aims to draw together what is known about structure and function in the superfamily. With the benefit of an expanding set of histidine phosphatase superfamily structures, a clearer picture of the conserved elements is obtained, along with, conversely, a view of the sometimes surprising variation in substrate-binding and proton donor residues across the superfamily. This analysis should contribute to correcting a history of over- and mis-annotation in the superfamily, but also suggests that structural knowledge, from models or experimental structures, in conjunction with experimental assays, will prove vital for the future description of function in the superfamily.

  16. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  17. Structure-function analysis of the 3' phosphatase component of T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Smith, Paul; Wang, Li Kai; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-09-15

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  18. AKAP phosphatase complexes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Redden, John M; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L

    2011-10-01

    Directed protein phosphorylation is indisputably critical for a multitude of cellular processes. A growing body of research demonstrates A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) to mediate a significant number of phosphorylation events in the heart. By acting as molecular tethers for the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, AKAPs focus kinase activity onto specific substrate. In the time since their discovery, the AKAP model has evolved in appreciation of the broader role these scaffolds play in coordinating multiple signaling enzymes to efficiently regulate dynamic cellular processes. The focus of this review is on the emerging role of AKAPs in regulating the 3 main cardiac phosphatases: Protein Phosphatase 1 by AKAP18 and Yotiao, and Protein Phosphatases 2A and 2B by muscle specific A-kinase anchoring protein.

  19. CDC25 phosphatases as potential human oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Galaktionov, K; Lee, A K; Eckstein, J; Draetta, G; Meckler, J; Loda, M; Beach, D

    1995-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated by CDC25 phosphatases, which remove inhibitory phosphate from tyrosine and threonine residues. In human cells, CDC25 proteins are encoded by a multigene family, consisting of CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. In rodent cells, human CDC25A or CDC25B but not CDC25C phosphatases cooperate with either Ha-RASG12V or loss of RB1 in oncogenic focus formation. Such transformants were highly aneuploid, grew in soft agar, and formed high-grade tumors in nude mice. Overexpression of CDC25B was detected in 32 percent of human primary breast cancers tested. The CDC25 phosphatases may contribute to the development of human cancer.

  20. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  1. Assaying inositol and phosphoinositide phosphatase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Janet L; Ercetin, Mustafa; Gillaspy, Glenda E

    2013-01-01

    One critical aspect of phosphoinositide signaling is the turnover of signaling molecules in the pathway. These signaling molecules include the phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs) and inositol phosphates (InsPs). The enzymes that catalyze the breakdown of these molecules are thus important potential regulators of signaling, and in many cases the activity of such enzymes needs to be measured and compared to other enzymes. PtdInsPs and InsPs are broken down by sequential dephosphorylation reactions which are catalyzed by a set of specific phosphatases. Many of the phosphatases can act on both PtdInsP and InsP substrates. The protocols described in this chapter detail activity assays that allow for the measurement of PtdInsP and InsP phosphatase activities in vitro starting with native or recombinant enzymes. Three different assays are described that have different equipment requirements and allow one to test a range of PtdInsP and InsP phosphatases that act on different substrates.

  2. Phosphatase activities analyzed by in vivo expressions.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Alois; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Meskiene, Irute

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatases act to reverse phosphorylation-related modifications induced by protein kinases. Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) are monomeric Ser/Thr phosphatases that require a metal for their activity and are abundant in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, such as Medicago and Arabidopsis PP2Cs control several essential processes, including ABA signaling, development, and wound-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In vitro assays with recombinant proteins and yeast two-hybrid systems usually provide initial information about putative PP2C substrates; however, these observations have to be verified in vivo. Therefore, a method for transient expression in isolated Arabidopsis suspension cell protoplasts was developed to assay PP2C action in living cells. This system has proven to be very useful in producing active enzymes and their substrates and in performing enzymatic reactions in vivo. Transient gene expression in isolated cells enabled assembly of functional protein kinase cascades and the creation of phosphorylated targets for PP2Cs. The method is based on the co-transformation and transient co-expression of different PP2C proteins with MAPK. It shows that epitope-tagged PP2C and MAPK proteins exhibit high enzymatic activities and produce substantial protein amounts easily monitored by Western blot analysis. Additionally, PP2C phosphatase activities can be directly tested in protein extracts from protoplasts, suggesting a possibility for analysis of activities of new PP2C family members.

  3. Phosphatase activities as biosignatures of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Itoh, Y.; Edazawa, Y.; Moroi, A.; Takano, Y.

    It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere high temperature hot springs and stratosphere Possible extraterrestrial biospheres in Mars Europa and Titan are being discussed Many biosignatures or biomarkers have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments Phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life since they are constituents of nucleic acids and cell mebranes Thus all the terrestrial organisms have phosphatases that are enzymes catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphate esters We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in extreme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life Core samples and chimney samples were collected at the Suiyo Seamount Izu-Bonin Arc the Pacific Ocean in 2001 and 2002 and in South Mariana hydrothermal systems the Pacific Oceanas in 2003 both in a part of the Archaean Park Project Phosphatase activity in solid rock samples was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate pH 8 0 or pH 6 5 as a substrate as follows Pulverized samples were incuvated with substrate solution for an hour and then production rate of p-nitrophenol was calculated with absorbance at 410 nm Phosphatase activity in extracts was measured fluorometrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratio were determined by HPLC after HF digestion of the

  4. Molecular Evolution of Phosphoprotein Phosphatases in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Miskei, Márton; Ádám, Csaba; Kovács, László; Karányi, Zsolt; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP), these ancient and important regulatory enzymes are present in all eukaryotic organisms. Based on the genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species we traced the evolution of the PPP catalytic subunits and noted a substantial expansion of the gene family. We concluded that the 18–22 PPP genes of Drosophilidae were generated from a core set of 8 indispensable phosphatases that are present in most of the insects. Retropositons followed by tandem gene duplications extended the phosphatase repertoire, and sporadic gene losses contributed to the species specific variations in the PPP complement. During the course of these studies we identified 5, up till now uncharacterized phosphatase retrogenes: PpY+, PpD5+, PpD6+, Pp4+, and Pp6+ which are found only in some ancient Drosophila. We demonstrated that all of these new PPP genes exhibit a distinct male specific expression. In addition to the changes in gene numbers, the intron-exon structure and the chromosomal localization of several PPP genes was also altered during evolution. The G−C content of the coding regions decreased when a gene moved into the heterochromatic region of chromosome Y. Thus the PPP enzymes exemplify the various types of dynamic rearrangements that accompany the molecular evolution of a gene family in Drosophilidae. PMID:21789237

  5. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  6. Tyrosine phosphatase activity in mitochondria: presence of Shp-2 phosphatase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Stringaro, A; Brunati, A M; Agostinelli, E; Arancia, G; Clari, G; Toninello, A

    2004-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation by unidentified enzymes has been observed in mitochondria, with recent evidence indicating that non-receptorial tyrosine kinases belonging to the Src family, which represent key players in several transduction pathways, are constitutively present in mitochondria. The extent of protein phosphorylation reflects a coordination balance between the activities of specific kinases and phophatases. The present study demonstrates that purified rat brain mitochondria possess endogenous tyrosine phosphatase activity. Mitochondrial phosphatases were found to be capable of dephosphorylating different exogenous substrates, including paranitrophenylphosphate, (32)P-poly(Glu-Tyr)(4:1) and (32)P-angiotensin. These activities are strongly inhibited by peroxovanadate, a well-known inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by inhibitors of alkali or Ser/Thr phosphatases, and mainly take place in the intermembrane space and outer mitochondrial membrane. Using a combination of approaches, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2 in mitochondria. Shp-2 plays a crucial role in a number of intracellular signalling cascades and is probably involved in several human diseases. It thus represents the first tyrosine phosphatase shown to be present in mitochondria.

  7. Assessment and kinetics of soil phosphatase in Brazilian Savanna systems.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adão S; Espíndola, Suéllen P; Campos, Maria Rita C

    2016-05-31

    The activity and kinetics of soil phosphatases are important indicators to evaluate soil quality in specific sites such as the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna). This study aimed to determine the activity and kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase in Cerrado systems. Soil phosphatase activity was assessed in samples of native Cerrado (NC), no-tillage (NT), conventional tillage (CT) and pasture with Brachiaria brizantha (PBb) and evaluated with acetate buffer (AB), tris-HCl buffer (TB), modified universal buffer (MUB) and low MUB. The Michaelis-Menten equation and Eadie-Hofstee model were applied to obtain the kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase using different concentrations of p-nitrophenol phosphate (p-NPP). MUB showed the lowest soil phosphatase activity in all soils whereas AB in NC and NT presented the highest. Low MUB decreased interferences in the assessment of soil phosphatase activity when compared to MUB, suggesting that organic acids interfere on the soil phosphatase activity. In NC and NT, soil phosphatase activity performed with TB was similar to AB and low MUB. Km values from the Michaels-Menten equation were higher in NC than in NT, which indicate a lower affinity of phosphatase activity for the substrate in NC. Vmax values were also higher in NC than in NT. The Eadie-Hofstee model suggests that NC had more phosphatase isoforms than NT. The study showed that buffer type is of fundamental importance when assessing soil phosphatase activity in Cerrado soils.

  8. Evaluation of APHA and AOAC methods for phosphatase in cheese.

    PubMed

    Murthy, G K; Cox, S

    1988-01-01

    Varieties of market cheese were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase by the modified rapid colorimetric method of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the official AOAC method, 16.304-16.306. In the APHA method, 5 g cheese (pH less than 7.0) is macerated with 2 mL 1:1 carbonate buffer, or 2 mL water (for cheese with pH greater than 7.0). Addition of 0.1 mL magnesium acetate (1 mg magnesium) to test portions of cheese extracts yielded reproducible and quantitative recovery of added phosphatase. In the AOAC method, macerating 0.5 g cheese with 1 mL borate buffer before adding milk phosphatase improved recovery among cheeses. Addition of magnesium ion increased phosphatase activity in some cheeses. Phosphatases in blue mold-ripened and Swiss cheeses were inactivated by heat faster than was milk phosphatase, yet milk phosphatase added to various soft cheeses was completely inactivated at 60 degrees C for 10 min. The lability of phosphatase was due to the heat-denaturing effect of NaCl present in finished cheeses. Some Mexican style soft cheeses contained both heat-labile and heat-stable phosphatases. These data suggest that the phosphatase test to differentiate milk and microbial phosphatases on the basis of repasteurization and analysis of cheese is no longer valid.

  9. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae.

  10. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  11. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  12. Primary structure of rat secretory acid phosphatase and comparison to other acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Roiko, K; Jänne, O A; Vihko, P

    1990-05-14

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding rat prostatic acid phosphatase (rPAP) were isolated by using two human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP)-encoding cDNAs to screen rat prostatic cDNA libraries. The isolated cDNAs encompassed a total of 1626 nucleotides (nt), of which 1143 nt corresponded to the protein coding sequence encoding a mature polypeptide of 350 amino acids (aa) and a 31-aa long signal peptide-like sequence. The deduced Mr of the mature rPAP was 40,599. RNA blot analysis indicated the presence of three mRNA species (4.9, 2.3 and 1.5 kb in size) in the rat prostate. The deduced aa sequences of rPAP and hPAP show 75% identity, whereas the similarity between rPAP and human lysosomal acid phosphatase (hLAP) is only 45%. Furthermore, the sequence similarity between rPAP and rat lysosomal acid phosphatase (rLAP) is 46% at the aa level. Similar to hPAP, but unlike hLAP and rLAP, the rPAP sequence lacks a membrane-anchoring domain indicating the secretory character of this phosphatase. All six cysteines present in the overlapping areas of the mature rPAP, hPAP, rLAP and hLAP proteins are positionally conserved, suggesting that these residues are important for the tertiary structure of acid phosphatases (APs). The previously reported active site residues, two arginines and one histidine, are also conserved in these APs.

  13. Phosphoinositide phosphatases: just as important as the kinases.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jennifer M; Fedele, Clare G; Davies, Elizabeth M; Becanovic, Jelena; Mitchell, Christina A

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide phosphatases comprise several large enzyme families with over 35 mammalian enzymes identified to date that degrade many phosphoinositide signals. Growth factor or insulin stimulation activates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase that phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] to form phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)], which is rapidly dephosphorylated either by PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), or by the 5-phosphatases (inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases), generating PtdIns(3,4)P(2). 5-phosphatases also hydrolyze PtdIns(4,5)P(2) forming PtdIns(4)P. Ten mammalian 5-phosphatases have been identified, which regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation, synaptic vesicle recycling, insulin signaling, and embryonic development. Two 5-phosphatase genes, OCRL and INPP5E are mutated in Lowe and Joubert syndrome respectively. SHIP [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain inositol phosphatase] 2, and SKIP (skeletal muscle- and kidney-enriched inositol phosphatase) negatively regulate insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. SHIP2 polymorphisms are associated with a predisposition to insulin resistance. SHIP1 controls hematopoietic cell proliferation and is mutated in some leukemias. The inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatases, INPP4A and INPP4B degrade PtdIns(3,4)P(2) to PtdIns(3)P and regulate neuroexcitatory cell death, or act as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer respectively. The Sac phosphatases degrade multiple phosphoinositides, such as PtdIns(3)P, PtdIns(4)P, PtdIns(5)P and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) to form PtdIns. Mutation in the Sac phosphatase gene, FIG4, leads to a degenerative neuropathy. Therefore the phosphatases, like the lipid kinases, play major roles in regulating cellular functions and their mutation or altered expression leads to many human diseases.

  14. Auxiliary phosphatases in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Silversmith, Ruth E

    2010-04-01

    Signal termination in two-component systems occurs by loss of the phosphoryl group from the response regulator protein. This review explores our current understanding of the structures, catalytic mechanisms and means of regulation of the known families of phosphatases that catalyze response regulator dephosphorylation. The CheZ and CheC/CheX/FliY families, despite different overall structures, employ identical catalytic strategies using an amide side chain to orient a water molecule for in-line attack of the aspartyl phosphate. Spo0E phosphatases contain sequence and structural features that suggest a strategy similar to the chemotaxis phosphatases but the mechanism used by the Rap phosphatases is not yet elucidated. Identification of features shared by phosphatase families may aid in the identification of currently unrecognized classes of response regulator phosphatases.

  15. Effect of Bacteria and Amoebae on Rhizosphere Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gould, W. Douglas; Coleman, David C.; Rubink, Amy J.

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of various components of soil microflora and microfauna to rhizosphere phosphatase activity were determined with hydroponic cultures. Three treatments were employed: (i) plants alone (Bouteloua gracilis (H.B.K.) Lag. ex Steud.) (ii) plants plus bacteria (Pseudomonas sp.), and (iii) plants plus bacteria plus amoebae (Acanthamoeba sp.). No alkaline phosphatase was detected, but an appreciable amount of acid phosphatase activity (120 to 500 nmol of p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolyzed per h per plant) was found in the root culture solutions. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased the amount of acid phosphatase in solution, and properties of additional activity were identical to properties of plant acid phosphatase. The presence of bacteria or bacteria and amoebae increased both solution and root phosphatase activities at most initial phosphate concentrations. PMID:16345390

  16. Carboxyarabinitol-1-P phosphatase of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kobza, J.; Moore, B.d.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The activity of carboxyarabinitol-1-P (CA1P) phosphatase was detected in clarified stromal extracts by the generation of {sup 14}C-carboxyarabinitol from {sup 14}C-CA1P. Carboxyribitol-1-P dependent activity was 3% of the CA1P dependent activity, indicating the enzyme was specific for CA1P. Inclusion of DTT in the assay was required for maximum velocity, but it appears that the enzyme is not regulated by thioredoxin in vivo. Activity o f the CA1P phosphatase was stimulated by RuBP, NADPH and FBP, though the latter two metabolites were required at nonphysiological concentrations in order to achieve significant stimulation. Contrary to a previous report on purified tobacco enzyme, ATP stimulated the CA1P phosphatase activity. In the presence of 1 mM RuBP or ATP, rates of 2 or 3 {mu}mol mg{sup {minus}1} Chl h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were observed at 1 mM CA1P. These rates were 3-4 fold higher than the rate observed in the absence of effectors and are 2-4 times the in vivo rate of degradation of CA1P during dark/light transitions. The rates from bean were about 7 fold higher than rates reported for the enzyme from tobacco. Changes in the levels of ATP and RuBP associated with dark/light transitions could modulate the enzyme activity in vivo, but it remains to be established if this is the only mechanism for the required regulation of the enzyme.

  17. Desialylated alkaline phosphatase: activation by 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, P R

    1984-01-01

    Mouse ileal alkaline phosphatase is a sialyl enzyme (12-14 moles per mole of enzyme). When partially desialylated by treatment with neuraminidase, the enzyme loses most of its activity, associated with reduced apparent Vmax and Km. Part of that loss, however, is recovered as the product 4-nitrophenol's concentration builds up in the cuvette. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that the activation is due to the binding of 4-nitrophenol as a ligand by the partially desialylated enzyme and that both the loss of activity by sialic acid removal and activation by ligand-binding are correlated with changes in protein conformation.

  18. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions.

    PubMed

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2010-12-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle.

  19. Functional size of the thylakoid phosphatases determined by radiation inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, L H; Tzeng, C M; Pan, R L

    1993-02-22

    Radiation inactivation technique was employed to determine the functional size of phosphatases from thylakoid membrane. The enzymatic activities of phosphatases decayed in a simple function with the increase of radiation dosage. D37 values of 18.8 +/- 2.4-14.1 +/- 1.5 Mrad were obtained, using phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, p-nitrophenol phosphate, and phospho-histone V-S, respectively, as substrates. The molecular masses of 48.2 +/- 6.3-61 +/- 5.7 kDa were yielded by target theory analysis. We thus speculate that the thylakoid alkaline phosphatase is probably a monomer while acid phosphatase is functionally a dimer in situ.

  20. Multiple forms of phosphatase from human brain: isolation and partial characterization of affi-gel blue nonbinding phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L Y; Wang, J Z; Gong, C X; Pei, J J; Zaidi, T; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    2001-04-01

    Phosphatases extracted from a human brain were resolved into two main groups, namely affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases and affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases. Affi-gel blue binding phosphatases were further separated into four different phosphatase activities, designated P1-P4, and described previously. In the present study we describe the affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases which were separated into seven different phosphatase activities, designated P5-P11 by poly-(L-lysine)-agarose and aminohexyl Sepharose 4B chromatographies. These seven phosphatase activities were active toward nonprotein phosphoester. P7-P11 and to some extent P5 could also dephosphorylate a phosphoprotein. They displayed different enzyme kinetics. On the basis of activity peak, the apparent molecular mass as estimated by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography for P5 was 49 kDa; P6, 32 kDa; P7, 150 kDa; P8, 250 kDa; P9, 165 kDa; P10, 90 kDa and P11, 165 kDa. Immunoblot analysis indicated that P8-P11 may belong to PP2B family, whereas P7 may associate with PP2A. The phosphatases P7-P11 were found to be effective in the dephosphorylation of Alzheimer's disease abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The resulting dephosphorylated tau regained its activity in promoting the microtubule assembly, suggesting that P7-P11 might regulate the phosphorylation of tau protein in the brain.

  1. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  2. A remote CheZ orthologue retains phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Ottemann, Karen M

    2010-07-01

    Aspartyl-phosphate phosphatases underlie the rapid responses of bacterial chemotaxis. One such phosphatase, CheZ, was originally proposed to be restricted to beta and gamma proteobacter, suggesting only a small subset of microbes relied on this protein. A putative CheZ phosphatase was identified genetically in the epsilon proteobacter Helicobacter pylori (Mol Micro 61:187). H. pylori utilizes a chemotaxis system consisting of CheAY, three CheVs, CheW, CheY(HP) and the putative CheZ to colonize the host stomach. Here we investigate whether this CheZ has phosphatase activity. We phosphorylated potential targets in vitro using either a phosphodonor or the CheAY kinase and [gamma-(32)P]-ATP, and found that H. pylori CheZ (CheZ(HP)) efficiently dephosphorylates CheY(HP) and CheAY and has additional weak activity on CheV2. We detected no phosphatase activity towards CheV1 or CheV3. Mutations corresponding to Escherichia coli CheZ active site residues or deletion of the C-terminal region inactivate CheZ(HP) phosphatase activity, suggesting the two CheZs function similarly. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that CheZ phosphatases are found in all proteobacteria classes, as well as classes Aquificae, Deferribacteres, Nitrospira and Sphingobacteria, demonstrating that CheZ phosphatases are broadly distributed within Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  4. Distinct phosphatase activity profiles in two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Morales-Neto, R; Hulshof, L; Ferreira, C V; Gadelha, F R

    2009-12-01

    Phosphorylation of parasite proteins plays a key role in the process of cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. In this sense, characterization of parasite kinases and phosphatases could open new possibilities for the rational design of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of Chagas' disease. In this work, we analyzed phosphatase activities in T. cruzi homogenates from 2 strains belonging to different lineages and with different resistance to oxidative stress. Tulahuen 2 cells (Lineage I) showed higher phosphatase activities and specificity constants when compared to the Y strain (Lineage II). Tulahuen 2 had an optimum phosphatase activity at pH 4.0 and the Y strain at pH 7.0. In both cases, neutral–basic, but not acid, phosphatase activities were increased in the presence of Mg2+. Although calcium had an inhibitory effect at a pH of 7.0 and 8.0 in the Y strain, this inhibition was restricted to pH 8.0 in the other strain. Different substrates and acid phosphotyrosine and alkaline phosphatase inhibitors exhibited distinct effects on the phosphatase activity of both strains. Our results provide a better understanding of T. cruzi phosphatases and reinforce the notion of heterogeneity among T. cruzi populations.

  5. Autophagy Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Identification of a Novel Phosphatase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    tyrosine phosphatase sigma. Nat Genet, 1999. 21(3): p. 330-3. 16. Wallace, M.J., et al., Neuronal defects and posterior pituitary hypoplasia in mice...pituitary hypoplasia in mice lacking the receptor tyrosine phosphatase PTPsigma. Nat. Genet. 21, 334-338. Walsh, J. P., Caldwell, K. K. and Majerus, P. W

  6. Violacein cytotoxicity on human blood lymphocytes and effect on phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, N; Justo, G Z; Haun, M; Durán, N; Ferreira, C V

    2005-10-01

    Given the importance of protein phosphorylation in the context of cellular functions, abnormal protein phosphatase activity has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer. These critical roles of protein phosphatases qualify them as potential targets for the development of medicinal compounds that possess distinct modes of action such as violacein. In this work, studies with this natural indolic pigment at a concentration of 10.0 micromol L(-1) demonstrated a 20% activation of total protein phosphatase extracted from human lymphocytes. Although no alteration was observed on protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45), 30% of inhibition was achieved in cytoplasmatic protein phosphatase activity after incubation with 10.0 micromol L(-1) violacein. Additionally, 5.0 micromol L(-1) of violacein inhibited by 50% the serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity. Violacein presented toxic effect on lymphocytes with IC50 values of 3 and 10 micromol L(-1) for protein content and protein phosphatase activity, respectively. These findings suggest an important role for protein phosphatases in the mechanisms controlling proliferation and cell death.

  7. Functional characterization of lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venky Sreedhar; Rao, D K Venkata; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2010-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acts as a signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular processes and it can rapidly be metabolized by phosphatase and acyltransferase. LPA phosphatase gene has not been identified and characterized in plants so far. The BLAST search revealed that the At3g03520 is similar to phospholipase family, and distantly related to bacterial phosphatases. The conserved motif, (J)4XXXNXSFD, was identified in both At3g03520 like phospholipases and acid phosphatases. In silico expression analysis of At3g03520 revealed a high expression during phosphate starvation and abiotic stresses. This gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to posses LPA specific phosphatase activity. These results suggest that this gene possibly plays a role in signal transduction and storage lipid synthesis.

  8. Phosphoglucan phosphatase function sheds light on starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Dylan M; Kötting, Oliver; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoglucan phosphatases are novel enzymes that remove phosphates from complex carbohydrates. In plants, these proteins are vital components in the remobilization of leaf starch at night. Breakdown of starch is initiated through reversible glucan phosphorylation to disrupt the semi-crystalline starch structure at the granule surface. The phosphoglucan phosphatases starch excess 4 (SEX4) and like-SEX4 2 (LSF2) dephosphorylate glucans to provide access for amylases that release maltose and glucose from starch. Another phosphatase, LSF1, is a putative inactive scaffold protein that may act as regulator of starch degradative enzymes at the granule surface. Absence of these phosphatases disrupts starch breakdown, resulting in plants accumulating excess starch. Here, we describe recent advances in understanding the biochemical and structural properties of each of these starch phosphatases.

  9. [Roles of phosphatases in pathogen infection: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Li, Xinqiang; Li, Zhenlun

    2012-02-01

    Phosphatases play a key role not only in cell physiological functions of an organism, but also in host-pathogen interactions. Many studies demonstrated that some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria could evade host immunity and promote pathogenicity by injecting phosphatases into host cells through type III secretion system. However, there were few reports about pathogenic fungi evading the immunity of hosts. Our researches indicated that the entomogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae could dephosphorylate the signal transduction substance of locust humoral immunity specifically in vitro by secreting extracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase, which implied that the fungus might interfere with the immune defense of locust. To provide reference for further studies of the functions of phosphatases, we reviewed the types of phosphatases and their roles in pathogen infection.

  10. Inhibition of renal alkaline phosphatase by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Khodai, Somayeh; Aminnaseri, Somayeh; Minoui, Saeed; Sobhani-Damavadifar, Zahra; Alavi, Sana; Osmani, Raheleh; Ahmadi, Shiva

    2011-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) belongs to hydrolase group of enzymes. It is responsible for removing phosphate groups from many types of molecules, including nucleotides and proteins. Cimetidine (trade name Tagamet) is an antagonist of histamine H2-receptor that inhibits the production of gastric acid. Cimetidine is used for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. In this study the inhibitory effect of cimetidine on mouse renal ALP activity was investigated. Our results showed that cimetidine can inhibit ALP by uncompetitive inhibition. In the absence of inhibitor the V(max) and K(m) of the enzyme were found to be 13.7 mmol/mg prot.min and 0.25 mM, respectively. Both the Vmax and Km of the enzyme decreased with increasing cimetidine concentrations (0- 1.2 mM). The Ki and IC(50) of cimetidine were determined to be about 0.5 mM and 0.52 mM, respectively.

  11. Mutations responsible for 3-phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Collet, Jean-François; Prieur, Benoît; Jaeken, Jaak; Peeraer, Yves; Rabbijns, Anja; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2004-02-01

    We report the identification of the mutations in the only known case of L-3-phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency, a recessively inherited condition. The two mutations correspond to the replacement of the semiconserved Asp32 residue by an asparagine and of the extremely conserved Met52 by a threonine. The effects of both mutations were studied on the human recombinant enzyme, expressed in Escherichia coli. Met52Thr almost abolished the enzymatic activity, whereas the Asp32Asn mutation caused a 50% decrease in Vmax. In addition, L-serine, which inhibits the conversion of [(14)C] phosphoserine to serine when catalysed by the wild-type enzyme, had a lesser inhibitory effect on the Asp32Asn mutant, indicating a reduction in the rate of phosphoenzyme hydrolysis. These modifications in the properties of the enzyme are consistent with the modification in the kinetic properties observed in fibroblasts from the patient.

  12. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  14. Functional interrelationships in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily: phosphodiesterase activity of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J; Herschlag, D

    2001-05-15

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a proficient phosphomonoesterase with two Zn(2+) ions in its active site. Sequence homology suggests a distant evolutionary relationship between AP and alkaline phosphodiesterase/nucleotide pyrophosphatase, with conservation of the catalytic metal ions. Furthermore, many other phosphodiesterases, although not evolutionarily related, have a similar active site configuration of divalent metal ions in their active sites. These observations led us to test whether AP could also catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters. The results described herein demonstrate that AP does have phosphodiesterase activity: the phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities copurify over several steps; inorganic phosphate, a strong competitive inhibitor of AP, inhibits the phosphodiesterase and phosphatase activities with the same inhibition constant; a point mutation that weakens phosphate binding to AP correspondingly weakens phosphate inhibition of the phosphodiesterase activity; and mutation of active site residues substantially reduces both the mono- and diesterase activities. AP accelerates the rate of phosphate diester hydrolysis by 10(11)-fold relative to the rate of the uncatalyzed reaction [(k(cat)/K(m))/k(w)]. Although this rate enhancement is substantial, it is at least 10(6)-fold less than the rate enhancement for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis. Mutational analysis suggests that common active site features contribute to hydrolysis of both phosphate monoesters and phosphate diesters. However, mutation of the active site arginine to serine, R166S, decreases the monoesterase activity but not the diesterase activity, suggesting that the interaction of this arginine with the nonbridging oxygen(s) of the phosphate monoester substrate provides a substantial amount of the preferential hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. The observation of phosphodiesterase activity extends the previous observation that AP has a low level of

  15. Mechanism of the phosphatase component of Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Polynucleotide kinase-phosphatase (Pnkp) from Clostridium thermocellum catalyzes ATP-dependent phosphorylation of 5'-OH termini of DNA or RNA polynucleotides and Ni(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent dephosphorylation of 2',3' cyclic phosphate, 2'-phosphate, and 3'-phosphate ribonucleotides. CthPnkp is an 870-amino-acid polypeptide composed of three domains: an N-terminal module similar to bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase, a central module that resembles the dinuclear metallo-phosphoesterase superfamily, and a C-terminal ligase-like adenylyltransferase domain. Here we conducted a mutational analysis of CthPnkp that identified 11 residues required for Ni(2+)-dependent phosphatase activity with 2'-AMP and 3'-AMP. Eight of the 11 CthPnkp side chains were also required for Ni(2+)-dependent hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The ensemble of essential side chains includes the conserved counterparts (Asp187, His189, Asp233, Arg237, Asn263, His264, His323, His376, and Asp392 in CthPnkp) of all of the amino acids that form the dinuclear metal-binding site and the phosphate-binding site of bacteriophage lambda phosphatase. Three residues (Asp236, His264, and Arg237) required for activity with 2'-AMP or 3'-AMP were dispensable for Ni(2+)-dependent hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Our findings, together with available structural information, provide fresh insights to the metallophosphoesterase mechanism, including the roles of His264 and Asp236 in proton donation to the leaving group. Deletion analysis defined an autonomous phosphatase domain, CthPnkp-(171-424).

  16. Giardia lamblia: Characterization of ecto-phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Amazonas, Juliana Natal; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Werneck-Lacerda, Aline; Pinheiro, Ana Acácia de Sá; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; De Souza, Wanderley; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2009-01-01

    Ecto-phosphatase activities of Giardia lamblia were characterized in intact cells, which are able to hydrolyze the artificial substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) to p-nitrophenol (p-NP) at a rate of 8.4+/-0.8 nmol p-NP/h/10(7) cells. The ecto-phosphatase activities were inhibited at high pH as well as by classical inhibitors of acid phosphatases, such as sodium fluoride and sodium molybdate and by inorganic phosphate, the final product of the reaction. Experiments using a classical inhibitor of phosphotyrosine phosphatase, sodium orthovanadate, also showed that the ecto-phosphatase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Different phosphorylated amino acids were used as substrates for the G. lamblia ecto-phosphatase activities the highest rate of phosphate release was achieved using phosphotyrosine. Not only p-NPP hydrolysis but also phosphotyrosine hydrolysis was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate. Phosphotyrosine but not phospho-serine or phospho-threonine inhibited the p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity. We also observed a positive correlation between the ecto-phosphatase activity and the capacity to encystation of G. lamblia trophozoites.

  17. Cracking the phosphatase code: docking interactions determine substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jagoree; Cyert, Martha S

    2009-12-08

    Phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-directed phosphatases display remarkable substrate specificity, yet the sites that they dephosphorylate show little similarity in amino acid sequence. Studies reveal that docking interactions are key for the recognition of substrates and regulators by two conserved phosphatases, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In each case, a small degenerate sequence motif in the interacting protein directs low-affinity binding to a docking surface on the phosphatase that is distinct from the active site; several such interactions combine to confer overall binding specificity. Some docking surfaces are conserved, such as a hydrophobic groove on a face opposite the active site that serves as a major recognition surface for the "RVxF" motif of proteins that interact with PP1 and the "PxIxIT" motif of substrates of calcineurin. Secondary motifs combine with this primary targeting sequence to specify phosphatase binding. A comprehensive interactome for mammalian PP1 was described, analysis of which defines several PP1-binding motifs. Studies of "LxVP," a secondary calcineurin-binding sequence, establish that this motif is a conserved feature of calcineurin substrates and that the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A inhibit the phosphatase by interfering with LxVP-mediated docking.

  18. A bifunctional kinase-phosphatase in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Steven L; Roberts, Mark A J; Manning, Cerys S; Armitage, Judith P

    2008-11-25

    Phosphorylation-based signaling pathways employ dephosphorylation mechanisms for signal termination. Histidine to aspartate phosphosignaling in the two-component system that controls bacterial chemotaxis has been studied extensively. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has a complex chemosensory pathway with multiple homologues of the Escherichia coli chemosensory proteins, although it lacks homologues of known signal-terminating CheY-P phosphatases, such as CheZ, CheC, FliY or CheX. Here, we demonstrate that an unusual CheA homologue, CheA(3), is not only a phosphodonor for the principal CheY protein, CheY(6), but is also is a specific phosphatase for CheY(6)-P. This phosphatase activity accelerates CheY(6)-P dephosphorylation to a rate that is comparable with the measured stimulus response time of approximately 1 s. CheA(3) possesses only two of the five domains found in classical CheAs, the Hpt (P1) and regulatory (P5) domains, which are joined by a 794-amino acid sequence that is required for phosphatase activity. The P1 domain of CheA(3) is phosphorylated by CheA(4), and it subsequently acts as a phosphodonor for the response regulators. A CheA(3) mutant protein without the 794-amino acid region lacked phosphatase activity, retained phosphotransfer function, but did not support chemotaxis, suggesting that the phosphatase activity may be required for chemotaxis. Using a nested deletion approach, we showed that a 200-amino acid segment of CheA(3) is required for phosphatase activity. The phosphatase activity of previously identified nonhybrid histidine protein kinases depends on the dimerization and histidine phosphorylation (DHp) domains. However, CheA(3) lacks a DHp domain, suggesting that its phosphatase mechanism is different from that of other histidine protein kinases.

  19. Identification of human pulmonary alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Capelli, A; Cerutti, C G; Lusuardi, M; Donner, C F

    1997-04-01

    An increase of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity has been observed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients affected by pulmonary fibrosis in chronic interstitial lung disorders. To characterize the ALP isoenzymes in such cases, we used gel filtration, agarose gel electrophoresis, heat and amino acid inhibition assays, wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) precipitation, and an immunoassay specific for the bone-isoform of ALP. Only one anodic band representing a high-molecular-weight isoform of ALP (Mr approximately 2,000 kDa) was observed on electrophoresis of BALF. The inhibition assay results were consistent for a tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme sensitive to a temperature of 56 degrees C (71.9 +/- 2.5% inhibition) and to homoarginine (65.7 +/- 1.9%), and resistant to L-phenylalanine and L-leucine. Less than 13% of ALP activity was heat-stable. After incubation of BALF specimens with glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase D plus Nonidet P-40, or with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C alone, an electrophoretic cathodic band (Mr approximately 220 kDa) appeared near the bone band of a standard serum. With the WGA assay, 84.4 +/- 3.3% of ALP precipitated and the band disappeared. After immunoassay for the bone isoform, a mean of less than 5% enzyme activity was measured. We conclude that the ALP found in BALF is a pulmonary isoform of a tissue nonspecific isoenzyme.

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Lydia; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne; Szedlacsek, Stefan E

    2008-03-01

    Structural analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has expanded considerably in the last several years, producing more than 200 structures in this class of enzymes (from 35 different proteins and their complexes with ligands). The small-medium size of the catalytic domain of approximately 280 residues plus a very compact fold makes it amenable to cloning and overexpression in bacterial systems thus facilitating crystallographic analysis. The low molecular weight PTPs being even smaller, approximately 150 residues, are also perfect targets for NMR analysis. The availability of different structures and complexes of PTPs with substrates and inhibitors has provided a wealth of information with profound effects in the way we understand their biological functions. Developments in mammalian expression technology recently led to the first crystal structure of a receptor-like PTP extracellular region. Altogether, the PTP structural work significantly advanced our knowledge regarding the architecture, regulation and substrate specificity of these enzymes. In this review, we compile the most prominent structural traits that characterize PTPs and their complexes with ligands. We discuss how the data can be used to design further functional experiments and as a basis for drug design given that many PTPs are now considered strategic therapeutic targets for human diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  1. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  2. Universal phosphatase-coupled glycosyltransferase assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Ethen, Cheryl M; Prather, Brittany; Machacek, Miranda; Jiang, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    A nonradioactive glycosyltransferase assay is described here. This method takes advantage of specific phosphatases that can be added into glycosyltransferase reactions to quantitatively release inorganic phosphate from the leaving groups of glycosyltransferase reactions. The released phosphate group is then detected using colorimetric malachite-based reagents. Because the amount of phosphate released is directly proportional to the sugar molecule transferred in a glycosyltransferase reaction, this method can be used to obtain accurate kinetic parameters of the glycosyltransferase. The assay can be performed in multiwell plates and quantitated by a plate reader, thus making it amenable to high-throughput screening. It has been successfully applied to all glycosyltransferases available to us, including glucosyltransferases, N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, N-acetylgalactosyltransferases, galactosyltransferases, fucosyltransferases and sialyltransferases. As examples, we first assayed Clostridium difficile toxin B, a protein O-glucosyltransferase that specifically monoglucosylates and inactivates Rho family small GTPases; we then showed that human KTELC1, a homolog of Rumi from Drosophila, was able to hydrolyze UDP-Glc; and finally, we measured the kinetic parameters of human sialyltransferase ST6GAL1.

  3. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  4. Lily pollen alkaline phytase is a histidine phosphatase similar to mammalian multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase (MINPP).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bakul Dhagat; Jog, Sonali P; Johnson, Steven C; Murthy, Pushpalatha P N

    2006-09-01

    Phytic acid is the most abundant inositol phosphate in cells; it constitutes 1-5% of the dry weight of cereal grains and legumes. Phytases are the primary enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of phytic acid and thus play important roles in inositol phosphate metabolism. A novel alkaline phytase in lily pollen (LlALP) was recently purified in our laboratory. In this paper, we describe the cloning and characterization of LlALP cDNA from lily pollen. Two isoforms of alkaline phytase cDNAs, LlAlp1 and LlAlp2, which are 1467 and 1533 bp long and encode proteins of 487 and 511 amino acids, respectively, were identified. The deduced amino acid sequences contains the signature heptapeptide of histidine phosphatases, -RHGXRXP-, but shares < 25% identity to fungal histidine acid phytases. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that LlALP is most closely related to multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase (MINPP) from humans (25%) and rats (23%). mRNA corresponding to LlAlp1 and LlAlp2 were expressed in leaves, stem, petals and pollen grains. The expression profiles of LlAlp isoforms in anthers indicated that mRNA corresponding to both isoforms were present at all stages of flower development. The expression of LlAlp2 cDNA in Escherichia coli revealed the accumulation of the active enzyme in inclusion bodies and confirmed that the cDNA encodes an alkaline phytase. In summary, plant alkaline phytase is a member of the histidine phosphatase family that includes MINPP and exhibits properties distinct from bacterial and fungal phytases.

  5. Inositol phosphatase activity of the Escherichia coli agp-encoded acid glucose-1-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cottrill, Michael A; Golovan, Serguei P; Phillips, John P; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2002-09-01

    When screening an Escherichia coli gene library for myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) phosphatases (phytases), we discovered that the agp-encoded acid glucose-1-phosphatase also possesses this activity. Purified Agp hydrolyzes glucose-1-phosphate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, and InsP6 with pH optima, 6.5, 3.5, and 4.5, respectively, and was stable when incubated at pH values ranging from 3 to 10. Glucose-1-phosphate was hydrolyzed most efficiently at 55 degrees C. while InsP6 and p-nitrophenyl phosphate were hydrolyzed maximally at 60 degrees C. The Agp exhibited Km values of (0.39 mM, 13 mM, and 0.54 mM for the hydrolysis of glucose-1-phosphate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, and InsP6, respectively. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of inositol phosphate hydrolysis products of Agp demonstrated that the enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate from each of InsP6, D-Ins(1,2,3,4,5)P5, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and Ins(1,2,3,4,6)P5, producing D/L-Ins(1,2,4,5,6)P5. D-Ins(1,2,4,5)P4, D/L-Ins(1,4,5,6)P4 and D/L-Ins(1,2,4,6)P4, respectively. These data support the contention that Agp is a 3-phosphatase.

  6. [Phosphatase activity of Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023].

    PubMed

    Bulavenko, L V; Kurdysh, I K

    2005-01-01

    Phosphatase activity of two strains of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023 and B. megaterium 12 is investigated. The phosphatase activity is found to reach 260 mkmol/g x hour for B. subtilis IMV B-7023 and 12-100 mkmol/g x hour for B. megaterium 12 at optimal temperature (55 degrees C) and pH (9.5-10.0). Synthesis of alkaline phosphatase is shown to reach its maximum values at the end of logarithmic phase of the culture growth. It is revealed that Mg2+, Ca2+ cations increase phosphotase activity of B. subtilis IMV B-7023, at the same time Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+ cations and inorganic phosphate decrease it. Dependence of the rate of phosphatase reaction of B. subtilis IMV B-7023 on substrate concentration is determined.

  7. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  8. Phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases: How do they affect tumourigenesis?

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    The activity of biological molecules is often affected by their phosphorylation state. Regulatory phosphorylation operates as a binary switch and is usually controlled by counteracting kinases and phosphatases. However, phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) has three phosphorylation sites on its inositol ring. The phosphorylation status of PtdIns is controlled by multiple kinases and phosphatases with distinct substrate specificities, serving as a 'lipid code' or 'phosphoinositide code'. Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) converts PtdIns(4,5)P₂ to PtdIns(3,4,5)P₃, which plays a pivotal role in signals controlling glucose uptake, cytoskeletal reorganization, cell proliferation and apoptosis. PI3K is pro-oncogenic, whereas phosphoinositide phosphatases that degrade PtdIns(3,4,5)P₃ are not always anti-oncogenic. Recent studies have revealed the unique characteristics of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases.

  9. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  10. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  11. Type 2C Protein Phosphatases in Fungi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio; González, Asier

    2011-01-01

    Type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatases are a remarkable class of protein phosphatases, which are conserved in eukaryotes and involved in a large variety of functional processes. Unlike in other Ser/Thr phosphatases, the catalytic polypeptide is not usually associated with regulatory subunits, and functional specificity is achieved by encoding multiple isoforms. For fungi, most information comes from the study of type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where seven PP2C-encoding genes (PTC1 to -7) with diverse functions can be found. More recently, data on several Candida albicans PP2C proteins became available, suggesting that some of them can be involved in virulence. In this work we review the available literature on fungal PP2Cs and explore sequence databases to provide a comprehensive overview of these enzymes in fungi. PMID:21076010

  12. Moraxella catarrhalis synthesizes an autotransporter that is an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hoopman, Todd C; Wang, Wei; Brautigam, Chad A; Sedillo, Jennifer L; Reilly, Thomas J; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-02-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis O35E was shown to synthesize a 105-kDa protein that has similarity to both acid phosphatases and autotransporters. The N-terminal portion of the M. catarrhalis acid phosphatase A (MapA) was most similar (the BLAST probability score was 10(-10)) to bacterial class A nonspecific acid phosphatases. The central region of the MapA protein had similarity to passenger domains of other autotransporter proteins, whereas the C-terminal portion of MapA resembled the translocation domain of conventional autotransporters. Cloning and expression of the M. catarrhalis mapA gene in Escherichia coli confirmed the presence of acid phosphatase activity in the MapA protein. The MapA protein was shown to be localized to the outer membrane of M. catarrhalis and was not detected either in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction from disrupted M. catarrhalis cells or in the spent culture supernatant fluid from M. catarrhalis. Use of the predicted MapA translocation domain in a fusion construct with the passenger domain from another predicted M. catarrhalis autotransporter confirmed the translocation ability of this MapA domain. Inactivation of the mapA gene in M. catarrhalis strain O35E reduced the acid phosphatase activity expressed by this organism, and this mutation could be complemented in trans with the wild-type mapA gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the mapA gene from six M. catarrhalis strains showed that this protein was highly conserved among strains of this pathogen. Site-directed mutagenesis of a critical histidine residue (H233A) in the predicted active site of the acid phosphatase domain in MapA eliminated acid phosphatase activity in the recombinant MapA protein. This is the first description of an autotransporter protein that expresses acid phosphatase activity.

  13. Leishmania amazonensis: characterization of an ecto-phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Belmont-Firpo, Rodrigo; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2006-12-01

    We have characterized a phosphatase activity present on the external surface of Leishmania amazonensis, using intact living parasites. This enzyme hydrolyzes the substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) at the rate of 25.70+/-1.17 nmol Pi x h(-1) x 10(-7)cells. The dependence on p-NPP concentration shows a normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics for this ecto-phosphatase activity present a V(max) of 31.93+/-3.04 nmol Pi x h(-1) x 10(-7)cells and apparent K(m) of 1.78+/-0.32 mM. Inorganic phosphate inhibited the ecto-phoshatase activity in a dose-dependent manner with the K(i) value of 2.60 mM. Experiments using classical inhibitor of acid phosphatase, such as ammonium molybdate, as well as inhibitors of phosphotyrosine phosphatase, such as sodium orthovanadate and [potassiumbisperoxo(1,10-phenanthroline)oxovanadate(V)] (bpV-PHEN), inhibited the ecto-phosphatase activity, with the K(i) values of 0.33 microM, 0.36 microM and 0.25 microM, respectively. Zinc chloride, another classical phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, also inhibited the ecto-phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner with K(i) 2.62 mM. Zinc inhibition was reversed by incubation with reduced glutathione (GSH) and cysteine, but not serine, showing that cysteine residues are important for enzymatic activity. Promastigote growth in a medium supplemented with 1mM sodium orthovanadate was completely inhibited as compared to the control medium. Taken together, these results suggest that L. amazonensis express a phosphohydrolase ectoenzyme with phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity.

  14. Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SIl Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the...16 Wheat Germ Lectin Electrophoresis to Quantitate Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes ................ 16 Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzyme...vs Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis ......................... 40 Clinical Correlation Using Wheat Germ Lectin 45 Placental Alkaline Phosphatase

  15. Resolution and purification of three periplasmic phosphatases of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Kier, L D; Weppelman, R; Ames, B N

    1977-01-01

    A survey of Salmonella typhimurium enzymes possessing phosphatase or phosphodiesterase activity was made using several different growth conditions. These studies revealed the presence of three major enzymes, all of which were subsequently purified: a cyclic 2' ,3'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.d), an acid hexose phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2), and a nonspecific acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). A fourth enzyme hydrolyzed bis-(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate but none of the other substrates tested. No evidence was found for the existence of an alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) or a specific 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5) in S. typhimurium LT2. All three phosphatases could be measured efficiently in intact cells, which suggested a periplasmic location; however, they were not readily released by osmotic shock procedures. The nonspecific acid phosphatase, which was purified to apparent homogeneity, yielded a single polypeptide band on both sodium dodecyl sulfate and acidic urea gel electrophoretic systems. Images PMID:192712

  16. OBSERVATIONS ON THE ACID PHOSPHATASES OF EUGLENA GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jacob J.

    1965-01-01

    When a bleached strain of Euglena is maintained in a medium containing very low con centrations of phosphate, the acid phosphatase activity increases. The increase in acid phosphatase activity is prevented by Actinomycin D and by p-fluorophenylalanine (PFA), indicating that the increased activity is due to de novo synthesis of acid phosphatase. When phosphate is replenished, the acid phosphatase activity decreases to the level characteristic of uninduced cells before there is any appreciable cell division. When cell division resumes in the presence of PFA, the level of acid phosphatase activity remains approximately constant. This indicates that there are two different phosphatases: a constitutive enzyme, whose synthesis is insensitive to the presence of PFA, and an induced enzyme, whose synthesis is sensitive to PFA. These enzymes are not equally sensitive to changes in pH and in fluoride concentration, thus permitting them to be assayed individually in whole toluene-treated cells. Induced cells also acquire the ability to remove phosphate from the medium very rapidly. PMID:14326108

  17. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  18. The cytochemistry of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Janckila, A J; Li, C Y; Lam, K W; Yam, L T

    1978-07-01

    Cytochemical demonstration of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity is essential for the diagnosis of leukemic reticuloendotheliosis. In order to perform this test correctly and to interpret the results propertly, it is necessary to understand the technical details of the cytochemical methods thoroughly. The method using naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--fast garnet GBC is recommended for this purpose, and factors crucial to the cytochemical study, such as fixation, substrate, coupler, pH and temperature of incubation buffer, counterstains, and mounting media are examined and discussed. Conventional methods for acid phosphatase in the presence and absence of L(+) tartaric acid are also critically examined. The naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--fast garnet GBC method is sensitive, technically simple and easily reproducible. Its reaction product is highly chromogenic and is most suitable for cytochemical demonstration of acid phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in cytologic preparations. The naphthol--ASBI phosphoric acid--pararosaniline method is highly specific and is best for histochemical demonstration of acid phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in tissue sections.

  19. A Malachite Green-Based Assay to Assess Glucan Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Amanda R.; Paasch, Bradley C.; Worby, Carolyn A.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent discovery of a unique class of dual-specificity phosphatases that dephosphorylate glucans, we report an in vitro assay tailored for the detection of phosphatase activity against phosphorylated glucans. We demonstrate that in contrast to a general phosphatase assay utilizing a synthetic substrate, only phosphatases that possess glucan phosphatase activity liberate phosphate from the phosphorylated glucan amylopectin using the described assay. This assay is simple and cost-effective, providing reproducible results that clearly establish the presence or absence of glucan phosphatase activity. The assay described will be a useful tool in characterizing emerging members of the glucan phosphatase family. PMID:23201267

  20. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1).

  1. Multiple forms of phosphatase from human brain: isolation and partial characterization of affi-gel blue binding phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L Y; Wang, J Z; Gong, C X; Pei, J J; Zaidi, T; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    2000-01-01

    Implication of protein phosphatases in Alzheimer disease led us to a systemic investigation of the identification of these enzyme activities in human brain. Human brain phosphatases eluted from DEAE-Sephacel with 0.22 M NaCl were resolved into two main groups by affi-gel blue chromatography, namely affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases and affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases. Affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases were further separated into four different phosphatases, designated P1, P2, P3, and P4 by calmodulin-Sepharose 4B and poly-(L-lysine)-agarose chromatographies. These four phosphatases exhibited activities towards nonprotein phosphoester and two of them, P1 and P4, could dephosphorylate phosphoproteins. The activities of the four phosphatases differed in pH optimum, divalent metal ion requirements, sensitivities to various inhibitors and substrate affinities. The apparent molecular masses as estimated by gel-filtration for P1, P2, P3, and P4 were 97, 45, 42, and 125 kDa, respectively. P1 is markedly similar to PP2B from bovine brain and rabbit skeletal muscle. P4 was labeled with anti-PP2A antibody and may represent a new subtype of PP2A. P1 and P4 were also effective in dephosphorylating Alzheimer disease abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau (AD P-tau). The resulting dephosphorylated AD P-tau had its activity restored in promoting assembly of microtubules in vitro. These results suggest that P1 and P4 might be involved in the regulation of phosphorylation of tau in human brain, especially in neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease which are characterized by the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of this protein.

  2. Structural elucidation of the NADP(H) phosphatase activity of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirudha; Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    NADP(H)/NAD(H) homeostasis has long been identified to play a pivotal role in the mitigation of reactive oxygen stress (ROS) in the intracellular milieu and is therefore critical for the progression and pathogenesis of many diseases. NAD(H) kinases and NADP(H) phosphatases are two key players in this pathway. Despite structural evidence demonstrating the existence and mode of action of NAD(H) kinases, the specific annotation and the mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatases remains obscure. Here, structural evidence supporting the alternative role of inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) as an NADP(H) phosphatase is reported. Crystal structures of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase (SaIMPase-I) in complex with the substrates D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate and NADP(+) have been solved. The structure of the SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-NADP(+) ternary complex reveals the catalytic mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatase. Moreover, structures of SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-substrate complexes have reinforced the earlier proposal that the length of the active-site-distant helix α4 and its preceding loop are the predisposing factors for the promiscuous substrate specificity of SaIMPase-I. Altogether, the evidence presented suggests that IMPase-family enzymes with a shorter α4 helix could be potential candidates for previously unreported NADP(H) phosphatase activity.

  3. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at low pH].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2009-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), three forms of tartrate-sensitive phosphatase were revealed using PAGE of the supernatant of ameba homogenates obtained with 1% Triton X-100 or distilled water and subsequent staining of gels with 2-naphthyl phosphate as substrate (pH 4.0). The form with the highest mobility in the ameba supernatant was sensitive to all tested phosphatase activity modulators. Two other forms with the lower mobilities were completely or significantly inactivated not only by sodium L-(+)-tartrate, but also by L-(+)-tartaric acid, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium molybdate, EDTA, EGTA, o-phospho-L-tyrosine, DL-dithiotreitol, H2O2, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ions of heavy metals - Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cu2+. Based on results of inhibitory analysis, lysosome location in the ameba cell, and wide substrate specificity of these two forms, it has been concluded that they belong to nonspecific acid phosphomonoesterases (AcP, EC 3.1.3.2). This AcP is suggested to have both phosphomonoesterase and phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activitis. Two ecto-phosphatases were revealed in the culture medium, in which amebas were cultivated. One of them was inhibited by the same reagents as the ameba tartrate-sensitive AcP and seems to be the AcP released into the culture medium in the process of exocytosis of the content of food vacuoles. In the culture medium, apart from this AcP, another phosphatase was revealed, which was not inhibited by any tested inhibitors of AcP and alkaline phosphatase. It cannot be ruled out that this phosphatase belong to the ecto-ATPases found in many protists; however, its ability to hydrolyze ATP has not yet been proven.

  4. Prostatic acid phosphatase degrades lysophosphatidic acid in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Takanezawa, Yasukazu; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Junken; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2004-07-30

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator with multiple biological activities and is detected in various biological fluids, including human seminal plasma. Due to its cell proliferation stimulatory and anti-apoptotic activities, LPA has been implicated in the progression of some cancers such as ovarian cancer and prostate cancer. Here, we show that prostatic acid phosphatase, which is a non-specific phosphatase and which has been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer, inactivates LPA in human seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma contains both an LPA-synthetic enzyme, lysoPLD, which converts lysophospholipids to LPA and is responsible for LPA production in serum, and its major substrate, lysophosphatidylcholine. In serum, LPA accumulated during incubation at 37 degrees C. However, in seminal plasma, LPA did not accumulate. This discrepancy is explained by the presence of a strong LPA-degrading activity. Incubation of LPA with seminal plasma resulted in the disappearance of LPA and an accompanying accumulation of monoglyceride showing that LPA is degraded by phosphatase activity present in the seminal plasma. When seminal plasma was incubated in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, LPA accumulated, indicating that LPA is produced and degraded in the fluid. Biochemical characterization of the LPA-phosphatase activity identified two phosphatase activities in human seminal plasma. By Western blotting analysis in combination with several column chromatographies, the major activity was revealed to be identical to prostatic acid phosphatase. The present study demonstrates active LPA metabolism in seminal plasma and indicates the possible role of LPA signaling in male sexual organs including prostate cancer.

  5. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  6. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Dongil; Kim, Dong-Il; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  7. Glycerol-3-phosphatase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Panhorst, Maren; Youn, Jung-Won; Wiefel, Lars; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Formation of glycerol as by-product of amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum has been observed under certain conditions, but the enzyme(s) involved in its synthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate were not known. It was shown here that cg1700 encodes an enzyme active as a glycerol-3-phosphatase (GPP) hydrolyzing glycerol-3-phosphate to inorganic phosphate and glycerol. GPP was found to be active as a homodimer. The enzyme preferred conditions of neutral pH and requires Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ for its activity. GPP dephosphorylated both L- and D-glycerol-3-phosphate with a preference for the D-enantiomer. The maximal activity of GPP was estimated to be 31.1 and 1.7 U mg⁻¹ with K(M) values of 3.8 and 2.9 mM for DL- and L-glycerol-3-phosphate, respectively. For physiological analysis a gpp deletion mutant was constructed and shown to lack the ability to produce detectable glycerol concentrations. Vice versa, gpp overexpression increased glycerol accumulation during growth in fructose minimal medium. It has been demonstrated previously that intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate is growth inhibitory as shown for a recombinant C. glutamicum strain overproducing glycerokinase and glycerol facilitator genes from E. coli in media containing glycerol. In this strain, overexpression of gpp restored growth in the presence of glycerol as intracellular glycerol-3-phosphate concentrations were reduced to wild-type levels. In C. glutamicum wild type, GPP was shown to be involved in utilization of DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as source of phosphorus, since growth with DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as sole phosphorus source was reduced in the gpp deletion strain whereas it was accelerated upon gpp overexpression. As GPP homologues were found to be encoded in the genomes of many other bacteria, the gpp homologues of Escherichia coli (b2293) and Bacillus subtilis (BSU09240, BSU34970) as well as gpp1 from the plant Arabidosis thaliana were overexpressed in E. coli MG1655 and

  8. Alkaline phosphatase revisited: hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound approximately 4 A apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) in excess of its inhibition constant (K(i) approximately 1 muM). This tight binding by P(i) has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k(cat)/K(m) for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k(cat)/K(m). The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK(a) of < or = 5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK(a) of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k(cat)/K(m) on the pK(a) of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of beta(lg) = -0.85 +/- 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of

  9. Crystal structure of rat intestinal alkaline phosphatase--role of crown domain in mammalian alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaushik; Mazumder Tagore, Debarati; Anumula, Rushith; Lakshmaiah, Basanth; Kumar, P P B S; Singaram, Senthuran; Matan, Thangavelu; Kallipatti, Sanjith; Selvam, Sabariya; Krishnamurthy, Prasad; Ramarao, Manjunath

    2013-11-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatases (IAPs) are involved in the cleavage of phosphate prodrugs to liberate the drug for absorption in the intestine. To facilitate in vitro characterization of phosphate prodrugs, we have cloned, expressed, purified and characterized IAPs from rat and cynomolgus monkey (rIAP and cIAP respectively) which are important pre-clinical species for drug metabolism studies. The recombinant rat and monkey enzymes expressed in Sf9 insect cells (IAP-Ic) were found to be glycosylated and active. Expression of rat IAP in Escherichia coli (rIAP-Ec) led to ~200-fold loss of activity that was partially recovered by the addition of external Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Crystal structures of rIAP-Ec and rIAP-Ic were determined and they provide rationale for the discrepancy in enzyme activities. Rat IAP-Ic retains its activity in presence of both Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) whereas activity of most other alkaline phosphatases (APs) including the cIAP was strongly inhibited by excess Zn(2+). Based on our crystal structure, we hypothesized the residue Q317 in rIAP, present within 7 Å of the Mg(2+) at M3, to be important for this difference in activity. The Q317H rIAP and H317Q cIAP mutants showed reversal in effect of Zn(2+), corroborating the hypothesis. Further analysis of the two structures indicated a close linkage between glycosylation and crown domain stability. A triple mutant of rIAP, where all the three putative N-linked glycosylation sites were mutated showed thermal instability and reduced activity.

  10. Human prostatic acid phosphatase directly stimulates collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase content of isolated bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, M.; Rosier, R.N.; Puzas, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) directly enhances the differentiated characteristics of isolated bone cells in vitro. This enzyme, when added to cell cultures for 24 h in vitro stimulates collagen synthesis and the production of alkaline phosphatase. The effects are dose dependent, with statistically significant effects occurring from 0.1-100 nM hPAP. Concentrations higher than 100 nM do not evoke greater effects. The maximal effect of hPAP occurs between 12 and 24 h of exposure. The cells stimulated to the greatest degree are osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts. Fibroblasts isolated from the same tissue show a lesser sensitivity to hPAP. hPAP has no detectable effect on cell proliferation, as measured by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation or total DNA synthesis. None of the observations reported in this work can be attributed to contaminating proteins in the hPAP preparation. hPAP was radiolabeled with 125I and was used for affinity binding and cross-linking studies. Scatchard analysis of specific binding indicated the presence of 1.0 X 10(5) high affinity binding sites/cell, with a Kd of 6.5 nM. Cross-linking studies demonstrated the presence of one 320-kDa binding complex. The pH profile and kinetic determinations of Km and maximum velocity for hPAP were similar to those previously reported, except for the finding of positive cooperativity of the substrate with the enzyme under the conditions of our assay. We believe that the direct stimulation of bone-forming cells by hPAP may contribute to the sclerotic nature of skeletal bone around sites of neoplastic prostatic metastases and that the effect of the enzyme is probably mediated by a plasma membrane receptor.

  11. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  12. Thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Tarasevich, B. N.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2009-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli (ECAP), bovine intestines (bovine IAP), and chicken intestines (chicken IAP) was studied in different buffer solutions and in the solid state. The conclusion was made that these enzymes had maximum stability in the solid state, and, in a carbonate buffer solution, their activity decreased most rapidly. It was found that the bacterial enzyme was more stable than animal phosphatases. It was noted that, for ECAP, four intermediate stages preceded the loss of enzyme activity, and, for bovine and chicken IAPs, three intermediate stages were observed. The activation energy of thermal inactivation of ECAP over the range 25-70°C was determined to be 80 kJ/mol; it corresponded to the dissociation of active dimers into inactive monomers. Higher activation energies (˜200 kJ/mol) observed at the initial stage of thermal inactivation of animal phosphatases resulted from the simultaneous loss of enzyme activity caused by dimer dissociation and denaturation. It was shown that the activation energy of denaturation of monomeric animal alkali phosphatases ranged from 330 to 380 kJ/mol depending on buffer media. It was concluded that the inactivation of solid samples of alkali phosphatases at 95°C was accompanied by an about twofold decrease in the content of β structures in protein molecules.

  13. The catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2008-11-01

    A comparative study was performed to examine the catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli and bovine and chicken intestines. The activity of enzyme dimers and tetramers was determined. The activity of the dimer was three or four times higher than that of the tetramer. The maximum activity and affinity for 4-nitrophenylphosphate was observed for the bacterial alkaline phosphatase ( K M = 1.7 × 10-5 M, V max = 1800 μmol/(min mg of protein) for dimers and V max = 420 μmol/(min mg of protein) for tetramers). The Michaelis constants were equal for two animal phosphatases in various buffer media (pH 8.5) ((3.5 ± 0.2) × 10-4 M). Five buffer systems were investigated: tris, carbonate, hepes, borate, and glycine buffers, and the lowest catalytic activity of alkaline phosphatases at equal pH was observed in the borate buffer (for enzyme from bovine intestine, V max = 80 μmol/(min mg of protein)). Cu2+ cations formed a complex with tris-(oxymethyl)-aminomethane ( tris-HCl buffer) and inhibited the intestine alkaline phosphatases by a noncompetitive mechanism.

  14. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  15. Studies on the catalytic mechanism of pig purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wynne, C J; Hamilton, S E; Dionysius, D A; Beck, J L; de Jersey, J

    1995-05-10

    Several independent experiments failed to reveal any evidence in support of the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the catalytic mechanism of pig allantoic fluid purple acid phosphatase: (i) attempts to label enzyme with phosphate derived from [32P]p-nitrophenyl phosphate were unsuccessful; (ii) values of kcat for a series of phosphate derivative varied over a wide range, with the enzyme showing a marked preference for activated ester and anhydride substrates over those with a stable leaving group; (iii) burst titrations revealed a "burst" of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl phosphate only when the enzyme was added after the substrate, suggesting that this result was an artifact of the order of addition of reagents; (iv) transphosphorylation from p-nitrophenyl phosphate to acceptor alcohols could not be detected, even under conditions where a transphosphorylation to hydrolysis ratio as low as 0.015 could have been measured; (v) enzyme-catalyzed exchange of 180 between phosphate and water was demonstrated, although at a rate much slower than that observed for other phosphatases where the involvement of a phosphoryl-enzyme intermediate in the mechanism has been clearly established. The present results are compared with those obtained in similar studies on other phosphatases, particularly the highly homologous beef spleen purple acid phosphatase, and their implications for the catalytic mechanism of the purple acid phosphatases are discussed.

  16. Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Kinetic studies with the tetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Halford, S E; Schlesinger, M J; Gutfreund, H

    1972-03-01

    1. The stability of the tetrameric form of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase was examined by analytical ultracentrifugation. 2. The stopped-flow technique was used to study the hydrolysis of nitrophenyl phosphates by the alkaline phosphatase tetramer at pH7.5 and 8.3. In both cases transient product formation was observed before the steady state was attained. Both transients consisted of the liberation of 1mol of nitrophenol/2mol of enzyme subunits within the dead-time of the apparatus. The steady-state rates were identical with those observed with the dimer under the same conditions. 3. The binding of 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl phosphonate to the alkaline phosphatase tetramer was studied by the temperature-jump technique. The self-association of two dimers to form the tetramer is linked to a conformation change within the dimer. This accounts for the differences between the transient phases in the reactions of the dimer and the tetramer with substrate. 4. Addition of P(i) to the alkaline phosphatase tetramer caused it to dissociate into dimers. The tetramer is unable to bind this ligand. It is suggested that the tetramer undergoes a compulsory dissociation before the completion of its first turnover with substrate. 5. On the basis of these findings a mechanism is proposed for the involvement of the alkaline phosphatase tetramer in the physiology of E. coli.

  17. Characteristics of plasmalemma alkaline phosphatase of rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y

    1983-01-01

    General characteristics of alkaline phosphatase activity of the plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from rat mesenteric arteries were investigated. The vascular smooth muscle plasmalemma alkaline phosphatase is a metalloenzyme which is strongly inhibited by chelating agents and this inhibition can be completely overcome by addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+. Zn2+ only partially reactivates the enzyme in the presence of low concentrations of EDTA. The enzymatic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, beta-glycerophosphate, alpha-glycerophosphate, or 3'-adenosine monophosphate showed an optimal activity in the alkaline region between pH 9 and 11. The alkaline phosphatase activity is distinctly different from the plasmalemma ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities with respect to their pH dependence, influence by added divalent metal ions and stability against heat inactivation. Vanadate ion, being structurally similar to the transition state analog of the phosphoryl group, potently inhibits alkaline phosphatase with an apparent Ki of 1.5 microM. The altered alkaline phosphatase activity of vascular smooth muscle in relation to its possible physiological function and pathophysiological manifestation associated with hypertensive disease are discussed.

  18. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  19. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bryan M.; Keasey, Sarah L.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly K.; Cherry, Scott; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P) residue, but also the Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7), atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27), viral (variola VH1), and Cdc25 (A-C). Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P) peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets. PMID:26302245

  20. A Novel Inositol Pyrophosphate Phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, Elizabeth A.; Chong, Lucy S.; Wu, Mingxuan; Crooke, Elliott; Fiedler, Dorothea; Resnick, Adam C.; Rolfes, Ronda J.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol pyrophosphates are high energy signaling molecules involved in cellular processes, such as energetic metabolism, telomere maintenance, stress responses, and vesicle trafficking, and can mediate protein phosphorylation. Although the inositol kinases underlying inositol pyrophosphate biosynthesis are well characterized, the phosphatases that selectively regulate their cellular pools are not fully described. The diphosphoinositol phosphate phosphohydrolase enzymes of the Nudix protein family have been demonstrated to dephosphorylate inositol pyrophosphates; however, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog Ddp1 prefers inorganic polyphosphate over inositol pyrophosphates. We identified a novel phosphatase of the recently discovered atypical dual specificity phosphatase family as a physiological inositol pyrophosphate phosphatase. Purified recombinant Siw14 hydrolyzes the β-phosphate from 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5PP-IP5 or IP7) in vitro. In vivo, siw14Δ yeast mutants possess increased IP7 levels, whereas heterologous SIW14 overexpression eliminates IP7 from cells. IP7 levels increased proportionately when siw14Δ was combined with ddp1Δ or vip1Δ, indicating independent activity by the enzymes encoded by these genes. We conclude that Siw14 is a physiological phosphatase that modulates inositol pyrophosphate metabolism by dephosphorylating the IP7 isoform 5PP-IP5 to IP6. PMID:26828065

  1. New Functions of the Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatases in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Erneux, Christophe; Ghosh, Somadri; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Edimo, William's Elong

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases act on inositol phosphates and phosphoinositides as substrates. They are 10 different isoenzymes and several splice variants in the human genome that are involved in a series of human pathologies such as the Lowe syndrome, the Joubert and MORM syndromes, breast cancer, glioblastoma, gastric cancer and several other type of cancers. Inositol 5-phosphatases can be amplified in human cancer cells, whereas the 3- and 4- phosphatase tumor suppressor PTEN and INPP4B, repectively are often repressed or deleted. The inositol 5-phosphatases are critically involved in a complex network of higly regulated phosphoinositides, affecting the lipid content of PI(3, 4, 5)P3, PI(4, 5)P2 and PI(3, 4)P2. This has an impact on the normal behavior of many intracellular target proteins e.g. protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or actin binding proteins and final biological responses. The production of PI(3, 4P)2 by dephosphorylation of the substrate PI(3, 4, 5)P3 is particularly important as it produces a new signal messenger in the control of cell migration, invasion and endocytosis. New inhibitors/activators of inositol 5- phosphatases have recently been identified for the possible control of their activity in several human pathologies such as inflamation and cancer.

  2. Acid phosphatase activities during the germination of Glycine max seeds.

    PubMed

    dos Prazeres, Janaina Nicanuzia; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a study concerning the determination of some characteristics of soybean seedlings and the detection of acid phosphatase activities towards different substrates during the germination. Enzyme activities with p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) as substrates were detected from the 5th and 7th days after germination, respectively. Acid phosphatase activities with tyrosine phosphate (TyrP), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) were also observed but to a lesser extent. Under the same conditions, no enzyme activity was detected with phytic acid (PhyAc) as substrate. The appearance of phosphatase activity was coincident with the decrease of inorganic phosphate content during germination; over the same period, the protein content increased up to the 5th day, decreased until the 8th day, and remained constant after this period. Relative to phosphatase activity in the cotyledons, the activities detected in the hypocotyl and roots were 82% and 38%, respectively. During storage the enzyme maintained about 63% of its activity for 3 months at 5 degrees C. The specificity constant (Vmax/Km) values for pNPP and PPi were 212 and 64 mu kat mM-1 mg-1, respectively. Amongst the substrates tested, PPi could be a potential physiological substrate for acid phosphatase during the germination of soybean seeds.

  3. A conserved phosphatase cascade that regulates nuclear membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S; Harris, Thurl E; Wiley, Sandra E; Lawrence, John C; Dixon, Jack E

    2007-04-17

    A newly emerging family of phosphatases that are members of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily contains the catalytic motif DXDX(T/V). A member of this DXDX(T/V) phosphatase family known as Dullard was recently shown to be a potential regulator of neural tube development in Xenopus [Satow R, Chan TC, Asashima M (2002) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 295:85-91]. Herein, we demonstrate that human Dullard and the yeast protein Nem1p perform similar functions in mammalian cells and yeast cells, respectively. In addition to similarity in primary sequence, Dullard and Nem1p possess similar domains and show similar substrate preferences, and both localize to the nuclear envelope. Additionally, we show that human Dullard can rescue the aberrant nuclear envelope morphology of nem1Delta yeast cells, functionally replacing Nem1p. Finally, Nem1p, has been shown to deposphorylate the yeast phosphatidic acid phosphatase Smp2p [Santos-Rosa H, Leung J, Grimsey N, Peak-Chew S, Siniossoglou S (2005) EMBO J 24:1931-1941], and we show that Dullard dephosphorylates the mammalian phospatidic acid phosphatase, lipin. Therefore, we propose that Dullard participates in a unique phosphatase cascade regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis, and that this cascade is conserved from yeast to mammals.

  4. A glutamate switch controls voltage-sensitive phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Kohout, Susy C; Xu, Qiang; Müller, Simone; Kimberlin, Christopher R; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Minor, Daniel L

    2012-05-06

    The Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP) couples a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) to a lipid phosphatase that is similar to the tumor suppressor PTEN. How the VSD controls enzyme function has been unclear. Here, we present high-resolution crystal structures of the Ci-VSP enzymatic domain that reveal conformational changes in a crucial loop, termed the 'gating loop', that controls access to the active site by a mechanism in which residue Glu411 directly competes with substrate. Structure-based mutations that restrict gating loop conformation impair catalytic function and demonstrate that Glu411 also contributes to substrate selectivity. Structure-guided mutations further define an interaction between the gating loop and linker that connects the phosphatase to the VSD for voltage control of enzyme activity. Together, the data suggest that functional coupling between the gating loop and the linker forms the heart of the regulatory mechanism that controls voltage-dependent enzyme activation.

  5. Inositol 5-phosphatases: insights from the Lowe syndrome protein OCRL.

    PubMed

    Pirruccello, Michelle; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-04-01

    The precise regulation of phosphoinositide lipids in cellular membranes is crucial for cellular survival and function. Inositol 5-phosphatases have been implicated in a variety of disorders, including various cancers, obesity, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and rare genetic conditions. Despite the obvious impact on human health, relatively little structural and biochemical information is available for this family. Here, we review recent structural and mechanistic work on the 5-phosphatases with a focus on OCRL, whose loss of function results in oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe and Dent 2 disease. Studies of OCRL emphasize how the actions of 5-phosphatases rely on both intrinsic and extrinsic membrane recognition properties for full catalytic function. Additionally, structural analysis of missense mutations in the catalytic domain of OCRL provides insight into the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in Lowe syndrome and Dent disease.

  6. Phosphatase Wip1 in Immunity: An Overview and Update

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Jin-Peng; Guan, Wen-Xian; Du, Jun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) is a newly identified serine/threonine phosphatase, which belongs to the PP2C family. Due to its involvement in stress-induced networks and overexpression in human tumors, primary studies have mainly focused on the role of Wip1 in tumorigenesis. It now has also been implicated in regulating several other physiological processes such as organism aging and neurogenesis. Recent evidence highlights a new role of Wip1 in controlling immune response through regulating immune cell development and function, as well as through the interplay with inflammatory signaling pathways such NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. In this short review, we will give an overview of Wip1 in immunity to better understand this important phosphatase. PMID:28144241

  7. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation.

  8. Structural basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Mirouze, Nicolas; Dubnau, David A; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2011-02-08

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic "switch" residue to an internal position when the β4-α4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  9. Phosphatase inhibitors with anti-angiogenic effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sylvest, Lene; Bendiksen, Christine Dam; Houen, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Levamisole has previously been identified as an inhibitor of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic behavior has not yet been established. However, one known effect of levamisole is the inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, and this fact encouraged us to test other phosphatase inhibitors for their anti-angiogenic effects by using the same method as used to identify levamisole: an ELISA-based co-culture angiogenesis assay giving quantitative and qualitative results. Historically, intracellular phosphatases have been associated with the downregulation of signaling pathways, and kinases with their upregulation, but lately, the phospatases have also been coupled to positive signaling, which is why inhibition of phosphatases has become associated with anti-tumorigenic and anti-angiogenic effects. The results obtained in this work reveal several agents with anti-angiogenic potential and give a strong indication that phosphatase inhibition is linked to anti-angiogenic activity. An apparent disruption of endothelial tube formation was seen for seven of eight phosphatase inhibitors tested in the angiogenesis assay. By looking at the morphological results, it was seen that most of the inhibitors impaired proliferation and elongation of the endothelial cells, which still had a differentiated appearance. One inhibitor, PTP inhibitor IV, seemed to impair endothelial cell differentiation and induced the same morphology as when cells were treated with levamisole, although at a 200 times lower concentration than that of levamisole. Hence, our work points out compounds with a potential that may be of use in the search for new medical products for the treatment of malignant tumors, or other conditions where angiogenesis plays a central role.

  10. Phosphatase activity on the cell wall of Fonsecaea pedrosoi.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, L F; Palmeira, V F; Pinheiro, A A S; Alviano, C S; Rozental, S; Travassos, L R; Meyer-Fernandes, J R

    2003-12-01

    The activity of a phosphatase was characterized in intact mycelial forms of Fonsecaea pedrosoi, a pathogenic fungus that causes chromoblastomycosis. At pH 5.5, this fungus hydrolyzed p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) to p-nitrophenol (p-NP) at a rate of 12.78 +/- 0.53 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight. The values of Vmax and apparent Km for p-NPP hydrolyses were measured as 17.89 +/- 0.92 nmol p-NP per h per mg hyphal dry weight and 1.57 +/- 0.26 mmol/l, respectively. This activity was inhibited at increased pH, a finding compatible with an acid phosphatase. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by classical inhibitors of acid phosphatases such as sodium orthovanadate (Ki = 4.23 micromol/l), sodium molybdate (Ki = 7.53 micromol/l) and sodium fluoride (Ki = 126.78 micromol/l) in a dose-dependent manner. Levamizole (1 mmol/l) and sodium tartrate (10 mmol/l), had no effect on the enzyme activity. Cytochemical localization of the acid phosphatase showed electrondense cerium phosphate deposits on the cell wall, as visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Phosphatase activity in F. pedrosoi seems to be associated with parasitism, as sclerotic cells, which are the fungal forms mainly detected in chromoblastomycosis lesions, showed much higher activities than conidia and mycelia did. A strain of F. pedrosoi recently isolated from a human case of chromoblastomycosis also showed increased enzyme activity, suggesting that the expression of surface phosphatases may be stimulated by interaction with the host.

  11. MDP-1: A novel eukaryotic magnesium-dependent phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Selengut, J D; Levine, R L

    2000-07-18

    We report here the purification, cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel phosphatase, MDP-1. In the course of investigating the reported acid phosphatase activity of carbonic anhydrase III preparations, several discrete phosphatases were discerned. One of these, a magnesium-dependent species of 18.6 kDa, was purified to homogeneity and yielded several peptide sequences from which the parent gene was identified by database searching. Although orthologous genes were identified in fungi and plants as well as mammalian species, there was no apparent homology to any known family of phosphatases. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli with a fusion tag and purified by affinity methods. The recombinant enzyme showed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity comparable to the originally isolated rabbit protein. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate, and phosphotyrosine. The selectivity for phosphotyrosine over phosphoserine or phosphothreonine is considerable, but the enzyme did not show activity toward five phosphotyrosine-containing peptides. None of the various substrates assayed (including various nucleotide, sugar, amino acid and peptide phosphates, phosphoinositides, and phosphodiesters) exhibited K(M) values lower than 1 mM, and many showed negligible rates of hydrolysis. The enzyme is inhibited by vanadate and fluoride but not by azide, cyanide, calcium, lithium, or tartaric acid. Chemical labeling, refolding, dialysis, and mutagenesis experiments suggest that the enzymatic mechanism is not dependent on cysteine, histidine, or nonmagnesium metal ions. In recognition of these observations, the enzyme has been given the name magnesium-dependent phosphatase-1 (MDP-1).

  12. Structural Basis of Response Regulator Dephosphorylation by Rap Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    V Parashar; N Mirouze; D Dubnau; M Neiditch

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic 'switch' residue to an internal position when the {beta}4-{alpha}4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  13. Autophagy Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Identification of a Novel Phosphatase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    lacking protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma . Nat Genet, 1999. 21(3): p. 330-3. 18. Wallace, M.J., et al., Neuronal defects and posterior pituitary...targeting requires receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases sigma and delta. J Neurosci, 2006. 26(22): p. 5872-80. 20. Klionsky, D.J., Autophagy: from...were seeded in McCoy’s 5A with 10% FBS at 200,000 cells per well of six -well tissue culture plates. After 24 hours, control or PTPRS siRNAs were

  14. Phosphotyrosine as a substrate of acid and alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Apostoł, I; Kuciel, R; Wasylewska, E; Ostrowski, W S

    1985-01-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for following dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine has been described. The absorption spectra of phosphotyrosine and tyrosine were plotted over the pH range from 3 to 9. The change in absorbance accompanying the conversion of phosphotyrosine to tyrosine was the greatest at 286 nm. The difference absorption coefficients were calculated for several pH values. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine by acid phosphatases from human prostate gland, from wheat germ and potatoes obeys the Michaelis-Menten equation, whereas alkaline phosphatases calf intestine and E. coli are inhibited by excess of substrate.

  15. Effect of vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Vescina, C M; Sálice, V C; Cortizo, A M; Etcheverry, S B

    1996-01-01

    The direct effect of different vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was investigated. Vanadate and vanadyl but not pervanadate inhibited the wheat germ ACP activity. These vanadium derivatives did not alter the fibroblast Swiss 3T3 soluble fraction ACP activity. Using inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), the wheat germ ACP was partially characterized as a PTPase. This study suggests that the inhibitory ability of different vanadium derivatives to modulate ACP activity seems to depend on the geometry around the vanadium atom more than on the oxidation state. Our results indicate a correlation between the PTPase activity and the sensitivity to vanadate and vanadyl cation.

  16. Purinergic receptor-mediated rapid depletion of nuclear phosphorylated Akt depends on pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase, calcineurin, protein phosphatase 2A, and PTEN phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Mistafa, Oras; Ghalali, Aram; Kadekar, Sandeep; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2010-09-03

    Akt is an important oncoprotein, and data suggest a critical role for nuclear Akt in cancer development. We have previously described a rapid (3-5 min) and P2X7-dependent depletion of nuclear phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) and effects on downstream targets, and here we studied mechanisms behind the pAkt depletion. We show that cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, or extracellular ATP, induced a complex and coordinated response in insulin-stimulated A549 cells leading to depletion of nuclear pAkt. It involved protein/lipid phosphatases PTEN, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase (PHLPP1 and -2), protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and calcineurin. We employed immunocytology, immunoprecipitation, and proximity ligation assay techniques and show that PHLPP and calcineurin translocated to the nucleus and formed complexes with Akt within 3 min. Also PTEN translocated to the nucleus and then co-localized with pAkt close to the nuclear membrane. An inhibitor of the scaffolding immunophilin FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) and calcineurin, FK506, prevented depletion of nuclear pAkt. Furthermore, okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A, prevented the nuclear pAkt depletion. Chemical inhibition and siRNA indicated that PHLPP, PP2A, and PTEN were required for a robust depletion of nuclear pAkt, and in prostate cancer cells lacking PTEN, transfection of PTEN restored the statin-induced pAkt depletion. The activation of protein and lipid phosphatases was paralleled by a rapid proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) translocation to the nucleus, a PCNA-p21(cip1) complex formation, and cyclin D1 degradation. We conclude that these effects reflect a signaling pathway for rapid depletion of pAkt that may stop the cell cycle.

  17. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M; Woodford, Mark R; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi; Vaughan, Cara K

    2016-08-09

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP-substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors.

  18. Purification and characterization of two wheat-embryo protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Polya, G M; Haritou, M

    1988-04-15

    Two protein phosphatases (enzymes I and II) were extensively purified from wheat embryo by a procedure involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, DEAE-Sephacel and Ultrogel AcA 44. Preparations of enzyme I (Mr 197,000) are heterogeneous. Preparations of enzyme II (Mr 35,000) contain only one major polypeptide (Mr 17,500), which exactly co-purifies with protein phosphatase II on gel filtration and is not present in preparations of enzyme I. However, this major polypeptide has been identified as calmodulin. Calmodulin and protein phosphatase II can be separated by further chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B. Protein phosphatases I and II do not require Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity. Both enzymes catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphohistone H1 (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-dependent protein kinase) and of phosphocasein (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-independent casein kinase), but neither enzyme dephosphorylates a range of non-protein phosphomonoesters tested. Both enzymes are inhibited by Zn2+, Hg2+, vanadate, molybdate, F-, pyrophosphate and ATP.

  19. Anion and divalent cation activation of phosphoglycolate phosphatase from leaves.

    PubMed

    Husic, H D; Tolbert, N E

    1984-02-15

    Phosphoglycolate (P-glycolate) phosphatase was purified 223-fold from spinach leaves by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 chromatography. The partially purified enzyme had a broad pH optimum between 5.6 and 8.0 and was specific for the hydrolysis of P-glycolate with a Km (P-glycolate) of 26 microM. The enzyme was activated by divalent cations including Mg2+, Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+, and by anions including Cl-, Br-, NO-3, and HCOO-. Neither anions nor divalent cations activated the enzyme without the other. The P-glycolate phosphatase activities from tobacco leaves or the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, also required Mg2+ and were activated by chloride. In addition, the enzyme was allosterically inhibited by ribose 5-phosphate. The activation of P-glycolate phosphatase by both anions and divalent cations and the inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate may be involved in the in vivo regulation of P-glycolate phosphatase activity.

  20. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module.

    PubMed

    Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-11-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P(2). In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1's endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals.

  1. Effects of organic dairy manure amendment on soil phosphatase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy production is increasing in the U.S. due to concerns over environmental, human, and animal health. It is well known that the application of livestock manure to soil can influence enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling and soil fertility, such as soil phosphatases; however, orga...

  2. Okadaic acid: the archetypal serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dounay, A B; Forsyth, C J

    2002-11-01

    As the first recognized member of the "okadaic acid class" of phosphatase inhibitors, the marine natural product okadaic acid is perhaps the most well-known member of a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have emerged as valuable probes for studying the roles of various cellular protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This review provides a historical perspective on the role that okadaic acid has played in stimulating a broad spectrum of modern scientific research as a result of the natural product's ability to bind to and inhibit important classes of protein serine / threonine phosphatases. The relationships between the structure and biological activities of okadaic acid are briefly reviewed, as well as the structural information regarding the particular cellular receptors protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A. Laboratory syntheses of okadaic acid and its analogs are thoroughly reviewed. Finally, an interpretation of the critical contacts observed between okadaic acid and PP1 by X-ray crystallography is provided, and specific molecular recognition hypotheses that are testable via the synthesis and assay of non-natural analogs of okadaic acid are suggested.

  3. New form of acid phosphatase during lysosome biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G R; Aithal, H N; Toback, F G; Getz, G S

    1981-01-01

    Lysosome formation was induced in cells of the renal medulla by feeding rats on a K+-deficient diet. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum in the production of acid phosphatase, a typical lysosomal enzyme, was examined. Lysosomal and microsomal fractions were prepared for study by differential centrifugation of homogenates of renal papilla and inner stripe of red medulla. Acid phosphatase activity in the microsomal fraction was distinguished from the activity in the lysosomal fraction in normal tissue by differences in pH optima, tartrate inhibition, distribution of multiple forms after polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and detergent-sensitivity. During progressive K+ depletion, acid phosphatase activity in both microsomal and lysosomal fractions of the tissue increased 3-fold. In the lysosomes, K+ depletion was associated with the appearance of a new band of acid phosphatase. The neuraminidase-sensitivity of this band on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the enzyme protein had been modified by the addition of sialic acid residues. K+ depletion also altered the lysosomal enzyme so that thiol compounds were able to stimulate its activity. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7326004

  4. Specificity profiling of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Zhai, Yujing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-07-03

    A combinatorial library method was developed to systematically profile the substrate specificity of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl (pS) and phosphothreonyl (pT) peptides. Application of this method and a previously reported phosphotyrosyl (pY) library screening technique to dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) VH1 of vaccinia virus revealed that VH1 is highly active toward both pS/pT and pY peptides. VH1 exhibits different and more stringent sequence specificity toward pS/pT than pY substrates. Unlike previously characterized protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), the activity and specificity of VH1 are primarily determined by the amino acid residues C-terminal to the pS, pT, or pY residue. In contrast, the mammalian VH1-related (VHR) DUSP has intrinsically low catalytic activity toward pS and pT substrates, suggesting that its primary physiological function is to dephosphorylate pY residues in substrate proteins. This method is applicable to other DUSPs and protein-serine/threonine phosphatases, and the substrate specificity data will be useful for identifying the physiological substrates of these enzymes.

  5. Effect of Poultry Manure Amendment on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure has traditionally been used as a fertilizer source. Manure phosphorus (P) exists in many forms, not all of which are immediately available. Microbial and plant-derived phosphatases can mineralize some organic P forms. Increased understanding of effects of manure application on soil p...

  6. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  7. Biocatalysis with Sol-Gel Encapsulated Acid Phosphatase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Suhasini; Tran, Vu; Ho, Maggie K.-M.; Phan, Chieu; Chin, Elizabeth; Wemmer, Zeke; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was performed in an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Students learned how to immobilize an enzyme in a sol-gel matrix and how to perform and evaluate enzyme-activity measurements. The enzyme acid phosphatase (APase) from wheat germ was encapsulated in sol-gel beads that were prepared from the precursor…

  8. Yeast Acid Phosphatases and Phytases: Production, Characterization and Commercial Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T.

    The element phosphorus is critical to all life forms as it forms the basic component of nucleic acids and ATP and has a number of indispensable biochemical roles. Unlike C or N, the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very slow, and thus making it the growth-limiting element in most soils and aquatic systems. Phosphohydrolases (e.g. acid phosphatases and phytases) are enzymes that break the C-O-P ester bonds and provide available inorganic phosphorus from various inassimilable organic forms of phosphorus like phytates. These enzymes are of significant value in effectively combating phosphorus pollution. Although phytases and acid phosphatases are produced by various plants, animals and micro organisms, microbial sources are more promising for the production on a commercial scale. Yeasts being the simplest eukaryotes are ideal candidates for phytase and phos-phatase research due to their mostly non-pathogenic and GRAS status. They have not, however, been utilized to their full potential. This chapter focuses attention on the present state of knowledge on the production, characterization and potential commercial prospects of yeast phytases and acid phosphatases.

  9. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  10. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  11. Dephosphorylation of phosphopeptides by calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B).

    PubMed

    Donella-Deana, A; Krinks, M H; Ruzzene, M; Klee, C; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-15

    38 (6-32 residues) enzymically phosphorylated synthetic peptides have been assayed as substrates for calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase (PP-2B) belonging to the family of Ser/Thr-specific enzymes but also active on phosphotyrosine residues. Many peptides reproduce, with suitable modifications, naturally occurring phosphoacceptor sites. While protein phosphatases 2A and 2C are also very active on short phosphopeptides, an extended N-terminal stretch appears to be a necessary, albeit not sufficient, condition for an optimal dephosphorylation, comparable to that of protein substrates, of both phosphoseryl and phosphotyrosyl peptides by calcineurin. This finding corroborates the view that higher-order structure is an important determinant for the substrate specificity of calcineurin. However, a number of shorter peptides are also appreciably dephosphorylated by this enzyme, their efficiency as substrates depending on local structural features. All the peptides that are appreciably dephosphorylated by calcineurin contain basic residue(s) on the N-terminal side. A basic residue located at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated residue plays a particularly relevant positive role in determining the dephosphorylation of short phosphopeptides. Acidic residue(s) adjacent to the C-terminal side of the phosphoamino acid are conversely powerful negative determinants, preventing the dephosphorylation of otherwise suitable peptide substrates. However, calcineurin displays an only moderate preference for phosphothreonyl peptides which are conversely strikingly preferred over their phosphoseryl counterparts by the other classes of Ser/Thr-specific protein phosphatases. Moreover calcineurin does not perceive as a strong negative determinant the motif Ser/Thr-Pro in peptides where this motif prevents dephosphorylation by the other classes of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Whenever tested on phosphotyrosyl peptides, calcineurin exhibits a specificity which

  12. Phosphatase acitivity as biosignatures in terrestrial extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Jun; Nakamoto, Saki; Hara, Masashi; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    Since phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life, phosphatase activity can be a can-didate for biosignatures of biological activity. It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere, high temperature hot springs and stratosphere. We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in ex-treme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and Antarctica , and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life. Core samples and chimney samples were collected at Tarama Knoll in Okinawa Trough in 2009, both in a part of the Archaean Park Project. Surface soil samples are obtained at the Sites 1-8 near Showa Base in Antarctica during the 47th Japan Antarctic exploration mission in 2005-6. Alkaline Phosphatase activ-ity in sea water and in soil was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pH 8.0) as a substrate. Phosphatase activities in extracts were measured fluoro-metrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate. Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratios were also determined by HPLC . Significant enzymatic ac-tivities were revealed in both some of the hydrothermal sub-vent systems and Antarctica soils, which is crucial evidence of vigorous microbial oasis. It is consistent with the fact that large enantiomeric excess of L-form amino acids were found in the same core sequences. Optimum temperatures of ALP in the chimney, Antarctica soil and YNU campus soil were 353 K, 313 K, and 333 K, respectively. The present results suggested that phosphatase activities,, together with amino acids, can be used as possible biosignatures for extant life.

  13. The relationship between the MMP system, adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, A; Spiers, JP

    2012-01-01

    The MMPs and their inhibitors [tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMPs) ] form the mainstay of extracellular matrix homeostasis. They are expressed in response to numerous stimuli including cytokines and GPCR activation. This review highlights the importance of adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) in regulating MMPs in the cardiovascular system, which may help explain some of the beneficial effects of targeting the adrenoceptor system in tissue remodelling and will establish emerging crosstalk between these three systems. Although α- and β-adrenoceptor activation increases MMP but decreases TIMP expression, MMPs are implicated in the growth stimulatory effects of adrenoceptor activation through transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, they have recently been found to catalyse the proteolysis of β-adrenoceptors and modulate vascular tone. While the mechanisms underpinning these effects are not well defined, reversible protein phosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases may be key. In particular, PPP (Ser/Thr phosphatases) are not only critical in resensitization and internalization of adrenoceptors but also modulate MMP expression. The interrelationship is complex as isoprenaline (ISO) inhibits okadaic acid [phosphoprotein phosphatase type 1/phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor]-mediated MMP expression. While this may be simply due to its ability to transiently increase PP2A activity, there is evidence for MMP-9 that ISO prevents okadaic acid-mediated expression of MMP-9 through a β-arrestin, NF-κB-dependent pathway, which is abolished by knock-down of PP2A. It is essential that crosstalk between MMPs, adrenoceptors and PPP are investigated further as it will provide important insight into how adrenoceptors modulate cardiovascular remodelling, and may identify new targets for pharmacological manipulation of the MMP system. PMID:22364165

  14. Protein phosphatase 2A: a highly regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Goris, J

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) comprises a family of serine/threonine phosphatases, minimally containing a well conserved catalytic subunit, the activity of which is highly regulated. Regulation is accomplished mainly by members of a family of regulatory subunits, which determine the substrate specificity, (sub)cellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzymes. Moreover, the catalytic subunit is subject to two types of post-translational modification, phosphorylation and methylation, which are also thought to be important regulatory devices. The regulatory ability of PTPA (PTPase activator), originally identified as a protein stimulating the phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity of PP2A, will also be discussed, alongside the other regulatory inputs. The use of specific PP2A inhibitors and molecular genetics in yeast, Drosophila and mice has revealed roles for PP2A in cell cycle regulation, cell morphology and development. PP2A also plays a prominent role in the regulation of specific signal transduction cascades, as witnessed by its presence in a number of macromolecular signalling modules, where it is often found in association with other phosphatases and kinases. Additionally, PP2A interacts with a substantial number of other cellular and viral proteins, which are PP2A substrates, target PP2A to different subcellular compartments or affect enzyme activity. Finally, the de-regulation of PP2A in some specific pathologies will be touched upon. PMID:11171037

  15. Formation and properties of organo-phosphatase complexes by abiotic and biotic polymerization of pyrogallol-phosphatase mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Maria A; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Scelza, Rosalia; Gianfreda, Liliana

    2010-04-28

    In this paper, the catalytic efficacy of peroxidase and manganese oxide, both commonly present in soil, to catalyze the formation of pyrogallol-phosphatase complexes was compared. The influence of several factors (e.g., the concentration of pyrogallol, the amount of catalysts, the nature of manganese oxide, birnessite, or pyrolusite, the incubation time, and the pH) on the transformation of pyrogallol and the characteristics and properties of the pyrogallol-phosphatase interaction products were investigated. The pyrogallol transformation mediated by both catalysts was very fast and increased by increasing the catalyst concentration. The nature of the catalyst also influenced the size and the molecular mass of the formed complexes. When polymerization of pyrogallol occurred with high intensity, a loss of phosphatase activity occurred, and it strongly depended on the pH at which the process was carried out and the catalyst. In particular, with peroxidase, the phosphatase activity was much lower in either suspensions or supernatants and not measurable in the insoluble complexes as compared to that measured in the presence of manganese oxides.

  16. Detection of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity in intact cells by flow cytometry using the fluorogenic ELF-97 phosphatase substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telford, W. G.; Cox, W. G.; Stiner, D.; Singer, V. L.; Doty, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate 2-(5'-chloro-2'-phosphoryloxyphenyl)-6-chloro-4-(3H)-quinazolinone (ELF((R))-97 for enzyme-labeled fluorescence) has been found useful for the histochemical detection of endogenous AP activity and AP-tagged proteins and oligonucleotide probes. In this study, we evaluated its effectiveness at detecting endogenous AP activity by flow cytometry. METHODS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate was used to detect endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 rat osteosarcoma cells and primary cultures of chick chondrocytes. Cells were labeled with the ELF-97 reagent and analyzed by flow cytometry using an argon ultraviolet (UV) laser. For comparison purposes, cells were also assayed for AP using a Fast Red Violet LB azo dye assay previously described for use in detecting AP activity by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate effectively detected endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 cells, with over 95% of the resulting fluorescent signal resulting from AP-specific activity (as determined by levamisole inhibition of AP activity). In contrast, less than 70% of the fluorescent signal from the Fast Red Violet LB (FRV) assay was AP-dependent, reflecting the high intrinsic fluorescence of the unreacted components. The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was also able to detect very low AP activity in chick chondrocytes that was undetectable by the azo dye method. CONCLUSIONS: The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was able to detect endogenous AP activity in fixed mammalian and avian cells by flow cytometry with superior sensitivity to previously described assays. This work also shows the applicability of ELF-97 to flow cytometry, supplementing its previously demonstrated histochemical applications. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Mammalian inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase II can compensate for the absence of all three yeast Sac1-like-domain-containing 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, C J; McColl, B K; Kong, A M; Ellis, S L; Wijayaratnam, A P; Sambrook, J; Mitchell, C A

    2001-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2)] plays a complex role in generating intracellular signalling molecules, and also in regulating actin-binding proteins, vesicular trafficking and vacuolar fusion. Four inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (hereafter called 5-phosphatases) have been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Inp51p, Inp52p, Inp53p and Inp54p. Each enzyme contains a 5-phosphatase domain which hydrolyses PtdIns(4,5)P(2), forming PtdIns4P, while Inp52p and Inp53p also express a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase domain within the Sac1-like domain. Disruption of any two yeast 5-phosphatases containing a Sac1-like domain results in abnormalities in actin polymerization, plasma membrane, vacuolar morphology and bud-site selection. Triple null mutant 5-phosphatase strains are non-viable. To investigate the role of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in mediating the phenotype of double and triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast, we determined whether a mammalian PtdIns(4,5)P(2) 5-phosphatase, 5-phosphatase II, which lacks polyphosphoinositide phosphatase activity, could correct the phenotype of triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast and restore cellular PtdIns(4,5)P(2) levels to near basal values. Mammalian 5-phosphatase II expressed under an inducible promoter corrected the growth, cell wall, vacuolar and actin polymerization defects of the triple 5-phosphatase null mutant yeast strains. Cellular PtdIns(4,5)P(2) levels in various 5-phosphatase double null mutant strains demonstrated significant accumulation (4.5-, 3- and 2-fold for Deltainp51Deltainp53, Deltainp51Deltainp52 and Deltainp52Deltainp53 double null mutants respectively), which was corrected significantly following 5-phosphatase II expression. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the functional and cellular consequences of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) accumulation and the evolutionary conservation of function between mammalian and yeast PtdIns(4,5)P(2) 5-phosphatases. PMID:11311145

  18. Repeated probing of Southwestern blots using alkaline phosphatase stripping.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jiang, Daifeng; Jarrett, Harry W

    2010-11-05

    Southwestern blotting is when a DNA sequence is used to probe DNA-binding proteins on an electrophoretic gel blot. It would be highly desirable to be able to probe a blot repeatedly with different DNA sequences. Alkaline phosphatase can remove 5'-phosphoryl groups from DNA and radiolabeled 5'-(32)P-DNA probes are commonly used in Southwestern blotting. Here is shown that once probed, the radioisotope signal on the blot can be effectively removed by brief digestion with alkaline phosphatase, and the blot can then be repeatedly probed at least six times with different DNA probes. This exceeds the repetitions possible with another commonly used method using SDS. The technique can be used with either one-dimensional or multi-dimensional Southwestern blots and does not have a large effect on the phosphorylation state of the blotted proteins. An alternative method using T4 polynucleotide kinase stripping is also introduced but was less well characterized.

  19. Inositol lipid phosphatases in membrane trafficking and human disease.

    PubMed

    Billcliff, Peter G; Lowe, Martin

    2014-07-15

    The specific interaction of phosphoinositides with proteins is critical for a plethora of cellular processes, including cytoskeleton remodelling, mitogenic signalling, ion channel regulation and membrane traffic. The spatiotemporal restriction of different phosphoinositide species helps to define compartments within the cell, and this is particularly important for membrane trafficking within both the secretory and endocytic pathways. Phosphoinositide homoeostasis is tightly regulated by a large number of inositol kinases and phosphatases, which respectively phosphorylate and dephosphorylate distinct phosphoinositide species. Many of these enzymes have been implicated in regulating membrane trafficking and, accordingly, their dysregulation has been linked to a number of human diseases. In the present review, we focus on the inositol phosphatases, concentrating on their roles in membrane trafficking and the human diseases with which they have been associated.

  20. Purification and Characterization of Acid Phosphatase V from Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Harsanyi, Zsolt; Dorn, Gordon L.

    1972-01-01

    Acid phosphatase V of Aspergillus nidulans was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme demonstrated a charge microheterogeneity on starch and acrylamide gel electrophoresis, but proved to be homogeneous on ultracentrifugation and gel filtration. Phosphatase V was found to be a classic acid orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase, and it cleaved p-nitrophenylphosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and uridine-5′-monophosphate at maximal rates. It was inhibited by fluoride, borate, and molybdate ions, and demonstrated end-product inhibition by inorganic phosphate. Metallic ions or cofactors were not required for activity. The molecular weight was estimated to be 100,000, the S20,w was calculated to be 4.1, and the pH optimum was found to be 6.1. Images PMID:4552990

  1. Myosin phosphatase Fine-tunes Zebrafish Motoneuron Position during Axonogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During embryogenesis the spinal cord shifts position along the anterior-posterior axis relative to adjacent tissues. How motor neurons whose cell bodies are located in the spinal cord while their axons reside in adjacent tissues compensate for such tissue shift is not well understood. Using live cell imaging in zebrafish, we show that as motor axons exit from the spinal cord and extend through extracellular matrix produced by adjacent notochord cells, these cells shift several cell diameters caudally. Despite this pronounced shift, individual motoneuron cell bodies stay aligned with their extending axons. We find that this alignment requires myosin phosphatase activity within motoneurons, and that mutations in the myosin phosphatase subunit mypt1 increase myosin phosphorylation causing a displacement between motoneuron cell bodies and their axons. Thus, we demonstrate that spinal motoneurons fine-tune their position during axonogenesis and we identify the myosin II regulatory network as a key regulator. PMID:27855159

  2. Hybrids of chemical derivatives of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Meighen, E; Yue, R

    1975-12-15

    The activities of hybrid dimers of alkaline phosphatase containing two chemically modified subunits have been investigated. One hybrid species was prepared by dissociation and reconstitution of a mixture of two variants produced by chemical modification of the native enzyme with succinic anhydride and tetranitromethane, respectively. The succinyl-nitrotyrosyl hybrid was separated from the other members of the hybrid set by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and then converted to a succinyl-aminotyrosyl hybrid by reduction of the modified tyrosine residues with sodium dithionite. A comparison of the activities of these two hybrids with the activities of the succinyl, nitrotyrosyl and aminotyrosyl derivatives has shown that either the subunits of alkaline phosphatase function independently or if the subunits turnover alternately in a reciprocating mechanism, then the intrinsic activity of each subunit must be strongly dependent on its partner subunit.

  3. Cytochemical characterization of yolk granule acid phosphatase during early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yanjie; Yan, Dongchun; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a cytochemical method and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine acid phosphatase activities of yolk granules throughout the early developmental stages of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic change of yolk granule acid phosphatase, and the mechanisms underlying its involvement in yolk degradation during the early developmental stages of molluscs. Three types of yolk granules (YGI, YGII, and YGIII) that differed in electron density and acid phosphatase reaction were identified in early cleavage, morula, blastula, gastrula, trochophore, and veliger stages. The morphological heterogeneities of the yolk granules were related to acid phosphatase activity and degrees of yolk degradation, indicating the association of acid phosphatase with yolk degradation in embryos and larvae of molluscs. Fusion of yolk granules was observed during embryogenesis and larval development of C. gigas. The fusion of YGI (free of acid phosphatase reaction) with YGII (rich in acid phosphatase reaction) could be the way by which yolk degradation is triggered.

  4. Human HAD phosphatases: structure, mechanism, and roles in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Annegrit; Schultz, Jörg; Gohla, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of hydrolases are an ancient and very large class of enzymes that have evolved to dephosphorylate a wide range of low- and high molecular weight substrates with often exquisite specificities. HAD phosphatases constitute approximately one-fifth of all human phosphatase catalytic subunits. While the overall sequence similarity between HAD phosphatases is generally very low, family members can be identified based on the presence of a characteristic Rossmann-like fold and the active site sequence DxDx(V/T). HAD phosphatases employ an aspartate residue as a nucleophile in a magnesium-dependent phosphoaspartyl transferase reaction. Although there is genetic evidence demonstrating a causal involvement of some HAD phosphatases in diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological disorders, the physiological roles of many of these enzymes are still poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the structure and evolution of human HAD phosphatases, and summarize their known functions in health and disease.

  5. Detection of bacterial phosphatase activity by means of an original and simple test.

    PubMed Central

    Satta, G; Grazi, G; Varaldo, P E; Fontana, R

    1979-01-01

    A new test for the detection of bacterial phosphatase activity has been devised. The test is performed using agar media containing both methyl green (MG) and phenolphthalein diphosphate (PDP); in these media phosphatase-producing strains grow deep-green-stained colonies whereas non-producing strains do not. A total of 739 different strains were tested, including 593 staphylococci, 95 micrococci, 11 streptococci, 10 corynebacteria, 14 enterobacteria, and 16 candidae. All strains found phosphatase-positive according to the conventional phosphatase test displayed deep-green-stained colonies on MG-PDP media, whereas all phosphatase-negative strains showed unstained colonies on the same media. The main advantages of the present phosphatase test as compared with other conventional ones are that it is more simple to perform, it can reveal the phosphatase activity of colonies grown in deep agar, and can be incorporated into commercial multitest kits. PMID:87403

  6. Membrane interaction and functional plasticity of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Braun, Werner; Schein, Catherine H

    2014-05-06

    In this issue of Structure, Trésaugues and colleagues determined the interaction of membrane-bound phosphoinositides with three clinically significant human inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (I5Ps). A comparison to the structures determined with soluble substrates revealed differences in the binding mode and suggested how the I5Ps and apurinic endonuclease (APE1) activities evolved from the same metal-binding active center.

  7. Hypervalent Organochalcogenanes as Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Piovan, Leandro; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2011-01-01

    A series of organochalcogenanes was synthesized and evaluated as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitors. The results indicate that organochalcogenanes inactivate the PTPs in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, most likely through covalent modification of the active site sulfur-moiety by the chalcogen atom. Consequently, organochalcogenanes represent a new class of mechanism-based probes to modulate the PTP-mediated cellular processes. PMID:21240419

  8. Targeting the Reversibly Oxidized Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Benoit; Yang, Ming; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled production of reactive oxygen species leads to reversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and has emerged as an important tier of regulation over phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction. We present a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay that detects reversible oxidation of members of each of the different PTP subclasses. Here, we describe the methods for enriching reversibly oxidized PTPs from complex protein extracts, illustrating the procedure in IMR90 fibroblasts. PMID:20807953

  9. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  10. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease

    PubMed Central

    Inamo, Yasuji

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Various laboratory findings are helpful in making a diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD); however, they are not specific. We found decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) activity in children with KFD. The levels of SAP fell in the acute phase and recovered during convalescence. We conclude that low SAP activity is a characteristic of KFD and may be an auxiliary diagnostic marker for the disease. PMID:28248884

  11. Influence of triethyl phosphate on phosphatase activity in shooting range soil: Isolation of a zinc-resistant bacterium with an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Story, Sandra; Brigmon, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatase-mediated hydrolysis of organic phosphate may be a viable means of stabilizing heavy metals via precipitation as a metal phosphate in bioremediation applications. We investigated the effect of triethyl phosphate (TEP) on soil microbial-phosphatase activity in a heavy-metal contaminated soil. Gaseous TEP has been used at subsurface sites for bioremediation of organic contaminants but not applied in heavy-metal contaminated areas. Little is known about how TEP affects microbial activity in soils and it is postulated that TEP can serve as a phosphate source in nutrient-poor groundwater and soil/sediments. Over a 3-week period, TEP amendment to microcosms containing heavy-metal contaminated soil resulted in increased activity of soil acid-phosphatase and repression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating a stimulatory effect on the microbial population. A soil-free enrichment of microorganisms adapted to heavy-metal and acidic conditions was derived from the TEP-amended soil microcosms using TEP as the sole phosphate source and the selected microbial consortium maintained a high acid-phosphatase activity with repression of alkaline phosphatase. Addition of 5mM zinc to soil-free microcosms had little effect on acid phosphatase but inhibited alkaline phosphatase. One bacterial member from the consortium, identified as Burkholderia cepacia sp., expressed an acid-phosphatase activity uninhibited by high concentrations of zinc and produced a soluble, indigo pigment under phosphate limitation. The pigment was produced in a phosphate-free medium and was not produced in the presence of TEP or phosphate ion, indicative of purple acid-phosphatase types that are pressed by bioavailable phosphate. These results demonstrate that TEP amendment was bioavailable and increased overall phosphatase activity in both soil and soil-free microcosms supporting the possibility of positive outcomes in bioremediation applications.

  12. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  13. The role of phosphatases in the initiation of skeletal mineralization.

    PubMed

    Millán, José Luis

    2013-10-01

    Endochondral ossification is a carefully orchestrated process mediated by promoters and inhibitors of mineralization. Phosphatases are implicated, but their identities and functions remain unclear. Mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) gene cause hypophosphatasia, a heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia, caused by an arrest in the propagation of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals onto the collagenous extracellular matrix due to accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a physiological TNAP substrate and a potent calcification inhibitor. However, TNAP knockout (Alpl(-/-)) mice are born with a mineralized skeleton and have HA crystals in their chondrocyte- and osteoblast-derived matrix vesicles (MVs). We have shown that PHOSPHO1, a soluble phosphatase with specificity for two molecules present in MVs, phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine, is responsible for initiating HA crystal formation inside MVs and that PHOSPHO1 and TNAP have nonredundant functional roles during endochondral ossification. Double ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function leads to the complete absence of skeletal mineralization and perinatal lethality, despite normal systemic phosphate and calcium levels. This strongly suggests that the Pi needed for initiation of MV-mediated mineralization is produced locally in the perivesicular space. As both TNAP and nucleoside pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) behave as potent ATPases and pyrophosphatases in the MV compartment, our current model of the mechanisms of skeletal mineralization implicate intravesicular PHOSPHO1 function and Pi influx into MVs in the initiation of mineralization and the functions of TNAP and NPP1 in the extravesicular progression of mineralization.

  14. Crosstalk between kinases, phosphatases and miRNAs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Júlia L F; Tornatore, Thaís F; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin J; de Jesus, Marcelo B; Cartaxo, Rodrigo T; Milani, Renato; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V

    2014-12-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of proteins, performed by kinases and phosphatases, is the major post translational protein modification in eukaryotic cells. This intracellular event represents a critical regulatory mechanism of several signaling pathways and can be related to a vast array of diseases, including cancer. Cancer research has produced increasing evidence that kinase and phosphatase activity can be compromised by mutations and also by miRNA silencing, performed by small non-coding and endogenously produced RNA molecules that lead to translational repression. miRNAs are believed to target about one-third of human mRNAs while a single miRNA may target about 200 transcripts simultaneously. Regulation of the phosphorylation balance by miRNAs has been a topic of intense research over the last years, spanning topics going as far as cancer aggressiveness and chemotherapy resistance. By addressing recent studies that have shown miRNA expression patterns as phenotypic signatures of cancers and how miRNA influence cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell cycle control, angiogenesis, inflammation and DNA repair, we discuss how kinases, phosphatases and miRNAs cooperatively act in cancer biology.

  15. Calcitonin releases acid phosphatase from rat ventral prostate explants.

    PubMed

    Latif, A; Nakhla, A M

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of salmon calcitonin in the culture medium of rat ventral prostate explants diminished l-tartarate-sensitive acid phosphatase activity in the tissues with a concomitant increment of the enzyme activity in the medium. The effect of the hormone was dose-dependent for a dose range of 10(-12)-10(-6) M. Acid phosphatase activity in prostate explants decreased from 38.6 +/- 3.5 to 20.5 +/- 2.8, whereas it increased from 0.60 +/- 0.15 to 2.80 +/- 0.40 nmol p-nitrophenol liberated/mg protein/30 min in the culture medium. Tissues exposed to 10(-6) M salmon calcitonin had higher acetylcholinesterase activity (8.8 +/- 0.7) than non-exposed ones (6.2 +/- 0.5 mumol substrate hydrolyzed/g tissue/min). These results suggest that locally produced calcitonin causes a release for prostatic acid phosphatase from prostate tissues possibly through its interaction with the cholinergic system.

  16. Physiological aspects of alkaline phosphatase in selected cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doonan, B B; Jensen, T E

    1980-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase of Plectonema boryanum shows a considerable increase in activity following placement of the cells in a phosphate free medium. Five days of phosphate starvation result in a 14-fold increase of alkaline phosphatase activity. Growth in the presence of inhibitors of transcription and translation indicate that the synthesis of the enzyme is de novo. Orthophosphate causes an immediate inhibition of enzyme activity. Enzyme was extracted from P. boryanum with lysozyme or polymyxin B treatment in order to make comparative studies of cell bound and cell free enzyme. Of several enzyme specific inhibitors tested, mercuric chloride was the most effective. Temperature studies showed that the cell bound enzyme was most active at 40 degrees C while the cell free enzyme was most active at 70 degrees C. The pH optimum was 9 for the cell free enzyme, and 8.8 for the cell bound. The enzyme was tested to determine if it could hydrolyse a number of different organic compounds. It hydrolysed p-nitrophenol phosphate 100%, fructose-6-phosphate 45%, beta-glycerol phosphate 25% and other compounds to a lesser degree. Of seventeen other Cyanobacteria tested for alkaline phosphatase, all were positive, and of these eleven were inducible for the enzyme. Ten of the isolates released some of the enzyme into the culture medium. Michaelis constants for the enzyme were also determined.

  17. Phosphoregulators: Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphatases of Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Ravasi, Timothy; Taylor, Darrin; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Grimmond, Sean

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of the human and mouse genome sequences, the task now turns to identifying their encoded transcripts and assigning gene function. In this study, we have undertaken a computational approach to identify and classify all of the protein kinases and phosphatases present in the mouse gene complement. A nonredundant set of these sequences was produced by mining Ensembl gene predictions and publicly available cDNA sequences with a panel of InterPro domains. This approach identified 561 candidate protein kinases and 162 candidate protein phosphatases. This cohort was then analyzed using TribeMCL protein sequence similarity clustering followed by CLUSTALV alignment and hierarchical tree generation. This approach allowed us to (1) distinguish between true members of the protein kinase and phosphatase families and enzymes of related biochemistry, (2) determine the structure of the families, and (3) suggest functions for previously uncharacterized members. The classifications obtained by this approach were in good agreement with previous schemes and allowed us to demonstrate domain associations with a number of clusters. Finally, we comment on the complementary nature of cDNA and genome-based gene detection and the impact of the FANTOM2 transcriptome project. PMID:12819143

  18. In vitro enzymatic assays of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Lubben, T; Clampit, J; Stashko, M; Trevillyan, J; Jirousek, M R

    2001-08-01

    Many hormone or growth factor receptors signal via the activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Alteration of the phosphorylation state of tyrosine residues in certain proteins can directly regulate enzyme activity or cause formation of protein complexes necessary for transducing intracellular signals. Genetic and biochemical evidence also implicates protein-tyrosine phosphatases in several disease processes, including negative regulation of insulin receptor signaling at the level of the insulin receptor and perhaps in signaling at the IRS-1 level. The expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is elevated in muscle and adipose tissue in insulin-resistant states both in man and rodents suggesting that PTP1B may play a role in the insulin-resistant state associated with diabetes and obesity. As described in this unit, PTP1B activity can be determined with the small molecule substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), in which the cleavage of the phosphate results in production of p-nitrophenol (pNP) and an increase in absorbance at 405 nm. Alternatively, PTP1B activity can be measured as described using model phosphotyrosyl-containing peptide substrates in which the release of free phosphate from the peptide is determined using a malachite green colorimetric assay.

  19. PTPL1: a large phosphatase with a split personality.

    PubMed

    Abaan, Ogan D; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2008-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPL1, (also known as PTPN13, FAP-1, PTP-BAS, PTP1E) is a non-receptor type PTP and, at 270 kDa, is the largest phosphatase within this group. In addition to the well-conserved PTP domain, PTPL1 contains at least 7 putative macromolecular interaction domains. This structural complexity indicates that PTPL1 may modulate diverse cellular functions, perhaps exerting both positive and negative effects. In accordance with this idea, while certain studies suggest that PTPL1 can act as a tumor-promoting gene other experimental studies have suggested that PTPL1 may function as a tumor suppressor. The role of PTPL1 in the cancer cell is therefore likely to be both complex and context dependent with possible roles including the modulation of growth, stress-response, and cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. Understanding the nature of molecular complexes containing PTPL1, its interaction partners, substrates, regulation and subcellular localization are key to unraveling the complex personality of this protein phosphatase.

  20. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  1. Centromeric binding and activity of Protein Phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lipinszki, Zoltan; Lefevre, Stephane; Savoian, Matthew S.; Singleton, Martin R.; Glover, David M.; Przewloka, Marcin R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell division cycle requires tight coupling between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. However, understanding the cell cycle roles of multimeric protein phosphatases has been limited by the lack of knowledge of how their diverse regulatory subunits target highly conserved catalytic subunits to their sites of action. Phosphoprotein phosphatase 4 (PP4) has been recently shown to participate in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We now find that the EVH1 domain of the regulatory subunit 3 of Drosophila PP4, Falafel (Flfl), directly interacts with the centromeric protein C (CENP-C). Unlike other EVH1 domains that interact with proline-rich ligands, the crystal structure of the Flfl amino-terminal EVH1 domain bound to a CENP-C peptide reveals a new target-recognition mode for the phosphatase subunit. We also show that binding of Flfl to CENP-C is required to bring PP4 activity to centromeres to maintain CENP-C and attached core kinetochore proteins at chromosomes during mitosis. PMID:25562660

  2. Combination of alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP)- and avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase complex (ABAP)-techniques for amplification of immunocytochemical staining of human testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, M S; Schulze, W; Holstein, A F

    1991-01-01

    An amplification procedure was developed for the visualization of antigens in human testis using monoclonal antibodies against desmin and vimentin. The technique combines the high sensitive and specific APAAP- and ABAP-methods. Depending on the quality of the antibodies used and the processing of the material prior to the immunocytochemical staining the amplification technique may be applied either as a single APAAP and ABAP- or as a double APAAP and ABAP-combination. Especially after the double amplification reaction a distinct increase of the staining intensity of the vimentin- (in Sertoli cells, myofibroblasts of the lamina propria, and fibroblasts of the interstitium) and desmin- (in myofibroblasts of the lamina propria and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels) like immunoreactivity was observed. If different diazonium salts were used for the visualization of the alkaline phosphatase activity (e.g. Fast Red TR Salt, Fast Blue BB Salt) desmin- and vimentin-like immunoreactivity can be demonstrated in the same tissue section in a double sequential staining approach. For double staining, the alkaline phosphatase technique may be combined successfully with a technique or a combination that uses peroxidase as a marker.

  3. Purification and characterization of a low-molecular-weight acid phosphatase--a phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase from bovine heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; Van Etten, R L

    1990-10-01

    A low-molecular-weight acid phosphatase that is representative of a group recently shown to be phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases was purified to homogeneity from bovine heart. The enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 18 kDa and had an isoelectric point of 7.0. The absorption coefficient, E1% 1cm was 9.65 at 280 nm. The enzyme had pH optima of 5.3 and 6.0 with the substrates p-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine phosphate, respectively. When measured at pH 5 and 37 degrees C, the enzyme had specific activities of 114 and 86 mumol min-1 mg-1 for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine O-phosphate, respectively, while the Km values were 0.38 and 14 mM. The enzyme was highly specific for aryl monophosphate esters and showed little or no activity toward aliphatic phosphate esters, with the remarkable exception of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and certain of its structural analogs. As shown by 31P NMR data, the activity toward FMN was due to the hydrolysis of one of the eight components present in the (commercial) sample. Both molybdate and vanadate were potent inhibitors, with inhibition constants of 37 and 29 microM, respectively; tartrate and fluoride had little effect on enzymatic activity. A two-stage reversible denaturation of the enzyme by guanidine HCl was observed with midpoints of 0.25 and 1.75 M, respectively. The amino acid composition was homologous to the low-molecular-weight acid phosphatases from other tissue. The enzyme showed immunological cross-reactivity against low-molecular-weight human liver acid phosphatase. There were 7 or 8 accessible cysteines on the monomeric protein and at least one was essential for enzyme activity. The enzyme also had phosphotransferase activity, for example transferring phosphate from p-nitrophenyl phosphate to a wide variety of alcohol acceptors.

  4. Phosphatase activity of the voltage-sensing phosphatase, VSP, shows graded dependence on the extent of activation of the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic phosphatase region, and the movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to the phosphatase activity. However, its coupling mechanisms still remain unclear. One possible scenario is that the phosphatase is activated only when the voltage sensor is in a fully activated state. Alternatively, the enzymatic activity of single VSP proteins could be graded in distinct activated states of the voltage sensor, and partial activation of the voltage sensor could lead to partial activation of the phosphatase. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we studied a voltage sensor mutant of zebrafish VSP, where the voltage sensor moves in two steps as evidenced by analyses of charge movements of the voltage sensor and voltage clamp fluorometry. Measurements of the phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate revealed that both steps of voltage sensor activation are coupled to the tuning of phosphatase activities, consistent with the idea that the phosphatase activity is graded by the magnitude of the movement of the voltage sensor.

  5. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, Kieran S; Huber, Thomas; Cassady, A Ian; Weber, Jane; Robinson, Jodie; Burrows, Allan; Kelly, Gregory; Guddat, Luke W; Hume, David A; Schenk, Gerhard; Flanagan, Jack U

    2008-01-01

    Background Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs), also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. Findings A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. Conlusion The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism. PMID:18771593

  6. Protein Phosphatase Methyl-Esterase PME-1 Protects Protein Phosphatase 2A from Ubiquitin/Proteasome Degradation.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Ryotaro; Miura, Akane; Usui, Tatsuya; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a conserved essential enzyme that is implicated as a tumor suppressor based on its central role in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Protein phosphatase methyl esterase (PME-1) catalyzes specifically the demethylation of the C-terminal Leu309 residue of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). It has been shown that PME-1 affects the activity of PP2A by demethylating PP2Ac, but also by directly binding to the phosphatase active site, suggesting loss of PME-1 in cells would enhance PP2A activity. However, here we show that PME-1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit lower PP2A activity than wild type MEFs. Loss of PME-1 enhanced poly-ubiquitination of PP2Ac and shortened the half-life of PP2Ac protein resulting in reduced PP2Ac levels. Chemical inhibition of PME-1 and rescue experiments with wild type and mutated PME-1 revealed methyl-esterase activity was necessary to maintain PP2Ac protein levels. Our data demonstrate that PME-1 methyl-esterase activity protects PP2Ac from ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

  7. Tyrosine phosphatases as key regulators of StAR induction and cholesterol transport: SHP2 as a potential tyrosine phosphatase involved in steroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Mariana; Mele, Pablo; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Orlando, Ulises; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-04-10

    The phospho-dephosphorylation of intermediate proteins is a key event in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. In this regard, it is well accepted that steroidogenic hormones act through the activation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. Although many cellular processes can be regulated by a crosstalk between different kinases and phosphatases, the relationship of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and tyrosine (Tyr)-dephosphorylation is a recently explored field in the regulation of steroid synthesis. Indeed in steroidogenic cells, one of the targets of hormone-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation is a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Whereas protein tyrosine phosphatases were initially regarded as household enzymes with constitutive activity, dephosphorylating all the substrates they encountered, evidence is now accumulating that protein tyrosine phosphatases are tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Here, we will describe the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis, relating them to steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, arachidonic acid metabolism and mitochondrial rearrangement.

  8. Gallium nitrate inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating mesenchymal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Boskey, A L; Ziecheck, W; Guidon, P; Doty, S B

    1993-02-01

    The effect of gallium nitrate on alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating chick limb-bud mesenchymal cell culture was monitored in order to gain insight into the observation that rachitic rats treated with gallium nitrate failed to show the expected increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Cultures maintained in media containing 15 microM gallium nitrate showed drastically decreased alkaline phosphatase activities in the absence of significant alterations in total protein synthesis and DNA content. However, addition of 15 microM gallium nitrate to cultures 18 h before assay for alkaline phosphatase activity had little effect. At the light microscopic and electron microscopic level, gallium-treated cultures differed morphologically from gallium-free cultures: with gallium present, there were fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes and cartilage nodules were flatter and further apart. Because of altered morphology, staining with an antibody against chick cartilage alkaline phosphatase appeared less extensive; however, all nodules stained equivalently relative to gallium-free controls. Histochemical staining for alkaline phosphatase activity was negative in gallium-treated cultures, demonstrating that the alkaline phosphatase protein present was not active. The defective alkaline phosphatase activity in cultures maintained in the presence of gallium was also evidenced when cultures were supplemented with the alkaline phosphatase substrate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta GP). The data presented suggest that gallium inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in this culture system and that gallium causes alterations in the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  9. Characterization of a tyrosine phosphatase activity in the oogenesis of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, D M P; Machado, E A

    2006-09-01

    In this work, phosphatase activity was characterized in the ovary and the haemolymph of Periplaneta americana. The optimum pH for these activities was 4.0, and a temperature of 44 degrees C was ideal for the maximal enzyme activity. The phosphatase activities were inhibited by NaF, sodium tartrate, Pi, sodium orthovanadate, and ammonium molybdate. The ovarian phosphatase activity at pH 4.0 was almost exclusive against phosphotyrosine, with little or no effect on the residues of phosphoserine or phosphothreonine. These results indicate that this phosphatase activity is due to the presence of an acid tyrosine phosphatase. The phosphatase activities of acid extracts from P. americana ovaries (OEX) and an acid extract from P. americana haemolymph (HEX) were analyzed in non-denaturant gel electrophoresis using an analog substrate beta-naphtyl phosphate. The gel revealed two bands with phosphatase activity in the ovary and one band in the haemolymph; these bands were excised and submitted to a 10% SDS-PAGE showing a single 70-kDa polypeptide in both samples. Histochemistry of the ovary with alpha-naphtyl phosphate for localization of acid phosphatase activity showed mainly labeling associated to the oocyte peripheral vesicles, basal lamina, and between follicle cells. Electron microscopy analysis showed that acid phosphatase was localized in small peripheral vesicles in the oocyte, but not inside yolk granules. The possible role of this phosphatase during oogenesis and embryogenesis is also discussed in this article.

  10. Structural basis for the glucan phosphatase activity of Starch Excess4

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Taylor, Adam O.; Pace, Rachel M.; Meekins, David A.; Guo, Hou-Fu; Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2010-11-12

    Living organisms utilize carbohydrates as essential energy storage molecules. Starch is the predominant carbohydrate storage molecule in plants while glycogen is utilized in animals. Starch is a water-insoluble polymer that requires the concerted activity of kinases and phosphatases to solubilize the outer surface of the glucan and mediate starch catabolism. All known plant genomes encode the glucan phosphatase Starch Excess4 (SEX4). SEX4 can dephosphorylate both the starch granule surface and soluble phosphoglucans and is necessary for processive starch metabolism. The physical basis for the function of SEX4 as a glucan phosphatase is currently unclear. Herein, we report the crystal structure of SEX4, containing phosphatase, carbohydrate-binding, and C-terminal domains. The three domains of SEX4 fold into a compact structure with extensive interdomain interactions. The C-terminal domain of SEX4 integrally folds into the core of the phosphatase domain and is essential for its stability. The phosphatase and carbohydrate-binding domains directly interact and position the phosphatase active site toward the carbohydrate-binding site in a single continuous pocket. Mutagenesis of the phosphatase domain residue F167, which forms the base of this pocket and bridges the two domains, selectively affects the ability of SEX4 to function as a glucan phosphatase. Together, these results reveal the unique tertiary architecture of SEX4 that provides the physical basis for its function as a glucan phosphatase.

  11. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The

  12. Assay of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase using synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-09-12

    Synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor was phosphorylated on tyrosine by the insulin receptor and found to be a potent substrate for dephosphorylation by rat liver particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases. Apparent Km values were approximately 5 microM. Vm values (nmol phosphate removed/min per mg protein) were 0.62 (particulate) and 0.2 (soluble). This corresponds to 80% of total activity being membrane-associated, indicating that membrane-bound phosphatases are important receptor phosphatases. The phosphatase activities were distinct from acid and alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion peptide 1142-1153 provides a useful tool for the further study and characterization of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases.

  13. FIG4 regulates lysosome membrane homeostasis independent of phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Cunningham, Kathleen M; Zhang, Ke; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2016-02-15

    FIG4 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in several diseases including Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 4J (CMT4J) and Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS). To investigate the mechanism of disease pathogenesis, we generated Drosophila models of FIG4-related diseases. Fig4 null mutant animals are viable but exhibit marked enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in muscle cells and neurons, accompanied by an age-related decline in flight ability. Transgenic animals expressing Drosophila Fig4 missense mutations corresponding to human pathogenic mutations can partially rescue lysosomal expansion phenotypes, consistent with these mutations causing decreased FIG4 function. Interestingly, Fig4 mutations predicted to inactivate FIG4 phosphatase activity rescue lysosome expansion phenotypes, and mutations in the phosphoinositide (3) phosphate kinase Fab1 that performs the reverse enzymatic reaction also causes a lysosome expansion phenotype. Since FIG4 and FAB1 are present together in the same biochemical complex, these data are consistent with a model in which FIG4 serves a phosphatase-independent biosynthetic function that is essential for lysosomal membrane homeostasis. Lysosomal phenotypes are suppressed by genetic inhibition of Rab7 or the HOPS complex, demonstrating that FIG4 functions after endosome-to-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, disruption of the retromer complex, implicated in recycling from the lysosome to Golgi, does not lead to similar phenotypes as Fig4, suggesting that the lysosomal defects are not due to compromised retromer-mediated recycling of endolysosomal membranes. These data show that FIG4 plays a critical noncatalytic function in maintaining lysosomal membrane homeostasis, and that this function is disrupted by mutations that cause CMT4J and YVS.

  14. Osseous plate alkaline phosphatase is anchored by GPI.

    PubMed

    Pizauro, J M; Ciancaglini, P; Leone, F A

    1994-02-01

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was released up to 100% from the membrane by using 0.1 U of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. thuringiensis. The M(r) of solubilized enzyme was 145,000 by Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and 66,000 by SDS-PAGE, suggesting a dimeric structure. Solubilization of the membrane-bound enzyme with phospholipase C did not destroy its ability to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) (264.3 mumol min-1 mg-1),ATP (42.0 mumol min-1 mg-1) and pyrophosphate (28.4 mumol min-1 mg-1). The hydrolysis of ATP and PNPP by solubilized enzyme exhibited "Michaelian" kinetics with K0.5 = 70 and 979 microM, respectively. For pyrophosphate, K0.5 was 128 microM and site-site interactions were observed (n = 1.4). Magnesium ions were stimulatory (Kd = 1.5 mM) but zinc ions were powerful non-competitive inhibitors (Kd = 6.2 microM) of solubilized enzyme. Treatment of solubilized alkaline phosphatase with Chellex 100 reduced the original PNPPase activity to 5%. Cobalt (K0.5 = 10.1 microM), magnesium (K0.5 = 29.5 microM) and manganese ions (K0.5 = 5 microM) restored the activity of the apoenzyme with positive cooperativity, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-solubilized alkaline phosphatase is a metalloenzyme. The stimulation of the apoenzyme by calcium ions (K0.5 = 653 microM) was lower than that observed for the other ions (26%) and exhibited site-site interactions (n = 0.7). Zinc ions had no effect on the apoenzyme of the solubilized enzyme.

  15. FIG4 regulates lysosome membrane homeostasis independent of phosphatase function

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Cunningham, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Ke; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    FIG4 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in several diseases including Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 4J (CMT4J) and Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS). To investigate the mechanism of disease pathogenesis, we generated Drosophila models of FIG4-related diseases. Fig4 null mutant animals are viable but exhibit marked enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in muscle cells and neurons, accompanied by an age-related decline in flight ability. Transgenic animals expressing Drosophila Fig4 missense mutations corresponding to human pathogenic mutations can partially rescue lysosomal expansion phenotypes, consistent with these mutations causing decreased FIG4 function. Interestingly, Fig4 mutations predicted to inactivate FIG4 phosphatase activity rescue lysosome expansion phenotypes, and mutations in the phosphoinositide (3) phosphate kinase Fab1 that performs the reverse enzymatic reaction also causes a lysosome expansion phenotype. Since FIG4 and FAB1 are present together in the same biochemical complex, these data are consistent with a model in which FIG4 serves a phosphatase-independent biosynthetic function that is essential for lysosomal membrane homeostasis. Lysosomal phenotypes are suppressed by genetic inhibition of Rab7 or the HOPS complex, demonstrating that FIG4 functions after endosome-to-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, disruption of the retromer complex, implicated in recycling from the lysosome to Golgi, does not lead to similar phenotypes as Fig4, suggesting that the lysosomal defects are not due to compromised retromer-mediated recycling of endolysosomal membranes. These data show that FIG4 plays a critical noncatalytic function in maintaining lysosomal membrane homeostasis, and that this function is disrupted by mutations that cause CMT4J and YVS. PMID:26662798

  16. Characterization of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tapia, Ana Lilia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Espíritu-Gordillo, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of phosphatases that has not been broadly studied in protozoan parasites. In humans, PRLs are involved in metastatic cancer, the promotion of cell migration and invasion. PTPs have been increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. We characterized the only putative protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (PTP EhPRL) in the eukaryotic human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we reported that the EhPRL protein possessed the classical HCX5R catalytic motif of PTPs and the CAAX box characteristic of the PRL family and exhibited 31-32% homology with the three human PRL isoforms. In amebae, the protein was expressed at low but detectable levels. The recombinant protein (rEhPRL) had enzymatic activity with the 3-o-methyl fluorescein phosphate (OMFP) substrate; this enzymatic activity was inhibited by the PTP inhibitor o-vanadate. Using immunofluorescence we showed that native EhPRL was localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When the trophozoites interacted with collagen, EhPRL relocalized over time to vesicle-like structures. Interaction with fibronectin increased the presence of the enzyme in the cytoplasm. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that EhPRL mRNA expression was upregulated when the trophozoites interacted with collagen but not with fibronectin. Trophozoites recovered from amoebic liver abscesses showed higher EhPRL mRNA expression levels than normal trophozoites. These results strongly suggest that EhPRL may play an important role in the biology and adaptive response of the parasite to the host environment during amoebic liver abscess development, thereby participating in the pathogenic mechanism.

  17. Phosphoprotein phosphatase of bovine spleen cell nuclei: physicochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rezyapkin, V.I.; Leonova, L.E.; Komkova, A.I.

    1986-01-10

    The physicochemical properties of phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 1.3.1.16) from bovine spleen cell nuclei were studied. The enzyme possesses broad substrate specificity and catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphocasein, ATP, ADP, and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). K/sub m/ for ATP, ADP, and pNPP are equal to 0.44, 0.43, and 1.25 mM, respectively. M/sub r/ of the enzyme, according to the data of gel filtraction of Sephadex G-75 and electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel of various concentrations is approx. 33,000. In electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, two protein bands with M/sub r/ 12,000 and 18,000 are detected. In the enzyme molecule, acid amino acid residues predominate; two free SH groups and two disulfide bridges are detected. Phosphoprotein phosphatase is a glycoprotein, containing approx. 22% carbonhydrates. The protein possesses a supplementary absorption maximum at 560 nm. Ammonium molybdate is a competitive inhibitor with K/sub i/ 0.37 ..mu..M, while sodium fluoride is a noncompetitive inhibitor with K/sub i/ 1.3 mM. Incubation in the presence of 2 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride for 25 h leads to a loss of approx. 46% of the enzymatic activity. Ammonium molybdate, sodium fluoride, and PMSF are reversible inhibitors. Modifications of the SH groups, NH/sub 2/ groups, and histidine leads to a decrease in the enzymatic activity. Incubation of phosphoprotein phosphatase with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP leads to the incorporation of 0.33 mole /sup 33/P per mole of the enzyme. The mechanism of hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond, catalyzed by the enzyme, is discussed.

  18. PEST family phosphatases in immunity, autoimmunity, and autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Veillette, André; Rhee, Inmoo; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Davidson, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    The proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich (PEST) family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes proline-enriched phosphatase (PEP)/lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), PTP-PEST, and PTP-hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF). PEP/LYP is a potent inhibitor of T-cell activation, principally by suppressing the activity of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). This function seems to be dependent, at least in part, on the ability of PEP to bind C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a PTK also involved in inactivating Src kinases. Interestingly, a polymorphism of LYP in humans (R620W) is a significant risk factor for autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. The R620W mutation may be a 'gain-of-function' mutation. In non-hematopoietic cells, PTP-PEST is a critical regulator of adhesion and migration. This effect correlates with the aptitude of PTP-PEST to dephosphorylate cytoskeletal proteins such as Cas, focal adhesion associated-kinase (FAK), Pyk2, and PSTPIP. While not established, a similar function may also exist in immune cells. Additionally, overexpression studies provided an indication that PTP-PEST may be a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation. Interestingly, mutations in a PTP-PEST- and PTP-HSCF-interacting protein, PSTPIP1, were identified in humans with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome and familial recurrent arthritis, two autoinflammatory diseases. These mutations abrogate the ability of PSTPIP1 to bind PTP-PEST and PTP-HSCF, suggesting that these two PTPs may be negative regulators of inflammation.

  19. A description of alkaline phosphatases from marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiyuan; Jia, Hongbing; Yu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (APs) are non-specific phosphohydrolases, and they are widely used in clinical diagnostics and biological studies. APs are widespread in nature and exhibit different structural formulations. Based on the diversity of biogenetic sources, APs exhibit temperature-propensity traits, and they are classified as psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic. In this article, the characteristics of psychrophilic APs from marine organisms were described, accompanied by a simple description of APs from other organisms. This review will facilitate better utilization of marine APs in the biotechnology field.

  20. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  1. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    immunoblot and malachite green based assay, respectively. We observe that LNCaP- shPPP2CA cells have low PP2ACα expression (Figure 1A) and activity...regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417-39. (6) Jennbacken K, Gustavsson H...cancer cells - - - shPPP2CA. Expression and activity of catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2ACα) was determined by immunoblot and melachite green - based

  2. Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases for Anticancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya. M.; Lawrence, Harshani. R.; Sebti, Saïd. M.; Lawrence, Nicholas. J.; Wu, Jie.

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a diverse family of enzymes encoded by 107 genes in the human genome. Together with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), PTPs regulate various cellular activities essential for the initiation and maintenance of malignant phenotypes. While PTK inhibitors are now used routinely for cancer treatment, the PTP inhibitor development field is still in the discovery phase. In this article, the suitability of targeting PTPs for novel anticancer drug discovery is discussed. Examples are presented for PTPs that have been targeted for anticancer drug discovery as well as potential new PTP targets for novel anticancer drug discovery. PMID:20337577

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    been shown to be involved in androgen-independent growth of human prostate cancer cells (Carson et al., 1999; Grethe and Porn -Ares, 2006; Murillo et... Porn -Ares MI. (2006). p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad via PP2A- dependent suppression of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 survival pathway in TNF-alpha...threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and sig- nalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417–39. 15. Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates

  4. Simplified preparation of a phosphatase inhibitor and further studies of its action.

    PubMed

    Coburn, S P; Schaltenbrand, W E

    1978-05-01

    1-Pyrrolidinecarbothioic acid (2-pyridylmethylene) hydrazide chelates Zn2+ but not Mg2+. This compound is about twice as effective as EDTA for inhibiting alkaline phosphatase from calf mucosa, and approx. 1000-fold more effective than EDTA for inhibiting acid phosphatase from wheat germ. The compound did not inhibit pyridoxine kinase activity in human leucocytes at the highest concentration tested (33 micron). Therefore it may be a useful tool for either examining or eliminating the effects of phosphatases in complex enzyme systems.

  5. Key role of succinate dehydrogenase in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Pomytkin, I A; Kolesova, O E

    2002-06-01

    We studied the role of mitochondria in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the liver. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an insulin-sensitive source of H(2)O(2)that acts as a physiological inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Succinate dehydrogenase plays a key role in insulin-stimulated generation of H(2)O(2)and inactivation of liver protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  6. Effect of aluminum phosphate on alkaline phosphatase activity of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, N; Prasanna, B Gowtham

    2006-09-01

    The impact of insoluble phosphorus such as aluminum and rock phosphate on alkaline phosphatase activity of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria was assessed. Polyurethane foam immobilized Nodularia recorded the highest alkaline phosphatase activity of 9.04 (m. mol p-nitrophenol released h(-1) mg(-1) protein) in vitro. A higher concentration of aluminum phosphate was recorded a 25% reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity, ammonia content, and available phosphorus in culture filtrate of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria. In general, immobilized cyanobacteria exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity in rock phosphate than aluminum phosphate.

  7. Alkaline Phosphatase Assay for Freshwater Sediments: Application to Perturbed Sediment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Gary S.; Puziss, Marla; Silver, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis-phosphatase assay was modified for use in freshwater sediment. Laboratory studies indicated that the recovery of purified alkaline phosphatase activity was 100% efficient in sterile freshwater sediments when optimized incubation and sonication conditions were used. Field studies of diverse freshwater sediments demonstrated the potential use of this assay for determining stream perturbation. Significant correlations between phosphatase and total viable cell counts, as well as adenosine triphosphate biomass, suggested that alkaline phosphatase activity has utility as an indicator of microbial population density and biomass in freshwater sediments. PMID:16345464

  8. Phosphatase of Chlamydomonas reinhardi: biochemical and cytochemical approach with specific mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, R F; Loppes, R; Deltour, R

    1976-01-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi produces two constitutive acid phosphatases and three depressible phosphatases (a neutral and two alkaline ones) that can utilize napthyl phosphate as a substrate. Specific mutants depressible phosphatase were used to investigate biochemical properties and the cytochemical localization of these enzymes. The two constitutive phosphatases show similar pH optima (about 5.0) and Km values (2 x 10(-3) to 3.3 x 10(-3) M) but differ in their heat sensitivity and affinity for glycerophosphate. Images PMID:4437

  9. Trypanosoma rangeli: differential expression of ecto-phosphatase activities in response to inorganic phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Dick, Claudia Fernanda; Dos-Santos, André Luiz Araújo; Fonseca-de-Souza, André L; Rocha-Ferreira, Juliana; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we showed that living cells of Trypanosoma rangeli express different ecto-phosphatase activities in response to different inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in the culture medium. The ecto-phosphatase activity from T. rangeli grown at low-Pi concentration was inhibited by the increase of the pH, while the ecto-phosphatase of the cells grown at high Pi concentration was not modulated by the change of the pH of the medium. Okadaic acid inhibited only the ecto-phosphatase activity from cells grown at low-Pi concentration but not the ecto-phosphatase activity from cells grown at high-Pi concentration. Accordingly, phosphatase activity from T. rangeli grown at low Pi concentration was able to hydrolyze P-serine and P-threonine at high rate but not P-tyrosine. The phosphatase activity from T. rangeli grown at high-Pi concentration was able to hydrolyze P-serine, P-threonine and P-tyrosine with the same rate. The addition of anterior midgut homogenate of Rhodnius prolixus on the epimastigotes suspension inhibited the enzyme activity of T. rangeli grown at low-Pi concentration. On the other hand, anterior midgut homogenate had no effect in the ecto-phosphatase of T. rangeli maintained at high-Pi concentration. Altogether, the results described here indicate that ecto-phosphatase activities hydrolyzing phosphorylated compounds present in the extracellular medium of T. rangeli are regulated by the external Pi concentration.

  10. Characterization of the 2',3' cyclic phosphodiesterase activities of Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase-phosphatase and bacteriophage lambda phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase-phosphatase (CthPnkp) catalyzes 5' and 3' end-healing reactions that prepare broken RNA termini for sealing by RNA ligase. The central phosphatase domain of CthPnkp belongs to the dinuclear metallophosphoesterase superfamily exemplified by bacteriophage lambda phosphatase (lambda-Pase). CthPnkp is a Ni(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent phosphodiesterase-monoesterase, active on nucleotide and non-nucleotide substrates, that can be transformed toward narrower metal and substrate specificities via mutations of the active site. Here we characterize the Mn(2+)-dependent 2',3' cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity of CthPnkp, the reaction most relevant to RNA repair pathways. We find that CthPnkp prefers a 2',3' cyclic phosphate to a 3',5' cyclic phosphate. A single H189D mutation imposes strict specificity for a 2',3' cyclic phosphate, which is cleaved to form a single 2'-NMP product. Analysis of the cyclic phosphodiesterase activities of mutated CthPnkp enzymes illuminates the active site and the structural features that affect substrate affinity and k(cat). We also characterize a previously unrecognized phosphodiesterase activity of lambda-Pase, which catalyzes hydrolysis of bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate. lambda-Pase also has cyclic phosphodiesterase activity with nucleoside 2',3' cyclic phosphates, which it hydrolyzes to yield a mixture of 2'-NMP and 3'-NMP products. We discuss our results in light of available structural and functional data for other phosphodiesterase members of the binuclear metallophosphoesterase family and draw inferences about how differences in active site composition influence catalytic repertoire.

  11. Activity of alkaline phosphatase adsorbed and grafted on "polydopamine" films.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation of dopamine in slightly basic solutions and in the presence of oxygen as an oxidant allows for the deposition of dopamine-eumelanin ("polydopamine") films on almost all kinds of materials allowing for an easy secondary functionalization. Molecules carrying nucleophilic groups like thiols and amines can be easily grafted on those films. Herein we show that alkaline phosphatase (ALP), as a model enzyme, adsorbs to "polydopamine" films and part of the adsorbed enzyme is rapidly desorbed in contact with Tris buffer. However a significant part of the enzyme remains irreversibly adsorbed and keeps some enzymatic activity for at least 2 weeks whereas ALP adsorbed on quartz slides is rapidly and quantitatively deactivated. In addition we estimated the Michaelis constant Km of the enzyme irreversibly bound to the "polydopamine" film. The Michaelis constant, and hence the affinity constant between paranitrophenol phosphate and ALP are almost identical between the enzyme bound on the film and the free enzyme in solution. Complementarily, it was found that "polydopamine" films display some phosphatase like catalytic activity.

  12. Characterization of Schistosome Tegumental Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP)

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rita; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect over 200 million people globally. The parasites can live for years in a putatively hostile environment - the blood of vertebrates. We have hypothesized that the unusual schistosome tegument (outer-covering) plays a role in protecting parasites in the blood; by impeding host immunological signaling pathways we suggest that tegumental molecules help create an immunologically privileged environment for schistosomes. In this work, we clone and characterize a schistosome alkaline phosphatase (SmAP), a predicted ∼60 kDa glycoprotein that has high sequence conservation with members of the alkaline phosphatase protein family. The SmAP gene is most highly expressed in intravascular parasite life stages. Using immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy, we confirm that SmAP is expressed at the host/parasite interface and in internal tissues. The ability of living parasites to cleave exogenous adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and generate adenosine is very largely abolished when SmAP gene expression is suppressed following RNAi treatment targeting the gene. These results lend support to the hypothesis that schistosome surface enzymes such as SmAP could dampen host immune responses against the parasites by generating immunosuppressants such as adenosine to promote their survival. This notion does not rule out other potential functions for the adenosine generated e.g. in parasite nutrition. PMID:21483710

  13. Inhibition of a protein tyrosine phosphatase using mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S; Girish, T S; Mandal, S S; Gopal, B; Bhattacharyya, A J

    2010-03-11

    The feasibility of utilizing mesoporous matrices of alumina and silica for the inhibition of enzymatic activity is presented here. These studies were performed on a protein tyrosine phosphatase by the name chick retinal tyrosine phosphotase-2 (CRYP-2), a protein that is identical in sequence to the human glomerular epithelial protein-1 and involved in hepatic carcinoma. The inhibition of CRYP-2 is of tremendous therapeutic importance. Inhibition of catalytic activity was examined using the sustained delivery of p-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS) from bare and amine functionalized mesoporous silica (MCM-48) and mesoporous alumina (Al(2)O(3)). Among the various mesoporous matrices employed, amine functionalized MCM-48 exhibited the best release of pNCS and also inhibition of CRYP-2. The maximum speed of reaction v(max) (=160 +/- 10 micromol/mnt/mg) and inhibition constant K(i) (=85.0 +/- 5.0 micromol) estimated using a competitive inhibition model were found to be very similar to inhibition activities of protein tyrosine phosphatases using other methods.

  14. Regulation of FcεRI signaling by lipid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuhny, Marcel; Zorn, Carolin N; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue-resident sentinels of hematopoietic origin that play a prominent role in allergic diseases. They express the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI), which when cross-linked by multivalent antigens triggers the release of preformed mediators, generation of arachidonic acid metabolites, and the synthesis of cytokines and chemokines. Stimulation of the FcεRI with increasing antigen concentrations follows a characteristic bell-shaped dose-responses curve. At high antigen concentrations, the so-called supra-optimal conditions, repression of FcεRI-induced responses is facilitated by activation and incorporation of negative signaling regulators. In this context, the SH2-containing inositol-5'-phosphatase, SHIP1, has been demonstrated to be of particular importance. SHIP1 with its catalytic and multiple protein interaction sites provides several layers of control for FcεRI signaling. Regulation of SHIP1 function occurs on various levels, e.g., protein expression, receptor and membrane recruitment, competition for protein-protein interaction sites, and activating modifications enhancing the phosphatase function. Apart from FcεRI-mediated signaling, SHIP1 can be activated by diverse unrelated receptor systems indicating its involvement in the regulation of antigen-dependent cellular responses by autocrine feedback mechanisms or tissue-specific and/or (patho-) physiologically determined factors. Thus, pharmacologic engagement of SHIP1 may represent a beneficial strategy for patients suffering from acute or chronic inflammation or allergies.

  15. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evolution of the metazoan protein phosphatase 2C superfamily.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adi; Privman, Eyal; Rasis, Michal; Lavi, Sara; Pupko, Tal

    2007-01-01

    Members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) superfamily are Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent serine/threonine phosphatases, which are essential for regulation of cell cycle and stress signaling pathways in cells. In this study, a comprehensive genomic analysis of all available metazoan PP2C sequences was conducted. The phylogeny of PP2C was reconstructed, revealing the existence of 15 vertebrate families which arose following a series of gene duplication events. Relative dating of these duplications showed that they occurred in two active periods: before the divergence of bilaterians and before vertebrate diversification. PP2C families which duplicated during the first period take part in different signaling pathways, whereas PP2C families which diverged in the second period display tissue expression differences yet participate in similar signaling pathways. These differences were found to involve variation of expression in tissues which show higher complexity in vertebrates, such as skeletal muscle and the nervous system. Further analysis was performed with the aim of identifying the functional domains of PP2C. The conservation pattern across the entire PP2C superfamily revealed an extensive domain of more than 50 amino acids which is highly conserved throughout all PP2C members. Several insertion or deletion events were found which may have led to the specialization of each PP2C family.

  17. New functional aspects of the atypical protein tyrosine phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Hengge, Alvan C

    2013-11-12

    LDP3 (VHZ) is the smallest classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) known to date and was originally misclassified as an atypical dual-specificity phosphatase. Kinetic isotope effects with steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of VHZ and mutants with p-nitrophenol phosphate have revealed several unusual properties. VHZ is significantly more active than previously reported but remains one of the least active PTPs. Highly unusual for a PTP, VHZ possesses two acidic residues (E134 and D65) in the active site. D65 occupies the position corresponding to the typical general acid in the PTP family. However, VHZ primarily utilizes E134 as the general acid, with D65 taking over this role when E134 is mutated. This unusual behavior is facilitated by two coexisting, but unequally populated, substrate binding modes. Unlike most classical PTPs, VHZ exhibits phosphotransferase activity. Despite the presence of the Q-loop that normally prevents alcoholysis of the phosphoenzyme intermediate in other classical PTPs, VHZ readily phosphorylates ethylene glycol. Although mutations of Q-loop residues affect this phosphotransferase activity, mutations on the IPD loop that contains the general acid exert more control over this process. A single P68V substitution on this loop completely abolishes phosphotransferase activity. The ability of native VHZ to catalyze transphosphorylation may lead to an imbalance of intracellular phosphorylation, which could explain the correlation of its overexpression with several types of cancer.

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Targeting the Oncogenic SHP2 Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Src homology 2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) is an oncogenic phosphatase associated with various kinds of leukemia and solid tumors. Thus, there is substantial interest in developing SHP2 inhibitors as potential anticancer and antileukemia agents. Using a structure-guided and fragment-based library approach, we identified a novel hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based SHP2 inhibitor 11a-1, with an IC50 value of 200 nM and greater than 5-fold selectivity against 20 mammalian PTPs. Structural and modeling studies reveal that the hydroxyindole carboxylic acid anchors the inhibitor to the SHP2 active site, while interactions of the oxalamide linker and the phenylthiophene tail with residues in the β5–β6 loop contribute to 11a-1’s binding potency and selectivity. Evidence suggests that 11a-1 specifically attenuates the SHP2-dependent signaling inside the cell. Moreover, 11a-1 blocks growth factor mediated Erk1/2 and Akt activation and exhibits excellent antiproliferative activity in lung cancer and breast cancer as well as leukemia cell lines. PMID:25003231

  19. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  20. Mammalian intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as highly active exopolyphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Schröder, H C

    2001-06-11

    Recent results revealed that inorganic polyphosphates (polyP), being energy-rich linear polymers of orthophosphate residues known from bacteria and yeast, also exist in higher eukaryotes. However, the enzymatic basis of their metabolism especially in mammalian cells is still uncertain. Here we demonstrate for the first time that alkaline phosphatase from calf intestine (CIAP) is able to cleave polyP molecules up to a chain length of about 800. The enzyme acts as an exopolyphosphatase degrading polyP in a processive manner. The pH optimum is in the alkaline range. Divalent cations are not required for catalytic activity but inhibit the degradation of polyP. The rate of hydrolysis of short-chain polyP by CIAP is comparable to that of the standard alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The specific activity of the enzyme decreases with increasing chain length of the polymer both in the alkaline and in the neutral pH range. The K(m) of the enzyme also decreases with increasing chain length. The mammalian tissue non-specific isoform of AP was not able to hydrolyze polyP under the conditions applied while the placental-type AP and the bacterial (Escherichia coli) AP displayed polyP-degrading activity.

  1. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 5 Is Essential for T Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schauder, David M.; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Bordas, Michelle; Cui, Weiguo; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates many key cellular processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and survival. The final proteins in this pathway, ERK1/2, are regulated by dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5). DUSP5 is a nuclear, inducible phosphatase with high affinity and fidelity for ERK1/2. By regulating the final step in the MAPK signaling cascade, DUSP5 exerts strong regulatory control over a central cellular pathway. Like other DUSPs, DUSP5 plays an important role in immune function. In this study, we have utilized new knockout mouse reagents to explore its function further. We demonstrate that global loss of DUSP5 does not result in any gross phenotypic changes. However, loss of DUSP5 affects memory/effector CD8+ T cell populations in response to acute viral infection. Specifically, Dusp5-/- mice have decreased proportions of short-lived effector cells (SLECs) and increased proportions of memory precursor effector cells (MPECs) in response to infection. Further, we show that this phenotype is T cell intrinsic; a bone marrow chimera model restricting loss of DUSP5 to the CD8+ T cell compartment displays a similar phenotype. Dusp5-/- T cells also display increased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and altered metabolic profiles, suggesting that DUSP5 is a pro-survival protein in T cells. PMID:27936095

  2. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  3. Detailed Structural Characterization of Unbound Protein Phosphatase 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dancheck, Barbara; Nairn, Angus C.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is an essential and ubiquitous serine/threonine protein phosphatase that is regulated by more than 100 known inhibitor and targeting proteins. It is currently unclear how protein inhibitors distinctly and specifically regulate PP1 to enable rapid responses to cellular alterations. We demonstrate that two PP1 inhibitors, I-2 and DARPP-32, belong to the class of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs). We show that both inhibitors have distinct preferences for transient local and long range structure. These preferences are likely their structural signature for their interaction with PP1. Furthermore, we show that upon phosphorylation of Thr34 in DARPP-32, which turns DARPP-32 into a potent inhibitor of PP1, neither local nor long range structure of DARPP-32 is altered. Therefore, our data suggests a role for these transient 3-dimensional topologies in binding mechanisms that enable extensive contacts with PP1's invariant surfaces. Together, these interactions enable potent and selective inhibition of PP1. PMID:18954090

  4. Molecular enzymology underlying regulation of protein phosphatase-1 by natural toxins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C F B; Maynes, J T; Perreault, K R; Dawson, J F; James, M N G

    2002-11-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases constitute a unique class of enzymes that are critical for cell regulation, as they must counteract the activities of thousands of protein kinases in human cells. Uncontrolled inhibition of phosphatase activity by toxic inhibitors can lead to widespread catastrophic effects. Over the past decade, a number of natural product toxins have been identified that specifically and potently inhibit protein phosphatase-1 and 2A. Amongst these are the cyanobacteria-derived cyclic heptapeptide microcystin-LR and the polyether fatty acid okadaic acid from dinoflagellate sources. The molecular mechanism underlying potent inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 by these toxins is becoming clear through insights gathered from diverse sources. These include: 1. Comparison of structure-activity relationships amongst the different classes of toxins. 2. Delineation of the structural differences between protein phosphatase-1 and 2A that account for their differing sensitivity to toxins, particularly okadaic acid and microcystin-LR. 3. Determination of the crystal structure of protein phosphatase-1 with microcystin-LR, okadaic acid and calyculin bound. 4. Site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of protein phosphatase-1 mutants. Taken together, these data point to a common binding site on protein phosphatase-1 for okadaic acid, microcystin-LR and the calyculins. However, careful analysis of these data suggest that each toxin binds to the common binding site in a subtly different way, relying on distinct structural interactions such as hydrophobic binding, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions to different degrees. The insights derived from studying the molecular enzymology of protein phosphatase-1 may help explain the different sensitivities of other structurally conserved protein serine/theonine phosphatases to toxin inhibition. Furthermore, studies on the binding of structurally diverse toxins at the active site of protein

  5. Mechanistic aspects of the low-molecular-weight phosphatase activity of the calmodulin-activated phosphatase, calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Martin, B L; Graves, D J

    1986-11-05

    Product and substrate analogs have been employed as inhibitors of the low-molecular-weight phosphatase activity of calcineurin, a calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase. Product inhibition kinetics demonstrate that both products, para-nitrophenol and inorganic phosphate, inhibit para-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis in a competitive manner. Inorganic phosphate is a linear competitive inhibitor, whereas the inhibition by para-nitrophenol is more complex. An analog of para-nitrophenol, pentafluorophenol, was found to be a linear competitive inhibitor. These patterns indicate a rapid equilibrium random kinetic mechanism for calcineurin. This mechanism suggests that calcineurin does not generate a phosphoryl enzyme during its catalytic reaction. Application of sulfate analogs indicates that binding of substrate occurs via the phosphoryl moiety. It is suggested that binding is a function of the affinity of ligand for the metal ion involved in calcineurin action. The dependence of the kinetic parameters of calcineurin upon pH was examined to provide information concerning the role of protonation in the activity and specificity of calcineurin. Log (VM) versus pH data for two low-molecular-weight substrates, para-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine-O-phosphate, reveal a pKa value for the enzyme-substrate complex. Analysis of log (VM/KM) data yields a pKa value for the free enzyme of 8.0. Protonation of the phenolic leaving group during hydrolysis is not the rate-limiting step in calcineurin catalysis.

  6. Structural and mechanistic characterization of L-histidinol phosphate phosphatase from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghodge, Swapnil V; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2013-02-12

    L-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)(7)-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~10(3) M(-1) s(-1). Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of an enzyme with a 2 order of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily.

  7. Kinetic mechanism of the Zn-dependent aryl-phosphatase activity of myo-inositol-1-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Casolaro, Mario; Ranaldi, Francesco; Manao, Giampaolo; Camici, Guido; Giachetti, Eugenio

    2007-02-01

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.25) is able to hydrolyze myo-inositol-1-phosphate in the presence of Mg(2+) ions at neutral pH, and also p-nitrophenyl phosphate in the presence of Zn(2+)-ions at acidic pH. This enzyme plays a role in phosphatidylinositol cell signalling and is a putative target of lithium therapy in manic depression. We elucidate here the kinetic mechanism of the Zn-dependent activity of myo-inositol-1-phosphatase. As part of this analysis it was necessary to determine the basicity constants of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and the stability constant of its metal-complex in the presence of zinc chloride. We find that the Zn-dependent reaction may be described either by a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism or an ordered steady-state mechanism in which the substrate binds to the free enzyme prior to the metal ion. In both models the Zn-substrate complex acts as a high affinity inhibitor, yielding a dead-end species through its binding to the enzyme-Zn-substrate in rapid-equilibrium or to the enzyme-phosphate complexes in a steady-state model. Phosphate is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to the substrate and an uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to zinc ions.

  8. 3' Phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] by voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP).

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Sakata, Souhei; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Horie, Shigeo; Homma, Koichi J; Sasaki, Takehiko; Okamura, Yasushi

    2012-06-19

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) consist of a voltage-sensor domain and a cytoplasmic region with remarkable sequence similarity to phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor phosphatase. VSPs dephosphorylate the 5' position of the inositol ring of both phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P(3)] and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] upon voltage depolarization. However, it is unclear whether VSPs also have 3' phosphatase activity. To gain insights into this question, we performed in vitro assays of phosphatase activities of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP) and transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology (TPTE) and PTEN homologous inositol lipid phosphatase (TPIP; one human ortholog of VSP) with radiolabeled PI(3,4,5)P(3). TLC assay showed that the 3' phosphate of PI(3,4,5)P(3) was not dephosphorylated, whereas that of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P(2)] was removed by VSPs. Monitoring of PI(3,4)P(2) levels with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain from tandem PH domain-containing protein (TAPP1) fused with GFP (PH(TAPP1)-GFP) by confocal microscopy in amphibian oocytes showed an increase of fluorescence intensity during depolarization to 0 mV, consistent with 5' phosphatase activity of VSP toward PI(3,4,5)P(3). However, depolarization to 60 mV showed a transient increase of GFP fluorescence followed by a decrease, indicating that, after PI(3,4,5)P(3) is dephosphorylated at the 5' position, PI(3,4)P(2) is then dephosphorylated at the 3' position. These results suggest that substrate specificity of the VSP changes with membrane potential.

  9. Spatial Patterns of Alkaline Phosphatase Expression within Bacterial Colonies and Biofilms in Response to Phosphate Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Tsan; Xu, Karen D.; McFeters, Gordon A.; Stewart, Philip S.

    1998-01-01

    The expression of alkaline phosphatase in response to phosphate starvation was shown to be spatially and temporally heterogeneous in bacterial biofilms and colonies. A commercial alkaline phosphatase substrate that generates a fluorescent, insoluble product was used in conjunction with frozen sectioning techniques to visualize spatial patterns of enzyme expression in both Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Some of the expression patterns observed revealed alkaline phosphatase activity at the boundary of the biofilm opposite the place where the staining substrate was delivered, indicating that the enzyme substrate penetrated the biofilm fully. Alkaline phosphatase accumulated linearly with time in K. pneumoniae colonies transferred from high-phosphate medium to low-phosphate medium up to specific activities of 50 μmol per min per mg of protein after 24 h. In K. pneumoniae biofilms and colonies, alkaline phosphatase was initially expressed in the region of the biofilm immediately adjacent to the carbon and energy source (glucose). In time, the region of alkaline phosphatase expression expanded inward until it spanned most, but not all, of the biofilm or colony depth. In contrast, expression of alkaline phosphatase in P. aeruginosa biofilms occurred in a thin, sharply delineated band at the biofilm-bulk fluid interface. In this case, the band of activity never occupied more than approximately one-sixth of the biofilm. These results are consistent with the working hypothesis that alkaline phosphatase expression patterns are primarily controlled by the local availability of either the carbon and energy source or the electron acceptor. PMID:9546188

  10. Preparative resolution of D,L-threonine catalyzed by immobilized phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Scollar, M P; Sigal, G; Klibanov, A M

    1985-03-01

    Hydrolysis of L- and D-O-phosphothreonines catalyzed by four different phosphatases, alkaline phosphatases from calf intestine and E. coli and acid phosphatases from wheat germ and potato, has been kinetically studied. Alkaline phosphatases were found to have comparable reactivities towards the optical isomers. On the other hand, both acid phosphatases displayed a marked stereoselectivity, hydrolyzing the L-ester much faster than its D counterpart. Wheat germ acid phosphatase was the most stereoselective enzyme: V(L)/V(D) = 24 and K(m,L)/K(m,D) = 0.17. This enzyme was immobilized (in k-carrageenan gel, followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde) and used for the preparative resolution of D,L-threonine: the latter was first chemically O-phosphorylated and then asymmetrically hydrolyzed by the immobilized phosphatase. As a result, gram quantities of L-threonine of high optical purity and O-phospho-D-threonine were prepared. Immobilized wheat germ phosphatase has been tested for the resolution of other racemic alcohols: serine, 2-amino-1-butanol, 1-amino-2-propanol, 2-octanol, and menthol. In all those cases, the enzyme was either not sufficiently stereoselective or too slow for preparative resolutions.

  11. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Crop Rotation Impacts on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a species with a low efficiency of acquiring soil P. Rotation crops may potentially influence P uptake by potato by increasing soil organic acids, phosphatase activity, and microbial biomass. However, this kind of information is very limited. We measured the activities of acid phosphatase,...

  12. Sac2/INPP5F is an inositol 4-phosphatase that functions in the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Fubito; Messa, Mirko; Nández, Ramiro; Czapla, Heather; Zou, Yixiao; Strittmatter, Stephen M; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-04-13

    The recruitment of inositol phosphatases to endocytic membranes mediates dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2, a phosphoinositide concentrated in the plasma membrane, and prevents its accumulation on endosomes. The importance of the conversion of PI(4,5)P2 to PtdIns during endocytosis is demonstrated by the presence of both a 5-phosphatase and a 4-phosphatase (Sac domain) module in the synaptojanins, endocytic PI(4,5)P2 phosphatases conserved from yeast to humans and the only PI(4,5)P2 phosphatases in yeast. OCRL, another 5-phosphatase that couples endocytosis to PI(4,5)P2 dephosphorylation, lacks a Sac domain. Here we show that Sac2/INPP5F is a PI4P phosphatase that colocalizes with OCRL on endocytic membranes, including vesicles formed by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinosomes, and Rab5 endosomes. An OCRL-Sac2/INPP5F interaction could be demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and was potentiated by Rab5, whose activity is required to recruit Sac2/INPP5F to endosomes. Sac2/INPP5F and OCRL may cooperate in the sequential dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2 at the 5 and 4 position of inositol in a partnership that mimics that of the two phosphatase modules of synaptojanin.

  13. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Płachno, B J; Adamec, L; Lichtscheidl, I K; Peroutka, M; Adlassnig, W; Vrba, J

    2006-11-01

    A new ELF (enzyme labelled fluorescence) assay was applied to detect phosphatase activity in glandular structures of 47 carnivorous plant species, especially Lentibulariaceae, in order to understand their digestive activities. We address the following questions: (1) Are phosphatases produced by the plants and/or by inhabitants of the traps? (2) Which type of hairs/glands is involved in the production of phosphatases? (3) Is this phosphatase production a common feature among carnivorous plants or is it restricted to evolutionarily advanced species? Our results showed activity of the phosphatases in glandular structures of the majority of the plants tested, both from the greenhouse and from sterile culture. In addition, extracellular phosphatases can also be produced by trap inhabitants. In Utricularia, activity of phosphatase was detected in internal glands of 27 species from both primitive and advanced sections and different ecological groups. Further positive reactions were found in Genlisea, Pinguicula, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Drosera, Drosophyllum, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus. In Utricularia and Genlisea, enzymatic secretion was independent of stimulation by prey. Byblis and Roridula are usually considered as "proto-carnivores", lacking digestive enzymes. However, we found high activity of phosphatases in both species. Thus, they should be classified as true carnivores. We suggest that the inflorescence of Byblis and some Pinguicula species might also be an additional "carnivorous organ", which can trap a prey, digest it, and finally absorb available nutrients.

  14. The Role of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Regulation of the Biosynthesis of Secreted Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Morona, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Tyrosine phosphorylation and associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are gaining prominence as critical mechanisms in the regulation of fundamental processes in a wide variety of bacteria. In particular, these phosphatases have been associated with the control of the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides, critically important virulence factors for bacteria. Recent Advances: Deletion and overexpression of the phosphatases result in altered polysaccharide biosynthesis in a range of bacteria. The recent structures of associated auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinases have suggested that the phosphatases may be critical for the cycling of the kinases between monomers and higher order oligomers. Critical Issues: Additional substrates of the phosphatases apart from cognate kinases are currently being identified. These are likely to be critical to our understanding of the mechanism by which polysaccharide biosynthesis is regulated. Future Directions: Ultimately, these protein tyrosine phosphatases are an attractive target for the development of novel antimicrobials. This is particularly the case for the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family, which is predominantly found in bacteria. Furthermore, the determination of bacterial tyrosine phosphoproteomes will likely help to uncover the fundamental roles, mechanism, and critical importance of these phosphatases in a wide range of bacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2274–2289. PMID:24295407

  15. Conserved sequence motifs among bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphatases that define a new phosphohydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Thaller, M. C.; Schippa, S.; Rossolini, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Members of a new molecular family of bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs), indicated as class C, were found to share significant sequence similarities to bacterial class B NSAPs and to some plant acid phosphatases, representing the first example of a family of bacterial NSAPs that has a relatively close eukaryotic counterpart. Despite the lack of an overall similarity, conserved sequence motifs were also identified among the above enzyme families (class B and class C bacterial NSAPs, and related plant phosphatases) and several other families of phosphohydrolases, including bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatases, histidinol-phosphatase domains of the bacterial bifunctional enzymes imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratases, and bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphoserine phosphatases and threalose-6-phosphatases. These conserved motifs are clustered within two domains, separated by a variable spacer region, according to the pattern [FILMAVT]-D-[ILFRMVY]-D-[GSNDE]-[TV]-[ILVAM]-[AT S VILMC]-X-¿YFWHKR)-X-¿YFWHNQ¿-X( 102,191)-¿KRHNQ¿-G-D-¿FYWHILVMC¿-¿QNH¿-¿FWYGP¿-D -¿PSNQYW¿. The dephosphorylating activity common to all these proteins supports the definition of this phosphatase motif and the inclusion of these enzymes into a superfamily of phosphohydrolases that we propose to indicate as "DDDD" after the presence of the four invariant aspartate residues. Database searches retrieved various hypothetical proteins of unknown function containing this or similar motifs, for which a phosphohydrolase activity could be hypothesized. PMID:9684901

  16. Alkaline phosphatase-polyresorcinol complex: characterization and application to seed coating.

    PubMed

    Pilar, María C; Ortega, Natividad; Perez-Mateos, Manuel; Busto, María D

    2009-03-11

    An alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) from Escherichia coli ATCC27257 was immobilized by copolymerization with resorcinol. The phosphatase-polyresorcinol complex synthesized retained about 74% of the original enzymatic activity. The pH and temperature profile of the immobilized and free enzyme revealed a similar behavior. Kinetic parameters were determined: K(m) and K(i) values were 2.44 and 0.423 mM, respectively, for the phosphatase-polyresorcinol complex and 1.07 and 0.069 mM, respectively, for free phosphatase. The thermal and storage stabilities of the immobilized phosphatase were higher than those of the native one. On addition to soil, free enzyme was completely inactivated in 4 days, whereas the phosphatase-polyresorcinol complex was comparatively stable. Barley seed coated with the immobilized enzyme exhibited higher rhizosphere phosphatase activity. Under pot culture conditions, an increase in the soil inorganic phosphorus was detected when the seed was encapsulated with the phosphatase-polyresorcinol complex, and a positive influence on biomass and inorganic phosphorus concentration of shoot was observed.

  17. Stimulation of phosphatidylglycerolphosphate phosphatase activity by unsaturated fatty acids in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Cao, S G; Hatch, G M

    1994-07-01

    Phosphatidylglycerolphosphate (PGP) synthase and PGP phosphatase catalyze the sequential synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol from cytidine-5'-diphosphate 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (CDP-DG) and glycerol-3-phosphate. PGP synthase and PGP phosphatase activities were characterized in rat heart mitochondrial fractions, and the effect of fatty acids on the activity of these enzymes was determined. PGP synthase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme that exhibited apparent Km values for CDP-PG and glycerol-3-phosphate of 46 and 20 microM, respectively. The addition of exogenous oleic acid to the assay mixture did not affect PGP synthase activity. PGP phosphatase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme, and addition of oleic acid to the assay mixture caused a concentration-dependent stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity. Maximum stimulation (1.9-fold) of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of 0.5 mM oleic acid, but the stimulation was slightly attenuated by the presence of albumin in the assay. The presence of oleic acid in the assay mixture caused the inactivation of PGP phosphatase activity to be retarded at 55 degrees C. Stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity was also observed with arachidonic acid, whereas taurocholic, stearic and palmitic acids did not significantly affect PGP phosphatase activity. The activity of mitochondrial phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase was not affected by inclusion of oleic acid in the incubation mixture. We postulate that unsaturated fatty acids stimulate PGP phosphatase activity in rat heart.

  18. Cloning and characterization of the NapA acid phosphatase/phosphotransferase of Morganella morganii: identification of a new family of bacterial acid-phosphatase-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Thaller, M C; Lombardi, G; Berlutti, F; Schippa, S; Rossolini, G M

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding a minor phosphate-irrepressible acid phosphatase (named NapA) of Morganella morganii was cloned and sequenced, and its product characterized. NapA is a secreted acid phosphatase composed of four 27 kDa polypeptide subunits. The enzyme is active on several organic phosphate monoesters but not on diesters, and is also endowed with transphosphorylating activity from organic phosphoric acid esters to nucleosides and other compounds with free hydroxyl groups. Its activity is inhibited by EDTA, inorganic phosphate, nucleosides and Ca2+, but not by fluoride or tartrate, and is enhanced by Mg2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. At the sequence level, the NapA enzyme did not show similarities to any other sequenced bacterial phosphatases. However, a search for homologous genes in sequence databases allowed identification of two open reading frames located within sequenced regions of the Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis genomes respectively, encoding proteins of unknown function which are highly homologous to the Morganella enzyme. Moreover, the properties of the NapA enzyme are very similar to those reported for the periplasmic nonspecific acid phosphatase II of Salmonella typhimurium (for which no sequence data are available). These data point to the existence of a new family of bacterial acid phosphatases, which we propose designating class B bacterial acid phosphatases.

  19. Vanadate monomers and dimers both inhibit the human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Crans, D C; Simone, C M; Saha, A K; Glew, R H

    1989-11-30

    A combination of enzyme kinetics and 51V NMR spectroscopy was used to identify the species of vanadate that inhibits acid phosphatases. Monomeric vanadate was shown to inhibit wheat germ and potato acid phosphatases. At pH 5.5, the vanadate dimer inhibits the human prostatic acid phosphatase whereas at pH 7.0 it is the vanadate monomer that inhibits this enzyme. The pH-dependent shift in the affinity of the prostatic phosphatase for vanadate is presumably due to deprotonation of an amino acid side chain in or near the binding site resulting in a conformational change in the protein. pH may be a subtle effector of the insulin-like vanadate activity in biological systems and may explain some of the differences in selectivity observed with the protein phosphatases.

  20. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-secreted phosphatases: from pathogenesis to targets for TB drug development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis; Chao, Joseph D; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2013-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects human alveolar macrophages and relies on the inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. This is, in part, dependent on the disruption of host signaling networks within the macrophage. In recent years, Mtb-secreted protein- and lipid-phosphatases protein-tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA), PtpB, and secreted acid phosphatase M (SapM) have been shown to contribute to Mtb pathogenicity. Here, we review the current knowledge on PtpA, PtpB, and SapM focusing on their ability to interfere with host functions. We further explore how these phosphatase-dependent host-pathogen interactions can be targeted for novel tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery and examine the ongoing development of inhibitors against these phosphatases.

  2. ERK1/2 is dephosphorylated by a novel phosphatase--CacyBP/SIP.

    PubMed

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Filipek, Anna

    2011-01-07

    Recently, we have reported that the CacyBP/SIP protein binds ERK1/2 (Kilanczyk et al., BBRC, 2009). In this work we show that CacyBP/SIP exhibits a phosphatase activity toward ERK1/2 kinases while its E217K mutant does not. The K(m) and V(max) values established for a standard phosphatase substrate, p-NPP, are 16.9±3.6 mM and 4.3±0.4 μmol/min, respectively. The CacyBP/SIP phosphatase activity is decreased by okadaic acid (IC(50)=45 nM). Our experimental results are supported by a theoretical analysis which revealed important sequence similarities between CacyBP/SIP and the phosphatase-like proteins as well as certain MAP kinase phosphatases.

  3. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  4. Alkaline phosphatase levels in patients with coronary heart disease saliva and its relation with periodontal status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunita, Dina Suci; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Tadjoedin, Fatimah M.; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease that causes narrowing of the coronary arteries. Currently, there is a hypothesis regarding periodontal infection that increases risk for heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a marker of inflammation will increase in atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. The objective of this research is analyzing the relationship between the levels of alkaline phosphatase in saliva with periodontal status in patients with CHD and non CHD. Here, saliva of 104 subjects were taken, each 1 ml, and levels of Alkaline Phosphatase was analyzed using Abbott ci4100 architect. We found that no significant difference of Alkaline Phosphatase levels in saliva between CHD patients and non CHD. Therefore, it can be concluded that Alkaline Phosphatase levels in patients with CHD saliva was higher than non CHD and no association between ALP levels with periodontal status.

  5. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  6. Polynucleotide Kinase-Phosphatase (PNKP) Mutations and Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrache, Lavinia C.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of human neurologic diseases are caused by inherited defects in DNA repair. In many cases, these syndromes almost exclusively impact the nervous system, underscoring the critical requirement for genome stability in this tissue. A striking example of this is defective enzymatic activity of polynucleotide kinase-phosphatase (PNKP), leading to microcephaly or neurodegeneration. Notably, the broad neural impact of mutations in PNKP can result in markedly different disease entities, even when the inherited mutation is the same. For example microcephaly with seizures (MCSZ) results from various hypomorphic PNKP mutations, as does ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 4 (AOA4). Thus, other contributing factors influence the neural phenotype when PNKP is disabled. Here we consider the role for PNKP in maintaining brain function and how perturbation in its activity can account for the varied pathology of neurodegeneration or microcephaly present in MCSZ and AOA4 respectively. PMID:27125728

  7. Purification and characterization of Ulva pertusa Kjellm alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Jingyun; Bao, Yongming; An, Lijia

    2003-05-01

    The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP, EC 3.1.3.1.) was found in seaweeds, including five kinds of green alga, eighteen kinds of red alga, and six kinds of brown alga, collected from the seaside of Dalian in China. The enzyme was purified 1230-fold from Ulva pertusa Kjellm. It had a specific activity of 48.6 U/mg protein and was proven to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE with a subunit molecular mass of 19.5 kDa. The activity of ALP peaked at pH9.8, and was completely inhibited by DTT and partly by NBS. The Michaelis-Menten constant Km and the maximum reaction velocity Vmax, at pH 9.8 and 37 degrees C were 0.950 mM and 5.00 microM/min, respectively.

  8. Dephosphorylation of bovine casein by milk alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lorient, D; Linden, G

    1976-02-01

    The pH of optimum activity of alkaline phosphatase from cow's milk depended on the substrate, being 10-1 for rho-nitrophenylphosphate, 8-6 for phosphoserine, 8-0 for phosvitin and 6-8 for casein. Individual casein components were dephosphorylated more rapidly than mixtures of alphas- and beta-caseins or of alphas-, beta-and kappa-caseins and micellar casein. Mixtures of 2 components involving kappa-casein were more readily dephosphorylated than alphas- and beta-casein mixtures. At pH 6-8, lactose, whey proteins and phosphate ions had an inhibitory effect. beta-Lactoglobulin had an inhibitory effect only when the pH of the reaction was lower than the optimum pH value of the enzyme. Mg2+ and Zn2+ were not inhibitory. The optimum conditions for dephosphorylation of casein are described.

  9. The influence of complexing pharmaceutical compositions on alkaline phosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2011-06-01

    It is established that the pharmaceutical compositions xydiphon, medifon, succimer, and EDTA, which are used as complexing agents for accelerating the excretion of heavy metals from human organism, at certain concentrations inhibit enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP). It is concluded that xydiphon and EDTA have a noticeable effect on AP activity at concentrations over 0.01 mM; medifon and succimer, at concentrations of over 0.3-0.5 mM. The enzyme's inhibition constants and type of inhibition are determined. Xydiphon is found to manifest the highest affinity to AP ( K I = 0.35 mM). It is shown by kinetic analysis that dissociative chemoinactivation of the enzyme takes place under the action of complexing agents. The corresponding kinetic parameters are calculated.

  10. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  11. Covalent Docking Predicts Substrates for Haloalkanoate Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme function prediction remains an important open problem. Though structure-based modeling, such as metabolite docking, can identify substrates of some enzymes, it is ill-suited to reactions that progress through a covalent intermediate. Here we investigated the ability of covalent docking to identify substrates that pass through such a covalent intermediate, focusing particularly on the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily. In retrospective assessments, covalent docking recapitulated substrate binding modes of known cocrystal structures and identified experimental substrates from a set of putative phosphorylated metabolites. In comparison, noncovalent docking of high-energy intermediates yielded nonproductive poses. In prospective predictions against seven enzymes, a substrate was identified for five. For one of those cases, a covalent docking prediction, confirmed by empirical screening, and combined with genomic context analysis, suggested the identity of the enzyme that catalyzes the orphan phosphatase reaction in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway of Bacteroides. PMID:25513739

  12. Characterization of cationic acid phosphatase isozyme from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Murakami, K; Hosoda, T; Yamamoto, Y; Watanabe, K; Morinaka, Y; Ohara, A

    1992-05-01

    Acid phosphatase isozyme was highly purified from rat liver mitochondrial fraction. The enzyme showed an isoelectric point value of above 9.5 on isoelectric focusing, and the apparent molecular weight was estimated to be 32000 by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration or 16000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, thiamine pyrophosphate, inorganic pyrophosphate, and phosphoprotein such as casein and phosvitin, but not of several phosphomonoesters, except for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and o-phosphotyrosine. The enzyme was not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate, and was significantly activated by Fe2+ and reducing agents such as ascorbic acid, L-cysteine,and dithiothreitol. The enzyme was found to be distributed in various rat tissues including liver, spleen, kidney, small intestine, lung, stomach, brain and heart, but not in skeletal muscle.

  13. A chemical relaxation study of human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Shear, D B; Kustin, K

    1968-01-01

    Chemical relaxation methods and a dilution technique were applied to the study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate by human prostatic acid phosphatase. Although the reaction mechanism was not elucidated, rate constants and equilibrium constants were obtained for the reaction of enzyme and p-nitrophenol to form a complex. A slow, 2-sec relaxation effect which showed no concentration dependence was observed in various reaction mixtures, including some lacking the substrate and products of the hydrolytic reaction. The conclusion drawn is that there are two forms of the prostatic enzyme, which are normally in equilibrium with each other, but which undergo a relatively slow interconversion when this equilibrium is perturbed. A preliminary calculation indicates that these forms are present in the equilibrium ratio of 2:1.

  14. Significantly Elevated Liver Alkaline Phosphatase in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shamban, Leonid; Patel, Brijesh; Williams, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy can have a mildly elevated liver profile, which should normalize with appropriate therapy. Liver specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in decompensated heart failure (HF) can be mildly elevated. The levels exceeding beyond the expected rise should be a concern and lead to further investigation. The literature reports insubstantial number of cases regarding significantly elevated levels of ALP and congestive hepatopathy. We report a case of a 45-year-old female with known history of severe cardiomyopathy that had persistently elevated levels of ALP. The extensive workup was negative for any specific pathology. The liver biopsy was consistent with congestive hepatopathy. The patient’s ALP levels decreased with aggressive diuretic therapy but still remained elevated. PMID:27785272

  15. Direct electrochemistry of porcine purple acid phosphatase (uteroferrin).

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Schenk, Gerhard; Wilson, Gregory J

    2004-08-17

    Cyclic voltammetry of the non-heme diiron enzyme porcine purple acid phosphatase (uteroferrin, Uf) has been reported for the first time. Totally reversible one-electron oxidation responses (FeIII-FeII --> FeII-FeIII) are seen both in the absence and in the presence of weak competitive inhibitors phosphate and arsenate, and dissociation constants of these oxoanion complexes formed with uteroferrin in its oxidized state (Uf(o)) have been determined. The effect of pH on the redox potentials has been investigated in the range 3 < pH < 6.5, enabling acid dissociation constants for Uf(o) and its phosphate and arsenate complexes to be calculated.

  16. Mannitol metabolism in brown algae involves a new phosphatase family.

    PubMed

    Groisillier, Agnès; Shao, Zhanru; Michel, Gurvan; Goulitquer, Sophie; Bonin, Patricia; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Duan, Delin; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly related to green plants and animals, and are found predominantly in the intertidal zone, a harsh and frequently changing environment. Because of their unique evolutionary history and of their habitat, brown algae feature several peculiarities in their metabolism. One of these is the mannitol cycle, which plays a central role in their physiology, as mannitol acts as carbon storage, osmoprotectant, and antioxidant. This polyol is derived directly from the photoassimilate fructose-6-phosphate via the action of a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase and a mannitol-1-phosphatase (M1Pase). Genome analysis of the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus allowed identification of genes potentially involved in the mannitol cycle. Among these, two genes coding for haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes were suggested to correspond to M1Pase activity, and thus were named EsM1Pase1 and EsM1Pase2, respectively. To test this hypothesis, both genes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant EsM1Pase2 was shown to hydrolyse the phosphate group from mannitol-1-phosphate to produce mannitol but was not active on the hexose monophosphates tested. Gene expression analysis showed that transcription of both E. siliculosus genes was under the influence of the diurnal cycle. Sequence analysis and three-dimensional homology modelling indicated that EsM1Pases, and their orthologues in Prasinophytes, should be seen as founding members of a new family of phosphatase with original substrate specificity within the HAD superfamily of proteins. This is the first report describing the characterization of a gene encoding M1Pase activity in photosynthetic organisms.

  17. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H(2)O(2) include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H(2)O(2) abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H(2)O(2) is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H(2)O(2)-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10M(-1)s(-1), which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H(2)O(2). We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H(2)O(2) solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that the hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H(2)O(2) for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H(2)O(2) under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases.

  18. Identification and enzymatic characterization of acid phosphatase from Burkholderia gladioli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Burkholderia is widespread in diverse ecological niches, the majority of known species are soil bacteria that exhibit different types of non-pathogenic interactions with plants. Burkholderia species are versatile organisms that solubilize insoluble minerals through the production of organic acids, which increase the availability of nutrients for the plant. Therefore these bacteria are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Results Burkholderia sp. (R 3.25 isolate) was isolated from agricultural soil in Ponta Grossa-PR-Brazil and identified through analysis of the 16S rDNA as a strain classified as Burkholderia gladioli. The expression of membrane-bound acid phosphatase (MBAcP) was strictly regulated with optimal expression at a concentration of phosphorus 5 mM. The apparent optimum pH for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (PNPP) was 6.0. The hydrolysis of PNPP by the enzyme exhibited a hyperbolic relationship with increasing concentration of substrate and no inhibition by excess of substrate was observed. Kinetic data revealed that the hydrolysis of PNPP exhibited cooperative kinetics with n = 1.3, Vm = 113.5 U/mg and K0.5 = 65 μM. The PNPPase activity was inhibited by vanadate, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, arsenate and phosphate, however the activity was not inhibited by calcium, levamisole, sodium tartrate, EDTA, zinc, magnesium, cobalt, ouabain, oligomycin or pantoprazol. Conclusion The synthesis of membrane-bound non-specific acid phosphatase, strictly regulated by phosphate, and its properties suggest that this bacterium has a potential biotechnological application to solubilize phosphate in soils with low levels of this element, for specific crops. PMID:24713147

  19. A novel phosphatase upregulated in Akp3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Narisawa, Sonoko; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Doctor, Kutbuddin S; Fukuda, Michiko N; Alpers, David H; Millán, José Luis

    2007-11-01

    Reexamination of the Akp3(-/-) mouse intestine showed that, despite the lack of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), the Akp3(-/-) gut still had considerable alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity in the duodenum and ileum. This activity is due to the expression of a novel murine Akp6 gene that encodes an IAP isozyme expressed in the gut in a global manner (gIAP) as opposed to duodenum-specific IAP (dIAP) isozyme encoded by the Akp3 gene. Phylogenetically, gIAP is similar to the rat IAP I isozyme. Kinetically, gIAP displays a 5.7-fold reduction in catalytic rate constant (k(cat)) and a 30% drop in K(m), leading to a 4-fold reduction k(cat)/K(m) compared with dIAP, and these changes in enzymatic properties can all be attributed to a crucial R317Q substitution. Western and Northern blot analyses document the expression of Akp6 in the gut, from the duodenum to the ileum, and it is upregulated in the jejunum and ileum of Akp3(-/-) mice. Developmentally, Akp3 expression is turned on during postnatal days 13-15 and exclusively in the duodenum, whereas Akp6 and Akp5 are expressed from birth throughout the gut with enhanced expression at weaning. Posttranslational modifications of gIAP have a pronounced effect on its catalytic properties. Given the low catalytic efficiency of gIAP, its upregulation during fat feeding, its sequence similarity with rat IAP I, and the fact that rat IAP I has been implicated in the upregulation of surfactant-like particles during fat intake, it appears likely that gIAP may have a role in mediating the accelerated fatty acid intake observed in Akp3(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet.

  20. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification.

    PubMed

    Chicote, Javier U; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins.

  1. Preparation and biophysical characterization of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Berti, Federico Pérez de; Otero, Lisandro H; Risso, Valeria A; Ferreyra, Raul G; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E; Ermácora, Mario R

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections constitute a widespread health problem with high economical and social impact, and the phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) of this bacterium is a potential target for antimicrobial treatment. However, drug design requires high-resolution structural information and detailed biophysical knowledge not available for PchP. An obstacle in the study of PchP is that current methods for its expression and purification are suboptimal and allowed only a preliminary kinetic characterization of the enzyme. Herein, we describe a new procedure for the efficient preparation of recombinant PchP overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is purified from urea solubilized inclusion bodies and refolded by dialysis. The product of PchP refolding is a mixture of native PchP and a kinetically-trapped, alternatively-folded aggregate that is very slowly converted into the native state. The properly folded and fully active enzyme is isolated from the refolding mixture by size-exclusion chromatography. PchP prepared by the new procedure was subjected to chemical and biophysical characterization, and its basic optical, hydrodynamic, metal-binding, and catalytic properties are reported. The unfolding of the enzyme was also investigated, and its thermal stability was determined. The obtained information should help to compare PchP with other phosphatases and to obtain a better understanding of its catalytic mechanism. In addition, preliminary trials showed that PchP prepared by the new protocol is suitable for crystallization, opening the way for high-resolution studies of the enzyme structure.

  2. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Expression of Neuregulin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatiana; Washington, Kareem; Rotimi, Jamie; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli A.; Niu, Xiaomei; Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a cellular serine/threonine phosphatase, is targeted to cellular promoters by its major regulatory subunits, PP1 nuclear targeting subunit, nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) and RepoMan. PP1 is also targeted to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) by NIPP1 where it can dephosphorylate RNAPII and cycle-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9). Here, we show that treatment of cells with a small molecule activator of PP1 increases the abundance of a neuregulin-1 (NRG-1)-derived peptide. NRG-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the cells stably or transiently expressing mutant NIPP1 (mNIPP1) that does not bind PP1, but not in the cells expressing NIPP1. Expression of mNIPP1 also activated the NRG-1 promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Analysis of extracts from mNIPP1 expressing cells by glycerol gradient centrifugation showed a redistribution of PP1 and CDK9 between large and small molecular weight complexes, and increased CDK9 Thr-186 phosphorylation. This correlated with the increased CDK9 activity. Further, RNAPII co-precipitated with mNIPP1, and phosphorylation of RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD) Ser-2 residues was greater in cells expressing mNIPP1. In mNIPP1 expressing cells, okadaic acid, a cell-permeable inhibitor of PP1, did not increase Ser-2 CTD phosphorylation inhibited by flavopiridol, in contrast to the NIPP1 expressing cells, suggesting that PP1 was no longer involved in RNAPII dephosphorylation. Finally, media conditioned with mNIPP1 cells induced the proliferation of wild type 84-31 cells, consistent with a role of neuregulin-1 as a growth promoting factor. Our study indicates that deregulation of PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme activates NRG-1 expression through RNAPII and CDK9 phosphorylation in a NF-κB dependent manner. PMID:27918433

  3. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  4. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chicote, Javier U.; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins. PMID:28257417

  5. Rac GTPase signaling through the PP5 protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Saverio; Darden, Thomas; Erxleben, Christian; Romeo, Charles; Russo, Angela; Martin, Negin; Rossie, Sandra; Armstrong, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the Rac-dependent mechanism of KCNH2 channel stimulation by thyroid hormone in a rat pituitary cell line, GH4C1, with the patch-clamp technique. Here we present physiological evidence for the protein serine/threonine phosphatase, PP5, as an effector of Rac GTPase signaling. We also propose and test a specific molecular mechanism for PP5 stimulation by Rac-GTP. Inhibition of PP5 with the microbial toxin, okadaic acid, blocked channel stimulation by thyroid hormone and by Rac, but signaling was restored by expression of a toxin-insensitive mutant of PP5, Y451A, which we engineered. PP5 is unique among protein phosphatases in that it contains an N-terminal regulatory domain with three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) that inhibit its activity. Expression of the TPR domain coupled to GFP blocked channel stimulation by the thyroid hormone. We also show that the published structures of the PP5 TPR domain and the TPR domain of p67, the Rac-binding subunit of NADPH oxidase, superimpose over 92 α carbons. Mutation of the PP5 TPR domain at two predicted contact points with Rac-GTP prevents the TPR domain from functioning as a dominant negative and blocks the ability of Y451A to rescue signaling in the presence of okadaic acid. PP5 stimulation by Rac provides a unique molecular mechanism for the antagonism of Rho-dependent signaling through protein kinases in many cellular processes, including metastasis, immune cell chemotaxis, and neuronal development. PMID:16549782

  6. Substrate analysis of Arabidopsis PP2C-type protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Umbrasaite, Julija; Schweighofer, Alois; Meskiene, Irute

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation by protein kinases can be reversed by the action of protein phosphatases. In plants, the Ser/Thr-specific phosphatases dominate among the protein phosphatase families with the type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) being the most abundant among them. PP2Cs are monomeric enzymes that require metal cations for their activity and are insensitive to known phosphatase inhibitors. PP2Cs were shown to counteract the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase/MAPK) activities in plants and to regulate developmental and stress signaling pathways. Studies of PP2C activities can be performed in vitro using recombinant proteins. The potential substrates of PP2Cs can be tested for dephosphorylation by the phosphatase in vitro. We have found that the stress-induced PP2Cs from alfalfa and Arabidopsis interact with stress-activated MAPKs in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens. Consequently, recombinant MAPKs were employed as substrates for dephosphorylation by selected PP2Cs from different family clusters. The members of the PP2C phosphatase family demonstrated specificity toward the substrate already in vitro, supporting the notion that protein phosphatases are specific enzymes. The PP2C from Arabidopsis thaliana cluster B, Arabidopsis PP2C-type phosphatase (AP2C1), and its homolog from Medicago sativa, Medicago PP2C-type phosphatase (MP2C), were able to dephosphorylate and inactivate MAPKs, whereas the ABSCISIC ACID (ABA)-INSENSITIVE 2 (ABI2) and HOMOLOGY TO ABI1 (HAB1) PP2Cs from the distinct Arabidopsis cluster A were not able to do so. The method described here can be used for the determination of PP2C protein activity and for studying the effect of mutations introduced into their catalytic domains.

  7. Alkaline, acid, and neutral phosphatase activities are induced during development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, R A; Zusman, D R

    1990-05-01

    One of the signals that has been reported to be important in stimulating fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus is starvation for phosphate. We therefore chose to study phosphatase activity during M. xanthus development. Many phosphatases can cleave the substrate p-nitrophenol phosphate. Using this substrate in buffers at various pHs, we obtained a profile of phosphatase activities during development and germination of M. xanthus. These experiments indicated that there are five patterns of phosphatase activity in M. xanthus: two vegetative and three developmental. The two uniquely vegetative activities have pH optima at 7.2 and 8.5. Both require magnesium and both are inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The developmental (spores) patterns of activity have pH optima of 5.2, 7.2, and 8.5. All three activities are Mg independent. Only the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by dithiothreitol. The acid phosphatase activity is induced very early in development, within the first 2 to 4 h. Both the neutral and alkaline phosphatase Mg-independent activities are induced much later, about the time that myxospores become evident (24 to 30 h). The three activities are greatly diminished upon germination; however, the kinetics of loss differ for all three. The acid phosphatase activity declines very rapidly, the neutral activity begins to decline only after spores begin to convert to rods, and the alkaline phosphatase activity remains high until the time the cells begin to divide. All three developmental activities were measured in the developmental signalling mutants carrying asg, csg, and dsg. The pattern of expression obtained in the mutants was consistent with that of other developmentally regulated genes which exhibit similar patterns of expression during development. The ease with which phosphatases can be assayed should make the activities described in this report useful biochemical markers of stages of both fruiting body formation and

  8. Separation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes from Various Rat Tissues Using Flat-Bed Acrylamide Gel Isoelectric Focusing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-22

    Technical Bulletin No. 104. Alkaline phosphatase activity was expressed as 1 micromole of p- nitrophenol hydrolyzed per hour and specific alkaline... phosphatase activity was defined as the number of micromoles of p- nitrophenol hydrolyzed per hour per microgram of protein. The total protein was determined... phosphatase activity is known or suspected. Importantly, the procedure is easily adapted for acid phosphatase examination by merely changing the pH and

  9. Identification and characterization of a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate phosphatase in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Han, CaiYun; Ma, ZhenQiao; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B6 comprises six interconvertible pyridine compounds, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. PLP is also a very reactive aldehyde. The most well established mechanism for maintaining low levels of free PLP is its dephosphorylation by phosphatases. A human PLP-specific phosphatase has been identified and characterized. However, very little is known about the phosphatase in other living organisms. In this study, a cDNA clone of putative PLP phosphatase was identified from B. mori and characterized. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 343 amino acid residues, and the recombinant enzyme purified from E. coli exhibited properties similar to that of human PLP phosphatase. B. mori has a single copy of the PLPP gene, which is located on 11th chromosome, spans a 5.7kb region and contains five exons and four introns. PLP phosphatase transcript was detected in every larva tissue except hemolymph, and was most highly represented in Malpighian tube. We further down-regulated the gene expression of the PLP phosphatase in 5th instar larvae with the RNA interference. However, no significant changes in the gene expression of PLP biosynthetic enzymes and composition of B6 vitamers were detected as compared with the control.

  10. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  11. Therapeutic insulin and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, A; McGeechan, A; Hume, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity is low at birth, and in term infants rises rapidly to adult levels. In contrast, in most preterm infants, it remains low postnatally making them vulnerable to repeated hypoglycaemic episodes, resultant cerebral damage, or risk of sudden and unexpected death.
AIMS—To investigate the clinical features of preterm infants with low glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity to determine the influencing factors.
METHODS—Clinical data from 36 preterm infants were correlated by stepwise multiple regression analysis with Vmax of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase as the dependent variable.
RESULTS—The most significant correlation was with the administration of insulin (units/kg/h postnatal life) with lesser effects of respiratory distress syndrome and dopamine administration. The Vmax changes reflected changes in the level of expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase protein.
CONCLUSION—In a variety of animal models, hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase levels have been shown to decrease in response to insulin, which also decreases transcription of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The association of insulin administration with high levels of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity and protein expression was therefore most unexpected. Results from model systems, or adults, must be extrapolated to the metabolism of preterm infants with caution.

 PMID:10794792

  12. Inhibition of acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatases by novel vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, Craig C; Hooker, Jaqueline D; Jones, Marjorie A; Dymon, Zaneta; Backhus, Emily A; Greiner, Bradley A; Dorner, Nicole A; Youkhana, Mary A; Manus, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    In the course of our investigations of vanadium-containing complexes for use as insulin-enhancing agents, we have generated a series of novel vanadium coordination complexes with bidentate ligands. Specifically we have focused on two ligands: anthranilate (anc(-)), a natural metabolite of tryptophan, and imidizole-4-carboxylate (imc(-)), meant to mimic naturally occurring N-donor ligands. For each ligand, we have generated a series of complexes containing the V(III), V(IV), and V(V) oxidation states. Each complex was investigated using phosphatase inhibition studies of three different phosphatases (acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatase) as prima facia evidence for potential use as an insulin-enhancing agent. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as an artificial phosphatase substrate, the levels of inhibition were determined by measuring the absorbance of the product at 405nm using UV/vis spectroscopy. Under our experimental conditions, for instance, V(imc)(3) appears to be as potent an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase as sodium orthovanadate when comparing the K(cat)/K(m) term. VO(anc)(2) is as potent an inhibitor of acid phosphatase and tyrosine phosphatase as the Na(3)VO(4). Thus, use of these complexes can increase our mechanistic understanding of the effects of vanadium in vivo.

  13. Acid and alkaline phosphatase localization in the digestive tract mucosa of the Hemisorubim platyrhynchos.

    PubMed

    Faccioli, Claudemir Kuhn; Chedid, Renata Alari; Mori, Ricardo Hideo; Amaral, Antônio Carlos do; Franceschini-Vicentini, Irene Bastos; Vicentini, Carlos Alberto

    2016-09-01

    This cytochemical study investigated the acid and alkaline phosphatase of the digestive tract of Hemisorubim platyrhynchos. Acid phosphatase was detected in the lining epithelium throughout the digestive tract, whereas alkaline phosphatase was only observed in the intestine. In the esophagus, an acid phosphatase reaction occurred in the apical cytoplasm of the epithelial cells and was related to epithelial protection and freeing of superficial cells for sloughing. Similar results were also observed in epithelial cells of gastric epithelium. In the gastric glands, acid phosphatase occurred in lysosomes of the oxynticopeptic cells acting in the macromolecule degradation for use as an energy source, whereas in the vesiculotubular system, its presence could be related to secretion processes. Furthermore, acid phosphatase in the intestine occurred in microvilli and lysosomes of the enterocytes and was correlated to absorption and intracellular digestion. However, no difference was reported among the regions of the intestine. However, alkaline phosphatase reaction revealed a large number of reaction dots in the anterior intestine, with the number decreasing toward the posterior intestine. This enzyme has been related to several functions, highlighting its role in the nutrient absorption primarily in the anterior intestine but also being essential in pH regulation because this is a carnivorous species with many gastric glands with secretions that could damage the intestine.

  14. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-07-29

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease.

  15. Peripartal changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, A T; Bosu, W T; MacWilliams, P; Gallagher, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripartal serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in 30 dairy cows in order to examine the association between retained fetal membranes and enzyme activity. Daily blood samples were obtained from pregnant cows, starting 15 days before the expected day of calving until eight days after parturition. Sera from 15 cows which retained fetal membranes longer than 24 hours and 15 cows which shed fetal membranes within six hours after parturition were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Mean alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities ranged from 15.93 to 32.6 U/L in retained and nonretained placenta cows. There was a trend towards higher serum alkaline phosphatase activities in retained placenta cows but the differences were not significant among the groups (P greater than 0.05). Mean lactate dehydrogenase activities ranged from 307.2 to 438.86 U/L in nonretained and retained placenta cows. Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities in nonretained and retained placenta cows were similar (P greater than 0.05). The alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities peaked at the time of parturition in both groups. However, the differences in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities on different days within non-retained and retained placenta cows were significant (P less than 0.05). Results indicate that prepartal changes in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities are not predictive of placental retention postpartum. PMID:3453274

  16. Colorimetric Immuno-Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Assay for Specific Detection of Microcystins and Nodularins of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, James S.; Bell, Steven G.; Codd, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A novel immunoassay was developed for specific detection of cyanobacterial cyclic peptide hepatotoxins which inhibit protein phosphatases. Immunoassay methods currently used for microcystin and nodularin detection and analysis do not provide information on the toxicity of microcystin and/or nodularin variants. Furthermore, protein phosphatase inhibition-based assays for these toxins are not specific and respond to other environmental protein phosphatase inhibitors, such as okadaic acid, calyculin A, and tautomycin. We addressed the problem of specificity in the analysis of protein phosphatase inhibitors by combining immunoassay-based detection of the toxins with a colorimetric protein phosphatase inhibition system in a single assay, designated the colorimetric immuno-protein phosphatase inhibition assay (CIPPIA). Polyclonal antibodies against microcystin-LR were used in conjunction with protein phosphatase inhibition, which enabled seven purified microcystin variants (microcystin-LR, -D-Asp3-RR, -LA, -LF, -LY, -LW, and -YR) and nodularin to be distinguished from okadaic acid, calyculin A, and tautomycin. A range of microcystin- and nodularin-containing laboratory strains and environmental samples of cyanobacteria were assayed by CIPPIA, and the results showed good correlation (R2 = 0.94, P < 0.00001) with the results of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection for toxin analysis. The CIPPIA procedure combines ease of use and detection of low concentrations with toxicity assessment and specificity for analysis of microcystins and nodularins. PMID:11157261

  17. Purification and characterization of a phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase from wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Tao, M

    1989-10-19

    A neutral phosphatase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate has been purified to homogeneity from wheat seedlings. The enzyme is a monomeric glycoprotein exhibiting a molecular weight of 35,000, frictional ratio of 1.22, Stokes' radius of 260 nm, and sedimentation coefficient of 3.2 S. That the enzyme is a glycoprotein is surmised from its chromatographic property on Concanavalin A-Sepharose column. An examination of the substrate specificity indicates that the enzyme exhibits a preference for phosphotyrosine over a number of phosphocompounds, including p-nitrophenylphosphate and several glycolytic intermediates. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are not hydrolyzed by the enzyme. The phosphatase activity is not affected by high concentrations of chelating agents and does not require metal ions. Molybdate, orthovanadate, Zn2+, and Hg2+ are all potent inhibitors of the phosphatase activity. The ability of the phosphatase to dephosphorylate protein phosphotyrosine has been investigated. [32P-Tyr]poly(Glu,Tyr)n, [32P-Tyr]alkylated bovine serum albumin, [32P-Tyr]angiotensin-I, and [32P-Tyr]band 3 (from human erythrocyte) are all substrates of the phosphatase. On the other hand, the enzyme has no activity toward protein phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. Our result further indicates that the neutral phosphatase is distinct from the wheat germ acid phosphatase. The latter enzyme is found to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosyl as well as phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl groups in proteins. In light of the many similarities in properties to phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases isolated from several sources, it is suggested that the wheat seedling phosphatase may participate in cellular regulation involving protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  18. Protein Phosphatases Decrease Their Activity during Capacitation: A New Requirement for This Event

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Janetti R.; Díaz, Emilce S.; Fara, Karla; Barón, Lina; Morales, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free) or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate). The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1) NCM; 2) NCM plus inhibitors; 3) RCM; and 4) RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min) increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important requirement for the

  19. A catalytic mechanism for the dual-specific phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Denu, J M; Dixon, J E

    1995-06-20

    Dual-specific protein-tyrosine phosphatases have the common active-site sequence motif HCXXGXXRS(T). The role of the conserved hydroxyl was investigated by changing serine-131 to an alanine (S131A) in the dual-specific protein-tyrosine phosphatase VHR. The pH profile of the kcat/Km value for the S131A mutant is indistinguishable from that of the native enzyme. In contrast, the kcat value for S131A mutant is 100-fold lower than that for the native enzyme, and the shape of the pH profile was perturbed from bell-shaped in the native enzyme to a pH-independent curve over the pH range 4.5-9.0. This evidence, along with results from a previous study, suggests that the S131A mutation alters the rate-limiting step in the catalytic mechanism. Formation of a phosphoenzyme intermediate appears to be rate-limiting with the native enzyme, whereas in the S131A mutant breakdown of the intermediate is rate-limiting. This was confirmed by the appearance of a burst of p-nitrophenol formation when p-nitrophenyl phosphate rapidly reacted with the S131A enzyme in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. Loss of this hydroxyl group at the active site dramatically diminished the ability of the enzyme to hydrolyze the thiol-phosphate intermediate without exerting any significant change in the steps leading to and including the formation of the intermediate. Consistent with rate-limiting intermediate formation in the native enzyme, the rate of burst in the S131A mutant was 1.5 s-1, which agrees well with the kcat value of 5 s-1 observed for native enzyme. The amplitude of the burst was stoichiometric with final enzyme concentration, and the slow linear rate (0.06 s-1) of p-nitrophenol formation after the burst was in agreement with the steady-state determined value of kcat (0.055 s-1).

  20. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  1. The use of the tyrosine phosphatase antagonist orthovanadate in the study of a cell proliferation inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enebo, D. J.; Hanek, G.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of murine fibroblasts with orthovanadate, a global tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, was shown to confer a "pseudo-transformed" phenotype with regard to cell morphology and growth characteristics. This alteration was manifested by both an increasing refractile appearance of the cells, consistent with many transformed cell lines, as well as an increase in maximum cell density was attained. Despite the abrogation of cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity, orthovanadate-treated cells remained sensitive to the biological activity of a naturally occurring sialoglycopeptide (SGP) cell surface proliferation inhibitor. The results indicated that tyrosine phosphatase activity, inhibited by orthovanadate, was not involved in the signal transduction pathway of the SGP.

  2. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  3. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M.; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26801627

  4. Sensing charges of the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Frezza, Ludivine; Sandtner, Walter; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Voltage control over enzymatic activity in voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) is conferred by a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) located in the N terminus. These VSDs are constituted by four putative transmembrane segments (S1 to S4) resembling those found in voltage-gated ion channels. The putative fourth segment (S4) of the VSD contains positive residues that likely function as voltage-sensing elements. To study in detail how these residues sense the plasma membrane potential, we have focused on five arginines in the S4 segment of the Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). After implementing a histidine scan, here we show that four arginine-to-histidine mutants, namely R223H to R232H, mediate voltage-dependent proton translocation across the membrane, indicating that these residues transit through the hydrophobic core of Ci-VSP as a function of the membrane potential. These observations indicate that the charges carried by these residues are sensing charges. Furthermore, our results also show that the electrical field in VSPs is focused in a narrow hydrophobic region that separates the extracellular and intracellular space and constitutes the energy barrier for charge crossing.

  5. Alkaline phosphatase in stallion semen: characterization and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Turner, R M O; McDonnell, S M

    2003-06-01

    Significant amounts of alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity have been found in semen plasma from numerous species. In species in which the majority of semen plasma AP (SPAP) activity originates from the epididymis and testicle, SPAP activity can be used clinically as a marker to differentiate testicular origin azoospermia or oligospermia from ejaculatory failure. Information on SPAP activity in stallions to date has been limited. In this study, a standard clinical chemistry analyzer was used to determine AP activity in pre-ejaculatory fluid and ejaculates from groups of normal stallions. Additionally, accessory glands, epididymides, testicles and other components of the urogenital tract of normal stallions were assayed to determine which tissues contain SPAP activity. The results indicated that levels of AP activity are low in pre-ejaculatory fluid, but significantly higher in ejaculatory fluid from normal stallions. Spermatozoa were not a significant source of SPAP activity. High levels of SPAP activity were found in the testes and epididymides. These findings suggest that SPAP activity is a candidate for a sperm-independent marker for ejaculation in the stallion. Finally, AP activity was determined in ejaculatory fluid from a stallion with bilaterally blocked ampullae, both before and after relief of the blockage. While the blockage was present, AP activity in ejaculatory fluid was low. However, following relief of the blockage, AP activity in ejaculatory fluid rose dramatically, thus suggesting that AP activity will be useful as an inexpensive, simple clinical assay for differentiating ejaculatory failure or excurrent duct blockages from testicular origin azoospermia and oligospermia.

  6. Responses of alkaline phosphatase activity in Daphnia to poor nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole D; Frost, Paul C

    2012-09-01

    The use of biochemical and molecular indices of nutritional stress have recently been promoted for their potential ability to assess the in situ nutritional state of zooplankton. The development and application of these indicators should at least consider the cross-reactivity with other nutritional stressors. We examined the potential usefulness of body alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) as an indicator of dietary phosphorus (P) stress in Daphnia. We measured growth rate, body P-content, and body APA of two species of Daphnia (D. magna, D. pulex) grown for different periods under diverse dietary conditions. We found P-poor food reduced daphnid growth rates and body P-content, while body APA increased in both species. However, body APA increased in P-sufficient D. magna and D. pulex that were feeding on cyanobacterial compared to green algal food, despite no differences in animal body P content. Body APA increased in D. magna fed P-poor food whether cyanobacterial or algal. Body APA also varied with age and other nutritional stresses (low food quantity, nitrogen-poor algae) in both daphnid species. Our results demonstrate that whole body homogenate APA in Daphnia is not singularly responsive to P-poor food, which will complicate or limit its future usefulness and application as an indicator of dietary P-stress in metazoans.

  7. Changes of serum alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Niwa, N; Hayakawa, T; Tsuge, H

    1996-10-01

    Changes of serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP) isoenzymes under fasting conditions were examined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), amino-acids (L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), L-homoarginine (L-HArg)) inhibition and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) treatment. The sALP of non-fasted rats was separated into three bands (S1, S2, S3) by PAGE. The molecular weight (M.W.) of S1 corresponded to that of an isoenzyme found in the ileum. By the addition of L-Phe, the staining intensity of S1 was weakened, S2 and S3 remained unchanged and the total activity of the isoenzymes extracted from intestine decreased. On the other hand, the activity of isoenzymes extracted from kidney and bone decreased by the addition of L-HArg. Therefore, S1 was judged to be derived from intestine. The activities of total sALP and S1 decreased from 16 h of fasting. Total sALP activity and sALP activity of the supernatant prepared by WGA treatment decreased, whereas the ALP activity of the precipitate (difference between total sALP activity and supernatant sALP activity) did not change. The activity band of the precipitate corresponded to that of S3 by PAGE. Therefore, S3 was judged to be derived from bone. In conclusion, under fasting conditions, the activity of S1 decreased while the activities of S2 and S3 remained unchanged.

  8. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  9. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis.

  10. The regulation of myosin phosphatase in pregnant human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Claire A; Bernal, Andrés López

    2012-02-01

    Myometrial smooth muscle contractility is regulated predominantly through the reversible phosphorylation of MYLs (myosin light chains), catalysed by MYLK (MYL kinase) and MYLP (MYL phosphatase) activities. MYLK is activated by Ca2+-calmodulin, and most uterotonic agonists operate through myometrial receptors that increase [Ca2+]i (intracellular Ca2+ concentration). Moreover, there is substantial evidence for Ca2+-independent inhibition of MYLP in smooth muscle, leading to generation of increased MYL phosphorylation and force for a given [Ca2+]i, a phenomenon known as 'Ca2+-sensitization'. ROCK (Rho-associated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation and inhibition of MYLP has been proposed as a mechanism for Ca2+-sensitization in smooth muscle. However, it is unclear to date whether the mechanisms that sensitize the contractile machinery to Ca2+ are important in the myometrium, as they appear to be in vascular and respiratory smooth muscle. In the present paper, we discuss the signalling pathways regulating MYLP activity and the involvement of ROCK in myometrial contractility, and present recent data from our laboratory which support a role for Ca2+-sensitization in human myometrium.

  11. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage sensing lipid phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sasha S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We find the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), to have not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage sensing domain (VSD). Using fast FRET reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we find that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This novel 2-step allosteric control over a dual specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility and endo/exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  12. Purification and characterization of alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Okamoto, M; Nishibori, M; Ichimura, M; Sakiyama, J; Endo, H

    1999-06-01

    Soluble alkaline phosphatase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus was purified by a combination of chromatographic methods, and its properties were examined. The purified enzyme had specific activity of 4.43 micromol p-nitrophenol/min per mg of protein and seemed to be a single band on SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of 32 kDa. Its apparent Km for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was 1.114 mM. The enzyme exhibited an optimal pH of approx. 9.0 and exhibited its highest activity at 60-70 degrees C. It also showed a bivalent cation requirement for activity, with maximal enhancement in the presence of Mg2+. In addition, significant thermal stability was observed in comparison with counterparts from mesophiles. Its partial N-terminal sequence was T1FSIVAFDPATGELGIAVQ19 as estimated by automated Edman degradation method. A search on the SwissProt database did not reveal any similar protein sequences from other sources.

  13. Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target.

  14. Bovine brain low Mr acid phosphatase: purification and properties.

    PubMed

    Saeed, A; Tremori, E; Manao, G; Camici, G; Cappugi, G; Ramponi, G

    1990-01-01

    Low molecular weight acid phosphatase from bovine brain was purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography on p-aminobenzylphosphonic acid-agarose to obtain the enzyme with both high specific activity (110 mumol min-1 mg-1 measured at pH 5.5 and 37 degrees C with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate) and good yields. The enzyme was characterized with respect to molecular weight, amino acid composition, pH optimum, Km and Vmax in varying substrates, and to the Ki of varying inhibitors. Furthermore, transphosphorylation to glycerol was demonstrated by measuring the released p-nitrophenol/Pi concentration ratio during the initial phase of the catalyzed reaction. The enzyme was inactivated by iodoacetate and 1,2-cycloexanedione. Inorganic phosphate, a competitive inhibitor, protected the enzyme from being inactivated by the above compounds, demonstrating the involvement of both cysteine(s) and arginine(s) at the active site of the enzyme. Furthermore, the strong inhibition exerted by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and the low inhibitory capacity possessed by the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate analogues pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and pyridoxal, indicate that at least one lysine residue is present at the active site.

  15. The thermal stability of a castor bean seed acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Granjeiro, Paulo Afonso; Cavagis, Alexandre Donizeti Martins; de Campos Leite, Luciana; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the activity and structural stability of an acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2.) purified from castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) seeds have been examined. The enzyme showed high activity at 45 degrees C using p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as substrate. The activation energy for the catalyzed reaction was 55.2 kJ mol(-1) and the enzyme maintained 50% of its activity even after 30 min at 55 degrees C. Thermal inactivation studies showed an influence of pH in the loss of enzymatic activity at 60 degrees C. A noticeable protective effect from thermal inactivation was observed when the enzyme was preincubated, at 60 degrees C, with the reaction products inorganic phosphate-P (10 mM) and p-nitrophenol-p-NP(10 mM). Denaturation studies showed a relatively high transition temperature (Tm) value of 75 degrees C and an influence of the combination of Pi (10 mM) and p-NP (10 mM) was observed on the conformational behaviour of the macromolecule.

  16. Monomeric Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Induces Insulin Sensitive Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lång, Pernilla; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Rydén, Mikael; Kaaman, Maria; Parini, Paolo; Carneheim, Claes; Cassady, A. Ian; Hume, David A.; Andersson, Göran; Arner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. Principal Findings Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. PMID:18320034

  17. Targeting phosphatase-dependent proteoglycan switch for rheumatoid arthritis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doody, Karen M.; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Svensson, Mattias N. D.; Coles, Charlotte H.; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Kiosses, William B.; Bartok, Beatrix; Fos, Camille; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L.; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Boyle, David L.; Arnett, Heather A.; Mustelin, Tomas; Corr, Maripat; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Firestein, Gary S.; Aricescu, A. Radu; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of several therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that target the immune system, a large number of RA patients fail to achieve remission. Joint-lining cells, called fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), become activated during RA and mediate joint inflammation and destruction of cartilage and bone. We identify RPTPσ, a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, as a therapeutic target for FLS-directed therapy. RPTPσ is reciprocally regulated by interactions with chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate containing extracellular proteoglycans in a mechanism called the proteoglycan switch. We show that the proteoglycan switch regulates FLS function. Incubation of FLS with a proteoglycan-binding RPTPσ decoy protein inhibited cell invasiveness and attachment to cartilage by disrupting a constitutive interaction between RPTPσ and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4. RPTPσ mediated the effect of proteoglycans on FLS signaling by regulating the phosphorylation and cytoskeletal localization of ezrin. Furthermore, administration of the RPTPσ decoy protein ameliorated in vivo human FLS invasiveness and arthritis severity in the K/BxN serum transfer model of RA. Our data demonstrate that FLS are regulated by an RPTPσ-dependent proteoglycan switch in vivo, which can be targeted for RA therapy. We envision that therapies targeting the proteoglycan switch or its intracellular pathway in FLS could be effective as a monotherapy or in combination with currently available immune-targeted agents to improve control of disease activity in RA patients. PMID:25995222

  18. Targeting phosphatase-dependent proteoglycan switch for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Doody, Karen M; Stanford, Stephanie M; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Svensson, Mattias N D; Coles, Charlotte H; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Kiosses, William B; Bartok, Beatrix; Fos, Camille; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Boyle, David L; Arnett, Heather A; Mustelin, Tomas; Corr, Maripat; Esko, Jeffrey D; Tremblay, Michel L; Firestein, Gary S; Aricescu, A Radu; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-05-20

    Despite the availability of several therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that target the immune system, a large number of RA patients fail to achieve remission. Joint-lining cells, called fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), become activated during RA and mediate joint inflammation and destruction of cartilage and bone. We identify RPTPσ, a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, as a therapeutic target for FLS-directed therapy. RPTPσ is reciprocally regulated by interactions with chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate containing extracellular proteoglycans in a mechanism called the proteoglycan switch. We show that the proteoglycan switch regulates FLS function. Incubation of FLS with a proteoglycan-binding RPTPσ decoy protein inhibited cell invasiveness and attachment to cartilage by disrupting a constitutive interaction between RPTPσ and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4. RPTPσ mediated the effect of proteoglycans on FLS signaling by regulating the phosphorylation and cytoskeletal localization of ezrin. Furthermore, administration of the RPTPσ decoy protein ameliorated in vivo human FLS invasiveness and arthritis severity in the K/BxN serum transfer model of RA. Our data demonstrate that FLS are regulated by an RPTPσ-dependent proteoglycan switch in vivo, which can be targeted for RA therapy. We envision that therapies targeting the proteoglycan switch or its intracellular pathway in FLS could be effective as a monotherapy or in combination with currently available immune-targeted agents to improve control of disease activity in RA patients.

  19. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  20. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  2. Mitotic kinases and phosphatases cooperate to shape the right response.

    PubMed

    Vallardi, Giulia; Saurin, Adrian T

    2015-01-01

    Kinases and phosphatases, two sides of the same coin; are they opposing forces that switch signals on and off or enzymes that work together to give the right type of response at the right time? It depends on how close you stand when you view the big picture. Up close and detailed, and you'll see individual phosphorylation sites as binary switches - lights being toggled on/off by antagonistic forces. Take a step back and multiple copies of the same light are being toggled, perhaps leading to a range of intensities, or a flickering pattern, lights flashing in unison or at random. It depends what the signal requires. Stand even further back, let the story unfold, and you'll see a dazzling multicolour array of different lights. A coordinated sequence of color that appears to burst into life at different times in different places, with a pace that is both frantic and serene. This is a vision of mitosis and what a true spectacle it is.

  3. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase of spinach acts as a phosphoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Z.B.; Seal, S.N.

    1987-05-01

    When /sup 32/P-glycolate and phosphoglycolate phosphatase from spinach are mixed, /sup 32/P is incorporated into acid precipitated protein. Properties that relate this phosphorylation to the enzyme are: The K/sub m/ value for P-glycolate is similar for protein phosphorylation and substrate hydrolysis; the /sup 32/P appearing in the phosphoenzyme is diluted by unlabeled P-glycolate or the alternative substrate, ethyl-P; the activator Cl/sup -/ enhances the effectiveness of ethyl-P as a substrate and as an inhibitor of the formation of /sup 32/P-enzyme; and /sup 32/P is lost from the enzyme when /sup 32/P-glycolate is consumed. The acid denatured phosphorylated protein is a molecule of 34,000 Da, which is half of the molecular weight of the native protein and is similar in size to the labeled band that is seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The enzyme-bound phosphoryl group appears to be an acyl-phosphate from its pH stability, being quite stable at pH 1, less stable at pH 5, and very unstable above pH 5. The bond is readily hydrolyzed in acid molybdate and it is sensitive to cleavage by hydroxylamine at pH 6.8. The demonstration of enzyme phosphorylation by /sup 32/P-glycolate resolves the dilemma presented by initial rate studies in which alternative substrates appeared to have different mechanisms.

  5. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  6. Interplay between intestinal alkaline phosphatase, diet, gut microbes and immunity.

    PubMed

    Estaki, Mehrbod; DeCoffe, Daniella; Gibson, Deanna L

    2014-11-14

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an essential role in intestinal homeostasis and health through interactions with the resident microbiota, diet and the gut. IAP's role in the intestine is to dephosphorylate toxic microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharides, unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides and flagellin as well as extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate. IAP's ability to detoxify these ligands is essential in protecting the host from sepsis during acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Also important in these complications is IAP's ability to regulate the microbial ecosystem by forming a complex relationship between microbiota, diet and the intestinal mucosal surface. Evidence reveals that diet alters IAP expression and activity and this in turn can influence the gut microbiota and homeostasis. IAP's ability to maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract has accelerated research on its potential use as a therapeutic agent against a multitude of diseases. Exogenous IAP has been shown to have beneficial effects when administered during ulcerative colitis, coronary bypass surgery and sepsis. There are currently a handful of human clinical trials underway investigating the effects of exogenous IAP during sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and heart surgery. In light of these findings IAP has been marked as a novel agent to help treat a variety of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the essential characteristics of IAP in protection and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis while addressing the intricate interplay between IAP, diet, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium.

  7. Identification, cloning, and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Massimelli, María J; Beassoni, Paola R; Forrellad, Marina A; Barra, José L; Garrido, Mónica N; Domenech, Carlos E; Lisa, Angela T

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP) is a periplasmic enzyme produced simultaneously with the hemolytic phospholipase C (PLc-H) when the bacteria are grown in the presence of choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. Molecular analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutant JUF8-00, after Tn5-751 mutagenesis, revealed that the PA5292 gene in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome was responsible for the synthesis of PChP. The enzyme expressed in E. coli, rPChP-Ec, purified by a chitin-binding column (IMPACT-CN system, New England BioLabs) was homogeneous after SDS-PAGE analysis. PChP was also expressed in P. aeruginosa PAO1-LAC, rPChP-Pa. Both recombinant enzymes exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa, as expected for the size of the PA5292 gene, and catalyzed the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. The saturation curve of rPChP-Ec and rPChP-Pa by phosphorylcholine revealed that these recombinant enzymes, like the purified native PChP, also contained the high- and low-affinity sites for phosphorylcholine and that the enzyme activity was inhibited by high substrate concentration.

  8. Identification of the human testis protein phosphatase 1 interactome.

    PubMed

    Fardilha, Margarida; Esteves, Sara L C; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vintém, Ana Paula; Domingues, Sara C; Rebelo, Sandra; Morrice, Nick; Cohen, Patricia T W; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F

    2011-11-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulatory mechanism in cellular signalling. To this end, PP1 is a major eukaryotic serine/threonine-specific phosphatase whose cellular functions, in turn, depend on complexes it forms with PP1 interacting proteins-PIPs. The importance of the testis/sperm-enriched variant, PP1γ2, in sperm motility and spermatogenesis has previously been shown. Given the key role of PIPs, it is imperative to identify the physiologically relevant PIPs in testis and sperm. Hence, we performed Yeast Two-Hybrid screens of a human testis cDNA library using as baits the different PP1 isoforms and also a proteomic approach aimed at identifying PP1γ2 binding proteins. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest data set of the human testis PP1 interactome. We report the identification of 77 proteins in human testis and 7 proteins in human sperm that bind PP1. The data obtained increased the known PP1 interactome by reporting 72 novel interactions. Confirmation of the interaction of PP1 with 5 different proteins was also further validated by co-immunoprecipitation or protein overlays. The data here presented provides important insights towards the function of these proteins and opens new possibilities for future research. In fact, such diversity in PP1 regulators makes them excellent targets for pharmacological intervention.

  9. Alterations in activities of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, ATPase and ATP content in response to seasonally varying Pi status in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus).

    PubMed

    Sen, Supatra; Mukherji, S

    2004-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the second most important macronutrient for plant growth. Plants exhibit numerous physiological and metabolic adaptations in response to seasonal variations in phosphorus content. Activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases, ATPase and ATP content were studied in summer, rainy and winter seasons at two different developmental stages (28 and 58 days after sowing) in Okra. Activities of both acid and alkaline phosphatases increased manifold in winter to cope up with low phosphorus content. ATP content and ATPase activity were high in summer signifying an active metabolic period. Phosphorus deficiency is characterized by low ATP content and ATPase activity (which are in turn partly responsible for a drastic reduction in growth and yield) and enhanced activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases which increase the availability of P in P-deficient seasons.

  10. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, III, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724–837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991–1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998–1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction. PMID:26445108

  11. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  12. Examination of the transition state of the low-molecular mass small tyrosine phosphatase 1. Comparisons with other protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, A C; Zhao, Y; Wu, L; Zhang, Z Y

    1997-06-24

    The reactions of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) with the low-molecular mass tyrosine phosphatase Stp1 and with the mutants D128N, D128A, D128E, and S18A have been studied by measurement of heavy-atom isotope effects in the substrate. The isotope effects were measured at the nonbridging oxygen atoms [18(V/K)nonbridge], at the bridging oxygen atom (the site of bond cleavage) [18(V/K)bridge], and at the nitrogen atom in the nitrophenol leaving group [15(V/K)]. The results with native Stp1 were 1.0160 +/- 0.0005 for 18(V/K)bridge, 1.0007 +/- 0.0001 for 15(V/K), and 1.0018 +/- 0.0003 for 18(V/K)nonbridge. The values for 18(V/K)nonbridge and 15(V/K) differ from those previously measured with other protein-tyrosine phosphatases and from those of the aqueous hydrolysis reaction of pNPP. The values indicate that in the transition state of the native Stp1 reaction the leaving group bears a partial negative charge, and there is nucleophilic interaction between the Cys nucleophile, and the phosphoryl group, causing some decrease in the nonbridge P-O bond order. The transition state remains highly dissociative with respect to the degree of bond cleavage to the leaving group. Mutation of the general acid from aspartic acid to glutamic acid slows catalysis but causes no change in the isotope effects and thus does not alter the degree of proton transfer to the leaving group in the transition state. Mutations of this residue to asparagine or alanine give values for 18(V/K)bridge of about 1.029, for 15(V/K) of about 1.003, and for 18(V/K)nonbridge of 1.0010 (D128A) to 1.0024 (D128N). These data indicate a dissociative transition state with the leaving group departing as the nitrophenolate anion and indicate more nucleophilic participation than in the aqueous hydrolysis of the pNPP dianion, just as in the native enzyme. The isotope effects with the S18A mutant, in which a hydrogen bonding stabilization of the anionic Cys nucleophile has been removed, were within experimental error of

  13. Regorafenib (Stivarga) pharmacologically targets epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is well-known to evoke cancer invasion/metastasis, leading to a high frequency of mortality in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase)-targeted therapy has been identified as a novel cancer therapeutic. Previously, we proved that sorafenib with anti-EMT potency prevents TGF-β1-induced EMT/invasion by directly activating SH2-domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1)-dependent p-STAT3Tyr705 suppression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Regorafenib has a closely related chemical structure as sorafenib and is approved for the pharmacotherapy of mCRC. Herein, we evaluate whether regorafenib activates PTPase SHP-1 in the same way as sorafenib to abolish EMT-related invasion/metastasis in CRC. Notably, regorafenib exerted potent anti-EMT activity to curb TGF-β1-induced EMT/invasion in vitro as well inhibited lung metastatic outgrowth of SW480 mesenchymal cells in vivo. Mechanistically, regorafenib-enhanced SHP-1 activity significantly impeded TGF-β1-induced EMT/invasion via low p-STAT3Tyr705 level as proved by a SHP-1 inhibitor or siRNA-mediated SHP-1 depletion. Conversely, overexpression of SHP-1 further enhanced the inhibitory effects of regorafenib on TGF-β1-induced p-STAT3Tyr705 and EMT/invasion. Regorafenib directly activates SHP-1 by potently relieving the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 to inhibit TGF-β1-induced p-STAT3Tyr705 and EMT/invasion. Importantly, the clinical evidence indicated that SHP-1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin and that significantly determined the overall survival of CRC patients. This result further confirms our in vitro data that SHP-1 is a negative regulatory PTPase in EMT regulation and serves as a pharmacological target for mCRC therapy. Collectively, activating PTPase SHP-1 by regorafenib focusing on its anti-EMT activity might be a useful pharmacotherapy for mCRC. PMID:27580057

  14. Structural and functional characterization of the 2H-phosphatase domain of Sts-2 reveals an acid-dependent phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunting; Jakoncic, Jean; Carpino, Nick; Nassar, Nicolas

    2009-03-03

    The suppressors of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling 1 and 2 (Sts-1 and -2, respectively) are multidomain proteins that negatively regulate the signaling of membrane-bound receptors, including TCR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Sts-1 was recently shown to be a new type of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP), with the phosphatase activity located within its C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) homology domain and key for the regulation of TCR signaling in T cells. The activity of the related Sts-2 enzyme is significantly less than that of Sts-1. Here we investigate the phosphatase activity of the PGM domain of Sts-2, Sts-2(PGM). The crystal structure of Sts-2(PGM) is remarkably similar to Sts-1(PGM), including conservation of all catalytic residues. Insight into mechanistic details is provided by the structures of the apo, tungstate-bound, and phosphate-bound enzyme. The active site shows stringent specificity, with the k(cat) optimum at pH 5.0 suggesting that Sts-2 might function as an acid-dependent phosphatase. Mutation of active site residues Gln372, Ala446, Glu481, Ser552, and Ser582 to their equivalents in Sts-1 increases the phosphatase activity of Sts-2(PGM) toward model substrates. Overall, our data demonstrate that Sts-2(PGM) adopts the conformation of an active phosphatase whose activity is fundamentally different from that of Sts-1 despite the strong structural homology. They also demonstrate that nonconserved active site residues are responsible for the difference in activity between the two isoforms. These differences reflect possible distinct physiological substrates.

  15. Interplay of myosin phosphatase and protein phosphatase-2A in the regulation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Bátori, Róbert; Bécsi, Bálint; Nagy, Dénes; Kónya, Zoltán; Hegedűs, Csaba; Bordán, Zsuzsanna; Verin, Alexander; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) at Thr497 (eNOSpThr497) by protein kinase C or RhoA-activated kinase is a major regulatory determinant of eNOS activity. The signalling mechanisms involved in the dephosphorylation of eNOSpThr497 have not yet been clarified. This study identifies myosin phosphatase (MP) holoenzyme consisting of protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) and MP target subunit-1 (MYPT1) as an eNOSpThr497 phosphatase. In support of this finding are: (i) eNOS and MYPT1 interacts in various endothelial cells (ECs) and in in vitro binding assays (ii) MYPT1 targets and stimulates PP1c toward eNOSpThr497 substrate (iii) phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 (MYPT1pThr696) controls the activity of MP on eNOSpThr497. Phosphatase inhibition suppresses both NO production and transendothelial resistance (TER) of ECs. In contrast, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) signals ECs via the 67 kDa laminin-receptor (67LR) resulting in protein kinase A dependent activation of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A). PP2A dephosphorylates MYPT1pThr696 and thereby stimulates MP activity inducing dephosphorylation of eNOSpThr497 and the 20 kDa myosin II light chains. Thus an interplay of MP and PP2A is involved in the physiological regulation of EC functions implying that an EGCG dependent activation of these phosphatases leads to enhanced NO production and EC barrier improvement. PMID:28300193

  16. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  17. Identification of a Mammalian-type Phosphatidylglycerophosphate Phosphatase in the Eubacterium Rhodopirellula baltica*

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Phildrich G.; Chen, Mark J.; Engel, James L.; Worby, Carolyn A.; Manning, Gerard; Dixon, Jack E.; Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a glycerophospholipid found predominantly in the mitochondrial membranes of eukaryotes and in bacterial membranes. Cardiolipin interacts with protein complexes and plays pivotal roles in cellular energy metabolism, membrane dynamics, and stress responses. We recently identified the mitochondrial phosphatase, PTPMT1, as the enzyme that converts phosphatidylglycerolphosphate (PGP) to phosphatidylglycerol, a critical step in the de novo biosynthesis of cardiolipin. Upon examination of PTPMT1 evolutionary distribution, we found a PTPMT1-like phosphatase in the bacterium Rhodopirellula baltica. The purified recombinant enzyme dephosphorylated PGP in vitro. Moreover, its expression restored cardiolipin deficiency and reversed growth impairment in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking the yeast PGP phosphatase, suggesting that it is a bona fide PTPMT1 ortholog. When ectopically expressed, this bacterial PGP phosphatase was localized in the mitochondria of yeast and mammalian cells. Together, our results demonstrate the conservation of function between bacterial and mammalian PTPMT1 orthologs. PMID:23293031

  18. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    PubMed

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-07-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity of a pathway, can be controlled by multiple tyrosine phosphatases, attesting to the intricate integration of these enzymes in cellular regulation. Lastly, we are starting to appreciate the roles of intracellular topology, tyrosine phosphorylation and oligomerization among the many mechanisms regulating tyrosine phosphatase activity.

  19. Subcellular localization of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis 749/C by immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold

    SciTech Connect

    Tinglu, G.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.

    1984-08-01

    Subcellular distribution of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C was determined by an immunoelectron microscopy method. Anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody labeled with 15- to 18-nm colloidal gold particles (gold-immunoglobulin G (IgG) complex) were used for the study. Both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic material were labeled with the gold-IgG particles. These particles formed clusters in association with the plasma membrane; in contrast, in the cytoplasm the particles were largely dispersed, and only a few clusters were found. The gold-IgG binding was quantitatively estimated by stereological analysis of labeled, frozen thin sections. This estimation of a variety of control samples showed that the labeling was specific for the alkaline phosphatase. Cluster formation of the gold -IgG particles in association with the plasma membrane suggests that existence of specific alkaline phosphatase binding sites (receptors) in the plasma membrane of B. licheniformis 749/C. 27 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  1. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 at 2.38 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 (DUSP27) is reported at 2.38 Å resolution. There are over 100 genes in the human genome that encode protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and approximately 60 of these are classified as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Although many dual-specificity phosphatases are still not well characterized, novel functions have been discovered for some of them that have led to new insights into a variety of biological processes and the molecular basis for certain diseases. Indeed, as the functions of DUSPs continue to be elucidated, a growing number of them are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Here, the overexpression, purification and structure determination of DUSP27 at 2.38 Å resolution are presented.

  2. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  3. [Comparative-enzymologic study of phosphatase activity of hydrobionts from Pacific Ocean].

    PubMed

    Rozengart, E V; Basova, N E

    2009-01-01

    Activities of acid phosphatase are studied with use as substrates of phenyl phosphate, alpha- and beta-glycerophosphates in various organs and tissues of a large group of industrial hydrobionts of the Pacific basin (12 fish species, 7 invertebrate species. and one mammalian species) and of alkaline phosphatase in various organs of the Commander (Berryteuthis magister) and the New Zealand (Nototodarus sloani sloani) squids. Intertissue and interspecies differences have been revealed in the substrate and inhibitory specificity of the studied enzyme preparations. The method of isolation and a partial purification of preparations of acid phosphatase from tissue of gonads and of alkaline phosphatase from tissues of kidney and liver of individuals of industrial squid species is described.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.; Garattini, E.; Hua, J.C.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-02-01

    Partial protein sequence data obtained on intestinal alkaline phosphatase indicated a high degree of homology with the reported sequence of the placental isoenzyme. Accordingly, placental alkaline phosphatase cDNA was cloned and used as a probe to clone intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA. The latter is somewhat larger (3.1 kilobases) than the cDNA for the placental isozyme (2.8 kilobases). Although the 3' untranslated regions are quite different, there is almost 90% homology in the translated regions of the two isozymes. There are, however, significant differences at their amino and carboxyl termini and a substitution of an alanine in intestinal alkaline phosphatase for a glycine in the active site of the placental isozyme.

  5. The measurement of alkaline phosphatase at nanomolar concentration within 70 s using a disposable microelectrochemical transistor.

    PubMed

    Astier, Y; Bartlett, P N

    2004-08-01

    We report a new approach to the measurement of alkaline phosphatase concentration based on the use of a disposable poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor. The measurement is carried out in a two cell configuration in which the poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor operates in acid solution and is connected to the alkaline buffer solution containing the analyte by a salt bridge. Disposable microelectrochemical transistors were reproducibly fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(aniline) onto photolithographically fabricated gold microband arrays. Using these devices alkaline phosphatase was detected by employing p-aminophenyl phosphate as the substrate for the enzyme and using glucose and glucose oxidase to recycle the p-aminophenol generated upon enzyme catalysed hydrolysis of the phosphate. Recycling the p-aminophenol with glucose and glucose oxidase amplified the detection of alkaline phosphatase approximately tenfold. Using this approach we obtain linear calibration curves for alkaline phosphatase up to 5 nM within 70 s on single use devices.

  6. EX VIVIO DETECTION OF KINASE AND PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL BIOPSIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification involved in every aspect cellular function. Levels of protein phosphotyrosine, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are regulated by the opposing activities of kinases and phosphatases, the expression of which can be alt...

  7. The significance of inhibitor-resistant alkaline phosphatase in the cytochemical demonstration of transport adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Firth, J A; Marland, B Y

    1975-08-01

    The hydrolysis of disodium p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 9.0 by slices of formaldehydee-fixed rat renal cortex was investigated by colorimetric estimation of the nitrophenol liberated. It was found that three types of activity could be identified on the basis of their responses to inhibitors and cations: (a) alkaline phosphatase sensitive to inhibition by L-tetramisole; (b) potassium-dependent phosphatase, probably identifiable with the phosphatase component of sodium-potassium-dependent transport adenosine triphosphatase (?Na-K-ATPase); and (c) alkaline phosphatase insensitive to L-tetramisole. It was found that in the presence of strontium ions, as used in Na-K-ATPase cytochemistry, the activities of the second and third types of enzyme were approximately equal. The implications of these findings for the cytochemical demonstration of Na-K-ATPase are discussed.

  8. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatases: natural regulators of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephanie J; Parry, Richard V; Westwick, John; Ward, Stephen G

    2008-02-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway has been implicated in a range of T lymphocyte cellular functions, particularly growth, proliferation, cytokine secretion, and survival. Dysregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signaling and function in leukocytes, including B and T lymphocytes, has been implicated in many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. As befits a pivotal signaling cascade, several mechanisms exist to ensure that the pathway is tightly regulated. This minireview focuses on two lipid phosphatases, viz. the 3'-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and SHIP (Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase). We discuss their role in regulating T lymphocyte signaling as well their potential as future therapeutic targets.

  9. The structure of phosphoinositide phosphatases: Insights into substrate specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, FoSheng; Mao, Yuxin

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are a group of key signaling and structural lipid molecules involved in a myriad of cellular processes. PI phosphatases, together with PI kinases, are responsible for the conversion of PIs between distinctive phosphorylation states. PI phosphatases are a large collection of enzymes that are evolved from at least two disparate ancestors. One group is distantly related to endonucleases, which apply divalent metal ions for phosphoryl transfer. The other group is related to protein tyrosine phosphatases, which contain a highly conserved active site motif Cys-X5-Arg (CX5R). In this review, we focus on structural insights to illustrate current understandings of the molecular mechanisms of each PI phosphatase family, with emphasis on their structural basis for substrate specificity determinants and catalytic mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phosphoinositides.

  10. Structural relationship between a bacterial developmental protein and eukaryotic PP2C protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Adler, E; Donella-Deana, A; Arigoni, F; Pinna, L A; Stragler, P

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis SpoIIE is a Ser protein phosphatase whose action on the phosphoprotein SpoIIAA triggers the cell type-specific activation of a sporulation transcription factor. Here we report that SpoIIE displays sequence similarity to the PP2C family of eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, and that residues common to these proteins are required for the function of both SpoIIE and TPD1, a yeast PP2C. These findings suggest that SpoIIE and the PP2C protein phosphatases are structurally related, and reveal a striking formal similarity between the SpoIIAA regulatory circuit and that of mammalian mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. This similarity may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of biological regulation based on the interplay of His protein kinase-like Ser kinases and PP2C-like protein phosphatases.

  11. Qualitative and Quantitative In Vitro Analysis of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphatase Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura Ren Huey; Gewinner, Christina Anja

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides compromise a family of eight membrane lipids which play important roles in many cellular signaling pathways. Signaling through phosphoinositides has been shown in a variety of cellular functions such cell proliferation, cell growth, apoptosis, and vesicle trafficking. Phospholipid phosphatases regulate cell signaling by modifying the concentration of phosphoinositides and their dephosphorylated products. To understand the role of individual lipid phosphatases in phosphoinositide turnover and functional signaling, it is crucial to determine the substrate specificity of the lipid phosphatase of interest. In this chapter we describe how the substrate specificity of an individual lipid phosphatase can be qualitatively and quantitatively measured in an in vitro radiometric assay. In addition, we specify the different expression systems and purification methods required to produce the necessary yield and functionality in order to further characterize these enzymes. The outstanding versatility and sensitivity of this assay system are yet unmatched and are therefore currently considered the standard of the field.

  12. A critical evaluation of a specific radioimmunoassay for prostatic acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, S.L.; Silver, H.K.; Sullivan, L.D.; Morse, M.J.; Archibald, E.L.

    1982-11-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) method for acid phosphatase detection was compared to a standard enzyme assay using sera from 210 normal volunteers and 285 patients with prostatic disease. Statistical and clinical comparisons were made between defined subgroups. All 55 normal females had RIA detectable serum acid phosphatase, implying that this assay cannot be entirely specific for enzyme of prostatic origin. Urinary catheterization did not affect acid phosphatase levels. In all stages of carcinoma there were more acid phosphatase elevations by the RIA method than enzyme method, but neither assay could differentiate intercapsular cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia. A small number of patients with biopsy proven negative nodules had marginally elevated values, suggesting an obligation for closer follow-up. The RIA method may be superior for monitoring patients with more advanced malignancy. Additional practical advantages of the RIA include relative simplicity and elimination of the special serum handling required for the enzyme assay.

  13. Dephosphorylation of purine mononucleotides by alkaline phosphatases. Substrate specificity and inhibition patterns.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M H

    1979-11-09

    Three purine mononucleotides, adenosine-, inosine- and guanosine monophosphate, were used as substrates at pH 7.4 and at 10.4 for three alkaline phosphatases (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (acid optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) containing similar phosphate-binding serine groups at their esteratic sites. Substrate specificity was found for the enzymes from calf intestine and bovine liver. Alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli was nonspecific. A substrate-dependent and pronounced inhibition with the purine analogue 1,3-dimethyl xanthine was found for the enzymes from intestine and liver, but not for alkaline phosphatase from E. coli. A substrate-independent and pronounced inhibition was found for all three enzymes with the phosphomonoester p-nitrophenol phosphate as the inhibitor. Alkaline phosphatases may play an important role in the regulation of the intracellular content of purine mononucleotides.

  14. Improvement of an acid phosphatase/DHAP-dependent aldolase cascade reaction by using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    van Herk, Teunie; Hartog, Aloysius F; Babich, Lara; Schoemaker, Hans E; Wever, Ron

    2009-09-04

    To enhance the phosphorylating activity of the bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica ser. typhimurium LT2 towards dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a mutant library was generated from the native enzyme. Three different variants that showed enhanced activity were identified after one round of epPCR. The single mutant V78L was the most active and showed an increase in the maximal DHAP concentration to 25 % higher than that of the wild-type enzyme at pH 6.0. This variant is 17 times more active than the wild-type acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica ser. typhimurium LT2 in the acid phosphatase/aldolase cascade reaction at pH 6.0 and is also six times more active than the phosphatase from Shigella flexneri that we previously used.

  15. Crystal structure of SP-PTP, a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bonsu; Keum, Chae Won; Lee, Hye Seon; Yun, Hye-Yeoung; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-09-23

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogenic bacterium that causes a variety of infectious diseases. The GAS genome encodes one protein tyrosine phosphatase, SP-PTP, which plays an essential role in the replication and virulence maintenance of GAS. Herein, we present the crystal structure of SP-PTP at 1.9 Å resolution. Although SP-PTP has been reported to have dual phosphatase specificity for both phosphorylated tyrosine and serine/threonine, three-dimensional structural analysis showed that SP-PTP shares high similarity with typical low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMWPTPs), which are specific for phosphotyrosine, but not with dual-specificity phosphatases, in overall folding and active site composition. In the dephosphorylation activity test, SP-PTP consistently acted on phosphotyrosine substrates, but not or only minimally on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine substrates. Collectively, our structural and biochemical analyses verified SP-PTP as a canonical tyrosine-specific LMWPTP.

  16. Type II phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases have unique sensitivities towards fatty acid composition and head group phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annette C; Wise, Helen M; Mitchell, Christina A; Nussbaum, Robert; Woscholski, Rüdiger

    2004-10-08

    The catalytic properties of the type II phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases of Lowe's oculocerebrorenal syndrome, INPP5B, Synaptojanin1, Synaptojanin2 and SKIP were analysed with respect to their substrate specificity and enzymological properties. Our data reveal that all phosphatases have unique substrate specificities as judged by their corresponding KM and VMax values. They also possessed an exclusive sensitivity towards fatty acid composition, head group phosphorylation and micellar presentation. Thus, the biological function of these enzymes will not just be determined by their corresponding regulatory domains, but will be distinctly influenced by their catalytic properties as well. This suggests that the phosphatase domains fulfil a unique catalytic function that cannot be fully compensated by other phosphatases.

  17. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-04

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  18. Dairy products and the French paradox: Could alkaline phosphatases play a role?

    PubMed

    Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-01

    The French paradox - high saturated fat consumption but low incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality - is still unresolved and continues to be a matter of debate and controversy. Recently, it was hypothesised that the high consumption of dairy products, and especially cheese by the French population might contribute to the explanation of the French paradox, in addition to the "(red) wine" hypothesis. Most notably this would involve milk bioactive peptides and biomolecules from cheese moulds. Here, we support the "dairy products" hypothesis further by proposing the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis. First, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a potent endogenous anti-inflammatory enzyme, is directly stimulated by various components of milk (e.g. casein, calcium, lactose and even fat). This enzyme dephosphorylates and thus detoxifies pro-inflammatory microbial components like lipopolysaccharide, making them unable to trigger inflammatory responses and generate chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity, known risk factors for CVD. Various vitamins present in high amounts in dairy products (e.g. vitamins A and D; methyl-donors: folate and vitamin B12), and also fermentation products such as butyrate and propionate found e.g. in cheese, all stimulate intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Second, moulded cheeses like Roquefort contain fungi producing an alkaline phosphatase. Third, milk itself contains a tissue nonspecific isoform of alkaline phosphatase that may function as IAP. Milk alkaline phosphatase is present in raw milk and dairy products increasingly consumed in France. It is deactivated by pasteurization but it can partially reactivate after thermal treatment. Experimental consolidation of the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis will require further work including: systematic alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in dairy products, live dairy ferments and

  19. Characterization of the Functional Domains of a Mammalian Voltage-Sensitive Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Rosasco, Mario G; Gordon, Sharona E; Bajjalieh, Sandra M

    2015-12-15

    Voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs) are proteins that directly couple changes in membrane electrical potential to inositol lipid phosphatase activity. VSPs thus couple two signaling pathways that are critical for cellular functioning. Although a number of nonmammalian VSPs have been characterized biophysically, mammalian VSPs are less well understood at both the physiological and biophysical levels. In this study, we aimed to address this gap in knowledge by determining whether the VSP from mouse, Mm-VSP, is expressed in the brain and contains a functional voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and a phosphatase domain. We report that Mm-VSP is expressed in neurons and is developmentally regulated. To address whether the functions of the VSD and phosphatase domain are retained in Mm-VSP, we took advantage of the modular nature of these domains and expressed each independently as a chimeric protein in a heterologous expression system. We found that the Mm-VSP VSD, fused to a viral potassium channel, was able to drive voltage-dependent gating of the channel pore. The Mm-VSP phosphatase domain, fused to the VSD of a nonmammalian VSP, was also functional: activation resulted in PI(4,5)P2 depletion that was sufficient to inhibit the PI(4,5)P2-regulated KCNQ2/3 channels. While testing the functionality of the VSD and phosphatase domain, we observed slight differences between the activities of Mm-VSP-based chimeras and those of nonmammalian VSPs. Although the properties of VSP chimeras may not completely reflect the properties of native VSPs, the differences we observed in voltage-sensing and phosphatase activity provide a starting point for future experiments to investigate the function of Mm-VSP and other mammalian VSPs. In conclusion, our data reveal that both the VSD and the lipid phosphatase domain of Mm-VSP are functional, indicating that Mm-VSP likely plays an important role in mouse neurophysiology.

  20. Adhesion-Linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0496 TITLE: Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, DAMD17-03-1-0496 Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression 6. AUTHOR(S) Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D. 7...we identified the Band 4.1 PTPs MEG1 and D1 as two candidate PTP metastasis suppressors. Our studies show that during MEC differentiation PTP MEG1

  1. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; P<0.001), and this association was independent (r=−0.61; P<0.001) of demographic and classical risk factors, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus and calcium, C-reactive protein, and albuminuria. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of endothelial dysfunction was ≈3-fold higher in patients in the third tertile than that of patients in the first tertile. We also tested the combined role of alkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (P<0.001) in patients with serum phosphorus above the median value when compared with patients with serum phosphorus below the median (−5.0% versus −10.2% per alkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (P<0.001) after adjustment of all the previously mentioned risk factors. Our data support a strong and significant inverse relationship between alkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels.

  2. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  3. Rapidly diverging evolution of an atypical alkaline phosphatase (PhoAaty) in marine phytoplankton: insights from dinoflagellate alkaline phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Lu; Shi, Xinguo; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a key enzyme that enables marine phytoplankton to scavenge phosphorus (P) from dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) when inorganic phosphate is scarce in the ocean. Yet how the AP gene has evolved in phytoplankton, particularly dinoflagellates, is poorly understood. We sequenced full-length AP genes and corresponding complementary DNA (cDNA) from 15 strains (10 species), representing four classes of the core dinoflagellate lineage, Gymnodiniales, Prorocentrales, Suessiales, and Gonyaulacales. Dinoflagellate AP gene sequences exhibited high variability, containing variable introns, pseudogenes, single nucleotide polymorphisms and consequent variations in amino acid sequence, indicative of gene duplication events and consistent with the “birth-and-death” model of gene evolution. Further sequence comparison showed that dinoflagellate APs likely belong to an atypical type AP (PhoAaty), which shares conserved motifs with counterparts in marine bacteria, cyanobacteria, green algae, haptophytes, and stramenopiles. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that PhoAaty probably originated from an ancestral gene in bacteria and evolved divergently in marine phytoplankton. Because variations in AP amino acid sequences may lead to differential subcellular localization and potentially different metal ion requirements, the multiple types of APs in algae may have resulted from selection for diversifying strategies to utilize DOP in the P variable marine environment. PMID:26379645

  4. Missense substitutions reflecting regulatory control of transmitter phosphatase activity in two-component signalling.

    PubMed

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Noriega, Chris E; Stewart, Valley

    2013-05-01

    Negative control in two-component signal transduction results from sensor transmitter phosphatase activity for phospho-receiver dephosphorylation. A hypothetical mechanism for this reaction involves a catalytic residue in the H-box active-site region. However, a complete understanding of transmitter phosphatase regulation is hampered by the abundance of kinase-competent, phosphatase-defective missense substitutions (K(+) P(-) phenotype) outside of the active-site region. For the Escherichia coli NarX sensor, a model for the HisKA_3 sequence family, DHp domain K(+) P(-) mutants defined two classes. Interaction mutants mapped to the active site-distal base of the DHp helix 1, whereas conformation mutants were affected in the X-box region of helix 2. Thus, different types of perturbations can influence transmitter phosphatase activity indirectly. By comparison, K(+) P(-) substitutions in the HisKA sensors EnvZ and NtrB additionally map to a third region, at the active site-proximal top of the DHp helix 1, independently identified as important for DHp-CA domain interaction in this sensor class. Moreover, the NarX transmitter phosphatase activity was independent of nucleotides, in contrast to the activity for many HisKA family sensors. Therefore, distinctions involving both the DHp and the CA domains suggest functional diversity in the regulation of HisKA and HisKA_3 transmitter phosphatase activities.

  5. Determinants of the tumor suppressor INPP4B protein and lipid phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Sandra M; Hodgson, Myles C; Packianathan, Charles; Bingol-Ozakpinar, Ozlem; Uras, Fikriye; Rosen, Barry P; Agoulnik, Irina U

    2013-10-18

    The tumor suppressor INPP4B is an important regulator of phosphatidyl-inositol signaling in the cell. Reduced INPP4B expression is associated with poor outcomes for breast, prostate, and ovarian cancer patients. INPP4B contains a CX5R catalytic motif characteristic of dual-specificity phosphatases, such as PTEN. Lipid phosphatase activity of INPP4B has previously been described. In this report we show that INPP4B can dephosphorylate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl (DiFMUP), synthetic phosphotyrosine analogs, suggesting that INPP4B has protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Using mutagenesis, we examined the functional role of specific amino acids within the INPP4B C842KSAKDR catalytic site. The K843M mutant displayed increased pNPP hydrolysis, the K846M mutant lost lipid phosphatase activity with no effect on PTP activity, and the D847E substitution ablated PTP activity and significantly reduced lipid phosphatase activity. Further, we show that INPP4B but not PTEN is able to reduce tyrosine phosphorylation of Akt1 and both the lipid and PTP activity of INPP4B likely contribute to the reduction of Akt1 phosphorylation. Taken together our data identified key residues in the INPP4B catalytic domain associated with lipid and protein phosphatase activities and found a robust downstream target regulated by INPP4B but not PTEN.

  6. Negative control in two-component signal transduction by transmitter phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Stewart, Valley

    2011-10-01

    Bifunctional sensor transmitter modules of two-component systems exert both positive and negative control on the receiver domain of the cognate response regulator. In negative control, the transmitter module accelerates the rate of phospho-receiver dephosphorylation. This transmitter phosphatase reaction serves the important physiological functions of resetting response regulator phosphorylation level and suppressing cross-talk. Although the biochemical reactions underlying positive control are reasonably well understood, the mechanism for transmitter phosphatase activity has been unknown. A recent hypothesis is that the transmitter phosphatase reaction is catalysed by a conserved Gln, Asn or Thr residue, via a hydrogen bond between the amide or hydroxyl group and the nucleophilic water molecule in acyl-phosphate hydrolysis. This hypothetical mechanism closely resembles the established mechanisms of auxiliary phosphatases such as CheZ and CheX, and may be widely conserved in two-component signal transduction. In addition to the proposed catalytic residues, transmitter phosphatase activity also requires the correct transmitter conformation and appropriate interactions with the receiver. Evidence suggests that the phosphatase-competent and autokinase-competent states are mutually exclusive, and the corresponding negative and positive activities are likely to be reciprocally regulated through dynamic control of transmitter conformations.

  7. Activation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase SLP2 by MIA40 Regulates Seed Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lay-Yin; Goudreault, Marilyn; Yeung, Edward; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Samuel, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases represents the most prolific and well-characterized posttranslational modification known. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Shewanella-like protein phosphatase 2 (AtSLP2) is a bona fide Ser/Thr protein phosphatase that is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) where it interacts with the mitochondrial oxidoreductase import and assembly protein 40 (AtMIA40), forming a protein complex. Interaction with AtMIA40 is necessary for the phosphatase activity of AtSLP2 and is dependent on the formation of disulfide bridges on AtSLP2. Furthermore, by utilizing atslp2 null mutant, AtSLP2 complemented and AtSLP2 overexpressing plants, we identify a function for the AtSLP2-AtMIA40 complex in negatively regulating gibberellic acid-related processes during seed germination. Results presented here characterize a mitochondrial IMS-localized protein phosphatase identified in photosynthetic eukaryotes as well as a protein phosphatase target of the highly conserved eukaryotic MIA40 IMS oxidoreductase. PMID:27923987

  8. Identification of a novel phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Lambert, Rocío; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings accumulate ureides derived from purines after germination. The first step in the conversion of purines to ureides is the removal of the 5'-phosphate group by a phosphatase that has not been established yet. Two main phosphatase activities were detected in the embryonic axes of common bean using inosine monophosphate as substrate in an in-gel assay. Both activities differed in their sensitive to the common phosphatase inhibitor molybdate, with the molybdate-resistant as the first enzyme induced after radicle protrusion. The molybdate-resistant phosphatase has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and this is the first enzyme which shows this resistance purified and characterized from plant tissues. The native enzyme was a monomer of 55 kDa and it showed highest activity with nucleotides as substrates, with the K(m) values in the micromolar range. Among nucleotides, the highest specific constant (V(max)/K(m)) was observed for adenosine monophosphate. Furthermore, the enzyme was inhibited by nucleosides, the products of the enzymatic reaction, with maximum effect for adenosine. Common bean seedlings imbibed in the presence of adenosine monophosphate in vivo showed the highest molybdate-resistant phosphatase activity in the axes in addition to increased ureide content. The data presented suggests that purified phosphatase is involved in nucleotide metabolism in embryonic axes from common bean.

  9. An acid phosphatase assay for quantifying the growth of adherent and nonadherent cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Sinai, P; Kain, S R

    1996-10-01

    We describe an acid phosphatase assay for determination of cell growth based on quantification of cytosolic acid phosphatase activity. The assay is based on the hydrolysis of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate by intracellular acid phosphatases in viable cells to produce p-nitrophenol. For all cell types examined, absorbance of p-nitrophenol at 405 nm is directly proportional to the cell number in the range of 10(3)-10(5) cells. The assay can quantify as few as 1000 cells per well in 96-well microtiter plates. The acid phosphatase assay was used to count various adherent and nonadherent cells, including human tumors, L6, and HT-2 cells. We also demonstrate the utility of this assay for analysis of growth factor and cytokine bioactivity on mammalian cells in culture. In comparison to [3H]thymidine incorporation, the acid phosphatase assay has similar sensitivity but a wider linear response range. The method also shows higher sensitivity and reproducibility in comparison to cell proliferation assays based on the reduction of tetrazolium salts. Because of the ease of use, sensitivity, and low cost, the acid phosphatase method is especially suited to applications where a large number of samples are assayed.

  10. Synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of enzyme instability.

    PubMed Central

    Bostian, K A; Lemire, J M; Halvorson, H O

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined under conditions of blocked derepression as described by Toh-e et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 162:139-149, 1978). Based on a genetic and biochemical analysis of the phenomenon these authors proposed a new regulatory model for acid phosphatase expression involving a simultaneous interaction of regulatory factors in the control of structural gene transcription. We demonstrate here that under growth conditions that fail to produce acid phosphatase the enzyme is readily inactivated. Furthermore, we demonstrate under these conditions the production of acid phosphatase mRNA which is active both in vitro and in vivo in the synthesis of enzyme. This eliminates any step prior to translation of acid phosphatase polypeptide as an explanation for the phenomenon. We interpret our results for the block in appearance of acid phosphatase as a result of both deaccelerated growth and cellular biosynthesis during derepression, accompanied by an enhanced instability of the enzyme. Images PMID:7050664

  11. Electrophoretic separation of alkaline and acid phosphatase isoenzymes from the pulp of monkey teeth.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A; Hasselgren, G

    1978-01-01

    Monkey pulps were homogenized in a Triton tris solution. After three centrifugation steps (800, 20000, and 105000 g) the supernatant was applied on acryl amide columns at pH 7.5 in a tris-diethyl barbituric acid buffer. Electrophoresis was performed at a constant current of 2.5 mA per gel column at 18--20 degrees C. Incubations for alkaline phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.1) were carried out at pH 8.3 using naphthol-AS-MX-phosphate as substrate and Fast Red Violet LB salt as coupler. Incubations for acid phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.2) were undertaken at pH 5.0 using alpha-naphtyl phosphate as substrate and hexazotized pararosanilin as coupling agent. After the incubations for alkaline phosphatase as well as acid phosphatase two bands showing enzyme activity were demonstrated. By means of treatment with heat (56 degrees C) prior to incubation or addition of vanadate or pyrophosphate to the incubation medium it was shown that the main part of the fast moving alkaline phosphatase band was sensitive to these procedures. The alkaline phosphatase of the slow moving band appeared to be resistant to heat or the addition of inhibitors.

  12. Purification of a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba that dephosphorylates and activates myosin II.

    PubMed

    McClure, J A; Korn, E D

    1983-12-10

    The actin-activated ATPase activity of myosin II from Acanthamoeba castellanii is inhibited by phosphorylation of 3 serine residues near the carboxyl end of the heavy chain of the molecule. We have purified a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba using myosin II as a substrate. This phosphatase has a molecular weight of 39,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an isoelectric point in urea of 5.2. The enzyme also is active against other phosphoserine protein substrates such as turkey gizzard smooth muscle myosin light chain, but not against a synthetic phosphotyrosine protein substrate. It does not hydrolyze ATP or p-nitrophenol phosphate. No effector has been found to increase substantially the activity of the enzyme as isolated, but it is inhibited by ATP, pyrophosphate, and NaF. This inhibition is reduced in the presence of MnCl2. The Mg2+-dependent actin-activated ATPase of myosin II is activated by dephosphorylation of phosphorylated myosin II by the phosphatase. Its broad substrate specificity, molecular weight, and response to protein phosphatase inhibitors suggest that the Acanthamoeba protein phosphatase is a type 2A phosphatase (Cohen, P. (1982) Nature (Lond.) 206, 613-620).

  13. Insight into the redox regulation of the phosphoglucan phosphatase SEX4 involved in starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Dylan M; Silva, Leslie P; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Glaring, Mikkel A; Schriemer, David C; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2013-01-01

    Starch is the major carbohydrate reserve in plants, and is degraded for growth at night. Starch breakdown requires reversible glucan phosphorylation at the granule surface by novel dikinases and phosphatases. The dual-specificity phosphatase starch excess 4 (SEX4) is required for glucan desphosphorylation; however, regulation of the enzymatic activity of SEX4 is not well understood. We show that SEX4 switches between reduced (active) and oxidized (inactive) states, suggesting that SEX4 is redox-regulated. Although only partial reactivation of SEX4 was achieved using artificial reductants (e.g. dithiothreitol), use of numerous chloroplastic thioredoxins recovered activity completely, suggesting that thioredoxins could reduce SEX4 in vivo. Analysis of peptides from oxidized and reduced SEX4 identified a disulfide linkage between the catalytic cysteine at position 198 (Cys198) and the cysteine at position 130 (Cys130) within the phosphatase domain. The position of these cysteines was structurally analogous to that for known redox-regulated dual-specificity phosphatases, suggesting a common mechanism of reversible oxidation amongst these phosphatases. Mutation of Cys130 renders SEX4 more sensitive to oxidative inactivation and less responsive to reductive reactivation. Together, these results provide the first biochemical evidence for a redox-dependent structural switch that regulates SEX4 activity, which represents the first plant phosphatase known to undergo reversible oxidation via disulfide bond formation like its mammalian counterparts.

  14. Aquatic plant nutrients, moss phosphatase activities and tissue composition in four upland streams in northern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, N. T. W.; Haile, S. M.; Whitton, B. A.

    2008-02-01

    SummaryA study was made of the water chemistry, tissue nutrients and surface phosphatase activities of the 2-cm apices of three mosses in four upland streams in northern England, UK. This was part of a project to optimize methods for assessing nutrient fractions in environments with highly variable water chemistry. Aqueous N and P fractions showed the greatest variability followed by moss phosphatase activities, with nutrient composition of the shoot apices the least variable. There was no consistent pattern as to which aqueous N or P fraction was the most variable. The ratio between total inorganic N and total filtrable P ranged over three orders of magnitude in some streams. The interrelations between tissue N and P concentrations, tissue N:P ratio, phosphatase activities and aqueous variables showed: Significant +ve relationship between tissue N and aqueous NO 3-N in some populations, but not between tissue P and aqueous P concentration; Significant +ve relationships between phosphatase activities and aqueous organic N, but none with aqueous organic P; Significant +ve relationships between phosphodiesterase:phosphomonoesterase activities and aqueous organic N; Significant -ve relationships between phosphatase activities and tissue P concentration; Significant +ve relationships between phosphatase activities and tissue N:P. Both types of biological measurement are valuable for monitoring ambient nutrients in upland streams. Neither is clearly better than the other, so both should be included in surveys.

  15. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests.

  16. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  17. Photoreceptor Neuroprotection: Regulation of Akt Activation Through Serine/Threonine Phosphatases, PHLPP and PHLPPL.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Raju V S; Kanan, Yogita; Anderson, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Serine/threonine kinase Akt is a downstream effector of insulin receptor/PI3K pathway that is involved in many processes, including providing neuroprotection to stressed rod photoreceptor cells. Akt signaling is known to be regulated by the serine/threonine phosphatases, PHLPP (PH domain and leucine rich repeat protein phosphatase) and PHLPPL (PH domain and leucine rich repeat protein phosphatase-like). We previously reported that both phosphatases are expressed in the retina, as well as in photoreceptor cells. In this study, we examined the PHLPP and PHLPPL phosphatase activities towards non-physiological and physiological substrates. Our results suggest that PHLPP was more active than PHLPPL towards non-physiological substrates, whereas both PHLPP and PHLPP dephosphorylated the physiological substrates of Akt1 and Akt3 with similar efficiencies. Our results also suggest that knockdown of PHLPPL alone does not increase Akt phosphorylation, due to a compensatory increase of PHLPP, which results in the dephosphorylation of Akt. Therefore, PHLPP and PHLPPL regulate Akt activation together when both phosphatases are expressed.

  18. Synthesis of functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters for acid phosphatase sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-10-01

    A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by introducing an alkaline aqueous solution of MUA into the GSH-Au+ complexes or AuNC@GSH solution. Subsequently, a reliable AuNC@GSH/MUA-based real-time assay of acid phosphatase (ACP) is established for the first time, inspired by the selective coordination of Fe3+ with surface ligands of AuNCs, the higher binding affinity between the pyrophosphate ion (PPi) and Fe3+, and the hydrolysis of PPi into orthophosphate by ACP. Our fluorescent chemosensor can also be applied to assay ACP in a real biological sample and, furthermore, to screen the inhibitor of ACP. This report paves a new avenue for synthesizing AuNCs based on either the bottom-up reduction or top-down etching method, establishing real-time fluorescence assays for ACP by means of PPi as the substrate, and further exploring the sensing applications of fluorescent AuNCs.A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by

  19. Downscaling Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in a Subtropical Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted by downscaling study to understand phosphorus (P)-deficient status of different plankton and the role of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in subtropical Feitsui Reservoir. Results from field survey showed that bulk APA (1.6~95.2 nM h-1) was widely observed in the epilimnion (0~20 m) with an apparent seasonal variations, suggesting that plankton in the system were subjected to P-deficient seasonally. Mixed layer depth (an index of phosphate availability) is the major factor influencing the variation of bulk APA and specific APA (124~1,253 nmol mg C-1 h-1), based on multiple linear regression analysis. Size-fractionated APA assays showed that picoplankton (size 0.2~3 um) contributed most of the bulk APA in the system. In addition, single-cell APA detected by enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assay indicated that heterotrophic bacteria are the major contributors of APA. Thus, we can infer that bacteria play an important role in accelerating P-cycle within P-deficient systems. Light/nutrient manipulation bioassays showed that bacterial growth was directly controlled by phosphate, while picocyanobacterial growth is controlled by light and can out-compete bacteria under P-limited condition with the aid of light. Further analysis revealed that the strength of summer typhoon is a factor responsible for the inter-annual variability of bulk and specific APA. APA study demonstrated the episodic events (e.g. strong typhoon and extreme precipitation) had significant influence on APA variability in sub-tropical to tropical aquatic ecosystems. Hence, the results herein will allow future studies on monitoring typhoon disturbance (intensity and frequency) as well as the APA of plankton during summer-to-autumn in subtropical systems.

  20. Cloning of the canine glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kishnani, P.; Bao, Y.; Brix, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two Maltese puppies with massive hepatomegaly and failure to thrive were found to have a markedly reduced Glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity in the liver and kidney. Deficiency of G-6-Pase activity causes type 1a glycogen storage disease in humans. To further study the mutation responsible for the disease in dog, we cloned G-6-Pase canine cDNA from normal mixed breed dog liver RNA using reverse transcriptase and PCR amplification using primers derived from the published murine G-6-Pase gene sequence. Sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1071 nucleotides that encodes a predicted 357 amino acid polypeptide in the canine G-6-Pase gene, same as mouse and human. We found more than 90% sequence homology between dog and human G-6-Pase sequence. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced canine G-6-Pase polypeptide shows six transmembrane-spanning segments similar to those seen in human and mouse. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization is similarly predicted by the presence of the ER protein retention signal KK positioned 3 and 4 amino acids from the carboxy terminal. Potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are identified at positions 96, 203, and 276. Northern blot analysis revealed increased G-6-Pase mRNA in the deficient dog liver compared to control. This could possibly reflect upregulation of transcription due to the persistent hypoglycemic state. Further studies are directed at the identification of the mutation involved in this deficient dog strain. Characterization of the G-6-Pase gene and protein in the deficient dog model can pave the way for new understanding in the pathophysiology of this disease and for the trials of novel therapeutic approaches including gene therapy.

  1. Modeling catalytic promiscuity in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Fernanda; Amrein, Beat Anton

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that promiscuity plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme function. This finding has helped to elucidate fundamental aspects of molecular evolution. While there has been extensive experimental work on enzyme promiscuity, computational modeling of the chemical details of such promiscuity has traditionally fallen behind the advances in experimental studies, not least due to the nearly prohibitive computational cost involved in examining multiple substrates with multiple potential mechanisms and binding modes in atomic detail with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, recent advances in both computational methodologies and power have allowed us to reach a stage in the field where we can start to overcome this problem, and molecular simulations can now provide accurate and efficient descriptions of complex biological systems with substantially less computational cost. This has led to significant advances in our understanding of enzyme function and evolution in a broader sense. Here, we will discuss currently available computational approaches that can allow us to probe the underlying molecular basis for enzyme specificity and selectivity, discussing the inherent strengths and weaknesses of each approach. As a case study, we will discuss recent computational work on different members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily (AP) using a range of different approaches, showing the complementary insights they have provided. We have selected this particular superfamily, as it poses a number of significant challenges for theory, ranging from the complexity of the actual reaction mechanisms involved to the reliable modeling of the catalytic metal centers, as well as the very large system sizes. We will demonstrate that, through current advances in methodologies, computational tools can provide significant insight into the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity, and, therefore, in turn, the mechanisms of protein

  2. Cinacalcet Lowers Serum Alkaline Phosphatase in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Belozeroff, Vasily; Goodman, William G.; Ren, Lulu; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Studies suggest an association between elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) and increased mortality in hemodialysis patients, but the effect of existing therapies on AP is not fully understood. We assessed the effects of cinacalcet on AP in a secondary analysis of controlled trial data. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This was a post hoc analysis of data from three 26-wk randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials and a 26-wk double-blind, placebo-controlled extension trial that investigated cinacalcet in secondary hyperparathyroidism treatment in dialysis patients. Hemodialysis patients (n = 890) with intact parathyroid hormone ≥300 pg/ml and serum calcium ≥8.4 mg/dl received cinacalcet plus standard therapy or standard therapy alone for up to 52 wk. Total, not bone-specific, AP was assessed (proportion of cinacalcet/control subjects achieving a ≥20% or any AP reduction from baseline; the proportion of subjects with AP ≥120 U/L) at baseline; the end of titration; and study weeks 26, 42, and 52. Results: At 52 wk, a greater proportion of cinacalcet-treated patients had either a ≥20% (39 versus 18%) or any (58 versus 36%) AP reduction compared with control subjects, respectively. The likelihood of achieving either a ≥20% or any AP reduction (determined by relative proportion) was 2.33 (95% confidence interval 1.50 to 3.61) and 1.74 (95% confidence interval 1.31 to 2.31), respectively, at week 52. Cinacalcet treatment tended toward a decreased percentage of patients with AP ≥120 U/L (baseline, 42.6%; week 52, 30.6%) compared with control (35.0 to 48.6%, respectively). Conclusions: In this combined analysis of controlled trials of patients who were receiving hemodialysis, cinacalcet lowered total serum AP. PMID:19261825

  3. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Carlos Eduardo; Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Beassoni, Paola Rita; Lisa, Angela Teresita

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) or phosphorylcholine (Pcho). The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs): one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O)2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure. PMID:21915373

  4. Small interfering RNA of alkaline phosphatase inhibits matrix mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kotobuki, Noriko; Matsushima, Asako; Kato, Youichi; Kubo, Yoko; Hirose, Motohiro; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the cascade of matrix mineralization, cells expressing high and low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were separated from human osteoblast-like (HOS) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting with an ALP antibody. After these cells had been recloned from single cells and then cultured under osteogenic conditions, high-ALP-expressing HOS (H-HOS) cells showed matrix mineralization, but low-ALP-expressing HOS (L-HOS) cells did not. The interaction among osteogenic-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), collagen type I alpha1 chain (COL1A1), tissue non-specific ALP, and osteocalcin (OCN), is well known as being related to matrix mineralization. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the gene expression of ALP was higher in H-HOS cells than in L-HOS, whereas the gene expression of RUNX2, COL1A1, and OCN was lower in H-HOS cells than in L-HOS cells. When small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of these osteogenic-related genes were introduced into H-HOS cells by transfection, only ALP siRNA inhibited matrix mineralization. Furthermore, the expression of not only the ALP gene, but also the COL1A1 and RUNX2 genes was influenced by the inhibition of ALP, although the expression of OCN was not affected by the inhibition of ALP. We have been able to confirm that the ALP gene is a strong candidate as the trigger of matrix mineralization. These results indicate the usefulness of cloned osteogenic cells in investigating the molecular mechanisms of matrix mineralization, the function of which can be modulated by using a variety of siRNAs.

  5. Imaging of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.; Motley, Matthew W.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Bhakta, Roshni; Boskey, Adele L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a paradigm for quantitative molecular imaging of bone cell activity. We hypothesized the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of the osteoblast enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using a small imaging molecule in combination with 19Flourine magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (19FMRSI). 6, 8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP), a fluorinated ALP substrate that is activatable to a fluorescent hydrolysis product was utilized as a prototype small imaging molecule. The molecular structure of DiFMUP includes two Fluorine atoms adjacent to a phosphate group allowing it and its hydrolysis product to be distinguished using 19Fluorine magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19FMRS) and 19FMRSI. ALP-mediated hydrolysis of DiFMUP was tested on osteoblastic cells and bone tissue, using serial measurements of fluorescence activity. Extracellular activation of DiFMUP on ALP-positive mouse bone precursor cells was observed. Concurringly, DiFMUP was also activated on bone derived from rat tibia. Marked inhibition of the cell and tissue activation of DiFMUP was detected after the addition of the ALP inhibitor levamisole. 19FMRS and 19FMRSI were applied for the non-invasive measurement of DiFMUP hydrolysis. 19FMRS revealed a two-peak spectrum representing DiFMUP with an associated chemical shift for the hydrolysis product. Activation of DiFMUP by ALP yielded a characteristic pharmacokinetic profile, which was quantifiable using non-localized 19FMRS and enabled the development of a pharmacokinetic model of ALP activity. Application of 19FMRSI facilitated anatomically accurate, non-invasive imaging of ALP concentration and activity in rat bone. Thus, 19FMRSI represents a promising approach for the quantitative imaging of bone cell activity during bone formation with potential for both preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:21799916

  6. Promiscuity in alkaline phosphatase superfamily. Unraveling evolution through molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    López-Canut, Violeta; Roca, Maite; Bertrán, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2011-08-10

    We here present a theoretical study of the alkaline hydrolysis of a phosphodiester (methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate or MpNPP) in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP), a monoesterase that also presents promiscuous activity as a diesterase. The analysis of our simulations, carried out by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials, shows that the reaction takes place through a D(N)A(N) or dissociative mechanism, the same mechanism employed by AP in the hydrolysis of monoesters. The promiscuous activity observed in this superfamily can be then explained on the basis of a conserved reaction mechanism. According to our simulations the specialization in the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters or phosphodiesters, developed in different members of the superfamily, is a consequence of the interactions established between the protein and the oxygen atoms of the phosphate group and, in particular, with the oxygen atom that bears the additional alkyl group when the substrate is a diester. A water molecule, belonging to the coordination shell of the Mg(2+) ion, and residue Lys328 seem to play decisive roles stabilizing a phosphomonoester substrate, but the latter contributes to increase the energy barrier for the hydrolysis of phosphodiesters. Then, mutations affecting the nature or positioning of Lys328 lead to an increased diesterase activity in AP. Finally, the capacity of this enzymatic family to catalyze the reaction of phosphoesters having different leaving groups, or substrate promiscuity, is explained by the ability of the enzyme to stabilize different charge distributions in the leaving group using different interactions involving either one of the zinc centers or residues placed on the outer side of the catalytic site.

  7. Dephosphorylation of endotoxin by alkaline phosphatase in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Poelstra, K.; Bakker, W. W.; Klok, P. A.; Kamps, J. A.; Hardonk, M. J.; Meijer, D. K.

    1997-01-01

    Natural substrates for alkaline phosphatase (AP) are at present not identified despite extensive investigations. Difficulties in imagining a possible physiological function involve its extremely high pH optimum for the usual exogenous substrates and its localization as an ecto-enzyme. As endotoxin is a substance that contains phosphate groups and is usually present in the extracellular space, we studied whether AP is able to dephosphorylate this bacterial product at physiological pH levels. We tested this in intestinal cryostat sections using histochemical methods with endotoxin from Escherichia coli and Salmonella minnesota R595 as substrate. Results show that dephosphorylation of both preparations occurs at pH 7.5 by AP activity. As phosphate residues in the lipid A moiety determine the toxicity of the molecule, we examined the effect of the AP inhibitor levamisole in vivo using a septicemia model in the rat. The results show that inhibition of endogenous AP by levamisole significantly reduces survival of rats intraperitoneally injected with E. coli bacteria, whereas this drug does not influence survival of rats receiving a sublethal dose of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. In view of the endotoxin-dephosphorylating properties of AP demonstrated in vitro, we propose a crucial role for this enzyme in host defense. The effects of levamisole during gram-negative bacterial infections and the localization of AP as an ecto-enzyme in most organs as well as the induction of enzyme activity during inflammatory reactions and cholestasis is in accordance with such a protective role. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9327750

  8. Alkaline Phosphatase: A Biomarker of Cardiac Function in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Makil, Elizabeth S; Tang, Xinyu; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Collins, R Thomas

    2017-02-09

    Myocardial dysfunction and heart failure are common in pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been suggested as a biomarker for myocardial dysfunction after Fontan operation. We hypothesized that pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction requiring orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) have diminished AP compared to normal. A retrospective review was performed in all patients who underwent OHT at Arkansas Children's Hospital between January 2007 and October 2012. Anatomic diagnoses, therapeutic interventions, and ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were recorded. Z scores for AP levels in the study group were determined by comparing the observed AP levels to age- and gender-matched normative values. T tests were performed to compare the mean AP Z score prior to and after OHT. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. During the study period, 124 OHTs were performed. Complete study data were available and analyzed from 71/124 patients (mean age at OHT 3.9 years; 51% female). The mean AP Z score was significantly lower in the study group prior to OHT compared to normal (p < 0.0001). The initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy prior to OHT was associated with a significant increase in AP and the ventricular EF (p < 0.001 for both). Treatment with milrinone was associated with an increase in EF. AP is significantly lower in pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction prior to OHT compared to normal. AP increases significantly after the initiation of therapies to improve myocardial function. Diminished AP is an indicator of myocardial dysfunction in pediatric patients.

  9. Alkaline phosphatase encapsulated in gellan-chitosan hybrid capsules.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Ogiwara, Daisuke; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2005-05-23

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was encapsulated in gellan-chitosan polyion complex (PIC) capsules using a convenient procedure. The recovery of ALP was about 50% when the capsules were prepared by dropping a solution of ALP and gellan mixture (ALP/gellan) into a chitosan solution. When p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP) were incubated with ALP/gellan-chitosan capsules as substrates for ALP, the transparent colorless capsules changed to yellow and blue, respectively. The encapsulation of ALP into the PIC capsules was also confirmed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses. The ALP and polypeptides of more than 30 kDa remained without release even after incubation at 4 degrees C for 14 d. The biochemical properties of the encapsulated ALP activity were similar to those of the intact enzyme. When the solution containing p-NPP was loaded on a column packed with ALP/gellan-chitosan capsules at 27 degrees C, approximately 75% of p-NPP was hydrolyzed by passing through the column. No significant leakage of ALP was observed during the procedure, indicating that the capsules were resistant to pressure in the chromatographic operation. Furthermore, 70% of the hydrolytic activity of the packed capsules remained after storage at 4 degrees C for one month. These results suggest that the polyion complex capsules could be useful materials for protein fixation without chemical modification. [Diagram: see text] Encapsulation of ALP into PIC capsules and the morphological changes seen in the absence of the ALP substrate and in the presence of p-NPP and BICP.

  10. Loss-of-function of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase reversibly increases the severity of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aich, Jyotirmoi; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ahmad, Tanveer; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2012-06-06

    Inositol polyphosphate phosphatases regulate the magnitude of phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling output. Although inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase is known to regulate phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling, little is known regarding its role in asthma pathogenesis. Here we show that modulation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase alters the severity of asthma. Allergic airway inflammation in mice led to calpain-mediated degradation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase. In allergic airway inflammation models, preventing inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase degradation by inhibiting calpain activity, or overexpression of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase in mouse lungs, led to attenuation of the asthma phenotype. Conversely, knockdown of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase severely aggravated the allergic airway inflammation and the asthma phenotype. Interestingly, inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase knockdown in lungs of naive mice led to spontaneous airway hyper-responsiveness, suggesting that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase could be vital in maintaining the lung homeostasis. We suggest that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase has an important role in modulating inflammatory response in asthma, and thus, uncover a new understanding of the complex interplay between inositol signalling and asthma, which could provide alternative strategies in asthma management.

  11. Regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3/Akt signalling by inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Eramo, Matthew J; Mitchell, Christina A

    2016-02-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) generated lipid signals, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and PtdIns(3,4)P2, are both required for the maximal activation of the serine/threonine kinase proto-oncogene Akt. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (5-phosphatases) hydrolyse the 5-position phosphate from the inositol head group of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to yield PtdIns(3,4)P2. Extensive work has revealed several 5-phosphatases inhibit PI3K-driven Akt signalling, by decreasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 despite increasing cellular levels of PtdIns(3,4)P2. The roles that 5-phosphatases play in suppressing cell proliferation and transformation are slow to emerge; however, the 5-phosphatase PIPP [proline-rich inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase; inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (INPP5J)] has recently been identified as a putative tumour suppressor in melanoma and breast cancer and SHIP1 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-containing inositol phosphatase 1] inhibits haematopoietic cell proliferation. INPP5E regulates cilia stability and INPP5E mutations have been implicated ciliopathy syndromes. This review will examine 5-phosphatase regulation of PI3K/Akt signalling, focussing on the role PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 5-phosphatases play in developmental diseases and cancer.

  12. A Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity on the external surface of Trypanosoma rangeli modulated by exogenous inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-de-Souza, André L; Dick, Claudia Fernanda; Dos Santos, André Luiz Araújo; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2008-08-01

    In this work, we characterized a Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity present in live Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes. This enzyme showed capacity to hydrolyze the artificial substrate for phosphatases, p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). At saturating concentration of p-NPP, half-maximal p-NPP hydrolysis was obtained with 0.23mM Mg(2+). Ca(2+) had no effect on the basal phosphatase activity, could not substitute Mg(2+) as an activator and in contrast inhibited the p-NPP hydrolysis stimulated by Mg(2+). The dependence on p-NPP concentration showed a normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics for this phosphatase activity with values of V(max) of 8.94+/-0.36 nmol p-NP x h(-1) x 10(-7) cells and apparent K(m) of 1.04+/-0.16 mM p-NPP. Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity was stimulated by the alkaline pH range. Experiments using inhibitors, such as, sodium fluoride, sodium orthovanadate and ammonium molybdate, inhibited the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), a product of phosphatases, inhibited reversibly in 50% this activity. Okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, specific phosphoserine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, inhibited significantly the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity. In addition, this phosphatase activity was able to recognize as substrates only o-phosphoserine and o-phosphothreonine, while o-phosphotyrosine was not a good substrate for this phosphatase. Epimastigote forms of T. rangeli exhibit a typical growth curve, achieving the stationary phase around fifth or sixth day and the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity decreased around 10-fold with the cell growth progression. Cells maintained at Pi-deprived medium (2 mM Pi) present Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity approximately threefold higher than that maintained at Pi-supplemented medium (50 mM Pi).

  13. Generic phosphatase activity detection using zinc mediated aggregation modulation of polypeptide-modified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selegård, Robert; Enander, Karin; Aili, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme. Phosphatase activity generates inorganic phosphate that forms an insoluble complex with Zn2+. In a sample containing a preset concentration of Zn2+, phosphatase activity will markedly reduce the concentration of dissolved Zn2+ from the original value, which in turn affects the aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a designed Zn2+ responsive polypeptide. The change in nanoparticle stability thus provides a rapid and sensitive readout of the phosphatase activity. The assay is not limited to a particular enzyme or enzyme substrate, which is demonstrated using three completely different phosphatases and five different substrates, and thus constitutes a highly interesting system for drug screening and diagnostics.A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme

  14. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  15. Interactions of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) proteins with phosphatidylinositol phosphates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of PTEN and voltage sensitive phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Antreas C; Devaney, Isabel; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-03-25

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein.

  16. Protein interaction network of the mammalian Hippo pathway reveals mechanisms of kinase-phosphatase interactions.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Amber L; Knight, James D R; Kean, Michelle J; Teo, Guoci; Weiss, Alexander; Dunham, Wade H; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Bagshaw, Richard D; Sicheri, Frank; Pawson, Tony; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Choi, Hyungwon; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-11-19

    The Hippo pathway regulates organ size and tissue homeostasis in response to multiple stimuli, including cell density and mechanotransduction. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatases can also stimulate Hippo signaling in cell culture. We defined the Hippo protein-protein interaction network with and without inhibition of serine and threonine phosphatases by okadaic acid. We identified 749 protein interactions, including 599 previously unrecognized interactions, and demonstrated that several interactions with serine and threonine phosphatases were phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of the T-loop of MST2 (mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 2), which prevented autophosphorylation, disrupted its association with STRIPAK (striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase complex). Deletion of the amino-terminal forkhead-associated domain of SLMAP (sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein), a component of the STRIPAK complex, prevented its association with MST1 and MST2. Phosphatase inhibition produced temporally distinct changes in proteins that interacted with MOB1A and MOB1B (Mps one binder kinase activator-like 1A and 1B) and promoted interactions with upstream Hippo pathway proteins, such as MST1 and MST2, and with the trimeric protein phosphatase 6 complex (PP6). Mutation of three basic amino acids that are part of a phospho-serine- and phospho-threonine-binding domain in human MOB1B prevented its interaction with MST1 and PP6 in cells treated with okadaic acid. Collectively, our results indicated that changes in phosphorylation orchestrate interactions between kinases and phosphatases in Hippo signaling, providing a putative mechanism for pathway regulation.

  17. Expression cloning and biochemical characterization of a Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A 1-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Karbarz, Mark J; Kalb, Suzanne R; Cotter, Robert J; Raetz, Christian R H

    2003-10-10

    Lipid A of Rhizobium leguminosarum, a nitrogen-fixing plant endosymbiont, displays several significant structural differences when compared with Escherichia coli. An especially striking feature of R. leguminosarum lipid A is that it lacks both the 1- and 4'-phosphate groups. Distinct lipid A phosphatases that attack either the 1 or the 4' positions have previously been identified in extracts of R. leguminosarum and Rhizobium etli but not Sinorhizobium meliloti or E. coli. Here we describe the identification of a hybrid cosmid (pMJK-1) containing a 25-kb R. leguminosarum 3841 DNA insert that directs the overexpression of the lipid A 1-phosphatase. Transfer of pMJK-1 into S. meliloti 1021 results in heterologous expression of 1-phosphatase activity, which is normally absent in extracts of strain 1021, and confers resistance to polymyxin. Sequencing of a 7-kb DNA fragment derived from the insert of pMJK-1 revealed the presence of a lipid phosphatase ortholog (designated LpxE). Expression of lpxE in E. coli behind the T7lac promoter results in the appearance of robust 1-phosphatase activity, which is normally absent in E. coli membranes. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/time of flight and radiochemical analysis of the product generated in vitro from the model substrate lipid IVA confirms the selective removal of the 1-phosphate group. These findings show that lpxE is the structural gene for the 1-phosphatase. The availability of lpxE may facilitate the re-engineering of lipid A structures in diverse Gram-negative bacteria and allow assessment of the role of the 1-phosphatase in R. leguminosarum symbiosis with plants. Possible orthologs of LpxE are present in some intracellular human pathogens, including Francisella tularensis, Brucella melitensis, and Legionella pneumophila.

  18. Biochemical Localization of Alkaline Phosphatase in the Cell Wall of a Marine Pseudomonad

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Linda M. M.; MacLeod, Robert A

    1974-01-01

    The various layers of the cell envelope of marine pseudomonad B-16 (ATCC 19855) have been separated from the cells and assayed directly for alkaline phosphatase activity under conditions established previously to be optimum for maintenance of the activity of the enzyme. Under conditions known to lead to the release of the contents of the periplasmic space from the cells, over 90% of the alkaline phosphatase was released into the medium. Neither the loosely bound outer layer nor the outer double-track layer (cell wall membrane) showed significant activity. A small amount of the alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells remained associated with the mureinoplasts when the outer layers of the cell wall were removed. Upon treatment of the mureinoplasts with lysozyme, some alkaline phosphatase was released into the medium and some remained with the protoplasts formed. Cells washed and suspended in 0.5 M NaCl were lysed by treatment with 2% toluene, and 95% of the alkaline phosphatase in the cells was released into the medium. Cells washed and suspended in complete salts solution (0.3 M NaCl, 0.05 M MgSO4, and 0.01 M KCl) or 0.05 M MgSO4 appeared intact after treatment with toluene but lost 50 and 10%, respectively, of their alkaline phosphatase. The results suggest that the presence of Mg2+ in the cell wall is necessary to prevent disruption of the cells by toluene and may also be required to prevent the release of alkaline phosphatase by toluene when disruption of the cells by toluene does not take place. PMID:4811547

  19. Cloning and characterization of three Eimeria tenella lipid phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang; Cai, Jianping; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Hou, Junling; Li, Hui; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Although lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) play an important role in cellular signaling in addition to lipid biosynthesis, little is thus far known about parasite LPPs. In this study, we characterized three Eimeria tenella cDNA clones encoding LPP named EtLPP1, EtLPP2 and EtLPP3. Key structural features previously described in LPPs, including the three conserved domains proposed as catalytic sites, a single conserved N-glycosylation site, and putative transmembrane domains were discovered in the three resulting EtLPP amino acid sequences. Expression of His6-tagged EtLPP1, -2, and -3 in HEK293 cells produced immunoreactive proteins with variable molecular sizes, suggesting the presence of multiple forms of each of the three EtLPPs. The two faster-migrating protein bands below each of the three EtLPP proteins were found to be very similar to the porcine 35-kDa LPP enzyme in their molecular size and the extent of their N-glycosylation, suggesting that the three EtLPPs are partially N-glycosylated. Kinetic analyses of the activity of the three enzymes against PA, LPA, C1P and S1P showed that Km values for each of the substrates were (in μM) 284, 46, 28, and 22 for EtLPP1; 369, 179, 237, and 52 for EtLPP2; and 355, 83, and 260 for EtLPP3. However, EtLPP3 showed negligible activity on S1P. These results confirmed that the three EtLPPs have broad substrate specificity. The results also indicated that despite structural similarities, the three EtLPPs may play distinct functions through their different models of substrate preference. Furthermore, particularly high expression levels of the three EtLPP genes were detected in the sporozoite stage of the E. tenella life cycle (p<0.001), suggesting that their encoded proteins might play an important biological function in the sporozoite stage.

  20. Measurement and modeling of glucose-6-phosphatase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sweet, I R; Najafi, H; Li, G; Grodberg, J; Matschinsky, F M

    1997-04-01

    In the beta-cells of the pancreas, glucose phosphorylation carried out by glucokinase is the rate-controlling step in glycolysis, and the kinetic characteristics of glucokinase govern to a high degree the dose-response relationship between glucose and insulin release. Because glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) opposes the action of glucokinase, it may have a regulatory role in the release of insulin in response to glucose if the enzyme is present in the beta-cells. A number of researchers have reported finding high levels of G-6-Pase in islets, but quantitation of its activity remains controversial, mainly because of difficulties in solubilizing a particulate enzyme. Therefore a method developed to measure functional glucose phosphorylation activity in intact brain was applied (Chi, M. M.-Y., M. E. Pusateri, J. G. Carter, B. J. Norris, D. B. McDougal, Jr., and O. H. Lowry. Anal. Biochem. 161: 508-513, 1987), and the rates of accumulation and disappearance of 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate (DG-6-P) in freshly harvested islets were determined as a measure of glucose cycling. Islets were incubated in the presence of 30 mM 2-deoxyglucose (DG) for 60 min, and subsequently the incubation medium was replaced with medium containing no DG, but instead high levels of mannoheptulose as a blocker of phosphorylation. The content of DG-6-P in the islets was measured at strategic times during the protocol. As predicted by a mathematical model, DG-6-P accumulated in the presence of DG and decayed after its washout. Both of these results are consistent with islets containing dephosphorylation activity for this substrate. The kinetic curves were fit using a mathematical model, and the maximal G-6-Pase activity was estimated to be 0.13 +/- 0.005 micromol x g(-1) x min(-1). However, when the physiological effect of this amount of G-6-Pase activity was assessed by use of a model of glycolysis, it was found that the impact on glucose cycling and usage was insignificant. It was concluded that

  1. Alkaline Phosphatase Revisited:  Hydrolysis of Alkyl Phosphates (†).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound ∼4 Å apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in excess of its inhibition constant (K i ≈ 1 μM). This tight binding by Pi has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k cat/K m for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k cat/K m. The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK a of ≤5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK a of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k cat/K m on the pK a of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of βlg = -0.85 ± 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. The new (32)P

  2. Determination of acid phosphatase in biological fluids using a new substrate, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Teshima, S; Hayashi, Y; Ando, M

    1987-09-30

    A new substrate, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (DCNP-P), is used for the determination of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) in serum and urine. It was hydrolyzed by acid phosphatase to 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) and phosphoric acid. At a pH of 4.5-6.0, the absorption of DCNP liberated by acid phosphatase was much higher than that of p-nitrophenol, which is commonly used as an aglycone in the acid phosphatase assay. By using DCNP-P as a substrate for acid phosphatase activity, determinations can be made without the colour reaction which requires the addition of an alkaline solution, and can be determined by the rate assay that does not require measurement of sample blanks in serum or urine. This method using DCNP-P is highly sensitive and is the most suitable for the rate assay of acid phosphatase activity in biological fluids.

  3. Gene fusion analysis of membrane protein topology: a direct comparison of alkaline phosphatase and beta-lactamase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, W A; Beckwith, J

    1994-01-01

    To compare two approaches to analyzing membrane protein topology, a number of alkaline phosphatase fusions to membrane proteins were converted to beta-lactamase fusions. While some alkaline phosphatase fusions near the N terminus of cytoplasmic loops of membrane proteins have anomalously high levels of activity, the equivalent beta-lactamase fusions do not. This disparity may reflect differences in the folding of beta-lactamase and alkaline phosphatase in the cytoplasm. PMID:7929016

  4. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-07-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  5. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis Is a Type 2C Protein Phosphatase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein phosphorylation has become increasingly recognized for its role in regulating bacterial physiology and virulence. Chlamydia spp. encode two validated Hanks'-type Ser/Thr protein kinases, which typically function with cognate protein phosphatases and appear capable of global protein phosphorylation. Consequently, we sought to identify a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase partner for the chlamydial kinases. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis L2 434/Bu, which has homologs in all sequenced Chlamydia spp., is a predicted type 2C Ser/Thr protein phosphatase (PP2C). Recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CTL0511 (rCTL0511) hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), a generic phosphatase substrate, in a MnCl2-dependent manner at physiological pH. Assays using phosphopeptide substrates revealed that rCTL0511 can dephosphorylate phosphorylated serine (P-Ser), P-Thr, and P-Tyr residues using either MnCl2 or MgCl2, indicating that metal usage can alter substrate preference. Phosphatase activity was unaffected by PP1, PP2A, and PP3 phosphatase inhibitors, while mutation of conserved PP2C residues significantly inhibited activity. Finally, phosphatase activity was detected in elementary body (EB) and reticulate body (RB) lysates, supporting a role for protein dephosphorylation in chlamydial development. These findings support that CTL0511 is a metal-dependent protein phosphatase with broad substrate specificity, substantiating a reversible phosphorylation network in C. trachomatis. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and economically important animal species. Our work demonstrates that Chlamydia spp. produce a PP2C capable of dephosphorylating P-Thr, P-Ser, and P-Tyr and that Chlamydia trachomatis EBs and RBs possess phosphatase activity. In conjunction with the chlamydial Hanks'-type kinases Pkn1 and PknD, validation of CTL0511 fulfills the enzymatic requirements for a

  6. Partial purification and kinetic characterization of acid phosphatase from garlic seedling.

    PubMed

    Yenigün, Begüm; Güvenilir, Yüksel

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain purer acid phosphatases than produced by prior art by operating under conditions that improve the final product. The study features are the use of a mild nonionic detergent, 40-80% saturation with (NH4)2SOm4, maintained at low temperature to remove impurity, and the use of chromatografic columns to concentrate the acid phosphatase and remove non-acid phosphatase proteins with lower or higher molecular weights. Acid phosphatase was isolated and purified from garlic seedlings by a streamline method without the use of proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes, butanol, or other organic solvents. Grown garlic seedlings of 10- 15 cm height were homogenized with 0.1 M acetate buffer containing 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1% Triton X-100. After homogenization, the supernatant was filtered with paper filters. Filtrated supernatant was cooled to 4 degrees C, followed by a threestep fractionation of the proteins with ammonium sulfate. The crude enzyme was isolated as a green precipitate that was dissolved in a small amount of 0.1 M acetate buffer containing 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1% Triton X-100. Garlic seedling acid phosphatase was purified with ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE cellulose). The column was equilibrated with 0.1 M acetate buffer. Acid phosphatase was purified 40-fold from the starting material. The specific activity of the pure enzyme was 168 U/mg. A variety of stability and activity profiles were determined for the purified garlic seedling acid phosphatase: optimum pH, optimum temperature, pH stability, temperature stability, thermal inactivation, substrate specificity, effect of enzyme concentration, effect of substrate concentration, activation energy, and effect of inhibitor and activator. The molecular mass of acid phosphatase was estimated to be 58 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH was 5.7 and the optimum temperature was 50 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at pH 4.0-10.0 and 40-60 degrees C

  7. Molecular cloning and functional expression of mannitol-1-phosphatase from the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Liberator, P; Anderson, J; Feiglin, M; Sardana, M; Griffin, P; Schmatz, D; Myers, R W

    1998-02-13

    A metabolic pathway responsible for the biosynthesis and utilization of mannitol is present in the seven species of Eimeria that infect chickens, but is not in the avian host. Mannitol-1-phosphatase (M1Pase), a key enzyme for mannitol biosynthesis, is a highly substrate-specific phosphatase and, accordingly, represents an attractive chemotherapeutic target. Amino acid sequence of tryptic peptides obtained from biochemically purified Eimeria tenella M1Pase was used to synthesize degenerate oligonucleotide hybridization probes. Using these reagents, a partial genomic clone and full-length cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of E. tenella M1Pase shows limited overall homology to members of the phosphohistidine family of phosphatases. This limited homology to other histidine phosphatases does, however, include several conserved residues that have been shown to be essential for their catalytic activity. Kinetic parameters of recombinant M1Pase expressed in bacteria are essentially identical to those of the biochemically purified preparation from E. tenella. Moreover, recombinant M1Pase is subject to active site-directed, hydroxylamine-reversible inhibition by the histidine-selective acylating reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate. These results indicate the presence of an essential histidine residue(s) at the M1Pase active site, as predicted for a histidine phosphatase.

  8. Outer membrane protein e of Escherichia coli K-12 is co-regulated with alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Tommassen, J; Lugtenberg, B

    1980-01-01

    Outer membrane protein e is induced in wild-type cells, just like alkaline phosphatase and some other periplasmic proteins, by growth under phosphatase limitation. nmpA and nmpB mutants, which synthesize protein e constitutively, are shown also to produce the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase constitutively. Alternatively, individual phoS, phoT, and phoR mutants as well as pit pst double mutants, all of which are known to produce alkaline phosphatase constitutively, were found to be constitutive for protein e. Also, the periplasmic space of most nmpA mutants and of all nmpB mutants grown in excess phosphate was found to contain, in addition to alkaline phosphatase, at least two new proteins, a phenomenon known for individual phoT and phoR mutants as well as for pit pst double mutants. The other nmpA mutants as well as phoS mutants lacked one of these extra periplasmic proteins, namely the phosphate-binding protein. From these data and from the known positions of the mentioned genes on the chromosomal map, it is concluded that nmpB mutants are identical to phoR mutants. Moreover, some nmpA mutants were shown to be identical to phoS mutants, whereas other nmpA mutants are likely to contain mutations in one of the genes phoS, phoT, or pst. Images PMID:6995425

  9. Selective activators of protein phosphatase 5 target the auto-inhibitory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Drazic, Adrian; Eckl, Julia M.; Alte, Ferdinand; Helmuth, Martin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Schmidt, Werner; Braun, Frank; Weiwad, Matthias; Fischer, Gunter; Gemmecker, Gerd; Sattler, Michael; Striggow, Frank; Groll, Michael; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine phosphatase. Its dephosphorylation activity modulates a diverse set of cellular factors including protein kinases and the microtubule-associated tau protein involved in neurodegenerative disorders. It is auto-regulated by its heat-shock protein (Hsp90)-interacting tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and its C-terminal α-helix. In the present study, we report the identification of five specific PP5 activators [PP5 small-molecule activators (P5SAs)] that enhance the phosphatase activity up to 8-fold. The compounds are allosteric modulators accelerating efficiently the turnover rate of PP5, but do barely affect substrate binding or the interaction between PP5 and the chaperone Hsp90. Enzymatic studies imply that the compounds bind to the phosphatase domain of PP5. For the most promising compound crystallographic comparisons of the apo PP5 and the PP5–P5SA-2 complex indicate a relaxation of the auto-inhibited state of PP5. Residual electron density and mutation analyses in PP5 suggest activator binding to a pocket in the phosphatase/TPR domain interface, which may exert regulatory functions. These compounds thus may expose regulatory mechanisms in the PP5 enzyme and serve to develop optimized activators based on these scaffolds. PMID:26182372

  10. [Spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of ethanol and acid phosphatase from wheat germ].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-mei; Liu, Guang-shen; Wang, Li-ming; Liu, Wei-ping

    2004-11-01

    Conformational and activity changes of acid phosphatase from wheat germ in ethanol solutions of different concentrations were measured by fluorescence spectra and differential UV-absorption spectra. The effect of ethanol on kinetics of acid phosphatase was determined by using the double reciprocal plot. The results indicate the ethanol has a significant effect on the activity and conformation of acid phosphatase. The activity of acid phosphatase decreased linearly with increasing the concentration of ethanol. Differential UV-absorption spectra of the enzyme denatured in ethanol solutions showed two positive peaks at 213 and 234 nm, respectively. The peaks on the differential UV-absorption spectra suggested that the conformation of enzyme molecule changed from orderly structure to out-of-order crispation. The fluorescence emission peak intensity of the enzyme gradually strengthened with increasing ethanol concentration, which is in concordance with the conformational change of the microenvironments of tyrosine and tryptophan residues. The results indicate that the expression of the enzyme activity correlates with the stability and integrity of the enzyme conformation to a great degree. Ethanol is uncompetitive inhibitor of acid phosphatase.

  11. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    PubMed

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  12. Phosphate-solubility and phosphatase activity in Gangetic alluvial soil as influenced by organophosphate insecticide residues.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shyam Prasad; Das, Amal Chandra

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the effect of four organophosphate insecticides, viz. monocrotophos, profenophos, quinalphos and triazophos at their field application rates (0.75, 1.0, 0.5 and 0.6 kg a.i.ha(-1), respectively), on the growth and activities of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms in relation to availability of insoluble phosphates in the Gangetic alluvial soil of West Bengal, India. The proliferation of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms was highly induced with profenophos (38.3%), while monocrotophos exerted maximum stimulation (20.8%) towards the solubility of insoluble phosphates in soil. The phosphatase activities of the soil (both acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) were significantly increased due to the incorporation of the insecticides in general, and the augmentation was more pronounced with quinalphos (43.1%) followed by profenophos (27.6%) for acid phosphatase, and with monocrotophos (25.2%) followed by profenophos (16.1%) for alkaline phosphatase activity in soil. The total phosphorus was highly retained by triazophos (19.9%) followed by monocrotophos (16.5%), while incorporation of triazophos and quinalphos manifested greater availability of water soluble phosphorus in soil.

  13. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding PDM phosphatase of Fusarium moniliforme.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Mari; Narita, Takao; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi

    2006-12-01

    PDM phosphatase was purified approximately 500-fold through six steps from the extract of dried powder of the culture filtrate of Fusarium moniliforme. The purified preparation appeared homogeneous on SDS-PAGE although the protein band was broad. Amino acid sequence information was collected on tryptic peptides from this preparation. cDNA cloning was carried out based on the information. A full-length cDNA was obtained and sequenced. The sequence had an open reading frame of 651 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 69,988 Da. Cloning and sequencing of the genomic DNA corresponding to the cDNA was also conducted. The deduced amino acid sequence could account for many but not all of the tryptic peptides, suggesting presence of contaminant protein(s). SDS-PAGE analysis after chemical deglycosylation showed two proteins with molecular masses of 58 and 68 kDa. This implied that the 58 kDa protein had been copurified with PDM phosphatase. Homology search showed that PDM phosphatase belongs to the purple acid phosphatase family, which is widely distributed in the biosphere. Sequence data of fungal purple acid phosphatases were collected from the database. Processing of the data revealed presence of two types, whose evolutionary relationships were discussed.

  14. A Porphyromonas gingivalis haloacid dehalogenase family phosphatase interacts with human phosphoproteins and is important for invasion.

    PubMed

    Tribble, Gena D; Mao, Song; James, Chloe E; Lamont, Richard J

    2006-07-18

    Haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) family phosphatases are widespread in prokaryotes and are generally involved in metabolic processes. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an invasive periodontal pathogen, secretes the HAD family phosphoserine phosphatase SerB653 when in contact with gingival epithelial cells. Here we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of SerB653 and show that a SerB653 allelic replacement mutant of P. gingivalis is deficient in internalization and persistence in gingival epithelial cells. In contrast, mutation of a second HAD family serine phosphatase of P. gingivalis (SerB1170), or of a serine transporter, did not affect invasion. A pull-down assay identified GAPDH and heat-shock protein 90 as potential substrates for SerB653. Furthermore, exogenous phosphatase regulated microtubule dynamics in host cells. These data indicate that P. gingivalis has adapted a formerly metabolic enzyme to facilitate entry into host cells by modulating host cytoskeletal architecture. Our findings define a virulence-related role of a HAD family phosphatase and reveal an invasin of an important periodontal pathogen.

  15. Dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases by type 2C protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aiyang; Ross, Karen E.; Kaldis, Philipp; Solomon, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Activating phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) is necessary for their kinase activity and cell cycle progression. This phosphorylation is carried out by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK); in contrast, little is known about the corresponding protein phosphatase. We show that type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are responsible for this dephosphorylation of Cdc28p, the major budding yeast CDK. Two yeast PP2Cs, Ptc2p and Ptc3p, display Cdc28p phosphatase activity in vitro and in vivo, and account for ∼90% of Cdc28p phosphatase activity in yeast extracts. Overexpression of PTC2 or PTC3 results in synthetic lethality in strains temperature-sensitive for yeast CAK1, and disruptions of PTC2 and PTC3 suppress the growth defect of a cak1 mutant. Furthermore, PP2C-like enzymes are the predominant phosphatases toward human Cdk2 in HeLa cell extracts, indicating that the substrate specificity of PP2Cs toward CDKs is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:10580002

  16. Okadaic acid-induced inhibition of B-50 dephosphorylation by presynaptic membrane-associated protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Han, Y F; Dokas, L A

    1991-10-01

    The neuronal tissue-specific protein kinase C (PKC) substrate B-50 can be dephosphorylated by endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs) in synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs). The present study characterizes membrane-associated B-50 phosphatase activity by using okadaic acid (OA) and purified 32P-labeled substrates. At a low concentration of [gamma-32P]ATP, PKC-mediated [32P]phosphate incorporation into B-50 in SPMs reached a maximal value at 30 s, followed by dephosphorylation. OA, added 30 s after the initiation of phosphorylation, partially prevented the dephosphorylation of B-50 at 2 nM, a dose that inhibits PP-2A. At the higher concentration of 1 microM, a dose of OA that inhibits PP-1 as well as PP-2A, a nearly complete blockade of B-50 dephosphorylation was seen. Heat-stable PP inhibitor-2 (I-2) also inhibited dephosphorylation of B-50. The effects of OA and I-2 on B-50 phosphatase activity were additive. Endogenous PP-1- and PP-2A-like activities in SPMs were also demonstrated by their capabilities of dephosphorylating [32P]phosphorylase a and [32P]casein. With these exogenous substrates, sensitivities of the membrane-bound phosphatases to OA and I-2 were found to be similar to those of purified forms of these enzymes. These results indicate that PP-1- and PP-2A-like enzymes are the major B-50 phosphatases in SPMs.

  17. Alkaline phosphatase: a possible treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Esther; Heemskerk, Suzanne; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disease in the intensive care unit and accounts for high morbidity and mortality. Sepsis, the predominant cause of AKI in this setting, involves a complex pathogenesis in which renal inflammation and hypoxia are believed to play an important role. A new therapy should be aimed at targeting both these processes, and the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, with its dual mode of action, might be a promising candidate. First, alkaline phosphatase is able to reduce inflammation through dephosphorylation and thereby detoxification of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), which is an important mediator of sepsis. Second, adenosine triphosphate, released during cellular stress caused by inflammation and hypoxia, has detrimental effects but can be converted by alkaline phosphatase into adenosine with anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effects. These postulated beneficial effects of alkaline phosphatase have been confirmed in animal experiments and two phase 2a clinical trials showing that kidney function improved in critically ill patients with sepsis-associated AKI. Because renal inflammation and hypoxia also are observed commonly in AKI induced by other causes, it would be of interest to investigate the therapeutic effect of alkaline phosphatase in these nephropathies as well.

  18. Acid- and alkaline phosphatase in amniotic fluid in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beckman, G; Beckman, L; Löfstrand, T

    1978-01-01

    171 samples of amniotic fluid were obtained by abdominal amniocentesis from 67 women with complicated pregnancies (isoimmunization, diabetes mellitus or toxaemia). The levels of heat-labile alkaline phosphatase (HLAP), heat-stable alkaline phosphatase (HSAP) and acid phosphatase (AcP) were determined and compared to the enzyme levels in 179 samples from women with normal pregnancies of corresponding gestational ages. HLAP showed two "peaks" of activity, one in the 5th-22nd week and the other at term. HSAP and AcP showed increased activity at term. HSAP was decreased (p less than 0.01) in isoimmunization between the 36th and 40th week. 11 cases of toxaemia with placental insufficiency showed no differences in the levels of HLAP and HSAP compared with normal pregnancy. AcP showed no differences between normal and complicated pregnancy. Samples contaminated by blood showed no significant increase in the acid- and alkaline phosphatase levels. Samples contaminated by meconium showed a complex pattern. Some samples had normal enzyme levels, some had high levels of HLAP only and some had high levels of HSAP and AcP. The origin of the enzymes is not known with certainty. HSAP in amniotic fluid is most likely not of placental but intestinal origin. Determinations of acid- and alkaline phosphatase in amniotic fluid seem to be of little values in the clinical management of complicated pregnancy.

  19. [Comparative effects of fluoride on three enzymes, hydrolyzing pyrophosphate - acid and alkaline phosphatases and inorganic pyrophosphatase].

    PubMed

    Kasho, V N; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1982-08-01

    The effects of fluoride on the activities of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) from potato and alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) from E. coli during pyrophosphate and p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolysis and on the activities of inorganic pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1) from baker's yeast during pyrophosphate hydrolysis were compared. For both phosphatases the type of interaction was found to be independent on the nature of substrate. For acid phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphatase the inhibition was of non-competitive and uncompetitive types, respectively. In the case of alkaline phosphatase fluoride increased the rate of p-nitrophenol release during p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolysis at pH greater than or equal to 7.9 without affecting the rate of phosphate release, which is indicative of fluorophosphate formation in the course of the transphosphorylation reaction. The data obtained suggest the existence of essential differences in the mechanisms of fluoride effects on the three enzymes under study.

  20. Separation and purification of the alkaline phosphatase and a phosphodiesterase from Halobacterium cutirubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Fitt, P S; Baddoo, P

    1979-01-01

    1. Halobacterium cutirubrum alkaline phosphatase is associated in crude extracts with a phosphodiesterase. 2. The enzymes were stabilized in buffers containing both (NH4)2SO4 and 10 mM-Mn2+. 3. Adsorption chromatography on Sepharose 6B/agarose-gel columns in the presence of 1.4M-(NH4)2SO4 gave a phosphatase-free phosphodiesterase and the alkaline phosphatase associated with some phosphodiesterase activity. 4. Further chromatography of the separated enzymes gave a good recovery of greater than 600-fold purified phosphodiesterase and greater than 3000-fold purified alkaline phosphatase. 5. The requirements of these enzymes and their relationship to each other was examined. 6. A detailed study showed that the alkaline phosphatase was adsorbed at least partially to agarose and dextran columns at all (NH4)2SO4 concentrations from 0.25 to 2M. 7. In contrast, no adsorption of the enzyme or protein standards was evident in 2.5M-KCl/l M-NaCl or 0.25 M-KCl/0.1 M-NaCl, in agreement with previous studies by Louis, Peterkin & Fitt [(1971) Biochem. J. 121, 635-641], thus confirming the validity of gel filtration in 2.5 M-KCl/1 M-NaCl as a method for determining the approximate molecular weights of extremehalophile proteins. PMID:227360

  1. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate. PMID:11536662

  2. Plasma alkaline phosphatase activity: a screening test for rickets in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Kovar, I; Mayne, P; Barltrop, D

    1982-02-06

    Both rickets and raised plasma alkaline phosphatase activity are common in the preterm infant. Measurement of plasma alkaline phosphatase activity is valuable in screening for active disease and in diagnosis, but normal reference data are not available for preterm babies. In 30 consecutive preterm infants (birthweight 1580 +/- 410 g, gestational age 31 +/- 2.5 weeks) serial measurements of plasma alkaline phosphatase activity, plasma levels of calcium and inorganic phosphorus, and the pattern of alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes were made. Four patterns of changes in plasma alkaline phosphatase activity with time were seen. 4 of the 30 infants were shown to have rickets; these children and 14 of the 26 non-rachitic infants showed an increasing/peak/decreasing pattern with increasing age, but levels were much higher in the rachitic infants. The activity in all 30 was raised above the adult and childhood reference ranges at some point in time. The data suggest that an activity of five times the upper limit of the normal adult reference range is acceptable in the preterm infant but an activity higher than this may suggest rickets.

  3. An Asymmetrically Balanced Organization of Kinases versus Phosphatases across Eukaryotes Determines Their Distinct Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Netta; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Ben-Zvi, Anat

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation underlies cellular response pathways across eukaryotes and is governed by the opposing actions of phosphorylating kinases and de-phosphorylating phosphatases. While kinases and phosphatases have been extensively studied, their organization and the mechanisms by which they balance each other are not well understood. To address these questions we performed quantitative analyses of large-scale 'omics' datasets from yeast, fly, plant, mouse and human. We uncovered an asymmetric balance of a previously-hidden scale: Each organism contained many different kinase genes, and these were balanced by a small set of highly abundant phosphatase proteins. Kinases were much more responsive to perturbations at the gene and protein levels. In addition, kinases had diverse scales of phenotypic impact when manipulated. Phosphatases, in contrast, were stable, highly robust and flatly organized, with rather uniform impact downstream. We validated aspects of this organization experimentally in nematode, and supported additional aspects by theoretic analysis of the dynamics of protein phosphorylation. Our analyses explain the empirical bias in the protein phosphorylation field toward characterization and therapeutic targeting of kinases at the expense of phosphatases. We show quantitatively and broadly that this is not only a historical bias, but stems from wide-ranging differences in their organization and impact. The asymmetric balance between these opposing regulators of protein phosphorylation is also common to opposing regulators of two other post-translational modification systems, suggesting its fundamental value. PMID:28135269

  4. An alkaline phosphatase transport mechanism in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Pike, Adrianne F; Kramer, Nynke I; Blaauboer, Bas J; Seinen, Willem; Brands, Ruud

    2015-01-25

    Systemic inflammation is associated with loss of blood-brain barrier integrity and neuroinflammation that lead to the exacerbation of neurodegenerative diseases. It is also associated specifically with the characteristic amyloid-β and tau pathologies of Alzheimer's disease. We have previously proposed an immunosurveillance mechanism for epithelial barriers involving negative feedback-regulated alkaline phosphatase transcytosis as an acute phase anti-inflammatory response that hangs in the balance between the resolution and the progression of inflammation. We now extend this model to endothelial barriers, particularly the blood-brain barrier, and present a literature-supported mechanistic explanation for Alzheimer's disease pathology with this system at its foundation. In this mechanism, a switch in the role of alkaline phosphatase from its baseline duties to a stopgap anti-inflammatory function results in the loss of alkaline phosphatase from cell membranes into circulation, thereby decreasing blood-brain barrier integrity and functionality. This occurs with impairment of both amyloid-β efflux and tau dephosphorylating activity in the brain as alkaline phosphatase is replenished at the barrier by receptor-mediated transport. We suggest systemic alkaline phosphatase administration as a potential therapy for the resolution of inflammation and the prevention of Alzheimer's disease pathology as well as that of other inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Root surface acid phosphatases and their role in phosphorus assimilation by Eriophorum vaginatum

    SciTech Connect

    Kroehler, C.J.; Linkins, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eriophorum vaginatum is a dominant plant in much of the arctic tundra ecosystem where phosphorus is frequently a limiting nutrient. The mineralization of this organic phosphorus was thought to be principally controlled by microbial respiration, however, more recent work shows that extracellular soil phosphatases are the principal regulators. The existence of plant root and mycorrhizal surface phosphatases which are capable of hydrolyzing organic phosphorus compounds, suggests that soil organic phosphorus may be directly utilized by plants. Since E. vaginatum is a tussock forming sedge with a very dense annually produced rooting system which can exploit most of the tussock soil volume, its surface